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Sample records for ablation plume expansion

  1. Synchronized videography of plasma plume expansion during femtosecond laser ablation

    Paolasini, Steven; Kietzig, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Femtosecond lasers are gaining industrial interest for surface patterning and structuring because of the reduced heat effects to the surrounding material, resulting in a good quality product with a high aspect ratio. Analysis of the plasma plume generated during ablation can provide useful information about the laser-material interactions and thereby the quality of the resulting surface patterns. As a low-cost alternative to rather complicated ICCD camera setups, presented here is an approach based on filming the laser machining process with a high speed camera and tuning the frame rate of the camera to slightly lower than the laser pulse frequency. The delay in frequency between the laser and camera results in frames taken from sequential pulses. Each frame represents a later phase of plume expansion although taken from different pulses. Assuming equal plume evolution processes from pulse to pulse, the sequence of images obtained completes a plume expansion video. To test the assumption of homogeneity between sequential plumes, the camera can be tuned to the frequency of the laser, as to capture consecutive plumes at the same phase in their evolution. This approach enables a relatively low-cost, high resolution visualization of plasma plume evolution suitable for industrial micromachining applications with femtosecond lasers. Using this approach we illustrate differences in plume expansion at the example of machining homogeneous surface patterns in different liquid and gaseous processing environments.

  2. Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds

    Lindley, R.A. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining {lambda}{sub o}; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

  3. Laser ablation plume expansion into an ambient gas

    Amoruso, S.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    The use of an ambient gas is a well-established method employed in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with nanosecond pulses and has been extensively studied in this context. Most of the existing treatments of the plume expansion are tackled by using complex numerical modeling involving specific target...... and energetics can be helpful for a quantitative description of the plume propagation into the surrounding, low-pressure atmosphere typically employed in PLD, thus allowing identifying the different stages of expansion for any target/background mass system....

  4. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures

  5. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  6. Effects of collision between two plumes on plume expansion dynamics during pulsed laser ablation in background gas

    Umezu, Ikurou; Sakamoto, Naomichi; Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Yasuhiro; Nobuzawa, Koichiro; Sugimura, Akira

    2013-03-01

    Si and Ge targets were simultaneously irradiated by individual two pulsed lasers, and two plumes from the targets were collided head-on with expectation to prepare hybrid nanoparticles. We investigate effects of He background gas pressure on plume collision dynamics. Three characteristic behaviors of plume expansion dynamics are observed at low, middle, and high background gas pressure regions. Interaction between the two atomic species during plume expansion was small and the effect of collision was hardly observed at a low background gas pressure, 130 Pa, while spatial evolution of the plume was suppressed at middle pressure, 270 Pa, due to collision of the two plumes. At high pressure, 2700 Pa, plume expansion is suppressed by background gas and the effect of a direct collision of two plumes was small. These results indicate that plume collision dynamics, which governs nanoparticle formation, and the mixture of Si and Ge species can be varied by background gas pressure. The deposit near the center of two targets was nanoparticles that were composed of Si and Ge.

  7. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen;

    2004-01-01

    The effect of an ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of laser ablated plasmas has been studied for two systems by exploiting different diagnostic techniques. First, the dynamics of a MgB2 laser produced plasma plume in an Ar atmosphere has been investigated by space-and time-resolved optical...... laser ablated plasma plume propagation in a background gas. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V All rights reserved....

  8. Diagnostics and expansion dynamics of the plume produced by laser ablation of a LiYF{sub 4} crystal in vacuum

    Bogi, A.; Barsanti, S.; Anwar-Ul-Haq, M.; Bicchi, P. [University of Siena, Department of Physics, Siena (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    The expansion in vacuum of the plume generated by the UV ablation of a LiYF{sub 4} crystal was analysed as a function of several parameters: distance from the target along the plume axis, laser fluency and angular dislocation with respect to the plume axis. The study was carried out by the optical time of flight technique. Time-resolved signals of the optical emission of the neutral as well as ionised species in the plume were recorded and analysed for different experimental situations. The most probable velocity for each species was calculated and confirmed by the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution fits of the relative emission temporal profiles. An angular distribution of the ablated species could also be provided. (orig.)

  9. On Predtechensky and Mayorov model for the plume expansion dynamics study into an ambient gas during thin film deposition by laser ablation

    Lafane, S.; Kerdja, T.; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Malek, S.; Kechouane, M.

    2013-01-01

    The plume expansion dynamics for the Sm1- x Nd x NiO3 thin films deposition by a KrF excimer laser into oxygen atmosphere has been investigated using fast imaging. The study was carried out at 0.2 and 0.3 mbar of oxygen pressure and for different laser fluences. The plasma plume dynamics was analysed in the framework of Predtechensky and Mayorov (PM) model. It was found that PM model gives a general description of the plume expansion by using parameters (laser fluence and oxygen pressure) that ensure a hemispherical expansion of the plume. The latter was discussed in the framework of the shock-wave model and the plume dimensions.

  10. Ablation plume dynamics in a background gas

    Amoruso, Salvatore; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, James G.

    2010-01-01

    expansion. The model also leads to an insightful treatment of the stopping behavior in dimensionless units for plumes and background gases of different atomic/molecular masses. The energetics of the plume dynamics can also be treated with this model. Experimental time-of-flight data of silver ions in a neon...

  11. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  12. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  13. Ablation plume dynamics in a background gas

    Amoruso, Salvatore; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, James G.

    2010-01-01

    The expansion of a plume in a background gas of pressure comparable to that used in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been analyzed in terms of the model of Predtechensky and Mayorov (PM). This approach gives a relatively clear and simple description of the essential hydrodynamics during the...

  14. Ablation plume structure and dynamics in ambient gas observed by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Khumaeni, A.; Kato, M.; Wakaida, I.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamic behavior of an ablation plume in ambient gas has been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. The second harmonic beam from an Nd:YAG laser (0.5-6 J/cm2) was focused on a sintered oxide pellet or a metal chip of gadolinium. The produced plume was subsequently intersected with a sheet-shaped UV beam from a dye laser so that time-resolved fluorescence images were acquired with an intensified CCD camera at various delay times. The obtained cross-sectional images of the plume indicate that the ablated ground state atoms and ions of gadolinium accumulate in a hemispherical contact layer between the plume and the ambient gas, and a cavity containing a smaller density of ablated species is formed near the center of the plume. At earlier expansion stage, another luminous component also expands in the cavity so that it coalesces into the hemispherical layer. The splitting and coalescence for atomic plume occur later than those for ionic plume. Furthermore, the hemispherical layer of neutral atoms appears later than that of ions; however, the locations of the layers are nearly identical. This coincidence of the appearance locations of the layers strongly suggests that the neutral atoms in the hemispherical layer are produced as a consequence of three-body recombination of ions through collisions with gas atoms. The obtained knowledge regarding plume expansion dynamics and detailed plume structure is useful for optimizing the experimental conditions for ablation-based spectroscopic analysis.

  15. Ablation Plume Induced by Laser Euv Radiation

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Koláček, Karel; Schmidt, Jiří; Štraus, Jaroslav

    Dordrecht: Springer International Publishing, 2015 - (Rocca, J.; Menoni, C.; Marconi, M.), s. 397-403. (Springer Proceedings in Physics. 169). ISBN 978-3-319-19521-6. [International Conference on X-Ray Laser s/14./. Fort Collins, Colorado (US), 26.05.2014-30.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-29772S; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : EUV laser * laser ablation * plume * Au * Al * Si * Cu * energy measurements Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-19521-6_52

  16. Thermalization of a UV laser ablation plume in a background gas: From a directed to a diffusionlike flow

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    Combined diagnostic measurements of deposition rates and ion time-of-flight signals have been employed to study the expansion of a laser ablation plume into a background gas. With increasing gas pressure the angular distribution of the collected ablated atoms becomes broader, while the total coll...... high-pressure regime the expansion can be described by a simple model based on diffusion from a confined plume....

  17. Ablation plume structure and dynamics in ambient gas observed by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    The dynamic behavior of an ablation plume in ambient gas has been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. The second harmonic beam from an Nd:YAG laser (0.5–6 J/cm2) was focused on a sintered oxide pellet or a metal chip of gadolinium. The produced plume was subsequently intersected with a sheet-shaped UV beam from a dye laser so that time-resolved fluorescence images were acquired with an intensified CCD camera at various delay times. The obtained cross-sectional images of the plume indicate that the ablated ground state atoms and ions of gadolinium accumulate in a hemispherical contact layer between the plume and the ambient gas, and a cavity containing a smaller density of ablated species is formed near the center of the plume. At earlier expansion stage, another luminous component also expands in the cavity so that it coalesces into the hemispherical layer. The splitting and coalescence for atomic plume occur later than those for ionic plume. Furthermore, the hemispherical layer of neutral atoms appears later than that of ions; however, the locations of the layers are nearly identical. This coincidence of the appearance locations of the layers strongly suggests that the neutral atoms in the hemispherical layer are produced as a consequence of three-body recombination of ions through collisions with gas atoms. The obtained knowledge regarding plume expansion dynamics and detailed plume structure is useful for optimizing the experimental conditions for ablation-based spectroscopic analysis. - Highlights: • Ablated ground-state species accumulated in a thin hemispherical boundary layer • Inside the layer, a cavity containing a small density of ablated species was formed. • The hemispherical layers of atoms and ions appeared at a nearly identical location. • The measured intensity peak variation was in good agreement with a model prediction. • We ascribed the dominant process for forming the layer to a three-body recombination

  18. Experimental and computational study of complex shockwave dynamics in laser ablation plumes in argon atmosphere

    We investigated spatio-temporal evolution of ns laser ablation plumes at atmospheric pressure, a favored condition for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry. The 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from a Nd:YAG laser were focused on to an Al target and the generated plasma was allowed to expand in 1 atm Ar. The hydrodynamic expansion features were studied using focused shadowgraphy and gated 2 ns self-emission visible imaging. Shadowgram images showed material ejection and generation of shock fronts. A secondary shock is observed behind the primary shock during the time window of 100−500 ns with instabilities near the laser cone angle. By comparing the self-emission images obtained using fast photography, it is concluded that the secondary shocks observed in the shadowgraphy were generated by fast moving target material. The plume front estimates using fast photography exhibited reasonable agreement with data obtained from shadowgraphy at early times ≤400 ns. However, at later times, fast photography images showed plume confinement while the shadowgraphic images showed propagation of the plume front even at greater times. The structure and dynamics of the plume obtained from optical diagnostic tools were compared to numerical simulations. We have shown that the main features of plume expansion in ambient Ar observed in the experiments can be reproduced using a continuum hydrodynamics model which provided valuable insight into the expansion dynamics and shock structure of the plasma plume.

  19. Gas-dynamic acceleration of laser-ablation plumes: Hyperthermal particle energies under thermal vaporization

    Morozov, A. A.; Evtushenko, A. B.; Bulgakov, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The expansion of a plume produced by low-fluence laser ablation of graphite in vacuum is investigated experimentally and by direct Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to explain hyperthermal particle energies for thermally vaporized materials. We demonstrate that the translation energy of neutral particles, ˜2 times higher than classical expectations, is due to two effects, hydrodynamic plume acceleration into the forward direction and kinetic selection of fast particles in the on-axis region. Both effects depend on the collision number within the plume and on the particles internal degrees of freedom. The simulations allow ablation properties to be evaluated, such as ablation rate and surface temperature, based on time-of-flight measurements. Available experimental data on kinetic energies of various laser-produced particles are well described by the presented model.

  20. Subpicosecond laser ablation of copper and fused silica: Initiation threshold and plasma expansion

    We investigated the subpicosecond laser ablation of copper and fused silica under 100 fs laser irradiation at 800 nm in vacuum by means of fast plume imaging and time- and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. We found that, to the difference of copper ablation, the laser-generated plasma from a fused silica target exhibited one 'main' component only. The 'slow' plasma component, observed during copper ablation and usually assigned to optical emission from nanoparticles was not detected by either plasma fast imaging or optical emission spectroscopy even when fused silica targets were submitted to the highest incident fluences used in our experiments. The characteristic expansion velocity of this unique component was about three times larger than the velocity of the fast plume component observed during copper ablation. The dependence of laser fluence on both plasma expansion and ablation rate was investigated and discussed in terms of ablation efficiency and initiation mechanisms.

  1. Broadening and attenuation of UV laser ablation plumes in background gases

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    The expansion of a laser-induced silver plume in a background gas has been studied in a variety of gases ranging from helium, oxygen and argon to xenon. We have measured the angular distribution of the total deposit of silver on an array of quartz crystal microbalances as well as the time-of-flight...... distribution with a Langmuir probe. The angular distribution broadens for all gases except for a minor pressure range for the helium background gas, in which a distinct plume narrowing occurs. The behavior of the collected, ablated silver atoms integrated over the full hemisphere is similar for all gases. This...... integral decreases strongly above a characteristic pressure, which depends on the specific gas. The ion time-of-flight signal shows a clear plume splitting into a fast and a slow component except for the ablation plume in a helium gas. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  2. RECENT ADVANCES IN PULSED LASER ABLATED PLASMA PLUMES: A REVIEW

    ASHUTOSH DWIVEDI

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation is a process in which an intense laser pulse interacts with the matter producing plasma. The present work describes the theoretical work being conducted in the past for the pulsed laser ablation phenomenon. It incorporates the theoretical models being proposed by various researchers around the globe for pulsed laser ablation. The main processes involved in the laser–matter interaction leading to plasma plume formation are the absorption and the reflection of the incident...

  3. Shock wave mediated plume chemistry for molecular formation in laser ablation plasmas

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Cannon, Bret D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-02-16

    Laser ablation is used in a variety of applications albeit formation mechanisms of molecules and nanoclusters are not well understood. We investigated the formation mechanisms of AlO molecules during complex interactions between an Al laser plume expanding into ambient air at atmospheric pressure levels. To produce the plasma a high-purity Al target was ablated using 1064 nm, 6 ns laser pulses. Our results show that the plasma chemistry leading to the formation of AlO is mediated by shock waves. During the early times of plasma expansion, the generated shock waves at the plume edges act as a barrier for the combustion process and the molecular formation is prevalent after the shockwave collapse. The temporally and spatially resolved contour mapping of Al and AlO highlight the formation routes and persistence of species in the plasma and its relation to plume hydrodynamics.

  4. Influence of the atomic mass of the background gas on laser ablation plume propagation

    Amoruso, Salvatore; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, James G.

    2008-01-01

    A combination of time-of-flight ion probe measurements and gas dynamical modeling has been used to investigate the propagation of a laser ablation plume in gases of different atomic/molecular weight. The pressure variation of the ion time-of-flight was found to be well described by the gas...... dynamical model of Predtechensky and Mayorov (Appl. Supercond. 1:2011, 1993). In particular, the model describes how the pressure required to stop the plume in a given distance depends on the atomic/molecular weight of the gas, which is a feature that cannot be explained by standard point......-blast-wave descriptions of laser ablation plume expansion in gas....

  5. The absorption and radiation of a tungsten plasma plume during nanosecond laser ablation

    In this paper, the effect of absorption of the laser beam and subsequent radiation on the dynamics of a tungsten plasma plume during pulsed laser ablation is analyzed. Different laser wavelengths are taken into consideration. The absorption and emission coefficients of tungsten plasma in a pressure range of 0.1–100 MPa and temperature up to 70 000 K are presented. The shielding effects due to the absorption and radiation of plasma may have an impact on the course of ablation. The numerical model that describes the tungsten target heating and the formation of the plasma and its expansion were made for 355 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser beam with a Gaussian profile was focused to a spot size of 0.055 mm2 with a power density of 1 × 109 W/cm2 (10 ns full width half maximum pulse duration). The plasma expands into air at ambient pressure of 1 mPa. The use of the shorter wavelength causes faster heating of the target, thus the higher ablation rate. The consequences of a higher ablation rate are slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plasma plume. The higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is due to the lower density and lower plasma radiation. In the initial phase of propagation of the plasma plume, when both the temperature and pressure are very high, the dominant radiation is emission due to photo-recombination. However, for a 1064 nm laser wavelength after 100 ns of plasma expansion, the radiation of the spectral lines is up to 46.5% of the total plasma radiation and should not be neglected

  6. The absorption and radiation of a tungsten plasma plume during nanosecond laser ablation

    Moscicki, T., E-mail: tmosc@ippt.pan.pl; Hoffman, J.; Chrzanowska, J. [Institute of Fundamental Technological Research PAS, Pawinskiego 5B, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the effect of absorption of the laser beam and subsequent radiation on the dynamics of a tungsten plasma plume during pulsed laser ablation is analyzed. Different laser wavelengths are taken into consideration. The absorption and emission coefficients of tungsten plasma in a pressure range of 0.1–100 MPa and temperature up to 70 000 K are presented. The shielding effects due to the absorption and radiation of plasma may have an impact on the course of ablation. The numerical model that describes the tungsten target heating and the formation of the plasma and its expansion were made for 355 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser beam with a Gaussian profile was focused to a spot size of 0.055 mm{sup 2} with a power density of 1 × 10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2} (10 ns full width half maximum pulse duration). The plasma expands into air at ambient pressure of 1 mPa. The use of the shorter wavelength causes faster heating of the target, thus the higher ablation rate. The consequences of a higher ablation rate are slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plasma plume. The higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is due to the lower density and lower plasma radiation. In the initial phase of propagation of the plasma plume, when both the temperature and pressure are very high, the dominant radiation is emission due to photo-recombination. However, for a 1064 nm laser wavelength after 100 ns of plasma expansion, the radiation of the spectral lines is up to 46.5% of the total plasma radiation and should not be neglected.

  7. Mapping neutral, ion, and electron number densities within laser-ablated plasma plumes

    Weaver, I.; Doyle, Liam A.; Martin, G. W.; Riley, Dave; Lamb, M. J.; Graham, William G.; Morrow, Tom; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.

    1998-05-01

    Spatially and temporally varying neutral, ion and electron number densities have been mapped out within laser ablated plasma plumes expanding into vacuum. Ablation of a magnesium target was performed using a KrF laser, 30 ns pulse duration and 248 nm wavelength. During the initial stage of plasma expansion (t Two distinct regions within the plume were identified. One is a fast component (approximately 106 cm-1) consisting of ions and neutrals with maximum number densities observed to be approximately 30 and 4 X 1012 cm-3 respectively, and the second consists of slow moving neutral material at a number density of up to 1015 cm-3. Additionally a Langmuir probe has been used to obtain ion and electron number densities at very late times in the plasma expansion (1 microsecond(s) Two regions within the plume with different velocities were observed. Within a fast component (approximately 3 X 106 cms-1) electron and ion number densities of the order 5 X 1012 cm-3 were observed and within the second slower component (approximately 106 cms-1) electron and ion number densities of the order 1 - 2 X 1013 cm-3 were determined.

  8. Characterization of ablated species in laser-induced plasma plume

    Plasma electron density and atomic population densities in the plasma plume produced by a laser ablation of aluminum metal were determined in various ambient gases at relatively high pressures. The method is based on the fit of a spectral line profile of Al(I) 2P(convolutionsign)-2S emission to the theoretical spectrum obtained by one-dimensional radiative transfer calculation. The electron density was higher for a higher ambient gas pressure, suggesting the confinement of the plume by an ambient gas. The electron density also depends on the type of ambient gases, i.e., it increased in the order He424, while the atomic population density is almost independent of the type of ambient species and pressure. The population densities of the upper and lower levels of the transition were compared, and the ratio between their spatial distribution widths was calculated. These results provide valuable information regarding the confinement of the plume by the ambient gas and give insight into the time evolution of the plume

  9. Effect of ionization on laser-induced plume self-similar expansion

    The dynamics of a laser ablation plume during the first stage of its expansion, just after the termination of the laser pulse is modelled. The one-dimensional expansion of the evaporated material, considered as an ideal fluid, is governed by one-fluid Euler equations. For high energetic ions, the charge separation can be neglected and the hydrodynamics equations solved using self-similar formulation. Numerical solution is obtained, first when the laser fluence range is low enough to deal with a neutral vapor, and in a second stage, when ionization effects on the expansion are taken into account, for different material targets. As a main result, we found that the presence of ions in the evaporated gas enhances the self-similar expansion.

  10. Plasma plume induced during ArF laser ablation of hydroxyapatite

    Plasma plume induced by ArF excimer laser ablation of a hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) target was studied during expansion into a vacuum or water vapour. The ArF laser operated at a wavelength of 193 nm with a pulse energy of 300-350 mJ and a 20 ns pulse duration. The emission spectra of the plasma plume were registered with the use of a spectrograph and an ICCD camera. The expansion of the plasma plume was studied using the time of flight method. The time-dependent radiation of the Ca I and Ca II lines was registered with the use of a monochromator and photomultiplier at various distances from the target. The dynamics of the plasma plume was also imaged by means of fast photography. It was found that during expansion into a vacuum, the plasma front moved with a constant velocity of 1.75 x 104 m s-1, while in the case of ambient water vapour at a pressure of 20 Pa, velocities of 1.75 x 104-1.5 x 103 m s-1 were found depending on the distance from the target. Electron densities of 1.2 x 1024-4.5 x 1021 m-3 were determined from the Stark broadening of the Ca II and Ca I lines at distances of 1-25 mm from the target. Temperatures of 11,500-4500 K were determined from the relative intensities of carbon lines and continuum radiation at distances of 4-29 mm from the target. The results allowed the estimation of thermal and kinetic energies of ablated particles. During expansion into a vacuum, the kinetic energies of Ca, P and O atoms were 64, 49 and 25 eV, respectively. During expansion into water vapour, kinetic energies dropped to 0.47, 0.36 and 0.19 eV, respectively at a distance of 25 mm from the target and were comparable to the energies of thermal motion.

  11. Appearance property and mechanism of plume produced by pulsed ultraviolet laser ablating copper

    Time-resolved measurements of plume emission spectra by pulsed ultraviolet laser ablating copper in neon were analyzed, and the photographs of plume from laser ablating copper were taken. The experimental results show that plume has different colours in different ranges. At low pressure the centre layer and middle layer colours of plume are mixed colour, and the outer layer colours of plume are yellow and green. At middle pressure the centre layer and middle layer colours of plume are white, and the outer layer colour of plume is pea green. At high pressure the centre layer and middle layer colours of plume are white, and the outer layer colour of plume is faintness green. The plume range is pressed with the rising of ambient gas pressure, and the range colour gets thin with the rising of ambient gas pressure. The plume excitation radiation mechanism in pulsed ultraviolet laser ablating copper was discussed. The primary excitation radiation mechanism in plume is electron collision energy transfer and atom collision energy transfer at low pressure and middle pressure, and it is electrons Bremsstrahlung and recombination excitation radiation of electron and ion at high pressure. The model can be used to explain the experimental result qualitatively. (authors)

  12. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of the Laser Ablation Plume Controled by RF Plasma

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Nishimura, Takuma; Mizuno, Manabu; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Sakai, Yosuke

    1999-10-01

    Recently, film deposition has been investigated using laser ablation methods which have a lot of advantages. For the purpose of control of the laser ablation plume, we introduced a radio frequency (RF) plasma. In this report we present position resolved optical emission spectra of the plume observed by an OMA (optical multichannel analyzer). The plume current is also measured. The RF plasma is generated in a helical coil installed between the substrate and the target. An ArF excimer laser (wavelength 193 nm, pulse duration time 20 ns) is used as a light source, and the target material is sintered carbon graphite. The laser fluence on the target surface is changed in a range from 1.2 to 6.4 J/cm^2. Ar gas is introduced to sustain the RF plasma. When the plume goes through the RF plasma, interaction of the plume with the plasma is expected. The possibility of control of the plume behavior is discussed.

  13. Langmuir probe study of plasma expansion in pulsed laser ablation

    Hansen, T.N.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Langmuir probes were used to monitor the asymptotic expansion of the plasma produced by the laser ablation of a silver target in a vacuum. The measured angular and temporal distributions of the ion flux and electron temperature were found to be in good agreement with the self-similar isentropic and...

  14. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  15. On the plume splitting of pulsed laser ablated Fe and Al plasmas

    A time resolved imaging study of pulsed laser ablated Fe and Al plasma plumes with specific interest in the splitting of plumes into the slow and fast moving components as they expand through the background argon gas at different pressures is reported. The material ablation was achieved using a Q-switched Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser operating at 532 nm with a pulse duration of ∼8 ns full width at half maximum and a fluence of 30 Jcm-2 at the target surface. Typical time resolved images with low magnification show that the splitting occurs at moderate background gas pressures (0.5 and 1.0 mbar for Fe, and 0.2 mbar for Al plasma plumes). The plume splitting did not occur for higher background gas pressures.

  16. On the plume splitting of pulsed laser ablated Fe and Al plasmas

    Mahmood, S.; Rawat, R. S.; Darby, M. S. B.; Zakaullah, M.; Springham, S. V.; Tan, T. L.; Lee, P.

    2010-10-01

    A time resolved imaging study of pulsed laser ablated Fe and Al plasma plumes with specific interest in the splitting of plumes into the slow and fast moving components as they expand through the background argon gas at different pressures is reported. The material ablation was achieved using a Q-switched Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser operating at 532 nm with a pulse duration of ˜8 ns full width at half maximum and a fluence of 30 Jcm-2 at the target surface. Typical time resolved images with low magnification show that the splitting occurs at moderate background gas pressures (0.5 and 1.0 mbar for Fe, and 0.2 mbar for Al plasma plumes). The plume splitting did not occur for higher background gas pressures.

  17. Adiabatic, Non-Isothermal Plume Expansion into Vacuum in Terms of Knudsen Layer

    F.M. Jasim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a theoretical analysis of laser plume formation in terms of Knudsen layer when a femtosecond laser pulse was irradiated on a thin gold foil in terms of gas dynamics equations. The laser spot was assumed to be noncircular laser spot radius, giving an ellipsoidal form of expansion. The profile of the plume will be discussed depending on the laser fluence and beam waist. Analytical solution of this expansion will be presented for the density of vapor plume.

  18. Ion dynamics in laser ablation plumes from selected metals at 355 nm

    Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen;

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of ions in a laser ablation plume from a number of metals irradiated by a ns-second pulse at 355 nm has been studied. The time-of-flight signals peak at flight times corresponding to velocities between 30 and 10 km/s with decreasing values for increasing atomic masses. The angular...

  19. Angular distribution of electron temperature and density in a laser-ablation plume

    Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen; Hansen, T.N.; Lunney, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    The angular distribution of electron temperature and density in a laser-ablation plume has been studied for the first time. The electron temperature ranges from 0.1 to 0.5 eV and is only weakly dependent on the angle in the low-intensity range studied here. In contrast, the typical ion energy is...

  20. Evolution of the plasma parameters in the expanding laser ablation plume of silver

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen; Hansen, T.N.; Lunney, J.G.

    The angular and radial variation of the ion density and electron temperature in the plasma plume produced by laser ablation of silver at fluences of 0.8-1.3 J cm(-2) at 355 nm have been studied using a time-resolving Langmuir probe. The angular dependence of the electron temperature and the...

  1. Energy balance of a laser ablation plume expanding in a background gas

    Amoruso, Salvatore; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, James G.

    2010-01-01

    The energy balance of a laser ablation plume in an ambient gas for nanosecond pulses has been investigated on the basis of the model of Predtechensky and Mayorov (PM), which provides a relatively simple and clear description of the essential hydrodynamics. This approach also leads to an insightful...

  2. Effects of oxygen background pressure on the stoichiometry of a LaGaO3 laser ablation plume investigated by time and spectrally resolved two-dimensional imaging

    Sambri, A.; Aruta, C.; Di Gennaro, E.; Wang, X.; Scotti di Uccio, U.; Miletto Granozio, F.; Amoruso, S.

    2016-03-01

    The plume expansion dynamics strongly affects the growth and the chemistry of pulsed laser deposited thin films. The interaction with the background gas determines the kinetic energy of the species impinging on the substrate, their angular broadening, the plasma chemistry, and eventually the cations stoichiometric ratio in oxide films. Here, we exploit two-dimensional, spectrally resolved plume imaging to characterize the diverse effects of the oxygen background pressure on the expansion dynamics of La, Ga, and LaO species during pulsed laser deposition of LaGaO3. The propagation of the ablated species towards the substrate is studied for background oxygen pressures ranging from high vacuum up to ≈10-1 mbar. Our experimental results show specie-dependent effects of the background gas on the angular distribution of the precursors within the plume. These findings suggest that even in the presence of a stoichiometric ablation and of a globally stoichiometric plume, cations off-stoichiometry can take place in the forefront portion of the plume impinging on the substrate. We show that such effect can be compensated by a proper choice of process parameters.

  3. Investigation of plumes produced by material ablation with two time-delayed femtosecond laser pulses

    We experimentally investigated and herewith reported the results of laser ablation of copper and gold with two time-delayed femtosecond laser pulses at 800 nm in vacuum. The ablation plume dynamic was monitored by fast plume imaging and time- and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. Optical microscopy was used to follow the ablation depth as a function of the delay between the two laser pulses. Nanoparticles deposition on mica substrates was analysed by atomic force microscopy. We estimate roughly the plume's atomization degree - that is the mass fraction of atomized material over the total ablated mass - from the relative intensities of radiation emitted from atoms and nanoparticles. It is shown that the atomization degree depends critically on the time delay between both laser pulses and on the characteristic time of electron-lattice relaxation. The increase of the atomization degree is accompanied by the decrease of the ablation depth. Atomic force microscopy measurements confirm the partial atomization of nanoparticles, as the analyses of particle deposition on mica substrates show a large decrease of the number of nanoparticles for large delay between the two pulses.

  4. Emission spectroscopy of laser ablation plume: Composition analysis of a target in water

    Emission spectra of the laser ablation plume formed by the irradiation of Cu65/Zn35 binary alloy in water at the room temperature with 150-ns pulsed laser were measured. The spectra were analyzed by comparing with the theoretical calculation based on the assumption that self-absorption effect is negligible and that the same temperature can be applied to Cu atoms and Zn atoms in the plume. The calculation reproduced the spectra very well and gave reasonable temperature as a best-fit parameter. However, the best-fit value of the Cu atomic density relative to Zn is significantly low compared with the target composition. Care should be taken to perform in situ LIBS in liquid due to the complicated plume formation mechanism and dynamics of material intake into the plume.

  5. Spectroscopic modeling and characterization of a collisionally confined laser-ablated plasma plume

    Plasma plumes produced by laser ablation are an established method for manufacturing the high quality stoichiometrically complex thin films used for a variety of optical, photoelectric, and superconducting applications. The state and reproducibility of the plasma close to the surface of the irradiated target plays a critical role in producing high quality thin films. Unfortunately, this dense plasma has historically eluded quantifiable characterization. The difficulty in modeling the plume formation arises in the accounting for the small amount of energy deposited into the target when physical properties of these exotic target materials are not known. In this work we obtain the high density state of the plasma plume through the use of an experimental spectroscopic technique and a custom spectroscopic model. In addition to obtaining detailed temperature and density profiles, issues regarding line broadening and opacity for spectroscopic characterization will be addressed for this unique environment

  6. Dynamics of Laser-Ablation Plume and Ambient Gas Visualized by Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging Spectroscopy

    Sasaki, Koichi; Watarai, Hiroshi

    2006-04-01

    The dynamics of both a laser-ablation plume and ambient gas were studied by visualizing their density distributions by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. A deep dip was formed in the density distribution of the ambient gas. The depth of the dip was almost 100% immediately after irradiation of the ablation laser pulse. The size of the dip expanded with time. At a long delay time after the irradiation of the ablation laser pulse, the ambient gas returned to the dip and slowly filled it. The location of the dip corresponded to that of the plume ejected from the target. This means that the high pressure of the plume removed the ambient gas, and the plume and the ambient gas located exclusively. In addition, we observed the formation and propagation of a compressed layer around the dip.

  7. Experimental studies of laser-ablated zirconium carbide plasma plumes: Fuel corrosion diagnostic development

    Understanding the corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel materials, such as refractory carbides, in a high temperature hydrogen environment is critical for several proposed nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) concepts. Monitoring the fuel corrosion products is important not only for understanding corrosion characteristics, but to assess the performance of an actual, operating nuclear propulsion system as well. In this paper, we describe an experimental study initiated to develop, test, and subsequently utilize non-intrusive, laser-based diagnostics to characterize the gaseous product species which are expected to evolve during the exposure of representative fuel samples to hydrogen. Laser ablation is used to produce high temperature, vapor plumes from solid solution, uranium-free, zirconium carbide (ZrC) forms for probing by other laser diagnostic methods; predominantly laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). We discuss the laser ablation technique, results of plume emission measurements, as well as the use of planar LIF to image both the ZrC plumes and actual NTP fuel corrosion constituents

  8. Ambient gas effects on the dynamics of laser-produced tin plume expansion

    Harilal, S. S.; O'Shay, Beau; Tao, Yezheng; Tillack, Mark S.

    2006-04-01

    Controlling the debris from a laser-generated tin plume is one of the prime issues in the development of an extreme ultraviolet lithographic light source. An ambient gas that is transparent to 13.5 nm radiation can be used for controlling highly energetic particles from the tin plume. We employed a partial ambient argon pressure for decelerating various species in the tin plume. The kinetic energy distributions of tin species were analyzed at short and large distances using time and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy and a Faraday cup, respectively. A fast-gated intensified charged coupled device was used for understanding the hydrodynamics of the plume's expansion into argon ambient. Our results indicate that the tin ions can be effectively mitigated with a partial argon pressure ~65 mTorr. Apart from thermalization and deceleration of plume species, the addition of ambient gas leads to other events such as double peak formation in the temporal distributions and ambient plasma formation.

  9. Angular distribution of electron temperature and density in a laser-ablation plume

    Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen; Hansen, T.N.; Lunney, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    The angular distribution of electron temperature and density in a laser-ablation plume has been studied for the first time. The electron temperature ranges from 0.1 to 0.5 eV and is only weakly dependent on the angle in the low-intensity range studied here. In contrast, the typical ion energy is ...... about 2 orders of magnitude larger, and its angular distribution is mon peaked about the target normal. The derived Values of the electron density are in agreement with the measured values of ion density....

  10. Comparative investigation of laser ablation plumes in air and argon by analysis of spectral line shapes: Insights on calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    We investigate the characteristic features of plume expansion in air and argon resulting from ultraviolet laser ablation of solid matter in conditions typically applied in material analysis via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Barite crown glass is chosen as a target material for the characteristic emission spectrum suitable for plasma diagnostics. The space-integrated plasma emission spectrum recorded with an echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector is compared to the computed spectral radiance of a nonuniform plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. In particular, resonance lines of neutral sodium atoms and barium ions are observed to probe gradients of temperature and density within the plume. It is shown that laser ablation in argon leads to an almost uniform plasma whereas gradients of temperature and density are evidenced in ambient air. The discrepancy is attributed to the different physical properties of both gases leading to a stronger vapor–gas energy exchange in the case of air. However, strong gradients occur only in a thin peripheral zone, close to the vapor–gas contact front. The larger plasma core appears almost uniform. The peripheral zone of low temperature mostly contributes to the plasma emission spectrum by absorption and material analysis via calibration-free LIBS in air may ignore the nonuniform character of the plasma if only transitions of small optical thickness are considered. - Highlights: • Investigation of laser ablation plumes by analysis of spectral line shapes • Simulation of emission spectra from nonuniform laser-produced plasma • Plasma is more uniform for ablation in argon. • Plasma nonuniformity mostly affects optically thick lines. • Calibration-free LIBS may ignore gradients if optically thin lines are chosen

  11. Laser ablated plasma plume diagnostics of cerium oxide: effect of oxygen partial pressure

    This paper describes the spatial and temporal investigation of laser ablated plasma plume of cerium oxide target using Langmuir probe to measure the plasma parameters. Cerium oxide target was ablated using a KrF (λ ∼ 248 nm) gas laser at an energy of 300 mJ per pulse. Experimental studies confirmed that oxygen partial pressure of 2 x 10-2 mbar is sufficient enough to get good quality films of cerium oxide. At this pressure, plume was diagnosed for their spatial and temporal behaviour. The tungsten probe tip was inserted along the length of the plasma to collect the ions and electrons effectively. A thin probe tip (about 0.4 mm diameter) was used to avoid plasma perturbation during measurements. A variable voltage was applied to the tip and corresponding current due to electrons and ions was collected. Spatial distribution was investigated at a regular interval of 15 mm from the target up maximum distance 45 mm and the temporal behaviour was recorded in the range of 0 to 50 μS with an interval of 0.5 μS. The ion and average electron density are found to be maximum at 30 mm from the target position and the plasma current of ceria is found to be maximum at 22 μS. (author)

  12. Plume expansion of a laser-induced plasma studied with the particle-in-cell method

    Ellegaard, Ole; Nedela, T; Urbassek, H; Schou, J

    2002-01-01

     The initial stage of laser-induced plasma plume expansion from a solid in vacuum and the effect of the Coulomb field have been studied. We have performed a one-dimensional numerical calculation by mapping the charge on a computational grid according to the particle-in-cell (PIC) method of Birdsall...

  13. Plume expansion of a laser-induced plasma studied with the particle-in-cell method

    Ellegaard, O.; Nedelea, T.; Schou, Jørgen; Urbassek, H.M.

    The initial stage of laser-induced plasma plume expansion from a solid in vacuum and the effect of the Coulomb field have been studied. We have performed a one-dimensional numerical calculation by mapping the charge on a computational grid according to the particle-in-cell (PIC) method of Birdsall...

  14. Classification of plastic materials by imaging laser-induced ablation plumes

    Negre, Erwan; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Pelascini, Frederic; Yu, Jin

    2016-08-01

    A method of rapid classification and identification of plastic materials has been studied in this work. Such method is based on fast spectroscopic imagery of laser-induced ablation plume on plastics to be analyzed. More specifically, a classification schema has been developed first according to the nature of the CC bonds which characterize the polymer matrix. Our results show that the spatial distribution and the evolution of the molecular species in the ablation plume, such as C2 and CN, exhibit clear different behaviors for polymers without any native CC bond, with CC single bonds or with CC double bonds respectively. Therefore the morphological parameters of the populations of the molecular species extracted from the time-resolved spectroscopic images of the plumes provide efficient indicators to classify the polymers characterized by the above mentioned different kinds of CC bonds. When dealing with different polymers with the same kind of CC bond, CC single bond for instance, other indicators should be introduced to provide the further discrimination. Such indicators can be for example a specific native molecular bond other than CC bonds, CN for example, the total emission intensity of which may exhibit specific time evolution. The robustness of the developed classification schema has been then studied with respect to two of the most frequently used additives in plastics fabrication, graphite and titanium. Our results show a negligible influence of these additives in the morphology of the populations of the molecular species when such additives are mixed into the polymer matrix with the percentages usually used in plastics productions, which demonstrates the validity of the developed classification schema for plastics.

  15. Numerical Simulation on Expansion Process of Ablation Plasma Induced by Intense Pulsed Ion Beam

    TAN Chang; LIU Yue; WANG Xiao-Gang; MA Teng-Cai

    2006-01-01

    We present a one-dimensional time-dependent numerical model for the expansion process of ablation plasmainduced by intense pulsed ion beam(IPIB).The evolutions of density,velocity,temperature,and pressure of theablation plasma of the aluminium target are obtained.The numerical results are well in agreement with therelative experimental data.It is shown that the expansion process of ablation plasma induced by IPIB includesstrongly nonlinear effects and that shock waves appear during the propagation of the ablation plasma.

  16. Two-dimensional imaging of atomic and nanoparticle components in copper plasma plume produced by ultrafast laser ablation

    Anoop, K. K.; Ni, Xiaochang; Bianco, M.; Paparo, D.; Wang, X.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the spatial and temporal evolution of the plume generated during ultrafast laser ablation of a pure copper target with 800 nm, ≈50 fs, Ti: Sapphire laser pulses. Time-gated imaging was used to record 2-dimensional images of plume populations. The temporal evolution of neutral (Cu*), and ionic (Cu+) components of the plume are separately imaged by exploiting bandpass interference filters, while nanoparticles are investigated by collecting their characteristic broadband emission. The ionic component of the plume moves two to three times faster than the neutral component, with a velocity which is almost independent of laser fluence. Plume emission intensity variations at different fluences and delay times are studied for both atomic and nanoparticle components.

  17. Time-of-flight spectroscopy characterization of the plasma plume from a laser-ablated potassium titanyl phosphate crystal

    Optical emission spectra of the plasma produced by 1.06-µm Nd:YAG laser irradiation of a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystal were recorded and analyzed in a time- and spatially resolved manner. The composition and evolution of the plasma plume were studied in low vacuum conditions. Emission lines associated with Ti(I), Ti(II) and K(I) were identified in the plasma. The delay times of emission peaks for the ablated species were investigated as a function of the observation distance from the target surface, and the velocities of these species were derived accordingly. Two emission peaks corresponding to a fast and a slow component of ablated Ti(I) were observed by optical time-of-flight spectroscopy. The origins of the two peaks and a possible mechanism for the laser ablation are discussed. - Highlights: • The optical emission spectra of the plasma plume produced by laser ablation of a KTP crystal were studied in a time- and spatially resolved manner. • Two emission peaks, corresponding to a fast and a slow component of ablated Ti(I), were observed. • The velocities of different species in the plasma plume were derived. • The origins of the two-peak emission of Ti(I) are discussed

  18. Calcium detection of human hair and nail by the nanosecond time-gated spectroscopy of laser-ablation plume

    Haruna, Masamitsu; Ohmi, Masato; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Morimoto, Shigeto

    2000-04-01

    We demonstrate the nanosecond time-gated spectroscopy of plume in laser ablation of biological tissue, which allows us to detect calcium (Ca) with high sensitivity by the use of either a UV or a near-IR laser pulse. Clear and sharp peaks of Ca+ appear in the luminescence spectrum of laser-ablation plume although the Ca content is only 0.1 percent in human hair and nail. Luminescence peaks of sodium atom (Na) and ionized carbon are also detectable. This specific spectroscopy is low invasive because a single low-energy laser pulse illuminates the tissue sample, and it does not require any poisonous sensititizers like fluorescence dye. This method, therefore, is a promising candidate for optical biopsy in the near future. In particular, Ca detection of human hair may lead to new diagnosis, including monitor of daily intake of Ca and a screening diagnosis of osteoporosis.

  19. Understanding plume splitting of laser ablated plasma: A view from ion distribution dynamics

    Plume splitting in low-pressure ambient air was understood in view of ion distribution dynamics from the laser ablated Al plasma (1064 nm 0.57 J/mm2) by combining fast photography and spatially resolved spectroscopy. In the beginning, the spectral lines were mainly from the Al III ion. Then, the Bragg peak in stopping power of the ambient gas to Al III could be the dominant reason for the enhanced emission from the fast moving part, and the recombination of Al III to Al I-II ions near the target surface was response to the radiations from the slow moving/stationary part. As the ambient gas pressure increased, stopping distances of the Al III decreased, and radiation from the air ions became pronounced. The laser shadowgraph image at 1100 Pa indicated that the shock wave front located between the fast moving and slow moving parts. Electron densities of the fast moving plasma, which peaked at the plasma front, were on the order of 1016 cm−3, and the electron temperatures were 2–3 eV

  20. Nanosecond and femtosecond ablation of La0.6Ca0.4CoO3: a comparison between plume dynamics and composition of the films

    Canulescu, Stela; Papadopoulou, E.; Anglos, D.;

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of La0.6Ca0.4CoO3 were grown by pulsed laser ablation with nanosecond and femtosecond pulses. The films deposited with femtosecond pulses (248 nm, 500 fs pulse duration) exhibit a higher surface roughness and deficiency in the cobalt content compared to the films deposited with...... nanosecond pulses (248 nm, 20 ns pulse duration). The origin of these pronounced differences between the films grown by ns and fs ablation has been studied in detail by time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy and imaging. The plumes generated by nanosecond and femtosecond ablation were analyzed in vacuum...... similar velocities of the plume species are observed for fs and ns laser ablation. The different film compositions are therefore not related to different kinetic energies and different distributions of various species in the plasma plume which has been identified as the origin of the deficiency of species...

  1. Laser-solid interaction and dynamics of laser-ablated materials

    An annealing model is extended to treat the vaporization process, and a hydrodynamic model describes the ablated material. We find that dynamic source and ionization effects accelerate the expansion front of the ablated plume with thermal vaporization temperature. The vaporization process and plume propagation in high background gas pressure are studied

  2. Groundwater contamination downstream of a contaminant penetration site. I. Extension-expansion of the contaminant plume

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    This study concerns the possible use of boundary layer (BL) approach for the analysis and evaluation of contaminant transport in groundwater due to contaminant penetration into the groundwater aquifer through a site of limited size. The contaminant penetration may occur through either the upper (surface) or lower (bedrock) boundary of the aquifer. Two general cases of contaminant penetration mechanisms are considered: (1) the contaminant is transferred through an interface between a contaminating and freshwater fluid phases, and (2) the contaminant arrives at groundwater by leakage and percolation. For the purpose of BL evaluation the contaminant plume is divided into three different sections: (1) the penetration section, (2) the extension-expansion section, and (3) the spearhead section. In each section a different BL method approach yields simple analytical expressions for the description of the contaminant plume migration and contaminant transport. Previous studies of the BL method can be directly applied to the evaluation of contaminant transport at the contaminant penetration section. The present study extends those studies and concerns the contaminant transport in the two other sections, which are located downstream of the penetration section. This study shows that the contaminant concentration profiles in sections 2 and 3 incorporate two BLs: (1) an inner BL adjacent to the aquifer bottom or surface boundary, and (2) an outer BL, which develops above or below the inner one. The method developed in the present study has been applied to practical issues concerning salinity penetration into groundwater in south central Kansas.

  3. Laser ablation in liquid media of noble metals. The physics of plasma plume and the optical properties of the produced colloids

    In experiments of pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL), performed on noble metal targets, many physical aspects regarding the characteristics of the plasma plume generated in the confining liquid, and the optical properties of the produced nano colloids deserve a clear definition and discussion. In this paper we present the relevant theories and the results of experiments performed in our laboratory on this argument.

  4. Ablation with a single micropatterned KrF laser pulse: quantitative evidence of transient liquid microflow driven by the plume pressure gradient at the surface of polyesters

    Weisbuch, F.; Tokarev, V. N.; Lazare, S.; Débarre, D.

    A microscopic flow of a transient liquid film produced by KrF laser ablation is evidenced on targets of PET and PEN. Experiments were done by using single pulses of the excimer laser beam micropatterned with the aid of submicron projection optics and grating masks. The samples of various crystalline states, ablated with a grating-forming beam (period Λ=3.7 μm), were precisely measured by atomic force microscopy, in order to evidence any deviation from the ablation behavior predicted by the current theory (combination of ablation curve and beam profile). This was confirmed by comparing various behaviors dependent on the polymer nature (PC, PET and PEN). PC is a normally ablating polymer in the sense that the ablated profile can be predicted with previous theory neglecting liquid-flow effects. This case is called `dry' ablation and PC is used as a reference material. But, for some particular samples like crystalline PET, it is revealed that during ablation a film of transient liquid, composed of various components, which are discussed, can flow under the transient action of the gradient of the pressure of the ablation plume and resolidify at the border of the spot after the end of the pulse. This mechanism is further supported by a hydrodynamics theoretical model in which a laser-induced viscosity drop and the gradient of the plume pressure play an important role. The volume of displaced liquid increases with fluence (0.5 to 2 J/cm2) and satisfactory quantitative agreement is obtained with the present model. The same experiment done on the same PET polymer but prepared in the amorphous state does not show microflow, and such an amorphous sample behaves like the reference PC (`dry' ablation). The reasons for this surprising result are discussed.

  5. Laser ablation in CdZnTe crystal due to thermal self-focusing: Secondary phase hydrodynamic expansion

    Medvid', A.; Mychko, A.; Dauksta, E.; Kosyak, V.; Grase, L.

    2016-06-01

    The present paper deals with the laser ablation in CdZnTe crystal irradiated by pulsed infrared laser. Two values of threshold intensities of the laser ablation were determined, namely of about 8.5 and 6.2 MW/cm2 for the incident and the rear surfaces, correspondingly. Lower intensity of the laser ablation for the rear surface is explained by thermal self-focusing of the laser beam in the CdZnTe crystal due to heating of Te inclusions with a following hydrodynamic expansion.

  6. Atomic Processes in Emission Characteristics of a Lithium Plasma Plume Formed by Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    High resolution spectral analysis of lithium plasma formed by single and double laser ablation has been undertaken to understand the plume-laser interaction, especially at the early stages of the plasma plume. In order to identify different atomic processes in evolving plasma, time resolved spectral emission studies at different inter-pulse delays have been performed for ionic and neutral lithium lines emitting from different levels. Along with the enhancement in emission intensity, a large line broadening and spectral shift, especially in the case of excited state transition Li I 610.3 nm have been observed in the presence of the second pulse. This broadening and shift gradually decrease with increasing time delay. Another interesting feature is the appearance of a multi-component structure in the ionic line at 548.4 nm and these components change conversely into a single structure at the later stages of the plasma. The multi-component structures are correlated with the presence of different velocity (temperature) distributions in non-LTE conditions. Atomic analyses by computing photon emissivity coefficients with an ADAS code have been used to identify the above processes.

  7. Atomic Processes in Emission Characteristics of a Lithium Plasma Plume Formed by Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    Sivakumaran, V.; Ajai, Kumar; K. Singh, R.; Prahlad, V.; C. Joshi, H.

    2013-03-01

    High resolution spectral analysis of lithium plasma formed by single and double laser ablation has been undertaken to understand the plume-laser interaction, especially at the early stages of the plasma plume. In order to identify different atomic processes in evolving plasma, time resolved spectral emission studies at different inter-pulse delays have been performed for ionic and neutral lithium lines emitting from different levels. Along with the enhancement in emission intensity, a large line broadening and spectral shift, especially in the case of excited state transition Li I 610.3 nm have been observed in the presence of the second pulse. This broadening and shift gradually decrease with increasing time delay. Another interesting feature is the appearance of a multi-component structure in the ionic line at 548.4 nm and these components change conversely into a single structure at the later stages of the plasma. The multi-component structures are correlated with the presence of different velocity (temperature) distributions in non-LTE conditions. Atomic analyses by computing photon emissivity coefficients with an ADAS code have been used to identify the above processes.

  8. Analysis of plume following ultraviolet laser ablation of doped polymers: Dependence on polymer molecular weight

    This work investigates the effect of polymer molecular weight MW on the plume characteristics of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) films doped with iodonaphthalene (NapI) and iodophenanthrene (PhenI) following irradiation in vacuum at 248 nm. Laser-induced fluorescence probing of the plume reveals the presence of ArH products (NapH and PhenH from, respectively, NapI- and PhenI-doped films). While a bimodal translational distribution of these products is observed in all cases, on average, a slower translational distribution is observed in the low MW system. The extent of the observed dependence is reduced as the optical absorption coefficient of the film increases, i.e., in the sequence NapI/PMMA, PhenI/PMMA, and PS-doped films. Further confirmation of the bimodal translational distributions is provided by monitoring in situ the temporally resolved attenuation by the plume as it expands in vacuum of a continuous wave helium-neon laser propagating parallel to the substrate. Results are discussed in the framework of the bulk photothermal model, according to which ejection requires that a critical number of bonds are broken

  9. Mass spectroscopic analysis of a plume induced by laser ablation of pyrolytic boron nitride

    Chae, H B; Lee, I H; Park, S M

    1998-01-01

    The laser ablation of a pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) target was investigated by time-of- flight quadrupole mass spectroscopy. According to the laser-correlated ion mass spectra, B sup + and B sub 2 sup + ions were produced, but neither N sup + , N sub 2 sup + , or BN sup + ions were observed at laser fluences below 1 J/cm sup 2. Instead, neutral N sub 2 molecules were found to be formed. The mean velocities and kinetic energies of the B sup + ions were obtained by time-of-flight analysis. Also, reactive laser ablation under a N sub 2 atmosphere was attempted by using a pulsed valve synchronized with the laser pulse.

  10. Expansion dynamics of the plasma produced by laser ablation of BaTiO3 in a gas environment

    Gonzalo de los Reyes, José; Afonso, Carmen N.; Madariaga, I.

    1997-01-01

    The expansion dynamics of the plasma produced by excimer laser ablation of BaTiO3 has been studied by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy over a broad gas pressure range (10–7–40 mbar), the gas being either reactive (oxygen) or inert (argon). The results obtained in both environments are qualitatively similar and they show that there is a distance-related pressure threshold above which the expansion dynamics differ from that of the free-expansion regime observed in vacuum. Analys...

  11. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  12. Energy distributions of plume ions from silver at different angles ablated in vacuum

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela

    A typical pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is carried out for a fluence between 0.5 and 2.5 J/cm2. The ablated particles are largely neutrals at the lowest fluence, but the fraction of ions increases strongly with fluence and accounts for more 0.5 of the particles at 2.5 J/cm2 [1,2]. Since it may be...... comparatively difficult to measure the energy and angular distribution of neutrals, measurements of the ionic fraction will be valuable for any modeling of PLD. We have irradiated silver in a vacuum chamber (~ 10-7 mbar) with a Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm and made detailed measurements of the time...

  13. Hydrodynamic modeling of ns-laser ablation

    David Autrique; Vasilios Alexiades; Harihar Khanal

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation is a versatile and widespread technique, applied in an increasing number of medical, industrial and analytical applications. A hydrodynamic multiphase model describing nanosecond-laser ablation (ns-LA) is outlined. The model accounts for target heating and mass removal mechanisms as well as plume expansion and plasma formation. A copper target is placed in an ambient environment consisting of helium and irradiated by a nanosecond-laser pulse. The effect of variable laser ...

  14. Time-resolved study of the plasma-plume emission during the nanosecond ablation of lithium fluoride

    Camacho, J.J., E-mail: j.j.camacho@uam.es [Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Diaz, L. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CFMAC, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Cid, J.P.; Poyato, J.M.L. [Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-01

    The properties of the plasma-plume accompanying the pulsed laser ablation of lithium fluoride (LiF) at medium-vacuum conditions (4 Pa) were studied by a combination of spatially and temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The laser-induced plasma at CO{sub 2} laser intensities ranging from 0.18 to 4.7 GW × cm{sup −2} was found strongly ionized in F{sup +}, Li{sup +}, F{sup 2{sup +}}, and F{sup 3{sup +}} species and rich in neutral lithium and fluorine atoms. The temporal behavior of excited Li atoms and ionized excited species F{sup +}, Li{sup +}, F{sup 2{sup +}}, and F{sup 3{sup +}} is reported. The results show a faster decay of the continuum emission and Li{sup +}, F{sup 3{sup +}}, and F{sup 2{sup +}} ionic species than in the case of F{sup +} and neutral Li atoms. The velocity distributions of atomic and ionic species are obtained from time-of-flight measurements. Electron density and excitation temperature in the laser-induced plasma were estimated from the analysis of spectral data at various delay times from the CO{sub 2} laser pulse incidence. From the intensity decay of Li{sup +}, F{sup +}, F{sup 2{sup +}} and F{sup 3{sup +}} with the delay time, we have estimated the three-body electron–ion recombination rate constants for these species. - Highlights: • The plasma-plume of lithium fluoride has been characterized by high-resolution LIBS. • Temporal evolution of excited Li, F{sup +}, Li{sup +}, F{sup 2{sup +}} and F{sup 3{sup +}} species is reported. • Plasma temperatures and electron densities are measured at different delay times. • High electron densities (2.5–6.6) × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} are measured. • Three-body electron–ion recombination constants of Li{sup +}, F{sup 2+} and F{sup 3{sup +}} are estimated.

  15. Influence of the plasma expansion dynamics on the structural properties of pulsed laser ablation deposited tin oxide thin films

    Tin oxide thin films were deposited by pulsed laser ablation at different oxygen partial pressures and substrate temperatures. Information on the structural and morphological properties of the deposited thin films has been obtained by means of X-ray photoelectron, Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopies and scanning electron microscopy. The expansion of the laser generated plasma has been studied by means of time resolved fast photography. Different expansion regimes were observed: in vacuum the plasma follows a free expansion one while the raise of the background oxygen pressure leads to the development of a shock wave. It was found that only at 13.3 Pa of oxygen gas, in the presence of a shock wave, the deposition of stoichiometric films, at relatively low substrates temperature, is attainable. The correlation between the observed dynamics of the plasma expansion and the structural properties of the deposited films is presented and discussed.

  16. Dynamics of a laser-produced silver plume in an oxygen background gas

    Schou, Jorgen; Toftmann, Bo; Amoruso, Salvatore

    2004-09-01

    The expansion of a plasma plume in a background gas is a key problem for film deposition and laser ablation studies. Combined diagnostic measurements of deposition rates and ion time-of-flight (TOF) signals have been used to study the dynamics of a laser ablation plume in an oxygen gas. This study is similar to our previous work on an argon background gas and shows essentially the same trend. At an enhanced gas pressure, the angular distribution of collected ablated atoms becomes comparatively broad, while the total collected yield decreases strongly. The total collected yield exhibits three separate regimes with increasing pressure, a vacuum-like regime, a transition regime with increasing plume broadening and splitting of the ion signal, and at the highest pressures a diffusion-like regime with a broad angular distribution. In the high pressure regime, the expansion can be described by a simple model based on diffusion from a confined plume.

  17. Calculation of Nozzle Ablation During Arcing Period in an SF6 Auto-Expansion Circuit Breaker

    Zhang, Junmin; Lu, Chunrong; Guan, Yonggang; Liu, Weidong

    2016-05-01

    The nozzle ablation process is described as two phases of heat and ablation in the interruption for an SF6 circuit breaker in this paper. Their mathematical models are established with the Fourier heat conduction differential equation respectively. The masses of nozzle ablation with different arc durations and arc currents are calculated through the model of the nozzle ablation combined with an MHD (magneto-hydrodynamic) arc model. The time of the temperature rise on the inner surface of the nozzle under a given energy flux and of reaching the pyrolysis temperature under different energy fluxes is respectively analyzed. The relations between the mass of nozzle ablation and breaking current and arc duration are obtained. The result shows that the absorbing energy process before the nozzle ablation can be neglected under the condition of the energy flux entering into nozzle q > 109 W/m2. The ablation is the severest during the high-current phase and the ablation mass increases rapidly with the breaking current and with arc duration respectively. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51177005 and 51477004)

  18. Calculation of Nozzle Ablation During Arcing Period in an SF6 Auto-Expansion Circuit Breaker

    ZHANG Junmin; LU Chunrong; GUAN Yonggang; LIU Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The nozzle ablation process is described as two phases of heat and ablation in the interruption for an SF6 circuit breaker in this paper.Their mathematical models are established with the Fourier heat conduction differential equation respectively.The masses of nozzle ablation with different arc durations and arc currents are calculated through the model of the nozzle ablation combined with an MHD (magneto-hydrodynamic) arc model.The time of the temperature rise on the inner surface of the nozzle under a given energy flux and of reaching the pyrolysis temperature under different energy fluxes is respectively analyzed.The relations between the mass of nozzle ablation and breaking current and arc duration are obtained.The result shows that the absorbing energy process before the nozzle ablation can be neglected under the condition of the energy flux entering into nozzle q > 109 W/m2.The ablation is the severest during the high-current phase and the ablation mass increases rapidly with the breaking current and with arc duration respectively.

  19. Femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials in the optical breakdown regime: Expansion of a transparent shell

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Siegel, J., E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Solis, J. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    Phase transition pathways of matter upon ablation with ultrashort laser pulses have been considered to be understood long-since for metals and semiconductors. We provide evidence that also certain dielectrics follow the same pathway, even at high pulse energies triggering optical breakdown. Employing femtosecond microscopy, we observe a characteristic ring pattern within the ablating region that dynamically changes for increasing time delays between pump and probe pulse. These transient Newton rings are related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer with the reflection at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Analysis of the ring structure shows that the ablation mechanism is initiated by a rarefaction wave leading within a few tens of picoseconds to the formation of a transparent thin shell of reduced density and refractive index, featuring optically sharp interfaces. The shell expands and eventually detaches from the solid material at delays of the order of 100 ps.

  20. Fundamental studies of pulsed laser ablation

    Claeyssens, F

    2001-01-01

    dopant) have resulted in a coherent view of the resulting plume, which exhibits a multi-component structure correlated with different regimes of ablation, which are attributed to ejection from ZnO and ablation from a Zn melt. OES measurements show that the emitting Zn component within the plume accelerates during expansion in vacuum - an observation attributable to the presence of hot, fast electrons in the plume. The same acceleration behaviour is observed in the case of Al atomic emissions resulting from ablation of an Al target in vacuum. Deposition conditions, substrate temperature and background gas pressure were all varied in a quest for optimally aligned, high quality ZnO thin films. Initial ab initio calculations were performed also, to aid in understanding the stability of these c-axis aligned films. The pulsed ultraviolet (lambda = 193, 248 nm) laser ablation of graphite, polycrystalline diamond and ZnO targets has been investigated. Characteristics of the resulting plumes of ablated material have b...

  1. Analyses of femtosecond laser ablation of Ti, Zr, Hf

    Grojo, D.; Hermann, J.; Bruneau, S; Itina, T

    2004-01-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation of Ti, Zr and Hf has been investigated by means of in-situ plasma diagnostics. Fast plasma imaging with the aid of an intensified charged coupled device (ICCD) camera was used to characterise the plasma plume expansion on a nanosecond time scale. Time- and spaceresolved optical emission spectroscopy was employed to perform time-of-flight measurements of ions and neutral atoms. It is shown that two plasma components with different expansion velocities are generated b...

  2. Endometrial ablation

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  3. Effect of ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of plasma plume formed by laser blow off of thin film

    George, Sony; Kumar, Ajai; Singh, R. K.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2010-03-01

    A study has been carried out to understand the influence of ambient gases on the dynamics of laser-blow-off plumes of multi-layered LiF-C thin film. Plume images at various time intervals ranging from 100 to 3000 ns have been recorded using an intensified CCD camera. Enhancement in the plume intensity and change in size and shape occurs on introducing ambient gases and these changes are highly dependent on the nature and composition of the ambient gas used. Velocity of the plume was found to be higher in helium ambient whereas intensity enhancement is greater in argon environment. The plume shapes have maximum size at 10-2 and 10-1 Torr of Ar and He pressures, respectively. As the background pressure increases further (>10-2 Torr: depending on the nature of gas), the plume gets compressed/focused in the lateral direction. Internal structure formation and turbulences are observed at higher pressures (>10-1 Torr) in both ambient gases.

  4. Pulsed laser ablation of solids basics, theory and applications

    Stafe, Mihai; Puscas, Niculae N

    2014-01-01

    The book introduces ‘the state of the art' of pulsed laser ablation and its applications. It is based on recent theoretical and experimental studies. The book reaches from the basics to advanced topics of pulsed laser ablation. Theoretical and experimental fundamental phenomena involved in pulsed laser ablation are discussed with respect to material properties, laser wavelength, fluence and intensity regime of the light absorbed linearly or non-linearly in the target material. The energy absorbed by the electrons leads to atom/molecule excitation, ionization and/or direct chemical bond breaking and is also transferred to the lattice leading to material heating and phase transitions. Experimental  non-invasive optical methods for analyzing these phenomena in real time are described. Theoretical models for pulsed laser ablation and phase transitions induced by laser beams and laser-vapour/plasma interaction during the plume expansion above the target are also presented. Calculations of the ablation speed and...

  5. Influence of laser energy density on the plasma expansion dynamics and film stoichiometry during laser ablation of BiSrCaCuO

    Gonzalo de los Reyes, José; Afonso, Carmen N.; Perriére, J.

    1996-01-01

    The plasma expansion dynamics and the composition of films deposited during laser ablation of BiSrCaCuO at laser energy densities in a broad interval (1-6 J/cm2) have been studied by means of spatially resolved real time optical emission spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering and nuclear reactive analysis, respectively. In vacuum, the velocity of the ejected species is found to increase as the energy density increases whereas the compositional and angular distribution of the deposited fil...

  6. Numerical study of the thermal ablation of wet solids by ultrashort laser pulses

    The ablation by ultrashort laser pulses at relatively low fluences (i.e., in the thermal regime) of solids wetted by a thin liquid film is studied using a generic numerical model. In comparison with dry targets, the liquid is found to significantly affect ablation by confining the solid and slowing down the expansion of the laser-heated material. These factors affect the relative efficiency of the various ablation mechanisms, leading, in particular, to the complete inhibition of phase explosion at lower fluences, a reduced ablation yield, and significant changes in the composition of the plume. As a consequence, at fluences above the ablation threshold, the size of the ejected nanoclusters is lower in presence of the liquid. Our results provide a qualitative understanding of the effect of wetting layers on the ablation process

  7. Desorption/ablation of lithium fluoride induced by extreme ultraviolet laser radiation

    Blejchař Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The availability of reliable modeling tools and input data required for the prediction of surface removal rate from the lithium fluoride targets irradiated by the intense photon beams is essential for many practical aspects. This study is motivated by the practical implementation of soft X-ray (SXR or extreme ultraviolet (XUV lasers for the pulsed ablation and thin film deposition. Specifically, it is focused on quantitative description of XUV laser-induced desorption/ablation from lithium fluoride, which is a reference large band-gap dielectric material with ionic crystalline structure. Computational framework was proposed and employed here for the reconstruction of plume expansion dynamics induced by the irradiation of lithium fluoride targets. The morphology of experimentally observed desorption/ablation craters were reproduced using idealized representation (two-zone approximation of the laser fluence profile. The calculation of desorption/ablation rate was performed using one-dimensional thermomechanic model (XUV-ABLATOR code taking into account laser heating and surface evaporation of the lithium fluoride target occurring on a nanosecond timescale. This step was followed by the application of two-dimensional hydrodynamic solver for description of laser-produced plasma plume expansion dynamics. The calculated plume lengths determined by numerical simulations were compared with a simple adiabatic expansion (blast-wave model.

  8. The effect of magnetic fields on the products of laser ablation

    Musaev, O. R.; Sutter, E. A.; Wrobel, J. M.; Kruger, M. B.

    2016-02-01

    Structures of gold nanoparticles were formed by laser ablation of bulk gold immersed in water. An excimer laser with a wavelength of 351 nm and a pulse energy of 7 mJ was used. Ablation was performed in two configurations: without and with an external 0.2 T magnetic field parallel to the ablation plume. Both configurations result in structures that include chains of aggregated nanoparticles, but to different degrees. Ablation in a magnetic field results in a higher fraction of spherical nanoparticles and shorter nanowires, compared to the nanowire networks formed in the absence of the field. This can be explained by magnetic confinement of the plasma during plume expansion. A model explaining nanowire formation and dependence on fluence and magnetic field is proposed.

  9. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  10. Laser Plasmas : Plasma dynamics from laser ablated solid lithium

    Debarati Bhattacharya

    2000-11-01

    Emission plasma plume generated by pulsed laser ablation of a lithium solid target by a ruby laser (694 nm, 20 ns, 3 J) was subjected to optical emission spectroscopy: time and space resolved optical emission was characterised as a function of distance from the target surface. Propagation of the plume was studied through ambient background of argon gas. Spectroscopic observations can, in general, be used to analyse plume structure with respect to an appropriate theoretical plasma model. The plume expansion dynamics in this case could be explained through a shock wave propagation model wherein, the experimental observations made were seen to fit well with the theoretical predictions. Spectral information derived from measurement of peak intensity and line width determined the parameters, electron temperature (e) and electron number density e, typically used to characterise laser produced plasma plume emission. These measurements were also used to validate the assumptions underlying the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model, invoked for the high density laser plasma under study. Some interesting results pertaining to the analysis of plume structure and spatio-temporal behaviour of e and e along the plume length will be presented and discussed.

  11. Plasma effects during ablation and drilling using pulsed solid-state lasers

    Breitling, Detlef; Ruf, Andreas; Berger, Peter W.; Dausinger, Friedrich H.; Klimentov, Sergei M.; Pivovarov, Paval A.; Kononenko, Taras V.; Konov, Vitali I.

    2003-09-01

    Plasma and vapor plumes generated by ultrashort laser pulses have been studied by various optical methods for both single pulse ablation as well as high-repetition rate drilling. Time-resolved shadow and resonance absorption photographs enable to determine the plume and vapor expansion behavior and, by means of an analytical shock wave model, allow to estimate an energy balance that can be refined by plasma transmission measurements. The results furthermore suggest that several types of laser-induced plasmas can be distinguished according to their origin: the material vapor plasma originating at the ablated surface even at moderate intensities, a breakdown plasma at increased power densities occurring in cold vapor or dust particles left from previous ablations during repetitively-pulsed processing and, finally, the optical breakdown in the pure atmosphere at high intensities. The latter also gives rise to nonlinear scattering phenomena resulting in a strong redistribution of the energy density in the beam profile.

  12. C9orf72 ablation causes immune dysregulation characterized by leukocyte expansion, autoantibody production, and glomerulonephropathy in mice.

    Atanasio, Amanda; Decman, Vilma; White, Derek; Ramos, Meg; Ikiz, Burcin; Lee, Hoi-Ching; Siao, Chia-Jen; Brydges, Susannah; LaRosa, Elizabeth; Bai, Yu; Fury, Wen; Burfeind, Patricia; Zamfirova, Ralica; Warshaw, Gregg; Orengo, Jamie; Oyejide, Adelekan; Fralish, Michael; Auerbach, Wojtek; Poueymirou, William; Freudenberg, Jan; Gong, Guochun; Zambrowicz, Brian; Valenzuela, David; Yancopoulos, George; Murphy, Andrew; Thurston, Gavin; Lai, Ka-Man Venus

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of a hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat in C9ORF72 is the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Both the function of C9ORF72 and the mechanism by which the repeat expansion drives neuropathology are unknown. To examine whether C9ORF72 haploinsufficiency induces neurological disease, we created a C9orf72-deficient mouse line. Null mice developed a robust immune phenotype characterized by myeloid expansion, T cell activation, and increased plasma cells. Mice also presented with elevated autoantibodies and evidence of immune-mediated glomerulonephropathy. Collectively, our data suggest that C9orf72 regulates immune homeostasis and an autoimmune response reminiscent of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) occurs in its absence. We further imply that haploinsufficiency is unlikely to be the causative factor in C9ALS/FTD pathology. PMID:26979938

  13. Plasma plume induced during pulsed laser deposition of hydroxyapatite

    Pulsed laser deposition is well-established method of deposition of thin films on different substrates. The particles ablated from a target owing to laser radiation-target interaction form a plasma plume and subsequently are deposited on a substrate. The mechanism of plasma formation and expansion consists of three stages. During the interaction of the laser beam with a material the target is heated to the temperatures exceeding the boiling temperatures and sometimes also the critical temperatures. The characteristic time of the target temperature rise is from 1 nanosecond in the case of dielectrics to some hundreds nanoseconds in the case of metals case of metals. In the same time the process of ablation begins. In the second stage the ablated particles are heated by the laser beam to the temperatures of 10-20 kK and form a plasma plume. The characteristic time of plasma heating is 10-100 nanoseconds. This process depends on the intensity of the laser beam and energy of quanta. Next the laser radiation decays (laser pulse duration FWHM ∼ 20-50 ns) and plasma plume expands adiabatically. In this work plasma plume induced by ArF excimer laser ablation of a hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) target during deposition process has been studied in different ambient conditions., i.e in air or water vapour with the addition of oxygen. Hydroxyapatite is a biocompatible ceramic. It may be deposited onto orthopedic implants in order to increase the bone-implant contact or over a porous titanium coating where it is used to promote bone ingrowth. The process of deposition significantly depends on mechanisms of plasma plume formation and its expansion. ArF laser operated at the wavelength of 193 nm with the pulse energy of 300 mJ and 20 ns pulse duration. The emission spectra of the plasma plume were registered with the use of a spectrograph and a fast gate, micro-channel plate (MCP) image intensifier optically coupled to an Andor CCD camera. The emission spectra consist mainly

  14. Laser ablation at the hydrodynamic regime

    Gojani Ardian B.

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation of several metals and PVC polymer by high energy nanosecond laser pulses is investigated experimentaly. Visualization by shadowgraphy revealed the dynamics of the discontinuities in ambient air and ablation plume above the target surface, while surface profiling allowed for determination of the ablated mass.

  15. Gated ICCD photography of the KrF-laser ablation of graphite into background gases

    Geohegan, D.B.; Puretzky, A.A.; Hettich, R.L.; Zheng, X.Y.; Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N.

    1993-07-01

    The interaction of a laser-generated ablation plume with a background gas is of current interest for several materials-fabrication applications. During pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films by laser ablation, for example, an ambient back ground gas (pressure usually {<=} 300 mTorr) is often employed. The dynamics of the KrF-laser ablation ({Phi} = 20 J cm{sup {minus}}) of graphite into 300 Torr of He, Ne, Ar, and Xe has been studied by fast imaging of the visible plasma emission using a gated intensified CCD array (ICCD) camera system. In each case, the soot which was redeposited on the graphite rod following ablation was highly fullerene deficient compared to the material collected on a sample disk 1.5 cm from the rod, as determined by laser desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (FTMS). The ICCD photographic investigations of the plasma plume propagation in the different gases reveal three common phases to the expansions: (1) forward motion, deceleration and stopping of the leading edge of the plume, (2) an apparent reflected shock within the plume which propagates backward and partially reflects from the rod surface, leaving ``redeposited`` material, (3) a secondary forward propagation and coalescence of the material reflected from the rod surface, resulting in continued expansion and dissipation of the plasma and the appearance of glowing ultrafine particles. Detailed sequencing of the plasma expansion into argon is presented here which shows at least two sets of reflected shocks. The possible explanation of the observed difference in fullerene content is discussed on the basis of different plasma phases resulting in soot deposition on the rod and disk.

  16. Spectral profile of atomic emission lines and effects of pulse duration on laser ablation in liquid

    The emission spectra of laser-ablated Cu atoms in water were examined, focusing on the irradiation-pulse duration effects. Spectral line profile was observed for the pulse duration of 19, 90, and 150 ns at various delay times. The line width as narrow as instrumental width was obtained by 150-ns pulse at the delay time of 800 ns. Also, long pulses result in high intensity of the emission. The spectral feature obtained by long pulses looks similar to that obtained in a gas phase. The absorption of the later part of the long pulse directly by the plume having been formed by the earlier part of the pulse may be the cause of this gas-phase-like emission. Whether the pulse heats directly the surface or the plume was investigated by the measurements of the removal volume of the ablation pit obtained by laser confocal scanning microscopy and the maximum bubble expansion size observed by shadowgraphy.

  17. High excitation of the species in nitrogen–aluminum plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance microwave discharge of N2 gas and pulsed laser ablation of Al target

    A reactive nitrogen–aluminum plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge of N2 gas and pulsed laser ablation of an Al target is characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The vibrational and rotational temperatures of N2 species are determined by spectral simulation. The generated plasma strongly emits radiation from a variety of excited species including ambient nitrogen and ablated aluminum and exhibits unique features in optical emission and temperature evolution compared with the plasmas generated by a pure ECR discharge or by the expansion of the ablation plume. The working N2 gas is first excited by ECR discharge and the excitation of nitrogen is further enhanced due to the fast expansion of the aluminum plume induced by target ablation, while the excitation of the ablated aluminum is prolonged during the plume expansion in the ECR nitrogen plasma, resulting in the formation of strongly reactive nitrogen–aluminum plasma which contains highly excited species with high vibrational and rotational temperatures. The enhanced intensities and the prolonged duration of the optical emissions of the combined plasma would provide an improved analytical capability for spectrochemical analysis. - Highlights: • ECR discharge and pulsed laser ablation generate highly excited ECR–PLA plasma. • The expansion of PLA plasma results in excitation enhancement of ECR plasma species. • The ECR plasma leads to excitation prolongation of PLA plasma species. • The ECR–PLA plasma emits strong emissions from a variety of excited species. • The ECR–PLA plasma maintains high vibrational–rotational temperatures for a long time

  18. Laser-solid interaction and dynamics of the laser-ablated materials

    Rapid transformations through the liquid and vapor phases induced by laser-solid interactions are described by the authors' thermal model with the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to determine the vaporization temperature under different surface pressure condition. Hydrodynamic behavior of the vapor during and after ablation is described by gas dynamic equations. These two models are coupled. Modeling results show that lower background pressure results lower laser energy density threshold for vaporization. The ablation rate and the amount of materials removed are proportional to the laser energy density above its threshold. The authors also demonstrate a dynamic source effect that accelerates the unsteady expansion of laser-ablated material in the direction perpendicular to the solid. A dynamic partial ionization effect is studied as well. A self-similar theory shows that the maximum expansion velocity is proportional to csα, where 1 - α is the slope of the velocity profile. Numerical hydrodynamic modeling is in good agreement with the theory. With these effects, α is reduced. Therefore, the expansion front velocity is significantly higher than that from conventional models. The results are consistent with experiments. They further study how the plume propagates in high background gas condition. Under appropriate conditions, the plume is slowed down, separates with the background, is backward moving, and hits the solid surface. Then, it splits into two parts when it rebounds from the surface. The results from the modeling will be compared with experimental observations where possible

  19. Plume radiation

    Dirscherl, R.

    1993-06-01

    The electromagnetic radiation originating from the exhaust plume of tactical missile motors is of outstanding importance for military system designers. Both missile- and countermeasure engineer rely on the knowledge of plume radiation properties, be it for guidance/interference control or for passive detection of adversary missiles. To allow access to plume radiation properties, they are characterized with respect to the radiation producing mechanisms like afterburning, its chemical constituents, and reactions as well as particle radiation. A classification of plume spectral emissivity regions is given due to the constraints imposed by available sensor technology and atmospheric propagation windows. Additionally assessment methods are presented that allow a common and general grouping of rocket motor properties into various categories. These methods describe state of the art experimental evaluation techniques as well as calculation codes that are most commonly used by developers of NATO countries. Dominant aspects influencing plume radiation are discussed and a standardized test technique is proposed for the assessment of plume radiation properties that include prediction procedures. These recommendations on terminology and assessment methods should be common to all employers of plume radiation. Special emphasis is put on the omnipresent need for self-protection by the passive detection of plume radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectral band.

  20. [INVITED] Control of femtosecond pulsed laser ablation and deposition by temporal pulse shaping

    Garrelie, Florence; Bourquard, Florent; Loir, Anne--Sophie; Donnet, Christophe; Colombier, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-01

    This study explores the effects of temporal laser pulse shaping on femtosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The potential of laser pulses temporally tailored on ultrafast time scales is used to control the expansion and the excitation degree of ablation products including atomic species and nanoparticles. The ablation plume generated by temporally shaped femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of aluminum and graphite targets is studied by in situ optical diagnostic methods. Taking advantage of automated pulse shaping techniques, an adaptive procedure based on spectroscopic feedback regulates the irradiance for the enhancement of typical plasma features. Thin films elaborated by unshaped femtosecond laser pulses and by optimized sequence indicate that the nanoparticles generation efficiency is strongly influenced by the temporal shaping of the laser irradiation. The ablation processes leading either to the generation of the nanoparticles either to the formation of plasma can be favored by using a temporal shaping of the laser pulse. Insights are given on the possibility to control the quantity of the nanoparticles. The temporal laser pulse shaping is shown also to strongly modify the laser-induced plasma contents and kinetics for graphite ablation. Temporal pulse shaping proves its capability to reduce the number of slow radicals while increasing the proportion of monomers, with the addition of ionized species in front of the plume. This modification of the composition and kinetics of plumes in graphite ablation using temporal laser pulse shaping is discussed in terms of modification of the structural properties of deposited Diamond-Like Carbon films (DLC). This gives rise to a better understanding of the growth processes involved in femtosecond-PLD and picosecond-PLD of DLC suggesting the importance of neutral C atoms, which are responsible for the subplantation process.

  1. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  2. Investigating the Response and Expansion of Plasma Plumes in a Mesosonic Plasma Using the Situational Awareness Sensor Suite for the ISS (SASSI)

    Gilchrist, Brian E.; Hoegy, W. R.; Krause, L. Habash; Minow, J. I.; Coffey, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    To study the complex interactions between the space environment surrounding the International Space Station (ISS) and the ISS space vehicle, we are exploring a specialized suite of plasma sensors, manipulated by the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to probe the near-ISS mesosonic plasma ionosphere moving past the ISS. It is proposed that SASSI consists of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Thermal Ion Capped Hemispherical Spectrometer (TICHS), Thermal Electron Capped Hemispherical Spectrometer (TECHS), Charge Analyzer Responsive to Local Oscillations (CARLO), the Collimated PhotoElectron Gun (CPEG), and the University of Michigan Advanced Langmuir Probe (ALP). There are multiple expected applications for SASSI. Here, we will discuss the study of fundamental plasma physics questions associated with how an emitted plasma plume (such as from the ISS Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU)) responds and expands in a mesosonic magnetoplasma as well as emit and collect current. The ISS PCU Xe plasma plume drifts through the ionosphere and across the Earth's magnetic field, resulting in complex dynamics. This is of practical and theoretical interest pertaining to contamination concerns (e.g. energetic ion scattering) and the ability to collect and emit current between the spacecraft and the ambient plasma ionosphere. This impacts, for example, predictions of electrodynamic tether current performance using plasma contactors as well as decisions about placing high-energy electric propulsion thrusters on ISS. We will discuss the required measurements and connection to proposed instruments for this study.

  3. Role of ambient gas and laser fluence in governing the dynamics of the plasma plumes produced by laser blow off of LiF-C thin film

    Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai; Patel, B. G.; Subramanian, K. P.

    2007-05-01

    The time- and space-resolved emission profiles of Li mathsize="8pt">I and Li mathsize="8pt">II emission lines from the laser-blow-off plumes of a multilayered LiF-C thin film have been studied using spectroscopic technique. The evolution features were analyzed in different ambient environments ranging from high vacuum to 3mbars of argon pressures and at various fluences of the ablating laser. During the evolution of the plume, a transition region was found to exist between 4 and 6mm. Here, the plume dynamics changed from free expansion to collisional regime, where the plume experienced viscous force of the medium. The enhancement observed in neutral lines, in comparison with ionic lines, is explained in terms of the yield difference in electron impact excitation and ionization processes. Substantial difference in the arrival time distribution of the plume species was observed for Li mathsize="8pt">I and Li mathsize="8pt">II lines at high ambient pressures. Three expansion models are invoked to explain the evolution of the plume in different ambient conditions. The laser fluence was found to control the ratio of ions and neutrals.

  4. Doping He droplets by laser ablation with a pulsed supersonic jet source

    Katzy, R.; Singer, M.; Izadnia, S.; LaForge, A. C., E-mail: aaron.laforge@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Stienkemeier, F. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Laser ablation offers the possibility to study a rich number of atoms, molecules, and clusters in the gas phase. By attaching laser ablated materials to helium nanodroplets, one can gain highly resolved spectra of isolated species in a cold, weakly perturbed system. Here, we present a new setup for doping pulsed helium nanodroplet beams by means of laser ablation. In comparison to more well-established techniques using a continuous nozzle, pulsed nozzles show significant differences in the doping efficiency depending on certain experimental parameters (e.g., position of the ablation plume with respect to the droplet formation, nozzle design, and expansion conditions). In particular, we demonstrate that when the ablation region overlaps with the droplet formation region, one also creates a supersonic beam of helium atoms seeded with the sample material. The processes are characterized using a surface ionization detector. The overall doping signal is compared to that of conventional oven cell doping showing very similar dependence on helium stagnation conditions, indicating a comparable doping process. Finally, the ablated material was spectroscopically studied via laser induced fluorescence.

  5. Doping He droplets by laser ablation with a pulsed supersonic jet source

    Laser ablation offers the possibility to study a rich number of atoms, molecules, and clusters in the gas phase. By attaching laser ablated materials to helium nanodroplets, one can gain highly resolved spectra of isolated species in a cold, weakly perturbed system. Here, we present a new setup for doping pulsed helium nanodroplet beams by means of laser ablation. In comparison to more well-established techniques using a continuous nozzle, pulsed nozzles show significant differences in the doping efficiency depending on certain experimental parameters (e.g., position of the ablation plume with respect to the droplet formation, nozzle design, and expansion conditions). In particular, we demonstrate that when the ablation region overlaps with the droplet formation region, one also creates a supersonic beam of helium atoms seeded with the sample material. The processes are characterized using a surface ionization detector. The overall doping signal is compared to that of conventional oven cell doping showing very similar dependence on helium stagnation conditions, indicating a comparable doping process. Finally, the ablated material was spectroscopically studied via laser induced fluorescence

  6. Optical emission spectroscopic studies on laser ablated TiO2 plasma

    Optical emission spectroscopic investigations of the plasma produced during Nd:YAG laser ablation of sintered TiO2 targets, in oxygen and argon gas environments are reported. The spatial variations of electron temperature (Te) and electron number density (Ne) are studied. The effect of oxygen/argon pressure on electron temperature (Te) and electron number density (Ne) is presented. The kinematics of the emitted particles and expansion of plume edge are discussed. Spatio-temporal variations of various species in TiO2 plasma were recorded and corresponding velocities were calculated. The effect of oxygen pressure on intensity of neutral/ion species and their corresponding velocities is also reported.

  7. Femtosecond ultraviolet laser ablation of silver and comparison with nanosecond ablation

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Doggett, B.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.;

    2013-01-01

    The ablation plume dynamics arising from ablation of silver with a 500 fs, 248 nm laser at ~2 J cm-2 has been studied using angle-resolved Langmuir ion probe and thin film deposition techniques. For the same laser fluence, the time-of-flight ion signals from femtosecond and nanosecond laser...

  8. Hybrid simulation of shock formation for super-Alfvénic expansion of laser ablated debris through an ambient, magnetized plasma

    Two-dimensional hybrid simulations of perpendicular collisionless shocks are modeled after potential laboratory conditions that are attainable in the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California, Los Angeles Basic Plasma Science Facility. The kJ class 1053 nm Nd:Glass Raptor laser will be used to ablate carbon targets in the LAPD with on-target energies of 100-500 J. The ablated debris ions will expand into ambient, partially ionized hydrogen or helium. A parameter study is performed via hybrid simulation to determine possible conditions that could lead to shock formation in future LAPD experiments. Simulation results are presented along with a comparison to an analytical coupling parameter

  9. Influence of surrounding gas, composition and pressure on plasma plume dynamics of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced aluminum plasmas

    Dawood, Mahmoud S.; Hamdan, Ahmad; Margot, Joëlle

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we present a comprehensive study of the plume dynamics of plasmas generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target. The effect of both ambient gas composition (helium, nitrogen or argon) and pressure (from ˜5 × 10-7 Torr up to atmosphere) is studied. The time- and space- resolved observation of the plasma plume are performed from spectrally integrated images using an intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD) camera. The iCCD images show that the ambient gas does not significantly influence the plume as long as the gas pressure is lower than 20 Torr and the time delay below 300 ns. However, for pressures higher than 20 Torr, the effect of the ambient gas becomes important, the shortest plasma plume length being observed when the gas mass species is highest. On the other hand, space- and time- resolved emission spectroscopy of aluminum ions at λ = 281.6 nm are used to determine the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) profiles. The effect of the ambient gas on the TOF profiles and therefore on the propagation velocity of Al ions is discussed. A correlation between the plasma plume expansion velocity deduced from the iCCD images and that estimated from the TOF profiles is presented. The observed differences are attributed mainly to the different physical mechanisms governing the two diagnostic techniques.

  10. Femtosecond ultraviolet laser ablation of silver and comparison with nanosecond ablation

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Doggett, B.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    The ablation plume dynamics arising from ablation of silver with a 500 fs, 248 nm laser at ~2 J cm-2 has been studied using angle-resolved Langmuir ion probe and thin film deposition techniques. For the same laser fluence, the time-of-flight ion signals from femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation are similar; both show a singly peaked time-of-flight distribution. The angular distribution of ion emission and the deposition are well described by the adiabatic and isentropic model of plume ex...

  11. Spatial investigations of ion and electron time of flight in laser ablated ZnO plasma

    Joshy, N. V.; Jayaraj, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    The time of flight (TOF) spectra of ions and electrons of laser ablated ZnO:Ga plasma plume were recorded. The laser fluence was varied from 2.55 Jcm-2 to 17.85 Jcm-2 and the ablation was carried out in vacuum and N2O ambient pressure ranging from 0.0001 mbar to 0.1 mbar. The TOF spectra were recorded at positions 10 mm to 50 mm from the target surface along the direction normal to the surface. Ion acceleration and corresponding electron deceleration were detected in the plasma due to the formation of electric double layer during plasma expansion. Twin peaks were recorded in the ion TOF spectra-corresponding to accelerated and thermal ions, while two categories of thermal electrons were detected in electron TOF spectra. The behaviour of these ions and electrons is studied as a function of laser fluence, ambient gas pressure and distance from the target surface.

  12. Spatial investigations of ion and electron time of flight in laser ablated ZnO plasma

    The time of flight (TOF) spectra of ions and electrons of laser ablated ZnO:Ga plasma plume were recorded. The laser fluence was varied from 2.55 Jcm-2 to 17.85 Jcm-2 and the ablation was carried out in vacuum and N2O ambient pressure ranging from 0.0001 mbar to 0.1 mbar. The TOF spectra were recorded at positions 10 mm to 50 mm from the target surface along the direction normal to the surface. Ion acceleration and corresponding electron deceleration were detected in the plasma due to the formation of electric double layer during plasma expansion. Twin peaks were recorded in the ion TOF spectra-corresponding to accelerated and thermal ions, while two categories of thermal electrons were detected in electron TOF spectra. The behaviour of these ions and electrons is studied as a function of laser fluence, ambient gas pressure and distance from the target surface.

  13. Optical Effects on Laser Ablated Polymer Surfaces

    Prabhu, R. D.; Govinthasamy, R.; Murthy, N. S.

    2006-03-01

    Laser ablation of poly (ethylene terephthalate) and polyimide films were investigated using Excimer-UV laser. SEM analyses indicate the presence of rings for a wide range of ablation parameters (fluence, frequency and number of pulses). It is proposed that the particles present in the plasma plume could cause the incident laser light to diffract, similar to the optical effects observed in the femtosecond laser ablation of solids. The polymer surface provides a perfect medium to register the optical signatures as seen in the SEM images. The fringe-spacings observed in the images are compared with the theoretical diffraction patterns and the height of the plasma particles above the surface is estimated using an optimization scheme. The results of the analysis are consistent with experimentally observed dynamics of the plasma plume. It is proposed that such optical effects could be a routine feature in the laser ablation of polymers. The significance of such artifacts for lithography is discussed.

  14. Identification of discontinuities in plasma plume evolution

    Gojani, Ardian B; Obayashi, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The ejection of material during laser ablation gives rise to the development of discontinuities in the ambient gas. Several of these discontinuities are observed and characterized, including externally and internally propagating shock waves, contact surface, and the ionization front. Qualitative experimental observations and analysis of these discontinuities is presented. Results from shadowgraphy enabled determination of an irradiance threshold between two different ablation mechanisms, and determination of several stages of plasma plume evolution. Consideration of the refractive index as a dynamic sum of the contributions from gas and electrons led to separate identification of ionization front from the contact surface. Furthermore, ionization front was observed to lead the shock wave at the earlier stage of the ablation.

  15. Ablative and fractional ablative lasers.

    Brightman, Lori A; Brauer, Jeremy A; Anolik, Robert; Weiss, Elliot; Karen, Julie; Chapas, Anne; Hale, Elizabeth; Bernstein, Leonard; Geronemus, Roy G

    2009-10-01

    The field of nonsurgical laser resurfacing for aesthetic enhancement continues to improve with new research and technological advances. Since its beginnings in the 1980s, the laser-resurfacing industry has produced a multitude of devices employing ablative, nonablative, and fractional ablative technologies. The three approaches largely differ in their method of thermal damage, weighing degrees of efficacy, downtime, and side effect profiles against each other. Nonablative technologies generate some interest, although only for those patient populations seeking mild improvements. Fractional technologies, however, have gained dramatic ground on fully ablative resurfacing. Fractional laser resurfacing, while exhibiting results that fall just short of the ideal outcomes of fully ablative treatments, is an increasingly attractive alternative because of its far more favorable side effect profile, reduced recovery time, and significant clinical outcome. PMID:19850197

  16. High-order harmonic generation in carbon-nanotube-containing plasma plumes

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) in carbon-nanotube (CNT)-containing plasma plumes has been demonstrated. Various targets were ablated to produce the plasma plumes containing nanotubes for the HHG in these media. Harmonics up to the 29th order were generated. Odd and even harmonics were generated using a two-color pump. The integrity of CNTs within the plasma plume, indicating nanotubes as the source of high-order harmonics, was confirmed by structural studies of plasma debris.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of cluster distribution from femtosecond laser ablation in aluminum

    Sonntag, S.; Trichet Paredes, C.; Roth, J.; Trebin, H.-R.

    2011-08-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation and plume evolution of aluminum is investigated for various inhomogeneous laser pulses. For the simulations of the atoms the molecular dynamics code IMD is used. The ablated gas-phase is scanned by a cluster algorithm (DBSCAN), from which we gain a cluster size distribution of the ablated material. Per single pulse, only a small portion of the total volume evaporates into the gas phase. Therefore—to have reasonable statistics—we have to deal with huge samples (6×107 atoms). The ablation threshold is determined by comparing the depth of the holes to the applied fluence. Angular and velocity distributions of the plume are compared to experiments.

  18. Effect of ambient air pressure on debris redeposition during laser ablation of glass

    The effect of ambient air pressure on the redeposition of debris, ablated from the zinc borosilicate glass target using 6 ns, 266 nm laser pulses, has been studied for incident fluences of 3-18 J/cm2. Measurements were carried out in air at pressures ranging from 10-750 Torr. Scanning electron microscopy and optical microscope observations of the target surface were made to analyze the morphology of the redeposited debris. It was found that for higher values of the laser fluence and ambient pressure, the target surface is extremely rough, with large pieces of molten glass and debris fragments deposited near and around the ablation site. The profile of the redeposited debris also shows signs of a strong shock-wave-cleaning effect and possibly a Rayleigh-Taylor instability at higher pressures. Contrary to this, under low-pressure environment the surface of the redeposited debris is cleaner and smoother, with minimal damage around the ablated crater. The measured radius of the debris field was found to be proportional to the inverse cube root of the ambient pressure, consistent with the stagnation distance of the expansion plume when energy balance with the displaced air is considered. In addition to this, the mass of the redeposited debris was estimated from the measured optical thickness of the film and compared to the ablated mass. In the range below 100 Torr, both the mass of the redeposited debris and the percentage of the ablated mass which was redeposited were found to increase with the increasing fluence and the ambient air pressure

  19. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    Russo, Richard E., E-mail: rerusso@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Applied Spectra, Inc., 46661 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Bol' shakov, Alexander A. [Applied Spectra, Inc., 46661 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Mao Xianglei [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McKay, Christopher P. [NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method - LAMIS - can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  20. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  1. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm‑1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility

  2. Energy distribution of ions produced by laser ablation of silver in vacuum

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela

    2013-01-01

    The ion energy in a silver ablation plume for fluence in the range of 0.6–2.4Jcm−2, typical for a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) experiment has been investigated. In this fluence range the ion fraction of the ablated particles becomes gradually dominant and can be utilized to characterize the...

  3. Ablation of lung tumours

    Gillams, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Radiofrequency, laser, microwave and cryotherapy have all been used for the ablation of lung tumours. However, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation are the most widely used technologies. RFA has been successfully applied to tumour measuring from

  4. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  5. Sulfur chemistry in a copper smelter plume

    Eatough, D.J.; Christensen, J.J.; Hill, M.W.; Major, T.D.; Mangelson, N.F.; Post, M.E.; Ryder, J.F.; Hansen, L.D.

    Sulfur transformation chemistry was studied in the plume of the Utah smelter of Kennecott Copper Corporation from April to October 1977. Samples were taken at up to four locations from 4 to 60 km from the stacks. Data collected at each station included: SO/sub 2/ concentration, low-volume collected total particulate matter, high-volume collected size fractionated particulate matter, wind velocity and direction, temperature, and relative humidity.The SO/sub 2/(g)-sulfate conversion process in the plume is described by a mechanism which is first order in SO/sub 2/(g). Equations are derived describing sulfur chemistry when both S(IV) and sulfate formation occur in a plume. The formation of sulfate results primarily in the formation of <0.5 ..mu..m particulates. The formation process is not correlated with plume expansion, particulate acidity, metal content, or S(IV) species. Due to meteorological restrictions on sampling, data were collected only during periods of maximum insolation. The formation of sulfate from SO/sub 2/(g) in the plume during periods of high insolation is temperature dependent with an apparent activation energy of 16.6 +/- 1.4 kcal mol/sup -1/ and k/sub 1/ value of 0.039 h/sup -1/ at 25/sup 0/C.

  6. Plasma plume length characterization

    Sarron, Vanessa; Robert, Éric; Fontane, Jérôme; Darny, Thibault; Riès, Delphine; Dozias, Sébastien; Joly, Laurent; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, neon and helium plume length, generated by a plasma gun (PG) are studied. The combination of ICCD imaging, Schlieren visualization and Pitot glass probe allow to characterize the strong influence of the plasma on rare gas flow. Beyond the shifting of the transition from laminar to turbulent, a plasma induced channeling of turbulent flow is achieved. Finally, the benefit of using a capillary for plasma propagation before in-air expansion is evidenced through the generation of lo...

  7. Plume splitting in pico-second laser-material interaction under the influence of shock wave

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study the physics of plume splitting in pico-second laser material interaction in background gas. The velocity distribution shows a clear split into two distinctive components. Detailed atom trajectory track reveals the behavior of atoms within the peaks and uncovers the mechanisms of peak formation. The observed plume velocity splitting emerges from two distinguished parts of the plume. The front peak of the plume is from the faster moving atoms and smaller particles during laser-material ablation. This region experiences strong constraint from the ambient gas and has substantial velocity attenuation. The second (rear) peak of the plume velocity originates from the larger and slower clusters in laser-material ablation. These larger clusters/particles experience very little constraint from the background, but are affected by the relaxation dynamics of plume and appear almost as a standing wave during the evolution. Density splitting only appears at the beginning of laser-material ablation and quickly disappears due to spread-out of the slower moving clusters. It is found that higher ambient pressure and stronger laser fluence favor earlier plume splitting.

  8. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Giannina Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  9. Dynamics expansion of laser produced plasma with different materials in magnetic field

    Rabia Qindeel; Noriah Bte Bidin; Yaacob Mat daud [Laser Technology Laboratory, Physics Department, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai 81310, Johor (Malaysia)], E-mail: plasmaqindeel@yahoo.com

    2008-12-01

    The dynamics expansion of the plasma generated by laser ablation of different materials has been investigated. The dynamics and confinement of laser generated plasma plumes are expanding across variable magnetic fields. A Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser with 1064 nm, 8 ns pulse width and 0.125 J laser energy was used to generate plasma that was allowed to expand across variable magnetic within 0.1 - 0.8 T. The expansions of laser-produced plasma of different materials are characterized by using constant laser power. CCD video camera was used to visualize and record the activities in the focal region. The plasma plume length, width and area were measured by using Matrox Inpector 2.1 and video Test 0.5 software. Spectrums of plasma beam from different materials are studied via spectrometer. The results show that the plasma generated by aluminum target is the largest than Brass and copper. The optical radiation from laser generated plasma beam spectrums are obtained in the range of UV to visible light.

  10. Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator

    The Airborne Radiation Monitoring System (ARMS) monitors air or ground radioactive contamination. The contamination source can be a radioactive plume or an area contaminated with radionuclides. The system is based on two major parts, an airborne unit carried by a helicopter and a ground station carried by a truck. The system enables real time measurement and analysis of radioactive plumes as well as post flight processing. The Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator purpose is to create a virtual space where the trained operators experience full radiation field conditions, without real radiation hazard. The ARMS is based on a flying platform and hence the simulator allows a significant reduction of flight time costs

  11. Chemistry in aircraft plumes

    Kraabol, A.G.; Stordal, F.; Knudsen, S. [Norwegian Inst. for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Konopka, P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    An expanding plume model with chemistry has been used to study the chemical conversion of NO{sub x} to reservoir species in aircraft plumes. The heterogeneous conversion of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} to HNO{sub 3}(s) has been investigated when the emissions take place during night-time. The plume from an B747 has been simulated. During a ten-hour calculation the most important reservoir species was HNO{sub 3} for emissions at noon. The heterogeneous reactions had little impact on the chemical loss of NO{sub x} to reservoir species for emissions at night. (author) 4 refs.

  12. Laser-induced back-ablation of aluminum thin films using picosecond laser pulses

    BULLOCK, A B

    1999-05-26

    Experiments were performed to understand laser-induced back-ablation of Al film targets with picosecond laser pulses. Al films deposited on the back surface of BK-7 substrates are ablated by picosecond laser pulses propagating into the Al film through the substrate. The ablated Al plume is transversely probed by a time-delayed, two-color sub-picoseond (500 fs) pulse, and this probe is then used to produce self-referencing interferograms and shadowgraphs of the Al plume in flight. Optical emission from the Al target due to LIBA is directed into a time-integrated grating spectrometer, and a time-integrating CCD camera records images of the Al plume emission. Ablated Al plumes are also redeposited on to receiving substrates. A post-experimental study of the Al target and recollected deposit characteristics was also done using optical microscopy, interferometry, and profilometry. In this high laser intensity regime, laser-induced substrate ionization and damage strongly limits transmitted laser fluence through the substrate above a threshold fluence. The threshold fluence for this ionization-based transmission limit in the substrate is dependent on the duration of the incident pulse. The substrate ionization can be used as a dynamic control of both transmitted spatial pulse profile and ablated Al plume shape. The efficiency of laser energy transfer between the laser pulse incident on the Al film and the ablated Al plume is estimated to be of order 5% and is a weak function of laser pulsewidth. The Al plume is highly directed. Low plume divergence ({theta}{sub divergence} < 5{sup o}) shows the ablated plume temperature to be very low at long time delays ( T << 0.5 eV at delays of 255 ns). Spectroscopic observations and calculations indicate that, in early time (t < 100 ps), the Al film region near the substrate/metal interface is at temperatures of order 0.5 eV. Interferograms of Al plumes produced with 0.1 {micro}m films show these plumes to be of high neutral atom

  13. Forced plume characteristics

    CRAPPER, P. F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of turbulent forced plumes generated by the steady release of mass, momentum and buoyancy from a finite source in a uniform environment. The entrainment coefficient assumption has been made; however a variable coefficient has been used so that the characteristics of the transition from jet to plume behaviour can be presented more clearly. A modified Boussinesq approximation has been made which corrects for the effect of density variations in the mass and ...

  14. Plumes - The Standard Model

    Anderson, Don L.

    1991-01-01

    1. The asthenosphere (=upper=convecting≡ depleted mantle≡ MORB source≡ DM ≡ primitive mantle - continental crust) represents the shallowest, sublithospheric mantle. 2. Enriched basalts must originate elsewhere. 3. The Continental Lithosphere (CL) is an ancient enriched reservoir where CFB originate or get contaminated by "plumes" coming from deeper. The CL is easily delaminated, replaced, displaced or depleted by plumes, extension or compression. 4. CL contaminates the So. A...

  15. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs

  16. Experiments and Theory of Ablation Plasma Ion Implantation

    Gilgenbach, R. M.; Qi, B.; Lau, Y. Y.; Johnston, M. D.; Doll, G. L.; Lazarides, A.

    2000-10-01

    Research is underway to accelerate laser ablation plume ions for implantation into substrates. Ablation plasma ion implantation (APII) biases the deposition substrate to a large negative voltage. APII has the advantages of direct acceleration and implantation of ions from metals or any other solid targets. This process is environmentally friendly because it avoids the use of toxic gaseous precursors. Initial experiments are directed towards the implantation of iron ions into silicon substrates at negative voltages from 2-10 kV. A KrF laser ablates iron targets at pulse energies up to 600 mJ and typical repetition rates of 10 Hz. Parameters which can be varied include laser fluence, relative timing of laser and high voltage pulse, and target-to-substrate distance. Spectroscopic diagnostics yield Fe plasma plume electron temperatures up to about 10 eV. Analysis of films will compare surface morphology, hardness and adhesion between deposited Vs accelerated-implanted plumes. A simple one dimensional theory is developed [1] to calculate the implanted ion current, extracted from the ion matrix sheath, as a function of time for various substrate-plume separations. This model accurately recovers Lieberman's classic results when the plume front is initially in contact with the substrate. [1] B. Qi, Y. Y. Lau, and R. M. Gilgenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. (to be published). * This research is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  17. High-speed photography of laser ablation plasmas from the high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    The luminous plume formed by laser ablation of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ has been investigated using high-speed framing photography. Variation of the background oxygen pressure was found to significantly influence the velocity distribution of the ablated species, leading in particular to shock wave formation and instabilities on the shock front at higher pressures. Spectral characteristics of the plume were studied using optical interference filters, and two distinct regions of emission were identified. (orig.)

  18. Emerging Local Ablation Techniques

    Stone, Michael J.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-01-01

    Local ablation technologies for hepatic malignancy have developed rapidly in the past decade, with advances in several percutaneous or externally delivered treatment methods including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound. Research has focused on increasing the size of the ablation zone and minimizing heat-sink effects. More recent developments include improvements in treatment planning and navigation with integration of several ima...

  19. Studies of ablation pressure, ablative acceleration and ablative implosions

    Time and space resolved X-ray spectroscopy have been used to measure ablation rate and ablation pressure on plane targets irradiated by the first and second harmonics of Nd glass laser light. Streaked X-ray shadowgraphy has been applied to the study of ablatively imploded spherical shell targets uniformly irradiated by six 1.05 μm laser beams. The results give a direct measurement of shell acceleration and thus of ablation pressure and show evidence of fluid instability increasing as the shell ratio is varied from 10 to 100. A direct determination of implosion core density is also obtained. (author)

  20. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  1. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Holloway, Brian C; Eklund, Peter C; Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C; Shinn, Michelle

    2012-11-27

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  2. Unsteady turbulent buoyant plumes

    Woodhouse, Mark J; Hogg, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    We model the unsteady evolution of turbulent buoyant plumes following temporal changes to the source conditions. The integral model is derived from radial integration of the governing equations expressing the conservation of mass, axial momentum and buoyancy. The non-uniform radial profiles of the axial velocity and density deficit in the plume are explicitly described by shape factors in the integral equations; the commonly-assumed top-hat profiles lead to shape factors equal to unity. The resultant model is hyperbolic when the momentum shape factor, determined from the radial profile of the mean axial velocity, differs from unity. The solutions of the model when source conditions are maintained at constant values retain the form of the well-established steady plume solutions. We demonstrate that the inclusion of a momentum shape factor that differs from unity leads to a well-posed integral model. Therefore, our model does not exhibit the mathematical pathologies that appear in previously proposed unsteady i...

  3. STEREOSCOPIC POLAR PLUME RECONSTRUCTIONS FROM STEREO/SECCHI IMAGES

    We present stereoscopic reconstructions of the location and inclination of polar plumes of two data sets based on the two simultaneously recorded images taken by the EUVI telescopes in the SECCHI instrument package onboard the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory spacecraft. The 10 plumes investigated show a superradial expansion in the coronal hole in three dimensions (3D) which is consistent with the two-dimensional results. Their deviations from the local meridian planes are rather small with an average of 6.047. By comparing the reconstructed plumes with a dipole field with its axis along the solar rotation axis, it is found that plumes are inclined more horizontally than the dipole field. The lower the latitude is, the larger is the deviation from the dipole field. The relationship between plumes and bright points has been investigated and they are not always associated. For the first data set, based on the 3D height of plumes and the electron density derived from SUMER/SOHO Si VIII line pair, we found that electron densities along the plumes decrease with height above the solar surface. The temperature obtained from the density scale height is 1.6-1.8 times larger than the temperature obtained from Mg IX line ratios. We attribute this discrepancy to a deviation of the electron and the ion temperatures. Finally, we have found that the outflow speeds studied in the O VI line in the plumes corrected by the angle between the line of sight and the plume orientation are quite small with a maximum of 10 km s-1. It is unlikely that plumes are a dominant contributor to the fast solar wind.

  4. Evidence for mantle plumes?

    Anderson, Don L; Natland, James H

    2007-11-22

    Geophysical hotspots have been attributed to partially molten asthenosphere, fertile blobs, small-scale convection and upwellings driven by core heat. Most are short-lived or too close together to be deeply seated, and do not have anomalous heat flow or temperature; many are related to tectonic features. Bourdon et al. investigate the dynamics of mantle plumes from uranium-series geochemistry and interpret their results as evidence for thermal plumes. Here we show why alternative mechanisms of upwelling and melting should be considered. PMID:18033248

  5. A study of particle generation during laser ablation withapplications

    Liu, Chunyi

    2005-08-12

    A study has been made of the generation of particles during laser ablation and has included size distribution measurements and observation of the formation processes. The particle size distribution with respect to different laser parameters was obtained in-line using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and a particle counter. The experimental results show that the particle size varies with laser energy, laser pulsewidth, ambient gas flow rate and sample properties. The results serve as a basis for controlling the size of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to study mass ejection processes and mechanisms. At higher laser irradiance, some particles were ejected in the liquid and even in the solid phase. Time-resolved images show the propagation of the shockwaves: external shockwaves propagate outward and decelerate, and internal shockwaves reflect back and forth between the gas contact surface and the sample surface. The internal shockwave is proposed to cause the ejection of liquid particles when the internal shockwave strikes the liquid molten layer. A simulation based on vapor plume expansion was carried out and provides satisfactory agreement with experimental results. Different material properties result in different particle ejection behavior:particle ejection for most materials including metals result in a conically shaped envelope for the ejected material while ejection for silicon resembles a liquid jet. The difference in density change when the materials melt was proposed to be an important factor in the different ejection behavior. The characteristics of particles generated by laser ablation have a strong influence on the chemical analysis of the irradiated sample. Large particles are more difficult to completely vaporize and ionize, and induced preferential vaporization causes fractionation (i.e. a detected chemical composition that differs from the sample material). Large particles also result in spikes in

  6. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  7. Improving operational plume forecasts

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-04-01

    Forecasting how plumes of particles, such as radioactive particles from a nuclear disaster, will be transported and dispersed in the atmosphere is an important but computationally challenging task. During the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan, operational plume forecasts were produced each day, but as the emissions continued, previous emissions were not included in the simulations used for forecasts because it became impractical to rerun the simulations each day from the beginning of the accident. Draxler and Rolph examine whether it is possible to improve plume simulation speed and flexibility as conditions and input data change. The authors use a method known as a transfer coefficient matrix approach that allows them to simulate many radionuclides using only a few generic species for the computation. Their simulations work faster by dividing the computation into separate independent segments in such a way that the most computationally time consuming pieces of the calculation need to be done only once. This makes it possible to provide real-time operational plume forecasts by continuously updating the previous simulations as new data become available. They tested their method using data from the Fukushima incident to show that it performed well. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, doi:10.1029/2011JD017205, 2012)

  8. PLUME and research sotware

    Baudin, Veronique; Gomez-Diaz, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    The PLUME open platform (https://www.projet-plume.org) has as first goal to share competences and to value the knowledge of software experts within the French higher education and research communities. The project proposes in its platform the access to more than 380 index cards describing useful and economic software for this community, with open access to everybody. The second goal of PLUME focuses on to improve the visibility of software produced by research laboratories within the higher education and research communities. The "development-ESR" index cards briefly describe the main features of the software, including references to research publications associated to it. The platform counts more than 300 cards describing research software, where 89 cards have an English version. In this talk we describe the theme classification and the taxonomy of the index cards and the evolution with new themes added to the project. We will also focus on the organisation of PLUME as an open project and its interests in the promotion of free/open source software from and for research, contributing to the creation of a community of shared knowledge.

  9. Basic ablation phenomena during laser thrombolysis

    Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Shearin, Alan; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents studies of microsecond ablation phenomena that take place during laser thrombolysis. The main goals were to optimize laser parameters for efficient ablation, and to investigate the ablation mechanism. Gelatin containing an absorbing dye was used as the clot model. A parametric study was performed to identify the optimal wavelength, spot size, pulse energies, and repetition rate for maximum material removal. The minimum radiant exposures to achieve ablation at any wavelength were measured. The results suggest that most visible wavelengths were equally efficient at removing material at radiant exposures above threshold. Ablation was initiated at surface temperatures just above 100 degrees Celsius. A vapor bubble was formed during ablation. Less than 5% of the total pulse energy is coupled into the bubble energy. A large part of the delivered energy is unaccounted for and is likely released partly as acoustic transients from the vapor expansion and partly wasted as heat. The current laser and delivery systems may not be able to completely remove large clot burden that is sometimes encountered in heart attacks. However, laser thrombolysis may emerge as a favored treatment for strokes where the occlusion is generally smaller and rapid recanalization is of paramount importance. A final hypothesis is that laser thrombolysis should be done at radiant exposures close to threshold to minimize any damaging effects of the bubble dynamics on the vessel wall.

  10. Dynamics of Molecular Emission Features from Nanosecond, Femtosecond Laser and Filament Ablation Plasmas

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-06-15

    The evolutionary paths of molecular species and nanoparticles in laser ablation plumes are not well understood due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that occur simultaneously in a transient laser-plasma system. It is well known that the emission features of ions, atoms, molecules and nanoparticles in a laser ablation plume strongly depend on the laser irradiation conditions. In this letter we report the temporal emission features of AlO molecules in plasmas generated using a nanosecond laser, a femtosecond laser and filaments generated from a femtosecond laser. Our results show that, at a fixed laser energy, the persistence of AlO is found to be highest and lowest in ns and filament laser plasmas respectively while molecular species are formed at early times for both ultrashort pulse (fs and filament) generated plasmas. Analysis of the AlO emission band features show that the vibrational temperature of AlO decays rapidly in filament assisted laser ablation plumes.

  11. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Pena-Diaz, M; Ponce, L; Arronte, M; Flores, T [Laboratorio TecnologIa Laser, CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Ind. Altamira, 89600, TAMPS (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  12. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained

  13. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  14. Thermal expansion

    Thermal expansion of fuel pellet is an important property which limits the lifetime of the fuels in reactors, because it affects both the pellet and cladding mechanical interaction and the gap conductivity. By fitting a number of available measured data, recommended equations have been presented and successfully used to estimate thermal expansion coefficient of the nuclear fuel pellet. However, due to large scatter of the measured data, non-consensus data have been omitted in formulating the equations. Also, the equation is strongly governed by the lack of appropriate experimental data. For those reasons, it is important to develop theoretical methodologies to better describe thermal expansion behaviour of nuclear fuel. In particular, first-principles and molecular dynamics simulations have been certainly contributed to predict reliable thermal expansion without fitting the measured data. Furthermore, the two theoretical techniques have improved on understanding the change of fuel dimension by describing the atomic-scale processes associated with lattice expansion in the fuels. (author)

  15. In situ Diagnostics During Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    1999-01-01

    The preliminary results of spectral analysis of the reaction zone during the carbon nanotube production by laser ablation method indicate synergetic dependence on dual laser setup. The emission spectra recorded from different regions of the laser ablated plume at different delay times from the laser pulses are used to map the temperatures of C2 and C3. These are compared with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectra also obtained during production to model the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. Experiments conducted to correlate the spectral features with nanotube yields as a function of different production parameters will be discussed.

  16. High resolution selective multilayer laser processing by nanosecond laser ablation of metal nanoparticle films

    Ablation of gold nanoparticle films on polymer was explored using a nanosecond pulsed laser, with the goal to achieve feature size reduction and functionality not amenable with inkjet printing. The ablation threshold fluence for the unsintered nanoparticle deposit was at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the bulk film. This could be explained by the combined effects of melting temperature depression, lower conductive heat transfer loss, strong absorption of the incident laser beam, and the relatively weak bonding between nanoparticles. The ablation physics were verified by the nanoparticle sintering characterization, ablation threshold measurement, time resolved ablation plume shadowgraphs, analysis of ablation ejecta, and the measurement and calculation of optical properties. High resolution and clean feature fabrication with small energy and selective multilayer processing are demonstrated

  17. Chemical plume source localization.

    Pang, Shuo; Farrell, Jay A

    2006-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating a likelihood map for the location of the source of a chemical plume using an autonomous vehicle as a sensor probe in a fluid flow. The fluid flow is assumed to have a high Reynolds number. Therefore, the dispersion of the chemical is dominated by turbulence, resulting in an intermittent chemical signal. The vehicle is capable of detecting above-threshold chemical concentration and sensing the fluid flow velocity at the vehicle location. This paper reviews instances of biological plume tracing and reviews previous strategies for a vehicle-based plume tracing. The main contribution is a new source-likelihood mapping approach based on Bayesian inference methods. Using this Bayesian methodology, the source-likelihood map is propagated through time and updated in response to both detection and nondetection events. Examples are included that use data from in-water testing to compare the mapping approach derived herein with the map derived using a previously existing technique. PMID:17036813

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of cluster distribution from femtosecond laser ablation in aluminum

    Sonntag, S.; Trichet Paredes, C.; Roth, J.; Trebin, H.R. [University of Stuttgart, Institute for Theoretical and Applied Physics, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Femtosecond laser ablation and plume evolution of aluminum is investigated for various inhomogeneous laser pulses. For the simulations of the atoms the molecular dynamics code IMD is used. The ablated gas-phase is scanned by a cluster algorithm (DBSCAN), from which we gain a cluster size distribution of the ablated material. Per single pulse, only a small portion of the total volume evaporates into the gas phase. Therefore - to have reasonable statistics - we have to deal with huge samples (6 x 10{sup 7} atoms). The ablation threshold is determined by comparing the depth of the holes to the applied fluence. Angular and velocity distributions of the plume are compared to experiments. (orig.)

  19. Stereoscopic Polar Plume Reconstructions from Stereo/Secchi Images

    Feng, L; Solanki, S K; Wilhelm, K; Wiegelmann, T; Podlipnik, B; Howard, R A; Plunkett, S P; Wuelser, J P; Gan, W Q; 10.1088/0004-637X/700/1/292

    2009-01-01

    We present stereoscopic reconstructions of the location and inclination of polar plumes of two data sets based on the two simultaneously recorded images taken by the EUVI telescopes in the SECCHI instrument package onboard the \\emph{STEREO (Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory)} spacecraft. The ten plumes investigated show a superradial expansion in the coronal hole in 3D which is consistent with the 2D results. Their deviations from the local meridian planes are rather small with an average of $6.47^{\\circ}$. By comparing the reconstructed plumes with a dipole field with its axis along the solar rotation axis, it is found that plumes are inclined more horizontally than the dipole field. The lower the latitude is, the larger is the deviation from the dipole field. The relationship between plumes and bright points has been investigated and they are not always associated. For the first data set, based on the 3D height of plumes and the electron density derived from SUMER/\\emph{SOHO} Si {\\sc viii} line pair, ...

  20. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  1. Morphology and growth mechanism of WOx films prepared by laser ablation of W in different atmospheres

    Ossi, P. M.; Bailini, A.; Geszti, O.; Radnóczi, G.

    2008-09-01

    Nanostructured tungsten oxide, WOx films were prepared by ablating a metallic target in helium, argon and dry air as buffer gases at fixed pressure, laser fluence and target-substrate distance. The obtained samples were observed by transmission and high-resolution electron microscopy. The morphologies and structures of the films are discussed and compared to the predictions of a model that interprets cluster growth in an expanding ablation plume as a function of process parameters.

  2. Predicting cooling tower plume dispersion

    An assessment of the effects of visible cooling tower plumes on the local environment can be a necessary part of any proposal for a new large industrial process. Predictions of the dispersion of plumes from cooling towers are based on methods developed for chimney emissions. However, the kinds of criteria used to judge the acceptability of cooling tower plumes are different from those used for stack plumes. The frequency of long elevated plumes and the frequency of ground fogging are the two main issues. It is shown that events associated with significant plumes visibility are dependent both on the operating characteristics of the tower and on the occurrence of certain meteorological conditions. The dependence on atmospheric conditions is shown to be fairly complex and simple performance criteria based on the exit conditions from the tower are not sufficient for assessments. (author)

  3. Control of laser-ablation plasma potential with external electrodes

    The potential of a laser-ablation plasma was controlled stably up to +2 kV by using external ring electrodes. A stable electron sheath was formed between the plasma and the external electrodes by placing the ring electrodes away from the boundary of the drifting plasma. The plasma kept the potential for a few μs regardless of the flux change of the ablation plasma. We also found that the plasma potential changed with the expansion angle of the plasma from the target. By changing the distance between the plasma boundary and the external electrodes, we succeeded in controlling the potential of laser-ablation plasma

  4. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume...

  5. Terrestrial Plume Impingement Testbed Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Masten Space Systems proposes to create a terrestrial plume impingement testbed for generating novel datasets for extraterrestrial robotic missions. This testbed...

  6. Observations of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    We present a 26 day time series (October 2010) of physical properties (volume flux, flow velocity, expansion rate) of a vigorous deep-sea hydrothermal plume measured using our Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS), which is connected to the Northeast Pacific Time Series Underwater Experiment Canada Cabled Observatory at the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. COVIS quantitatively monitors the initial buoyant rise of the plume from ˜5 m to ˜15 m above the vents. The time series exhibits temporal variations of the plume vertical volume flux (1.93-5.09 m3/s ), centerline vertical velocity component (0.11-0.24 m/s ) and expansion rate (0.082-0.21 m/m ); these variations have major spectral peaks at semidiurnal (˜2 cycle/day) and inertial oscillation (˜1.5 cycle/day) frequencies. The plume expansion rate (average ˜0.14 m/m ) is inversely proportional to the plume centerline vertical velocity component (coefficient of determination R2˜0.5). This inverse proportionality, as well as the semidiurnal frequency, indicates interaction between the plume and ambient ocean currents consistent with an entrainment of ambient seawater that increases with the magnitude of ambient currents. The inertial oscillations observed in the time series provide evidence for the influence of surface storms on the dynamics of hydrothermal plumes.

  7. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation. PMID:27050331

  8. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  9. Optical time of flight studies of lithium plasma in double pulse laser ablation: Evidence of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption

    The early stage of formation of lithium plasma in a collinear—double pulse laser ablation mode has been studied using optical time of flight (OTOF) spectroscopy as a function of inter-pulse delay time, the distance from the target surface and the fluence of the ablation lasers. The experimental TOF measurements were carried out for lithium neutral (670.8 nm and 610.3 nm), and ionic (548.4 nm and 478.8 nm) lines. These experimental observations have been compared with that for single pulse laser ablation mode. It is found that depending on the fluence and laser pulse shape of the first pre-ablation laser and the second main ablation laser, the plasma plume formation and its characteristic features can be described in terms of plume-plume or laser-plume interaction processes. Moreover, the enhancement in the intensity of Li neutral and ionic lines is observed when the laser-plume interaction is the dominant process. Here, we see the evidence of the role of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption process in the initial stage of formation of lithium plasma in this case

  10. Time-integrated photography of laser-induced plasma plumes

    Proyer, S.; Stangl, E. [Johannes Keppler Univ., Linz (Austria). Angewandte Phys.

    1995-06-01

    The shape of the plasma plume induced by KrF-laser irradiation of Y-Ba-Cu-O, Cu-O, and Cu targets in O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} atmosphere was investigated by time-integrated photography. The dependence on laser fluence, spot size, and pressure of the ambient gas was studied. Special emphasis was put on the ablation of YBCO in O{sub 2} atmosphere under experimental conditions that are typical for thin-film deposition. (orig.) 27 refs.

  11. In-Situ Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation

    Arepalli, Sivaram; DeBoer, Gary; Scott, Darl D.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation involves emission and laser induced fluorescence (LIP) data obtained during carbon nanotube production by double pulse laser oven method. Recent LIP data of nickel indicate longer decay (of the order of few milliseconds) of nickel atomic vapor. This contrasts with less than a millisecond decays of C2 and C3 observed in the plume. The possible role of nickel in the kinetics of carbon nanotube formation will be discussed. Evolution of the laser ablated plume is recorded as plume images which are correlated with the transient emission and LIP data

  12. Laser ablation principles and applications

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  13. Autocatalytic plume pinch-off

    Rogers, Michael C; Morris, Stephen W

    2010-01-01

    A localized source of buoyancy flux in a non-reactive fluid medium creates a plume. The flux can be provided by either heat, a compositional difference between the fluid comprising the plume and its surroundings, or a combination of both. For autocatalytic plumes produced by the iodate-arsenous acid reaction, however, buoyancy is produced along the entire reacting interface between the plume and its surroundings. Buoyancy production at the moving interface drives fluid motion, which in turn generates flow that advects the reaction front. As a consequence of this interplay between fluid flow and chemical reaction, autocatalytic plumes exhibit a rich dynamics during their ascent through the reactant medium. One of the more interesting dynamical features is the production of an accelerating vortical plume head that in certain cases pinches-off and detaches from the upwelling conduit. After pinch-off, a new plume head forms in the conduit below, and this can lead to multiple generations of plume heads for a singl...

  14. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis. PMID:20368458

  15. Dilution of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls.......The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls....

  16. Observation of the initial stage of the laser ablation

    The time and space resolved properties of laser ablated carbon particles were measured by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using Laser Plasma X-ray (LPX) as an X-ray source. The energy density of the irradiation laser on the sample was in the range of 0.5-20 J/cm2 and the time delay was varied between 0 and 120ns. The absorption spectra exhibits several peaks originated from level to level transitions and an intense broad absorption in the energy range of C-K edge. At a delay time of 120ns, the absorption peak of 1s → 2p transition of neutral carbon atom (C0), C-, C+ and C2+ ions were observed. The absorption peak from C0 is stronger as the probing position is closer to the sample surface and its intensity decreases rapidly with distance from the sample surface. The absorption peak C2+ ion was observed only at comparatively distant positions from surface. The maximum speed of highly charged ions are faster than that of neutral atoms and negative charged ions. The neutral atom and lower charged ions are emitted from the sample surface even after laser irradiation. The spatial distribution of the laser ablated particles in the localized helium gas environment were measured. In the helium gas environment, the ablation plume is depressed by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume. (author)

  17. Laser ablation laser induced fluorescence for sensitive detection of heavy metals in water

    Godwal, Yogesh

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy LIBS is a fast non-contact technique for the analysis of the elemental composition using spectral information of the emission from a laser-induced plasma. For the LIBS studies in this thesis the focus has been in using very low energy, microjoule pulses in order to give high spatial resolution and minimize the laser system requirements. This is a regime that we refer to as microLIBS. Under such conditions it is important to maximize the signal detected to give the lowest limit of detection LOD possible. One technique to improve the signal to noise ratios is by coupling LIBS with Laser Induced Fluorescence. This is a technique where the first pulse creates a vapor plume and the second pulse tuned to a resonant absorption line of the species of interest re-excites the plume. We term this technique as Laser ablation Laser Induced Fluorescence LA-LIF. We have been investigating the performance of LA-LIF at low pulse energies (≤ 1 mJ for both pulses) for the detection of elemental contaminants in water. This technique allows reasonable performance compared to high energy single-pulse LIBS, but at a much reduced total energy expenditure. This allows LODs in the parts per billion range ppb range which typically cannot be obtained with low energy single pulse probing of the systems. This approach or exceeds the sensitivities which can be obtained with many shots using much larger energy systems. In this thesis we investigated the performance of LIBS at low pulse energies for the detection of Pb as a contaminant in water. An LOD of 70 ppb was obtained for an accumulation of 100 shots with the ablation laser pulse energy of 250 muJ and an excitation laser pulse energy of 8 muJ. A systematic study of the detector conditions was made for the system for the detection of Pb. Scaling laws for the LOD in terms of the pump and probe energies were measured and also the effect of detector gain, the gate delay and the gate width were studied. In

  18. Plume rise from multiple sources

    A simple enhancement factor for plume rise from multiple sources is proposed and tested against plume-rise observations. For bent-over buoyant plumes, this results in the recommendation that multiple-source rise be calculated as [(N + S)/(1 + S)]/sup 1/3/ times the single-source rise, Δh1, where N is the number of sources and S = 6 (total width of source configuration/N/sup 1/3/ Δh1)/sup 3/2/. For calm conditions a crude but simple method is suggested for predicting the height of plume merger and subsequent behavior which is based on the geometry and velocity variations of a single buoyant plume. Finally, it is suggested that large clusters of buoyant sources might occasionally give rise to concentrated vortices either within the source configuration or just downwind of it

  19. Study of the ablation of extra-low temperature aggregate target and the development of technology of formation of non-equilibrium high-quality functional thin films by the plume control; Gokuteion gyoshutai target no abureshon oyobi purumu seigyo ni yoru hiheiko kohinshitsu kinosei usumaku seisei gijutsu kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    A study was made on factors of the formation of high-quality thin films in the pulse laser deposition (PLD) method, a synthesis method of high-grade functional material thin films. In the experiment, plume current measurements using Cu target were conducted for the control of electric and magnetic fields. Especially, the measuring evaluation was made of the two-dimensional distribution including not only the central part of the substrate placed opposite to the target, but the periphery of the substrate. As a result, the following was found out. The distribution of charged particles in the plume is different in positive charge and negative charge, and the negative charge is dispersed/distributed more widely. Accelerating/decelerating effects of charged particles by the electric field are saturated when the bias voltage absolute value is approximately 100V. Ionization is promoted by giving the magnetic field, and the plume distribution is expanded. Positive charged particles of the plume in the magnetic field are decelerated. In the distribution control by giving the electric field, it is effective to think improvement of the distribution not by attracting charged particles by the electric field, but by shutting out charged particles of the same polarity. 29 refs., 75 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Laser ablation in a liquid-confined environment using a nanosecond laser pulse

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Lee, Ho; Welch, Ashley J.

    2008-04-01

    Laser ablation of aluminum metal with 1ns, 800nm pulse at low radiant exposures was investigated in air (dry) and water (wet) environments. Compared to dry ablation, an approximately eight times increase in material removal rate was associated with wet ablation. Based on optical reflectance and scanning electron microscope images, bubble formation/collapse was responsible for augmented acoustic pressure and ablation performance. Numerically simulated temperature distributions during wet ablation were consistent with the occurrence of explosive water vaporization near the critical temperature of water. Strong pressure emission during liquid vaporization and jet formation can account for enhanced ablation process. Radial expansion of bubbles minimized the redeposition of debris, leading to improvements in energy coupling to the target and ablation performance.

  1. Laser ablation in a liquid-confined environment using a nanosecond laser pulse

    Laser ablation of aluminum metal with 1 ns, 800 nm pulse at low radiant exposures was investigated in air (dry) and water (wet) environments. Compared to dry ablation, an approximately eight times increase in material removal rate was associated with wet ablation. Based on optical reflectance and scanning electron microscope images, bubble formation/collapse was responsible for augmented acoustic pressure and ablation performance. Numerically simulated temperature distributions during wet ablation were consistent with the occurrence of explosive water vaporization near the critical temperature of water. Strong pressure emission during liquid vaporization and jet formation can account for enhanced ablation process. Radial expansion of bubbles minimized the redeposition of debris, leading to improvements in energy coupling to the target and ablation performance

  2. Pulsed IR laser ablation of organic polymers in air: shielding effects and plasma pipe formation

    Panchenko, A N; Shulepov, M A; Tel' minov, A E [Institute of High-Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Zakharov, L A; Bulgakova, N M [Institute of Thermophysics SB RAS, 1 prosp. Lavrentyev, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Paletsky, A A, E-mail: nbul@itp.nsc.ru [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion SB RAS, 3 Institutskaya St., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-28

    We report the effect of 'plasma pipe' formation on pulsed laser ablation of organic polymers in air under normal conditions. Ablation of polymers (PMMA, polyimide) is carried out in a wide range of CO{sub 2} laser fluences with special attention to plasma formation in the ablation products. Evolution of laser ablation plumes in air under different pressures is investigated with simultaneous registration of radiation spectra of the ablation products. An analysis based on thermo-chemical modelling is performed to elucidate the effects of laser light attenuation upon ablation, including plasma and chemical processes in a near-target space. The analysis has shown that the experimental observations of plume development in air can be explained by a combination of processes including formation of a pre-ionized channel along the laser beam propagation, laser-supported detonation wave and effective combustion of the polymer ablation products. A scenario of a streamer-like polymer plasma flow within an air plasma pipe created via laser-induced breakdown is proposed.

  3. Plume rise predictions

    Anyone involved with diffusion calculations becomes well aware of the strong dependence of maximum ground concentrations on the effective stack height, h/sub e/. For most conditions chi/sub max/ is approximately proportional to h/sub e/-2, as has been recognized at least since 1936 (Bosanquet and Pearson). Making allowance for the gradual decrease in the ratio of vertical to lateral diffusion at increasing heights, the exponent is slightly larger, say chi/sub max/ approximately h/sub e/-2.3. In inversion breakup fumigation, the exponent is somewhat smaller; very crudely, chi/sub max/ approximately h/sub e/-1.5. In any case, for an elevated emission the dependence of chi/sub max/ on h/sub e/ is substantial. It is postulated that a really clever ignorant theoretician can disguise his ignorance with dimensionless constants. For most sources the effective stack height is considerably larger than the actual source height, h/sub s/. For instance, for power plants with no downwash problems, h/sub e/ is more than twice h/sub s/ whenever the wind is less than 10 m/sec, which is most of the time. This is unfortunate for anyone who has to predict ground concentrations, for he is likely to have to calculate the plume rise, Δh. Especially when using h/sub e/ = h/sub s/ + Δh instead of h/sub s/ may reduce chi/sub max/ by a factor of anywhere from 4 to infinity. Factors to be considered in making plume rise predictions are discussed

  4. Time-resolved diagnostics of excimer laser-generated ablation plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition

    Characteristics of laser plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films are examined with four in situ diagnostic techniques: Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, ion probe studies, and gated ICCD (intensified charge-coupled-device array) fast photography. These four techniques are complementary and permit simultaneous views of the transport of ions, excited states, ground state neutrals and ions, and hot particulates following KrF laser ablation of YBCO, BN, graphite and Si in vacuum and background gases. The implementation and advantages of the four techniques are first described in order to introduce the key features of laser plasmas for pulsed laser deposition. Aspects of the interaction of the ablation plume with background gases (i.e., thermalization, attenuation, shock formation) and the collision of the plasma plume with the substrate heater are then summarized. The techniques of fast ICCD photography and gated photon counting are then applied to investigate the temperature, velocity, and spatial distribution of hot particles generated during KrF ablation of YBCO, BN, Si and graphite. Finally, key features of fast imaging of the laser ablation of graphite into high pressure rare gases are presented in order to elucidate internal reflected shocks within the plume, redeposition of material on a surface, and formation of hot nanoparticles within the plume

  5. Ion time-of-flight study of laser ablation of silver in low pressure gases

    Hansen, T.N.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of ions from a laser-ablated silver target in low pressure background atmospheres have been investigated in a simple geometry using an electrical probe. A simple scattering picture for the first transmitted peak of the observed plume splitting has been used to calculate cross section...

  6. Radiofrequency ablation in dermatology

    Sachdeva Silonie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofreqeuency ablation is a versatile dermatosurgical procedure used for surgical management of skin lesions by using various forms of alternating current at an ultra high frequency. The major modalities in radiofrequency are electrosection, electrocoagulation, electrodessication and fulguration. The use of radiofrequency ablation in dermatosurgical practice has gained importance in recent years as it can be used to treat most of the skin lesions with ease in less time with clean surgical field due to adequate hemostasis and with minimal side effects and complications. This article focuses on the major tissue effects and factors influencing radiofrequency ablation and its application for various dermatological conditions.

  7. Liver tumor ablation

    Minimal-invasive techniques for ablation of primary and secondary hepatic tumors gain increasingly clinical importance. This is especially true since surgical resection and classic chemotherapy is successful only in a limited number of patients. Local ablative methods incorporate chemo- (percutaneous alcohol instillation, transarterial chemoembolization), thermo- (radiofrequency-, laser-, microwave-, cryoablation, high intensive focused ultrasound) and radio-ablative techniques (interstitial brachytherapy, selective internal radiotherapy). Regarding their implementation and specific effects these methods are varying widely, nevertheless all of them have a high therapeutical efficacy together with a low complication rate in common - correct application presumed. The knowledge on specific indications and contraindications is crucial to implement these methods into multimodality therapy concepts. (orig.)

  8. Microwave Ablation of Hepatic Malignancy

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Tim J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lee, Fred. T.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an extremely promising heat-based thermal ablation modality that has particular applicability in treating hepatic malignancies. Microwaves can generate very high temperatures in very short time periods, potentially leading to improved treatment efficiency and larger ablation zones. As the available technology continues to improve, microwave ablation is emerging as a valuable alternative to radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. This article rev...

  9. Rat liver regeneration following ablation with irreversible electroporation.

    Golberg, Alexander; Bruinsma, Bote G; Jaramillo, Maria; Yarmush, Martin L; Uygun, Basak E

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, irreversible electroporation (IRE) ablation has emerged as a promising tool for the treatment of multiple diseases including hepatic cancer. However, the mechanisms behind the tissue regeneration following IRE ablation have not been investigated. Our results indicate that IRE treatment immediately kills the cells at the treatment site preserving the extracellular architecture, in effect causing in vivo decellularization. Over the course of 4 weeks, progenitor cell differentiation, through YAP and notch pathways, together with hepatocyte expansion led to almost complete regeneration of the ablated liver leading to the formation of hepatocyte like cells at the ablated zone. We did not observe significant scarring or tumor formation at the regenerated areas 6 months post IRE. Our study suggests a new model to study the regeneration of liver when the naïve extracellular matrix is decellularized in vivo with completely preserved extracellular architecture. PMID:26819842

  10. Thermal plumes in ventilated rooms

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects. Free...... account and the temperature excess and the velocity distribution are calculated by use of an extrapolation method. In the case with a concentrated heat source (dia 50mm, 343W) and nearly uniform surroundings the model of a plume above a point heat source is verified. It represents a borderline case with...... than for a point heat source. The exact knowledge of the vertical temperature gradient is essential to predict the flow propagation due to its influence on the entrainment, e.g. in an integral method of plume calculation • Since the flow from different heated bodies is individual full...

  11. Time-resolved and integrated angular distributions of plume ions from silver at low and medium laser fluence

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Laser impact on metals in the UV regime results in a significant number of ablated plume ions even at moderate fluence (0.7–2.4 J/cm2). The ablated particles are largely neutrals at the lowest fluence, but the fraction of ions increases strongly with fluence. The ion flow in different directions...... with increasing fluence and can be well approximated by Anisimov’s model. Typically, the spectra of silver ions peak from 70 eV up to 145 eV in a direction close to the normal of the target surface with increasing fluence. With increasing observation angle, the time-of-flight spectra exhibit a peak at...... longer flight times, i.e., at a lower kinetic energy. At the highest fluence, the ionized fraction of the ablated particles in the plume increases up to 0.5....

  12. femtosecond laser ablation

    Margetic, Vanja

    2003-01-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation was investigated as a solid sampling method for elemental chemical analysis. In comparison to the sampling with longer laser pulses, two aspects could be improved by using ultrashort pulses: elimination of the elemental fractionation from the ablation crater, which is necessary for an accurate quantitative analysis, and better control of the material removal (especially for metals), which increases the spatial resolution of microanalysis. Basic aspects of ultrashort...

  13. Volcanic eruption plumes on Io

    The detection of an umbrella-shaped plume extending about 280 km above the bright limb of Io was one of the most important discoveries made during the Voyager 1 encounter with the jovian system. This discovery proves that Io is volcanically active at present, and the number and magnitude of these eruptions indicate that Io is the most volcanically active body so far discovered in the Solar System. Preliminary analyses of these eruptive plumes are presented. (U.K.)

  14. Emissivity of rocket plume particulates.

    Whisman, Curtis D.

    1992-01-01

    The optical properties of motor aluminum oxide are required inputs to current plume signature prediction codes, such as SIRRM. Accurate predictions are possible only if variations in the particle emissivity due to changes in particle size, contamination, and changing temperature, etc. , are known . This investigation demonstrated a simplified method for determination of the emissivity of rocket motor generated alumina. Plume particulate material was collected on ...

  15. Investigation of Balcony Plume Entrainment

    Liu, F.; Nielsen, Peter V.; Heiselberg, Per;

    2009-01-01

    An investigation on the scenarios of the spill plume and its equation was presented in this paper. The study includes two aspects, i.e., the small-scale experiment and the numerical simulation. Two balcony spill plume models are assessed by comparing with the FDS (Fire Dynamic Simulation) and small...... is independent of the fire location. The Investigations in this paper are useful for the fire engineers in designing smoke control systems....

  16. EUV ablation of organic polymers at a high fluence

    Chiara; Liberatore; Klaus; Mann; Matthias; Mller; Ladislav; Pina; Libor; Juha; Jorge; J.Rocca; Akira; Endo; Tomas; Mocek

    2014-01-01

    A preliminary investigation on short-wavelength ablation mechanisms of poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA) and poly(1,4-phenylene ether ether-sulfone)(PPEES) by extreme ultraviolet(EUV) radiation at 13.5 nm using a table-top laserproduced plasma from a gas-puff target at LLG(Gttingen) and at 46.9 nm by a 10 Hz desktop capillary discharge laser operated at the Institute of Physics(Prague) is presented.Ablation of polymer materials is initiated by photoinduced polymer chain scissions.The ablation occurs due to the formation of volatile products by the EUV radiolysis removed as an ablation plume from the irradiated material into the vacuum.In general,cross-linking of polymer molecules can compete with the chain decomposition.Both processes may influence the efficiency and quality of micro(nano)structuring in polymer materials.Wavelength is a critical parameter to be taken into account when an EUV ablation process occurs,because different wavelengths result in different energy densities in the near-surface region of the polymer exposed to nanosecond pulses of intense EUV radiation.

  17. Towards redistribution laser cooling of molecular gases: Production of candidate molecules SrH by laser ablation

    Simon, Philipp; Moroshkin, Peter; Weller, Lars; Sass, Anne; Weitz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Laser cooling by collisional redistribution of radiation has been successfully applied in the past for cooling dense atomic gases. Here we report on progress of work aiming at the demonstration of redistribution laser cooling in a molecular gas. The candidate molecule strontium monohydride is produced by laser ablation of strontium dihydride in a pressurized noble gas atmosphere. The composition of the ablation plasma plume is analyzed by measuring its emission spectrum. The dynamics of SrH m...

  18. Mapping Densities in Analogue Laboratory Turbulent Plumes Using Dye Concentration

    Fisher, M. A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Changing tephra concentration in volcanic eruption columns is difficult to measure in the field due to fluid opacity. The bulk fluid erupted may be higher density than the surrounding atmosphere at the vent and then transition to positive buoyancy through the ingestion and heating of ambient air; thus, the concentration of the plume fluid as it rises is critical to determining whether the material rises in a sustained plume or collapses into a pyroclastic density current. We evaluate the changing concentration of an analogue plume via tracer dye intensity and relate it to plume radius expansion and vent distance. To calibrate our concentration metric, we calculated the density and dye concentration of pre-determined tracer-water mixtures. The density of the solution was directly measured using a micropipette and high precision balance. The calculated density falls within the standard error of the measured density for each step. Five photographs were taken of each concentration using a mounted Ex-FH100 digital camera with identical lighting. Using a MATLAB script, the RGB (Red-Green-Blue) color value was extracted from five pixels located at the same coordinates in each image, confirming that there was no inherent error caused by the camera and that the RGB value was the same across an entire image. We created a color map to convert from the RGB color value of a pixel in an image to its corresponding concentration. This method algorithm can then be applied to an analogue volcanic tank model, using the color variations in the plume eddies to determine the tracer concentration, and thereby density distribution, in the plume.

  19. THE STRUCTURE AND ORIGIN OF SOLAR PLUMES: NETWORK PLUMES

    This study is based upon plumes seen close to the solar limb within coronal holes in the emission from ions formed in the temperature region of 1 MK, in particular, the band of Fe IX 171 A from EIT on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. It is shown, using geometric arguments, that two distinct classes of structure contribute to apparently similar plume observations. Quasi-cylindrical structures are anchored in discrete regions of the solar surface (beam plumes), and faint extended structures require integration along the line of sight (LOS) in order to reproduce the observed brightness. This second category, sometimes called 'curtains', are ubiquitous within the polar holes and are usually more abundant than the beam plumes, which depend more on the enhanced magnetic structures detected at their footpoints. It is here proposed that both phenomena are based on plasma structures in which emerging magnetic loops interact with ambient monopolar fields, involving reconnection. The important difference is in terms of physical scale. It is proposed that curtains are composed of a large number of microplumes, distributed along the LOS. The supergranule network provides the required spatial structure. It is shown by modeling that the observations can be reproduced if microplumes are concentrated within some 5 Mm of the cell boundaries. For this reason, we propose to call this second population 'network plumes'. The processes involved could represent a major contribution to the heating mechanism of the solar corona.

  20. Ground state C2 density measurement in carbon plume using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of C2 molecules produced by laser ablation of a graphite target is studied using optical emission spectroscopy, dynamic imaging and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) investigations. We observe peculiar bifurcation of carbon plume into two parts; stationary component close to the target surface and a component moving away from the target surface which splits further in two parts as the plume expands. The two distinct plumes are attributed to recombination of carbon species and formation of nanoparticles. The molecular carbon C2 moves with a faster velocity and dies out at ∼ 800 ns whereas the clusters of nanoparticle move with a slower velocity due to their higher mass and can be observed even after 1600 ns. C2 molecules in the d3Πg state were probed for laser-induced fluorescence during ablation of graphite using the Swan (0,0) band at 516.5 nm. The fluorescence spectrum and images of fluorescence d3Πg - a3Πu(0,1)(λ = 563.5 nm) are recorded using a spectrograph attached to the ICCD camera. To get absolute ground state C2 density from fluorescence images, the images are calibrated using complimentary absorption experiment. This study qualitatively helps to get optimum conditions for nanoparticle formation using the laser ablation of graphite target and hence deducing optimum conditions for thin film deposition.

  1. Tomographic reconstruction of polar plumes

    Auchère, F.; Guennou, C.; Barbey, N.

    2012-06-01

    We present a tomographic reconstruction of polar plumes as observed in the Extreme Ultraviolet in January 2010. Plumes are elusive structures visible in polar coronal holes that may play an important role in the acceleration of the solar wind. However, despite numerous observations, little is irrefutably known about them. Because of line of sight effects, even their geometry is subject to debate. Are they genuine cylindrical features of the corona or are they only chance alignments along the line of sight? Tomography provides a means to reconstruct the volume of an optically thin object from a set of observations taken from different vantage points. In the case of the Sun, these are typically obtained by using a solar rotation worth of images, which limits the ability to reconstruct short lived structures. We present here a tomographic inversion of the solar corona obtained using only 6 days of data. This is achieved by using simultaneously three space telescopes (EUVI/STEREO and SWAP/PROBA2) in a very specific orbital configuration. The result is the shortest possible tomographic snapshot of polar plumes. The 3D reconstruction shows both quasi-cylindrical plumes and a network pattern that can mimic them by line of sight superimpositions. This suggests that the controversy on plume geometry is due to the coexistence of both types of structures.

  2. Power Laser Ablation Symposia

    Phipps, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Laser ablation describes the interaction of intense optical fields with matter, in which atoms are selectively driven off by thermal or nonthermal mechanisms. The field of laser ablation physics is advancing so rapidly that its principal results are seen only in specialized journals and conferences. This is the first book that combines the most recent results in this rapidly advancing field with authoritative treatment of laser ablation and its applications, including the physics of high-power laser-matter interaction. Many practical applications exist, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to propulsion of aerostats for pollution monitoring to laser ignition of hypersonic engines to laser cleaning nanoscale contaminants in high-volume computer hard drive manufacture to direct observation of the electronic or dissociative states in atoms and molecules, to studying the properties of materials during 200kbar shocks developed in 200fs. Selecting topics which are representative of such a broad field is difficu...

  3. Towards redistribution laser cooling of molecular gases: Production of candidate molecules SrH by laser ablation

    Simon, Philipp; Weller, Lars; Sass, Anne; Weitz, Martin; 10.1117/12.2002379

    2013-01-01

    Laser cooling by collisional redistribution of radiation has been successfully applied in the past for cooling dense atomic gases. Here we report on progress of work aiming at the demonstration of redistribution laser cooling in a molecular gas. The candidate molecule strontium monohydride is produced by laser ablation of strontium dihydride in a pressurized noble gas atmosphere. The composition of the ablation plasma plume is analyzed by measuring its emission spectrum. The dynamics of SrH molecular density following the ablation laser pulse is studied as a function of the buffer gas pressure and the laser intensity.

  4. Laser ablation synthesis of zinc oxide clusters: a new family of fullerenes?

    Bulgakov, A V; Bulgakov, Alexander V.; Ozerov, Igor; Proxy, Wladimir Marine; ccsd-00000864, ccsd

    2003-01-01

    Positively charged zinc oxide clusters ZnnOm (up to n = 16, m <= n) of various stoichiometry were synthesized in the gas phase by excimer ArF laser ablation of a ZnO target and investigated using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Depending on ablation conditions, either metal rich or stoichiometric clusters dominate in the mass spectrum. When the irradiated target surface is fairly fresh, the most abundant clusters are metal rich with Zn(n+1)On and Zn(n+3)On being the major series. The stoichiometric clusters are observed with an etched ablated surface. The magic numbers at n = 9, 11 and 15 in mass spectra of (ZnO)n clusters indicate that the clusters have hollow spheroid structures related to fullerenes. A local abundance minimum at n = 13 provides an additional evidence for the presence in the ablation plume of fullerene-like (ZnO)n clusters.

  5. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.lippert@psi.ch [General Energy Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Döbeli, Max [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-10-28

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially {sup 18}O substituted La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  6. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially 18O substituted La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures

  7. Laser ablation characteristics of metallic materials: Role of Debye-Waller thermal parameter

    The interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a solid target results in the formation of a crater and a plasma plume. The characteristics of both depend on physical properties of target material, environmental conditions, and laser parameters (e.g. wavelength, pulse duration, energy, beam diameter) etc. It has been shown for numerous metals and their alloys that plasma threshold fluence, plasma threshold energy, ablation efficiency, ablation yield, angular distribution of laser produced plasma (LPP) ions, etc. are a unique function of the Debye-Waller thermal parameter B or the mean-square amplitude of atomic vibration of the target material for given experimental conditions. The FWHM of the angular distribution of LPP ions, ablation yield, and ablation efficiency increase whereas plasma threshold fluence and plasma threshold energy decrease as B-factor of the target material increases

  8. Analysis of laser ablation dynamics of CFRP in order to reduce heat affected zone

    Sato, Yuji; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Nariyama, Tatsuya; Nakai, Kazuki; Matsuoka, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Kenjiro; Masuno, Shinichiro; Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Nakano, Hitoshi

    2014-03-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced plastic [CFRP], which has high strength, light weight and weather resistance, is attractive material applied for automobile, aircraft and so on. The laser processing of CFRP is one of suitable way to machining tool. However, thermal affected zone was formed at the exposure part, since the heat conduction property of the matrix is different from that of carbon fiber. In this paper, we demonstrated that the CFRP plates were cut with UV nanosecond laser to reduce the heat affected zone. The ablation plume and ablation mass were investigated by laser microscope and ultra-high speed camera. Furthermore, the ablation model was constructed by energy balance, and it was confirmed that the ablation rate was 0.028 μg/ pulse in good agreement with the calculation value of 0.03 μg/ pulse.

  9. Thermal Plumes in Ventilated Rooms

    Kofoed, P.; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The main objective of ventilation is to provide good air quality for the occupants. For this purpose the necessary ventilating air change rate must be determined. Within displacement ventilation the estimation is closely related to the air flow rate in the thermal plumes when an air quality based...... design method is used. The vertical volume flux in a plume is influenced by many factors. Placement of the flow in relation to surrounding walls is one of them. This reduces the entrainment and is the subject of this article....

  10. Optical-vortex laser ablation

    Hamazaki, Junichi; Morita, Ryuji; Chujo, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Tanda, Satoshi; Omatsu, Takashige

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation of Ta plates using nanosecond optical vortex pulses was carried out, for the first time. It was suggested that owing to orbital angular momentum of optical vortex, clearer and smoother processed surfaces were obtained with less ablation threshold fluence, in comparison with the ablation by a nonvortex annular beam modified from a spatially Gaussian beam.

  11. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  12. FINAL REPORT. IMPROVED ANALYTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SOLID WASTE-FORMS BY FUNDAMENTAL DEVELOPMENT OF LASER ABLATION TECHNOLOGY

    Laser ablation can save the DOE millions of dollars in characterization costs. Chemical characterization represents a significant need within the DOE EM program in the areas of high-level waste, tanks, sub-surface contaminant plumes, D&D activities, spent nuclear fuel, mixed wast...

  13. Spark ablation device

    Schmidt-Ott, A.; Pfeiffer, T.V.

    2013-01-01

    A spark ablation device for generating nanoparticles comprising a spark generator; the spark generator comprising first and second electrodes, wherein the spark generator further comprises at least one power source which is arranged to be operative at a first energy level for maintaining a discharge

  14. Tumor ablations in IMRI

    Roberto Blanco Sequeiros

    2002-01-01

    @@ IntroductionMagnetic resonance imaging based guidance control and monitoring of minimally invasive intervention has developed from a hypothetical concept to a practical possibility. Magnetic-resonance-guided interstitial therapy in principle is defined as a treatment technique for ablating deepseated tumors in the human body.

  15. Thermal Plumes in Ventilated Rooms

    Kofoed, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Axisymmeric circular buoyant jets are treated both theoretically and experimentally. From a literature study the author concludes that the state of experimental knowledge is less satisfactory. Further three different measuring methods have been established to investigate the thermal plumes from pure sources of heat in ventilated rooms.

  16. Deposition of fibrous nanostructure by ultrafast laser ablation

    This research work demonstrated that laser-induced reverse transfer (LIRT) can be used for controllable site-specific deposition of fibrous nanostructure. The LIRT method makes it possible to generate and deposit the fibrous nanostructure of a wide variety of materials on a transparent acceptor in a single-step process at an ambient condition. The deposition of fibrous nanostructures was conducted using ultrafast laser ablation of silicon and aluminum targets placed behind a glass acceptor. Femtosecond laser pulses pass through the transparent acceptor and hit the bulk donor. Consequently a mass quantity of nanoparticles ablates from the donor and then aggregates and forms a porous fibrous nanostructure on the transparent acceptor. Our experiments demonstrated that the gap between the target and the glass acceptor was critical in the formation and accumulation of nanofibers and it determines the density of the formed nanostructure. The formation mechanism of the nanostructures can be explained by the well-established theory of vapor condensation within the plume induced by ultrafast laser ablation. Experimental results also show that the length of the nanostructure can be controlled by the gap between the target and glass acceptor. Lastly, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis shows the oxygen concentration in the nanofibrous structure which is associated with oxidation of ablated material at ambient atmosphere.

  17. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    Hammer, J.H.

    1993-08-10

    A method is described of generating power at a situs exposed to the solar wind which comprises creating at separate sources at the situs discrete plasma plumes extending in opposed directions, providing electrical communication between the plumes at their source and interposing a desired electrical load in the said electrical communication between the plumes.

  18. Ablation of hard dental tissues with an ArF-pulsed excimer laser

    Neev, Joseph; Raney, Daniel; Whalen, William E.; Fujishige, Jack T.; Ho, Peter D.; McGrann, John V.; Berns, Michael W.

    1991-06-01

    The interaction of 15 ns pulses from an ArF excimer laser with hard dental tissue was investigated for the purpose of obtaining practical information on the ablation process. Dark field fast photography utilizing an auxiliary, 15 ns Nd:Yag laser 'probe', was used to study the ablation plume dynamics as a function of time, luminescence were studied at different fluence levels and prr. Dentin ablation was found to be about four times as efficient as ablation of enamel in the higher fluence levels tested (> 10 J/cm2) and about twice as efficient as the ablation in the lower fluence regime (approximately equals 1 J/cm2). The dentin etch depth per pulse was found to increase exponentially with fluence (at least up to the tested level of 11 J/cm2), while in enamel the etch depth per pulse appears to increase logarithmically with fluence. Dentin ablation yields a larger, more dense plume which can be ejected (depending on the fluence level) to a height of several millimeters above the surface with observed ejection velocity in access of 1200 m/s. The dentin plume consisted of a relatively uniform particle size distribution (0.1 micrometers to 10 micrometers in diameter). Enamel ablation, on the other hand, yields a smaller observed ejection velocities (about 800 m/s), and a much smaller plume of fine particles (about 0.1 micrometers in diameter) and gases, confined to within 0.5 mm of the surface. In addition, an even smaller amount of highly non-uniform debris, (from ten to several hundred micrometers in size) is observed to be ejected to higher levels, and reach roughly half the height of the corresponding dentin plume for similar fluence levels. Although both dentin and enamel yield lower ablation efficiencies at 1 Hz, no significant difference is detected between the ablation efficiency at 5 Hz and ablation 10 Hz prr. Both materials remained within 20 degree(s)C of room temperature even at fluences as high as 20 J/cm2 and prr as high as 10 Hz for enamel and 20 Hz for

  19. Effects of the absorption coefficient on resonant infrared laser ablation of poly(ethylene glycol)

    We describe experiments on resonant infrared laser ablation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) at two different resonant excitation wavelengths and for different molecular weights of PEG. The two resonant wavelengths correspond to different stretching vibrations of the polymer and have absorption coefficients that differ by roughly an order of magnitude. Ablation via excitation of the O-H terminal group stretching mode at 2.94 μm, the weaker of the two absorptions, is delayed in time by several microseconds with respect to ablation at 3.47 μm, the more strongly absorbing C-H stretching mode of the polymer. Time-resolved plume shadowgraphs along with ablation rate measurements for the two modes reveal that the absorption coefficient strongly affects the physical characteristics of the ejecta and plume, as well as the time scale for material removal. Temperature-rise calculations demonstrate that phase explosion is likely the operative mechanism in ablation at the C-H mode, while normal boiling may play a role in material removal at the O-H mode

  20. Plasma plume photography and spectroscopy of Fe-Oxide materials

    Viskup, R. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser - Assisted Diagnostics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)], E-mail: Richard.Viskup@jku.at; Praher, B.; Stehrer, T.; Jasik, J. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser - Assisted Diagnostics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Wolfmeir, H.; Arenholz, E. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, A-4031 Linz (Austria); Pedarnig, J.D. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser - Assisted Diagnostics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)], E-mail: Johannes.Pedarnig@jku.at; Heitz, J. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser - Assisted Diagnostics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2009-03-01

    Time-resolved photography was employed to study plasma dynamics and particle ejection of laser-irradiated iron oxide materials. Nano-particle powder, pressed powder pellets and sintered ceramics were ablated in air and Ar gas background by means of short laser pulses (Nd:YAG laser wavelength {lambda} = 1064 nm and pulse duration {tau}{sub L} {approx} 6 ns; KrF laser {lambda} = 248 nm and {tau}{sub L} {approx} 20 ns). Plasma plume dynamics significantly depended on sample morphology. The ejection of non-luminous particles up to several hundreds of microseconds after the laser pulse was observed for powder and pressed powder target materials. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was employed for element analysis of iron oxide powders, pressed pellets and sintered ceramics. LIBS spectra of the different targets were comparable to each other and qualitatively independent of target morphology.

  1. Ion time-of-flight study of laser ablation of silver in low pressure gases

    Hansen, T.N.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    The dynamics of ions from a laser-ablated silver target in low pressure background atmospheres have been investigated in a simple geometry using an electrical probe. A simple scattering picture for the first transmitted peak of the observed plume splitting has been used to calculate cross section...... of the ablated silver ions in oxygen (sigma{O(2)} = 4.8 x 10(-16) cm(2)) and in argon (sigma{Ar} = 6.7 x 10(-16) cm(2)). The dynamics of the blast wave is well described by blast wave theory. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  2. Influence of oxygen pressure on the characteristics of the KrF-laser-induced plasma plume created above an YBaCuO superconducting target

    The laser-induced plasma plume created above an YBaCuO superconducting target by a KrF laser beam (248 nm) is investigated by time-resolved spectroscopy under an oxygen atmosphere. The influence of the oxygen partial pressure on the ejection velocities of the ablated species and on the relaxation of atomic and molecular excited species is particularly studied

  3. Quantitative observations of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar

    Xu, Guangyu

    The Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) is used to quantitatively monitor the hydrothermal discharge from the Grotto mound, a venting sulfide structure on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Since its deployment in September 2010, COVIS has recorded a multi-year long, near-continuous acoustic backscatter dataset. Further analysis of this dataset sheds light on the backscattering mechanisms within the buoyant plumes above Grotto and yields quantitative information on the influences of oceanic, atmospheric, and geological processes on the dynamics and heat source of the plumes. An investigation of the acoustic scattering mechanisms within the buoyant plumes issuing from Grotto suggests the dominant scattering mechanism within the plumes is the temperature fluctuations caused by the turbulent mixing of the buoyant plumes with the ambient seawater. In comparison, the backscatter from plume particles is negligible at lower levels of the plume but can potentially be significant at higher levels. Furthermore, this finding demonstrates the potential of inverting the acoustic backsatter to estimate the temperature fluctuations within the plumes. Processing the backscatter dataset recorded by COVIS yields time-series measurements of the vertical flow rate, volume transport, expansion rate of the largest buoyant plume above Grotto. Further analysis of those time-series measurements suggests the rate at which the ambient seawater is entrained into the plume increases with the magnitude of the ambient ocean currents---the current-driven entrainment. Furthermore, the oscillations in the ambient ocean currents that are driven by tidal and atmospheric forcing are introduced into the flow field within the plume through the current-driven entrainment. An inverse method has been developed to estimate the source heat transport driving the largest plume above Grotto from its volume transport estimates. The result suggests the heat transport driving the plume was

  4. Nuclear radiation effects on the ablation performance of advanced composite heatshield materials

    Results are presented from experiments to define the influence of simulated nuclear radiation damage on the ablation response of carbon-phenolic materials. Tests were conducted in a 50 MW arc jet facility. Several damaging methods were used and the effects of material properties were studied. The data were used to refine theoretical models of the ablation response. Effects of nonisothermal thermocouple measurements and material expansion due to outgassing and delamination are included. Results show that the ablation response is critically dependent upon the char layer expansion characteristics and material properties are shown to have a significant influence. The effect of the simulated nuclear damage on the ablation performance of these materials is negligible

  5. Detection of Metallic Compounds in Rocket Plumes

    Rogers, Chris; Dunn, Dr. Robert

    1998-04-01

    Recent experiments using metal mixed in hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) fuel grains in small hybrid rocket indicates ion detectors may be effective in detection of metallic compounds in rocket plumes. We wanted to ascertain the extent to which the presence of metallic compounds in rocket plumes could be detected using ion probes and Gaussian rings. Charges that collide with or pass near the intruding probe are detected. Gaussian rings, short insulated cylindrical Gaussian surfaces, enclose the plume without intruding into the plume. Charges in the plume are detected by currents they induce in the cylinder.

  6. Compositional differentiation of Enceladus' plume

    Khawaja, N.; Postberg, F.; Schmidt, J.

    2014-04-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) on board the Cassini spacecraft sampled Enceladus' plume ice particles emanated directly from Enceladus' fractured south polar terrain (SPT), the so-called "Tiger Stripes", during two consecutive flybys (E17 and E18) in 2012. The spacecraft passed through the dense plume with a moderate velocity of ~7.5km/s, horizontally to the SPT with a closest approach (CA) at an altitude of ~75km almost directly over the south pole. In both flybys, spectra were recorded during a time interval of ~ ±3 minutes with respect to the closest approach achieving an average sampling rate of about 0.6 sec-1. We assume that the spacecraft passed through the plume during an interval of about ±60(sec) from the CA. Particles encountered before and after this period are predominately from the E-ring background in which Enceladus is embedded. Most CDA TOF-mass spectra are identified as one of three compositional types: (i) almost pure water (ii) organic rich and (iii) salt rich [2]. A Boxcar Analysis (BCA) is performed from a count database for compositional mapping of the plume along the space-craft trajectory. In BCA, counts of each spectrum type are integrated for a certain interval of time (box size). The integral of counts represents frequencies of compositional types in absolute abundances, which are converted later into proportions. This technique has been proven to be a suitable for inferring the compositional profiles from an earlier flyby (E5) [1]. The inferred compositional profiles show similar trends on E17 and E18. The abundances of different compositional types in the plume clearly differ from the Ering background and imply a compositional differentiation inside the plume. Following up the work of Schmidt et al, 2008 and Postberg et al, 2011 we can link different compositional types to different origins. The E17/E18 results are compared with the E5 flyby in 2008, which yielded the currently best compositional profile [2] but was executed at much

  7. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy oflaser-ablated copper atoms

    Andrejeva, Anna; Harris, Joe P.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2014-01-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of laser-ablated copper atoms entrainedin a supersonic free jet expansion are reported. Depending on the ionization scheme employed, andthe conditions under which the copper atoms are produced, very different spectra are produced, whichare discussed. In some circumstances, high proportions of metastable atoms survive the ablation andexpansion process and are clearly seen in the spectra. The spectroscopic transitions for the observedlin...

  8. On the great plume debate

    Yaoling Niu

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introductory note Geological processes are ultimately consequences of Earth's thermal evolution. Plate tectonic theory, which explains geological phenomena along plate boundaries, elegantly illustrates this concept. For example, the origin of oceanic plates at ocean ridges, the movement and growth of these plates, and their ultimate consumption back into the Earth's deep interior through subduction zones provide an efficient mechanism to cool the earth's mantle, leading to large-scale mantle convection. Mantle plumes, which explain another set of global geological phenomena such as within-plate volcanism, cool the earth's deep interior (probably the Earth's core) and represent another mode of Earth's thermal convection. Plate tectonic theory and mantle plume hypothesis thus complement each other to explain much of the whole picture of Earth processes and phenomena.

  9. Meteoroid ablation models

    Popova, Olga

    2004-12-01

    The fate of entering meteoroids in atmosphere is determined by their size, velocity and substance properties. Material from ablation of small-sized meteors (roughly R≤0.01-1 cm) is mostly deposited between 120 and 80 km altitudes. Larger bodies (up to meter sizes) penetrate deeper into the atmosphere (down to 20 km altitude). Meteoroids of cometary origin typically have higher termination altitude due to substance properties and higher entry velocity. Fast meteoroids ( V>30-40 km/s) may lose a part of their material at higher altitudes due to sputtering. Local flow regime realized around the falling body determines the heat transfer and mass loss processes. Classic approach to meteor interaction with atmosphere allows describing two limiting cases: - large meteoroid at relatively low altitude, where shock wave is formed (hydrodynamical models); - small meteoroid/or high altitudes - free molecule regime of interaction, which assumes no collisions between evaporated meteoroid particles. These evaporated particles form initial train, which then spreads into an ambient air due to diffusion. Ablation models should make it possible to describe physical conditions that occur around meteor body. Several self-consistent hydrodynamical models are developed, but similar models for transition and free molecule regimes are still under study. This paper reviews existing ablation models and discusses model boundaries.

  10. Radiation emitted from rocket plumes

    Deimling, L.; Liehmann, W.; Eisenreich, N.; Weindel, M.; Eckl, W. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Chemische Technologie (ICT), Pfinztal-Berghausen (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    The signature of rocket plumes can be used for detection, identification and guidance of rockets. The objective was to investigate the signature of various types of solid rocket propellants by application of spectroscopic methods. The emission and transmission characteristics of plumes were studied experimentally, the results were analyzed based on molecular bands and continuum radiation. The model formulations include a nitramine propellant, a double-base propellant and a composite propellant. Applied were rapid-scanning filter wheel spectormeters for the wavelength region from 1.2 {mu}m to 14 {mu}m with a time resolution of 50 spectra/s and a wavelengths resolution of 1% of actual wavelength. The UV/VIS wavelengths region was recorded by an OMA system with wavelength resolution of 0.1 nm and 1 nm and time resolution of 10 spectra/s. Molecular bands of water and carbon dioxide dominate in the near infrared and infrared. Depending on composition, continuous radiation indicates particles in the rocket exhaust. A code was developed to calculate molecular bands and continuous rdiation using temperature and species distributions found by thermodynamic estimation to obtain the radiance of the plume. Comparison with experimental data delivered plume temperatures. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Signatur von Raketenabgasstrahlen kann genutzt werden zur Detektion, Identifikation und Lenkung. Ziel der vorgestellten Arbeit war die Untersuchung der Signaturen unterschiedlicher Raketenfesttreibstoffe mittels spektroskopischer Verfahren. Die Emissions- und Transmissionscharakteristik wurde experimentell untersucht und die erhaltenen Daten auf der Basis kontinuierlicher und molekularer Strahlung analysiert. Die Modellformulierungen umfassten einen Nitramin - Treibstoff, eine Double-base - Formulierung und einen Composittreibstoff. Angewendet wurden Filterradspektrometer fuer den infraroten Spektralbereich und ein konventionelles Gitterspektrometer im Ultravioletten und Sichtbaren. Die

  11. Observed cooling tower plume characteristics

    In-plume measurements with an instrumented Cessna 411 aircraft were made at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station (913 MWe) near Sacramento, California; the Trojan nuclear plant (1130 MWe) on the Columbia River 50 mi. north of Portland, Oregon; and the coal-fired Centralia Steam Plant (1400 MWe) 50 mi. north of the Trojan plant. Additional surface-based operations conducted at Rancho Seco included pibal tracking to determine the wind velocity profile, time-exposure photographs of the plume for external plume definition and measurements of sulfate deposition due to the drift of entrained circulating water. Heat rejection at Rancho Seco is from two 425 ft. natural-draft towers whose exit diameters are 195 ft; at Trojan, from a single 500 ft. natural-draft tower with exit diameter of 250 ft; and at Centralia, from four mechanical-draft towers. Results of the analyses to date are summarized for three days' operation at Rancho Seco (February 17, 18, and 20 in 1975) and one day (May 13, 1976) at Trojan and Centralia. During the course of these flights, measurements of temperature, humidity, turbulence, Aitken nuclei, and cloud droplet spectra were taken

  12. Ablation plasma transport using multicusp magnetic field for laser ion source

    Takahashi, K.; Umezawa, M.; Uchino, T.; Ikegami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, N.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a plasma guiding method using multicusp magnetic field to transport the ablation plasma keeping the density for developing laser ion sources. To investigate the effect of guiding using the magnetic field on the ablation plasma, we demonstrated the transport of the laser ablation plasma in the multicusp magnetic field. The magnetic field was formed with eight permanent magnets and arranged to limit the plasma expansion in the radial direction. We investigated the variation of the plasma ion current density and charge distribution during transport in the magnetic field. The results indicate that the plasma is confined in the radial direction during the transport in the multicusp magnetic field.

  13. Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    Foster, Ryan C.B.; Joseph M Stavas

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft...

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation in pancreas

    Seicean, Andrada; Tefas, Cristian; Ungureanu, Bogdan;

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation of the pancreas represents a more effective tumor-destruction method compared to other ablation techniques. The endoscopic ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation is indicated for locally advanced, non-metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma, without the need of general...

  15. Energy distribution of ions produced by laser ablation of silver in vacuum

    The ion energy in a silver ablation plume for fluence in the range of 0.6–2.4 J cm−2, typical for a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) experiment has been investigated. In this fluence range the ion fraction of the ablated particles becomes gradually dominant and can be utilized to characterize the ablation process. A silver target in vacuum was irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm and detailed measurements of the time-resolved angular distribution of plume ions were made. In contrast to earlier work, the beam spot was circular such that any flip-over effect of the plume is avoided. The angular energy distribution of ions in forward direction exceeds values of 500 eV, while at large angles the ion energy tail is below 100 eV. The maximum for the time-of-flight distributions agrees consistently with the prediction of Anisimov's model in the low fluence range, in which hydrodynamic motion prevails.

  16. Axisymmetric Plume Simulations with NASA's DSMC Analysis Code

    Stewart, B. D.; Lumpkin, F. E., III

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of axisymmetric Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) Analysis Code (DAC) results to analytic and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions in the near continuum regime and to 3D DAC solutions in the rarefied regime for expansion plumes into a vacuum is performed to investigate the validity of the newest DAC axisymmetric implementation. This new implementation, based on the standard DSMC axisymmetric approach where the representative molecules are allowed to move in all three dimensions but are rotated back to the plane of symmetry by the end of the move step, has been fully integrated into the 3D-based DAC code and therefore retains all of DAC s features, such as being able to compute flow over complex geometries and to model chemistry. Axisymmetric DAC results for a spherically symmetric isentropic expansion are in very good agreement with a source flow analytic solution in the continuum regime and show departure from equilibrium downstream of the estimated breakdown location. Axisymmetric density contours also compare favorably against CFD results for the R1E thruster while temperature contours depart from equilibrium very rapidly away from the estimated breakdown surface. Finally, axisymmetric and 3D DAC results are in very good agreement over the entire plume region and, as expected, this new axisymmetric implementation shows a significant reduction in computer resources required to achieve accurate simulations for this problem over the 3D simulations.

  17. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.;

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few c...... cases have been reported. No standardised or generally accepted approach exists. This paper evaluates the different methods for redox characterization based on the experiences from the reported applications....

  18. Spectroscopic Diagnostics of Polar Coronal Plumes

    Wilhelm, K; Dwivedi, B N

    2009-01-01

    Polar coronal plumes seen during solar eclipses can now be studied with space-borne telescopes and spectrometers. We briefly discuss such observations from space with a view to understanding their plasma characteristics. Using these observations, especially from SUMER/SOHO, but also from EUVI/STEREO, we deduce densities, temperatures, and abundance anomalies in plumes and inter-plume regions, and discuss their implications for better understanding of these structures in the Sun's atmosphere.

  19. Gas Effect On Plasma Dynamics Of Laser Ablation Zinc Oxide

    Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Kerdja, T.; Lafane, S.; Malek, S.

    2008-09-01

    In order to synthesis zinc oxide thin films and nanostructures, laser ablation of ZnO target into both vacuum and oxygen atmosphere was performed. The gas effect on the plume dynamics was studied for O2 pressures varied between 10-2 to 70 mbar. Plasma plume evolution was investigated by ICCD camera fast imaging. The plasma was created by a KrF excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns) at a fluence of 2 J/cm2. The light emitted by the plume was observed along the perpendicular to the ejection direction through a fast intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD). We have found that the plasma dynamics is very affected by the gas pressures. The photographs reveal the stratification of plasma into slow and fast components for 0.5 mbar O2 pressures and beyond. The photographs also show the apparition of hydrodynamic instabilities which are related to chemical reactions between the plasma and the surrounding gas for a certain range of pressures.

  20. Diagnosis of laser ablated carbon particles measured by time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    The time and space resolved properties of laser ablated carbon particles were measured by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using LPX as an X-ray source. The energy density of the irradiation laser on the sample was in the range of 0.5-20J/cm2 and the time delay was varied between 0 and 120ns. The absorption spectra exhibited several peaks originated from level to level transitions and an intense broad absorption in the energy range of C-K edge. At a delay time of 120ns, the absorption peak from 1s→2p transition of neutral carbon atom (C0), C-, C+ and C2+ ions were observed. The absorption peak from C0 was stronger as the probing position was closer to the sample surface and decreased rapidly with distance from the sample surface. The absorption peak C2+ ion was observed only at comparatively distant positions from surface. The maximum speeds of highly charged ions were faster than that of neutral atoms and negative charged ions. The neutral atom and lower charged ions were emitted from the sample even after laser irradiation. The spatial distributions of the laser ablated carbon particles in the localized helium gas environment were measured. In the helium gas environment, the ablation plume was depressed by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume. (author)

  1. Comparison of the laser ablation process on Zn and Ti using pulsed digital holographic interferometry

    Pulsed digital holographic interferometry has been used to compare the laser ablation process of a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser pulse (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse duration 12 ns) on two different metals (Zn and Ti) under atmospheric air pressure. Digital holograms were recorded for different time delays using collimated laser light (532 nm) passed through the volume along the target. Numerical data of the integrated refractive index field were calculated and presented as phase maps. Intensity maps were calculated from the recorded digital holograms and are used to calculate the attenuation of the probing laser beam by the ablated plume. The different structures of the plume, namely streaks normal to the surface for Zn in contrast to absorbing regions for Ti, indicates that different mechanisms of laser ablation could happen for different metals for the same laser settings and surrounding gas. At a laser fluence of 5 J/cm2, phase explosion appears to be the ablation mechanism in case of Zn, while for Ti normal vaporization seems to be the dominant mechanism.

  2. Silver nanoparticles generated by pulsed laser ablation in supercritical CO2 medium

    Machmudah, Siti; Sato, Takayuki; Wahyudiono; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has been widely employed in industrial and biological applications and in other fields. The environmental conditions in which PLA is conducted are important parameters that affect both the solid particle cloud and the deposition produced by the plume. In this work, the generation of nanoparticles (NPs) has been developed by performing PLA of silver (Ag) plates in a supercritical CO2 medium. Ag NPs were successfully generated by allowing the selective generation of clusters. Laser ablation was performed with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm under various pressures and temperatures of CO2 medium. On the basis of the experimental result, both surface of the irradiated Ag plate and structure of Ag NPs were significantly affected by the changes in supercritical CO2 pressure and temperature. With increasing irradiation pressure, plume deposited in the surrounding crater created by the ablation was clearly observed. In Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) the image of the generated Ag NPs on the silicon wafer and the morphology of Ag particles were basically a sphere-like structure. Ag particles contain NPs with large-varied diameter ranging from 5 nm to 1.2 μm. The bigger Ag NPs melted during the ablation process and then ejected smaller spherical Ag NPs, which formed nanoclusters attached on the molten Ag NPs. The smaller Ag NPs were also formed around the bigger Ag NPs. Based on the results, this new method can also be used to obtain advanced nano-structured materials.

  3. Vertical cloud structure of Jupiter's equatorial plumes

    Stoker, C. R.; Hord, C.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple-scattering radiative transfer calculations were used to deduce the vertical cloud structure (VCS) of Jupiter's equatorial region. The VCS model of the equatorial plumes is obtained through an analysis of Voyager images of the 6190-A methane band and the 6000-A continuum, and ground-based 8900-A methane band images. The VCS of the equatorial plumes is found to be consistent with the hypothesis that the plumes are caused by upwelling at the ammonia condensation level produced by buoyancy due to latent heat release from the condensation of water clouds nearly three scale heights below the plumes.

  4. Effects of closed immersion filtered water flow velocity on the ablation threshold of bisphenol A polycarbonate during excimer laser machining

    A closed flowing thick film filtered water immersion technique ensures a controlled geometry for both the optical interfaces of the flowing liquid film and allows repeatable control of flow-rate during machining. This has the action of preventing splashing, ensures repeatable machining conditions and allows control of liquid flow velocity. To investigate the impact of this technique on ablation threshold, bisphenol A polycarbonate samples have been machined using KrF excimer laser radiation passing through a medium of filtered water flowing at a number of flow velocities, that are controllable by modifying the liquid flow-rates. An average decrease in ablation threshold of 7.5% when using turbulent flow velocity regime closed thick film filtered water immersed ablation, compared to ablation using a similar beam in ambient air; however, the use of laminar flow velocities resulted in negligible differences between closed flowing thick film filtered water immersion and ambient air. Plotting the recorded threshold fluence achieved with varying flow velocity showed that an optimum flow velocity of 3.00 m/s existed which yielded a minimum ablation threshold of 112 mJ/cm2. This is attributed to the distortion of the ablation plume effected by the flowing immersion fluid changing the ablation mechanism: at laminar flow velocities Bremsstrahlung attenuation decreases etch rate, at excessive flow velocities the plume is completely destroyed, removing the effect of plume etching. Laminar flow velocity regime ablation is limited by slow removal of debris causing a non-linear etch rate over 'n' pulses which is a result of debris produced by one pulse remaining suspended over the feature for the next pulse. The impact of closed thick film filtered water immersed ablation is dependant upon beam fluence: high fluence beams achieved greater etch efficiency at high flow velocities as the effect of Bremsstrahlung attenuation is removed by the action of the fluid on the plume; low

  5. Lidar measurements of plume statistics

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.

    1993-01-01

    measured crosswind concentration profiles, the following statistics were obtained: 1) Mean profile, 2) Root mean square profile, 3) Fluctuation intensities,and 4)Intermittency factors. Furthermore, some experimentally determined probability density functions (pdf's) of the fluctuations are presented. All...... the measured statistics are referred to a fixed and a 'moving' frame of reference, the latter being defined as a frame of reference from which the (low frequency) plume meander is removed. Finally, the measured statistics are compared with statistics on concentration fluctuations obtained with a...

  6. Plume spread and atmospheric stability

    Weber, R.O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The horizontal spread of a plume in atmospheric dispersion can be described by the standard deviation of horizontal direction. The widely used Pasquill-Gifford classes of atmospheric stability have assigned typical values of the standard deviation of horizontal wind direction and of the lapse rate. A measured lapse rate can thus be used to estimate the standard deviation of wind direction. It is examined by means of a large dataset of fast wind measurements how good these estimates are. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  7. LASER ABLATION STUDIES OF CONCRETE

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-s...

  8. Interaction of Extreme Ultraviolet Laser Radiation with Solid Surface: Ablation, Desorption, Nanostructuring

    Koláček, Karel; Schmidt, Jiří; Štraus, Jaroslav; Frolov, Oleksandr; Juha, Libor; Chalupský, Jaromír

    Vol. 9255. Bellingham: SPIE-INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING, 2015 - (Tang, C.; Chen, S.; Tang, X.), 92553U-92553U. (SPIE. 9255). ISBN 978-1-62841-322-9. ISSN 0277-786X. [International Symposium on High Power Laser Systems and Applications 2014/20./. Chengdu (CN), 25.08.2014-29.08.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-29772S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : interaction of XUV radiation with solid surface * desorption * ablation * nanostructuring * nanopatterning * ablation plume * ablation jet Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s; BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s (FZU-D) http://spie.org/Publications/Proceedings/Volume/9255

  9. Mechanism of Er:YAG laser-induced ablation of dental hard substances

    Hibst, Raimund; Keller, Ulrich

    1993-07-01

    Er:YAG laser ablation was investigated by fast photography in a Schlieren optic setup. The results support the idea of continuous, thermally driven microexplosion type of ablation, which is based on the inhomogeneous distribution of strong (water) and weak absorbers (hydroxyapatite). Sudden vaporization and heating of the water content leads to a very effective material removal by bursting off the solid tissue components. Material is ejected in the form of particles when the threshold energy density for ablation (about 3 J cm-2) is reached. For high radiant exposure, initial plume velocity is in the order of the speed of sound in air. After leaving the tissue surface, particles are heated by the still incoming laser radiation, causing glowing and melting. No surface plasma and only weak pressure waves caused by individual spikes were observed.

  10. Laser ablation loading of a radiofrequency ion trap

    Zimmermann, K; Herrera-Sancho, O A; Peik, E

    2012-01-01

    The production of ions via laser ablation for the loading of radiofrequency (RF) ion traps is investigated using a nitrogen laser with a maximum pulse energy of 0.17 mJ and a peak intensity of about 250 MW/cm^2. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is used to measure the ion yield and the distribution of the charge states. Singly charged ions of elements that are presently considered for the use in optical clocks or quantum logic applications could be produced from metallic samples at a rate of the order of magnitude 10^5 ions per pulse. A linear Paul trap was loaded with Th+ ions produced by laser ablation. An overall ion production and trapping efficiency of 10^-7 to 10^-6 was attained. For ions injected individually, a dependence of the capture probability on the phase of the RF field has been predicted. In the experiment this was not observed, presumably because of collective effects within the ablation plume.

  11. Laser ablation loading of a radiofrequency ion trap

    Zimmermann, K.; Okhapkin, M. V.; Herrera-Sancho, O. A.; Peik, E.

    2012-06-01

    The production of ions via laser ablation for the loading of radiofrequency (RF) ion traps is investigated using a nitrogen laser with a maximum pulse energy of 0.17 mJ and a peak intensity of about 250 MW/cm2. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is used to measure the ion yield and the distribution of the charge states. Singly charged ions of elements that are presently considered for the use in optical clocks or quantum logic applications could be produced from metallic samples at a rate of the order of magnitude 105 ions per pulse. A linear Paul trap was loaded with Th+ ions produced by laser ablation. An overall ion production and trapping efficiency of 10-7 to 10-6 was attained. For ions injected individually, a dependence of the capture probability on the phase of the RF field has been predicted. In the experiment this was not observed, presumably because of collective effects within the ablation plume.

  12. Spectroscopic, imaging, and probe diagnostics of laser plasma plumes expanding between confining surfaces

    Laser plasma plumes were generated in aluminum rectangular cavities of fixed depth (6 mm) and varying height (2.0, 1.5, and 1.0 mm). Space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy, gated intensified visible imaging, and Langmuir probe diagnostics were utilized to diagnose the evolution of the confined plasma plumes in comparison to freely expanding plasma plume generated from ablation of a planar target. The constrained plasma behavior displayed a multiphase history. Early stage interactions (t160 ns) resulted in sustained 'decay', i.e., a rapid termination of continuum emission, in concert with decreases in peak electron density (Ne) and plasma temperature (T). This later phase originates from loss mechanisms which bleed the plasma plume of thermal energy and charged particles. These loss mechanisms increase in magnitude as the duration of the plasma-surface interaction increases. The transition from enhancement phase, originating from hydrodynamic containment, and plasma-surface collisions, to decay phase is described and occurs for each cavity at a different point in the space time history.

  13. Infrared Sensing of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with laboratory experiments on buoyant surface plumes where heat is the source of buoyancy. Temperature distributions were measured at the water surface using infra-red sensing, and inside the waterbody a computer based measurement system was applied. The plume is described...

  14. Aggregate Particles in the Plumes of Enceladus

    Gao, Peter; Zhang, Xi; Ingersoll, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of the total particulate mass of the plumes of Enceladus are important to constrain theories of particle formation and transport at the surface and interior of the satellite. We revisit the calculations of Ingersoll and Ewald (2011), who estimated the particulate mass of the Enceladus plumes from strongly forward scattered light in Cassini ISS images. We model the plume as a combination of spherical particles and irregular aggregates resulting from the coagulation of spherical monomers, the latter of which allows for plumes of lower particulate mass. Though a continuum of solutions are permitted by the model, the best fits to the ISS data consist either of low mass plumes composed entirely of small aggregates or high mass plumes composed of large aggregates and spheres. The high mass plumes can be divided into a population of large aggregates with total particulate mass of 116 +/- 12 X 10^3 kg, and a mixed population of spheres and aggregates consisting of a few large monomers that has a total plume...

  15. Experiments on a turbulent plume: shape analyses

    Kitamura, S.; Sumita, I.

    2009-12-01

    Turbulent plume which is characterized by a large Reynolds number (Re >> 1) and buoyancy, is ubiquitous in nature, an example of which is a volcanic plume. As the turbulent plume rises, it entrains the ambient fluid and grows in size. There have been many laboratory experiments on turbulent plumes, but only few attempts were made to characterize the shape of the evolving plume as a function of source parameters (initial velocity and buoyancy). Here we report the results of laboratory experiments on a turbulent plume, a simplified model of a volcanic plume, to study how the shape of the plume changes as a function of time. Water and aqueous solutions of condensed milk, NaCl and CsCl, colored with a fluorescent dye are injected downward through an orifice (ID 1 mm) into a water contained in an acrylic tank with a cross-section of 30cm ¥times 30cm and a height of 50cm. Plumes with a density difference of 0.00 < ¥Delta ¥rho < 8.00 ¥times 10^ 2 (¥mbox{kg m}^ {-3}) and Re in the range and 210 < Re < 2850, are generated. These experimental parameters (initial Re, buoyancy) were chosen so that they cover the range from inertia-driven to buoyancy-driven regime. We find that the plume shape changes with time as instability and entrainment proceeds. In the beginning it is finger-like, but with time, plume head and vortices develop, and finally it transforms into a cone-like self-similar shape. After transforming a "cone-like" shape, sometimes a "head" appears again. We devise new methods to quantitatively characterize these changes of shape. Here we use (1) the height of the centroid of the plume shape and (2) the deviation from the self-similar triangular shape. Using these methods, we defined 4 regimes as a function of time. We find that the onset times of the 4 regimes have a negative power-law relations on initial Re, which scale better than using onset heights. Importantly, we find that the buoyancy causes the regime transitions to become earlier. Our experiments

  16. Measurements on cooling tower plumes. Pt. 3

    In this paper an extended field experiment is described in which cooling tower plumes were investigated by means of three-dimensional in situ measurements. The goal of this program was to obtain input data for numerical models of cooling tower plumes. Data for testing or developing assumptions for sub-grid parametrizations were of special interest. Utilizing modern systems for high-resolution aerology and small aircraft, four measuring campaigns were conducted: two campaigns (1974) at the cooling towers of the RWE power station at Neurath and also two (1975) at the single cooling tower of the RWE power station at Meppen. Because of the broad spectrum of weather situations, it can be assumed that the results are representative with regard to the interrelationship between the structure of cooling tower plumes and the large-scale meteorological situation. A large number of flights with a powered glider ASK 16 (more than 100 flight hours) crossing the plumes on orthogonal tracks was performed. All flights showed that the plume could be identified up to large downwind distances by discontinuous jumps of temperature and vapour pressure. Therefore a definite geometry of the plume could always be defined. In all cross sections a vertical circulation could be observed. At the plumes boundaries, which could be defined by the mentioned jumps of temperature and vapour pressure, a maximum of downward vertical motion was observed in most cases. Entrainment along the boundary of a cross section seems to be very small, except at the lower part of the plume. There, the mass entrainment is maximum and is responsible for plume rise as well as for enlargement of the cross section. The visible part of the plume (cloud) was only a small fraction of the whole plume. The discontinuities of temperature and vapour pressure show that the plume fills the space below the visible plume down to the ground. However, all effects decrease rapidly towards the ground. It turned out that high

  17. Numerical Simulations of Europa Hydrothermal Plumes

    Goodman, J. C.; Lenferink, E.

    2009-12-01

    The liquid water interiors of Europa and other icy moons of the outer solar system are likely to be driven by geothermal heating from the sea floor, leading to the development of buoyant hydrothermal plumes. These plumes potentially control icy surface geomorphology, and are of interest to astrobiologists. We have performed a series of simulations of these plumes using the MITGCM. We assume in this experiment that Europa's ocean is deep (of order 100 km) and unstratified, and that plume buoyancy is controlled by temperature, not composition. A series of experiments was performed to explore a limited region of parameter space, with ocean depth H ranging from 50 to 100 km deep, source heat flux Q between 1 and 10 GW, and values of the Coriolis parameter f between 30% and 90% of the Europa average value. As predicted by earlier work, the plumes in our simulations form narrow cylindrical chimneys (a few km across) under the influence of the Coriolis effect. These plumes broaden over time until they become baroclinically unstable, breaking up into cone-shaped eddies when they become 20-35 km in diameter; the shed eddies are of a similar size. Large-scale currents in the region of the plume range between 1.5 and 5 cm/s; temperature anomalies in the plume far from the seafloor are tiny, varying between 30 and 160 microkelvin. Variations in plume size, shape, speed, and temperature are in excellent agreement with previous laboratory tank experiments, and in rough agreement with theoretical predictions. Plume dynamics and geometry are controlled by a "natural Rossby number" which depends strongly on depth H and Coriolis parameter f, but only weakly on source heat flux Q. However, some specific theoretical predictions are not borne out by these simulations. The time elapsed between startup of the source and the beginning of eddy-shedding is much less variable than predicted; also, the plume temperature varies with ocean depth H when our theory says it should not. Both of

  18. Fire analog: a comparison between fire plumes and energy center cooling tower plumes

    Thermal plumes or convection columns associated with large fires have been compared to thermal plumes from cooling tower systems to evaluate the fire analog concept. Energy release rate of mass fires is generally larger than that of single or small groups of cooling towers but may be comparable to proposed large energy centers. However, siginficant physical differences exist between cooling tower and fire plumes. Cooling tower plumes are usually dominated by ambient wind and turbulence conditions. Fire plumes, depending on fire intensity and area, can transform into free convection energy systems resulting in convective columns, strong inflow and updrafts, turbulence and concentrated vortices. Since these characteristics have not been observed with cooling tower plumes to date, the fire analog concept is questionable at this time. Additional research is needed on fire and cooling tower plumes

  19. Low-buoyancy thermochemical plumes resolve controversy of classical mantle plume concept.

    Dannberg, Juliane; Sobolev, Stephan V

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's biggest magmatic events are believed to originate from massive melting when hot mantle plumes rising from the lowermost mantle reach the base of the lithosphere. Classical models predict large plume heads that cause kilometre-scale surface uplift, and narrow (100 km radius) plume tails that remain in the mantle after the plume head spreads below the lithosphere. However, in many cases, such uplifts and narrow plume tails are not observed. Here using numerical models, we show that the issue can be resolved if major mantle plumes contain up to 15-20% of recycled oceanic crust in a form of dense eclogite, which drastically decreases their buoyancy and makes it depth dependent. We demonstrate that, despite their low buoyancy, large enough thermochemical plumes can rise through the whole mantle causing only negligible surface uplift. Their tails are bulky (>200 km radius) and remain in the upper mantle for 100 millions of years. PMID:25907970

  20. Low-buoyancy thermochemical plumes resolve controversy of classical mantle plume concept

    Dannberg, Juliane; Sobolev, Stephan V.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's biggest magmatic events are believed to originate from massive melting when hot mantle plumes rising from the lowermost mantle reach the base of the lithosphere. Classical models predict large plume heads that cause kilometre-scale surface uplift, and narrow (100 km radius) plume tails that remain in the mantle after the plume head spreads below the lithosphere. However, in many cases, such uplifts and narrow plume tails are not observed. Here using numerical models, we show that the issue can be resolved if major mantle plumes contain up to 15–20% of recycled oceanic crust in a form of dense eclogite, which drastically decreases their buoyancy and makes it depth dependent. We demonstrate that, despite their low buoyancy, large enough thermochemical plumes can rise through the whole mantle causing only negligible surface uplift. Their tails are bulky (>200 km radius) and remain in the upper mantle for 100 millions of years. PMID:25907970

  1. Lesion size in relation to ablation site during radiofrequency ablation

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, A;

    1998-01-01

    performed during two different flow-velocities in a tissue bath, while electrode contact pressure and position were unchanged. Target temperature was 80 degrees C. Obtained tip temperature, power consumption and lesion dimensions were measured. In vivo lesion volume, depth and width were found significantly...... convective cooling by induction of a flow around the electrode tip increases lesion dimensions and power consumptions. Furthermore we conclude that for the given target temperature the power consumption is positively correlated with lesion volume (p <0.001), whereas the obtained tip temperature is not.......This study was designed to investigate the effect of the convective cooling of the tip of the ablation electrode during temperature controlled radiofrequency ablation. In vivo two different application sites in the left ventricle of anaesthetised pigs were ablated and in vitro ablation was...

  2. MISR Observations of Etna Volcanic Plumes

    Scollo, S.; Kahn, R. A.; Nelson, D. L.; Coltelli, M.; Diner, D. J.; Garay, M. J.; Realmuto, V. J.

    2012-01-01

    In the last twelve years, Mt. Etna, located in eastern Sicily, has produced a great number of explosive eruptions. Volcanic plumes have risen to several km above sea level and created problems for aviation and the communities living near the volcano. A reduction of hazards may be accomplished using remote sensing techniques to evaluate important features of volcanic plumes. Since 2000, the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on board NASA s Terra spacecraft has been extensively used to study aerosol dispersal and to extract the three-dimensional structure of plumes coming from anthropogenic or natural sources, including volcanoes. In the present work, MISR data from several explosive events occurring at Etna are analyzed using a program named MINX (MISR INteractive eXplorer). MINX uses stereo matching techniques to evaluate the height of the volcanic aerosol with a precision of a few hundred meters, and extracts aerosol properties from the MISR Standard products. We analyzed twenty volcanic plumes produced during the 2000, 2001, 2002-03, 2006 and 2008 Etna eruptions, finding that volcanic aerosol dispersal and column height obtained by this analysis is in good agreement with ground-based observations. MISR aerosol type retrievals: (1) clearly distinguish volcanic plumes that are sulphate and/or water vapor dominated from ash-dominated ones; (2) detect even low concentrations of volcanic ash in the atmosphere; (3) demonstrate that sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes consist of smaller-sized particles compared to ash plumes. This work highlights the potential of MISR to detect important volcanic plume characteristics that can be used to constrain the eruption source parameters in volcanic ash dispersion models. Further, the possibility of discriminating sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes from ash-dominated ones is important to better understand the atmospheric impact of these plumes.

  3. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained “ash” particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous “snowflakes” as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  4. Leonid meteor ablation, energy exchange and trail morphology

    Zinn, John; Judd, O' Dean P.; ReVelle, D. O. (Douglas O.)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes theoretical model studies of the interaction of Leonid meteoroids with the earth's atmosphere. Subject to some modest-to-strenuous approximations we compute the rates of ablation and deceleration, energy deposition, and terminal altitudes of the meteors as functions of their initial mass and bulk density, velocity, trajectory entry angle, drag coefficient, heat of ablation, and an ablation energy transfer fraction. We find that the dominant energy deposition in the atmosphere is associated with the stopping of the ablated meteor particles and vapor by the surrounding air. Then having computed the energy deposition rates versus altitude we compute the hydrodynamic and radiative expansion of the hot wake material in the radial direction, along with the associated air chemistry. From the computed results we can then plot two-dimensional temperature contours -- as functions of the instantaneous distance behind the meteor and radial distance from the center of the wake, at various altitudes along the meteor's path. We also compute the rates of emission of radiation and the radiative efficiency, and discuss comparisons with observations.

  5. Measurements of outflow velocities in on-disk plumes from EIS/Hinode observations

    Fu, Hui; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Huang, Zhenghua; Jiao, Fangran; Mou, Chaozhou, E-mail: xld@sdu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2014-10-20

    The contribution of plumes to the solar wind has been subject to hot debate in the past decades. The EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode provides a unique means to deduce outflow velocities at coronal heights via direct Doppler shift measurements of coronal emission lines. Such direct Doppler shift measurements were not possible with previous spectrometers. We measure the outflow velocity at coronal heights in several on-disk long-duration plumes, which are located in coronal holes (CHs) and show significant blueshifts throughout the entire observational period. In one case, a plume is measured four hours apart. The deduced outflow velocities are consistent, suggesting that the flows are quasi-steady. Furthermore, we provide an outflow velocity profile along the plumes, finding that the velocity corrected for the line-of-sight effect can reach 10 km s{sup –1} at 1.02 R {sub ☉}, 15 km s{sup –1} at 1.03 R {sub ☉}, and 25 km s{sup –1} at 1.05 R {sub ☉}. This clear signature of steady acceleration, combined with the fact that there is no significant blueshift at the base of plumes, provides an important constraint on plume models. At the height of 1.03 R {sub ☉}, EIS also deduced a density of 1.3 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup –3}, resulting in a proton flux of about 4.2 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} scaled to 1 AU, which is an order of magnitude higher than the proton input to a typical solar wind if a radial expansion is assumed. This suggests that CH plumes may be an important source of the solar wind.

  6. Ion acceleration enhanced by target ablation

    Laser proton acceleration can be enhanced by using target ablation, due to the energetic electrons generated in the ablation preplasma. When the ablation pulse matches main pulse, the enhancement gets optimized because the electrons' energy density is highest. A scaling law between the ablation pulse and main pulse is confirmed by the simulation, showing that for given CPA pulse and target, proton energy improvement can be achieved several times by adjusting the target ablation

  7. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob;

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures...

  8. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-01

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology. PMID:23614661

  9. Ablative therapy for liver tumours

    Dick, E A; Taylor-Robinson, S D; Thomas, H C; Gedroyc, W M W

    2002-01-01

    Established ablative therapies for the treatment of primary and secondary liver tumours, including percutaneous ethanol injection, cryotherapy, and radiofrequency ablation, are discussed. Newer techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging guided laser interstitial thermal therapy of liver tumours has produced a median survival rate of 40.8 months after treatment. The merits of this newly emerging technique are discussed, together with future developments, such as focused ultrasound therapy, ...

  10. Percutaneous Ablation of Hepatic Tumors

    McCarley, James R.; Soulen, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    The liver is a common site of both primary and secondary malignancy resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Careful patient evaluation and triage allows for optimal utilization of all oncologic therapies, including radiation, systemic chemotherapy, surgery, transarterial therapies, and ablation. Although the role of interventional oncologists in the management of hepatic malignancies continues to evolve, the use of percutaneous ablation therapies has proven to be an effective and mi...

  11. Radiation from advanced solid rocket motor plumes

    Farmer, Richard C.; Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to develop an understanding of solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes in sufficient detail to accurately explain the majority of plume radiation test data. Improved flowfield and radiation analysis codes were developed to accurately and efficiently account for all the factors which effect radiation heating from rocket plumes. These codes were verified by comparing predicted plume behavior with measured NASA/MSFC ASRM test data. Upon conducting a thorough review of the current state-of-the-art of SRM plume flowfield and radiation prediction methodology and the pertinent data base, the following analyses were developed for future design use. The NOZZRAD code was developed for preliminary base heating design and Al2O3 particle optical property data evaluation using a generalized two-flux solution to the radiative transfer equation. The IDARAD code was developed for rapid evaluation of plume radiation effects using the spherical harmonics method of differential approximation to the radiative transfer equation. The FDNS CFD code with fully coupled Euler-Lagrange particle tracking was validated by comparison to predictions made with the industry standard RAMP code for SRM nozzle flowfield analysis. The FDNS code provides the ability to analyze not only rocket nozzle flow, but also axisymmetric and three-dimensional plume flowfields with state-of-the-art CFD methodology. Procedures for conducting meaningful thermo-vision camera studies were developed.

  12. Low-order harmonic generation in nanosecond laser ablation plasmas of carbon containing materials

    In this work we report on a systematic study of the spatiotemporal behaviour of low-order harmonics generated in nanosecond laser ablation plasmas of carbon containing materials. Plasmas were generated from targets of graphite and boron carbide ablated with a nanosecond Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. Low-order harmonics (3rd and 5th) of the fundamental wavelength of a ns Nd:YAG driving laser, propagating perpendicularly to the ablation laser at variable time delays, were observed. The temporal study of the low-order harmonics generated under vacuum and atmospheres of Kr and Xe, revealed the presence of two populations that contribute to the harmonic generation (HG) at different times. It was found that under vacuum only small species contribute to the HG process, whereas under buffer gas, heavier species, such as clusters and nanoparticles, contribute to the HG at longer times. Optical emission spectroscopy, time of flight mass spectrometry and characterization of deposits collected on-line on a nearby substrate provided additional information that complemented the results of the spatiotemporal study of the generated harmonics. This approach to ablation plume analysis allows elucidating the identity of the nonlinear emitters in laser ablation plasmas and facilitates the investigation of efficient, nanoparticle-enhanced, coherent short wavelength generation processes.

  13. Chemical communication: does odor plume shape matter?

    Lof, M.E.; Hemerik, L.; Gee, de, A.W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Many insects use chemical information to gather information about their environment. Infochemicals are spread into the environment as the wind disperses the odor molecules from the source. The structure of an odor plume around a food source is complex and time-dependent. At a large scale, it meanders as it moves with the wind. At a smaller scale, patches with odors are interspersed with regions of clean air. In this study, we compare a plume model that takes the features of a real odor plume ...

  14. A study of laser ablation propulsion using polyoxymethelyne and a high power diode laser

    Kolesar, Michael D.

    With an increased interest by universities, government and commercial groups in using constellations of pico and nano satellites, the need for micro-thrusters to aid in the station-keeping capabilities has become strong. This report examines using polymers and a laser to ablate material as a potential propulsion option for station-keeping. Homopolymer polyoxymethelyne (POM), commonly known as Delrin(TM), was tested as a fuel for a high powered (20 Watt 980 nm) solid state diode laser ablation thruster to be used for station-keeping on pico and nano sized satellites. The experiments required a partial vacuum to reduce the effects of air decomposition and remove water vapor during the ablation event. The vacuum chamber, shadowgraph, and an impulse measurement system were all designed and built around the 20-Watt laser. Three different sample thicknesses were tested (.005", .010", and .020") to determine the behavior of the polymer. The laser was focused onto the POM sample, which was mounted to a load cell and calibrated to measure the impulse of the system imparted by the laser pulse. The calculated thrust values ranged from 600 microN to 1300 microN with a high uncertainty due to the small sample size. The exhaust plume from the ablation event was captured using a shadowgraph. A low velocity was recorded because the chamber was not a complete vacuum, causing the exhaust plume to collide with the air molecules in the test chamber. However the load cell results suggested that 1.30 mN per burst can be produced with an uncertainty of 30%. With the work outlined in this paper, POM shows the promise and challenge of being a good candidate as a fuel material. POM warrants further development and investment as a fuel to be used with a laser ablation micro-thruster.

  15. Laser ablation initiated fast discharge for spectrochemical applications

    Vinić Milica L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of an experimental study of the optical emission enhancement possibilities during the single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of the aluminum alloy are presented. This study is performed in air, argon and helium at different pressures with and without the additional fast electric discharge. The discharge was initiated by plasma plume created by laser ablation of target. The influences of various capacitors and discharge voltages on enhancement of the studied spectral line intensities were also studied. The application of the fast discharge through optical emission enhancement enables lowering of detection limits thus making this spectrochemical method comparable with the other analytical techniques. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171014

  16. Asteroid rotation and orbit control via laser ablation

    Vetrisano, Massimo; Colombo, Camilla; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an approach to control the rotational motion of an asteroid while a spacecraft is deflecting its trajectory through laser ablation. During the deflection, the proximity motion of the spacecraft is coupled with the orbital and rotational motion of the asteroid. The combination of the deflection acceleration, solar radiation pressure, gravity field and plume impingement will force the spacecraft to drift away from the asteroid. In turn, a variation of the motion of the spacecraft produces a change in the modulus and direction of the deflection action which modifies the rotational and orbital motion of the asteroid. An on-board state estimation and control algorithm is then presented that simultaneously provides an optimal proximity control and a control of the rotational motion of the asteroid. It will be shown that the simultaneous control of the rotational and proximity motions of asteroid and spacecraft has a significant impact on the required deflection time.

  17. Ultrashort-pulse laser ablation of gold thin film targets: Theory and experiment

    Laser ablation of a gold thin film irradiated by ultrashort pulses is studied using molecular-dynamics simulations, and compared with that of a bulk target. A film thickness comparable to the ballistic electron depth in gold (≈ 100 nm) is considered, evidencing a significant change of the temperature spatial profile inside the target material, which eventually influences the material decomposition. Particular emphasis is given to the process of nanoparticle generation. The simulations indicate a more uniform heating of the sample in the case of the thin film, which is accompanied by a more homogeneous size distribution of the nanoparticles produced in the ablation process. An experimental characterization of the ultrashort-pulse ablation process is also carried out. The produced nanoparticles are collected on suitable substrates, and atomic force microscopy analysis of less than one layer deposits is performed. An ≈ 2 × narrowing of the nanoparticles equivalent to spherical diameter size distribution is observed in the case of ablation of the gold thin film, in fairly good agreement with the theoretical predictions. Moreover, interesting changes of the nanoparticle shape are evidenced, which are correlated to the changes in the nanoparticle ablation plume dynamics, as studied by time-gated imaging of its self-emission. Our findings suggest ultrashort-pulse laser ablation of thin films as a viable route to achieve a more uniform nanoparticle size distribution. - Highlights: • Nanoparticle generation at fs laser ablation of Au bulk target and thin film is studied. • The spatial confinement in depth at thin film geometry results in homogeneous heating. • Narrower and more homogeneous particle size distribution is observed for thin film

  18. Novel plume deflection concept testing Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will explore the feasibility and effectiveness of utilizing an electrically driven thermal shield for use as part of rocket plume deflectors. To...

  19. Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Rocket Plumes Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the need for non-intrusive sensors for rocket plume properties, we propose a laser-based velocity diagnostic that does not require seeding, works in high...

  20. Plume Diagnostics for Combustion Stability Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sierra Engineering Inc. and Purdue University propose to develop a non-intrusive plume instrument capable of detecting and diagnosing combustion instability. This...

  1. Ozone photochemistry in boreal biomass burning plumes

    M. Parrington

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of ozone (O3 photochemistry observed by aircraft measurements of boreal biomass burning plumes over eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Measurements of O3 and a number of key chemical species associated with O3 photochemistry, including non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs, nitrogen oxides (NOx and total nitrogen containing species (NOy, were made from the UK FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft as part of the "quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites" (BORTAS experiment between 12 July and 3 August 2011. The location and timing of the aircraft measurements put BORTAS into a unique position to sample biomass burning plumes from the same source region in Northwestern Ontario with a range of ages. We found that O3 mixing ratios measured in biomass burning plumes were indistinguishable from non-plume measurements, but evaluating them in relationship to measurements of carbon monoxide (CO, total alkyl nitrates (ΣAN and the surrogate species NOz (= NOy-NOx revealed that the potential for O3 production increased with plume age. We used NMHC ratios to estimate photochemical ages of the observed biomass burning plumes between 0 and 10 days. The BORTAS measurements provided a wide dynamic range of O3 production in the sampled biomass burning plumes with ΔO3/ΔCO enhancement ratios increasing from 0.020 ± 0.008 ppbv ppbv−1 in plumes with photochemical ages less than 2 days to 0.55 ± 0.29 ppbv ppbv−1 in plumes with photochemical ages greater than 5 days. We found that the main contributing factor to the variability in the ΔO3/ΔCO enhancement ratio was ΔCO in plumes with photochemical ages less than 4 days, and that was a transition to ΔO3 becoming the main contributing factor in plumes with ages greater than 4 days. In comparing O3 mixing ratios with components of the NOy budget, we observed that plumes with ages between 2 and 4 days were characterised

  2. Mantle plumes: Why the current skepticism?

    Gillian R. Foulger

    2005-01-01

    The present reappraisal of the mantle plume hypothesis is perhaps the most exciting current debate in Earth science. Nevertheless, the fundamental reasons for why it has arisen are often not well understood. They are that 1) many observations do not agree with the predictions of the original model, 2) it is possible that convection of the sort required to generate thermal plumes in the Earth's mantle does not occur, 3) so many variants of the original model have been invoked to accommodate conflicting data that the plume hypthesis is in practice no longer testable, and 4) alternative models are viable, though these have been largely neglected by researchers. Regardless of the final outcome, the present vigorous debate is to be welcomed since it is likely to stimulate new discoveries in a way that unquestioning acceptance of the conventional plume model will not.

  3. Isotopic mapping of groundwater perchlorate plumes.

    Sturchio, Neil C; Hoaglund, John R; Marroquin, Roy J; Beloso, Abelardo D; Heraty, Linnea J; Bortz, Sarah E; Patterson, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of stable isotope ratios of chlorine and oxygen in perchlorate can, in some cases, be used for mapping and source identification of groundwater perchlorate plumes. This is demonstrated here for large, intersecting perchlorate plumes in groundwater from a region having extensive groundwater perchlorate contamination and a large population dependent on groundwater resources. The region contains both synthetic perchlorate derived from rocket fuel manufacturing and testing activities and agricultural perchlorate derived predominantly from imported Chilean (Atacama) nitrate fertilizer, along with a likely component of indigenous natural background perchlorate from local wet and dry atmospheric deposition. Most samples within each plume reflect either a predominantly synthetic or a predominantly agricultural perchlorate source and there is apparently a minor contribution from the indigenous natural background perchlorate. The existence of isotopically distinct perchlorate plumes in this area is consistent with other lines of evidence, including groundwater levels and flow paths as well as the historical land use and areal distribution of potential perchlorate sources. PMID:21352209

  4. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation byradiofrequency

    Gianmattia del Genio; Federica del Genio; Pietro Schettino; Paolo Limongelli; Salvatore Tolone; Luigi Brusciano; Manuela Avellino; Chiara Vitiello; Giovanni Docimo; Angelo Pezzullo; Ludovico Docimo

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benignlesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is anestablished endoscopic technique for the eradication ofBarrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation ofesophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA)have been reported. We report a case of esophagealpapilloma successfully treated with a single sessionof radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation ofthe lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using anew catheter inserted through the working channelof endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue wasremoved by a specifically designed cup. Completeablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy withbiopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of asa new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patientswith esophageal papilloma.

  5. Fire analog: a comparison between fire plumes and energy center cooling tower plumes

    Orgill, M.M.

    1977-10-01

    Thermal plumes or convection columns associated with large fires are compared to thermal plumes from cooling towers and proposed energy centers to evaluate the fire analog concept. Energy release rates of mass fires are generally larger than for single or small groups of cooling towers but are comparable to proposed large energy centers. However, significant physical differences exist between cooling tower plumes and fire plumes. Cooling tower plumes are generally dominated by ambient wind, stability and turbulence conditions. Fire plumes, depending on burning rates and other factors, can transform into convective columns which may cause the fire behavior to become more violent. This transformation can cause strong inflow winds and updrafts, turbulence and concentrated vortices. Intense convective columns may interact with ambient winds to create significant downwind effects such as wakes and Karman vortex streets. These characteristics have not been observed with cooling tower plumes to date. The differences in physical characteristics between cooling tower and fire plumes makes the fire analog concept very questionable even though the approximate energy requirements appear to be satisfied in case of large energy centers. Additional research is suggested in studying the upper-level plume characteristics of small experimental fires so this information can be correlated with similar data from cooling towers. Numerical simulation of fires and proposed multiple cooling tower systems could also provide comparative data.

  6. Hydrothermal plumes and processes in Indian Ocean

    Sands, Carla Marie

    2006-01-01

    The predicted cycling of the whole ocean through hydrothermal plumes is comparable to the mixing time of the oceans (few thousand years). Hence, understanding hydrothermal plume processes is crucial if their impact on the global geochemical cycles of elements is to be assessed. One of the most important processes that has been demonstrated to modify the gross chemical flux from venting to the oceans is the oxidative precipitation of dissolved Fe (II). It has been hypothesised t...

  7. A modeling of buoyant gas plume migration

    Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-12-01

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic time, eventually dissolves in the formation brine and remains trapped by mineralization. However, one of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is that naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even in a supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the formation brine. Buoyancy tends to drive the leaked CO{sub 2} plume upward. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution and migration, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for safe carbon dioxide geologic sequestration. In this study, we obtain simple estimates of vertical plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. We describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases by a Buckley-Leverett type model. The model predicts that a plume of supercritical carbon dioxide in a homogeneous water-saturated porous medium does not migrate upward like a bubble in bulk water. Rather, it spreads upward until it reaches a seal or until it becomes immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration (Silin et al., 2007). In a layered reservoir, the simplified solution predicts a slower plume front propagation relative to a homogeneous formation with the same harmonic mean permeability. In contrast, the model yields much higher

  8. Rocket plume tomography of combustion species

    Kutrieb, Joshua M.

    2001-01-01

    Interest in accurate detection and targeting of aggressor missiles has received considerable interest with the national priority of developing a missile defense system. Understanding the thermal signatures of the exhaust plumes of such missiles is key to accomplishing that mission. Before signature models can be precisely developed for specific rockets, the radiation of the molecular or combustion species within those plumes must be accurately predicted. A combination translation / rotation s...

  9. Thermal plumes of kitchen appliances: idle mode

    Kosonen, R. [Halton Oy, Kausala (Finland); Koskela, H.; Saarinen, P. [Finnish Inst. of Occupational Health, Turku (Finland)

    2006-09-15

    In the kitchen environment, pollutant fumes of the cooking process are released into the ambient air by the convection plumes. The practical problem is to compute the requested extract air flow rate to maintain good indoor air quality in an energy efficient manner. In the most accurate design method, the design of a kitchen ventilation system is based on the flow rate of the thermal plume. In this method, the amount of heat carried in a convective plume over a cooking appliance at a certain height is calculated. The heat load is then assumed to be a point heat source and the velocity and temperature profiles are approximated to be Gaussian distributed. In commercial kitchens, the location of the extraction point is at a height of 0.9-1.4 m above the heat source where the convection flow is not yet fully developed. This paper demonstrates that the generic plume equation, derived in the region of complete flow similarity, is not accurate in this intermediate zone. However, it gives a reasonable accuracy for practical applications when an individually adjusted empirical factor of the virtual origin is applied. The power intensity of the heat gain has a much more significant effect on the plume characteristic than the previous studies indicate. The plumes are narrower and the spreading angle is smaller with higher heat gains. (author)

  10. Vertical distribution of Pahang River plume

    Taher, T. M.; Lihan, T.; Mustapha, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    Large rivers transported high amount of discharge towards the sea and induced the river plume formation. The contents of the plume consist of suspended solids, nutrients, pollutants and other particles. Productivity at estuary depends on the organic and nutrient contents from the river discharge. Due to many possible factors, the dispersal of the plume shows spatial variation horizontally and vertically. The monsoonal wind is a factor that effecting plume vertical profile pattern. This study determines the vertical distribution pattern of the plumeat Pahang River through field observation. Several water parameters were measured during cruises conducted at respective monsoon. Data collected includes depth, chlorophyll-a, salinity, temperature and suspended particulate matter. Depth at Pahang's offshore usually does not reached more than 15 m depth because of the shallow continental shelf at South China Sea. The plume has higher concentration at the mouth of the river which causes the area to be less saline and it decreases as the station furthers from the river. Chlorophyll-a is distributed mainly at the surface level where the area is warmer and received freshwater runoff. Suspended particulate matter shows downward distribution from the front of the estuary towards deep water column depth (10 m). Temperature pattern shows warmer surface layer with depth less than 5 m while deeper water column has lower temperature. Vertical profile pattern of Pahang River plume generally shows slight difference between each monsoon by referring to particular parameter.

  11. Ablation dynamics in laser sclerotomy ab externo

    Brinkmann, Ralf; Droege, Gerit; Mohrenstecher, Dirk; Scheu, M.; Birngruber, Reginald

    1996-01-01

    Laser sclerostomy ab externo with flashlamp excited mid-IR laser systems emitting in the 2-3 micrometer spectral range is in phase II clinical trials. Although acutely high success rates were achieved, the restenosis rate after several months is about 40%. Laser pulses of several hundreds of microseconds, known to induce thermo-mechanical explosive evaporation were used for this procedure. We investigated the ablation dynamics in tissue and the cavitation bubble dynamics in water by means of an Er:YAG laser system to estimate the extent of mechanical damage zones in the sclera and in the anterior chamber, which may contribute to the clinical failure. We found substantial mechanical tissue deformation during the ablation process caused by the cavitation effects. Stress waves up to several bar generated by explosive evaporization were measured. The fast mechanical stretching and collapsing of the scleral tissue induced by cavitation resulted in tissue dissection as could be proved by flash photography and histology. The observed high restenosis might be a result of a subsequent enhanced wound healing process. Early fistula occlusions due to iris adherences, observed in about 20% of the clinical cases may be attributed to intraocular trauma induced by vapor bubble expansion through the anterior chamber after scleral perforation. An automatic feedback system minimizing adverse effects by steering and terminating the laser process during scleral fistulization is demonstrated. Moreover, a new approach in laser sclerostomy ab externo is presented using a cw-IR laser diode system emitting at the 1.94 micrometer mid-IR water absorption peak. This system was used in vitro and showed smaller damage zones compared to the pulsed laser radiation.

  12. Local thermal ablation of renal cell carcinoma

    Purpose: With evolving local thermal ablation technology, the clinical application of thermal ablation has been actively investigated in the treatment for renal cell carcinoma. We review the evolution and current status of radiofrequency ablation and microwave ablation for renal cell carcinoma. Materials and methods: All articles published in English on radiofrequency ablation or microwave ablation as a treatment for renal cell carcinoma were identified with a MEDLINE® and PubMed® search from 1990 to 2010. Results: Local thermal ablation has several advantages, including keeping more normal renal units, relatively simple operation, easy tolerance, fewer complications, a shorter hospitalization and convalescence period. Long-term data has determined radiofrequency ablation is responsible for poor surgical candidates with renal cell carcinoma, however, tumor size, location and shape might affect the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation. Microwave ablation can induce large ablation volumes and yield good local tumor control. Associated complications appear to be low. Conclusions: Local ablative approaches seem to represent an attractive alternative to extirpative surgery for the treatment of small renal neoplasms in select patients. Potential developments include concepts to improve the accuracy and effectiveness of thermal ablation by improving the guiding, monitoring capabilities and detection capacity of multi-center lesions to provide at least equivalent cancer control to conventional surgery.

  13. Optical wave microphone measurement during laser ablation of Si

    Pulsed laser irradiation is used for surface treatment of a solid and ablation for particle formation in gas, liquid or supercritical phase media. When a pulsed laser is used to irradiate a solid, spatial refractive index variations (including photothermal expansion, shockwaves and particles) occur, which vary depending on the energy density of the pulsed laser. We focused on this phenomenon and applied an unique method for detection of refractive index variation using an optical wave microphone based on Fraunhofer diffraction. In this research, we analyzed the waveforms and frequencies of refractive index variations caused by pulsed laser irradiation of silicon in air and measured with an optical wave microphone.

  14. Rayleigh Wave Azimuthal Anisotropy beneath the Hawaiian Swell - Evidence for plume-related mantle flow

    Laske, Gabi; Marzen, Rachel

    2015-04-01

    During the two-stage Hawaiian PLUME (Plume-Lithosphere Undersea Melt Experiment) deployment, we collected continuous seismic data at ten land stations and nearly 70 ocean bottom sites from 2005 through mid-2007. Both the usage broad-band seismometers as well as the central location of Hawaii with good azimuthal seismicity coverage allows us to conduct a comprehensive analysis of surface wave azimuthal anisotropy at periods between 20 and 100 s. Using a triangle method that we developed for earlier studies, we fit propagating spherical wave fronts to the phases at three stations simultaneously to determine the frequency-dependent average phase velocity within these triangles. We use the standard Smith-and-Dahlen parameterization to express azimuthal variations. A systematic comparison between results obtained for different truncation levels in the trigonometric expansion allows us to assess stability of the results and assign error bars. We observe a marked shift in the overall geometry of fast directions. At periods shorter than about 30 s, the fast direction aligns coherently with the fossil spreading direction across the entire PLUME network. This result supports the idea that flow-aligned asthenospheric material is added to the cooling plate as it thickens. This is also consistent with published PLUME shear-wave splitting observations. However, at longer periods, that sense the asthenosphere below the fast direction rotates incoherently, indicating that flow in the asthenosphere is significantly perturbed from the direction of current plate motion. We present results from forward modeling as well as initial inversions that suggest that plume-related mantle flow does not reach into the upper lithosphere, at the scales imposed by both the PLUME station spacing and the surface waves used in this study.

  15. Measurements at cooling tower plumes. Part 3. Three-dimensional measurements at cooling tower plumes

    An extended field experiment is described in which cooling tower plumes were studied by means of three-dimensional in situ measurements. The goal was to obtain input data for numerical models of cooling tower plumes. Of special interest were data for testing or developing assumptions for sub-grid parametrizations. Utilizing modern systems for high-resolution aerology and small aircraft, four measuring campaigns were conducted: two campaigns (1974) at the cooling towers of the RWE power station Neurath and also two (1975) at the single cooling tower of the RWE power station Meppen. Because of the broad spectrum of weather situations it can be assumed that the results are representative with regard to the interrelationship between structure of cooling tower plume and large-scale meteorological situation. A large number of flights with a powered glider crossing the plumes on orthogonal tracks was performed. All flights showed that the plume could be identified up to large downwind distances by discontinuous jumps of temperature and vapor pressure. Therefore, a definite geometry of the plume could always be defined. In all cross sections a vertical circulation could be observed. At the boundary, which could be defined by the mentioned jumps of temperature and vapor pressure, a maximum of downward vertical motion could be observed in most cases. Entrainment along the boundary of a cross section seems to be very small, except at the lower part of the plume. There, the mass entrainment is maximum and is responsible for plume rise as well as for enlargement of the cross section. The visible part of the plume (cloud) was only a small fraction of the whole plume. High-resolution aerology is necessary in order to explain the structure and behavior of such plumes. This is especially the case in investigations regarding the dynamic break-through of temperature inversions. Such cases were observed frequently under various meteorological conditions and are described

  16. Hubble Captures Volcanic Eruption Plume From Io

    1997-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a picture of a 400-km-high (250-mile-high) plume of gas and dust from a volcanic eruption on Io, Jupiter's large innermost moon.Io was passing in front of Jupiter when this image was taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in July 1996. The plume appears as an orange patch just off the edge of Io in the eight o'clock position, against the blue background of Jupiter's clouds. Io's volcanic eruptions blasts material hundreds of kilometers into space in giant plumes of gas and dust. In this image, material must have been blown out of the volcano at more than 2,000 mph to form a plume of this size, which is the largest yet seen on Io.Until now, these plumes have only been seen by spacecraft near Jupiter, and their detection from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope opens up new opportunities for long-term studies of these remarkable phenomena.The plume seen here is from Pele, one of Io's most powerful volcanos. Pele's eruptions have been seen before. In March 1979, the Voyager 1 spacecraft recorded a 300-km-high eruption cloud from Pele. But the volcano was inactive when the Voyager 2 spacecraft flew by Jupiter in July 1979. This Hubble observation is the first glimpse of a Pele eruption plume since the Voyager expeditions.Io's volcanic plumes are much taller than those produced by terrestrial volcanos because of a combination of factors. The moon's thin atmosphere offers no resistance to the expanding volcanic gases; its weak gravity (one-sixth that of Earth) allows material to climb higher before falling; and its biggest volcanos are more powerful than most of Earth's volcanos.This image is a contrast-enhanced composite of an ultraviolet image (2600 Angstrom wavelength), shown in blue, and a violet image (4100 Angstrom wavelength), shown in orange. The orange color probably occurs because of the absorption and/or scattering of ultraviolet light in the plume. This light from Jupiter passes through the plume and is

  17. Investigation of Nd:YAG laser produced tin droplet plasma expansion

    Chen, Ziqi; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang; Wang, Junwu

    2016-05-01

    The present work reports an investigation of plasma expansion produced by Nd:YAG laser irradiating tin droplets. An intensified charged coupled device camera was used to record the plasma plume images, and the temporal evolution of the plasma plume was studied at various laser intensities. Our results demonstrate that the shape of the plasma plume develops from an approximate circle to an ellipse. The temporal evolutions of plasma boundary and plasma centroid were calculated by the secondary moment of plasma image intensity. The angle distributions of the plasma expanding velocity were obtained; the results show that the plasma expanding velocity decreases with increase of the angle to the incoming laser axis. In addition, the eccentricity of the plasma ellipse decreases with time. Meanwhile, we found that the centroid of plasma clusters moves toward the laser incoming direction during the expansion stage and the velocity of this motion is independent of laser intensity.

  18. Microbial populations in contaminant plumes

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Bekins, Barbara A.

    Efficient biodegradation of subsurface contaminants requires two elements: (1) microbial populations with the necessary degradative capabilities, and (2) favorable subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions. Practical constraints on experimental design and interpretation in both the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences have resulted in limited knowledge of the interaction between hydrogeological and microbiological features of subsurface environments. These practical constraints include: (1) inconsistencies between the scales of investigation in the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences, and (2) practical limitations on the ability to accurately define microbial populations in environmental samples. However, advances in application of small-scale sampling methods and interdisciplinary approaches to site investigations are beginning to significantly improve understanding of hydrogeological and microbiological interactions. Likewise, culture-based and molecular analyses of microbial populations in subsurface contaminant plumes have revealed significant adaptation of microbial populations to plume environmental conditions. Results of recent studies suggest that variability in subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions significantly influences subsurface microbial-community structure. Combined investigations of site conditions and microbial-community structure provide the knowledge needed to understand interactions between subsurface microbial populations, plume geochemistry, and contaminant biodegradation. La biodégradation efficace des polluants souterrains requiert deux éléments: des populations microbiennes possédant les aptitudes nécessaires à la dégradation, et des conditions géochimiques et hydrologiques souterraines favorables. Des contraintes pratiques sur la conception et l'interprétation des expériences à la fois en microbiologie et en hydrogéologie ont conduit à une connaissance limitée des interactions entre les

  19. Dynamics of plasma expansion in the pulsed laser material interaction

    N Kumar; S Dash; A K Tyagi; Baldev Raj

    2010-08-01

    A pulse Nd: YAG laser with pulse duration 5–10 ns, beam radius at focal point 0·2–0·4 mm, wavelengths 1064 nm, 532 nm and 238 nm with linearly polarized radiation and Gaussian beam profile, was impacted on a thin foil of titanium metal for generating plasma plume. Numerically, the above parameters were linked with average kinetic energy of the electrons and ions in the laser-induced plasma. In the present model, electrons having higher velocities are assumed to escape from plasma, that forms a negatively charged sheath around the plasma. It is seen from present computations that the forward directed nature of the laser evaporation process results from the anisotropic expansion velocities associated with different species. These velocities are mainly controlled by the initial dimension of the expanding plasma. An attempt was undertaken to estimate the length of the plume at different ambient gas pressures using an adiabatic expansion model. The rate of the plasma expansion for various Ar+ ion energies was derived from numerical calculations. A numerical definition of this plasma includes events like collisional/radiative, excitation/de-excitation and ionization/recombination processes involving multiples of energy levels with several ionization stages. Finally, based on a kinetic model, the plasma expansion rate across the laser beam axis was investigated.

  20. High-speed photographic studies of dye-assisted pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation of dental hard tissues

    Lu, Quiang; Wallace, David B.; Hayes, Donald J.

    1997-06-01

    We have been evaluating the use of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser for ablating hard dental tissue. For this application we apply dye-drops of an IR absorptive fluid on the enamel, then irradiate with a laser pulse from the laser. By using ink- jet technology to deliver the dye-drops, we can attain micron- and millisecond-scale precision in drop delivery, with a 'burst' of drops preceding each laser pulse. To gain better understanding of the ablation process we have used a high- speed CCD camera system with 1 microsecond(s) exposure and 1 microsecond(s) inter-exposure-interval capability. Fast photography of the ablation process showed the following typical events. (i) The laser induced plasma plume erupts immediately after pulse onset, expands to maximum within 50 microsecond(s) , and lasts up to 200 microsecond(s) . (ii) Ejected particles flying away from the site of laser pulse/dye-drop impact are detected within 30 microsecond(s) of laser pulse onset, and continue up to 10 ms. These particles attain velocities up to 50 m/s with lower velocities from lower pulse power. (iii) The plasma plume has a peak height that increases with increasing laser fluence, ranging up to 10 mm for a fluence of 242 J/cm2 on enamel. From this study, the dye-assisted ablation mechanisms are inferred to be plasma-mediated and explosion- mediated tissue removal.

  1. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm-2) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm-2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm-2. The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material. (paper)

  3. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  4. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatmentoption for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis,thermal ablation techniques provide a valid nonsurgicaltreatment alternative, thanks to their minimalinvasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile,proven efficacy in local disease control, virtuallyunlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Differentenergy sources are currently employed in clinics asphysical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgicalthermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency(RF) currents are the most used, whilemicrowave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasinglypopular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidlybecame the standard of care in ablation, especially inthe treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFAexhibits substantial performance limitations in thetreatment of large lesions and/or tumors located nearmajor heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the FarEastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promisingresults but also severe limitations in the controllabilityof the emitted field and in the high amount of poweremployed for the ablation of large tumors, resultingin a poor coagulative performance and a relativelyhigh complication rate, nowadays shows better resultsboth in terms of treatment controllability and of overallcoagulative performance, thanks to the improvementof technology. In this review we provide an extensiveand detailed overview of the key physical and technicalaspects of MWA and of the currently available systems,and we want to discuss the most relevant published dataon MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinicalresults and to the type and rate of complications, both inabsolute terms and in comparison with RFA.

  5. African Equatorial and Subtropical Ozone Plumes: Recurrences Timescales of the Brown Cloud Trans-African Plumes and Other Plumes

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Thompson, Anne M.; Guan, Hong; Witte, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-01-01

    We have found repeated illustrations in the maps of Total Tropospheric Ozone (TTO) of apparent transport of ozone from the Indian Ocean to the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. Most interesting are examples that coincide with the INDOEX observations of late northern winter, 1999. Three soundings associated with the SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) network help confirm and quantify degree of influence of pollution, lightning, and stratospheric sources, suggesting that perhaps 40% of increased Atlantic ozone could be Asian pollution during periods of maximum identified in the TTO maps. We outline recurrent periods of apparent ozone transport from Indian to Atlantic Ocean regions both during and outside the late-winter period. These are placed in the context of some general observations about factors controlling recurrence timescales for the expression of both equatorial and subtropical plumes. Low-level subtropical plumes are often controlled by frontal systems approaching the Namib coast; these direct mid-level air into either easterly equatorial plumes or westerly mid- troposphere plumes. Equatorial plumes of ozone cross Africa on an easterly path due to the occasional coincidence of two phenomena: (1) lofting of ozone to mid and upper levels, often in the Western Indian Ocean, and (2) the eastward extension of an Equatorial African easterly jet.

  6. PlumeSat: A Micro-Satellite Based Plume Imagery Collection Experiment

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Ng, L.C.

    2002-06-30

    This paper describes a technical approach to cost-effectively collect plume imagery of boosting targets using a novel micro-satellite based platform operating in low earth orbit (LEO). The plume collection Micro-satellite or PlueSat for short, will be capable of carrying an array of multi-spectral (UV through LWIR) passive and active (Imaging LADAR) sensors and maneuvering with a lateral divert propulsion system to different observation altitudes (100 to 300 km) and different closing geometries to achieve a range of aspect angles (15 to 60 degrees) in order to simulate a variety of boost phase intercept missions. The PlumeSat will be a cost effective platform to collect boost phase plume imagery from within 1 to 10 km ranges, resulting in 0.1 to 1 meter resolution imagery of a variety of potential target missiles with a goal of demonstrating reliable plume-to-hardbody handover algorithms for future boost phase intercept missions. Once deployed on orbit, the PlumeSat would perform a series phenomenology collection experiments until expends its on-board propellants. The baseline PlumeSat concept is sized to provide from 5 to 7 separate fly by data collects of boosting targets. The total number of data collects will depend on the orbital basing altitude and the accuracy in delivering the boosting target vehicle to the nominal PlumeSat fly-by volume.

  7. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  8. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Pua, Uei, E-mail: druei@yahoo.com [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  9. Short-pulse laser ablation of solids: From phase explosion to fragmentation

    The mechanisms of laser ablation in silicon are investigated close to the threshold energy for pulse durations of 500 fs and 50 ps. This is achieved using a unique model coupling carrier and atom dynamics within a unified Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics scheme. Under femtosecond laser irradiation, isochoric heating and rapid adiabatic expansion of the material provide a natural pathway to phase explosion. This is not observed under slower, nonadiabatic cooling with picosecond pulses where fragmentation of the hot metallic fluid is the only relevant ablation mechanism

  10. Ablation of Solid Hydrogen in a Plasma

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard

    1979-01-01

    Several hydrogen pellet ablation models based on the formation of a shielding neutral cloud have been reported by different authors. The predicted ablation rates are shown to follow almost the same scaling law and this is used to explain the authors' ablation experiment....

  11. Soft thrombus formation in radiofrequency catheter ablation

    Demolin, JM; Eick, OJ; Munch, K; Koullick, E; Nakagawa, H; Wittkampf, FHM

    2002-01-01

    During RF catheter ablation, local temperature elevation can result in coagulum formation on the ablation electrode, resulting in impedance rise. A recent study has also demonstrated the formation of a so-called soft thrombus during experimental ablations. This deposit poorly adhered to the catheter

  12. Fast ion generation in femtosecond laser ablation of a metallic target at moderate laser intensity

    The generation of ions during laser ablation of a metallic target (copper) with ≈50 fs Ti:Sa laser pulses of moderate intensity (≈1014 W cm−2) is studied by simultaneous fast-imaging and ion-probe techniques. The spatiotemporal distribution of excited ions and neutrals in the laser-produced plasma plume is analyzed by exploiting appropriate band-pass filters in the imaging set-up, while the ion flux angular distribution is characterized by angle-resolved ion probe measurements. An interesting feature of our results is the generation of a fast ion population separated from the neutral component of the atomic plasma plume and characterized by sub-keV kinetic energies, which is interpreted in the frame of a simple model of ambipolar diffusion. (paper)

  13. Models of the SL9 Impacts II. Radiative-hydrodynamic Modeling of the Plume Splashback

    Deming, D; Deming, Drake; Harrington, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    We model the plume "splashback" phase of the SL9 collisions with Jupiter using the ZEUS-3D hydrodynamic code. We modified the Zeus code to include gray radiative transport, and we present validation tests. We couple the infalling mass and momentum fluxes of SL9 plume material (from paper I) to a jovian atmospheric model. A strong and complex shock structure results. The modeled shock temperatures agree well with observations, and the structure and evolution of the modeled shocks account for the appearance of high excitation molecular line emission after the peak of the continuum light curve. The splashback region cools by radial expansion as well as by radiation. The morphology of our synthetic continuum light curves agree with observations over a broad wavelength range (0.9 to 12 microns). A feature of our ballistic plume is a shell of mass at the highest velocities, which we term the "vanguard". Portions of the vanguard ejected on shallow trajectories produce a lateral shock front, whose initial expansion a...

  14. Expansion for Universal Quantifiers

    Lenglet, Sergueï

    2012-01-01

    Expansion is an operation on typings (i.e., pairs of typing environments and result types) defined originally in type systems for the lambda-calculus with intersection types in order to obtain principal (i.e., most informative, strongest) typings. In a type inference scenario, expansion allows postponing choices for whether and how to use non-syntax-driven typing rules (e.g., intersection introduction) until enough information has been gathered to make the right decision. Furthermore, these choices can be equivalent to inserting uses of such typing rules at deeply nested positions in a typing derivation, without needing to actually inspect or modify (or even have) the typing derivation. Expansion has in recent years become simpler due to the use of expansion variables (e.g., in System E). This paper extends expansion and expansion variables to systems with forall-quantifiers. We present System Fs, an extension of System F with expansion, and prove its main properties. This system turns type inference into a c...

  15. Near field characteristics of buoyant helium plumes

    Kuchimanchi K Bharadwaj; Debopam Das; Pavan K Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Puffing and entrainment characteristics of helium plumes emanating out into ambient air from a circular orifice are investigated in the present study. Velocity and density fields are measured across a diametric plane using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) respectively in phase resolved manner. Experiments are performed in Froude numbers range 0.2–0.4 and for Reynolds numbers 58–248. Puffing frequency measurements reveal that the plume puffing frequencies are insensitive to the plume exit conditions, since the instability is buoyancy driven. The frequencies obtained in the present case are in agreement with frequencies obtained by Cetegen & Kasper (1996) for plumes originating from circular nozzles of various L/D ratios. Velocity and density measurements reveal that toroidal vortex formed during a puffing cycle entrains ambient air as it traverses downstream and this periodic engulfment governs the entrainment mechanism in pulsating plumes. The obtained velocity and density fields are used to calculate mass entrainment rates. It is revealed that though the flow is unsteady, the contribution of unsteady term in mass conservation to entrainment is negligible, and it becomes zero over a puff cycle. Finally, an empirical relation for variation of mass entrainment with height has been proposed, in which the non-dimensional mass entrainment is found to follow a power law with the non-dimensional height.

  16. Crater Formation Due to Lunar Plume Impingement

    Marsell, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Thruster plume impingement on a surface comprised of small, loose particles may cause blast ejecta to be spread over a large area and possibly cause damage to the vehicle. For this reason it is important to study the effects of plume impingement and crater formation on surfaces like those found on the moon. Lunar soil, also known as regolith, is made up of fine granular particles on the order of 100 microns.i Whenever a vehicle lifts-off from such a surface, the exhaust plume from the main engine will cause the formation of a crater. This crater formation may cause laterally ejected mass to be deflected and possibly damage the vehicle. This study is a first attempt at analyzing the dynamics of crater formation due to thruster exhaust plume impingement during liftoff from the moon. Though soil erosion on the lunar surface is not considered, this study aims at examining the evolution of the shear stress along the lunar surface as the engine fires. The location of the regions of high shear stress will determine where the crater begins to form and will lend insight into how big the crater will be. This information will help determine the probability that something will strike the vehicle. The final sections of this report discuss a novel method for studying this problem that uses a volume of fluid (VOF)ii method to track the movement of both the exhaust plume and the eroding surface.

  17. Third harmonic generation in air ambient and laser ablated carbon plasma

    Singh, Ravi Pratap, E-mail: ravips@iitk.ac.in; Gupta, Shyam L.; Thareja, Raj K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh 208016 (India)

    2015-12-15

    We report the third harmonic generation of a nanosecond laser pulse (1.06 μm) in air ambient and in the presence of nanoparticles from laser ablated carbon plasma. Significant decrease in the threshold of third harmonic generation and multi-fold increment in the intensity of generated third harmonic is observed in presence of carbon plasma. The third harmonic in air is due to the quasi-resonant four photon process involving vibrationally excited states of molecular ion of nitrogen due to electron impact ionization and laser pulse. Following optical emission spectroscopic observations we conclude that the presence of C{sub 2} and CN in the ablated plume play a vital role in the observed third harmonic signals.

  18. Third harmonic generation in air ambient and laser ablated carbon plasma

    We report the third harmonic generation of a nanosecond laser pulse (1.06 μm) in air ambient and in the presence of nanoparticles from laser ablated carbon plasma. Significant decrease in the threshold of third harmonic generation and multi-fold increment in the intensity of generated third harmonic is observed in presence of carbon plasma. The third harmonic in air is due to the quasi-resonant four photon process involving vibrationally excited states of molecular ion of nitrogen due to electron impact ionization and laser pulse. Following optical emission spectroscopic observations we conclude that the presence of C2 and CN in the ablated plume play a vital role in the observed third harmonic signals

  19. Spectroscopic studies of the exhaust plume of a quasi-steady MPD accelerator. Ph.D. Thesis

    Bruckner, A. P.

    1972-01-01

    Spectroscopic and photographic investigations are reported that reveal a complex azimuthal species structure in the exhaust plume of a quasi-steady argon MPD accelerator. Over a wide range of operating conditions the injected argon remains collimated in discrete jets which are azimuthally in line with the six propellant injector orifices. The regions between these argon jets, including the central core of the exhaust flow, are occupied by impurities such as carbon, hydrogen and oxygen ablated from the Plexiglas back plate of the arc chamber. The features of this plume structure are found to be dependent on the arc current and mass flow rate. It is found that nearly half the observed velocity is attained in an acceleration region well downstream of the region of significant electromagnetic interaction. Recombination calculations show that the ionization energy is essentially frozen.

  20. The 2016 Case for Mantle Plumes and a Plume-Fed Asthenosphere (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)

    Morgan, Jason P.

    2016-04-01

    The process of science always returns to weighing evidence and arguments for and against a given hypothesis. As hypotheses can only be falsified, never universally proved, doubt and skepticism remain essential elements of the scientific method. In the past decade, even the hypothesis that mantle plumes exist as upwelling currents in the convecting mantle has been subject to intense scrutiny; from geochemists and geochronologists concerned that idealized plume models could not fit many details of their observations, and from seismologists concerned that mantle plumes can sometimes not be 'seen' in their increasingly high-resolution tomographic images of the mantle. In the place of mantle plumes, various locally specific and largely non-predictive hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origins of non-plate boundary volcanism at Hawaii, Samoa, etc. In my opinion, this debate has now passed from what was initially an extremely useful restorative from simply 'believing' in the idealized conventional mantle plume/hotspot scenario to becoming an active impediment to our community's ability to better understand the dynamics of the solid Earth. Having no working hypothesis at all is usually worse for making progress than having an imperfect and incomplete but partially correct one. There continues to be strong arguments and strong emerging evidence for deep mantle plumes. Furthermore, deep thermal plumes should exist in a mantle that is heated at its base, and the existence of Earth's (convective) geodynamo clearly indicates that heat flows from the core to heat the mantle's base. Here I review recent seismic evidence by French, Romanowicz, and coworkers that I feel lends strong new observational support for the existence of deep mantle plumes. I also review recent evidence consistent with the idea that secular core cooling replenishes half the mantle's heat loss through its top surface, e.g. that the present-day mantle is strongly bottom heated. Causes for

  1. Radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases

    The liver is the second only to lymph nodes as the most common site of metastatic disease irrespective of the primary tumor. Up to 50% of all patients with malignant diseases will develop liver metastases with a significant morbidity and mortality. Although the surgical resection leads to an improvement of the survival time, only approximately 20% of the patients are eligible for surgical intervention. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation represents one of the most important alternatives as well as complementary methods for the therapy of liver metastases. RF ablation can lead in a selected patient group to a palliation or to an increased life expectancy. RF ablation appears either safer (vs. cryotherapy) or easier (vs. laser) or more effective (percutaneous ethanol instillation [PEI]), transarterial chemoembolisation [TACE] in comparison with other minimal invasive procedures. RF ablation can be performed percutaneously, laparoscopically or intraoperatively and may be combined with chemotherapy as well as with surgical resection. Permanent technical improvements of RF systems, a better understanding of the underlying electrophysiological principles and an interdisciplinary approach will lead to a prognosis improvement in patients with liver metastases. (orig.)

  2. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Physics of Hypersonic Flow and TPS Considerations. Destinations, Missions and Requirements. State of the Art Thermal Protection Systems Capabilities. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS. Entry Systems Concepts. Flexible TPS for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators. Conformal TPS for Rigid Aeroshell. 3-D Woven TPS for Extreme Entry Environment. Multi-functional Carbon Fabric for Mechanically Deployable.

  3. A numerical simulation of ablation controlled arcs

    Godin, D.; Trepanier, J.Y. [Ecole Polytechnique, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Eby, S.D. [Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de Recherche en Calcul Applique, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Robin-Jouan, P. [GEC-Alsthom T and D, Villeurbanne, (France)

    1998-09-01

    An approach to model the ablation phenomenon of ablation controlled arcs using computational fluid dynamics was presented. Ablation controlled arcs are found in high voltage electrical equipment such as fuses and circuit-breakers. A qualitative prediction of the ablation level is critical from an industrial point of view because deliberate use of ablation is made to increase the pressure in a circuit-breaker chamber to allow for an efficient extinction when the current returns to zero. The numerical model was validated by comparing results of published experimental data. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Numerical simulation on plasma characteristics of Ge ablated by pulse laser

    In the early stage of UV excimer laser ablation of semiconductor, plasma induced by laser ablation was assumed at local thermodynamic equilibrium. One-dimension hydrodynamic model is presented for the laser ablation of Ge in a background gas (He) at 133.32 Pa and the characteristics of plasma induced by Gaussian-shaped KrF laser pulse with wavelength of 248 nm, pulse width of 17 ns, and peak power of 4 x 108 W/cm2. The results show that the ablated depth arrives 55 nm after laser pulse irradiation. The background gas He is gradually pushed away by the Ge vapor, forming a compression shock wave. And the maximum temperature always locates at the front of the shock wave. Spatial distribution of ionization degrees at different time shows that the first-order ionization degree of Ge always dominates in the region close to the target surface. The second-order ionization degree of Ge is a little bit bigger than the first-order ionization degree of Ge during the pulse in the center part of plume. But after the pulse, the second-order ionization degree of Ge drops gradually and then the first-order ionization degree of Ge dominates again. (authors)

  5. Thermal plumes of kitchen appliances: cooking mode

    Kosonen, R. [Halton Oy, Kausala (Finland); Koskela, H.; Saarinen, P. [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Turku (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The main method in the design practice of kitchen ventilation has been the calculation of the airflow rate, which is sufficient to extract the convective heat and contaminants. Undersized airflow rates could lead into indoor air problems and oversized ventilation system increases unnecessary energy consumption and the life-cycle costs of the system. In the most accurate design method, the design of a kitchen ventilation system is based on the airflow rate of the thermal plume. When the convection flow is calculated, the influence of the cooking process is ignored. In this paper, the actual measured plume characteristics of typical kitchen appliances are presented during cooking mode. The conducted measurements show that the generic plume equation gives a suitable platform for practical applications during the cooking mode as well. The critical factors affecting the accuracy are the estimation of the actual convection load and the proper adjustment of the virtual origin. (author)

  6. Ozone photochemistry in boreal biomass burning plumes

    M. Parrington

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of ozone photochemistry observed by aircraft measurements of boreal biomass burning plumes over Eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Measurements of ozone and a number of key chemical species associated with ozone photochemistry, including non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs, nitrogen oxides (NOx and total nitrogen containing species (NOy, were made from the UK FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft as part of the quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites (BORTAS experiment between 12 July and 3 August 2011. We found that ozone mixing ratios measured in biomass burning plumes were indistinguishable from non-plume measurements, but evaluating them in relationship to measurements of carbon monoxide (CO, total alkyl nitrates (ΣAN and the surrogate species NOz (=NOy - NOx revealed that the potential for ozone production increased with plume age. We used NMHC ratios to estimate photochemical ages of the observed biomass burning plumes between 0 and 15 days. Ozone production, calculated from ΔO3/ΔCO enhancement ratios, increased from 0.020 ± 0.008 ppbv ppbv−1 in plumes with photochemical ages less than 2 days to 0.55 ± 0.29 ppbv ppbv−1 in plumes with photochemical ages greater than 5 days. In comparing ozone mixing ratios with components of the NOy budget we observed that plumes with ages between 2 and 4 days were characterised by high aerosol loading, relative humidity greater than 40%, and low ozone production efficiencies of 8 ppbv ppbv−1 relative to ΣAN and 2 ppbv ppbv−1 relative to NOz. In plumes with ages greater than 4 days, ozone production efficiency increased to 473 ppbv ppbv−1 relative to ΣAN and 155 ppbv ppbv−1 relative to NOz. From the BORTAS measurements we estimated

  7. Plume mapping via hidden Markov methods.

    Farrell, J A; Pang, Shuo; Li, Wei

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of mapping likely locations of a chemical source using an autonomous vehicle operating in a fluid flow. The paper reviews biological plume-tracing concepts, reviews previous strategies for vehicle-based plume tracing, and presents a new plume mapping approach based on hidden Markov methods (HMM). HMM provide efficient algorithms for predicting the likelihood of odor detection versus position, the likelihood of source location versus position, the most likely path taken by the odor to a given location, and the path between two points most likely to result in odor detection. All four are useful for solving the odor source localization problem using an autonomous vehicle. The vehicle is assumed to be capable of detecting above threshold chemical concentration and sensing the fluid flow velocity at the vehicle location. The fluid flow is assumed to vary with space and time, and to have a high Reynolds number (Re>10). PMID:18238238

  8. Simulating Irregular Source Geometries for Ionian Plumes

    Volcanic plumes on Io respresent a complex rarefied flow into a near-vacuum in the presence of gravity. A 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to investigate the gas dynamics of such plumes, with a focus on the effects of source geometry on far-field deposition patterns. A rectangular slit and a semicircular half annulus are simulated to illustrate general principles, especially the effects of vent curvature on deposition ring structure. Then two possible models for the giant plume Pele are presented. One is a curved line source corresponding to an IR image of a particularly hot region in the volcano's caldera and the other is a large area source corresponding to the entire caldera. The former is seen to produce the features seen in observations of Pele's ring, but with an error in orientation. The latter corrects the error in orientation, but loses some structure. A hybrid simulation of 3D slit flow is also discussed.

  9. Multipole expansions in magnetostatics

    Multipole expansions of the magnetic field of a spatially restricted system of stationary currents and those for the potential function of such currents in an external magnetic field are studied using angular momentum algebraic techniques. It is found that the expansion for the magnetic induction vector is made identical to that for the electric field strength of a neutral system of charges by substituting electric for magnetic multipole moments. The toroidal part of the multipole expansion for the magnetic field vector potential can, due to its potential nature, be omitted in the static case. Also, the potential function of a system of currents in an external magnetic field and the potential energy of a neutral system of charges in an external electric field have identical multipole expansions. For axisymmetric systems, the expressions for the field and those for the potential energy of electric and magnetic multipoles are reduced to simple forms, with symmetry axis orientation dependence separated out. (methodological notes)

  10. Multipole expansions in magnetostatics

    Agre, Mark Ya [National University of ' Kyiv-Mohyla Academy' , Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2011-02-28

    Multipole expansions of the magnetic field of a spatially restricted system of stationary currents and those for the potential function of such currents in an external magnetic field are studied using angular momentum algebraic techniques. It is found that the expansion for the magnetic induction vector is made identical to that for the electric field strength of a neutral system of charges by substituting electric for magnetic multipole moments. The toroidal part of the multipole expansion for the magnetic field vector potential can, due to its potential nature, be omitted in the static case. Also, the potential function of a system of currents in an external magnetic field and the potential energy of a neutral system of charges in an external electric field have identical multipole expansions. For axisymmetric systems, the expressions for the field and those for the potential energy of electric and magnetic multipoles are reduced to simple forms, with symmetry axis orientation dependence separated out. (methodological notes)

  11. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    Fermous, Rachid, E-mail: rfermous@usthb.dz; Djebli, Mourad, E-mail: mdjebli@usthb.dz [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, USTHB, B.P. 32 Bab-Ezzouar, 16079 Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  12. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 ± 0.14, 1.45 ± 0.13, and 1.74 ± 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 ± 0.09 and 1.26 ± 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 ± 0.65, 2.85 ± 0.72, and 4.45 ± 0.47 cm3 for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 ± 0.30 and 2.29 ± 0.55 cm3 got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  13. Measurement of femtosecond laser ablation by soft x-ray laser interferometry and reflective imaging

    We have demonstrated a pump and probe imaging of the metal surface morphology during the femtosecond laser ablation by using the laser-driven plasma induced soft x-ray laser (SXRL) as a probe beam. The SXRL is suitable for probing the surface morphological changes, because it has the suitable wavelength of 13.9 nm, corresponding to the penetration depth less than 5nm and the short pulse duration of 7 ps. The pumping laser used for ablation was a Ti:Sapphire laser system. The dependence for the pump laser fluence of the ablation surface expansion and the surface condition (roughness and density gradient) were observed from the soft x-ray interferogram and reflective image, respectively. (author)

  14. Resonant state expansions

    The completeness properties of the discrete set of bound state, virtual states and resonances characterizing the system of a single nonrelativistic particle moving in a central cutoff potential is investigated. From a completeness relation in terms of these discrete states and complex scattering states one can derive several Resonant State Expansions (RSE). It is interesting to obtain purely discrete expansion which, if valid, would significantly simplify the treatment of the continuum. Such expansions can be derived using Mittag-Leffler (ML) theory for a cutoff potential and it would be nice to see if one can obtain the same expansions starting from an eigenfunction theory that is not restricted to a finite sphere. The RSE of Greens functions is especially important, e.g. in the continuum RPA (CRPA) method of treating giant resonances in nuclear physics. The convergence of RSE is studied in simple cases using square well wavefunctions in order to achieve high numerical accuracy. Several expansions can be derived from each other by using the theory of analytic functions and one can the see how to obtain a natural discretization of the continuum. Since the resonance wavefunctions are oscillating with an exponentially increasing amplitude, and therefore have to be interpreted through some regularization procedure, every statement made about quantities involving such states is checked by numerical calculations.Realistic nuclear wavefunctions, generated by a Wood-Saxon potential, are used to test also the usefulness of RSE in a realistic nuclear calculation. There are some fundamental differences between different symmetries of the integral contour that defines the continuum in RSE. One kind of symmetry is necessary to have an expansion of the unity operator that is idempotent. Another symmetry must be used if we want purely discrete expansions. These are found to be of the same form as given by ML. (29 refs.)

  15. PLUME FORMATION, TRANSPORT AND MODELING, PRESENTED IN RENO, NEVADA

    This presentation presents information on plume formation, transport and modeling. The outline for the presentation is: conceptualization of hydrocarbon releases; factors affecting plume length and concentration; modeling considerations; and uncertainty in model calculations.

  16. Seismic Anisotropy near Hawaii - Evidence for plume-related mantle flow

    Laske, Gabi; Marzen, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    During the Hawaiian PLUME (Plume-Lithosphere Undersea Melt Experiment) deployment, we collected continuous seismic data at ten land stations and nearly 70 ocean bottom sites from 2005 through mid-2007. Both the usage broad-band seismometers as well as the central location of Hawaii with good azimuthal seismicity coverage has allowed us to conduct a comprehensive analysis of surface wave azimuthal anisotropy at periods between 20 and 100 s. We use a sub-array approach to successively fit propagating spherical wave fronts in order to obtain frequency-dependent estimates at a large number of points. We use the standard Smith-and-Dahlen parameterization to express azimuthal variations. A systematic comparison between results obtained for different truncation levels in the trigonometric expansion allows us to assess stability of the results and assign error bars. At short periods, the fast direction aligns coherently with the fossil spreading direction across the entire PLUME network. This result supports the idea that flow-aligned asthenospheric material is "frozen" to the bottom of the cooling plate as it thickens. However, at longer periods, that sense the asthenosphere below the fast direction rotates incoherently, indicating that flow in the asthenosphere is significantly perturbed from the direction of current plate motion. A published shear-wave splitting study (Collins et al., 2012) found no evidence for such an anomalous mantle flow and therefore seems inconsistent with our results. We present initial surface-wave inversion results that suggest that plume-related mantle flow does not reach into the upper lithosphere. We also present forward-modeling results attempting to reconcile both surface-wave and shear-wave splitting observations. Collins, J.A., Wolfe, C.J. and Laske, G., 2012. Shear wave splitting at the Hawaiian hots pot from the PLUME land and ocean bottom seismometer deployments, Geochem. Geophys. Geosys., 13, doi:10.1029/2011gc003881.

  17. The evolution of photochemical smog in a power plant plume

    The evolution of photochemical smog in a plant plume was investigated with the aid of an instrumented helicopter. Air samples were taken in the plume of the Cumberland Power Plant, located in central Tennessee, during the afternoon of 16 July 1995 as part of the Southern Oxidants Study - Nashville Middle Tennessee Ozone Study. Twelve cross-wind air sampling traverses were made at six distance groups from 35 to 116 km from the source. During the sampling period the winds were from the west-northwest and the plume drifted towards the city of Nashville TN. Ten of the traverses were made upwind of the city, where the power plant plume was isolated, and two traverses downwind of the city when the plumes were possibly mixed. The results revealed that even six hours after the release, excess ozone production was limited to the edges of the plume. Only when the plume was sufficiently dispersed, but still upwind of Nashville, was excess ozone (up to 109 ppbv, 50-60 ppbv above background levels) produced in the center of the plume. The concentrations image of the plume and a Lagrangian particle model suggests that portions of the power plant plume mixed with the urban plume. The mixed urban power plant plume began to regenerate O3 that peaked at 120 ppbv at a short distance (15-25 km) downwind of Nashville. Ozone productivity (the ratio of excess O3 to NOy and NOz) in the isolated plume was significantly lower compared with that found in the city plume. The production of nitrate, a chain termination product, was significantly higher in the power plant plume compared to the mixed plume, indicating shorter chain length of the photochemical smog chain reaction mechanism. (author)

  18. Expansion joints for LMFBR

    This discourse recounts efforts put into the SNR-2 project; specifically the development of compensation devices. The various prototypes of these compensation devices are described and the state of the development reviewed. Large Na (sodium)-heat transfer systems require a lot of valuable space if the component lay-out does not include compensation devices. So, in order to condense the spatial requirement as much as possible, expansion joints must be integrated into the pipe system. There are two basic types to suit the purpose: axial expansion joints and angular expansion joints. The expansion joints were developed on the basis of specific design criteria whereby differentiation is made between expansion joints of small and large nominal diameter. Expansion joints for installation in the sodium-filled primary piping are equipped with safety bellows in addition to the actual working bellows. Expansion joints must be designed and mounted in a manner to completely withstand seismic forces. The design must exclude any damage to the bellows during intermittent operations, that is, when sodium is drained the bellows' folds must be completely empty; otherwise residual solidified sodium could destroy the bellows when restarting. The expansion joints must be engineered on the basis of the following design data for the secondary system of the SNR project: working pressure: 16 bar; failure mode pressure: 5 events; failure mode: 5 sec., 28.5 bar, 520 deg. C; working temperature: 520 deg. C; temperature transients: 30 deg. C/sec.; service life: 200,000 h; number of load cycles: 104; material: 1.4948 or 1.4919; layer thickness of folds: 0.5 mm; angular deflection (DN 800): +3 deg. C or; axial expansion absorption (DN 600): ±80 mm; calculation: ASME class. The bellows' development work is not handled within this scope. The bellows are supplied by leading manufacturers, and warrant highest quality. Multiple bellows were selected on the basis of maximum elasticity - a property

  19. Detection of contaminant plumes released from landfills

    N. B. Yenigül

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Contaminant leaks released from landfills are a significant threat to groundwater quality. The groundwater detection monitoring systems installed in the vicinity of such facilities are vital. In this study the detection probability of a contaminant plume released from a landfill has been investigated by means of both a simulation and an analytical model for both homogeneous and heterogeneous aquifer conditions. The results of the two models are compared for homogeneous aquifer conditions to illustrate the errors that might be encountered with the simulation model. For heterogeneous aquifer conditions contaminant transport is modelled by an analytical model using effective (macro dispersivities.

    The results of the analysis show that the simulation model gives the concentration values correctly over most of the plume length for homogeneous aquifer conditions, and that the detection probability of a contaminant plume at given monitoring well locations match quite well. For heterogeneous aquifer conditions the approximating analytical model based on effective (macro dispersivities yields the average concentration distribution satisfactorily. However, it is insufficient in monitoring system design since the discrepancy between the detection probabilities of contaminant plumes at given monitoring well locations computed by the two models is significant, particularly with high dispersivity and heterogeneity.

  20. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    Guennou, Chloé; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) 10 eV). We have used EIS spectroscopic observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over an ~24 hour period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we have used a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We have used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we have estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These res...

  1. Dynamical geochemistry of the Hawaiian plume

    This paper presents a simple dynamical model for melting and trace element distribution in the Hawaiian mantle plume. I model the plume as a partially molten stagnation point flow against the oceanic lithosphere, and obtain solutions for the temperature, melt migration rate, and trace element concentration within it. Trace element concentrations in the melt exceed simple batch melting predictions by up to 70%. The magnitude of this effect depends strongly on the solid-melt partition coefficient K. Trace elements with different K therefore experience a 'dynamical fractionation' within the plume, and incompatible trace element ratios such as La/Ce always exceed the batch melting predictions. I suggest a simple model for plume-lithosphere interaction in which melts from these two sources mix in proportions determined by thermodynamic constraints. The model can explain the composition of basalts from Haleakala if the degree of melting of the lithosphere F1 decreases with time from roughly 10% for tholeiites to 2% for alkalic basalts. These values are considerably higher than previous estimates of F1 1 are highly sensitive to the values chosen for the partition coefficients, however, and should therefore be interpreted with caution. (orig.)

  2. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4±0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA

  3. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  4. Observation of the dependence on the fluence and materials in femto-second laser ablation process by using the soft x-ray laser probe

    We have succeeded in simultaneous observation of the ablation front and the expansion front with thin filmy structure in the femto-second laser ablation process of a gold target by using the 13.9 nm soft x-ray probe (incident angle to the sample ∼70deg) with soft x-ray interferometer. The dependence on the laser local fluence and materials was obtained by the comparison between gold and tungsten. (author)

  5. Characterization of redox conditions in groundwater contaminant plumes

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwarth, Steven A.;

    2000-01-01

    Evaluation of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behaviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  6. Highly buoyant bent-over plumes in a boundary layer

    Tohidi, Ali; Kaye, Nigel B.

    2016-04-01

    Highly buoyant plumes, such as wildfire plumes, in low to moderate wind speeds have initial trajectories that are steeper than many industrial waste plumes. They will rise further into the atmosphere before bending significantly. In such cases the plume's trajectory will be influenced by the vertical variation in horizontal velocity of the atmospheric boundary layer. This paper examined the behavior of a plume in an unstratified environment with a power-law ambient velocity profile. Examination of previously published experimental measurements of plume trajectory show that inclusion of the boundary layer velocity profile in the plume model often provides better predictions of the plume trajectory compared to algebraic expressions developed for uniform flow plumes. However, there are many cases in which uniform velocity profile algebraic expressions are as good as boundary layer models. It is shown that it is only important to model the role of the atmospheric boundary layer velocity profile in cases where either the momentum length (square root of source momentum flux divided by the reference wind speed) or buoyancy length (buoyancy flux divided by the reference wind speed cubed) is significantly greater than the plume release height within the boundary layer. This criteria is rarely met with industrial waste plumes, but it is important in modeling wildfire plumes.

  7. Groundwater monitoring and plume discharge zone characterization for the NRX radiostrontium plume at Chalk River Laboratories

    Olfert, J.M.; Audet, M.; Killey, D., E-mail: olfertjm@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Groundwater is the principal pathway for the migration of most radiological and non-radiological compounds from past and present operating areas at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). The CRL Groundwater Monitoring Program (GWMP) was established to measure the groundwater quality around the perimeters of areas affected, or potentially affected, by groundwater plumes. One of these is the NRX Rod Bays plume, a legacy plume that originated from the fuel storage bays of the National Research Experimental (NRX) reactor. This plume contains primarily {sup 90}Sr migrating along the groundwater flow system to the Ottawa River. A characterization study of the shoreline region was completed recently to map the plume discharge zone by collecting samples from mini-piezometers and groundwater seeps (springs) during a period of low river level. Analysis of discharging groundwaters determined that the {sup 90}Sr concentrations were very similar to those sampled from nearby (upgradient) GWMP monitoring wells. With this favorable correlation, the high density of seep and mini-piezometer sampling along the shoreline allowed refinements to be made in defining the northerly and southerly boundaries of the radiostrontium plume. The seep and mini-piezometer sampling also provided evidence that the monitoring wells sampled routinely within the CRL GWMP are positioned appropriately for providing representative sampling of the plume. Shoreline seep and mini-piezometer sampling can lead to refinements in the conceptual site model for plumes with limited effort and cost. The supplemental characterization work can also potentially identify other targets for routine groundwater monitoring. (author)

  8. Tumor Ablation with Irreversible Electroporation

    Al-Sakere, Bassim; André, Franck,; Bernat, Claire; Connault, Elisabeth; Opolon, Paule; Davalos, Rafael V.; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop dur...

  9. The planet beyond the plume hypothesis

    Smith, Alan D.; Lewis, Charles

    1999-12-01

    Acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics was accompanied by the rise of the mantle plume/hotspot concept which has come to dominate geodynamics from its use both as an explanation for the origin of intraplate volcanism and as a reference frame for plate motions. However, even with a large degree of flexibility permitted in plume composition, temperature, size, and depth of origin, adoption of any limited number of hotspots means the plume model cannot account for all occurrences of the type of volcanism it was devised to explain. While scientific protocol would normally demand that an alternative explanation be sought, there have been few challenges to "plume theory" on account of a series of intricate controls set up by the plume model which makes plumes seem to be an essential feature of the Earth. The hotspot frame acts not only as a reference but also controls plate tectonics. Accommodating plumes relegates mantle convection to a weak, sluggish effect such that basal drag appears as a minor, resisting force, with plates having to move themselves by boundary forces and continents having to be rifted by plumes. Correspondingly, the geochemical evolution of the mantle is controlled by the requirement to isolate subducted crust into plume sources which limits potential buffers on the composition of the MORB-source to plume- or lower mantle material. Crustal growth and Precambrian tectonics are controlled by interpretations of greenstone belts as oceanic plateaus generated by plumes. Challenges to any aspect of the plume model are thus liable to be dismissed unless a counter explanation is offered across the geodynamic spectrum influenced by "plume theory". Nonetheless, an alternative synthesis can be made based on longstanding petrological evidence for derivation of intraplate volcanism from volatile-bearing sources (wetspots) in conjunction with concepts dismissed for being incompatible or superfluous to "plume theory". In the alternative Earth, the sources for

  10. Caries selective ablation: the handpiece

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    1995-05-01

    Caries selective ablation is fixed to a window of fluences predicted by the ablation thresholds of carious and healthy dentin, respectively. The aim of the study was to develop a dental handpiece which guarantees homogeneous fluence at the irradiated tooth surface. Furthermore the point of treatment should be cooled down without energy losses due to the cooling system. We suggest the direct coupling of the laser radiation into a laminar stream of liquid, which acts in turn as a lengthened beam guide. The impacts of the laser radiation and of the cooling medium fall exactly into the same point. Hot ablation debris is removed out of the crater by the flush of the water jet. Fluences are constant if the handpiece is used in contact mode or at a distance. Normally the surface of a bare fiber working in contact mode is destroyed after a few shots. Coupling the laser radiation into a stream of liquid prevents this destruction. Putting together the benefits of this special handpiece short overall treatment times seem to be possible. High average power can be applied to the tooth without the threat of thermal damage. Furthermore no time consuming cutting of the fiber prolongs the treatment time.

  11. Plasma plume effects on the conductivity of amorphous-LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces grown by pulsed laser deposition in O2 and Ar

    Sambri, A.; Christensen, Dennis; Trier, Felix;

    2012-01-01

    . During the deposition, the LaAlO3 ablation plume is also studied, in situ, by fast photography and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. An interesting correlation between interfacial conductivity and kinetic energy of the Al atoms in the plume is observed: to assure conducting interfaces of...... amorphous-LaAlO3/SrTiO3, the kinetic energy of Al should be higher than 1 eV. Our findings add further insights on mechanisms leading to interfacial conductivity in SrTiO3-based oxide heterostructures.© 2012 American Institute of Physics....

  12. Transient Ablation Regime in Circuit Breakers

    Alexandre, Martin; Jean-Yves, Trepanier; Marcelo, Reggio; Guo, Xueyan

    2007-12-01

    Nozzle wall ablation caused by high temperature electric arcs is studied in the context of high voltage SF6 circuit breakers. The simplified ablation model used in litterature has been updated to take into account the unsteady state of ablation. Ablation rate and velocity are now calculated by a kinetic model using two layers of transition, between the bulk plasma and the ablating wall. The first layer (Knudsen layer), right by the wall, is a kinetic layer of a few mean-free path of thickness. The second layer is collision dominated and makes the transition between the kinetic layer and the plasma bulk. With this new coupled algorithm, it is now possible to calculate the temperature distribution inside the wall, as well as more accurate ablation rates.

  13. Explosive character of the atheroma plaques ablation

    At the present time, ischemia (heart disease) is a main cause of the death in the world; a promising method for its treatment is the use of the technology of the laser light of raised power for the ablation of the atherosclerosis plaques. In this paper, the thermodynamic processes will be studied at the beginning and during atheroma ablation using Nd-YAG (10-50 w) and Argon (4-10 w) lasers of a theoretical point of view. The spatial distribution of the temperature during the ablation has been modelated by the method of finite volumes. The manifestation of the raised temperature of the tissue at the threshold of the ablation, which describes the explosive nature of the ablation by laser (popcorn effect), is observed and discussed. The results indicate the quantitative differences in the ablation behavior between the two used lasers, which can have important clinical implications particularly in the reduction of thermal damages to surrounding normal tissue. (author)

  14. Ablation of BaTiO3 in a gas pressure: Plasma and film optical properties

    Gonzalo de los Reyes, José; Afonso, Carmen N.; Ballesteros, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Space-resolved real-time emission spectroscopy and in situ reflectance measurements during film growth are used to characterize the plasma expansion dynamics and the refractive index of films produced by laser ablation of BaTiO3, respectively. The refractive index of the films remains nearly constant when increasing the gas pressure up to a pressure threshold above which it increases sharply, similar results being obtained either in oxygen or argon. This behavior is correlated to the changes ...

  15. Radiofrequency Ablation of Hepatic Cysts : Case Report

    Radiofrequency ablation has been frequently performed on intra-hepatic solid tumor, namely, hepatocellular carcinoma, metastatic tumor and cholangio carcinoma, for take the cure. But, the reports of radiofrequency ablation for intrahepatic simple cysts are few. In vitro experiment of animal and in vivo treatment for intrahepatic cysts of human had been reported in rare cases. We report 4 cases of radiofrequency ablation for symptomatic intrahepatic cysts

  16. Photoacoustic Characterization of Radiofrequency Ablation Lesions

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh ...

  17. Moderne Technologien in der Ablation des Vorhofflimmerns

    Haegeli, L; Duru, F.; Lüscher, T F

    2010-01-01

    Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation has become an accepted therapy. The arrhythmia affects around 6% of the population over the age of 65 years. Electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins from the left atrium is the central strategy in catheter ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. However, procedural outcomes and efficacy using sequential “point-by-point” radiofrequency lesion creation with a conventional ablation catheter are operator-dependent and time-consuming. Moreover, re...

  18. Computer-aided hepatic tumour ablation

    Voirin, D; Amavizca, M; Leroy, A; Letoublon, C; Troccaz, J; Voirin, David; Payan, Yohan; Amavizca, Miriam; Leroy, Antoine; Letoublon, Christian; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2001-01-01

    Surgical resection of hepatic tumours is not always possible. Alternative techniques consist in locally using chemical or physical agents to destroy the tumour and this may be performed percutaneously. It requires a precise localisation of the tumour placement during ablation. Computer-assisted surgery tools may be used in conjunction to these new ablation techniques to improve the therapeutic efficiency whilst benefiting from minimal invasiveness. This communication introduces the principles of a system for computer-assisted hepatic tumour ablation.

  19. Characterization of Carbon Plasma Evolution Using Laser Ablation TOF Mass Spectrometry

    Zhang, Lei; Feng, Chunlei; Xiao, Qingmei; Hai, Ran; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer has been used to investigate the distribution of intermediate species and formation process of carbon clusters. The graphite sample was ablated by Nd:YAG laser (532 nm and 1064 nm). The results indicate that the maximum size distribution shifted towards small cluster ions as the laser fluence increased, which happened because of the fragmentation of larger clusters in the hot plume. The temporal evolution of ions was measured by varying the delay time of the ion extraction pulse with respect to the laser irradiation, which was used to provide distribution information of the species in the ablated plasma plume. When the laser fluence decreased, the yield of all of the clusters obviously dropped. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2013GB109005) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175035), Chinesisch-Deutsches Forschungs Project (GZ768), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Nos. DUT12ZD(G)01, DUT14ZD(G)04) and MMLab Research Project (DP1051208)

  20. Entrainment and mixing in vertical buoyant light-gas plumes

    A simple model is developed to determine the entrainment coefficient and the spread of a light-gas plume in a quiescent atmosphere. Experiments performed with low-velocity saltwater/freshwater and helium-in-air jets indicate that buoyant gas plumes spread significantly faster than thermal plumes. The calculated effluent concentrations are in excellent agreement with those measured when an entrainment coefficient of 0.15 is used in the plume equations. This is significantly higher than the entrainment coefficients of 0.075 to 0.093 reported for thermal plumes

  1. Expansion of Pannes

    For the Long Island, New Jersey, and southern New England region, one facet of marsh drowning as a result of accelerated sea level rise is the expansion of salt marsh ponds and pannes. Over the past century, marsh ponds and pannes have formed and expanded in areas of poor drainag...

  2. THESAURUS AND QUERY EXPANSION

    Hazra Imran

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The explosive growth of the World Wide Web is making it difficult for a user to locate information that isrelevant to his/her interest. Though existing search engines work well to a certain extent but they still faceproblems like word mismatch which arises because the majority of information retrieval systemscompare query and document terms on lexical level rather than on semantic level and short query: theaverage length of queries by the user is less than two words. Short queries and the incompatibilitybetween the terms in user queries and documents strongly affect the retrieval of relevant document.Query expansion has long been suggested as a technique to increase the effectiveness of the informationretrieval. Query expansion is the process of supplementing additional terms or phrases to the originalquery to improve the retrieval performance. The central problem of query expansion is the selection ofthe expansion terms based on which user’s original query is expanded. Thesaurus helps to solve thisproblem. Thesaurus have frequently been incorporated in information retrieval system for identifying thesynonymous expressions and linguistic entities that are semantically similar. Thesaurus has been widelyused in many applications, including information retrieval and natural language processing.

  3. OPEC future capacity expansions

    This conference presentation examined OPEC future capacity expansions including highlights from 2000-2004 from the supply perspective and actions by OPEC; OPEC spare capacity in 2005/2006; medium-term capacity expansion and investments; long-term scenarios, challenges and opportunities; and upstream policies in member countries. Highlights from the supply perspective included worst than expected non-OPEC supply response; non-OPEC supply affected by a number of accidents and strikes; geopolitical tensions; and higher than expected demand for OPEC crude. OPEC's actions included closer relationship with other producers and consumers; capacity expansions in 2004 and 2005/2006; and OPEC kept the market well supplied with crude in 2004. The presentation also provided data using graphical charts on OPEC net capacity additions until 2005/2006; OPEC production versus spare capacity from 2003 to 2005; OPEC production and capacity to 2010; and change in required OPEC production from 2005-2020. Medium term expansion to 2010 includes over 60 projects. Medium-term risks such as project execution, financing, costs, demand, reserves, depletion, integration of Iraq, and geopolitical tensions were also discussed. The presentation concluded that in the long term, large uncertainties remain; the peak of world supply is not imminent; and continued and enhanced cooperation is essential to market stability. tabs., figs

  4. Bed expansion crucible tests

    The Am/Cm program will vitrify the americium and curium currently stored in F-canyon. A batch flowsheet has been developed (with non-radioactive surrogate feed in place of the F-canyon solution) and tested full-scale in the 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM) facility at TNX. During a normal process run, a small bed expansion occurs when oxygen released from reduction of cerium (IV) oxide to cerium (III) oxide is trapped in highly viscous glass. The bed expansion is characterized by a foamy layer of glass that slowly expands as the oxygen is trapped and then dissipates when the viscosity of the foam becomes low enough to allow the oxygen to escape. Severe bed expansions were noted in the 5-inch CIM when re-heating after an interlock during the calcination phase of the heat cycle, escaping the confines of the melter vessel. In order to better understand the cause of the larger than normal bed expansion and to develop mitigating techniques, a series of three crucible tests were conducted

  5. Cardiac Remodeling After Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    Li-Wei Lo, MD; Shih-Ann Chen, MD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency catheter ablation procedures are considered a reasonable option for patients with symptomatic, drug refractory atrial fibrillation (AF. Ablation procedures have been reported to effectively restore sinus rhythm and provide long-term relief of symptoms. Both electrical and structural remodeling occurs with AF. A reversal of the electrical remodeling develops within 1 week after restoration to sinus rhythm following the catheter ablation. The recovery rate is faster in the right atrium than the left atrium. Reverse structural remodeling takes longer and is still present 2 to 4 months after restoration of sinus rhythm. The left atrial transport function also improves after successful catheter ablation of AF. Left atrial strain surveys from echocardiography are able to identify patients who respond to catheter ablation with significant reverse remodeling after ablation. Pre-procedural delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging is also able to determine the degree of atrial fibrosis and is another tool to predict the reverse remodeling after ablation. The remodeling process is complex if recurrence develops after ablation. Recent evidence shows that a combined reverse electrical and structural remodeling occurs after ablation of chronic AF when recurrence is paroxysmal AF. Progressive electrical remodeling without any structural remodeling develops in those with recurrence involving chronic AF. Whether progressive atrial remodeling is the cause or consequence during the recurrence of AF remains obscure and requires further study.

  6. Aromatic Thermosetting Copolyesters for Ablative TPS Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Better performing ablative thermal protection systems than currently available are needed to satisfy requirements of the most severe crew exploration vehicles, such...

  7. Plasma-mediated ablation of biofilm contamination

    Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Huang, Huan

    2010-12-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser removal of thin biofilm contamination on different substrates has been conducted via the use of plasma-mediated ablation. The biofilms were formed using sheep whole blood. The ablation was generated using a 1.2 ps ultra-short pulsed laser with wavelength centered at 1552 nm. The blood contamination was transformed into plasma and collected with a vacuum system. The single line ablation features have been measured. The ablation thresholds of blood contamination and bare substrates were determined. It is found that the ablation threshold of the blood contamination is lower than those of the beneath substrates including the glass slide, PDMS, and human dermal tissues. The ablation effects of different laser parameters (pulse overlap rate and pulse energy) were studied and ablation efficiency was measured. Proper ablation parameters were found to efficiently remove contamination with maximum efficiency and without damage to the substrate surface for the current laser system. Complete removal of blood contaminant from the glass substrate surface and freeze-dried dermis tissue surface was demonstrated by the USP laser ablation with repeated area scanning. No obvious thermal damage was found in the decontaminated glass and tissue samples.

  8. Exhaust Nozzle Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Test Results for Isolated Nozzles

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2011-01-01

    Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions were due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacts with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. An experiment was conducted in the 1- by 1-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center to validate the computational study. Results demonstrated how the nozzle lip shock moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and reduced the nozzle boat-tail expansion, causing a favorable change in the observed pressure signature. Experimental results were presented for comparison to the CFD results. The strong nozzle lip shock at high values of NPR intersected the nozzle boat-tail expansion and suppressed the expansion wave. Based on these results, it may be feasible to reduce the boat-tail expansion for a future supersonic aircraft with under-expanded nozzle exhaust flow by modifying nozzle pressure or nozzle divergent section geometry.

  9. Characterization of laser ablation of copper in the irradiance regime of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis

    Picard, J., E-mail: jessica.picard@cea.fr [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Sirven, J.-B.; Lacour, J.-L. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DPC/SEARS/LANIE, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Musset, O. [Université de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS 5209, F-21000 Dijon (France); Cardona, D.; Hubinois, J.-C. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Mauchien, P. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DPC/SEARS/LANIE, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-11-01

    The LIBS signal depends both on the ablated mass and on the plasma excitation temperature. These fundamental parameters depend in a complex manner on laser ablation and on laser–plasma coupling. As several works in the literature suggest that laser ablation processes play a predominant role compared to plasma heating phenomena in the LIBS signal variations, this paper focuses on the study of laser ablation. The objective was to determine an interaction regime enabling to maximally control the laser ablation. Nanosecond laser ablation of copper at 266 nm was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry analysis, in air at 1 bar and in the vacuum. The laser beam spatial profile at the sample surface was characterized in order to give realistic values of the irradiance. The effect of the number of accumulated laser shots on the crater volume was studied. Then, the ablation crater morphology, volume, depth and diameter were measured as a function of irradiance between 0.35 and 96 GW/cm². Results show that in the vacuum, a regular trend is observed over the whole irradiance range. In air at 1 bar, below a certain irradiance, laser ablation is very similar to the vacuum case, and the ablation efficiency of copper was estimated at 0.15 ± 0.03 atom/photon. Beyond this irradiance, the laser beam propagation is strongly disrupted by the expansion of the dense plasma, and plasma shielding appears. The fraction of laser energy used for laser ablation and for plasma heating is estimated in the different irradiance regimes. - Highlights: • The morphology of copper's craters was studied as a function of the pulse energy. • Correlation at low energy and two pressures between crater volume and pulse energy • The ablation efficiency of copper at 1 bar is equal to 0.15 atom/photon. • Ablation efficiency in the vacuum is not limited by laser–plasma interaction. • Physical mechanisms of laser ablation at both pressures are discussed.

  10. Electric Propulsion Plume Simulations Using Parallel Computer

    Joseph Wang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A parallel, three-dimensional electrostatic PIC code is developed for large-scale electric propulsion simulations using parallel supercomputers. This code uses a newly developed immersed-finite-element particle-in-cell (IFE-PIC algorithm designed to handle complex boundary conditions accurately while maintaining the computational speed of the standard PIC code. Domain decomposition is used in both field solve and particle push to divide the computation among processors. Two simulations studies are presented to demonstrate the capability of the code. The first is a full particle simulation of near-thruster plume using real ion to electron mass ratio. The second is a high-resolution simulation of multiple ion thruster plume interactions for a realistic spacecraft using a domain enclosing the entire solar array panel. Performance benchmarks show that the IFE-PIC achieves a high parallel efficiency of ≥ 90%

  11. Numerical Modelling of Jets and Plumes

    Larsen, Torben

    1993-01-01

    An overview on numerical models for prediction of the flow and mixing processes in turbulent jets and plumes is given. The overview is structured to follow an increasing complexity in the physical and numerical principles. The various types of models are briefly mentioned, from the one-dimensiona......An overview on numerical models for prediction of the flow and mixing processes in turbulent jets and plumes is given. The overview is structured to follow an increasing complexity in the physical and numerical principles. The various types of models are briefly mentioned, from the one......-dimensional integral method to the general 3-dimensional solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Also the predictive capabilities of the models are discussed. The presentation takes the perspective of civil engineering and covers issues like sewage outfalls and cooling water discharges to the sea....

  12. Stationary plume induced by carbon dioxide dissolution

    In this paper, laminar convection flows induced by carbon dioxide absorption are addressed from experimental, numerical and theoretical points of view. A vertical glass tube (of centimetre scale) filled with distilled water is subjected to a sudden increase in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. As a result of the diffusion of the gas into the unsaturated solution, a thin layer of fluid located underneath the surface becomes heavier. This initial density gradient first destabilizes to form a plume, which goes downwards through the entire cell. After a first transient pulsating regime (periodic succession of such Rayleigh-Benard plumes), a stationary flow settles in the tube, which is maintained by the constant supply of gas at the surface. At late stages, this stationary regime is followed by an aperiodic regime, which lasts until the complete saturation of the solution (thermodynamic equilibrium). The present study only focuses on the stationary regime, whose characteristics appear to be almost independent of the Bond number and the aspect ratio but strongly dependent on the chemical Rayleigh number. Three decades of Rayleigh numbers are explored using particle image velocimetry measurements, which allows for a precise determination of the scaling exponents for the vertical velocity amplitude and the plume width. The assumption that gravity and a constant pressure gradient balance the viscous effects enables us to derive an analytic expression for the stationary vertical velocity on the axis, which scales as Ra2/3 (ln Ra)1/3. As a consequence, the width of the plume scales as Ra-1/6 (ln Ra)-1/3 and the mass Nusselt number as (Ra= ln Ra)1/3. These scalings are in excellent agreement with the experimental and numerical results. The multiplicative constants of these scalings can also be calculated and show a fairly good agreement if a rigid boundary condition (no-slip) is assumed at the free surface. (authors)

  13. Ozone photochemistry in boreal biomass burning plumes

    M. Parrington; Palmer, P. I.; Lewis, A. C.; J. D. Lee; A. R. Rickard; De Carlo, P; Taylor, J.W.; J. R. Hopkins; S. Punjabi; D. E. Oram; G. Forster; Aruffo, E.; Moller, S. J.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; Allan, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of ozone (O3) photochemistry observed by aircraft measurements of boreal biomass burning plumes over eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Measurements of O3 and a number of key chemical species associated with O3 photochemistry, including non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and total nitrogen containing species (NOy), were made from the UK FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft as part of the "quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric ox...

  14. Ozone photochemistry in boreal biomass burning plumes

    M. Parrington; Palmer, P. I.; Lewis, A. C.; J. D. Lee; A. R. Rickard; P. Di Carlo; Taylor, J.W.; J. R. Hopkins; S. Punjabi; D. E. Oram; G. Forster; Aruffo, E.; Moller, S. J.; S. J.-B. Bauguitte; Allan, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of ozone photochemistry observed by aircraft measurements of boreal biomass burning plumes over Eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Measurements of ozone and a number of key chemical species associated with ozone photochemistry, including non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and total nitrogen containing species (NOy), were made from the UK FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft as part of the quantifying ...

  15. Ozone photochemistry in boreal biomass burning plumes

    M. Parrington; Palmer, P. I.; Lewis, A. C.; J. D. Lee; A. R. Rickard; P. Di Carlo; Taylor, J.W.; J. R. Hopkins; S. Punjabi; D. E. Oram; G. Forster; Aruffo, E.; Moller, S. J.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; Allan, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of ozone photochemistry observed by aircraft measurements of boreal biomass burning plumes over Eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Measurements of ozone and a number of key chemical species associated with ozone photochemistry, including non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and total nitrogen containing species (NOy), were made from the UK FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft as part of the quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on tropospheric ox...

  16. Modelling the atmospheric chemistry of volcanic plumes

    Surl, Luke

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Volcanoes are the principal way by which volatiles are transferred from the solid Earth to the atmosphere-hydrosphere system. Once released into the atmosphere, volcanic emissions rapidly undergo a complex series of chemical reactions. This thesis seeks to further the understanding of such processes by both observation and numerical modelling. I have adapted WRF-Chem to model passive degassing from Mount Etna, the chemistry of its plume, and its influence on the ...

  17. Space Station flexible dynamics under plume impingement

    Williams, Trevor

    1993-12-01

    Assembly of the Space Station requires numerous construction flights by the Space Shuttle. A particularly challenging problem is that of control of each intermediate station configuration when the shuttle orbiter is approaching it to deliver the next component. The necessary braking maneuvers cause orbiter thruster plumes to impinge on the station, especially its solar arrays. This in turn causes both overall attitude errors and excitation of flexible-body vibration modes. These plume loads are predicted to lead to CMG saturation during the approach of the orbiter to the SC-5 station configuration, necessitating the use of the station RCS jets for desaturation. They are also expected to lead to significant excitation of solar array vibrations. It is therefore of great practical importance to investigate the effects of plume loads on the flexible dynamics of station configuration SC-5 as accurately as possible. However, this system possesses a great many flexible modes (89 below 5 rad/s), making analysis time-consuming and complicated. Model reduction techniques can be used to overcome this problem, reducing the system model to one which retains only the significant dynamics, i.e. those which are strongly excited by the control inputs or plume disturbance forces and which strongly couple with the measured outputs. The particular technique to be used in this study is the subsystem balancing approach which was previously developed by the present investigator. This method is very efficient computationally. Furthermore, it gives accurate results even for the difficult case where the structure has many closed-spaced natural frequencies, when standard modal truncation can give misleading results. Station configuration SC-5 is a good example of such a structure.

  18. Sub-Grid Scale Plume Modeling

    Greg Yarwood

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Multi-pollutant chemical transport models (CTMs are being routinely used to predict the impacts of emission controls on the concentrations and deposition of primary and secondary pollutants. While these models have a fairly comprehensive treatment of the governing atmospheric processes, they are unable to correctly represent processes that occur at very fine scales, such as the near-source transport and chemistry of emissions from elevated point sources, because of their relatively coarse horizontal resolution. Several different approaches have been used to address this limitation, such as using fine grids, adaptive grids, hybrid modeling, or an embedded sub-grid scale plume model, i.e., plume-in-grid (PinG modeling. In this paper, we first discuss the relative merits of these various approaches used to resolve sub-grid scale effects in grid models, and then focus on PinG modeling which has been very effective in addressing the problems listed above. We start with a history and review of PinG modeling from its initial applications for ozone modeling in the Urban Airshed Model (UAM in the early 1980s using a relatively simple plume model, to more sophisticated and state-of-the-science plume models, that include a full treatment of gas-phase, aerosol, and cloud chemistry, embedded in contemporary models such as CMAQ, CAMx, and WRF-Chem. We present examples of some typical results from PinG modeling for a variety of applications, discuss the implications of PinG on model predictions of source attribution, and discuss possible future developments and applications for PinG modeling.

  19. Increase in Volume of Ablation Zones during Follow-up Is Highly Suggestive of Ablation Site Recurrence in Colorectal Liver Metastases Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation

    Kele, Petra G.; de Jong, Koert P.; van der Jagt, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that volume changes of ablation zones (AZs) on successive computed tomography (CT) scans could predict ablation site recurrences (ASRs) in patients with colorectal liver metastases treated by radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Materials and Methods: RF ablation was perform

  20. Propagation of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in an integral oil-gas plume model

    Wang, Shitao

    2016-05-27

    Polynomial Chaos expansions are used to analyze uncertainties in an integral oil-gas plume model simulating the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The study focuses on six uncertain input parameters—two entrainment parameters, the gas to oil ratio, two parameters associated with the droplet-size distribution, and the flow rate—that impact the model\\'s estimates of the plume\\'s trap and peel heights, and of its various gas fluxes. The ranges of the uncertain inputs were determined by experimental data. Ensemble calculations were performed to construct polynomial chaos-based surrogates that describe the variations in the outputs due to variations in the uncertain inputs. The surrogates were then used to estimate reliably the statistics of the model outputs, and to perform an analysis of variance. Two experiments were performed to study the impacts of high and low flow rate uncertainties. The analysis shows that in the former case the flow rate is the largest contributor to output uncertainties, whereas in the latter case, with the uncertainty range constrained by aposteriori analyses, the flow rate\\'s contribution becomes negligible. The trap and peel heights uncertainties are then mainly due to uncertainties in the 95% percentile of the droplet size and in the entrainment parameters.

  1. A simulation method of aircraft plumes for real-time imaging

    Li, Ni; Lv, Zhenhua; Huai, Wenqin; Gong, Guanghong

    2016-07-01

    Real-time infrared simulation technology can provide a large number of infrared images under different conditions to support the design, test and evaluation of a system having infrared imaging equipment with very low costs. By synthesizing heat transfer, infrared physics, fluid mechanics and computer graphics, a real-time infrared simulation method is proposed based on the method of characteristics to predict the infrared feature of aircraft plumes, which tries to obtain a good balance between simulation precision and computation efficiency. The temperature and pressure distribution in the under-expansion status can be rapidly solved with dynamically changing flight statuses and engine working states. And a modified C-G (Curtis-Godson) spectral band model that combines the plume streamlines with the conventional C-G spectral band model was implemented to calculate the non-uniformly distributed radiation parameters inside a plume field. The simulation result was analyzed and compared with the CFD++, which validates the credibility and efficiency of the proposed simulation method.

  2. Deposition of high quality YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) thin films over large areas by pulsed laser ablation with substrate scanning

    Davis, M. F.; Wosik, J.; Forster, K.; Deshmukh, S. C.; Rampersad, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes thin films deposited in a system where substrates are scanned over areas up to 3.5 x 3.5 cm through the stationary plume of an ablated material defined by an aperture. These YBCO films are deposited on LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 substrates with the thickness of 90 and 160 nm. Attention is focused on the main features of the deposition system: line focusing of the laser beam on the target; an aperture defining the area of the plume; computerized stepper motor-driven X-Y stage translating the heated sampler holder behind the plume-defining aperture in programmed patterns; and substrate mounting block with uniform heating at high temperatures over large areas. It is noted that the high degree of uniformity of the properties in each film batch illustrates that the technique of pulsed laser deposition can be applied to produce large YBCO films of high quality.

  3. Monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes

    Scollo, S.; Prestifilippo, M.; Spata, G.; D'Agostino, M.; Coltelli, M.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper we describe the results of a project ongoing at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV). The objective is to develop and implement a system for monitoring and forecasting volcanic plumes of Etna. Monitoring is based at present by multispectral infrared measurements from the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager on board the Meteosat Second Generation geosynchronous satellite, visual and thermal cameras, and three radar disdrometers able to detect ash dispersal and fallout. Forecasting is performed by using automatic procedures for: i) downloading weather forecast data from meteorological mesoscale models; ii) running models of tephra dispersal, iii) plotting hazard maps of volcanic ash dispersal and deposition for certain scenarios and, iv) publishing the results on a web-site dedicated to the Italian Civil Protection. Simulations are based on eruptive scenarios obtained by analysing field data collected after the end of recent Etna eruptions. Forecasting is, hence, supported by plume observations carried out by the monitoring system. The system was tested on some explosive events occurred during 2006 and 2007 successfully. The potentiality use of monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes, in a way to prevent threats to aviation from volcanic ash, is finally discussed.

  4. Plumes from one and two cooling towers

    Use of mechanical- and natural-draft cooling towers is expanding in the United States in response to pressures for better resource allocation and preservation. Specifically, increasing public and regulatory concern over the effects of the intake and discharge of large volumes of cooling water has encouraged electric utilities to accept cooling towers as the primary method of removing condenser waste heat even though once-through cooling is considerably less expensive. Other factors encouraging the use of cooling towers include small water supply and consumption rates, reduction in land requirements (compared to cooling ponds or lakes), and operational flexibility. The growing demand for electric energy should also add to the increase of cooling tower use. The experimental program and its comparison to model prediction suggest that optimal siting of cooling towers, particularly multiple towers, is a task requiring knowledge of ambient wind history, plume dynamics, and tower operating conditions. Based on the tower wake effects and on the results for interaction of plumes from two cooling towers, site terrain may be a very significant factor in plume dynamics and interaction

  5. Dynamic behavior of a thermal plume

    The thermal front phenomenon was observed during field surveys in June and October, 1978 at the Ginna Power Plant site on Lake Ontario. Thermal fronts are rapid temperature oscillations in the near field of a thermal plume and are generally observed in calm receiving water. The fronts were measured at a number of fixed locations in the Ginna plume from two boats equipped to measure temperature at four depths and from one boat measuring velocity at 2 1/2 feet below the water surface. Infrared overflight measurements were also taken. Temperature oscillations were observed with amplitudes of over 30C measured from the mean with periods ranging from approximately 100 to 600 seconds depending on the longitudinal distance from the discharge, discharge velocity, water depth in the lake, and receiving water current. Oscillations appeared to be highest near the discharge for the June survey and decayed with distance from the discharge with little variation in depth. During the October survey (when the lake elevation was 2.3 feet lower than the June survey and the plume touched lake bottom for the first 200-300 feet) the oscillations started at about 200 feet from the discharge, peaked at about 500 feet and were not discernible at distances greater than 1400 feet from the discharge. The discharge, meteorological and hydraulic site conditions were all relatively constant during each day of the surveys

  6. Monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes

    S. Scollo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the results of a project ongoing at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV. The objective is to develop and implement a system for monitoring and forecasting volcanic plumes of Etna. Monitoring is based at present by multispectral infrared measurements from the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager on board the Meteosat Second Generation geosynchronous satellite, visual and thermal cameras, and three radar disdrometers able to detect ash dispersal and fallout. Forecasting is performed by using automatic procedures for: i downloading weather forecast data from meteorological mesoscale models; ii running models of tephra dispersal, iii plotting hazard maps of volcanic ash dispersal and deposition for certain scenarios and, iv publishing the results on a web-site dedicated to the Italian Civil Protection. Simulations are based on eruptive scenarios obtained by analysing field data collected after the end of recent Etna eruptions. Forecasting is, hence, supported by plume observations carried out by the monitoring system. The system was tested on some explosive events occurred during 2006 and 2007 successfully. The potentiality use of monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes, in a way to prevent threats to aviation from volcanic ash, is finally discussed.

  7. Therapeutic efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation versus microwave ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF ablation versus microwave (MW ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC measuring ≤ 5 cm in greatest diameter. From January 2006 to December 2006, 78 patients had undergone RF ablation whereas 77 had undergone MW ablation. Complete ablation (CA, local tumour progression (LTP and distant recurrence (DR were compared. The overall survival curves were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier technique and compared with the log-rank test. The CA rate was 83.4% (78/93 for RF ablation and 86.7%(91/105 for MW ablation. The LTP rate was 11.8% (11/93 for RF ablation and 10.5% (11/105 for MW ablation. DR was found in 51 (65.4% in the RF ablation and 62 (80.5% in the MW ablation. There was no significant difference in the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates (P = 0.780 and the 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-free survival rates (P = 0.123 between RF and MW ablation. At subgroup analyses, for patients with tumors ≤ 3.0 cm, there was no significant difference in the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates (P = 0.067 and the corresponding disease-free survival rates(P = 0.849. For patients with tumor diameters of 3.1-5.0 cm, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 87.1%, 61.3%, and 40.1% for RF ablation and 85.4%, 36.6%, and 22% for MW ablation, with no significant difference (P = 0.068. The corresponding disease-free survival rates were 74.2%, 54.8%, and 45.2% for the RF ablation group and 53.3%, 26.8%, and 17.1% for the MW ablation group. The disease-free survival curve for the RF ablation group was significantly better than that for the MW ablation group (P = 0.018. RF ablation and MW ablation are both effective methods in treating hepatocellular carcinomas, with no significant differences in CA, LTP, DR, and overall survival.

  8. Ag and Au nanoparticles for SERS substrates produced by pulsed laser ablation

    Agarwal, N.R.; Castiglioni, C.; Lucotti, A. [DCMIC, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Fazio, E.; Neri, F. [Dip. Fisica della Materia e Ingegneria Elettronica, Universita di Messina, Messina (Italy); Trusso, S. [CNR- Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Messina (Italy); Santo, N. [Centro Interdipartimentale Microscopia Avanzata, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Ossi, P.M. [Dip. Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    A method for the growth of films consisting of Nanoparticles (NP) of Ag and Au is presented. Nanostructured films were obtained by means of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a metallic target in presence of a controlled Ar atmosphere. The morphology of these films from island structures to isolated nanoparticles, measured by SEM, depends on the varying gas pressure (10-100 Pa) and on the number of laser pulses (500-30000), keeping other deposition parameters such as the target to substrate distance, incidence angle, laser wavelength, laser fluence constant. Fast imaging of the plasma, performed using a intensified and gateable CCD camera at different time delays with respect to the arrival of the laser pulse, allows revelation of the propagation regime of the ablation plume and inference of plasma initial velocity. This data along with the measured average ablated mass per pulse were taken as inputs to a model to estimate the average size of NPs grown in the expanding plume. The theoretical NP sizes were compared with sizes measured from TEM images. These images indicate narrow gradients of NP sizes. Hence strict control of growth parameters aids fine tuning of NP size that is essential for many applications, including Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) active substrates. UV-Visible Spectroscopy helped in determination of appropriate laser wavelength for resonant excitation of the localized surface plasmon. SERS Spectra obtained with increasingly lower concentrations of reference dye Rhodamin 6G (Rh6G) and medical drug Apomorphine, are discussed as a perspective of application to biomedical sensors. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Financing electricity expansion

    Expansion of electricity supply is associated with economic development. The installation and enlargement of power systems in developing countries entails a huge financial burden, however. Energy consumers in such countries must pay not only for supplies but for the cost of raising the capital for expansion on the international markets. Estimates are presented for the capital expenditure for electricity supply over the period 1990 to 2020 for the major world regions, using approximations for the cost of plant and capital and for the returns earned. These data lead to the conclusion that the five regions with the lowest per capita incomes are those which will need the major part of the capital expenditure and the highest percentage of external finance. (6 tables) (UK)

  10. Operator product expansion algebra

    The Operator Product Expansion (OPE) is a theoretical tool for studying the short distance behaviour of products of local quantum fields. Over the past 40 years, the OPE has not only found widespread computational application in high-energy physics, but, on a more conceptual level, it also encodes fundamental information on algebraic structures underlying quantum field theories. I review new insights into the status and properties of the OPE within Euclidean perturbation theory, addressing in particular the topics of convergence and ''factorisation'' of the expansion. Further, I present a formula for the ''deformation'' of the OPE algebra caused by a quartic interaction. This formula can be used to set up a novel iterative scheme for the perturbative computation of OPE coefficients, based solely on the zeroth order coefficients (and renormalisation conditions) as initial input.

  11. Expansion at Olympic Dam

    The Olympic Dam orebody is the 6th largest copper and the single largest uranium orebody in the world. Mine production commenced in June 1988, at an annual production rate of around 45,000 tonnes of copper and 1,000 tonnes of uranium. Western Mining Corporation announced in 1996 a proposed $1.25 billion expansion of the Olympic Dam operation to raise the annual production capacity of the mine to 200,000 tonnes of copper, approximately 3,700 tonnes of uranium, 75,000 ounces of gold and 950,000 ounces of silver by 2001. Further optimisation work has identified a faster track expansion route, with an increase in the capital cost to $1.487 billion but improved investment outcome, a new target completion date of end 1999, and a new uranium output of 4,600 tonnes per annum from that date

  12. Expansion of Hanford concrete

    This report presents results of measurements of thermal expansion of concrete cores from Hanford, Washington facilities, and concrete cast at the Construction Technology Laboratories of Portland Cement Association (CTL/PCA). Thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 16000F on 0.5 x 3.0-in. specimens heated at a rate of 100F/min. Specimens were cored from concrete cylinders cast at CTL/PCA in 1975 and 1977, and from cylindrical cores taken from the Purex Building and Waste Tank Farms at the Hanford, Washington complex. A total of 14 specimens were tested: eight tests on CTL/PCA cast concrete, two tests on material from the Purex Building, and four tests on Waste Tank Farms concrete. All tests were conducted using a commercially built dilatometer of high strain resolution

  13. The influence of ns- and fs-LA plume local conditions on the performace of a combined LIBS/LA-ICP-MS sensor

    LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.

    2016-02-01

    Both laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are well-established analytical techniques with their own unique advantages and disadvantages. The combination of the two analytical methods is a very promising way to overcome the challenges faced by each method individually. We made a comprehensive comparison of local plasma conditions between nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) laser ablation (LA) sources in a combined LIBS and LA-ICP-MS system. The optical emission spectra and ICP-MS signal were recorded simultaneously for both ns- and fs-LA and figures of merit of the system were analyzed. Characterization of the plasma was conducted by evaluating temperature and density of the plume under various irradiation conditions using optical emission spectroscopy, and correlations to ns- and fs-LIBS and LA-ICP-MS signal were made. The present study is very useful for providing conditions for a multimodal system as well as giving insight into how laser ablation plume parameters are related to LA-ICP-MS and LIBS results for both ns- and fs-LA.

  14. Effects of ambient background gases on YBCO plume propagation under film growth conditions: Spectroscopic, ion probe, and fast photographic studies

    The formation, composition, and propagation of KrF laser-produced plasmas from Y1Ba2Cu3O7-x have been studied with emphasis on topics relevant to film growth by pulsed-laser deposition. Spatially and temporally resolved, high-resolution optical absorption and emission spectroscopy, fast ion probes, and fast photography [obtained with a gated, image-intensified CCD array detector (ICCD)] are employed to investigate both emitting and non-emitting species in the laser plume as well as the overall shape and propagation of the laser plasma in background gases of oxygen and xenon. Transient optical absorption spectroscopy is applied to study the composition of the plume of ejected material from the dense layer near the target surface to distances of several centimeters. Optical absorption persists long after the decay of plasma fluorescence, indicating a slower component to plume transport. The absorption of YO formed by YBCO ablation in vacuum and by-yttrium ablation in oxygen is presented. Fast electric ion probes are utilized to measure velocities and total collected charge of the positive ions in the expanding YBCO laser plasma from near-threshold, vacuum conditions into the high fluence, background gas conditions utilized for thin-film growth. The exponential attenuation of the positive ion flux transmitted through 50--300 mTorr background oxygen is measured and used to define an attenuation coefficient. The showing of the laser plasma and formation of shock structures due to gas collisions is studied by ion probe measurements and fast ICCD photography. A comparison between shock wave propagation and drag models is presented to describe the arrival time and shape of the ion probe current waveform with distance. 11 refs, 11 figs

  15. IKEA's International Expansion

    Harapiak, Clayton

    2013-01-01

    This case concerns a global retailing firm that is dealing with strategic management and marketing issues. Applying a scenario of international expansion, this case provides a thorough analysis of the current business environment for IKEA. Utilizing a variety of methods (e.g. SWOT, PESTLE, McKinsey Matrix) the overall objective is to provide students with the opportunity to apply their research skills and knowledge regarding a highly competitive industry to develop strategic marketing strateg...

  16. China petrochemical expansion progressing

    This paper reports on China's petrochemical expansion surge which is picking up speed. A worldscale petrochemical complex is emerging at Shanghai with an eye to expanding China's petrochemical exports, possibly through joint ventures with foreign companies, China Features reported. In other action, Beijing and Henan province have approved plans for a $1.2 billion chemical fibers complex at the proposed Luoyang refinery, China Daily reported

  17. Ultraprecise thermal expansion measurements of seven low expansion materials

    Berthold, J. W., III; Jacobs, S. F.

    1976-01-01

    We summarize a large number of ultraprecise thermal expansion measurements made on seven different low expansivity materials. Expansion coefficients in the -150-300 C temperature range are shown for Owens-Illinois Cer-Vit C-101, Corning ULE 7971 (titanium silicate) and fused silica 7940, Heraeus-Schott Zerodur low-expansion material and Homosil fused silica, Universal Cyclops Invar LR-35, and Simonds Saw and Steel Super Invar.

  18. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation for Uterine Adenomyosis

    Scarperi, Stefano; Pontrelli, Giovanni; Campana, Colette; Steinkasserer, Martin; Ercoli, Alfredo; Minelli, Luca; Bergamini, Valentino; Ceccaroni, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Symptomatic uterine adenomyosis, unresponsive to medical therapy, is a challenging condition for patients who desire to preserve their uterus. This study was an evaluation of the feasibility and efficacy of laparoscopic radiofrequency thermal ablation of symptomatic nodular uterine adenomyosis. Methods: Fifteen women with symptomatic nodular adenomyosis, who had no plans for pregnancy but declined hysterectomy, underwent radiofrequency thermal ablation. Ultrasonogra...

  19. Time-stepping for laser ablation

    Harihar Khanal; David Autrique; Vasilios Alexiades

    2013-01-01

    Nanosecond laser ablation is a popular technique, applied in many areas of science and technology such as medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. We outline a computational model for radiative and collisional processes occurring during ns-laser ablation, and compare the performance of various low and high order time-stepping algorithms.

  20. PULSED LASER ABLATION OF CEMENT AND CONCRETE

    Laser ablation was investigated as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete from nuclear facilities. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam...

  1. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment

  2. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...

  3. Synthetic image generation of factory stack and cooling tower plumes

    Kuo, Shiao D.; Schott, John R.

    1997-07-01

    A new model for generating synthetic images of plumes has been developed using a radiometrically based ray-tracing algorithm. Existing plume models that describe the characteristics of the plume (constituents, concentration, particulate sizing, and temperature) are used to generate AutoCAD models for input into the code. The effects of scattered light using Mie theory and radiative transfer, as well as thermal self-emission/absorption from within the plume, are modeled for different regions of the plume. The ray-tracing accounts for direct sunlight, scattered skylight, reflected sunlight from the background, and thermal self-emission from both the atmosphere and background. Synthetic generated images of a cooling tower plume, composed of water droplets, and a factor stack plume, composed of methyl chloride, are produced for visible, MWIR, and LWIR bands. Images of the plume from different view angles are also produced. Observations are made on the interaction between the plume and its background and possible effects for remote sensing. Images are made of the methyl chloride plume in which the concentration and temperature are varied to determine the sensitivity of the radiance reaching the sensor.

  4. High Heat Flux Block Ablator-in-Honeycomb Heat Shield Using Ablator/Aerogel-Filled Foam Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultramet and ARA Ablatives Laboratory previously developed and demonstrated advanced foam-reinforced carbon/phenolic ablators that offer substantially increased...

  5. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry: Parameter influence on boron isotope measurements

    Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) was recently reported for optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure. LAMIS utilizes molecular emissions which exhibit larger isotopic spectral shits than in atomic transitions. For boron monoxide 10BO and 11BO, the isotopic shifts extend from 114 cm-1 (0.74 nm) to 145-238 cm-1 (5-8 nm) at the B2Σ+ (v = 0) → X2Σ+ (v = 2) and A2Πi (v = 0) → X2Σ+ (v = 3) transitions, respectively. These molecular isotopic shifts are over two orders of magnitude larger than the maximum isotopic shift of approximately 0.6 cm-1 in atomic boron. This paper describes how boron isotope abundance can be quantitatively determined using LAMIS and how atomic, ionic, and molecular optical emission develops in a plasma emanating from laser ablation of solid samples with various boron isotopic composition. We demonstrate that requirements for spectral resolution of the measurement system can be significantly relaxed when the isotopic abundance ratio is determined using chemometric analysis of spectra. Sensitivity can be improved by using a second slightly delayed laser pulse arriving into an expanding plume created by the first ablation pulse.

  6. UV laser irradiation of IR laser generated particles ablated from nitrobenzyl alcohol

    Particles generated by 2.94 μm pulsed IR laser ablation of liquid 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol were irradiated with a 351 nm UV laser 3.5 mm above and parallel to the sample target. The size and concentration of the ablated particles were measured with a light scattering particle sizer. The application of the UV laser resulted in a reduction in the average particle size by one-half and an increase in the total particle concentration by a factor of nine. The optimum delay between the IR and UV lasers was between 16 and 26 μs and was dependent on the fluence of the IR laser: higher fluence led to a more rapid appearance of particulate. The ejection velocity of the particle plume, as determined by the delay time corresponding to the maximum two-laser particle concentration signal, was 130 m/s at 1600 J/m2 IR laser fluence and increased to 220 m/s at 2700 J/m2. The emission of particles extended for several ms. The observations are consistent with a rapid phase change and emission of particulate, followed by an extended emission of particles ablated from the target surface.

  7. Damage on fused silica optics caused by laser ablation of surface-bound microparticles.

    Raman, Rajesh N; Demos, Stavros G; Shen, Nan; Feigenbaum, Eyal; Negres, Raluca A; Elhadj, Selim; Rubenchik, Alexander M; Matthews, Manyalibo J

    2016-02-01

    High peak power laser systems are vulnerable to performance degradation due to particulate contamination on optical surfaces. In this work, we show using model contaminant particles that their optical properties decisively determine the nature of the optical damage. Borosilicate particles with low intrinsic optical absorption undergo ablation initiating in their sub-surface, leading to brittle fragmentation, distributed plasma formation, material dispersal and ultimately can lead to micro-fractures in the substrate optical surface. In contrast, energy coupling into metallic particles is highly localized near the particle-substrate interface leading to the formation of a confined plasma and subsequent etching of the substrate surface, accompanied by particle ejection driven by the recoil momentum of the ablation plume. While the tendency to create fractured surface pitting from borosilicate is stochastic, the smooth ablation pits created by metal particles is deterministic, with pit depths scaling linearly with laser fluence. A simple model is employed which predicts ~3x electric field intensity enhancement from surface-bound fragments. In addition, our results suggest that the amount of energy deposited in metal particles is at least twice that in transparent particles. PMID:26906835

  8. Single laser based dual-wavelength ablation technique for emission enhancement during LIBS

    In this paper, a novel method of the dual-wavelength (laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy LIBS) technique using a single laser system is proposed and demonstrated. Experiments are performed using a pulsed Nd3+ : YAG laser with a pair of 355-1064 nm and also with 532-1064 nm. The shorter wavelength laser is used for ablation and plasma formation, and the fundamental wavelength (1064 nm) is used for plasma re-excitation. The proposed dual-wavelength LIBS technique is used for lunar simulant samples under different ambient pressure conditions. Various characteristic parameters, such as the emission line-intensity enhancement, plasma temperature, lifetime and plasma area, are studied. Experimental studies clearly showed the emission line-intensity enhancement up to a factor of 3. Emission lifetime showed a longer sustained emission with an increase of up to 33% for the dual-wavelength approach. A theoretical simulation based on the hydrodynamic equations is also performed for dual-wavelength ablation and re-excitation. The estimated plasma temperature and ablation plume-front velocity clearly showed an increase in dual wavelength, which is in agreement with the experimental results.

  9. New Technologies in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    John Rickard, MD, MPH; Saman Nazarian MD, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a major public health issue worldwide the incidence of which is likely to continue to rise. With the birth of pulmonary vein isolation(PVI, cardiac ablation has emerged as key strategy for the treatment of AF. PVI using traditional point by point radiofrequency ablation is time consuming and technically challenging. Refining patient selection for PVI also remains an important goal. New ablative strategies using catheter-based balloon technologies, such as cryothermy and laser-based systems, may simplify PVI. In addition, new MRI-based techniques offer the hope of refining patient selection prior to ablation. Lastly, FIRM mapping represents an entirely new approach to AF ablation via the targeting of mechanisms that perpetuate AF rather than simply targeting triggers alone.

  10. Phased RF ablation: results and concerns

    Alexandra Kiss, MD, PhD; G�bor S�ndorfi, MD; Edina Nagy-Bal�, MD, PhD; Mihran Martirosyan, MD; Zoltan Csanadi, MD, PhD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available reatment of atrial fibrillation (AF with catheter ablation has proven to be a safe and effective treatment modality which is offered to an increasing number of patients in many centers. Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI is an established cornerstone of AF ablation strategies. Athough the isolation of the pulmonary veins (PVs with irrigated focal radiofrequency (RF catheters using a point-by-point method is considered as the gold standard, it can be challenging to create contiguous lesions, time consuming, and require advanced three dimensional (3D mapping and navigational systems. The phased RF ablation system was designed to address many of these challenges associated with conventional focal RF ablation. In this review, we describe the main features of phased RF ablation and summarize the data available on clinical outcome with this technology.

  11. Tumor ablation with irreversible electroporation.

    Bassim Al-Sakere

    Full Text Available We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop during the application of the pulses were used to design an efficient treatment protocol with minimal heating of the tissue. Tumor regression was confirmed by histological studies which also revealed that it occurred as a direct result of irreversible cell membrane permeabilization. Parametric studies show that the successful outcome of the procedure is related to the applied electric field strength, the total pulse duration as well as the temporal mode of delivery of the pulses. Our best results were obtained using plate electrodes to deliver across the tumor 80 pulses of 100 micros at 0.3 Hz with an electrical field magnitude of 2500 V/cm. These conditions induced complete regression in 12 out of 13 treated tumors, (92%, in the absence of tissue heating. Irreversible electroporation is thus a new effective modality for non-thermal tumor ablation.

  12. Analysis of Exhaust Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for a 59-Degree Wing Body Model

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2011-01-01

    Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions are due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacted with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. The nozzle lip shock moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and reduced the nozzle boat-tail expansion. Lip shock movement caused a favorable change in the observed pressure signature. These results were applied to a simplified supersonic vehicle geometry with no inlets and no tail, in which the goal was to demonstrate how under-expanded nozzle operation reduced the sonic boom signature by twelve percent. A secondary goal was to demonstrate the use of the Cart3D inviscid code for off-body pressure signatures including the nozzle plume effect.

  13. Metallic targets ablation by laser plasma production in a vacuum

    A model of metallic target ablation and metallic plasma production by laser irradiation is reported. The model considers laser energy absorption by the plasma, electron emission from hot targets and ion flux to the target from the plasma as well as an electric sheath produced at the target-plasma interface. The proposed approach takes into account that the plasma, partially shields the laser radiation from the target, and also converts absorbed laser energy to kinetic and potential energies of the charged plasma particles, which they transport not only through the ambient vacuum but also through the electrostatic sheath to the solid surface. Therefore additional plasma heating by the accelerated emitted electrons and target heating caused by bombardment of it by the accelerated ions are considered. A system of equations, including equations for solid heat conduction, plasma generation, and plasma expansion, is solved self-consistently. The results of calculations explain the measured dependencies of ablation yield (μ g/pulse) for Al, Ni, and Ti targets on laser fluence in range of (5–21)J/cm2 published previously by Torrisi et al

  14. Spallative ablation of dielectrics by X-ray laser

    Inogamov, N A; Faenov, A Ya; Khokhlov, V A; Shepelev, V V; Skobelev, I Yu; Kato, Y; Tanaka, M; Pikuz, T A; Kishimoto, M; Ishino, M; Nishikino, M; Fukuda, Y; Bulanov, S V; Kawachi, T; Petrov, Yu V; Anisimov, S I; Fortov, V E

    2009-01-01

    Short laser pulse in wide range of wavelengths, from infrared to X-ray, disturbs electron-ion equilibrium and rises pressure in a heated layer. The case where pulse duration $\\tau_L$ is shorter than acoustic relaxation time $t_s$ is considered in the paper. It is shown that this short pulse may cause thermomechanical phenomena such as spallative ablation regardless to wavelength. While the physics of electron-ion relaxation on wavelength and various electron spectra of substances: there are spectra with an energy gap in semiconductors and dielectrics opposed to gapless continuous spectra in metals. The paper describes entire sequence of thermomechanical processes from expansion, nucleation, foaming, and nanostructuring to spallation with particular attention to spallation by X-ray pulse.

  15. Exponential Decay of Expansive Constants

    Sun, Peng

    2011-01-01

    A map $f$ on a compact metric space is expansive if and only if $f^n$ is expansive. We study the exponential rate of decay of the expansive constant of $f^n$. A major result is that this rate times box dimension bounds topological entropy.

  16. The validity of currently popular plume rise formulas

    The ground-level concentrations of pollutants downwind of a tall chimney decrease as the effective height of the stack increases. The effective height of the stack is the actual height plus the rise of the plume centerline due to momentum and buoyancy of the effluent. Over twenty plume rise formulas have been proposed, but none is Widely accepted due in part to a lack of sufficient plume rise data for testing. In this paper, 711 plume rise observations are used to test the ability of fifteen of the published formulas to predict plume rise. The plume rise data were obtained from stacks whose heat emission rate varied over four orders of magnitude. (author)

  17. Monitoring the formation of inorganic fullerene-like MoS2 nanostructures by laser ablation in liquid environments

    Laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is emerging as a simple, clean and reproducible way to generate a large number of intriguing nanometric structures with peculiar properties. In this work we present some results on the formation of MoS2 fullerene-like nanoparticles (10-15 nm diameter) obtained by the ablation of crystalline targets in water. Such a top-down approach can be considered greener than standard sulphidization reactions and represents an intriguing single step procedure. The generation of the MoS2 nanostructures is in competition with that of oxide clusters and strongly depends on the oxidative environment created by the plasma plume. The size, shape and crystalline phase of the obtained nanoparticles are studied by microscopy while X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy is used to investigate the chemical state of produced nanostructures and to propose mechanisms for their growth.

  18. Room temperature synthesized rutile TiO2 nanoparticles induced by laser ablation in liquid and their photocatalytic activity

    TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by one-step pulsed laser ablation of a titanium target immersed in a poly-(vinylpyrrolidone) solution at room temperature. The products were systematically characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that the rutile TiO2 nanocrystalline particles were one-step synthesized at room temperature and the mean size in diameter is about 50 nm with a narrow size distribution. A probable formation process was proposed on the basis of the microstructure and the instantaneous plasma plume induced by the laser. Photocatalytic activity was monitored by degradation of a methylene blue solution. The as-prepared rutile TiO2 nanoparticles demonstrate a good photocatalytic performance. This work shows that pulsed laser ablation in liquid media is a good method to synthesize some nanosized materials which are difficult to produce by other conventional methods.

  19. A model of pellet ablation with a multi-species ablatant

    The single species neutral - shielding model for the ablation of a hydrogenic pellet is extended by considering the ablatant as a mixture of four species: Molecular and atomic hydrogen, protons and electrons. Compared with the single-species-ablatant model, results of the analysis showed that the ablatant state differs considerably. The attenuation of the incoming electron energy and energy flux, however, are very much similar, irrespective of the ablatant composition. The scaling law of the pellet ablation rate with respect to the plasma state of Te, ne and the pellet radius, rp remains the same; the ablation rate is reduced approximately by 15%. At some combinations of Te, ne and rp, a weak shock can appear when the ablated flow downstream becomes sonic. A sufficient but not necessary condition for its occurrence is that the ablatant approaches either a state of complete dissociation, or complete ionization. To study the possible existence of an effective energy absorbing spherical region around the pellet, a comparison between the local ablated electron collisional mean free path and the electron Larmor radius in the cloud is made. A critical field, Bc is then defined and evalued at the ionization radius, ri. For plasma state of fusion interest and pellet radius beyond 0.15 mm, Bc is well above 10 Tesla. (orig.) With 3 tabs., 7 figs., 21 refs

  20. Technical Overview of Plume Radiation from a Solid Rocket Motor

    SAKURAI, Yasushi; Kimura, Hiroshi

    1986-01-01

    Current technology for calculation of plume radiation from a solid rocket motor is overviewed and a useful engineering model is reviewed and recommended for design purpose. A solid rocket motor plume is a conical cloud which contains cold scattering particles and hot emitting-absorbing particles. Radiation to aft-end equipment of spacecraft is a major concern of thermal design engineers. Radiative properties of the plume totally depends on the particle behaviors in the flow field and the anal...

  1. Rethinking expansive learning

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Lundh Snis, Ulrika

    Abstract: This paper analyses an online community of master’s students taking a course in ICT and organisational learning. The students initiated and facilitated an educational design for organisational learning called Proactive Review in the organisation where they are employed. By using an online...... discussion forum on Google groups, they created new ways of reflecting and learning. We used netnography to select qualitative postings from the online community and expansive learning concepts for data analysis. The findings show how students changed practices of organisational learning in their...

  2. Marine bird aggregations associated with the tidally-driven plume and plume fronts of the Columbia River

    Zamon, Jeannette E.; Phillips, Elizabeth M.; Guy, Troy J.

    2014-09-01

    Freshwater discharge from large rivers into the coastal ocean creates tidally-driven frontal systems known to enhance mixing, primary production, and secondary production. Many authors suggest that tidal plume fronts increase energy flow to fish-eating predators by attracting planktivorous fishes to feed on plankton aggregated by the fronts. However, few studies of plume fronts directly examine piscivorous predator response to plume fronts. Our work examined densities of piscivorous seabirds relative to the plume region and plume fronts of the Columbia River, USA. Common murres (Uria aalge) and sooty shearwaters (Puffinus griseus) composed 83% of all birds detected on mesoscale surveys of the Washington and Oregon coasts (June 2003-2006), and 91.3% of all birds detected on fine scale surveys of the plume region less than 40 km from the river mouth (May 2003 and 2006). Mesoscale comparisons showed consistently more predators in the central plume area compared to the surrounding marine area (murres: 10.1-21.5 vs. 3.4-8.2 birds km-2; shearwaters: 24.2-75.1 vs. 11.8-25.9 birds km-2). Fine scale comparisons showed that murre density in 2003 and shearwater density in both 2003 and 2006 were significantly elevated in the tidal plume region composed of the most recently discharged river water. Murres tended to be more abundant on the north face of the plume. In May 2003, more murres and shearwaters were found within 3 km of the front on any given transect, although maximum bird density was not necessarily found in the same location as the front itself. Predator density on a given transect was not correlated with frontal strength in either year. The high bird densities we observed associated with the tidal plume demonstrate that the turbid Columbia River plume does not necessarily provide fish with refuge from visual predators. Bird predation in the plume region may therefore impact early marine survival of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), which must migrate through the

  3. Field experimental observations of highly graded sediment plumes

    Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob; Saremi, Sina; Jimenez, Carlos;

    2015-01-01

    A field experiment in the waters off the south-eastern coast of Cyprus was carried out to study near-field formation of sediment plumes from dumping. Different loads of sediment were poured into calm and limpid waters one at the time from just above the sea surface. The associated plumes, gravita......A field experiment in the waters off the south-eastern coast of Cyprus was carried out to study near-field formation of sediment plumes from dumping. Different loads of sediment were poured into calm and limpid waters one at the time from just above the sea surface. The associated plumes...

  4. The effects of plasmaspheric plumes on dayside reconnection

    Ouellette, J. E.; Lyon, J. G.; Brambles, O. J.; Zhang, B.; Lotko, W.

    2016-05-01

    We summarize the results of a study on the impact of plasmaspheric plumes on dayside reconnection using a three-dimensional magnetospheric simulation code. We find that the mass loading of magnetospheric flux tubes slows local reconnection rates, though not as much as predicted by Borovsky et al. (2013) due to differences in how well the Cassak-Shay theory matches magnetospheric configurations with and without plasmaspheric plumes. Additionally, we find that in some circumstances reconnection activity is enhanced on either side of the plumes, which moderates its impact on the total dayside reconnection rate. These results provide evidence that plasmaspheric plumes have both local- and global-scale effects on dayside reconnection.

  5. Algorithms and analysis for underwater vehicle plume tracing.

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Savage, Elizabeth L. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Hurtado, John Edward (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Eskridge, Steven E.

    2003-07-01

    The goal of this research was to develop and demonstrate cooperative 3-D plume tracing algorithms for miniature autonomous underwater vehicles. Applications for this technology include Lost Asset and Survivor Location Systems (L-SALS) and Ship-in-Port Patrol and Protection (SP3). This research was a joint effort that included Nekton Research, LLC, Sandia National Laboratories, and Texas A&M University. Nekton Research developed the miniature autonomous underwater vehicles while Sandia and Texas A&M developed the 3-D plume tracing algorithms. This report describes the plume tracing algorithm and presents test results from successful underwater testing with pseudo-plume sources.

  6. Gas plume quantification in downlooking hyperspectral longwave infrared images

    Turcotte, Caroline S.; Davenport, Michael R.

    2010-10-01

    Algorithms have been developed to support quantitative analysis of a gas plume using down-looking airborne hyperspectral long-wave infrared (LWIR) imagery. The resulting gas quantification "GQ" tool estimates the quantity of one or more gases at each pixel, and estimates uncertainty based on factors such as atmospheric transmittance, background clutter, and plume temperature contrast. GQ uses gas-insensitive segmentation algorithms to classify the background very precisely so that it can infer gas quantities from the differences between plume-bearing pixels and similar non-plume pixels. It also includes MODTRAN-based algorithms to iteratively assess various profiles of air temperature, water vapour, and ozone, and select the one that implies smooth emissivity curves for the (unknown) materials on the ground. GQ then uses a generalized least-squares (GLS) algorithm to simultaneously estimate the most likely mixture of background (terrain) material and foreground plume gases. Cross-linking of plume temperature to the estimated gas quantity is very non-linear, so the GLS solution was iteratively assessed over a range of plume temperatures to find the best fit to the observed spectrum. Quantification errors due to local variations in the camera-topixel distance were suppressed using a subspace projection operator. Lacking detailed depth-maps for real plumes, the GQ algorithm was tested on synthetic scenes generated by the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) software. Initial results showed pixel-by-pixel gas quantification errors of less than 15% for a Freon 134a plume.

  7. Studies of the environmental impact of evaporative cooling tower plumes

    This ongoing research program of the environmental impact of natural-draft evaporative cooling tower plumes consists principally of a comprehensive series of airborne measurements of a variety of the physical characteristics of the plumes and, to a lesser extent, of preliminary studies of remote sodar plume probing techniques and the development of simplified dynamical numerical models suitable for use in conducting field measurement programs. The PSU Doppler sodar was used at the Keystone Power Plant in southwestern Pennsylvania for an extended series of remote measurements of the characteristics of plume turbulent temperature and velocity fluctuations and results are discussed

  8. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Northwest Plume interceptor system evaluation

    Laase, A.D.; Clausen, J.L.

    1998-07-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) recently installed an interceptor system consisting of four wells, evenly divided between two well fields, to contain the Northwest Plume. As stated in the Northwest Plume Record of Decision (ROD), groundwater will be pumped at a rate to reduce further contamination and initiate control of the northwest contaminant plume. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the optimum (minimal) well field pumping rates required for plume hotspot containment. Plume hotspot, as defined in the Northwest Plume ROD and throughout this report, is that portion of the plume with trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations greater than 1,000 {micro}g/L. An existing 3-dimensional groundwater model was modified and used to perform capture zone analyses of the north and south interceptor system well fields. Model results suggest that the plume hotspot is not contained at the system design pumping rate of 100 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well field. Rather, the modeling determined that north and south well field pumping rates of 400 and 150 gal/min, respectively, are necessary for plume hotspot containment. The difference between the design and optimal pumping rates required for containment can be attributed to the discovery of a highly transmissive zone in the vicinity of the two well fields.

  9. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Northwest Plume interceptor system evaluation

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) recently installed an interceptor system consisting of four wells, evenly divided between two well fields, to contain the Northwest Plume. As stated in the Northwest Plume Record of Decision (ROD), groundwater will be pumped at a rate to reduce further contamination and initiate control of the northwest contaminant plume. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the optimum (minimal) well field pumping rates required for plume hotspot containment. Plume hotspot, as defined in the Northwest Plume ROD and throughout this report, is that portion of the plume with trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations greater than 1,000 microg/L. An existing 3-dimensional groundwater model was modified and used to perform capture zone analyses of the north and south interceptor system well fields. Model results suggest that the plume hotspot is not contained at the system design pumping rate of 100 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well field. Rather, the modeling determined that north and south well field pumping rates of 400 and 150 gal/min, respectively, are necessary for plume hotspot containment. The difference between the design and optimal pumping rates required for containment can be attributed to the discovery of a highly transmissive zone in the vicinity of the two well fields

  10. Engineering Properties of Expansive Soil

    DAI Shaobin; SONG Minghai; HUANG Jun

    2005-01-01

    The components of expansive soil were analyzed with EDAX, and it is shown that the main contents of expansive soil in the northern Hubei have some significant effects on engineering properties of expansive soil. Furthermore, the soil modified by lime has an obvious increase of Ca2+ and an improvement of connections between granules so as to reduce the expansibility and contractility of soil. And it also has a better effect on the modified expansive soil than the one modified by pulverized fuel ash.

  11. Optimum Droplet Motion in Fire Plumes

    Vasily Novozhilov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper introduces analytical model applicable for analysis of motion of water droplets injected into fire-generated plumes. The model is derived from Lagrangian equation of droplet motion.Application of the developed model to the practically important problem that is fire suppression by water sprays is discussed. A criterion for optimum spray dynamics is proposed. An analytical expression is provided for the optimum droplet size in the spray as a function of Heat Release Rate (HRR of fire.The present approach provides a quick estimation of optimum spray parameters for a particular fire suppression application.

  12. Integral models for buoyant plume calculations

    Integral models have been proven to be successful and inexpensive tools for the solution of a variety of jet-type environmental flow problems. In the Sonderforschungsbereich 80, a family of integral models has been developed for several applications as, e.g., the mixing of waste water and cooling water plumes discharged into lakes and coastal waters for the dispersion of pollutants and heat emitted by chimneys, cooling towers and urban heat islands into the atmosphere. The common features of these integral models are discussed. Finally, the quality of model results is demonstrated by comparing predictions with experimental data. (orig.)

  13. Neural Ablation and Regeneration in Pain Practice.

    Choi, Eun Ji; Choi, Yun Mi; Jang, Eun Jung; Kim, Ju Yeon; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    A nerve block is an effective tool for diagnostic and therapeutic methods. If a diagnostic nerve block is successful for pain relief and the subsequent therapeutic nerve block is effective for only a limited duration, the next step that should be considered is a nerve ablation or modulation. The nerve ablation causes iatrogenic neural degeneration aiming only for sensory or sympathetic denervation without motor deficits. Nerve ablation produces the interruption of axonal continuity, degeneration of nerve fibers distal to the lesion (Wallerian degeneration), and the eventual death of axotomized neurons. The nerve ablation methods currently available for resection/removal of innervation are performed by either chemical or thermal ablation. Meanwhile, the nerve modulation method for interruption of innervation is performed using an electromagnetic field of pulsed radiofrequency. According to Sunderland's classification, it is first and foremost suggested that current neural ablations produce third degree peripheral nerve injury (PNI) to the myelin, axon, and endoneurium without any disruption of the fascicular arrangement, perineurium, and epineurium. The merit of Sunderland's third degree PNI is to produce a reversible injury. However, its shortcoming is the recurrence of pain and the necessity of repeated ablative procedures. The molecular mechanisms related to axonal regeneration after injury include cross-talk between axons and glial cells, neurotrophic factors, extracellular matrix molecules, and their receptors. It is essential to establish a safe, long-standing denervation method without any complications in future practices based on the mechanisms of nerve degeneration as well as following regeneration. PMID:26839664

  14. Ablation yield and angular distribution of ablated particles from laser-irradiated metals: The most fundamental determining factor

    Five metals (Zn, Cu, Ni, Ti, and Mo) were irradiated with 150 shots of a Q-switched Nd:YAG pulsed laser in a vacuum of 10-3 torr. The ions projected out of the laser-produced plasma (LPP) plume were detected by CR-39 detectors positioned at -15o, 0o, 30o, 60o, and 90o with respect to the target-surface normal at a distance of 5 cm from the target in each case. The angular distribution of LPP ions, which is characterized by the exponent n of cosn θ distribution, is given by n = 2.5-11 for the five target metals. The value of the exponent n has no systematic correlation with the square-root of atomic mass of the target metals but exhibits systematic dependence on the room temperature Debye-Waller's thermal parameter B or the mean-square amplitude of atomic vibrations 2>. Likewise, the ablation yield (atoms/shot) of the twelve target metals investigated by Thestrup et al. (2002) under identical irradiation conditions is a function of the room temperature B-factor or 2>.

  15. An experimental study of simultaneous ablation with dual probes in radiofrequency thermal ablation

    Jang, Il Soo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Seo, Heung Suk; Kim, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Sun; Heo, Jeong Nam [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    To determine the differences between sequential ablation with a single probe and simultaneous ablation with dual probes. Using two 14-gauge expandable probes (nine internal prongs with 4-cm deployment), radiofrequency was applied sequentially (n=8) or simultaneously (n=8) to ten ex-vivo cow livers. Before starting ablation, two RF probes with an inter-probe space of 2 cm (n=8) or 3 cm (n=8) were inserted. In the sequential group, switching the connecting cable to an RF generator permitted ablation with the second probe just after ablation with the first probe had finished. In the simultaneous group, single ablation was performed only after connecting the shafts of both RF probes using a connection device. Each ablation lasted 7 minutes at a target temperature of 105-110 .deg. C. The size and shape of the ablated area, and total ablation time were then compared between the two groups. With 2-cm spacing, the group, mean length and overlapping width of ablated lesions were, respectively, 5.20 and 5.05 cm in the sequential group (n=4), and 5.81 and 5.65 cm in the simultaneous group (n=4). With 3-cm spacing, the corresponding figures were 4.99 and 5.60 cm in the sequential group (n=4), and 6.04 and 6.78 cm in the simultaneous group (n=4). With 2-cm spacing, the mean depth of the proximal waist was 0.58 cm in the sequential (group and 0.28 cm in the simultaneous group, while with 3-cm spacing, the corresponding figures were 1.65 and 1.48 cm. In neither group was there a distal waist. Mean total ablation time was 23.4 minutes in the sequential group and 14 minutes in the simultaneous group. In terms of ablation size and ablation time, simultaneous radiofrequency ablation with dual probes is superior to sequential ablation with a single probe. A simultaneous approach will enable an operator to overcome difficulty in probe repositioning during overlapping ablation, resulting in complete ablation with a successful safety margin.

  16. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  17. Laser induced ablation studies from gold target

    Laser produced gold plasmas show an enhanced mass ablation rate and ablation pressure as compared to theoretical prediction. This is attributed to radiation effect. Experimental results indicate an increase in the C-J point density and an agreement with self-regulating ablation scaling. Using 1.06 μm laser radiation on 12.5 μm thick planar gold targets, at an absorbed laser intensity IA ≤ 2 x 1013 W/cm2, the experimental results are presented. (Author)

  18. Catheter ablation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gökoğlan, Yalçın; Güneş, Mahmut F; Horton, Rodney; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Burkhardt, J David; Natale, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation for inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is recommended for patients symptomatic for palpitations and refractory to other treatments. The current approach consists in sinus node modification (SNM), achieved by ablation of the cranial part of the sinus node to eliminate faster sinus rates while trying to preserve chronotropic competence. This approach has a limited efficacy, with a very modest long-term clinical success. To overcome this, proper patient selection is crucial and an epicardial approach should always be considered. This brief review will discuss the current role and limitations of catheter ablation in the management of patients with IST. PMID:26310299

  19. Atrioventricular Junction Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation.

    Patel, Dilesh; Daoud, Emile G

    2016-04-01

    Atrioventricular junction (AVJ) ablation is an effective therapy in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation who are intolerant to or unsuccessfully managed with rhythm control or medical rate control strategies. A drawback is that the procedure mandates a pacing system. Overall, the safety and efficacy of AVJ ablation is high with a majority of the patients reporting significant improvement in symptoms and quality-of-life measures. Risk of sudden cardiac death after device implantation is low, especially with an appropriate postprocedure pacing rate. Mortality benefit with AVJ ablation has been shown in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices. PMID:26968669

  20. How I do it: Radiofrequency ablation

    Over the past decade, image-guided tumor ablation using thermal energy has emerged as a promising technique for treating focal, primary or secondary, nonoperable tumors. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is minimally invasive and requires less resources, time, and recovery period and is, moreover, relatively inexpensive. RFA has been used to treat tumors located in the liver, lung, bone, kidneys, brain, thyroid, breast, and pancreas. This article will describe how to choose an appropriate case; precisely place the needle into the tumor; the precautions to be taken before, during, and after the procedure; probable complications; and the follow-up of patients undergoing ablation

  1. Tumor Ablation: Common Modalities and General Practices

    Knavel, Erica M.; Brace, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique that is commonly used in the treatment of tumors of the liver, kidney, bone, and lung. During tumor ablation, thermal energy is used to heat or cool tissue to cytotoxic levels (less than −40°C or more than 60°C). An additional technique is being developed that targets the permeability of the cell membrane and is ostensibly nonthermal. Within the classification of tumor ablation, there are several modalities used worldwide: radiofrequency, micro...

  2. The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study

    Arbelo, Elena; Brugada, Josep; Hindricks, Gerhard;

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study is a prospective registry designed to describe the clinical epidemiology of patients undergoing an atrial fibrillation (AFib) ablation, and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across Europe. The aims of the 1-year follow-up were to analyse...... left atrial tachycardia, and 4 patients died (1 haemorrhagic stroke, 1 ventricular fibrillation in a patient with ischaemic heart disease, 1 cancer, and 1 of unknown cause). CONCLUSION: The AFib Ablation Pilot Study provided crucial information on the epidemiology, management, and outcomes of catheter...

  3. Investigation of different liquid media and ablation times on pulsed laser ablation synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, Particle size distribution diagram from Laser Particle Size Analyzer (LPSA), UV-visible absorption spectra, and weight changes of targets were used for the characterization and comparison of products. The experiments demonstrated that ablation efficiency in ethylene glycol is too low, in ethanol is higher, and in acetone is highest. Comparison between ethanol and acetone clarified that acetone medium leads to finer nanoparticles (mean diameter of 30 nm) with narrower size distribution (from 10 to 100 nm). However, thin carbon layer coats some of them, which was not observed in ethanol medium. It was also revealed that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, but lower ablation rate. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, were synthesized in higher ablation times.

  4. Investigation of different liquid media and ablation times on pulsed laser ablation synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles

    Baladi, Arash [Materials Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Jalal Al Ahmad, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarraf Mamoory, Rasoul, E-mail: rsarrafm@modares.ac.ir [Materials Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Jalal Al Ahmad, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-01

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, Particle size distribution diagram from Laser Particle Size Analyzer (LPSA), UV-visible absorption spectra, and weight changes of targets were used for the characterization and comparison of products. The experiments demonstrated that ablation efficiency in ethylene glycol is too low, in ethanol is higher, and in acetone is highest. Comparison between ethanol and acetone clarified that acetone medium leads to finer nanoparticles (mean diameter of 30 nm) with narrower size distribution (from 10 to 100 nm). However, thin carbon layer coats some of them, which was not observed in ethanol medium. It was also revealed that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, but lower ablation rate. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, were synthesized in higher ablation times.

  5. Flyer Acceleration by Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation and Application for Space Propulsion

    Flyer acceleration by ablation plasma pressure produced by irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam has been studied. Acceleration process including expansion of ablation plasma was simulated based on fluid model. And interaction between incident pulsed ion beam and a flyer target was considered as accounting stopping power of it. In experiments, we used ETIGO-II intense pulsed ion beam generator with two kinds of diodes; 1) Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID, power densities of <100 J/cm2) and 2) Spherical-focused Plasma Focus Diode (SPFD, power densities of up to 4.3 kJ/cm2). Numerical results of accelerated flyer velocity agreed well with measured one over wide range of incident ion beam energy density. Flyer velocity of 5.6 km/s and ablation plasma pressure of 15 GPa was demonstrated by the present experiments. Acceleration of double-layer target consists of gold/aluminum was studied. For adequate layer thickness, such a flyer target could be much more accelerated than a single layer. Effect of waveform of ion beam was also examined. Parabolic waveform could accelerate more efficiently than rectangular waveform. Applicability of ablation propulsion was discussed. Specific impulse of 7000∼8000 seconds and time averaged thrust of up to 5000∼6000N can be expected. Their values can be controllable by changing power density of incident ion beam and pulse duration

  6. Mechanism of laser ablation for aqueous media irradiated under confined-stress conditions

    Pulsed laser ablation of aqueous medium irradiated under conditions of temporal confinement of thermal stress is described. Time-resolved measurements of laser-induced transient stress waves with simultaneous imaging of ablation process by laser-flash photography were performed. Stress transients induced in aqueous solution of K2CrO4 by ablative nanosecond laser pulses at 355 nm were studied by a broad-band lithium niobate acoustic transducer. Recoil momentum upon material ejection was measured from the temporal profiles of the acoustic transducer signal as a function of incident laser fluence. Cavitation bubbles produced in the irradiated volume during the tensile phase of thermoelastic stress were shown to drive material ejection at temperatures substantially below 100 degree C. Experimental data are evident that nanosecond-pulse laser ablation of aqueous media (when temporal stress-confinement conditions are satisfied) include the following two main stages of material ejection: (1) ejection of water microdroplets due to expansion and rupture of subsurface cavitation bubbles; (2) ejection of liquid streams with substantial volume upon collapse of initial crater and large cavitation bubbles in the depth of irradiated volume (after coalescence of smaller bubbles). copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  7. Typical flutter ablation as an adjunct to catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    Dipen Shah

    2008-01-01

    Typical atrial flutter and atrial fibrillation are frequently observed to coexist(1) .  In the current context of interventional electrophysiology, curative or at least definitive ablation is available for both arrhythmias. Despite their coexistence, it is not clear whether typical flutter ablation is necessary in all patients undergoing catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. The following review explores the pathophysiology of both arrhythmias, their interrelationships and the availa...

  8. Typical flutter ablation as an adjunct to catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    Dipen Shah

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Typical atrial flutter and atrial fibrillation are frequently observed to coexist(1 .  In the current context of interventional electrophysiology, curative or at least definitive ablation is available for both arrhythmias. Despite their coexistence, it is not clear whether typical flutter ablation is necessary in all patients undergoing catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. The following review explores the pathophysiology of both arrhythmias, their interrelationships and the available data pertaining to this theme.

  9. Local Ablative Strategies for Ductal Pancreatic Cancer (Radiofrequency Ablation, Irreversible Electroporation): A Review

    Salvatore Paiella; Roberto Salvia; Marco Ramera; Roberto Girelli; Isabella Frigerio; Alessandro Giardino; Valentina Allegrini; Claudio Bassi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has still a dismal prognosis. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) accounts for the 40% of the new diagnoses. Current treatment options are based on chemo- and radiotherapy regimens. Local ablative techniques seem to be the future therapeutic option for stage-III patients with PDAC. Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) and Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) are actually the most emerging local ablative techniques used on LAPC. Initial clinical studies on ...

  10. Charged nanograins in the Enceladus plume

    Hill, T. W.; Thomsen, M. F.; Tokar, R. L.; Coates, A. J.; Lewis, G. R.; Young, D. T.; Crary, F. J.; Baragiola, R. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Dong, Y.; Wilson, R. J.; Jones, G. H.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Mitchell, D. G.; Horányi, M.

    2012-05-01

    There have been three Cassini encounters with the south-pole eruptive plume of Enceladus for which the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) had viewing in the spacecraft ram direction. In each case, CAPS detected a cold dense population of heavy charged particles having mass-to-charge (m/q) ratios up to the maximum detectable by CAPS (˜104 amu/e). These particles are interpreted as singly charged nanometer-sized water-ice grains. Although they are detected with both negative and positive net charges, the former greatly outnumber the latter, at least in the m/q range accessible to CAPS. On the most distant available encounter (E3, March 2008) we derive a net (negative) charge density of up to ˜2600 e/cm3 for nanograins, far exceeding the ambient plasma number density, but less than the net (positive) charge density inferred from the RPWS Langmuir probe data during the same plume encounter. Comparison of the CAPS data from the three available encounters is consistent with the idea that the nanograins leave the surface vents largely uncharged, but become increasingly negatively charged by plasma electron impact as they move farther from the satellite. These nanograins provide a potentially potent source of magnetospheric plasma and E-ring material.

  11. Method of hybrid plume plasma propulsion

    Chang, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A technique for producing thrust by generating a hybrid plume plasma exhaust is disclosed. A plasma flow is generated and introduced into a nozzle which features one or more inlets positioned to direct a flow of neutral gas about the interior of the nozzle. When such a neutral gas flow is combined with the plasma flow within the nozzle, a hybrid plume is constructed including a flow of hot plasma along the center of the nozzle surrounded by a generally annular flow of neutral gas, with an annular transition region between the pure plasma and the neutral gas. The temperature of the outer gas layer is below that of the pure plasma and generally separates the pure plasma from the interior surfaces of the nozzle. The neutral gas flow both insulates the nozzle walls from the high temperatures of the plasma flow and adds to the mass flow rate of the hybrid exhaust. The rate of flow of neutral gas into the interior of the nozzle may be selectively adjusted to control the thrust and specific impulse of the device.

  12. SRS reactor stack plume marking tests

    Tests performed in 105-K in 1987 and 1988 demonstrated that the stack plume can successfully be made visible (i.e., marked) by introducing smoke into the stack breech. The ultimate objective of these tests is to provide a means during an emergency evacuation so that an evacuee can readily identify the stack plume and evacuate in the opposite direction, thus minimizing the potential of severe radiation exposure. The EPA has also requested DOE to arrange for more tests to settle a technical question involving the correct calculation of stack downwash. New test canisters were received in 1988 designed to produce more smoke per unit time; however, these canisters have not been evaluated, because normal ventilation conditions have not been reestablished in K Area. Meanwhile, both the authorization and procedure to conduct the tests have expired. The tests can be performed during normal reactor operation. It is recommended that appropriate authorization and procedure approval be obtained to resume testing after K Area restart

  13. Intercontinental transport of nitrogen oxide pollution plumes

    M. Wenig

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe the first satellite observation of intercontinental transport of nitrogen oxides emitted by power plants, verified by simulations with a particle tracer model. The analysis of such episodes shows that anthropogenic NOx plumes may influence the atmospheric chemistry thousands of kilometers away from its origin, as well as the ocean they traverse due to nitrogen fertilization. This kind of monitoring became possible by applying an improved algorithm to extract the tropospheric fraction of NO2 from the spectral data coming from the GOME instrument.

    As an example we show the observation of NO2 in the time period 4--14 May, 1998, from the South African Plateau to Australia which was possible due to favourable weather conditions during that time period which availed the satellite measurement. This episode was also simulated with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART which uses NOx emissions taken from an inventory for industrial emissions in South Africa and is driven with analyses from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Additionally lightning emissions were added by utilizing Lightning Imaging Sensor data. Lightning NOx  was found to amount to around 10% of the resulting concentrations. Both, the measured and simulated emission plume show matching patterns while traversing the Indian Ocean to Australia and show great resemblance to the aerosol and CO2 transport observed by Piketh et al. (2000

  14. Intercontinental transport of nitrogen oxide pollution plumes

    M. Wenig

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the first satellite observation of intercontinental transport of nitrogen oxides emitted by power plants, verified by simulations with a particle tracer model. The analysis of such episodes shows that anthropogenic NOx plumes may influence the atmospheric chemistry thousands of kilometers away from its origin, as well as the ocean they traverse due to nitrogen fertilization. This kind of monitoring became possible by applying an improved algorithm to extract the tropospheric fraction of NO2 from the spectral data coming from the GOME instrument. As an example we show the observation of NO2 in the time period 4--14 May, 1998, from the South African Plateau to Australia which was possible due to favourable weather conditions during that time period which availed the satellite measurement. This episode was also simulated with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART which uses NOx emissions taken from an inventory for industrial emissions in South Africa and is driven with analyses from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Additionally lightning emissions were taken into account by utilizing Lightning Imaging Sensor data. Lightning was found to contribute probably not more than 25% of the resulting concentrations. Both, the measured and simulated emission plume show matching patterns while traversing the Indian Ocean to Australia and show great resemblance to the aerosol and CO2 transport observed by Piketh et al. (2000.

  15. Channelization of plumes beneath ice shelves

    Dallaston, M. C.

    2015-11-11

    © 2015 Cambridge University Press. We study a simplified model of ice-ocean interaction beneath a floating ice shelf, and investigate the possibility for channels to form in the ice shelf base due to spatial variations in conditions at the grounding line. The model combines an extensional thin-film description of viscous ice flow in the shelf, with melting at its base driven by a turbulent ocean plume. Small transverse perturbations to the one-dimensional steady state are considered, driven either by ice thickness or subglacial discharge variations across the grounding line. Either forcing leads to the growth of channels downstream, with melting driven by locally enhanced ocean velocities, and thus heat transfer. Narrow channels are smoothed out due to turbulent mixing in the ocean plume, leading to a preferred wavelength for channel growth. In the absence of perturbations at the grounding line, linear stability analysis suggests that the one-dimensional state is stable to initial perturbations, chiefly due to the background ice advection.

  16. Birth, life, and death of a solar coronal plume

    We analyze a solar polar-coronal-hole (CH) plume over its entire ≈40 hr lifetime, using high-resolution Solar Dynamic Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data. We examine (1) the plume's relationship to a bright point (BP) that persists at its base, (2) plume outflows and their possible contribution to the solar wind mass supply, and (3) the physical properties of the plume. We find that the plume started ≈2 hr after the BP first appeared and became undetectable ≈1 hr after the BP disappeared. We detected radially moving radiance variations from both the plume and from interplume regions, corresponding to apparent outflow speeds ranging over ≈(30-300) km s–1 with outflow velocities being higher in the 'cooler' AIA 171 Å channel than in the 'hotter' 193 Å and 211 Å channels, which is inconsistent with wave motions; therefore, we conclude that the observed radiance variations represent material outflows. If they persist into the heliosphere and plumes cover ≈10% of a typical CH area, these flows could account for ≈50% of the solar wind mass. From a differential emission measure analysis of the AIA images, we find that the average electron temperature of the plume remained approximately constant over its lifetime, at T e ≈ 8.5 × 105 K. Its density, however, decreased with the age of the plume, being about a factor of three lower when the plume faded compared to when it was born. We conclude that the plume died due to a density reduction rather than to a temperature decrease.

  17. Birth, life, and death of a solar coronal plume

    Pucci, Stefano; Romoli, Marco [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Firenze, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Poletto, Giannina [INAF-Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Sterling, Alphonse C., E-mail: stpucci@arcetri.astro.it [Space Science Office, NASA/MSFC, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We analyze a solar polar-coronal-hole (CH) plume over its entire ≈40 hr lifetime, using high-resolution Solar Dynamic Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data. We examine (1) the plume's relationship to a bright point (BP) that persists at its base, (2) plume outflows and their possible contribution to the solar wind mass supply, and (3) the physical properties of the plume. We find that the plume started ≈2 hr after the BP first appeared and became undetectable ≈1 hr after the BP disappeared. We detected radially moving radiance variations from both the plume and from interplume regions, corresponding to apparent outflow speeds ranging over ≈(30-300) km s{sup –1} with outflow velocities being higher in the 'cooler' AIA 171 Å channel than in the 'hotter' 193 Å and 211 Å channels, which is inconsistent with wave motions; therefore, we conclude that the observed radiance variations represent material outflows. If they persist into the heliosphere and plumes cover ≈10% of a typical CH area, these flows could account for ≈50% of the solar wind mass. From a differential emission measure analysis of the AIA images, we find that the average electron temperature of the plume remained approximately constant over its lifetime, at T {sub e} ≈ 8.5 × 10{sup 5} K. Its density, however, decreased with the age of the plume, being about a factor of three lower when the plume faded compared to when it was born. We conclude that the plume died due to a density reduction rather than to a temperature decrease.

  18. Visualization of aerosol particles generated by near infrared nano- and femtosecond laser ablation

    The expansion of aerosols generated by near infrared (NIR) nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) laser ablation (LA) of metals at atmospheric pressures was explored by laser-induced scattering. In order to achieve adequate temporal and spatial resolution a pulsed laser source was utilized for illuminating a 0.5 mm-wide cross section of the expanding aerosol. It could, for instance, be shown that NIR-ns-LA under quiescent argon atmosphere provokes the formation of a dense aerosol confined within a radially propagating vortex ring. The expansion dynamics achieved under these conditions were found to be fairly slow whereas the degree of aerosol dispersion for NIR-ns-LA using helium drastically increased due to its lower viscosity. As a consequence, the maximum diameter of expansion differed by a factor of approximately four. The trajectories of aerosol particles generated by NIR-ns-LA using argon could, furthermore, be simulated on the basis of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). For this purpose, a model inspired by the thermal character of NIR-ns-LA taking into account a sudden temperature build-up of 10,000 K at the position of the laser focus was implemented. In contrast, NIR-fs-LA generally resulted in extremely dynamic expansion patterns. Initial aerosol velocities derived from corresponding expansion plots varied from 10 m/s up to 30 m/s for fs-LA using argon and helium, respectively. Our results, moreover, indicate that fs-LA carried out under helium atmosphere favours a chaotic aerosol expansion. Analytical implications concerning, e.g. dispersion phenomena or the choice of the LA protocol and physical dimensions of future ablation cell designs are discussed

  19. Atrial Tachycardias Occurring After Atrial Fibrillation Ablation: Strategies for Mapping and Ablation

    Stavros Mountantonakis, MD

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of left atrial tachycardias (AT after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF is common, especially after more extensive ablation of persistent AF. These AT are invariably symptomatic and often do not respond to medical therapy. The initial strategy involves ventricular rate control, cardioversion, and observation as some tachycardias may resolve with time. For persistent ATs, effective management frequently requires catheter intervention. Careful characterization of the tachycardia mechanism is essential in designing an effective ablation strategy that would also avoid further creation of pro-arrhythmic substrate. With this review, we summarize the incidence, mechanism, diagnosis and treatment of ATs occurring after AF ablation.

  20. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin and enamel: relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency

    Chen, Hu; Liu, Jing; Li, Hong; Ge, Wenqi; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to study the relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency of a femtosecond laser with a Gaussian-shaped pulse used to ablate dentin and enamel for prosthodontic tooth preparation. A diode-pumped thin-disk femtosecond laser with wavelength of 1025 nm and pulse width of 400 fs was used for the ablation of dentin and enamel. The laser spot was guided in a line on the dentin and enamel surfaces to form a groove-shaped ablation zone under a series of laser pulse energies. The width and volume of the ablated line were measured under a three-dimensional confocal microscope to calculate the ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiency for dentin reached a maximum value of 0.020 mm3/J when the laser fluence was set at 6.51 J/cm2. For enamel, the maximum ablation efficiency was 0.009 mm3/J at a fluence of 7.59 J/cm2. Ablation efficiency of the femtosecond laser on dentin and enamel is closely related to the laser fluence and may reach a maximum when the laser fluence is set to an appropriate value.

  1. Simple spherical ablative-implosion model

    A simple model of the ablative implosion of a high-aspect-ratio (shell radius to shell thickness ratio) spherical shell is described. The model is similar in spirit to Rosenbluth's snowplow model. The scaling of the implosion time was determined in terms of the ablation pressure and the shell parameters such as diameter, wall thickness, and shell density, and compared these to complete hydrodynamic code calculations. The energy transfer efficiency from ablation pressure to shell implosion kinetic energy was examined and found to be very efficient. It may be possible to attach a simple heat-transport calculation to our implosion model to describe the laser-driven ablation-implosion process. The model may be useful for determining other energy driven (e.g., ion beam) implosion scaling

  2. Laser-Induced Ablative Amorphisation of Montmorillonite

    Duchek, P.; Urbanová, Markéta; Pokorná, Dana; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Šubrt, Jan; Pola, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 358, č. 23 (2012), s. 3382-3387. ISSN 0022-3093 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : laser ablation * montmorillonite * amorphization Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.597, year: 2012

  3. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  4. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  5. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  6. Ablative Ceramic Foam Based TPS Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel composite material ablative TPS for planetary vehicles that can survive a dual heating exposure is proposed. NextGen's TPS concept is a bi-layer functional...

  7. Quantitative spectroscopy of low temperature magnesium and titanium plasma plumes

    Simultaneous absorption spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence measurements were used to map the densities of monatomic species within KrF laser produced magnesium and titanium plasma plumes expanding in vacuum. Density contour plots of ground state Mg I and Mg II species were obtained for five slices within a magnesium plasma at a delay of lRs and for a laser fluence of (2.0 ± 0.2)Jcm-2. Peak densities of the order of 1012-1013 cm-3 were detected for both species beyond 14 mm. from target. Closer to target the peak optical densities exceeded the limit of the detection system, however by fitting Voigt profiles to the wings of the absorption lineshapes the Mg I number densities, in this region, were estimated to be >1014 cm-3 This value agrees with the estimation obtained by 'regressing' spatial absorption profiles recorded at long delay times. The populations within a number of Ti I and Ti II levels were investigated for a laser fluence of approximately (5.1 ± 0.2)Jcm-2 . Density contour plots were produced for delay times of 0.6, 0.9 and 1.4 μs. The peak density of the ground state Ti I level at 0.9 μs was in good agreement with that predicted for ground state Mg I at 1 μs. TOF distributions of ground state Ti II levels were consistent with a free expansion over the laser fluence range (2.5 - 9)Jcm-2 . A Langmuir probe was used to determine the free electron TOF distribution within titanium plasmas, which was found to contain two peaks. The integrated fluxes of free electrons and ground state Ti II species, measured using a Langmuir probe and absorption spectroscopy / LIF respectively, were in excellent agreement, demonstrating consistency of results derived from three different diagnostics. (author)

  8. Redox zones of a landfill leachate pollution plume (Vejen, Denmark)

    Lyngkilde, John; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1992-01-01

    , ferrogenic, nitrate-reducing and aerobic environments overa distance of 370 m. This redox zone sequence is consistent with thermodynamical principles and is closely matched by the leachate plume determined by the chloride plume distribution. The redox zone sequence is believed to be key in controlling the...... fate of reactive pollutants leached from the landfill....

  9. Atmospheric effects of a Canadian forest fire smoke plume

    Westphal, Douglas L.; Toon, Owen B.; Mckie, William R.

    1988-01-01

    In 1982, a northern British Columbia forest fire created a massive smoke plume that could be detected for several days in satellite imagery. The radiative and dynamical impacts of this large forest fire smoke plume are investigated using interactive prognostic models of atmospheric circulation, aerosol microphysics and transport, and radiative heat transfer.

  10. Airborne Gamma-ray Measurements in the Chernobyl Plume

    Grasty, R. L.; Hovgaard, Jens; Multala, J.

    On 29 April 1986, the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF) survey aircraft with a gamma ray spectrometer flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The aircraft became contaminated and the gamma spectrometer measured radioactivity in the plume as well as radioactivity on ...

  11. Laboratory-Scale Simulation of Spiral Plumes in the Mantle

    Sharifulin, A N

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of laboratory simulation a mechanism is established for the formation of the upper mantle convection spiral plumes from a hot point in the presence of a roll-type large-scale convective flow. The observed plume has horizontal sections near the upper limit, which may lead to the formation of chains of volcanic islands.

  12. Airborne Gamma-ray Measurements in the Chernobyl Plume

    Grasty, R. L.; Hovgaard, Jens; Multala, J.

    1997-01-01

    On 29 April 1986, the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF) survey aircraft with a gamma ray spectrometer flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The aircraft became contaminated and the gamma spectrometer measured radioactivity in the plume as well as radioactivity on...

  13. Ocean outfall plume characterization using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle.

    Rogowski, Peter; Terrill, Eric; Otero, Mark; Hazard, Lisa; Middleton, William

    2013-01-01

    A monitoring mission to map and characterize the Point Loma Ocean Outfall (PLOO) wastewater plume using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was performed on 3 March 2011. The mobility of an AUV provides a significant advantage in surveying discharge plumes over traditional cast-based methods, and when combined with optical and oceanographic sensors, provides a capability for both detecting plumes and assessing their mixing in the near and far-fields. Unique to this study is the measurement of Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) in the discharge plume and its application for quantitative estimates of the plume's dilution. AUV mission planning methodologies for discharge plume sampling, plume characterization using onboard optical sensors, and comparison of observational data to model results are presented. The results suggest that even under variable oceanic conditions, properly planned missions for AUVs equipped with an optical CDOM sensor in addition to traditional oceanographic sensors, can accurately characterize and track ocean outfall plumes at higher resolutions than cast-based techniques. PMID:23306274

  14. Imaging mantle plumes with instantaneous phase measurements of diffracted waves

    Rickers, F.; Fichtner, A.; Trampert, J.

    2012-01-01

    In a synthetic tomographic experiment, we succeeded to recover an idealized narrow mantle plume reaching deep into the lower mantle by using a misfit based on the instantaneous phase difference. A misfit based on simple cross-correlation traveltime shifts leaves the lower mantle part of the plume la

  15. Identification of mantle plumes in the Emeishan Large Igneous Province

    Yi-Gang Xu; Jifeng Xu; Yue-Jun Wang; Bin He; Xiaolong Huang; Zhenyu Luo; Sun-Lin Chung; Long Xiao; Dan Zhu; Hui Shao; Wei-Ming Fan

    2007-01-01

    @@ The plume hypothesis has been recently challengedlargely because some fundamental aspects predicted bythe modeling of plumes are found to be lacking in someclassic hotspot regions. This review paper summarizesrecent achievements made in the late Permian Emeishan continental flood basalt province in southwest China.

  16. Temperature and velocity measurements of a rising thermal plume

    Cagney, Neil; Newsome, William H.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina; Cotel, Aline; Hart, Stanley R.; Whitehead, John A.

    2015-03-01

    The three-dimensional velocity and temperature fields surrounding an isolated thermal plume in a fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity are measured using Particle-Image Velocimetry and thermochromatic liquid crystals, respectively. The experimental conditions are relevant to a plume rising through the mantle. It is shown that while the velocity and the isotherm surrounding the plume can be used to visualize the plume, they do not reveal the finer details of its structure. However, by computing the Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent fields from the velocity measurements, the material lines of the flow can be found, which clearly identify the shape of the plume head and characterize the behavior of the flow along the plume stem. It is shown that the vast majority of the material in the plume head has undergone significant stretching and originates from a wide region very low in the fluid domain, which is proposed as a contributing factor to the small-scale isotopic variability observed in ocean-island basalt regions. Lastly, the Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent fields are used to calculate the steady state rise velocity of the thermal plume, which is found to scale linearly with the Rayleigh number, in contrast to some previous work. The possible cause and the significance of these conflicting results are discussed, and it is suggested that the scaling relationship may be affected by the temperature-dependence of the fluid viscosity in the current work.

  17. Phased RF ablation: results and concerns

    Alexandra Kiss, MD, PhD; G�bor S�ndorfi, MD; Edina Nagy-Bal�, MD, PhD; Mihran Martirosyan, MD; Zoltan Csanadi, MD, PhD

    2015-01-01

    reatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) with catheter ablation has proven to be a safe and effective treatment modality which is offered to an increasing number of patients in many centers. Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is an established cornerstone of AF ablation strategies. Athough the isolation of the pulmonary veins (PVs) with irrigated focal radiofrequency (RF) catheters using a point-by-point method is considered as the gold standard, it can be challenging to create contiguous lesions, ti...

  18. Photogrammetric recession measurements of an ablating surface

    Schairer, Edward T. (Inventor); Heineck, James T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An instrument and method for measuring the time history of recession of an ablating surface of a test article during testing in a high enthalpy thermal test facility, such as an arcjet. The method advances prior art by providing time-history data over the full ablating surface without targets and without any modifications to the test article. The method is non-intrusive, simple to implement, requires no external light source, and does not interfere with normal operations of the arcjet facility.

  19. Simple ablative implosion model: shell dynamics

    A simple model, derived from Newton's Second Law, for the ablative implosion of a thin spherical shell is presented. The scaling dependence of the implosion time, shell velocity, and mass loss on shell dimensions and the critical physical parameter, the ablation pressure, is derived. Finally, the model is used to examine implosion energy efficiency and to describe an interesting application, wall-recoil heating of a contained fuel gas

  20. Retained Foreign Body After Laser Ablation

    Ren, Shiyan; Liu, Peng; Wang, Wei; Yang, Yuguan

    2012-01-01

    Laser ablation for varicose veins is a common practice, and postoperative complications may happen. A retained foreign body could be left accidently in the treated leg. It is rarely reported in literature. We herein describe two cases of retained foreign body during the laser ablation for varicose veins. One patient with varicose veins received laser therapy 5 years earlier, and had experienced discomfort and pain. After investigation, an overlooked sheath fragment was removed surgically from...

  1. MODELLING AND MEASUREMENT OF NOx CONCENTRATION IN PLUME FROM AIRCRAFT ENGINE UNDER OPERATION CONDITIONS AT THE AERODROME AREA

    Oleksandr Zaporozhets

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Airport air pollution is growing concern because of the air traffic expansion over the years (at annual rate of 5 %, rising tension of airports and growing cities expansion close each other (for such Ukrainian airports, as Zhulyany, Boryspol, Lviv, Odesa and Zaporizhzhia and accordingly growing public concern with air quality around the airport. Analysis of inventory emission results at major European and Ukrainian airports highlighted, that an aircraft is the dominant source of air pollution in most cases under consideration. For accurate assessment of aircraft emission contribution to total airport pollution and development of successful mitigation strategies, it is necessary to combine the modeling and measurement methods. Methods: Measurement of NOx concentration in the jet/plume from aircraft engine was implemented by chemiluminescence method under real operating conditions (taxi, landing, accelerating on the runway and take-off at International Boryspol airport (IBA. Modeling of NOx concentration was done by complex model PolEmiCa, which takes into account the transport and dilution of air contaminates by exhaust gases jet and the wing trailing vortexes.Results: The results of the measured NOx concentration in plume from aircraft engine for take-off conditions at IBA were used for improvement and validation of the complex model PolEmiCa. The comparison of measured and modeled instantaneous concentration of NOx was sufficiently improved by taking into account the impact of wing trailing vortices on the parameters of the jet (buoyancy height, horizontal and vertical deviation and on concentration distribution in plume. Discussion: Combined approach of modeling and measurement methods provides more accurate representation of aircraft emission contribution to total air pollution in airport area. Modeling side provides scientific grounding for organization of instrumental monitoring of aircraft engine emissions, particularly, scheme

  2. Laser Ablation for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Pacella, Claudio Maurizio; Francica, Giampiero; Di Costanzo, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and is increasingly detected at small size (liver transplantation, or percutaneous ablation have been proposed. When surgical options are precluded, image-guided tumor ablation is recommended as the most appropriate therapeutic choice in terms of tumor local control, safety, and improvement in survival. Laser ablation (LA) represents one of currently available loco-ablative techniques: light is delivered via flexible quartz fibers of diameter from 300 to 600 μm inserted into tumor lesion through either fine needles (21g Chiba needles) or large-bore catheters. The thermal destruction of tissue is achieved through conversion of absorbed light (usually infrared) into heat. A range of different imaging modalities have been used to guide percutaneous laser ablation, but ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are most widely employed, according to local experience and resource availability. Available clinical data suggest that LA is highly effective in terms of tumoricidal capability with an excellent safety profile; the best results in terms of long-term survival are obtained in early HCC so that LA can be proposed not only in unresectable cases but, not differently from radiofrequency ablation, also as the first-line treatment. PMID:22191028

  3. Numerical Study of Hall Thruster Plume and Sputtering Erosion

    Li Yan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Potential sputtering erosion caused by the interactions between spacecraft and plasma plume of Hall thrusters is a concern for electric propulsion. In this study, calculation model of Hall thruster’s plume and sputtering erosion is presented. The model is based on three dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell and direct simulation Monte Carlo method (PIC/DSMC method which is integrated with plume-wall sputtering yield model. For low-energy heavy-ion sputtering in Hall thruster plume, the Matsunami formula for the normal incidence sputtering yield and the Yamamura angular dependence of sputtering yield are used. The validation of the simulation model is realized through comparing plume results with the measured data. Then, SPT-70’s sputtering erosion on satellite surfaces is assessed and effect of mass flow rate on sputtering erosion is analyzed.

  4. Numerical modeling of cooling tower plumes: comparison with experiments

    This chapter compares mathematical models designed to study the impact of cooling tower plumes from a nuclear power plant in France. The 3 models are an integral model for a statistical evaluation of plume characteristics and their cumulative effect (reduction of insolation); a spectral microphysical model, to study the interaction processes between a natural cloud and the plume; and a 3D plume model, involving both dynamics, microphysics and their coupling, to investigate the problems of plumes development, especially in convective situations (cumuli formation). Experimental data were obtained near the BUGEY nuclear power plant (two units of 900 MWe, two natural draft cooling towers per unit). The three models currently used are compared to the experimental data. Includes 3 tables and 3 drawings

  5. Characterization of redox conditions in groundwater contaminant plumes

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwarth, Steven A.; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Heron, Gorm; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    Evaluation of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behaviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...... cases have been reported. No standardised or generally accepted approach exists. Slow electrode kinetics and the common lack of internal equilibrium of redox processes in pollution plumes make, with a few exceptions, direct electrochemical measurement and rigorous interpretation of redox potentials...... dubious, if not erroneous. Several other approaches have been used in addressing redox conditions in pollution plumes: redox-sensitive compounds in groundwater samples, hydrogen concentrations in groundwater, concentrations of volatile fatty acids in groundwater, sediment characteristics and microbial...

  6. Burial Ground Expansion Hydrogeologic Characterization

    Gaughan , T.F.

    1999-02-26

    Sirrine Environmental Consultants provided technical oversight of the installation of eighteen groundwater monitoring wells and six exploratory borings around the location of the Burial Ground Expansion.

  7. Rollback subduction: the great killer of mantle plumes

    Druken, K. A.; Kincaid, C. R.; Griffiths, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    Subduction driven mantle flow is shown to stall and decapitate buoyant upwellings, thereby severely limiting vertical heat and mass transport. Ongoing debate tends to focus on the expected surface expression of plumes rising independently of the background circulation, however we present 3-D laboratory results that suggest rollback subduction greatly alters this classic plume model. A Phenolic sheet and temperature dependent glucose fluid, are used to model the subducting plate and upper ~2000 km of the mantle, respectively. Experiments varied style and rate of rollback subduction as well as plume temperature and position. Results show that buoyant upwellings located as far as 1500 km behind the trench fall under two regimes, (I) plate dominated or (II) plume dominated. In either regime, down-dip sinking of the slab initially stalls vertical plume motion and the combination of down-dip sinking and trench rollback redistributes material throughout the system. Plumes with as much as 400°C excess temperature behave as passive features in the subduction-induced 3-D flow (Regime I). Less than 10% of plume material in this regime is capable of reaching zones for melt generation, with rollback subduction trapping or re-subducting the majority of plume material at depth. Only plumes of 600°C excess temperature (or more) are able to overcome the dominant 3-D flow and transport heat and mass to the surface (Regime II). Regardless of plume temperature, conduit velocities (proxy for melt generation) show cycles of high and low hotspot activity also due to distortion from subduction-induced flow. As a result of both the sinking and rollback motions, the temporal hotspot trend is variable and differs from conventional plate-conduit interaction.

  8. Role of transients in the sustainability of solar coronal plumes

    Raouafi, N.-E. [The John Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723-6099 (United States); Stenborg, G., E-mail: NourEddine.Raouafi@jhuapl.edu [SPACS, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We report on the role of small-scale, transient magnetic activity in the formation and evolution of solar coronal plumes. Three plumes within equatorial coronal holes are analyzed over the span of several days based on the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å and 193 Å images and SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager line-of-sight magnetograms. The focus is on the role of transient structures at the footpoints in sustaining coronal plumes for relatively long periods of time (i.e., several days). The appearance of plumes is a gradual and lengthy process. In some cases, the initial stages of plume formation are marked by the appearance of pillar-like structures whose footpoints are the sources of transient brightenings. In addition to nominal jets occurring prior to and during the development of plumes, the data show that a large number of small jets (i.e., {sup j}etlets{sup )} and plume transient bright points (PTBPs) occur on timescales of tens of seconds to a few minutes. These features are the result of quasi-random cancellations of fragmented and diffuse minority magnetic polarity with the dominant unipolar magnetic field concentration over an extended period of time. They unambiguously reflect a highly dynamical evolution at the footpoints and are seemingly the main energy source for plumes. This suggests a tendency for plumes to be dependent on the occurrence of transients (i.e., jetlets, and PTBPs) resulting from low-rate magnetic reconnection. The decay phase of plumes is characterized by gradual fainting and multiple rejuvenations as a result of the dispersal of the unipolar magnetic concentration and its precipitation into multiple magnetic centers.

  9. Role of transients in the sustainability of solar coronal plumes

    We report on the role of small-scale, transient magnetic activity in the formation and evolution of solar coronal plumes. Three plumes within equatorial coronal holes are analyzed over the span of several days based on the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å and 193 Å images and SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager line-of-sight magnetograms. The focus is on the role of transient structures at the footpoints in sustaining coronal plumes for relatively long periods of time (i.e., several days). The appearance of plumes is a gradual and lengthy process. In some cases, the initial stages of plume formation are marked by the appearance of pillar-like structures whose footpoints are the sources of transient brightenings. In addition to nominal jets occurring prior to and during the development of plumes, the data show that a large number of small jets (i.e., jetlets) and plume transient bright points (PTBPs) occur on timescales of tens of seconds to a few minutes. These features are the result of quasi-random cancellations of fragmented and diffuse minority magnetic polarity with the dominant unipolar magnetic field concentration over an extended period of time. They unambiguously reflect a highly dynamical evolution at the footpoints and are seemingly the main energy source for plumes. This suggests a tendency for plumes to be dependent on the occurrence of transients (i.e., jetlets, and PTBPs) resulting from low-rate magnetic reconnection. The decay phase of plumes is characterized by gradual fainting and multiple rejuvenations as a result of the dispersal of the unipolar magnetic concentration and its precipitation into multiple magnetic centers.

  10. Fire analog: a comparison between fire plumes and energy center cooling tower plumes

    Past studies on the waste heat from thermal power plant cooling towers and proposed energy parks suggest that the dissipation of this waste energy may result in significant meteorological effects. Preliminary calculations have shown that the rate of atmospheric dissipation of the waste energy from groupings of cooling towers is approximately equal to that by geophysical phenomena such as thunderstorms, volcanoes, and large fires. Cumulus clouds and convective vortices often result from these natural energy releases. One of the geophysical analogs, the large fire, is evaluated in terms of how good a physical analog it is to cooling towers or groups of cooling towers. The literature on experimental and wild fires was reviewed in relation to how fire thermal plume characteristics may be typical of a thermal plume from cooling towers

  11. Prediction of the steady surface thermal plume

    This paper presents a two-dimensional numerical procedure which employs finite-difference techniques to solve the partial-differential equations governing the steady flow and heat transfer of a surface thermal plume in the near field. The profiles of the velocities and temperature are assumed to be nearly uniform in the vertical direction. The rates of turbulent entrainment of ambient fluid are calculated from empirical relations, which take the influence of buoyancy in damping turbulent fluctuations into consideration. Computations of the lateral and longitudinal profiles of the velocities, temperature and layer depth are compared with laboratory measurements in heated discharges at densimetric Froude numbers in the range 1-4 and initial aspect ratios varying from 1 to 3. The agreement between the computations and the measurements is fairly good in most cases. (orig.)

  12. Infrared Imagery of Solid Rocket Exhaust Plumes

    Moran, Robert P.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test program consisted of a series of 18 solid rocket motor static firings, simulating the liftoff conditions of the Ares I five-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Vehicle. Primary test objectives included acquiring acoustic and pressure data which will be used to validate analytical models for the prediction of Ares 1 liftoff acoustics and ignition overpressure environments. The test article consisted of a 5% scale Ares I vehicle and launch tower mounted on the Mobile Launch Pad. The testing also incorporated several Water Sound Suppression Systems. Infrared imagery was employed during the solid rocket testing to support the validation or improvement of analytical models, and identify corollaries between rocket plume size or shape and the accompanying measured level of noise suppression obtained by water sound suppression systems.

  13. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Renal Angiomyolipomas

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of US-guided percutaneous microwave (MW) ablation in the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma (AML).Materials and MethodsFrom January 2011 to April 2014, seven patients (5 females and 2 males; mean age 51.4) with 11 renal AMLs (9 sporadic type and 2 tuberous sclerosis associated) with a mean size of 3.4 ± 0.7 cm (range 2.4–4.9 cm) were treated with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation under US guidance. Tumoral diameter, volume, and CT/MR enhancement were measured on pre-treatment, immediate post-ablation, and delayed post-ablation imaging. Clinical symptoms and creatinine were assessed on follow-up visits.ResultsAll ablations were technically successful and no major complications were encountered. Mean ablation parameters were ablation power of 65 W (range 60–70 W), using 456 mL of hydrodissection fluid per patient, over 4.7 min (range 3–8 min). Immediate post-ablation imaging demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 1.8 % (3.4–3.3 cm) and 1.7 % (27.5–26.3 cm3), respectively. Delayed imaging follow-up obtained at a mean interval of 23.1 months (median 17.6; range 9–47) demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 29 % (3.4–2.4 cm) and 47 % (27.5–12.1 cm3), respectively. Tumoral enhancement decreased on immediate post-procedure and delayed imaging by CT/MR parameters, indicating decreased tumor vascularity. No patients required additional intervention and no patients experienced spontaneous bleeding post-ablation.ConclusionOur early experience with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation demonstrates it to be a safe and effective modality to devascularize and decrease the size of renal AMLs

  14. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Renal Angiomyolipomas

    Cristescu, Mircea, E-mail: mcristescu@uwhealth.org [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology (United States); Abel, E. Jason, E-mail: abel@urology.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, Department of Urology (United States); Wells, Shane, E-mail: swells@uwhealth.org; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J., E-mail: tziemlewicz@uwhealth.org [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology (United States); Hedican, Sean P., E-mail: hedican@surgery.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, Department of Urology (United States); Lubner, Megan G., E-mail: mlubner@uwhealth.org; Hinshaw, J. Louis, E-mail: jhinshaw@uwhealth.org; Brace, Christopher L., E-mail: cbrace@uwhealth.org; Lee, Fred T., E-mail: flee@uwhealth.org [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of US-guided percutaneous microwave (MW) ablation in the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma (AML).Materials and MethodsFrom January 2011 to April 2014, seven patients (5 females and 2 males; mean age 51.4) with 11 renal AMLs (9 sporadic type and 2 tuberous sclerosis associated) with a mean size of 3.4 ± 0.7 cm (range 2.4–4.9 cm) were treated with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation under US guidance. Tumoral diameter, volume, and CT/MR enhancement were measured on pre-treatment, immediate post-ablation, and delayed post-ablation imaging. Clinical symptoms and creatinine were assessed on follow-up visits.ResultsAll ablations were technically successful and no major complications were encountered. Mean ablation parameters were ablation power of 65 W (range 60–70 W), using 456 mL of hydrodissection fluid per patient, over 4.7 min (range 3–8 min). Immediate post-ablation imaging demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 1.8 % (3.4–3.3 cm) and 1.7 % (27.5–26.3 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Delayed imaging follow-up obtained at a mean interval of 23.1 months (median 17.6; range 9–47) demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 29 % (3.4–2.4 cm) and 47 % (27.5–12.1 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Tumoral enhancement decreased on immediate post-procedure and delayed imaging by CT/MR parameters, indicating decreased tumor vascularity. No patients required additional intervention and no patients experienced spontaneous bleeding post-ablation.ConclusionOur early experience with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation demonstrates it to be a safe and effective modality to devascularize and decrease the size of renal AMLs.

  15. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  16. Lip Reconstruction after Tumor Ablation

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimi, Azin; Kazemi, Mohammad; Shams, Amin; Hashemzadeh, Haleh

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25% of all oral cavity carcinomas involve the lips, and the primary management of these lesions is complete surgical resection. Loss of tissue in the lips after resection is treated with a variety of techniques, depending on the extension and location of the defect. Here we review highly accepted techniques of lip reconstruction and some of new trials with significant clinical results. Reconstruction choice is primarily depend to size of the defect, localization of defect, elasticity of tissues. But patient’s age, comorbidities, and motivation are also important. According to the defect location and size, different reconstruction methods can be used. For defects involved less than 30% of lips, primary closures are sufficient. In defects with 35–70% lip involvement, the Karapandzic, Abbe, Estlander, McGregor or Gillies’ fan flaps or their modifications can be used. When lip remaining tissues are insufficient, cheek tissue can be used in Webster and Bernard advancement flaps and their various modifications. Deltopectoral or radial forearm free flaps can be options for large defects of the lip extending to the Jaws. To achieve best functional and esthetic results, surgeons should be able to choose most appropriate reconstruction method. Considering defects’ size and location, patients’ expects and surgeon’s ability and knowledge, a variety of flaps are presented in order to reconstruct defects resulted from tumor ablation. It’s necessary for surgeons to trace the recent innovations in lip reconstruction to offer best choices to patients. PMID:27308236

  17. Fractional ablative erbium YAG laser

    Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Haak, Christina S; Erlendsson, Andrés M;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Treatment of a variety of skin disorders with ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) is driving the development of portable AFXLs. This study measures micropore dimensions produced by a small 2,940 nm AFXL using a variety of stacked pulses, and determines a model correlating...... laser parameters with tissue effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ex vivo pig skin was exposed to a miniaturized 2,940 nm AFXL, spot size 225 µm, density 5%, power levels 1.15-2.22 W, pulse durations 50-225 microseconds, pulse repetition rates 100-500 Hz, and 2, 20, or 50 stacked pulses, resulting in pulse...... 190 to 347 µm. CONCLUSIONS: Pulse stacking with a small, low power 2,940 nm AFXL created reproducible shallow to deep micropores, and influenced micropore configuration. Mathematical modeling established relations between laser settings and micropore dimensions, which assists in choosing laser...

  18. Effect of ablatant composition on the ablation of a fuelling pellet

    The single species neutral-shielding model for the ablation of a hydrogenic pellet is extended by considering the ablatant as a mixture of four species: molecular and atomic hydrogen, protons and electrons. Compared with the results of the frozen flow, (i.e. the single species molecular hydrogen gas model), results of the analysis showed that the presence of dissociation and ionization effects caused a marked difference of the ablatant state. The attenuations of the incoming electron energy and energy flux, however, are very much similar irrespective of whether the ablated flow is in a frozen or an equilibrium state. The scaling law of the pellet ablation rate with respect to the plasma state of Te, ne and the pellet radius remains the same; the ablation rate is reduced by approximately 15%. To examine the possible existence of a spherical shell around the pellet where most of the incoming electron energy is absorbed, acodmparison is made between the local electron collisional mean free path and the electron Larmor radius. A critical field at the ionization radius is evaluated. An effective spherical energyabsorbing region exists when the local field strength is below the critical value. For a plasma state of low Te and ne, (where the ablatant is hardly ionized), and for one near the thermonuclear condition (where a highly dense ablatant exists near the pellet), the effective energy absorption region is nearly spherical. 20 refs. (author)

  19. Laser ablation of single-crystalline silicon by radiation of pulsed frequency-selective fiber laser

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the process of destruction of the surface of a single-crystalline silicon wafer scanned by the beam of a pulsed ytterbium-doped fiber laser radiation with a wavelength of λ = 1062 nm. It is established that the laser ablation can proceed without melting of silicon and the formation of a plasma plume. Under certain parameters of the process (radiation power, beam scan velocity, and beam overlap density), pronounced oxidation of silicon microparticles with the formation of a characteristic loose layer of fine powdered silicon dioxide has been observed for the first time. The range of lasing and beam scanning regimes in which the growth of SiO2 layer takes place is determined.

  20. Characterization of material ablation driven by laser generated intense extreme ultraviolet light

    Tanaka, Nozomi; Masuda, Masaya; Deguchi, Ryo; Murakami, Masakatsu; Sunahara, Atsushi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    We present a comparative study on the hydrodynamic behaviour of plasmas generated by material ablation by the irradiation of nanosecond extreme ultraviolet (EUV or XUV) or infrared laser pulses on solid samples. It was clarified that the difference in the photon energy deposition and following material heating mechanism between these two lights result in the difference in the plasma parameters and plasma expansion characteristics. Silicon plate was ablated by either focused intense EUV pulse (λ = 9-25 nm, 10 ns) or laser pulse (λ = 1064 nm, 10 ns), both with an intensity of ˜109 W/cm2. Both the angular distributions and energy spectra of the expanding ions revealed that the photoionized plasma generated by the EUV light differs significantly from that produced by the laser. The laser-generated plasma undergoes spherical expansion, whereas the EUV-generated plasma undergoes planar expansion in a comparatively narrow angular range. It is presumed that the EUV radiation is transmitted through the expanding plasma and directly photoionizes the samples in the solid phase, consequently forming a high-density and high-pressure plasma. Due to a steep pressure gradient along the direction of the target normal, the EUV plasma expands straightforward resulting in the narrower angular distribution observed.