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Sample records for aberrant exon splicing

  1. Aberrant splicing of HTT generates the pathogenic exon 1 protein in Huntington disease.

    Sathasivam, Kirupa; Neueder, Andreas; Gipson, Theresa A; Landles, Christian; Benjamin, Agnesska C; Bondulich, Marie K; Smith, Donna L; Faull, Richard L M; Roos, Raymund A C; Howland, David; Detloff, Peter J; Housman, David E; Bates, Gillian P

    2013-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a devastating, late-onset, inherited neurodegenerative disorder that manifests with personality changes, movement disorders, and cognitive decline. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in exon 1 of the HTT gene that translates to a polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein (HTT). The formation of HTT fragments has been implicated as an essential step in the molecular pathogenesis of HD and several proteases that cleave HTT have been identified. However, the importance of smaller N-terminal fragments has been highlighted by their presence in HD postmortem brains and by the fact that nuclear inclusions are only detected by antibodies to the N terminus of HTT. Despite an intense research effort, the precise length of these fragments and the mechanism by which they are generated remains unknown. Here we show that CAG repeat length-dependent aberrant splicing of exon 1 HTT results in a short polyadenylated mRNA that is translated into an exon 1 HTT protein. Given that mutant exon 1 HTT proteins have consistently been shown to be highly pathogenic in HD mouse models, the aberrant splicing of HTT mRNA provides a mechanistic basis for the molecular pathogenesis of HD. RNA-targeted therapeutic strategies designed to lower the levels of HTT are under development. Many of these approaches would not prevent the production of exon 1 HTT and should be reviewed in light of our findings. PMID:23341618

  2. Aberrant splicing of HTT generates the pathogenic exon 1 protein in Huntington disease

    Sathasivam, Kirupa; Neueder, Andreas; Gipson, Theresa A.; Landles, Christian; Benjamin, Agnesska C.; Bondulich, Marie K.; Smith, Donna L.; Faull, Richard L. M.; Roos, Raymund A.C.; Howland, David; Detloff, Peter J.; Housman, David E.; Bates, Gillian P.

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a devastating, late-onset, inherited neurodegenerative disorder that manifests with personality changes, movement disorders, and cognitive decline. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in exon 1 of the HTT gene that translates to a polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein (HTT). The formation of HTT fragments has been implicated as an essential step in the molecular pathogenesis of HD and several proteases that cleave HTT have been identified. However, the im...

  3. Faster exon assembly by sparse spliced alignment

    Tiskin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Assembling a gene from candidate exons is an important problem in computational biology. Among the most successful approaches to this problem is \\emph{spliced alignment}, proposed by Gelfand et al., which scores different candidate exon chains within a DNA sequence of length $m$ by comparing them to a known related gene sequence of length n, $m = \\Theta(n)$. Gelfand et al.\\ gave an algorithm for spliced alignment running in time O(n^3). Kent et al.\\ considered sparse spliced alignment, where the number of candidate exons is O(n), and proposed an algorithm for this problem running in time O(n^{2.5}). We improve on this result, by proposing an algorithm for sparse spliced alignment running in time O(n^{2.25}). Our approach is based on a new framework of \\emph{quasi-local string comparison}.

  4. Purifying Selection on Exonic Splice Enhancers in Intronless Genes.

    Savisaar, Rosina; Hurst, Laurence D

    2016-06-01

    Exonic splice enhancers (ESEs) are short nucleotide motifs, enriched near exon ends, that enhance the recognition of the splice site and thus promote splicing. Are intronless genes under selection to avoid these motifs so as not to attract the splicing machinery to an mRNA that should not be spliced, thereby preventing the production of an aberrant transcript? Consistent with this possibility, we find that ESEs in putative recent retrocopies are at a higher density and evolving faster than those in other intronless genes, suggesting that they are being lost. Moreover, intronless genes are less dense in putative ESEs than intron-containing ones. However, this latter difference is likely due to the skewed base composition of intronless sequences, a skew that is in line with the general GC richness of few exon genes. Indeed, after controlling for such biases, we find that both intronless and intron-containing genes are denser in ESEs than expected by chance. Importantly, nucleotide-controlled analysis of evolutionary rates at synonymous sites in ESEs indicates that the ESEs in intronless genes are under purifying selection in both human and mouse. We conclude that on the loss of introns, some but not all, ESE motifs are lost, the remainder having functions beyond a role in splice promotion. These results have implications for the design of intronless transgenes and for understanding the causes of selection on synonymous sites. PMID:26802218

  5. Rectifier of aberrant mRNA splicing recovers tRNA modification in familial dysautonomia

    Yoshida, Mayumi; Kataoka, Naoyuki; Miyauchi, Kenjyo; Ohe, Kenji; Iida, Kei; Yoshida, Suguru; Nojima, Takayuki; Okuno, Yukiko; Onogi, Hiroshi; Usui, Tomomi; Takeuchi, Akihide; Hosoya, Takamitsu; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is caused by missplicing of the IκB kinase complex-associated protein (IKAP) gene, which results in the skipping of exon 20, especially in neurons. FD would be treatable if exon 20 inclusion were increased correctly to reestablish correct splicing. Here, we have established a dual-color splicing reporter that recapitulates FD-type splicing. By using this reporter, we have identified a small chemical compound, named rectifier of aberrant splicing (RECTAS), that recti...

  6. Tau exon 10 alternative splicing and tauopathies

    Liu Fei; Gong Cheng-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Abnormalities of microtubule-associated protein tau play a central role in neurofibrillary degeneration in several neurodegenerative disorders that collectively called tauopathies. Six isoforms of tau are expressed in adult human brain, which result from alternative splicing of pre-mRNA generated from a single tau gene. Alternative splicing of tau exon 10 results in tau isoforms containing either three or four microtubule-binding repeats (3R-tau and 4R-tau, respectively). Approximate...

  7. Mutations in Tau Gene Exon 10 Associated with FTDP-17 Alter the Activity of an Exonic Splicing Enhancer to Interact with Tra2β*

    Jiang, Zhihong; Tang, Hao; Havlioglu, Necat; Zhang, Xiaochun; Stamm, Stefan; Yan, Riqiang; Jane Y Wu

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the human tau gene leading to aberrant splicing have been identified in FTDP-17, an autosomal dominant hereditary neurodegenerative disorder. Molecular mechanisms by which such mutations cause tau aberrant splicing were not understood. We characterized two mutations in exon 10 of the tau gene, N279K and Del280K. Our results revealed an exonic splicing enhancer element located in exon 10. The activity of this AG-rich splicing enhancer was altered by N279K and Del280K mutations. Th...

  8. Splicing of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) exon 11 is vulnerable - Molecular pathology of mutations in PAH exon 11

    Heintz, Caroline; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard;

    2012-01-01

    molecular pathology is important. Mutations that disturb the splicing of exons (e.g. interplay between splice site strength and regulatory sequences like exon splicing enhancers (ESEs)/exon splicing silencers (ESSs)) may cause different severity of PKU. In this study, we identified PAH exon 11 as a...

  9. Exon Expression and Alternatively Spliced Genes in Tourette Syndrome

    Tian, Yingfang; Liao, Isaac H.; Zhan, Xinhua; Gunther, Joan R.; Ander, Bradley P.; Liu, Dazhi; Lit, Lisa; Jickling, Glen C.; Corbett, Blythe A.; Bos-Veneman, Netty G. P.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Sharp, Frank R.

    2011-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is diagnosed based upon clinical criteria including motor and vocal tics. We hypothesized that differences in exon expression and splicing might be useful for pathophysiology and diagnosis. To demonstrate exon expression and alternatively spliced gene differences in blood of i

  10. An exonic splicing silencer in the testes-specific DNA ligase III β exon

    Chew, Shern L; Baginsky, Lysa; Eperon, Ian C.

    2000-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing of two terminal exons (α and β) regulates the expression of the human DNA ligase III gene. In most tissues, the α exon is expressed. In testes and during spermatogenesis, the β exon is used instead. The α exon encodes the interaction domain with a scaffold DNA repair protein, XRCC1, while the β exon-encoded C-terminal does not. Sequence elements regulating the alternative splicing pattern were mapped by in vitro splicing assays in HeLa nuclear extracts. Deletion ...

  11. Characterization of aberrant splicing of von Willebrand factor in von Willebrand disease: an underrecognized mechanism.

    Hawke, Lindsey; Bowman, Mackenzie L; Poon, Man-Chiu; Scully, Mary-Frances; Rivard, Georges-Etienne; James, Paula D

    2016-07-28

    Approximately 10% of von Willebrand factor (VWF) gene mutations are thought to alter messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing through disruption of consensus splice sites. This mechanism is likely underrecognized and affected by mutations outside consensus splice sites. During VWF synthesis, splicing abnormalities lead to qualitative defects or quantitative deficiencies in VWF. This study investigated the pathologic mechanism acting in 3 von Willebrand disease (VWD) families with putative splicing mutations using patient-derived blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) and a heterologous human embryonic kidney (HEK 293(T)) cell model. The exonic mutation c.3538G>A causes 3 in-frame splicing variants (23del, 26del, and 23/26del) which cannot bind platelets, blood coagulation factor VIII, or collagen, causing VWD through dominant-negative intracellular retention of coexpressed wild-type (WT) VWF, and increased trafficking to lysosomes. Individuals heterozygous for the c.5842+1G>C mutation produce exon 33 skipping, exons 33-34 skipping, and WT VWF transcripts. Pathogenic intracellular retention of VWF lacking exons 33-34 causes their VWD. The branch site mutation c.6599-20A>T causes type 1 VWD through mRNA degradation of exon 38 skipping transcripts. Splicing ratios of aberrant transcripts and coexpressed WT were altered in the BOECs with exposure to shear stress. This study provides evidence of mutations outside consensus splice sites disrupting splicing and introduces the concept that VWF splicing is affected by shear stress on endothelial cells. PMID:27317792

  12. Aberrant splicing and drug resistance in AML.

    de Necochea-Campion, Rosalia; Shouse, Geoffrey P; Zhou, Qi; Mirshahidi, Saied; Chen, Chien-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has unveiled a new window into the heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In particular, recurrent mutations in spliceosome machinery and genome-wide aberrant splicing events have been recognized as a prominent component of this disease. This review will focus on how these factors influence drug resistance through altered splicing of tumor suppressor and oncogenes and dysregulation of the apoptotic signaling network. A better understanding of these factors in disease progression is necessary to design appropriate therapeutic strategies recognizing specific alternatively spliced or mutated oncogenic targets. PMID:27613060

  13. Diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues.

    Lan Lin

    Full Text Available Exonization of Alu elements is a major mechanism for birth of new exons in primate genomes. Prior analyses of expressed sequence tags show that almost all Alu-derived exons are alternatively spliced, and the vast majority of these exons have low transcript inclusion levels. In this work, we provide genomic and experimental evidence for diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues. Using Exon array data of 330 Alu-derived exons in 11 human tissues and detailed RT-PCR analyses of 38 exons, we show that some Alu-derived exons are constitutively spliced in a broad range of human tissues, and some display strong tissue-specific switch in their transcript inclusion levels. Most of such exons are derived from ancient Alu elements in the genome. In SEPN1, mutations of which are linked to a form of congenital muscular dystrophy, the muscle-specific inclusion of an Alu-derived exon may be important for regulating SEPN1 activity in muscle. Realtime qPCR analysis of this SEPN1 exon in macaque and chimpanzee tissues indicates human-specific increase in its transcript inclusion level and muscle specificity after the divergence of humans and chimpanzees. Our results imply that some Alu exonization events may have acquired adaptive benefits during the evolution of primate transcriptomes.

  14. Splicing aberrations caused by constitutional RB1 gene mutations in retinoblastoma

    Vidya Latha Parsam; Mohammed Javed Ali; Santosh G Honavar; Geeta K Vemuganti; Chitra Kannabiran

    2011-06-01

    Analysis of RB1 mRNA from blood leukocytes of patients with retinoblastoma identified the effects of mutations involving consensus splice site, exonic substitution and whole-exon deletions identified in genomic DNA of these patients. In addition, this study identified mutations in cases in which no mutations were detectable in the genomic DNA. One proband had mutation at the canonical splice site at +5 position of IVS22, and analysis of the transcripts in this family revealed skipping of exon 22 in three members of this family. In one proband, a missense substitution of c.652T > G (g.56897T > G; Leu218Val) in exon 7 led to splicing aberrations involving deletions of exons 7 and 8, suggesting the formation of a cryptic splice site. In two probands with no detectable changes in the genomic DNA upon screening of RB1 exons and flanking intronic sequences, transcripts were found to have deletions of exon 6 in one, and exons 21 and 22 in another family. In two probands, RNA analysis confirmed genomic deletions involving one or more exons. This study reveals novel effects of RB1 mutations on splicing and suggests the utility of RNA analysis as an adjunct to mutational screening of genomic DNA in retinoblastoma.

  15. Exon-centric regulation of pyruvate kinase M alternative splicing via mutually exclusive exons

    Zhenxun Wang; Deblina Chatterjee; Hyun Yong Jeon; Martin Akerman; Matthew G. Vander Heiden; Lewis C. Cantley; Adrian R. Krainer

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the pyruvate kinase M gene (PK-M) can generate the M2 isoform and promote aerobic glycolysis and tumor growth.However,the cancer-specific alternative splicing regulation of PK-M is not completely understood.Here,we demonstrate that PK-M is regulated by reciprocal affects on the mutually exclusive exons 9 and 10,such that exon 9 is repressed and exon 10 is activated in cancer cells.Strikingly,exonic,rather than intronic,cis-elements are key determinants ef PK-M splicing isoform ratios.Using a systematic sub-exonic duplication approach,we identify a potent exonlc splicing enhancer in exon 10,which differs from its homologous counterpart in exon 9 by only two nucleotides.We identify SRSF3 as one of the cognate factors,and show that this serine/arginine-rich protein activates exon 10 and mediates changes in glucose metabolism.These findings provide mechanistic insights into the complex regulation of alternative splicing of a key regulator of the Warburg effect,and also have implications for other genes with a similar pattern of alternative splicing.

  16. Identification of an exonic splicing silencer in exon 6A of the human VEGF gene

    Crystal Ronald G

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The different isoforms of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF play diverse roles in vascular growth, structure and function. Alternative splicing of the VEGF gene results in the expression of three abundant isoforms: VEGF121, VEGF165 and VEGF189. The mRNA for VEGF189 contains the alternatively spliced exon 6A whereas the mRNA for VEGF165 lacks this exon. The objective of this study was to identify the cis elements that control utilization of exon 6A. A reporter minigene was constructed (pGFP-E6A containing the coding sequence for GFP whose translation was dependent on faithful splicing for removal of the VEGF exon 6A. To identify cis-acting splicing elements, sequential deletions were made across exon 6A in the pGFP-E6A plasmid. Results A candidate cis-acting exonic splicing silencer (ESS comprising nucleotides 22-30 of exon 6A sequence was identified corresponding to the a silencer consensus sequence of AAGGGG. The function of this sequence as an ESS was confirmed in vivo both in the context of the reporter minigene as a plasmid and in the context of a longer minigene with VEGF exon 6A in its native context in an adenoviral gene transfer vector. Further mutagenesis studies resulted in the identification of the second G residue of the putative ESS as the most critical for function. Conclusion This work establishes the identity of cis sequences that regulate alternative VEGF splicing and dictate the relative expression levels of VEGF isoforms.

  17. Widespread evolutionary conservation of alternatively spliced exons in caenorhabditis

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob L; Penny, David;

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) contributes to increased transcriptome and proteome diversity in various eukaryotic lineages. Previous studies showed low levels of conservation of alternatively spliced (cassette) exons within mammals and within dipterans. We report a strikingly different pattern in...... patterns of splicing. The functionality of the vast majority of cassette exons is underscored by various other features. We suggest that differences in conservation between lineages reflect differences in levels of functionality and further suggest that these differences are due to differences in intron...... length and the strength of consensus boundaries across lineages. Finally, we demonstrate an inverse relationship between AS and gene duplication, suggesting that the latter may be primarily responsible for the emergence of new functional transcripts in nematodes. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb...

  18. Exon definition may facilitate splice site selection in RNAs with multiple exons.

    Robberson, B L; Cote, G J; Berget, S M

    1990-01-01

    Interactions at the 3' end of the intron initiate spliceosome assembly and splice site selection in vertebrate pre-mRNAs. Multiple factors, including U1 small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), are involved in initial recognition at the 3' end of the intron. Experiments were designed to test the possibility that U1 snRNP interaction at the 3' end of the intron during early assembly functions to recognize and define the downstream exon and its resident 5' splice site. Splicing precursor RNAs...

  19. Context-dependent splicing regulation: Exon definition, co-occurring motif pairs and tissue specificity

    Ke, Shengdong; CHASIN, LAWRENCE A.

    2011-01-01

    Splicing is a crucial process in gene expression in higher organisms because: (1) most vertebrate genes contain introns; and (2) alternative splicing is primarily responsible for increasing proteomic complexity and functional diversity. Intron definition, the coordination across an intron, is a mandatory step in the splicing process. However, exon definition, the coordination across an exon, is also thought to be required for the splicing of most vertebrate exons. Recent investigations of exo...

  20. Effect of BRCA2 sequence variants predicted to disrupt exonic splice enhancers on BRCA2 transcripts

    Brewster Brooke L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic screening of breast cancer patients and their families have identified a number of variants of unknown clinical significance in the breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Evaluation of such unclassified variants may be assisted by web-based bioinformatic prediction tools, although accurate prediction of aberrant splicing by unclassified variants affecting exonic splice enhancers (ESEs remains a challenge. Methods This study used a combination of RT-PCR analysis and splicing reporter minigene assays to assess five unclassified variants in the BRCA2 gene that we had previously predicted to disrupt an ESE using bioinformatic approaches. Results Analysis of BRCA2 c.8308 G > A (p.Ala2770Thr by mRNA analysis, and BRCA2 c.8962A > G (p.Ser2988Gly, BRCA2 c.8972G > A (p.Arg2991His, BRCA2 c.9172A > G (p.Ser3058Gly, and BRCA2 c.9213G > T (p.Glu3071Asp by a minigene assay, revealed no evidence for aberrant splicing. Conclusions These results illustrate the need for improved methods for predicting functional ESEs and the potential consequences of sequence variants contained therein.

  1. Alternative splicing in colon, bladder, and prostate cancer identified by exon-array analysis

    Thorsen, Kasper; Sørensen, Karina D.; Brems-Eskildsen, Anne Sofie;

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing enhances proteome diversity and modulates cancer-associated proteins. To identify tissue- and tumor-specific alternative splicing, we used the GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array to measure whole-genome exon expression in 102 normal and cancer tissue samples of different stages ...

  2. Synaptic signaling and aberrant RNA splicing in autism spectrum disorders

    Ryan M Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between presynaptic and postsynaptic cellular adhesion molecules drive synapse maturation during development. These trans-synaptic interactions are regulated by alternative splicing of cellular adhesion molecule RNAs, which ultimately determines neurotransmitter phenotype. The diverse assortment of RNAs produced by alternative splicing generates countless protein isoforms necessary for guiding specialized cell-to-cell connectivity. Failure to generate the appropriate synaptic adhesion proteins is associated with disrupted glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid signaling, resulting in loss of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity, and risk for developmental disorders, including autism. While the majority of genetic mutations currently linked to autism are rare variants that change the protein coding sequence of synaptic candidate genes, regulatory polymorphisms affecting constitutive and alternative splicing have emerged as risk factors in numerous other diseases, accounting for an estimated 40-60% of general disease risk. Here, we review the relationship between aberrant RNA splicing of synapse-related genes and autism spectrum disorders.

  3. Evolution of alternative splicing regulation: changes in predicted exonic splicing regulators are not associated with changes in alternative splicing levels in primates

    Manuel Irimia; Jakob Lewin Rukov; Scott William Roy

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal and quantitative manner. This regulation is achieved by a complex interplay between spliceosomal (trans) factors that bind to different sequence (cis) elements. cis-elements reside in both introns and exons and may either enhance or silence splicing. Differential combinations of cis-elements allows for a huge diversity of overall splicing signals, together comprising a complex ‘splicing code’. Many cis-elements have been identifie...

  4. The evolutionary fate of alternatively spliced homologous exons after gene duplication.

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene. PMID:25931610

  5. Testing for natural selection in human exonic splicing regulators associated with evolutionary rate shifts.

    Ramalho, Rodrigo F; Gelfman, Sahar; de Souza, Jorge E; Ast, Gil; de Souza, Sandro J; Meyer, Diogo

    2013-04-01

    Despite evidence that at the interspecific scale, exonic splicing silencers (ESSs) are under negative selection in constitutive exons, little is known about the effects of slightly deleterious polymorphisms on these splicing regulators. Through the application of a modified version of the McDonald-Kreitman test, we compared the normalized proportions of human polymorphisms and human/rhesus substitutions affecting exonic splicing regulators (ESRs) on sequences of constitutive and alternative exons. Our results show a depletion of substitutions and an enrichment of SNPs associated with ESS gain in constitutive exons. Moreover, we show that this evolutionary pattern is also present in a set of ESRs previously involved in the transition from constitutive to skipped exons in the mammalian lineage. The similarity between these two sets of ESRs suggests that the transition from constitutive to skipped exons in mammals is more frequently associated with the inhibition than with the promotion of splicing signals. This is in accordance with the hypothesis of a constitutive origin of exon skipping and corroborates previous findings about the antagonistic role of certain exonic splicing enhancers. PMID:23529588

  6. Evolution of alternative splicing regulation: changes in predicted exonic splicing regulators are not associated with changes in alternative splicing levels in primates.

    Manuel Irimia

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal and quantitative manner. This regulation is achieved by a complex interplay between spliceosomal (trans factors that bind to different sequence (cis elements. cis-elements reside in both introns and exons and may either enhance or silence splicing. Differential combinations of cis-elements allows for a huge diversity of overall splicing signals, together comprising a complex 'splicing code'. Many cis-elements have been identified, and their effects on exon inclusion levels demonstrated in reporter systems. However, the impact of interspecific differences in these elements on the evolution of alternative splicing levels has not yet been investigated at genomic level. Here we study the effect of interspecific differences in predicted exonic splicing regulators (ESRs on exon inclusion levels in human and chimpanzee. For this purpose, we compiled and studied comprehensive datasets of predicted ESRs, identified by several computational and experimental approaches, as well as microarray data for changes in alternative splicing levels between human and chimpanzee. Surprisingly, we found no association between changes in predicted ESRs and changes in alternative splicing levels. This observation holds across different ESR exon positions, exon lengths, and 5' splice site strengths. We suggest that this lack of association is mainly due to the great importance of context for ESR functionality: many ESR-like motifs in primates may have little or no effect on splicing, and thus interspecific changes at short-time scales may primarily occur in these effectively neutral ESRs. These results underscore the difficulties of using current computational ESR prediction algorithms to identify truly functionally important motifs, and provide a cautionary tale for studies of the effect of SNPs on splicing in human disease.

  7. Evolution of alternative splicing regulation: changes in predicted exonic splicing regulators are not associated with changes in alternative splicing levels in primates.

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Roy, Scott William

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal and quantitative manner. This regulation is achieved by a complex interplay between spliceosomal (trans) factors that bind to different sequence (cis) elements. cis-elements reside in both introns and exons and may either enhance or silence splicing. Differential combinations of cis-elements allows for a huge diversity of overall splicing signals, together comprising a complex 'splicing code'. Many cis-elements have been identified, and their effects on exon inclusion levels demonstrated in reporter systems. However, the impact of interspecific differences in these elements on the evolution of alternative splicing levels has not yet been investigated at genomic level. Here we study the effect of interspecific differences in predicted exonic splicing regulators (ESRs) on exon inclusion levels in human and chimpanzee. For this purpose, we compiled and studied comprehensive datasets of predicted ESRs, identified by several computational and experimental approaches, as well as microarray data for changes in alternative splicing levels between human and chimpanzee. Surprisingly, we found no association between changes in predicted ESRs and changes in alternative splicing levels. This observation holds across different ESR exon positions, exon lengths, and 5' splice site strengths. We suggest that this lack of association is mainly due to the great importance of context for ESR functionality: many ESR-like motifs in primates may have little or no effect on splicing, and thus interspecific changes at short-time scales may primarily occur in these effectively neutral ESRs. These results underscore the difficulties of using current computational ESR prediction algorithms to identify truly functionally important motifs, and provide a cautionary tale for studies of the effect of SNPs on splicing in human disease. PMID:19495418

  8. Intrasplicing coordinates alternative first exons with alternative splicing in the protein 4.1R gene

    Conboy, John G.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Tan, Jeff S.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2008-11-07

    In the protein 4.1R gene, alternative first exons splice differentially to alternative 3' splice sites far downstream in exon 2'/2 (E2'/2). We describe a novel intrasplicing mechanism by which exon 1A (E1A) splices exclusively to the distal E2'/2 acceptor via two nested splicing reactions regulated by novel properties of exon 1B (E1B). E1B behaves as an exon in the first step, using its consensus 5' donor to splice to the proximal E2'/2 acceptor. A long region of downstream intron is excised, juxtaposing E1B with E2'/2 to generate a new composite acceptor containing the E1B branchpoint/pyrimidine tract and E2 distal 3' AG-dinucleotide. Next, the upstream E1A splices over E1B to this distal acceptor, excising the remaining intron plus E1B and E2' to form mature E1A/E2 product. We mapped branch points for both intrasplicing reactions and demonstrated that mutation of the E1B 5' splice site or branchpoint abrogates intrasplicing. In the 4.1R gene, intrasplicing ultimately determines N-terminal protein structure and function. More generally, intrasplicing represents a new mechanism whereby alternative promoters can be coordinated with downstream alternative splicing.

  9. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved--all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago--and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  10. Evolutionary connections between coding and splicing regulatory regions in the fibronectin EDA exon.

    Zago, Paola; Buratti, Emanuele; Stuani, Cristiana; Baralle, Francisco E

    2011-08-01

    Research on exonic coding sequences has demonstrated that many substitutions at the amino acid level may also reflect profound changes at the level of splicing regulatory regions. These results have revealed that, for many alternatively spliced exons, there is considerable pressure to strike a balance between two different and sometimes conflicting forces: the drive to improve the quality and production efficiency of proteins and the maintenance of proper exon recognition by the splicing machinery. Up to now, the systems used to investigate these connections have mostly focused on short alternatively spliced exons that contain a high density of splicing regulatory elements. Although this is obviously a desirable feature in order to maximize the chances of spotting connections, it also complicates the process of drawing straightforward evolutionary pathways between different species (because of the numerous alternative pathways through which the same end point can be achieved). The alternatively spliced fibronectin extra domain A exon (also referred to as EDI or EIIIA) does not have these limitations, as its inclusion is already known to depend on a single exonic splicing enhancer element within its sequence. In this study, we have compared the rat and human fibronectin EDA exons with regard to RNA structure, exonic splicing enhancer strengths, and SR protein occupancy. The results gained from these analyses have then been used to perform an accurate evaluation of EDA sequences observed in a wide range of animal species. This comparison strongly suggests the existence of an evolutionary connection between changes at the nucleotide levels and the need to maintain efficient EDA recognition in different species. PMID:21663748

  11. Assembly of splicing complexes on exon 11 of the human insulin receptor gene does not correlate with splicing efficiency in-vitro

    Caples Matt

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incorporation of exon 11 of the insulin receptor gene is both developmentally and hormonally-regulated. Previously, we have shown the presence of enhancer and silencer elements that modulate the incorporation of the small 36-nucleotide exon. In this study, we investigated the role of inherent splice site strength in the alternative splicing decision and whether recognition of the splice sites is the major determinant of exon incorporation. Results We found that mutation of the flanking sub-optimal splice sites to consensus sequences caused the exon to be constitutively spliced in-vivo. These findings are consistent with the exon-definition model for splicing. In-vitro splicing of RNA templates containing exon 11 and portions of the upstream intron recapitulated the regulation seen in-vivo. Unexpectedly, we found that the splice sites are occupied and spliceosomal complex A was assembled on all templates in-vitro irrespective of splicing efficiency. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the exon-definition model explains alternative splicing of exon 11 in the IR gene in-vivo but not in-vitro. The in-vitro results suggest that the regulation occurs at a later step in spliceosome assembly on this exon.

  12. Assembly of splicing complexes on exon 11 of the human insulin receptor gene does not correlate with splicing efficiency in-vitro

    Caples Matt; Evans Lui-Guojing; Webster Nicholas JG; Erker Laura; Chew Shern L

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Incorporation of exon 11 of the insulin receptor gene is both developmentally and hormonally-regulated. Previously, we have shown the presence of enhancer and silencer elements that modulate the incorporation of the small 36-nucleotide exon. In this study, we investigated the role of inherent splice site strength in the alternative splicing decision and whether recognition of the splice sites is the major determinant of exon incorporation. Results We found that mutation of...

  13. The complete local genotype-phenotype landscape for the alternative splicing of a human exon.

    Julien, Philippe; Miñana, Belén; Baeza-Centurion, Pablo; Valcárcel, Juan; Lehner, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The properties of genotype-phenotype landscapes are crucial for understanding evolution but are not characterized for most traits. Here, we present a >95% complete local landscape for a defined molecular function-the alternative splicing of a human exon (FAS/CD95 exon 6, involved in the control of apoptosis). The landscape provides important mechanistic insights, revealing that regulatory information is dispersed throughout nearly every nucleotide in an exon, that the exon is more robust to the effects of mutations than its immediate neighbours in genotype space, and that high mutation sensitivity (evolvability) will drive the rapid divergence of alternative splicing between species unless it is constrained by selection. Moreover, the extensive epistasis in the landscape predicts that exonic regulatory sequences may diverge between species even when exon inclusion levels are functionally important and conserved by selection. PMID:27161764

  14. The complete local genotype–phenotype landscape for the alternative splicing of a human exon

    Julien, Philippe; Miñana, Belén; Baeza-Centurion, Pablo; Valcárcel, Juan; Lehner, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The properties of genotype–phenotype landscapes are crucial for understanding evolution but are not characterized for most traits. Here, we present a >95% complete local landscape for a defined molecular function—the alternative splicing of a human exon (FAS/CD95 exon 6, involved in the control of apoptosis). The landscape provides important mechanistic insights, revealing that regulatory information is dispersed throughout nearly every nucleotide in an exon, that the exon is more robust to the effects of mutations than its immediate neighbours in genotype space, and that high mutation sensitivity (evolvability) will drive the rapid divergence of alternative splicing between species unless it is constrained by selection. Moreover, the extensive epistasis in the landscape predicts that exonic regulatory sequences may diverge between species even when exon inclusion levels are functionally important and conserved by selection. PMID:27161764

  15. Stabilization of the Tau Exon 10 Stem Loop Alters Pre-mRNA Splicing

    Donahue, Christine P.; Muratore, Christina; Wu, Jane Y.; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Wolfe, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles containing filaments of the microtubule-associated protein tau are found in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Mutations in the tau gene itself cause frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism, demonstrating the critical role of tau in pathogenesis. Many of these mutations in tau are silent, are found at the 5′-splice site of exon 10, and lead to increased inclusion of exon 10. These silent mutations are predicted to destabilize a stem loop structure at the exon 1...

  16. Decoding of exon splicing patterns in the human RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene.

    Grinev, Vasily V; Migas, Alexandr A; Kirsanava, Aksana D; Mishkova, Olga A; Siomava, Natalia; Ramanouskaya, Tatiana V; Vaitsiankova, Alina V; Ilyushonak, Ilia M; Nazarov, Petr V; Vallar, Laurent; Aleinikova, Olga V

    2015-11-01

    The t(8;21) translocation is the most widespread genetic defect found in human acute myeloid leukemia. This translocation results in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene that produces a wide variety of alternative transcripts and influences the course of the disease. The rules of combinatorics and splicing of exons in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts are not known. To address this issue, we developed an exon graph model of the fusion gene organization and evaluated its local exon combinatorics by the exon combinatorial index (ECI). Here we show that the local exon combinatorics of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 gene follows a power-law behavior and (i) the vast majority of exons has a low ECI, (ii) only a small part is represented by "exons-hubs" of splicing with very high ECI values, and (iii) it is scale-free and very sensitive to targeted skipping of "exons-hubs". Stochasticity of the splicing machinery and preferred usage of exons in alternative splicing can explain such behavior of the system. Stochasticity may explain up to 12% of the ECI variance and results in a number of non-coding and unproductive transcripts that can be considered as a noise. Half-life of these transcripts is increased due to the deregulation of some key genes of the nonsense-mediated decay system in leukemia cells. On the other hand, preferred usage of exons may explain up to 75% of the ECI variability. Our analysis revealed a set of splicing-related cis-regulatory motifs that can explain "attractiveness" of exons in alternative splicing but only when they are considered together. Cis-regulatory motifs are guides for splicing trans-factors and we observed a leukemia-specific profile of expression of the splicing genes in t(8;21)-positive blasts. Altogether, our results show that alternative splicing of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts follows strict rules and that the power-law component of the fusion gene organization confers a high flexibility to this process. PMID:26320575

  17. DEDB: a database of Drosophila melanogaster exons in splicing graph form

    Tan Tin

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wealth of quality genomic and mRNA/EST sequences in recent years has provided the data required for large-scale genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing. We have capitalized on this by constructing a database that contains alternative splicing information organized as splicing graphs, where all transcripts arising from a single gene are collected, organized and classified. The splicing graph then serves as the basis for the classification of the various types of alternative splicing events. Description DEDB http://proline.bic.nus.edu.sg/dedb/index.html is a database of Drosophila melanogaster exons obtained from FlyBase arranged in a splicing graph form that permits the creation of simple rules allowing for the classification of alternative splicing events. Pfam domains were also mapped onto the protein sequences allowing users to access the impact of alternative splicing events on domain organization. Conclusions DEDB's catalogue of splicing graphs facilitates genome-wide classification of alternative splicing events for genome analysis. The splicing graph viewer brings together genome, transcript, protein and domain information to facilitate biologists in understanding the implications of alternative splicing.

  18. Computational analysis reveals a correlation of exon-skipping events with splicing, transcription and epigenetic factors.

    Ye, Zhenqing; Chen, Zhong; Lan, Xun; Hara, Stephen; Sunkel, Benjamin; Huang, Tim H-M; Elnitski, Laura; Wang, Qianben; Jin, Victor X

    2014-03-01

    Alternative splicing (AS), in higher eukaryotes, is one of the mechanisms of post-transcriptional regulation that generate multiple transcripts from the same gene. One particular mode of AS is the skipping event where an exon may be alternatively excluded or constitutively included in the resulting mature mRNA. Both transcript isoforms from this skipping event site, i.e. in which the exon is either included (inclusion isoform) or excluded (skipping isoform), are typically present in one cell, and maintain a subtle balance that is vital to cellular function and dynamics. However, how the prevailing conditions dictate which isoform is expressed and what biological factors might influence the regulation of this process remain areas requiring further exploration. In this study, we have developed a novel computational method, graph-based exon-skipping scanner (GESS), for de novo detection of skipping event sites from raw RNA-seq reads without prior knowledge of gene annotations, as well as for determining the dominant isoform generated from such sites. We have applied our method to publicly available RNA-seq data in GM12878 and K562 cells from the ENCODE consortium and experimentally validated several skipping site predictions by RT-PCR. Furthermore, we integrated other sequencing-based genomic data to investigate the impact of splicing activities, transcription factors (TFs) and epigenetic histone modifications on splicing outcomes. Our computational analysis found that splice sites within the skipping-isoform-dominated group (SIDG) tended to exhibit weaker MaxEntScan-calculated splice site strength around middle, 'skipping', exons compared to those in the inclusion-isoform-dominated group (IIDG). We further showed the positional preference pattern of splicing factors, characterized by enrichment in the intronic splice sites immediately bordering middle exons. Finally, our analysis suggested that different epigenetic factors may introduce a variable obstacle in the

  19. Differential GC Content between Exons and Introns Establishes Distinct Strategies of Splice-Site Recognition

    Maayan Amit

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available During evolution segments of homeothermic genomes underwent a GC content increase. Our analyses reveal that two exon-intron architectures have evolved from an ancestral state of low GC content exons flanked by short introns with a lower GC content. One group underwent a GC content elevation that abolished the differential exon-intron GC content, with introns remaining short. The other group retained the overall low GC content as well as the differential exon-intron GC content, and is associated with longer introns. We show that differential exon-intron GC content regulates exon inclusion level in this group, in which disease-associated mutations often lead to exon skipping. This group's exons also display higher nucleosome occupancy compared to flanking introns and exons of the other group, thus “marking” them for spliceosomal recognition. Collectively, our results reveal that differential exon-intron GC content is a previously unidentified determinant of exon selection and argue that the two GC content architectures reflect the two mechanisms by which splicing signals are recognized: exon definition and intron definition.

  20. Evolution of alternative splicing regulation: changes in predicted exonic splicing regulators are not associated with changes in alternative splicing levels in primates

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Roy, Scott William

    2009-01-01

    interspecific differences in these elements on the evolution of alternative splicing levels has not yet been investigated at genomic level. Here we study the effect of interspecific differences in predicted exonic splicing regulators (ESRs) on exon inclusion levels in human and chimpanzee. For this purpose, we...... compiled and studied comprehensive datasets of predicted ESRs, identified by several computational and experimental approaches, as well as microarray data for changes in alternative splicing levels between human and chimpanzee. Surprisingly, we found no association between changes in predicted ESRs and...... or no effect on splicing, and thus interspecific changes at short-time scales may primarily occur in these effectively neutral ESRs. These results underscore the difficulties of using current computational ESR prediction algorithms to identify truly functionally important motifs, and provide a...

  1. Divergence of exonic splicing elements after gene duplication and the impact on gene structures

    Zhang, Zhenguo; Zhou, Li; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xianfeng; Hu, Landian; Kong, Xiangyin

    2009-01-01

    Background The origin of new genes and their contribution to functional novelty has been the subject of considerable interest. There has been much progress in understanding the mechanisms by which new genes originate. Here we examine a novel way that new gene structures could originate, namely through the evolution of new alternative splicing isoforms after gene duplication. Results We studied the divergence of exonic splicing enhancers and silencers after gene duplication and the contributio...

  2. Inclusion of the Central Exon of Parvovirus B19 Precursor mRNA Is Determined by Multiple Splicing Enhancers in both the Exon and the Downstream Intron ▿

    Guan, Wuxiang; Cheng, Fang; Huang, Qinfeng; Kleiboeker, Steve; Qiu, Jianming

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) plays a key role in posttranscriptional regulation of B19V gene expression. We report that the central exon of the B19V pre-mRNA is defined by three GAA motif-containing exonic splicing enhancers and a G/GU-rich intronic splicing enhancer that lies adjacent to the second donor site. Moreover, targeting of morpholino antisense oligonucleotides to the two splicing enhancers surrounding the second donor site led...

  3. Abnormal splicing switch of DMD's penultimate exon compromises muscle fibre maintenance in myotonic dystrophy.

    Rau, Frédérique; Lainé, Jeanne; Ramanoudjame, Laetitita; Ferry, Arnaud; Arandel, Ludovic; Delalande, Olivier; Jollet, Arnaud; Dingli, Florent; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Kabashi, Edor; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Koo, Taeyoung; Loew, Damarys; Swanson, Maurice S; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Dickson, George; Allamand, Valérie; Marie, Joëlle; Furling, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a dominant neuromuscular disease caused by nuclear-retained RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats. These toxic RNAs alter the activities of RNA splicing factors resulting in alternative splicing misregulation and muscular dysfunction. Here we show that the abnormal splicing of DMD exon 78 found in dystrophic muscles of DM1 patients is due to the functional loss of MBNL1 and leads to the re-expression of an embryonic dystrophin in place of the adult isoform. Forced expression of embryonic dystrophin in zebrafish using an exon-skipping approach severely impairs the mobility and muscle architecture. Moreover, reproducing Dmd exon 78 missplicing switch in mice induces muscle fibre remodelling and ultrastructural abnormalities including ringed fibres, sarcoplasmic masses or Z-band disorganization, which are characteristic features of dystrophic DM1 skeletal muscles. Thus, we propose that splicing misregulation of DMD exon 78 compromises muscle fibre maintenance and contributes to the progressive dystrophic process in DM1. PMID:26018658

  4. Exon organization and novel alternative splicing of Ank3 in mouse heart.

    Gokay Yamankurt

    Full Text Available Ankyrin-G is an adaptor protein that links membrane proteins to the underlying cytoskeletal network. Alternative splicing of the Ank3 gene gives rise to multiple ankyrin-G isoforms in numerous tissues. To date, only one ankyrin-G isoform has been characterized in heart and transcriptional regulation of the Ank3 gene is completely unknown. In this study, we describe the first comprehensive analysis of Ank3 expression in heart. Using a PCR-based screen of cardiac mRNA transcripts, we identify two new exons and 28 alternative splice variants of the Ank3 gene. We measure the relative expression of each splice variant using quantitative real-time PCR and exon-exon boundary spanning primers that specifically amplify individual Ank3 variants. Six variants are rarely expressed (<1%, while the remaining variants display similar expression patterns in three hearts. Of the five first exons in the Ank3 gene, exon 1d is only expressed in heart and skeletal muscle as it was not detected in brain, kidney, cerebellum, and lung. Immunoblot analysis reveals multiple ankyrin-G isoforms in heart, and two ankyrin-G subpopulations are detected in adult cardiomyocytes by immunofluorescence. One population co-localizes with the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 at the intercalated disc, while the other population expresses at the Z-line. Two of the rare splice variants excise a portion of the ZU5 motif, which encodes the minimal spectrin-binding domain, and these variants lack β-spectrin binding. Together, these data demonstrate that Ank3 is subject to complex splicing regulation resulting in a diverse population of ankyrin-G isoforms in heart.

  5. Absence of regulated splicing of fibronectin EDA exon reduces atherosclerosis in mice

    Babaev, Vladimir R.; Porro, Fabiola; Linton, MacRae F.; Fazio, Sergio; Baralle, Francisco E.; Muro, Andrés F.

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are characterized by a profound alteration in the architecture of the arterial intima, with a marked increase of fibronectin (FN) and the appearance of the alternatively spliced FN variant containing the Extra Domain A (EDA). To analyze the role of FN isoforms in atherosclerotic lesion formation we utilized mouse strains devoid of EDA-exon regulated splicing, which constitutively include (EDA+/+) or exclude (EDA−/−) the exon. Both mutant mice had a 40% reduction in atherosclerotic lesions after the atherogenic-diet treatment (Mean±SE, μm2; 22969±2185; 13660±1533; 14260±2501 for EDAwt/wt, EDA+/+ and EDA−/−, respectively; p≤0.01 ANOVA test) associated to a lower capacity of macrophages to uptake modified LDL and undergo foam-cell formation. Lesions in control mice were more numerous and bigger, with augmented and deeper macrophage infiltration, and increased FN expression in the sub-endothelial area. Previous experiments have shown that apoE−/−EDA−/− mice have a decreased number and size of atherosclerotic lesions and, on this basis, it has been proposed that the EDA domain has a pro-atherogenic role. Our data with the EDA+/+ mice rules out this hypothesis and suggest that regulated splicing of the EDA exon of the FN gene is involved in progression of atherosclerosis, highlighting the importance of alternative splicing in regulating cellular processes. PMID:17897651

  6. Loss of Endocan tumorigenic properties after alternative splicing of exon 2

    Scherpereel Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endocan was originally described as a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan found freely circulating in the blood. Endocan expression confers tumorigenic properties to epithelial cell lines or accelerate the growth of already tumorigenic cells. This molecule is the product of a single gene composed of 3 exons. Previous data showed that endocan mRNA is subject to alternative splicing with possible generation of two protein products. In the present study we identified, and functionally characterized, the alternative spliced product of the endocan gene: the exon 2-deleted endocan, called endocanΔ2. Methods Stable, endocanΔ2-overexpressing cell lines were generated to investigate the biological activities of this new alternatively spliced product of endocan gene. Tumorigenesis was studied by inoculating endocan and endocanΔ2 expressing cell lines subcutaneously in SCID mice. Biochemical properties of endocan and endocanΔ2 were studied after production of recombinant proteins in various cell lines of human and murine origin. Results Our results showed that the exon 2 deletion impairs synthesis of the glycan chain, known to be involved in the pro-tumoral effect of endocan. EndocanΔ2 did not promote tumor formation by 293 cells implanted in the skin of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice. Conclusion Our results emphasize the key role of the polypeptide sequence encoded by the exon 2 of endocan gene in tumorigenesis, and suggest that this sequence could be a target for future therapies against cancer.

  7. Loss of Endocan tumorigenic properties after alternative splicing of exon 2

    Endocan was originally described as a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan found freely circulating in the blood. Endocan expression confers tumorigenic properties to epithelial cell lines or accelerate the growth of already tumorigenic cells. This molecule is the product of a single gene composed of 3 exons. Previous data showed that endocan mRNA is subject to alternative splicing with possible generation of two protein products. In the present study we identified, and functionally characterized, the alternative spliced product of the endocan gene: the exon 2-deleted endocan, called endocanΔ2. Stable, endocanΔ2-overexpressing cell lines were generated to investigate the biological activities of this new alternatively spliced product of endocan gene. Tumorigenesis was studied by inoculating endocan and endocanΔ2 expressing cell lines subcutaneously in SCID mice. Biochemical properties of endocan and endocanΔ2 were studied after production of recombinant proteins in various cell lines of human and murine origin. Our results showed that the exon 2 deletion impairs synthesis of the glycan chain, known to be involved in the pro-tumoral effect of endocan. EndocanΔ2 did not promote tumor formation by 293 cells implanted in the skin of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Our results emphasize the key role of the polypeptide sequence encoded by the exon 2 of endocan gene in tumorigenesis, and suggest that this sequence could be a target for future therapies against cancer

  8. Regulation of tissue-specific alternative splicing: exon-specific cis-elements govern the splicing of leukocyte common antigen pre-mRNA.

    Streuli, M; Saito, H

    1989-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is an important mechanism for controlling gene expression. Exons 4, 5 and 6 of the human leukocyte common antigen (LCA) gene are included in B cell mRNA but excluded from thymocyte mRNA by differential splicing. In order to study this tissue-specific alternative splicing, we constructed mini-genes that contain only a few of the LCA exons and the SV40 promoter. Mouse B cells and thymocytes were transfected with these mini-gene constructs and the structures ...

  9. Mammalian tissues defective in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay display highly aberrant splicing patterns

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim Lütken; Waage, Johannes Eichler; Tian, Geng;

    2012-01-01

    bioinformatic pipeline that maps RNA-seq data to a combinatorial exon database, predicts NMD-susceptibility for mRNA isoforms and calculates the distribution of major splice isoform classes. We present a catalog of NMD-regulated alternative splicing events, showing that isoforms of 30% of all expressed genes......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) affects the outcome of alternative splicing by degrading mRNA isoforms with premature termination codons. Splicing regulators constitute important NMD targets; however, the extent to which loss of NMD causes extensive deregulation of...... alternative splicing has not previously been assayed in a global, unbiased manner. Here, we combine mouse genetics and RNA-seq to provide the first in vivo analysis of the global impact of NMD on splicing patterns in two primary mouse tissues ablated for the NMD factor UPF2. RESULTS: We developed a...

  10. Two novel exonic point mutations in HEXA identified in a juvenile Tay-Sachs patient: role of alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    Levit, A; Nutman, D; Osher, E; Kamhi, E; Navon, R

    2010-06-01

    We have identified three mutations in the beta-hexoseaminidase A (HEXA) gene in a juvenile Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) patient, which exhibited a reduced level of HEXA mRNA. Two mutations are novel, c.814G>A (p.Gly272Arg) and c.1305C>T (p.=), located in exon 8 and in exon 11, respectively. The third mutation, c.1195A>G (p.Asn399Asp) in exon 11, has been previously characterized as a common polymorphism in African-Americans. Hex A activity measured in TSD Glial cells, transfected with HEXA cDNA constructs bearing these mutations, was unaltered from the activity level measured in normal HEXA cDNA. Analysis of RT-PCR products revealed three aberrant transcripts in the patient, one where exon 8 was absent, one where exon 11 was absent and a third lacking both exons 10 and 11. All three novel transcripts contain frameshifts resulting in premature termination codons (PTCs). Transfection of mini-gene constructs carrying the c.814G>A and c.1305C>T mutations proved that the two mutations result in exon skipping. mRNAs that harbor a PTC are detected and degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway to prevent synthesis of abnormal proteins. However, although NMD is functional in the patient's fibroblasts, aberrant transcripts are still present. We suggest that the level of correctly spliced transcripts as well as the efficiency in which NMD degrade the PTC-containing transcripts, apparently plays an important role in the phenotype severity of the unique patient and thus should be considered as a potential target for drug therapy. PMID:20363167

  11. Categorization of 77 dystrophin exons into 5 groups by a decision tree using indexes of splicing regulatory factors as decision markers

    Malueka Rusdy

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a fatal muscle-wasting disease, is characterized by dystrophin deficiency caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Skipping of a target dystrophin exon during splicing with antisense oligonucleotides is attracting much attention as the most plausible way to express dystrophin in DMD. Antisense oligonucleotides have been designed against splicing regulatory sequences such as splicing enhancer sequences of target exons. Recently, we reported that a chemical kinase inhibitor specifically enhances the skipping of mutated dystrophin exon 31, indicating the existence of exon-specific splicing regulatory systems. However, the basis for such individual regulatory systems is largely unknown. Here, we categorized the dystrophin exons in terms of their splicing regulatory factors. Results Using a computer-based machine learning system, we first constructed a decision tree separating 77 authentic from 14 known cryptic exons using 25 indexes of splicing regulatory factors as decision markers. We evaluated the classification accuracy of a novel cryptic exon (exon 11a identified in this study. However, the tree mislabeled exon 11a as a true exon. Therefore, we re-constructed the decision tree to separate all 15 cryptic exons. The revised decision tree categorized the 77 authentic exons into five groups. Furthermore, all nine disease-associated novel exons were successfully categorized as exons, validating the decision tree. One group, consisting of 30 exons, was characterized by a high density of exonic splicing enhancer sequences. This suggests that AOs targeting splicing enhancer sequences would efficiently induce skipping of exons belonging to this group. Conclusions The decision tree categorized the 77 authentic exons into five groups. Our classification may help to establish the strategy for exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  12. Synaptic signaling and aberrant RNA splicing in autism spectrum disorders

    Ryan M Smith; Wolfgang eSadee

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between presynaptic and postsynaptic cellular adhesion molecules drive synapse maturation during development. These trans-synaptic interactions are regulated by alternative splicing of cellular adhesion molecule RNAs, which ultimately determines neurotransmitter phenotype. The diverse assortment of RNAs produced by alternative splicing generates countless protein isoforms necessary for guiding specialized cell-to-cell connectivity. Failure to generate the appropriate synaptic ...

  13. Synaptic Signaling and Aberrant RNA Splicing in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Smith, Ryan M; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between presynaptic and postsynaptic cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) drive synapse maturation during development. These trans-synaptic interactions are regulated by alternative splicing of CAM RNAs, which ultimately determines neurotransmitter phenotype. The diverse assortment of RNAs produced by alternative splicing generates countless protein isoforms necessary for guiding specialized cell-to-cell connectivity. Failure to generate the appropriate synaptic adhesion proteins i...

  14. Disruption of the splicing enhancer sequence within exon 27 of the dystrophin gene by a nonsense mutation induces partial skipping of the exon and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Shiga, N; Takeshima, Y; Sakamoto, H; Inoue, K; Yokota, Y; Yokoyama, M; Matsuo, M

    1997-11-01

    The mechanism of exon skipping induced by nonsense mutations has not been well elucidated. We now report results of in vitro splicing studies which disclosed that a particular example of exon skipping is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence located within the exon. A nonsense mutation (E1211X) due to a G to T transversion at the 28th nucleotide of exon 27 (G3839T) was identified in the dystrophin gene of a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy case. Partial skipping of the exon resulted in the production of truncated dystrophin mRNA, although the consensus sequences for splicing at both ends of exon 27 were unaltered. To determine how E1211X induced exon 27 skipping, the splicing enhancer activity of purine-rich region within exon 27 was examined in an in vitro splicing system using chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA. The mutant sequence containing G3839T abolished splicing enhancer activity of the wild-type purine-rich sequence for the upstream intron in this chimeric pre-mRNA. An artificial polypurine oligonucleotide mimicking the purine-rich sequence of exon 27 also showed enhancer activity that was suppressed by the introduction of a T nucleotide. Furthermore, the splicing enhancer activity was more markedly inhibited when a nonsense codon was created by the inserted T residue. This is the first evidence that partial skipping of an exon harboring a nonsense mutation is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence. PMID:9410897

  15. Population genetics of duplicated alternatively spliced exons of the Dscam gene in Daphnia and Drosophila.

    Daniela Brites

    Full Text Available In insects and crustaceans, the Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam occurs in many different isoforms. These are produced by mutually exclusive alternative splicing of dozens of tandem duplicated exons coding for parts or whole immunoglobulin (Ig domains of the Dscam protein. This diversity plays a role in the development of the nervous system and also in the immune system. Structural analysis of the protein suggested candidate epitopes where binding to pathogens could occur. These epitopes are coded by regions of the duplicated exons and are therefore diverse within individuals. Here we apply molecular population genetics and molecular evolution analyses using Daphnia magna and several Drosophila species to investigate the potential role of natural selection in the divergence between orthologs of these duplicated exons among species, as well as between paralogous exons within species. We found no evidence for a role of positive selection in the divergence of these paralogous exons. However, the power of this test was low, and the fact that no signs of gene conversion between paralogous exons were found suggests that paralog diversity may nonetheless be maintained by selection. The analysis of orthologous exons in Drosophila and in Daphnia revealed an excess of non-synonymous polymorphisms in the epitopes putatively involved in pathogen binding. This may be a sign of balancing selection. Indeed, in Dr. melanogaster the same derived non-synonymous alleles segregate in several populations around the world. Yet other hallmarks of balancing selection were not found. Hence, we cannot rule out that the excess of non-synonymous polymorphisms is caused by segregating slightly deleterious alleles, thus potentially indicating reduced selective constraints in the putative pathogen binding epitopes of Dscam.

  16. Exonic Splicing Mutations Are More Prevalent than Currently Estimated and Can Be Predicted by Using In Silico Tools

    Soukarieh, Omar; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Hamieh, Mohamad; Drouet, Aurélie; Baert-Desurmont, Stéphanie; Frébourg, Thierry; Tosi, Mario; Martins, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The identification of a causal mutation is essential for molecular diagnosis and clinical management of many genetic disorders. However, even if next-generation exome sequencing has greatly improved the detection of nucleotide changes, the biological interpretation of most exonic variants remains challenging. Moreover, particular attention is typically given to protein-coding changes often neglecting the potential impact of exonic variants on RNA splicing. Here, we used the exon 10 of MLH1, a gene implicated in hereditary cancer, as a model system to assess the prevalence of RNA splicing mutations among all single-nucleotide variants identified in a given exon. We performed comprehensive minigene assays and analyzed patient’s RNA when available. Our study revealed a staggering number of splicing mutations in MLH1 exon 10 (77% of the 22 analyzed variants), including mutations directly affecting splice sites and, particularly, mutations altering potential splicing regulatory elements (ESRs). We then used this thoroughly characterized dataset, together with experimental data derived from previous studies on BRCA1, BRCA2, CFTR and NF1, to evaluate the predictive power of 3 in silico approaches recently described as promising tools for pinpointing ESR-mutations. Our results indicate that ΔtESRseq and ΔHZEI-based approaches not only discriminate which variants affect splicing, but also predict the direction and severity of the induced splicing defects. In contrast, the ΔΨ-based approach did not show a compelling predictive power. Our data indicates that exonic splicing mutations are more prevalent than currently appreciated and that they can now be predicted by using bioinformatics methods. These findings have implications for all genetically-caused diseases. PMID:26761715

  17. Exonic Splicing Mutations Are More Prevalent than Currently Estimated and Can Be Predicted by Using In Silico Tools.

    Omar Soukarieh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of a causal mutation is essential for molecular diagnosis and clinical management of many genetic disorders. However, even if next-generation exome sequencing has greatly improved the detection of nucleotide changes, the biological interpretation of most exonic variants remains challenging. Moreover, particular attention is typically given to protein-coding changes often neglecting the potential impact of exonic variants on RNA splicing. Here, we used the exon 10 of MLH1, a gene implicated in hereditary cancer, as a model system to assess the prevalence of RNA splicing mutations among all single-nucleotide variants identified in a given exon. We performed comprehensive minigene assays and analyzed patient's RNA when available. Our study revealed a staggering number of splicing mutations in MLH1 exon 10 (77% of the 22 analyzed variants, including mutations directly affecting splice sites and, particularly, mutations altering potential splicing regulatory elements (ESRs. We then used this thoroughly characterized dataset, together with experimental data derived from previous studies on BRCA1, BRCA2, CFTR and NF1, to evaluate the predictive power of 3 in silico approaches recently described as promising tools for pinpointing ESR-mutations. Our results indicate that ΔtESRseq and ΔHZEI-based approaches not only discriminate which variants affect splicing, but also predict the direction and severity of the induced splicing defects. In contrast, the ΔΨ-based approach did not show a compelling predictive power. Our data indicates that exonic splicing mutations are more prevalent than currently appreciated and that they can now be predicted by using bioinformatics methods. These findings have implications for all genetically-caused diseases.

  18. A novel point mutation (G[sup [minus]1] to T) in a 5[prime] splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Hagiwara, Yoko; Nishio, Hisahide; Kitoh, Yoshihiko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Narita, Naoko; Wada, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Matsuo, Masafumi (Kobe Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. The authors now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5[prime] splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5[prime] splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G[sup [minus]1]-to-T mutation at the 5[prime] splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  19. A novel point mutation (G-1 to T) in a 5' splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Hagiwara, Y; Nishio, H; Kitoh, Y; Takeshima, Y; Narita, N; Wada, H; Yokoyama, M; Nakamura, H; Matsuo, M

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. We now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5' splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5' splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G-1-to-T mutation at the 5' splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. PMID:8279470

  20. 5 ' splice site mutations in tau associated with the inherited dementia FTDP-17 affect a stem-loop structure that regulates alternative splicing of exon 10

    Grover, A.; Houlden, H; Baker, M.; Adamson, J.; J. Lewis; Prihar, G.; Pickering-Brown, S.; Duff, K; Hutton, M.

    1999-01-01

    Missense and splice site mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene were recently found associated with fronto-temporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (Poorkaj et al. (1998) Ann. Neurol. 43, 815-825; Hutton et al. (1998) Nature 393, 702-705; Spillantini et al. (1998) Proc. Natl Acad Sci. U.S.A 95, 7737-7741). The mutations in the 5' splice site of exon 10 were shown to increase the ratio of tau mRNAs containing exon 10 and thus the proportion of Tau protein is...

  1. Alteration of introns in a hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS1 minigene convert Pre-mRNA [corrected] splicing to the aberrant pattern in multiple myeloma (MM: MM patients harbor similar changes.

    Jitra Kriangkum

    Full Text Available Aberrant pre-mRNA splice variants of hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS1 have been identified in malignant cells from cancer patients. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that intronic sequence changes can underlie aberrant splicing. Deletions and mutations were introduced into HAS1 minigene constructs to identify regions that can influence aberrant intronic splicing, comparing the splicing pattern in transfectants with that in multiple myeloma (MM patients. Introduced genetic variations in introns 3 and 4 of HAS1 as shown here can promote aberrant splicing of the type detected in malignant cells from MM patients. HAS1Vd is a novel intronic splice variant first identified here. HAS1Vb, an intronic splice variant previously identified in patients, skips exon 4 and utilizes the same intron 4 alternative 3'splice site as HAS1Vd. For transfected constructs with unaltered introns 3 and 4, HAS1Vd transcripts are readily detectable, frequently to the exclusion of HAS1Vb. In contrast, in MM patients, HAS1Vb is more frequent than HAS1Vd. In the HAS1 minigene, combining deletion in intron 4 with mutations in intron 3 leads to a shift from HAS1Vd expression to HAS1Vb expression. The upregulation of aberrant splicing, exemplified here by the expression of HAS1Vb, is shown here to be influenced by multiple genetic changes in intronic sequences. For HAS1Vb, this includes enhanced exon 4 skipping and increased usage of alternative 3' splice sites. Thus, the combination of introduced mutations in HAS1 intron3 with introduced deletions in HAS1 intron 4 promoted a shift to an aberrant splicing pattern previously shown to be clinically significant. Most MM patients harbor genetic variations in intron 4, and as shown here, nearly half harbor recurrent mutations in HAS1 intron 3. Our work suggests that aberrant intronic HAS1 splicing in MM patients may rely on intronic HAS1 deletions and mutations that are frequent in MM patients but absent from healthy donors.

  2. Identical splicing of aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor transcripts from amplified rearranged genes in human glioblastomas.

    Sugawa, N; Ekstrand, A J; James, C D; Collins, V P

    1990-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor gene has been found to be amplified and rearranged in human glioblastomas in vivo. Here we present the sequence across a splice junction of aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor transcripts derived from corresponding and uniquely rearranged genes that are coamplified and coexpressed with non-rearranged epidermal growth factor receptor genes in six primary human glioblastomas. Each of these six tumors contains aberrant transcripts derived from identical...

  3. Characterization of a spliced exon product of herpes simplex type-1 latency-associated transcript in productively infected cells

    The latency-associated transcripts (LATs) of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) are the only viral RNAs accumulating during latent infections in the sensory ganglia of the peripheral nervous system. The major form of LAT that accumulates in latently infected neurons is a 2 kb intron, spliced from a much less abundant 8.3 primary transcript. The spliced exon mRNA has been hard to detect. However, in this study, we have examined the spliced exon RNA in productively infected cells using ribonuclease protection (RPA), and quantitative RT-PCR (q-PCR) assays. We were able to detect the LAT exon RNA in productively infected SY5Y cells (a human neuronal cell line). The level of the LAT exon RNA was found to be approximately 5% that of the 2 kb intron RNA and thus is likely to be relatively unstable. Quantitative RT-PCR (q-PCR) assays were used to examine the LAT exon RNA and its properties. They confirmed that the LAT exon mRNA is present at a very low level in productively infected cells, compared to the levels of other viral transcripts. Furthermore, experiments showed that the LAT exon mRNA is expressed as a true late gene, and appears to be polyadenylated. In SY5Y cells, in contrast to most late viral transcripts, the LAT exon RNA was found to be mainly nuclear localized during the late stage of a productive infection. Interestingly, more LAT exon RNA was found in the cytoplasm in differentiated compared to undifferentiated SY5Y cells, suggesting the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of the LAT exon RNA and its related function may be influenced by the differentiation state of cells

  4. Control of HIV-1 env RNA splicing and transport: investigating the role of hnRNP A1 in exon splicing silencer (ESS3a) function

    The control of HIV-1 viral RNA splicing and transport plays an important role in the successful replication of the virus. Previous studies have identified both an exon splicing enhancer (ESE) and a bipartite exon splicing silencer (ESS3a and ESS3b) within the terminal exon of HIV-1 that are involved in modulating both splicing and Rev-mediated export of viral RNA. To define the mechanism of ESS3a function, experiments were carried out to better define the cis and trans components required for ESS3a activity. Mutations throughout the 30-nt element resulted in partial loss of ESS function. Combining mutations was found to have an additive effect, suggesting the presence of multiple binding sites. Analysis of interacting factors identified hnRNP A1 as one component of the complex that modulates ESS3a activity. However, subsequent binding analyses determined that hnRNP A1 interacts with only one portion of ESS3a, suggesting the involvement of another host factor. Parallel analysis of the effect of the mutations on Rev-mediated export determined that there is not a direct correlation between the effect of the mutations on splicing and RNA transport. Consistent with this hypothesis, replacement of ESS3a with consensus hnRNP A1 binding sites was found to be insufficient to block Rev-mediated RNA export

  5. Aberrant splicing of the DMP1-ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway in cancer.

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A

    2016-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) of mRNA precursors is a ubiquitous mechanism for generating numerous transcripts with different activities from one genomic locus in mammalian cells. The gene products from a single locus can thus have similar, dominant-negative or even opposing functions. Aberrant AS has been found in cancer to express proteins that promote cell growth, local invasion and metastasis. This review will focus on the aberrant splicing of tumor suppressor/oncogenes that belong to the DMP1-ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway. Our recent study shows that the DMP1 locus generates both tumor-suppressive DMP1α (p53-dependent) and oncogenic DMP1β (p53-independent) splice variants, and the DMP1β/α ratio increases with neoplastic transformation of breast epithelial cells. This process is associated with high DMP1β protein expression and shorter survival of breast cancer (BC) patients. Accumulating pieces of evidence show that ARF is frequently inactivated by aberrant splicing in human cancers, demonstrating its involvement in human malignancies. Splice variants from the MDM2 locus promote cell growth in culture and accelerate tumorigenesis in vivo. Human cancers expressing these splice variants are associated with advanced stage/metastasis, and thus have negative clinical impacts. Although they lack most of the p53-binding domain, their activities are mostly dependent on p53 since they bind to wild-type MDM2. The p53 locus produces splice isoforms that have either favorable (β/γ at the C-terminus) or negative impact (Δ40, Δ133 at the N-terminus) on patients' survival. As the oncogenic AS products from these loci are expressed only in cancer cells, they may eventually become targets for molecular therapies. PMID:26802432

  6. Disruption of the splicing enhancer sequence within exon 27 of the dystrophin gene by a nonsense mutation induces partial skipping of the exon and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Shiga, N.; Takeshima, Y; Sakamoto, H; Inoue, K.; Y. Yokota; Yokoyama, M.; Matsuo, M.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of exon skipping induced by nonsense mutations has not been well elucidated. We now report results of in vitro splicing studies which disclosed that a particular example of exon skipping is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence located within the exon. A nonsense mutation (E1211X) due to a G to T transversion at the 28th nucleotide of exon 27 (G3839T) was identified in the dystrophin gene of a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy case. Partial skipping of the exon resu...

  7. Identification of evolutionarily conserved exons as regulated targets for the splicing activator tra2β in development.

    Sushma Grellscheid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing amplifies the information content of the genome, creating multiple mRNA isoforms from single genes. The evolutionarily conserved splicing activator Tra2β (Sfrs10 is essential for mouse embryogenesis and implicated in spermatogenesis. Here we find that Tra2β is up-regulated as the mitotic stem cell containing population of male germ cells differentiate into meiotic and post-meiotic cells. Using CLIP coupled to deep sequencing, we found that Tra2β binds a high frequency of exons and identified specific G/A rich motifs as frequent targets. Significantly, for the first time we have analysed the splicing effect of Sfrs10 depletion in vivo by generating a conditional neuronal-specific Sfrs10 knock-out mouse (Sfrs10(fl/fl; Nestin-Cre(tg/+. This mouse has defects in brain development and allowed correlation of genuine physiologically Tra2β regulated exons. These belonged to a novel class which were longer than average size and importantly needed multiple cooperative Tra2β binding sites for efficient splicing activation, thus explaining the observed splicing defects in the knockout mice. Regulated exons included a cassette exon which produces a meiotic isoform of the Nasp histone chaperone that helps monitor DNA double-strand breaks. We also found a previously uncharacterised poison exon identifying a new pathway of feedback control between vertebrate Tra2 proteins. Both Nasp-T and the Tra2a poison exon are evolutionarily conserved, suggesting they might control fundamental developmental processes. Tra2β protein isoforms lacking the RRM were able to activate specific target exons indicating an additional functional role as a splicing co-activator. Significantly the N-terminal RS1 domain conserved between flies and humans was essential for the splicing activator function of Tra2β. Versions of Tra2β lacking this N-terminal RS1 domain potently repressed the same target exons activated by full-length Tra2β protein.

  8. A synonymous polymorphic variation in ACADM exon 11 affects splicing efficiency and may affect fatty acid oxidation

    Bruun, Gitte Hoffmann; Doktor, Thomas Koed; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2013-01-01

    In recent studies combining genome-wide association and tandem-MS based metabolic profiling, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs211718C>T, located far upstream of the MCAD gene (ACADM) was found to be associated with serum concentrations of medium-chain acylcarnitines indicating improved...... with exon 11 missplicing, and that the c.1161G allele corrects this missplicing. This may result in production of more full length MCAD protein from the c.1161G allele. Our analysis suggests that the improved splicing of the c.1161G allele is due to changes in the relative binding of splicing...... expression, perhaps due to improved splicing. This study is a proof of principle that synonymous SNPs are not neutral. By changing the binding sites for splicing regulatory proteins they can have significant effects on pre-mRNA splicing and thus protein function. In addition, this study shows that for a...

  9. Changes in type II procollagen isoform expression during chondrogenesis by disruption of an alternative 5’ splice site within Col2a1 exon 2

    Hering, Thomas M.; Wirthlin, Louisa; Ravindran, Soumya; McAlinden, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    This study describes a new mechanism controlling the production of alternatively-spliced isoforms of type II procollagen (Col2a1) in vivo. During chondrogenesis, precursor chondrocytes predominantly produce isoforms containing alternatively-spliced exon 2 (type IIA and IID) while Col2a1 mRNA devoid of exon 2 (type IIB) is the major isoform produced by differentiated chondrocytes. We previously identified an additional Col2a1 isoform containing a truncated exon 2 and premature termination codo...

  10. ExonMiner: Web service for analysis of GeneChip Exon array data

    Imoto Seiya

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some splicing isoform-specific transcriptional regulations are related to disease. Therefore, detection of disease specific splice variations is the first step for finding disease specific transcriptional regulations. Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array can measure exon-level expression profiles that are suitable to find differentially expressed exons in genome-wide scale. However, exon array produces massive datasets that are more than we can handle and analyze on personal computer. Results We have developed ExonMiner that is the first all-in-one web service for analysis of exon array data to detect transcripts that have significantly different splicing patterns in two cells, e.g. normal and cancer cells. ExonMiner can perform the following analyses: (1 data normalization, (2 statistical analysis based on two-way ANOVA, (3 finding transcripts with significantly different splice patterns, (4 efficient visualization based on heatmaps and barplots, and (5 meta-analysis to detect exon level biomarkers. We implemented ExonMiner on a supercomputer system in order to perform genome-wide analysis for more than 300,000 transcripts in exon array data, which has the potential to reveal the aberrant splice variations in cancer cells as exon level biomarkers. Conclusion ExonMiner is well suited for analysis of exon array data and does not require any installation of software except for internet browsers. What all users need to do is to access the ExonMiner URL http://ae.hgc.jp/exonminer. Users can analyze full dataset of exon array data within hours by high-level statistical analysis with sound theoretical basis that finds aberrant splice variants as biomarkers.

  11. Implementation of exon arrays: alternative splicing during T-cell proliferation as determined by whole genome analysis

    Whistler Toni

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The contribution of alternative splicing and isoform expression to cellular response is emerging as an area of considerable interest, and the newly developed exon arrays allow for systematic study of these processes. We use this pilot study to report on the feasibility of exon array implementation looking to replace the 3' in vitro transcription expression arrays in our laboratory. One of the most widely studied models of cellular response is T-cell activation from exogenous stimulation. Microarray studies have contributed to our understanding of key pathways activated during T-cell stimulation. We use this system to examine whole genome transcription and alternate exon usage events that are regulated during lymphocyte proliferation in an attempt to evaluate the exon arrays. Results Peripheral blood mononuclear cells form healthy donors were activated using phytohemagglutinin, IL2 and ionomycin and harvested at 5 points over a 7 day period. Flow cytometry measured cell cycle events and the Affymetrix exon array platform was used to identify the gene expression and alternate exon usage changes. Gene expression changes were noted in a total of 2105 transcripts, and alternate exon usage identified in 472 transcript clusters. There was an overlap of 263 transcripts which showed both differential expression and alternate exon usage over time. Gene ontology enrichment analysis showed a broader range of biological changes in biological processes for the differentially expressed genes, which include cell cycle, cell division, cell proliferation, chromosome segregation, cell death, component organization and biogenesis and metabolic process ontologies. The alternate exon usage ontological enrichments are in metabolism and component organization and biogenesis. We focus on alternate exon usage changes in the transcripts of the spliceosome complex. The real-time PCR validation rates were 86% for transcript expression and 71% for

  12. Alternative splicing of exon 17 and a missense mutation in exon 20 of the insulin receptor gene in two brothers with a novel syndrome of insulin resistance (congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy)

    Vorwerk, P; Christoffersen, C T; Müller, J;

    1999-01-01

    compound heterozygotes for mutations in the IR gene. The maternal allele was alternatively spliced in exon 17 due to a point mutation in the -1 donor splice site of the exon. The abnormal skipping of exon 17 shifts the amino acid reading frame and leads to a truncated IR, missing the entire tyrosine kinase...... domain. In the correct spliced variant, the point mutation is silent and results in a normally translated IR. The paternal allele carries a missense mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain. All three cDNA variants were present in the lymphocytes of the patients. Purified IR from 293 cells overexpressing...

  13. Mutation in the U2 snRNA influences exon interactions of U5 snRNA loop 1 during pre-mRNA splicing

    McGrail, Joanne C.; Tatum, Elaine M; O'Keefe, Raymond T.

    2006-01-01

    The U2 and U6 snRNAs contribute to the catalysis of intron removal while U5 snRNA loop 1 holds the exons for ligation during pre-mRNA splicing. It is unclear how different exons are positioned precisely with U5 loop 1. Here, we investigate the role of U2 and U6 in positioning the exons with U5 loop 1. Reconstitution in vitro of spliceosomes with mutations in U2 allows U5–pre-mRNA interactions before the first step of splicing. However, insertion in U2 helix Ia disrupts U5–exon interactions wi...

  14. Aberrant splicing and missense mutations cause steroid 21-hydroxylase [P-450(C21)] deficiency in humans: Possible gene conversion products

    Four steroid 21-hydroxylase B [P-450(C21)B] genes (designated P.7, P.10-1, P.10-2, and P.3) from three P-450(C21)-deficient patients were isolated to analyze their structures and functions. Several base changes were observed in the sequences of the four P-450(C21)B genes as compared to that of the functional B gene. Many of these base changes were identical to those of the P-450(C21)A pseudogene. The three DNAs (P.10-1, P.10.2, and P.3) produced no P-450(C21) activity in a functional assay for P-450(C21) by the COS cell expression system, while the P.7 DNA expressed the activity. The P.10-1 and P.10-2 DNAs were shown to have a point mutation in the second intron, causing aberrant splicing. The P.3 DNA carried three clustered missense mutations in the sixty exon, which impaired P-450(C21) activity. All these critical mutations could be seen in the corresponding site of the P-450(C21)A pseudogene. These data strongly suggest the involvement of gene conversion in this genetic disease

  15. Exon array analysis of head and neck cancers identifies a hypoxia related splice variant of LAMA3 associated with a poor prognosis.

    Moller-Levet, Carla S.; Guy N J Betts; Harris, Adrian L; Homer, Jarrod J.; West, Catharine M. L.; Miller, Crispin J.

    2009-01-01

    The identification of alternatively spliced transcript variants specific to particular biological processes in tumours should increase our understanding of cancer. Hypoxia is an important factor in cancer biology, and associated splice variants may present new markers to help with planning treatment. A method was developed to analyse alternative splicing in exon array data, using probeset multiplicity to identify genes with changes in expression across their loci, and a combination of the spl...

  16. DEDB: a database of Drosophila melanogaster exons in splicing graph form

    Tan Tin; Lee Bernett TK; Ranganathan Shoba

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background A wealth of quality genomic and mRNA/EST sequences in recent years has provided the data required for large-scale genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing. We have capitalized on this by constructing a database that contains alternative splicing information organized as splicing graphs, where all transcripts arising from a single gene are collected, organized and classified. The splicing graph then serves as the basis for the classification of the various types of alte...

  17. Upstream ORF affects MYCN translation depending on exon 1b alternative splicing

    The MYCN gene is transcribed into two major mRNAs: one full-length (MYCN) and one exon 1b-spliced (MYCNΔ1b) mRNA. But nothing is known about their respective ability to translate the MYCN protein. Plasmids were prepared to enable translation from the upstream (uORF) and major ORF of the two MYCN transcripts. Translation was studied after transfection in neuroblastoma SH-EP cell line. Impact of the upstream AUG on translation was evaluated after directed mutagenesis. Functional study with the two MYCN mRNAs was conducted by a cell viability assay. Existence of a new protein encoded by the MYCNΔ1b uORF was explored by designing a rabbit polyclonal antibody against a specific epitope of this protein. Both are translated, but higher levels of protein were seen with MYCNΔ1b mRNA. An upstream ORF was shown to have positive cis-regulatory activity on translation from MYCN but not from MYCNΔ1b mRNA. In transfected SH-EP neuroblastoma cells, high MYCN dosage obtained with MYCNΔ1b mRNA translation induces an antiapoptotic effect after serum deprivation that was not observed with low MYCN expression obtained with MYCN mRNA. Here, we showed that MYCNOT: MYCN Overlap Transcript, a new protein of unknown function is translated from the upstream AUG of MYCNΔ1b mRNA. Existence of upstream ORF in MYCN transcripts leads to a new level of MYCN regulation. The resulting MYCN dosage has a weak but significant anti-apoptotic activity after intrinsic apoptosis induction

  18. Upstream ORF affects MYCN translation depending on exon 1b alternative splicing

    Tutrone Giovani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MYCN gene is transcribed into two major mRNAs: one full-length (MYCN and one exon 1b-spliced (MYCNΔ1b mRNA. But nothing is known about their respective ability to translate the MYCN protein. Methods Plasmids were prepared to enable translation from the upstream (uORF and major ORF of the two MYCN transcripts. Translation was studied after transfection in neuroblastoma SH-EP cell line. Impact of the upstream AUG on translation was evaluated after directed mutagenesis. Functional study with the two MYCN mRNAs was conducted by a cell viability assay. Existence of a new protein encoded by the MYCNΔ1b uORF was explored by designing a rabbit polyclonal antibody against a specific epitope of this protein. Results Both are translated, but higher levels of protein were seen with MYCNΔ1b mRNA. An upstream ORF was shown to have positive cis-regulatory activity on translation from MYCN but not from MYCNΔ1b mRNA. In transfected SH-EP neuroblastoma cells, high MYCN dosage obtained with MYCNΔ1b mRNA translation induces an antiapoptotic effect after serum deprivation that was not observed with low MYCN expression obtained with MYCN mRNA. Here, we showed that MYCNOT: MYCN Overlap Transcript, a new protein of unknown function is translated from the upstream AUG of MYCNΔ1b mRNA. Conclusions Existence of upstream ORF in MYCN transcripts leads to a new level of MYCN regulation. The resulting MYCN dosage has a weak but significant anti-apoptotic activity after intrinsic apoptosis induction.

  19. Exon-level transcriptome profiling in murine breast cancer reveals splicing changes specific to tumors with different metastatic abilities.

    Amandine Bemmo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the second most frequent type of cancer affecting women. We are increasingly aware that changes in mRNA splicing are associated with various characteristics of cancer. The most deadly aspect of cancer is metastasis, the process by which cancer spreads from the primary tumor to distant organs. However, little is known specifically about the involvement of alternative splicing in the formation of macroscopic metastases. Our study investigates transcript isoform changes that characterize tumors of different abilities to form growing metastases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To identify alternative splicing events (ASEs that are associated with the fully metastatic phenotype in breast cancer, we used Affymetrix Exon Microarrays to profile mRNA isoform variations genome-wide in weakly metastatic (168FARN and 4T07 and highly metastatic (4T1 mammary carcinomas. Statistical analysis identified significant expression changes in 7606 out of 155,994 (4% exons and in 1725 out of 189,460 (1% intronic regions, which affect 2623 out of 16,654 (16% genes. These changes correspond to putative alternative isoforms-several of which are novel-that are differentially expressed between tumors of varying metastatic phenotypes. Gene pathway analysis showed that 1224 of genes expressing alternative isoforms were involved in cell growth, cell interactions, cell proliferation, cell migration and cell death and have been previously linked to cancers and genetic disorders. We chose ten predicted splice variants for RT-PCR validation, eight of which were successfully confirmed (MED24, MFI2, SRRT, CD44, CLK1 and HNRNPH1. These include three novel intron retentions in CD44, a gene in which isoform variations have been previously associated with the metastasis of several cancers. CONCLUSION: Our findings reveal that various genes are differently spliced and/or expressed in association with the metastatic phenotype of tumor cells. Identification of

  20. Dissecting an alternative splicing analysis workflow for GeneChip® Exon 1.0 ST Affymetrix arrays

    Calogero Raffaele A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new microarray platform (GeneChip® Exon 1.0 ST has recently been developed by Affymetrix http://www.affymetrix.com. This microarray platform changes the conventional view of transcript analysis since it allows the evaluation of the expression level of a transcript by querying each exon component. The Exon 1.0 ST platform does however raise some issues regarding the approaches to be used in identifying genome-wide alternative splicing events (ASEs. In this study an exon-level data analysis workflow is dissected in order to detect limit and strength of each step, thus modifying the overall workflow and thereby optimizing the detection of ASEs. Results This study was carried out using a semi-synthetic exon-skipping benchmark experiment embedding a total of 268 exon skipping events. Our results point out that summarization methods (RMA, PLIER do not affect the efficacy of statistical tools in detecting ASEs. However, data pre-filtering is mandatory if the detected number of false ASEs are to be reduced. MiDAS and Rank Product methods efficiently detect true ASEs but they suffer from the lack of multiple test error correction. The intersection of MiDAS and Rank Product results efficiently moderates the detection of false ASEs. Conclusion To optimize the detection of ASEs we propose the following workflow: i data pre-filtering, ii statistical selection of ASEs using both MiDAS and Rank Product, iii intersection of results derived from the two statistical analyses in order to moderate family-wise errors (FWER.

  1. Thousands of exon skipping events differentiate among splicing patterns in sixteen human tissues

    Liliana Florea; Li Song; Salzberg, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing is widely recognized for its roles in regulating genes and creating gene diversity. However, despite many efforts, the repertoire of gene splicing variation is still incompletely characterized, even in humans. Here we describe a new computational system, ASprofile, and its application to RNA-seq data from Illumina’s Human Body Map project (>2.5 billion reads).  Using the system, we identified putative alternative splicing events in 16 different human tissues, which provid...

  2. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    Federico Abascal; Iakes Ezkurdia; Juan Rodriguez-Rivas; Jose Manuel Rodriguez; Angela del Pozo; Jesús Vázquez; Alfonso Valencia; Tress, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a...

  3. Modulation of mdm2 pre-mRNA splicing by 9-aminoacridine-PNA (peptide nucleic acid) conjugates targeting intron-exon junctions

    Modulation of pre-mRNA splicing by antisense molecules is a promising mechanism of action for gene therapeutic drugs. In this study, we have examined the potential of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) 9-aminoacridine conjugates to modulate the pre-mRNA splicing of the mdm2 human cancer gene in JAR cells. We screened 10 different 15 mer PNAs targeting intron2 at both the 5' - and the 3'-splice site for their effects on the splicing of mdm2 using RT-PCR analysis. We also tested a PNA (2512) targeting the 3'-splice site of intron3 with a complementarity of 4 bases to intron3 and 11 bases to exon4 for its splicing modulation effect. This PNA2512 was further tested for the effects on the mdm2 protein level as well as for inhibition of cell growth in combination with the DNA damaging agent camptothecin (CPT). We show that several of these PNAs effectively inhibit the splicing thereby producing a larger mRNA still containing intron2, while skipping of exon3 was not observed by any of these PNAs. The most effective PNA (PNA2406) targeting the 3'-splice site of intron2 had a complementarity of 4 bases to intron2 and 11 bases to exon3. PNA (2512) targeting the 3'-splice site of intron3 induced both splicing inhibition (intron3 skipping) and skipping of exon4. Furthermore, treatment of JAR cells with this PNA resulted in a reduction in the level of MDM2 protein and a concomitant increase in the level of tumor suppressor p53. In addition, a combination of this PNA with CPT inhibited cell growth more than CPT alone. We have identified several PNAs targeting the 5'- or 3'-splice sites in intron2 or the 3'-splice site of intron3 of mdm2 pre-mRNA which can inhibit splicing. Antisense targeting of splice junctions of mdm2 pre-mRNA may be a powerful method to evaluate the cellular function of MDM2 splice variants as well as a promising approach for discovery of mdm2 targeted anticancer drugs

  4. Exon size affects competition between splicing and cleavage-polyadenylation in the immunoglobulin mu gene.

    Peterson, M L; Bryman, M B; Peiter, M; Cowan, C

    1994-01-01

    The alternative RNA processing of microseconds and microns mRNAs from a single primary transcript depends on competition between a cleavage-polyadenylation reaction to produce microseconds mRNA and a splicing reaction to produce microns mRNA. The ratio of microseconds to microns mRNA is regulated during B-cell maturation; relatively more spliced microns mRNA is made in B cells than in plasma cells. The balance between the efficiencies of splicing and cleavage-polyadenylation is critical to th...

  5. The RNA-binding profile of Acinus, a peripheral component of the exon junction complex, reveals its role in splicing regulation.

    Rodor, Julie; Pan, Qun; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Eyras, Eduardo; Cáceres, Javier F

    2016-09-01

    Acinus (apoptotic chromatin condensation inducer in the nucleus) is an RNA-binding protein (RBP) originally identified for its role in apoptosis. It was later found to be an auxiliary component of the exon junction complex (EJC), which is deposited at exon junctions as a consequence of pre-mRNA splicing. To uncover the cellular functions of Acinus and investigate its role in splicing, we mapped its endogenous RNA targets using the cross-linking immunoprecipitation protocol (iCLIP). We observed that Acinus binds to pre-mRNAs, associating specifically to a subset of suboptimal introns, but also to spliced mRNAs. We also confirmed the presence of Acinus as a peripheral factor of the EJC. RNA-seq was used to investigate changes in gene expression and alternative splicing following siRNA-mediated depletion of Acinus in HeLa cells. This analysis revealed that Acinus is preferentially required for the inclusion of specific alternative cassette exons and also controls the faithful splicing of a subset of introns. Moreover, a large number of splicing changes can be related to Acinus binding, suggesting a direct role of Acinus in exon and intron definition. In particular, Acinus regulates the splicing of DFFA/ICAD transcript, a major regulator of DNA fragmentation. Globally, the genome-wide identification of RNA targets of Acinus revealed its role in splicing regulation as well as its involvement in other cellular pathways, including cell cycle progression. Altogether, this study uncovers new cellular functions of an RBP transiently associated with the EJC. PMID:27365209

  6. The Exon Junction Complex Controls the Efficient and Faithful Splicing of a Subset of Transcripts Involved in Mitotic Cell-Cycle Progression.

    Fukumura, Kazuhiro; Wakabayashi, Shunichi; Kataoka, Naoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Nakai, Kenta; Mayeda, Akila; Inoue, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) that is deposited onto spliced mRNAs upstream of exon-exon junctions plays important roles in multiple post-splicing gene expression events, such as mRNA export, surveillance, localization, and translation. However, a direct role for the human EJC in pre-mRNA splicing has not been fully understood. Using HeLa cells, we depleted one of the EJC core components, Y14, and the resulting transcriptome was analyzed by deep sequencing (RNA-Seq) and confirmed by RT-PCR. We found that Y14 is required for efficient and faithful splicing of a group of transcripts that is enriched in short intron-containing genes involved in mitotic cell-cycle progression. Tethering of EJC core components (Y14, eIF4AIII or MAGOH) to a model reporter pre-mRNA harboring a short intron showed that these core components are prerequisites for the splicing activation. Taken together, we conclude that the EJC core assembled on pre-mRNA is critical for efficient and faithful splicing of a specific subset of short introns in mitotic cell cycle-related genes. PMID:27490541

  7. Identification of cis-Acting Elements and Splicing Factors Involved in the Regulation of BIM Pre-mRNA Splicing

    Juan, Wen Chun; Roca, Xavier; Ong, S. Tiong

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant changes in the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein, BCL-2-like 11 (BIM), can result in either impaired or excessive apoptosis, which can contribute to tumorigenesis and degenerative disorders, respectively. Altering BIM pre-mRNA splicing is an attractive approach to modulate apoptosis because BIM activity is partly determined by the alternative splicing of exons 3 or 4, whereby exon 3-containing transcripts are not apoptotic. Here we identified several cis-acting elements and spl...

  8. Fox-2 Splicing Factor Binds to a Conserved Intron Motif to PromoteInclusion of Protein 4.1R Alternative Exon 16

    Ponthier, Julie L.; Schluepen, Christina; Chen, Weiguo; Lersch,Robert A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Hou, Victor C.; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Chasis, Joel A.; Winkelmann, John C.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-03-01

    Activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) inclusion during erythropoiesis represents a physiologically important splicing switch that increases 4.1R affinity for spectrin and actin. Previous studies showed that negative regulation of E16 splicing is mediated by the binding of hnRNP A/B proteins to silencer elements in the exon and that downregulation of hnRNP A/B proteins in erythroblasts leads to activation of E16 inclusion. This paper demonstrates that positive regulation of E16 splicing can be mediated by Fox-2 or Fox-1, two closely related splicing factors that possess identical RNA recognition motifs. SELEX experiments with human Fox-1 revealed highly selective binding to the hexamer UGCAUG. Both Fox-1 and Fox-2 were able to bind the conserved UGCAUG elements in the proximal intron downstream of E16, and both could activate E16 splicing in HeLa cell co-transfection assays in a UGCAUG-dependent manner. Conversely, knockdown of Fox-2 expression, achieved with two different siRNA sequences resulted in decreased E16 splicing. Moreover, immunoblot experiments demonstrate mouse erythroblasts express Fox-2, but not Fox-1. These findings suggest that Fox-2 is a physiological activator of E16 splicing in differentiating erythroid cells in vivo. Recent experiments show that UGCAUG is present in the proximal intron sequence of many tissue-specific alternative exons, and we propose that the Fox family of splicing enhancers plays an important role in alternative splicing switches during differentiation in metazoan organisms.

  9. Adding In Silico Assessment of Potential Splice Aberration to the Integrated Evaluation of BRCA Gene Unclassified Variants.

    Vallée, Maxime P; Di Sera, Tonya L; Nix, David A; Paquette, Andrew M; Parsons, Michael T; Bell, Russel; Hoffman, Andrea; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Goldgar, David E; Spurdle, Amanda B; Tavtigian, Sean V

    2016-07-01

    Clinical mutation screening of the cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 generates many unclassified variants (UVs). Most of these UVs are either rare missense substitutions or nucleotide substitutions near the splice junctions of the protein coding exons. Previously, we developed a quantitative method for evaluation of BRCA gene UVs-the "integrated evaluation"-that combines a sequence analysis-based prior probability of pathogenicity with patient and/or tumor observational data to arrive at a posterior probability of pathogenicity. One limitation of the sequence analysis-based prior has been that it evaluates UVs from the perspective of missense substitution severity but not probability to disrupt normal mRNA splicing. Here, we calibrated output from the splice-site fitness program MaxEntScan to generate spliceogenicity-based prior probabilities of pathogenicity for BRCA gene variants; these range from 0.97 for variants with high probability to damage a donor or acceptor to 0.02 for exonic variants that do not impact a splice junction and are unlikely to create a de novo donor. We created a database http://priors.hci.utah.edu/PRIORS/ that provides the combined missense substitution severity and spliceogenicity-based probability of pathogenicity for BRCA gene single-nucleotide substitutions. We also updated the BRCA gene Ex-UV LOVD, available at http://hci-exlovd.hci.utah.edu, with 77 re-evaluable variants. PMID:26913838

  10. Exon array analysis of head and neck cancers identifies a hypoxia related splice variant of LAMA3 associated with a poor prognosis.

    Moller-Levet, Carla S; Betts, Guy N J; Harris, Adrian L; Homer, Jarrod J; West, Catharine M L; Miller, Crispin J

    2009-11-01

    The identification of alternatively spliced transcript variants specific to particular biological processes in tumours should increase our understanding of cancer. Hypoxia is an important factor in cancer biology, and associated splice variants may present new markers to help with planning treatment. A method was developed to analyse alternative splicing in exon array data, using probeset multiplicity to identify genes with changes in expression across their loci, and a combination of the splicing index and a new metric based on the variation of reliability weighted fold changes to detect changes in the splicing patterns. The approach was validated on a cancer/normal sample dataset in which alternative splicing events had been confirmed using RT-PCR. We then analysed ten head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using exon arrays and identified differentially expressed splice variants in five samples with high versus five with low levels of hypoxia-associated genes. The analysis identified a splice variant of LAMA3 (Laminin alpha 3), LAMA3-A, known to be involved in tumour cell invasion and progression. The full-length transcript of the gene (LAMA3-B) did not appear to be hypoxia-associated. The results were confirmed using qualitative RT-PCR. In a series of 59 prospectively collected head and neck tumours, expression of LAMA3-A had prognostic significance whereas LAMA3-B did not. This work illustrates the potential for alternatively spliced transcripts to act as biomarkers of disease prognosis with improved specificity for particular tissues or conditions over assays which do not discriminate between splice variants. PMID:19936049

  11. Exon array analysis of head and neck cancers identifies a hypoxia related splice variant of LAMA3 associated with a poor prognosis.

    Carla S Moller-Levet

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of alternatively spliced transcript variants specific to particular biological processes in tumours should increase our understanding of cancer. Hypoxia is an important factor in cancer biology, and associated splice variants may present new markers to help with planning treatment. A method was developed to analyse alternative splicing in exon array data, using probeset multiplicity to identify genes with changes in expression across their loci, and a combination of the splicing index and a new metric based on the variation of reliability weighted fold changes to detect changes in the splicing patterns. The approach was validated on a cancer/normal sample dataset in which alternative splicing events had been confirmed using RT-PCR. We then analysed ten head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using exon arrays and identified differentially expressed splice variants in five samples with high versus five with low levels of hypoxia-associated genes. The analysis identified a splice variant of LAMA3 (Laminin alpha 3, LAMA3-A, known to be involved in tumour cell invasion and progression. The full-length transcript of the gene (LAMA3-B did not appear to be hypoxia-associated. The results were confirmed using qualitative RT-PCR. In a series of 59 prospectively collected head and neck tumours, expression of LAMA3-A had prognostic significance whereas LAMA3-B did not. This work illustrates the potential for alternatively spliced transcripts to act as biomarkers of disease prognosis with improved specificity for particular tissues or conditions over assays which do not discriminate between splice variants.

  12. Splicing remodels messenger ribonucleoprotein architecture via eIF4A3-dependent and -independent recruitment of exon junction complex components.

    Zhang, Zuo; Krainer, Adrian R

    2007-07-10

    Pre-mRNA splicing not only removes introns and joins exons to generate spliced mRNA but also results in remodeling of the spliced messenger ribonucleoprotein, influencing various downstream events. This remodeling includes the loading of an exon-exon junction complex (EJC). It is unclear how the spliceosome recruits the EJC onto the mRNA and whether EJC formation or EJC components are required for pre-mRNA splicing. Here we immunodepleted the EJC core component eIF4A3 from HeLa cell nuclear extract and found that eIF4A3 is dispensable for pre-mRNA splicing in vitro. However, eIF4A3 is required for the splicing-dependent loading of the Y14/Magoh heterodimer onto mRNA, and this activity of human eIF4A3 is also present in the Drosophila ortholog. Surprisingly, the loading of six other EJC components was not affected by eIF4A3 depletion, suggesting that their binding to mRNA involves different or redundant pathways. Finally, we found that the assembly of the EJC onto mRNA occurs at the late stages of the splicing reaction and requires the second-step splicing and mRNA-release factor HRH1/hPrp22. The EJC-dependent and -independent recruitment of RNA-binding proteins onto mRNA suggests a role for the EJC in messenger ribonucleoprotein remodeling involving interactions with other proteins already bound to the pre-mRNA, which has implications for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and other mRNA transactions. PMID:17606899

  13. Thousands of exon skipping events differentiate among splicing patterns in sixteen human tissues [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2dl

    Liliana Florea

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is widely recognized for its roles in regulating genes and creating gene diversity. However, despite many efforts, the repertoire of gene splicing variation is still incompletely characterized, even in humans. Here we describe a new computational system, ASprofile, and its application to RNA-seq data from Illumina’s Human Body Map project (>2.5 billion reads.  Using the system, we identified putative alternative splicing events in 16 different human tissues, which provide a dynamic picture of splicing variation across the tissues. We detected 26,989 potential exon skipping events representing differences in splicing patterns among the tissues. A large proportion of the events (>60% were novel, involving new exons (~3000, new introns (~16000, or both. When tracing these events across the sixteen tissues, only a small number (4-7% appeared to be differentially expressed (‘switched’ between two tissues, while 30-45% showed little variation, and the remaining 50-65% were not present in one or both tissues compared.  Novel exon skipping events appeared to be slightly less variable than known events, but were more tissue-specific. Our study represents the first effort to build a comprehensive catalog of alternative splicing in normal human tissues from RNA-seq data, while providing insights into the role of alternative splicing in shaping tissue transcriptome differences. The catalog of events and the ASprofile software are freely available from the Zenodo repository (http://zenodo.org/record/7068; doi:10.5281/zenodo.7068 and from our web site http://ccb.jhu.edu/software/ASprofile.

  14. Exon Array Analysis using re-defined probe sets results in reliable identification of alternatively spliced genes in non-small cell lung cancer

    Gröne Jörn

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with novel targeted therapies is a major unmet clinical need. Alternative splicing is a mechanism which generates diverse protein products and is of functional relevance in cancer. Results In this study, a genome-wide analysis of the alteration of splicing patterns between lung cancer and normal lung tissue was performed. We generated an exon array data set derived from matched pairs of lung cancer and normal lung tissue including both the adenocarcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma subtypes. An enhanced workflow was developed to reliably detect differential splicing in an exon array data set. In total, 330 genes were found to be differentially spliced in non-small cell lung cancer compared to normal lung tissue. Microarray findings were validated with independent laboratory methods for CLSTN1, FN1, KIAA1217, MYO18A, NCOR2, NUMB, SLK, SYNE2, TPM1, (in total, 10 events and ADD3, which was analysed in depth. We achieved a high validation rate of 69%. Evidence was found that the activity of FOX2, the splicing factor shown to cause cancer-specific splicing patterns in breast and ovarian cancer, is not altered at the transcript level in several cancer types including lung cancer. Conclusions This study demonstrates how alternatively spliced genes can reliably be identified in a cancer data set. Our findings underline that key processes of cancer progression in NSCLC are affected by alternative splicing, which can be exploited in the search for novel targeted therapies.

  15. hnRNP H Is a Component of a Splicing Enhancer Complex That Activates a c-src Alternative Exon in Neuronal Cells

    Chou, Min-Yuan; Rooke, Nanette; Turck, Christoph W.; Black, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The regulation of the c-src N1 exon is mediated by an intronic splicing enhancer downstream of the N1 5′ splice site. Previous experiments showed that a set of proteins assembles onto the most conserved core of this enhancer sequence specifically in neuronal WERI-1 cell extracts. The most prominent components of this enhancer complex are the proteins hnRNP F, KSRP, and an unidentified protein of 58 kDa (p58). This p58 protein was purified from the WERI-1 cell nuclear extract by ammonium sulfa...

  16. Alternative-splicing in the exon-10 region of GABA(A receptor beta(2 subunit gene: relationships between novel isoforms and psychotic disorders.

    Cunyou Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in GABRB2, the gene for beta(2-subunit of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A receptor, have been associated with schizophrenia (SCZ and quantitatively correlated to mRNA expression and alternative splicing. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Expression of the Exon 10 region of GABRB2 from minigene constructs revealed this region to be an "alternative splicing hotspot" that readily gave rise to differently spliced isoforms depending on intron sequences. This led to a search in human brain cDNA libraries, and the discovery of two novel isoforms, beta(2S1 and beta(2S2, bearing variations in the neighborhood of Exon-10. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of postmortem brain samples showed increased beta(2S1 expression and decreased beta(2S2 expression in both SCZ and bipolar disorder (BPD compared to controls. Disease-control differences were significantly correlated with SNP rs187269 in BPD males for both beta(2S1 and beta(2S2 expressions, and significantly correlated with SNPs rs2546620 and rs187269 in SCZ males for beta(2S2 expression. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis indicated that Thr(365, a potential phosphorylation site in Exon-10, played a key role in determining the time profile of the ATP-dependent electrophysiological current run-down. CONCLUSION: This study therefore provided experimental evidence for the importance of non-coding sequences in the Exon-10 region in GABRB2 with respect to beta(2-subunit splicing diversity and the etiologies of SCZ and BPD.

  17. Glycolysis controls the induction of human regulatory T cells by modulating the expression of FOXP3 exon 2 splicing variants.

    De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Porcellini, Antonio; Colamatteo, Alessandra; Santopaolo, Marianna; Zuchegna, Candida; Romano, Antonella; De Simone, Salvatore; Procaccini, Claudio; La Rocca, Claudia; Carrieri, Pietro Biagio; Maniscalco, Giorgia Teresa; Salvetti, Marco; Buscarinu, Maria Chiara; Franzese, Adriana; Mozzillo, Enza; La Cava, Antonio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    Human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) that develop from conventional T cells (T(conv) cells) following suboptimal stimulation via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) (induced T(reg) cells (iT(reg) cells)) express the transcription factor Foxp3, are suppressive, and display an active proliferative and metabolic state. Here we found that the induction and suppressive function of iT(reg) cells tightly depended on glycolysis, which controlled Foxp3 splicing variants containing exon 2 (Foxp3-E2) through the glycolytic enzyme enolase-1. The Foxp3-E2-related suppressive activity of iT(reg) cells was altered in human autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, and was associated with impaired glycolysis and signaling via interleukin 2. This link between glycolysis and Foxp3-E2 variants via enolase-1 shows a previously unknown mechanism for controlling the induction and function of T(reg) cells in health and in autoimmunity. PMID:26414764

  18. The exon junction complex regulates the splicing of cell polarity gene dlg1 to control Wingless signaling in development

    Liu, Min; Li, Yajuan; Liu, Aiguo; Li, Ruifeng; Su, Ying; Du, Juan; Li, Cheng; Zhu, Alan Jian

    2016-01-01

    Wingless (Wg)/Wnt signaling is conserved in all metazoan animals and plays critical roles in development. The Wg/Wnt morphogen reception is essential for signal activation, whose activity is mediated through the receptor complex and a scaffold protein Dishevelled (Dsh). We report here that the exon junction complex (EJC) activity is indispensable for Wg signaling by maintaining an appropriate level of Dsh protein for Wg ligand reception in Drosophila. Transcriptome analyses in Drosophila wing imaginal discs indicate that the EJC controls the splicing of the cell polarity gene discs large 1 (dlg1), whose coding protein directly interacts with Dsh. Genetic and biochemical experiments demonstrate that Dlg1 protein acts independently from its role in cell polarity to protect Dsh protein from lysosomal degradation. More importantly, human orthologous Dlg protein is sufficient to promote Dvl protein stabilization and Wnt signaling activity, thus revealing a conserved regulatory mechanism of Wg/Wnt signaling by Dlg and EJC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17200.001 PMID:27536874

  19. Modulation of mdm2 pre-mRNA splicing by 9-aminoacridine-PNA (peptide nucleic acid) conjugates targeting intron-exon junctions

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Eysturskard, Jonhard; Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Modulation of pre-mRNA splicing by antisense molecules is a promising mechanism of action for gene therapeutic drugs. In this study, we have examined the potential of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) 9-aminoacridine conjugates to modulate the pre-mRNA splicing of the mdm2 human...... cancer gene in JAR cells. METHODS: We screened 10 different 15 mer PNAs targeting intron2 at both the 5;- and the 3;-splice site for their effects on the splicing of mdm2 using RT-PCR analysis. We also tested a PNA (2512) targeting the 3;-splice site of intron3 with a complementarity of 4 bases to intron......3 and 11 bases to exon4 for its splicing modulation effect. This PNA2512 was further tested for the effects on the mdm2 protein level as well as for inhibition of cell growth in combination with the DNA damaging agent camptothecin (CPT). RESULTS: We show that several of these PNAs effectively...

  20. Single base mutation in the proα2(I) collagen gene that causes efficient splicing of RNA from exon 27 to exon 29 and synthesis of a shortened but in-frame proα2(I) chain

    Previous observations demonstrated that a lethal variant of osteogenesis imperfecta had two altered alleles for proα2(I) chains of type I procollagen. One mutation produced a nonfunctioning allele in that there was synthesis of mRNA but no detectable synthesis of proα2(I) chains from the allele. The mutation in the other allele caused synthesis of shortened proα2(I) chains that lacked most or all of the 18 amino acids encoded by exon 28. Subclones of the proα2(I) gene were prepared from the proband's DNA and the DNA sequence was determined for a 582-base-pair (bp) region that extended from the last 30 bp of intervening sequence 26 to the first 26 bp of intervening sequence 29. Data from six independent subclones demonstrated that all had the same sequence as a previously isolated normal clone for the proα2(I) gene except that four subclones had a single base mutation at the 3' end of intervening sequence 27. The mutation was a substitution of guanine for adenine that changed the universal consensus sequence for the 3' splicing site of RNA from -AG- to -GG-. S1 nuclease experiments demonstrated that about half the proα2(I) mRNA in the proband's fibroblasts was abnormally spliced and that the major species of abnormal proα2(I) mRNA was completely spliced from the last codon of exon 27 to the first codon of exon 29. The mutation is apparently unique among RNA splicing mutations of mammalian systems in producing a shortened polypeptide chain that is in-frame in terms of coding sequences, that is used in the subunit assembly of a protein, and that contributes to a lethal phenotype

  1. Optional exon in the 5'-untranslated region of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase gene: conserved sequence and splicing pattern in humans and hamsters

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase (hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase, EC 4.1.3.5) is a negatively regulated enzyme in the synthetic pathway for cholesterol, isopentenyl tRNA, and other isoprenoids. The 5'-untranslated region of the mRNA for Chinese hamster hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase contains an optional exon of 59 nucleotides located 10 nucleotides upstream of the translation start site. About 50% of the mRNAs contain this exon, and the other 50% lack it owing to differential intron splicing. The authors show that the two transcripts are found in similar ratios in multiple tissues of the Syrian hamster, including the brain. The relative amounts of the two transcripts in brain and liver are constant from day 0 to day 75 of life. A similar alternative splicing pattern for hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase was observed in three human tissues: cultured fibroblasts, fetal adrenal gland, and fetal liver. A cDNA for human synthase had 90% homology to the hamster sequence in the region corresponding to the optional exon. This sequence contains a 20 out of 26 nucleotide match with the sequence immediately upstream of the initiator AUG codon in the mRNA for hamster hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase, the enzyme that follows the synthase in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. These findings raise the possibility that the optional exon plays an important, conserved functional role in humans and hamsters

  2. Interplay between DMD point mutations and splicing signals in Dystrophinopathy phenotypes.

    Jonàs Juan-Mateu

    Full Text Available DMD nonsense and frameshift mutations lead to severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy while in-frame mutations lead to milder Becker muscular dystrophy. Exceptions are found in 10% of cases and the production of alternatively spliced transcripts is considered a key modifier of disease severity. Several exonic mutations have been shown to induce exon-skipping, while splice site mutations result in exon-skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites. However, factors determining the splicing pathway are still unclear. Point mutations provide valuable information regarding the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and elements defining exon identity in the DMD gene. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of 98 point mutations related to clinical phenotype and their effect on muscle mRNA and dystrophin expression. Aberrant splicing was found in 27 mutations due to alteration of splice sites or splicing regulatory elements. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to test the ability of the available algorithms to predict consequences on mRNA and to investigate the major factors that determine the splicing pathway in mutations affecting splicing signals. Our findings suggest that the splicing pathway is highly dependent on the interplay between splice site strength and density of regulatory elements.

  3. The human decorin gene: Intron-exon organization, discovery of two alternatively spliced exons in the 5[prime] untralsated region, and mapping of the gene to chromosome 12q23

    Danielson, K.G.; Fazzio, A.; Cohen, I.; Cannizzaro, L.A.; Eichstetter, I.; Iozzo, R.V. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Decorin is a chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan expressed by most vascular and avascular connective tissues and, because of its ability to interact with collagen and growth factors, has been implicated in the control of matrix assembly and cellular growth. To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in regulating its tissue expression, we have isolated a number of genomic clones encoding the complete decorin gene. The human decorin gene spans over 38 kb of continuous DNA sequence and contains eight exons and very large introns, two of which are 5.4 and > 13.2 kb. We have discovered two alternatively spliced leader exons, exons Ia and Ib, in the 5[prime] untranslated region. These exons were identified by cloning and sequencing cDNAs obtained by polymerase chain reaction amplification of a fibroblast cDNA library. Using Northern blotting or reverse transcriptase PCR, we detected the two leader exons in a variety of mRNAs isolated from human cell lines and tissues. Interestingly, sequences highly (74-87%) homologous to exons Ia and lb are found in the 5[prime]untranslated region of avian and bovine decorin, respectively. This high degree of conservation among species suggests regulatory functions for these leader exons. In the 3' untranslated region there are several polyadenylation sites, and at least two of these sites could give rise to the transcripts of [approx]1.6 and [approx]1.9 kb, typically detected in a variety of tissues and cells. Using a genomic clone as the labeled probe and in situ hybridization of human metaphase chromosomes, we have mapped the decorin gene to the discrete region of human chromosome 12q23. This sturdy provides the molecular basis for discerning the transcriptional control of the decorin gene and offers the opportunity to investigate genetic disorders linked to this important human gene. 57 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Inverse splicing of a group II intron.

    Jarrell, K A

    1993-01-01

    I describe the self-splicing of an RNA that consists of exon sequences flanked by group II intron sequences. I find that this RNA undergoes accurate splicing in vitro, yielding an excised exon circle. This splicing reaction involves the joining of the 5' splice site at the end of an exon to the 3' splice site at the beginning of the same exon; thus, I term it inverse splicing. Inverse splicing provides a potential mechanism for exon scrambling, for exon deletion in alternative splicing pathwa...

  5. A five' splice-region G → C mutation in exon 1 of the human β-globin gene inhibits pre-mRNA splicing: A mechanism for β+-thalassemia

    The authors have characterized a Mediterranean β-thalassemia allele containing a sequence change at codon 30 that alters both β-globin pre-mRNA splicing and the structure of the homoglobin product. Presumably, this G → C transversion at position -1 of intron 1 reduces severely the utilization of the normal 5' splice site since the level of the Arg → Thr mutant hemoglobin (designated hemoglobin Kairouan) found in the erythrocytes of the patient is very low (2% of total hemoglobin). Since no natural mutations of the guanine located at position -1 of the CAG/GTAAGT consensus sequence had been isolated previously. They investigated the role of this nucleotide in the constitution of an active 5' splice site by studying the splicing of the pre-mRNA in cell-free extracts. They demonstrate that correct splicing of the mutant pre-mRNA is 98% inhibited. Their results provide further insights into the mechanisms of pre-mRNA maturation by revealing that the last residue of the exon plays a role at least equivalent to that of the intron residue at position +5

  6. Differential detection of alternatively spliced variants of Ciz1 in normal and cancer cells using a custom exon-junction microarray

    Ciz1 promotes initiation of mammalian DNA replication and is present within nuclear matrix associated DNA replication factories. Depletion of Ciz1 from normal and cancer cells restrains entry to S phase and inhibits cell proliferation. Several alternative splicing events with putative functional consequences have been identified and reported, but many more variants are predicted to exist based on publicly available mRNAs and expressed sequence tags. Here we report the development and validation of a custom exon and exon-junction microarray focused on the human CIZ1 gene, capable of reproducible detection of differential splice-variant expression. Using a pair of paediatric cancer cell lines and a pool of eight normal lines as reference, the array identified expected and novel CIZ1 splicing events. One novel variant (delta 8-12) that encodes a predicted protein lacking key functional sites, was validated by quantitative RT-PCR and found to be over-represented in a range of other cancer cell lines, and over half of a panel of primary lung tumours. Expression of CIZ1 delta 8-12 appears to be restricted to cancer cells, and may therefore be a useful novel biomarker

  7. Fibrillin binds calcium and is coded by cDNAs that reveal a multidomain structure and alternatively spliced exons at the 5[prime] end

    Corson, G.M.; Chalberg, S.C.; Charbonneau, N.L.; Sakai, L.Y. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (United States)); Dietz, H.C. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Fibrillin is an important structural protein of the extracellular matrix. It is a large cysteine-rich glycoprotein with extensive intrachain disulfide bonds, likely contributed by multiple EGF-like repeats. The authors have previously published 6.9 kb of FBN1 cDNA sequence. FBN1 cDNA clones that extend the sequence 3089 bp in the 5[prime] direction are described in this report. The deduced primary structure suggests that fibrillin in composed of multiple domains. The most predominant features the presence of 43 calcium binding EGF-like repeats. They demonstrate here that fibrillin molecules bind calcium. In addition, three alternatively spliced exons at the 5[prime] end are described. Analysis of 5.8 kb of surrounding genomic sequence revealed a 1.8-kb CpG island spanning the alternatively spliced exons and the next downstream exon. Since FBN1 is the gene responsible for Marfan syndrome, the information presented here will be useful in identifying new mutations and in understanding the function of fibrillin in the pathogenesis of the disease. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Cyclin D1 splice site variant triggers chromosomal aberrations in healthy humans

    Hemminki, K.; Mušák, L.; Vymetálková, Veronika; Šmerhovský, Z.; Halásová, E.; Osina, O.; Letková, L.; Försti, A.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Buchancová, J.; Vodička, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 3 (2014), s. 721-722. ISSN 0887-6924 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : chromosomal aberrations * DNA repair Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 10.431, year: 2014

  9. Cross-kingdom patterns of alternative splicing and splice recognition

    Pearson, Matthew D.; McGuire, Abigail M; Neafsey, Daniel Edward; Galagan, James E.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Variations in transcript splicing can reveal how eukaryotes recognize intronic splice sites. Retained introns (RIs) commonly appear when the intron definition (ID) mechanism of splice site recognition inconsistently identifies intron-exon boundaries, and cassette exons (CEs) are often caused by variable recognition of splice junctions by the exon definition (ED) mechanism. We have performed a comprehensive survey of alternative splicing across 42 eukaryotes to gain ins...

  10. Modified Cav1.4 Expression in the Cacna1fnob2 Mouse Due to Alternative Splicing of an ETn Inserted in Exon 2

    Doering, Clinton J.; Rehak, Renata; Bonfield, Stephan; Peloquin, Jean B.; Stell, William K.; Mema, Silvina C.; Sauvé, Yves; McRory, John E.

    2008-01-01

    The Cacna1fnob2 mouse is reported to be a naturally occurring null mutation for the Cav1.4 calcium channel gene and the phenotype of this mouse is not identical to that of the targeted gene knockout model. We found two mRNA species in the Cacna1fnob2 mouse: approximately 90% of the mRNA represents a transcript with an in-frame stop codon within exon 2 of CACNA1F, while approximately 10% of the mRNA represents a transcript in which alternative splicing within the ETn element has removed the st...

  11. Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II.

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the IDS gene, including exonic alterations associated with aberrant splicing. In the present work, cell-based splicing assays were performed to study the effects of two splicing mutations in exon 3 of IDS, i.e., c.241C>T and c.257C>T, whose presence activates a cryptic splice site in exon 3 and one in exon 8, i.e., c.1122C>T that despite being a synonymous mutation is responsible for the creation of a new splice site in exon 8 leading to a transcript shorter than usual. Mutant minigene analysis and overexpression assays revealed that SRSF2 and hnRNP E1 might be involved in the use and repression of the constitutive 3' splice site of exon 3 respectively. For the c.1122C>T the use of antisense therapy to correct the splicing defect was explored, but transfection of patient fibroblasts with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (n=3) and a locked nucleic acid failed to abolish the abnormal transcript; indeed, it resulted in the appearance of yet another aberrant splicing product. Interestingly, the oligonucleotides transfection in control fibroblasts led to the appearance of the aberrant transcript observed in patients' cells after treatment, which shows that the oligonucleotides are masking an important cis-acting element for 5' splice site regulation of exon 8. These results highlight the importance of functional studies for understanding the pathogenic consequences of mis-splicing and highlight the difficulty in developing antisense therapies involving gene regions under complex splicing regulation. PMID:26407519

  12. Correction of tau mis-splicing caused by FTDP-17 MAPT mutations by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing

    Rodriguez-Martin, Teresa; Anthony, Karen; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.; Mansfield, S. Gary; Anderton, Brian H.; Gallo, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) is caused by mutations in the MAPT gene, encoding the tau protein that accumulates in intraneuronal lesions in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Several FTDP-17 mutations affect alternative splicing and result in excess exon 10 (E10) inclusion in tau mRNA. RNA reprogramming using spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing (SMaRT) could be a method of choice to correct aberrant E10 splicing resulting from FTDP-17 mu...

  13. Aberrant splicing of androgenic receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symtpoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. The authors report a G → T mutation in the splice donor site of intron 4 of the androgen receptor gene of a 46, XY subject lacking detectable androgen binding to the receptor and with the complete form of androgen insensitivity. This point mutation completely abolishes normal RNA splicing at the exon 4/intron 4 boundary and results in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site in exon 4, which leads to the deletion of 123 nucleotides from the mRNA. Translation of the mutant mRNA results in an androgen receptor protein ∼5 kDa smaller than the wild type. This mutated androgen receptor protein was unable to bind androgens and unable to activate transcription of an androgen-regulated reporter gene construct. This mutation in the human androgen receptor gene demonstrates the importance of an intact steroid-binding domain for proper androgen receptor functioning in vivo

  14. Gene structure for the α1 chain of a human short-chain collagen (type XIII) with alternatively spliced transcripts and translation termination codon at the 5' end of the last exon

    Two overlapping human genomic clones that encode a short-chain collagen, designated α1(XIII), were isolated by using recently described cDNA clones. Characterization of the cosmid clones that span ∼ 65,000 base pairs (bp) of the 3' end of the gene established several unusual features of this collagen gene. The last exon encodes solely the 3' untranslated region and it begins with a complete stop codon. The 10 adjacent exons vary in size from 27 to 87 bp and two of them are 54 bp. Therefore, the α1-chain gene of type XIII collagen has some features found in genes for fibrillar collagens but other features that are distinctly different. Previous analysis of overlapping cDNA clones and nuclease S1 mapping of mRNAs indicated one alternative splicing site causing a deletion of 36 bp from the mature mRNA. The present study showed that the 36 bp is contained within the gene as a single exon and also that the gene has a 45-bp -Gly-Xaa-Xaa- repeat coding exon not found in the cDNA clones previously characterized. Nuclease S1 mapping experiments indicated that this 45-bp exon is found in normal human skin fibroblast mRNAs. Accordingly, the data demonstrate that there is alternative splicing of at least two exons of the type α1(XIII)-chain gene

  15. A novel synonymous mutation in the MPZ gene causing an aberrant splicing pattern and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1b.

    Corrado, L; Magri, S; Bagarotti, A; Carecchio, M; Piscosquito, G; Pareyson, D; Varrasi, C; Vecchio, D; Zonta, A; Cantello, R; Taroni, F; D'Alfonso, S

    2016-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy with a heterogeneous genetic background. Here, we describe two CMT1B families with a mild sensory-motor neuropathy and a novel synonymous variant (c.309G > T, p.G103G) in exon 3 of the MPZ gene. Next generation sequencing analysis on a 94 CMT gene panel showed no mutations in other disease genes. In vitro splicing assay and mRNA expression analysis indicated that the c.309T variant enhances a cryptic donor splice site at position c.304 resulting in the markedly increased expression of the r.304_448del alternative transcript in patients' cells. This transcript is predicted to encode a truncated P0 protein (p.V102Cfs11*) lacking the transmembrane domain, thus suggesting a possible haploinsufficiency mechanism for this mutation. This is the third reported synonymous MPZ variant associated with CMT1 and affecting splicing. These data confirm the functional impact of synonymous variants on MPZ splicing and their possible role as disease-causing mutations rather than silent polymorphisms. PMID:27344971

  16. Modified Ca(v1.4 expression in the Cacna1f(nob2 mouse due to alternative splicing of an ETn inserted in exon 2.

    Clinton J Doering

    Full Text Available The Cacna1f(nob2 mouse is reported to be a naturally occurring null mutation for the Ca(v1.4 calcium channel gene and the phenotype of this mouse is not identical to that of the targeted gene knockout model. We found two mRNA species in the Cacna1f(nob2 mouse: approximately 90% of the mRNA represents a transcript with an in-frame stop codon within exon 2 of CACNA1F, while approximately 10% of the mRNA represents a transcript in which alternative splicing within the ETn element has removed the stop codon. This latter mRNA codes for full length Ca(v1.4 protein, detectable by Western blot analysis that is predicted to differ from wild type Ca(v1.4 protein in a region of approximately 22 amino acids in the N-terminal portion of the protein. Electrophysiological analysis with either mouse Ca(v1.4(wt or Ca(v1.4(nob2 cDNA revealed that the alternatively spliced protein does not differ from wild type with respect to activation and inactivation characteristics; however, while the wild type N-terminus interacted with filamin proteins in a biochemical pull-down experiment, the alternatively spliced N-terminus did not. The Cacna1f(nob2 mouse electroretinogram displayed reduced b-wave and oscillatory potential amplitudes, and the retina was morphologically disorganized, with substantial reduction in thickness of the outer plexiform layer and sprouting of bipolar cell dendrites ectopically into the outer nuclear layer. Nevertheless, the spatial contrast sensitivity (optokinetic response of Cacna1f(nob2 mice was generally similar to that of wild type mice. These results suggest the Cacna1f(nob2 mouse is not a CACNA1F knockout model. Rather, alternative splicing within the ETn element can lead to full-length Ca(v1.4 protein, albeit at reduced levels, and the functional Ca(v1.4 mutant may be incapable of interacting with cytoskeletal filamin proteins. These changes, do not alter the ability of the Cacna1f(nob2 mouse to detect and follow moving sine-wave gratings

  17. A novel point mutation (G-1 to T) in a 5' splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Hagiwara, Y; Nishio, H; Kitoh, Y; Takeshima, Y; Narita, N; Wada, H; Yokoyama, M.; Nakamura, H; Matsuo, M.

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. We now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5' splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipp...

  18. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA.

    Munroe, Stephen H; Morales, Christopher H; Duyck, Tessa H; Waters, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα) codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3' end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30) located downstream of the alternative 3'splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3'UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing. PMID:26368571

  19. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA.

    Stephen H Munroe

    Full Text Available The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3' end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30 located downstream of the alternative 3'splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3'UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing.

  20. Classifying MLH1 and MSH2 variants using bioinformatic prediction, splicing assays, segregation, and tumor characteristics.

    Arnold, Sven; Buchanan, Daniel D; Barker, Melissa; Jaskowski, Lesley; Walsh, Michael D; Birney, Genevieve; Woods, Michael O; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Brown, Melissa A; Tavtigian, Sean V; Goldgar, David E; Young, Joanne P; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2009-05-01

    Reliable methods for predicting functional consequences of variants in disease genes would be beneficial in the clinical setting. This study was undertaken to predict, and confirm in vitro, splicing aberrations associated with mismatch repair (MMR) variants identified in familial colon cancer patients. Six programs were used to predict the effect of 13 MLH1 and 6 MSH2 gene variants on pre-mRNA splicing. mRNA from cycloheximide-treated lymphoblastoid cell lines of variant carriers was screened for splicing aberrations. Tumors of variant carriers were tested for microsatellite instability and MMR protein expression. Variant segregation in families was assessed using Bayes factor causality analysis. Amino acid alterations were examined for evolutionary conservation and physicochemical properties. Splicing aberrations were detected for 10 variants, including a frameshift as a minor cDNA product, and altered ratio of known alternate splice products. Loss of splice sites was well predicted by splice-site prediction programs SpliceSiteFinder (90%) and NNSPLICE (90%), but consequence of splice site loss was less accurately predicted. No aberrations correlated with ESE predictions for the nine exonic variants studied. Seven of eight missense variants had normal splicing (88%), but only one was a substitution considered neutral from evolutionary/physicochemical analysis. Combined with information from tumor and segregation analysis, and literature review, 16 of 19 variants were considered clinically relevant. Bioinformatic tools for prediction of splicing aberrations need improvement before use without supporting studies to assess variant pathogenicity. Classification of mismatch repair gene variants is assisted by a comprehensive approach that includes in vitro, tumor pathology, clinical, and evolutionary conservation data. PMID:19267393

  1. Oxidative Stress Triggers Body-Wide Skipping of Multiple Exons of the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Gene

    Seo, Joonbae; Singh, Natalia N.; Ottesen, Eric W.; Sivanesan, Senthilkumar; Shishimorova, Maria; Singh, Ravindra N.

    2016-01-01

    Humans carry two nearly identical copies of Survival Motor Neuron gene: SMN1 and SMN2. Loss of SMN1 leads to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the most frequent genetic cause of infant mortality. While SMN2 cannot compensate for the loss of SMN1 due to predominant skipping of exon 7, correction of SMN2 exon 7 splicing holds the promise of a cure for SMA. Previously, we used cell-based models coupled with a multi-exon-skipping detection assay (MESDA) to demonstrate the vulnerability of SMN2 exons to aberrant splicing under the conditions of oxidative stress (OS). Here we employ a transgenic mouse model and MESDA to examine the OS-induced splicing regulation of SMN2 exons. We induced OS using paraquat that is known to trigger production of reactive oxygen species and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We show an overwhelming co-skipping of SMN2 exon 5 and exon 7 under OS in all tissues except testis. We also show that OS increases skipping of SMN2 exon 3 in all tissues except testis. We uncover several new SMN2 splice isoforms expressed at elevated levels under the conditions of OS. We analyze cis-elements and transacting factors to demonstrate the diversity of mechanisms for splicing misregulation under OS. Our results of proteome analysis reveal downregulation of hnRNP H as one of the potential consequences of OS in brain. Our findings suggest SMN2 as a sensor of OS with implications to SMA and other diseases impacted by low levels of SMN protein. PMID:27111068

  2. Oxidative Stress Triggers Body-Wide Skipping of Multiple Exons of the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Gene.

    Joonbae Seo

    Full Text Available Humans carry two nearly identical copies of Survival Motor Neuron gene: SMN1 and SMN2. Loss of SMN1 leads to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, the most frequent genetic cause of infant mortality. While SMN2 cannot compensate for the loss of SMN1 due to predominant skipping of exon 7, correction of SMN2 exon 7 splicing holds the promise of a cure for SMA. Previously, we used cell-based models coupled with a multi-exon-skipping detection assay (MESDA to demonstrate the vulnerability of SMN2 exons to aberrant splicing under the conditions of oxidative stress (OS. Here we employ a transgenic mouse model and MESDA to examine the OS-induced splicing regulation of SMN2 exons. We induced OS using paraquat that is known to trigger production of reactive oxygen species and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We show an overwhelming co-skipping of SMN2 exon 5 and exon 7 under OS in all tissues except testis. We also show that OS increases skipping of SMN2 exon 3 in all tissues except testis. We uncover several new SMN2 splice isoforms expressed at elevated levels under the conditions of OS. We analyze cis-elements and transacting factors to demonstrate the diversity of mechanisms for splicing misregulation under OS. Our results of proteome analysis reveal downregulation of hnRNP H as one of the potential consequences of OS in brain. Our findings suggest SMN2 as a sensor of OS with implications to SMA and other diseases impacted by low levels of SMN protein.

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of aryl-naloxamide opiate analgesics targeting truncated exon 11-associated mu opioid receptor (MOR-1) splice variants

    Majumdar, Susruta; Subrath, Joan; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Polikar, Lisa; Burgman, Maxim; Nagakura, Kuni; Ocampo, Julie; Haselton, Nathan; Pasternak, Anna R.; Grinnell, Steven; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2012-01-01

    3-Iodobenzoylnaltrexamide 1 (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic acting through a novel receptor target that lack many side-effects of traditional opiates composed, in part, of exon 11-associated truncated six transmembrane domain MOR-1 (6TM/E11) splice variants. To better understand the SAR of this drug target, a number of 4,5-epoxymorphinan analogs were synthesized. Results show the importance of a free 3-phenolic group, a phenyl ring at the 6 position, an iodine at the 3′ or 4′ position of the phenyl ring and an N-allyl or c-propylmethyl group to maintain high 6TM/E11 affinity and activity. 3-Iodobenzoylnaloxamide 15 (IBNalA) with a N-allyl group displayed lower delta opioid receptor affinity than its naltrexamine analog, was 10-fold more potent an analgesic than morphine, elicited no respiratory depression or physical dependence and only limited inhibition of gastrointestinal transit. Thus, the aryl-naloxamide scaffold can generate a potent analgesic acting through the 6TM/E11 sites with advantageous side-effect profile and greater selectivity. PMID:22734622

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of aryl-naloxamide opiate analgesics targeting truncated exon 11-associated μ opioid receptor (MOR-1) splice variants.

    Majumdar, Susruta; Subrath, Joan; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Polikar, Lisa; Burgman, Maxim; Nagakura, Kuni; Ocampo, Julie; Haselton, Nathan; Pasternak, Anna R; Grinnell, Steven; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2012-07-26

    3-Iodobenzoylnaltrexamide 1 (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic acting through a novel receptor target that lack many side-effects of traditional opiates composed, in part, of exon 11-associated truncated six transmembrane domain MOR-1 (6TM/E11) splice variants. To better understand the SAR of this drug target, a number of 4,5-epoxymorphinan analogues were synthesized. Results show the importance of a free 3-phenolic group, a phenyl ring at the 6 position, an iodine at the 3'or 4' position of the phenyl ring, and an N-allyl or c-propylmethyl group to maintain high 6TM/E11 affinity and activity. 3-Iodobenzoylnaloxamide 15 (IBNalA) with a N-allyl group displayed lower δ opioid receptor affinity than its naltrexamine analogue, was 10-fold more potent an analgesic than morphine, elicited no respiratory depression or physical dependence, and only limited inhibition of gastrointestinal transit. Thus, the aryl-naloxamide scaffold can generate a potent analgesic acting through the 6TM/E11 sites with advantageous side-effect profile and greater selectivity. PMID:22734622

  5. PNA-mediated modulation and redirection of Her-2 pre-mRNA splicing: specific skipping of erbB-2 exon 19 coding for the ATP catalytic domain

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Nielsen, Birgit N; Shiraishi, Takehiko;

    2010-01-01

    The Her-2 receptor coded for by the proto-oncogenic erbB-2 gene is a clinically validated target for treatment of a significant genetic subclass of breast cancers, and Her-2 is also overexpressed or mutated in a range of other cancers. In an approach to exploit antisense mediated splicing...... oligomers that specifically induce skipping of exon 19 as this exon is coding for the ATP catalytic domain of Her-2, and if expressed such truncated version of the Her-2 protein should be functionally inactive in a dominant negative fashion. Therefore, antisense compounds having efficient erbB-2 exon 19...... skipping activity could be very interesting in terms of drug discovery. In the present study we identified PNA oligomers having such activity in SK-BR-3 and HeLa cancer cells in culture....

  6. Functional diversity of human basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor TCF4 isoforms generated by alternative 5' exon usage and splicing.

    Mari Sepp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factor 4 (TCF4 alias ITF2, E2-2, ME2 or SEF2 is a ubiquitous class A basic helix-loop-helix protein that binds to E-box DNA sequences (CANNTG. While involved in the development and functioning of many different cell types, recent studies point to important roles for TCF4 in the nervous system. Specifically, human TCF4 gene is implicated in susceptibility to schizophrenia and TCF4 haploinsufficiency is the cause of the Pitt-Hopkins mental retardation syndrome. However, the structure, expression and coding potential of the human TCF4 gene have not been described in detail. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we used human tissue samples to characterize human TCF4 gene structure and TCF4 expression at mRNA and protein level. We report that although widely expressed, human TCF4 mRNA expression is particularly high in the brain. We demonstrate that usage of numerous 5' exons of the human TCF4 gene potentially yields in TCF4 protein isoforms with 18 different N-termini. In addition, the diversity of isoforms is increased by alternative splicing of several internal exons. For functional characterization of TCF4 isoforms, we overexpressed individual isoforms in cultured human cells. Our analysis revealed that subcellular distribution of TCF4 isoforms is differentially regulated: Some isoforms contain a bipartite nuclear localization signal and are exclusively nuclear, whereas distribution of other isoforms relies on heterodimerization partners. Furthermore, the ability of different TCF4 isoforms to regulate E-box controlled reporter gene transcription is varied depending on whether one or both of the two TCF4 transcription activation domains are present in the protein. Both TCF4 activation domains are able to activate transcription independently, but act synergistically in combination. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, in this study we have described the inter-tissue variability of TCF4 expression in human and provided evidence

  7. Conserved RNA secondary structures promote alternative splicing

    Shepard, PJ; Hertel, KJ

    2008-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is carried out by the spliceosome, which identifies exons and removes intervening introns. Alternative splicing in higher eukaryotes results in the generation of multiple protein isoforms from gene transcripts. The extensive alternative splicing observed implies a flexibility of the spliceosome to identify exons within a given pre-mRNA. To reach this flexibility, splice-site selection in higher eukaryotes has evolved to depend on multiple parameters such as splice-site stren...

  8. ExonMiner: Web service for analysis of GeneChip Exon array data

    Imoto Seiya; Saito Ayumu; Nagasaki Masao; Yoshida Ryo; Numata Kazuyuki; Miyano Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Some splicing isoform-specific transcriptional regulations are related to disease. Therefore, detection of disease specific splice variations is the first step for finding disease specific transcriptional regulations. Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array can measure exon-level expression profiles that are suitable to find differentially expressed exons in genome-wide scale. However, exon array produces massive datasets that are more than we can handle and analyze on personal...

  9. BAP1 missense mutation c.2054 A>T (p.E685V completely disrupts normal splicing through creation of a novel 5' splice site in a human mesothelioma cell line.

    Arianne Morrison

    Full Text Available BAP1 is a tumor suppressor gene that is lost or deleted in diverse cancers, including uveal mela¬noma, malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM, clear cell renal carcinoma, and cholangiocarcinoma. Recently, BAP1 germline mutations have been reported in families with combinations of these same cancers. A particular challenge for mutation screening is the classification of non-truncating BAP1 sequence variants because it is not known whether these subtle changes can affect the protein function sufficiently to predispose to cancer development. Here we report mRNA splicing analysis on a homozygous substitution mutation, BAP1 c. 2054 A&T (p.Glu685Val, identified in an MPM cell line derived from a mesothelioma patient. The mutation occurred at the 3rd nucleotide from the 3' end of exon 16. RT-PCR, cloning and subsequent sequencing revealed several aberrant splicing products not observed in the controls: 1 a 4 bp deletion at the end of exon 16 in all clones derived from the major splicing product. The BAP1 c. 2054 A&T mutation introduced a new 5' splice site (GU, which resulted in the deletion of 4 base pairs and presumably protein truncation; 2 a variety of alternative splicing products that led to retention of different introns: introns 14-16; introns 15-16; intron 14 and intron 16; 3 partial intron 14 and 15 retentions caused by activation of alternative 3' splice acceptor sites (AG in the introns. Taken together, we were unable to detect any correctly spliced mRNA transcripts in this cell line. These results suggest that aberrant splicing caused by this mutation is quite efficient as it completely abolishes normal splicing through creation of a novel 5' splice site and activation of cryptic splice sites. These data support the conclusion that BAP1 c.2054 A&T (p.E685V variant is a pathogenic mutation and contributes to MPM through disruption of normal splicing.

  10. Prediction of Alternative Splicing of Exons Based on Multi-features Fusion%基于特征融合的选择性剪切外显子预测*

    袁芳; 范金坪

    2014-01-01

    基因在转录的过程中,mRNA前体常常会经过一个选择性剪切的过程,它包括多种选择性剪切形式。选择性剪切的鉴别在生命科学的研究和医学上都有重要意义。由于选择性剪切的内在限制,同类的预测选择性剪切的模型或者算法只能预测出特殊的选择性剪切事件的类别。本文在研究序列本身特征的基础上,考虑了碱基的保守性,并结合支持向量机建立的预测模型对选择性剪切外显子进行预测。性能测试结果显示,相比同类预测模型该方法在性能方面有了一定提高。%Lternative splicing is a regulated process during gene expression that results in a single gene coding for multi‐ple proteins .Identification of alternative splicing has important significance in the study of life and medical science .Due to the inherent limitations of alternative splicing ,the existing method of predicting alternative splicing can only suit for special alternative splicing cases .Here ,in addition to sequence inherent characteristics ,the nucleotide conservation is studied based on the characteristics .Combined with support vector machine ,a new model is established to predict the alternative splicing of exon .And ,the test results show that the performance of CDGMiner is satisfactory .

  11. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  12. Factor IX[sub Madrid 2]: A deletion/insertion in Facotr IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site

    Solera, J. (Unidades de Genetica Molecular, Madrid (Spain)); Magallon, M.; Martin-Villar, J. (Hemofilia Hospital, Madrid (Spain)); Coloma, A. (Departamento deBioquimica de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad Autonoma, Madrid (Spain))

    1992-02-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5[prime] end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3[prime] end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment.

  13. SAW: A Method to Identify Splicing Events from RNA-Seq Data Based on Splicing Fingerprints

    Kang Ning; Damian Fermin

    2010-01-01

    Splicing event identification is one of the most important issues in the comprehensive analysis of transcription profile. Recent development of next-generation sequencing technology has generated an extensive profile of alternative splicing. However, while many of these splicing events are between exons that are relatively close on genome sequences, reads generated by RNA-Seq are not limited to alternative splicing between close exons but occur in virtually all splicing events. In this work, ...

  14. Improved antisense oligonucleotide design to suppress aberrant SMN2 gene transcript processing: towards a treatment for spinal muscular atrophy.

    Chalermchai Mitrpant

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is caused by loss of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1 gene, resulting in reduced SMN protein. Humans possess the additional SMN2 gene (or genes that does produce low level of full length SMN, but cannot adequately compensate for loss of SMN1 due to aberrant splicing. The majority of SMN2 gene transcripts lack exon 7 and the resultant SMNΔ7 mRNA is translated into an unstable and non-functional protein. Splice intervention therapies to promote exon 7 retention and increase amounts of full-length SMN2 transcript offer great potential as a treatment for SMA patients. Several splice silencing motifs in SMN2 have been identified as potential targets for antisense oligonucleotide mediated splice modification. A strong splice silencer is located downstream of exon 7 in SMN2 intron 7. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting this motif promoted SMN2 exon 7 retention in the mature SMN2 transcripts, with increased SMN expression detected in SMA fibroblasts. We report here systematic optimisation of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides (PMO that promote exon 7 retention to levels that rescued the phenotype in a severe mouse model of SMA after intracerebroventricular delivery. Furthermore, the PMO gives the longest survival reported to date after a single dosing by ICV.

  15. Contribution of bioinformatics predictions and functional splicing assays to the interpretation of unclassified variants of the BRCA genes

    Théry, Jean Christophe; Krieger, Sophie; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Révillion, Françoise; Buisine, Marie-Pierre; Killian, Audrey; Duponchel, Christiane; Rousselin, Antoine; Vaur, Dominique; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Berthet, Pascaline; Frébourg, Thierry; Martins, Alexandra; Hardouin, Agnès; Tosi, Mario

    2011-01-01

    A large fraction of sequence variants of unknown significance (VUS) of the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 may induce splicing defects. We analyzed 53 VUSs of BRCA1 or BRCA2, detected in consecutive molecular screenings, by using five splicing prediction programs, and we classified them into two groups according to the strength of the predictions. In parallel, we tested them by using functional splicing assays. A total of 10 VUSs were predicted by two or more programs to induce a significant reduction of splice site strength or activation of cryptic splice sites or generation of new splice sites. Minigene-based splicing assays confirmed four of these predictions. Five additional VUSs, all at internal exon positions, were not predicted to induce alterations of splice sites, but revealed variable levels of exon skipping, most likely induced by the modification of exonic splicing regulatory elements. We provide new data in favor of the pathogenic nature of the variants BRCA1 c.212+3A>G and BRCA1 c.5194−12G>A, which induced aberrant out-of-frame mRNA forms. Moreover, the novel variant BRCA2 c.7977−7C>G induced in frame inclusion of 6 nt from the 3′ end of intron 17. The novel variants BRCA2 c.520C>T and BRCA2 c.7992T>A induced incomplete skipping of exons 7 and 18, respectively. This work highlights the contribution of splicing minigene assays to the assessment of pathogenicity, not only when patient RNA is not available, but also as a tool to improve the accuracy of bioinformatics predictions. PMID:21673748

  16. COMMUNICATION: Alternative splicing and genomic stability

    Cahill, Kevin

    2004-06-01

    Alternative splicing allows an organism to make different proteins in different cells at different times, all from the same gene. In a cell that uses alternative splicing, the total length of all the exons is much shorter than in a cell that encodes the same set of proteins without alternative splicing. This economical use of exons makes genes more stable during reproduction and development because a genome with a shorter exon length is more resistant to harmful mutations. Genomic stability may be the reason why higher vertebrates splice alternatively. For a broad class of alternatively spliced genes, a formula is given for the increase in their stability.

  17. Enhanced Exon-skipping Induced by U7 snRNA Carrying a Splicing Silencer Sequence: Promising Tool for DMD Therapy

    Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Babbs, Arran; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Garcia, Luis; Davies, Kay E.

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. In most cases, the open-reading frame is disrupted which results in the absence of functional protein. Antisense-mediated exon skipping is one of the most promising approaches for the treatment of DMD and has recently been shown to correct the reading frame and restore dystrophin expression in vitro and in vivo. Specific exon skipping can be achieved using synthetic oligonucleotide...

  18. Integrating many co-splicing networks to reconstruct splicing regulatory modules

    Dai Chao; Li Wenyuan; Liu Juan; Zhou Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Alternative splicing is a ubiquitous gene regulatory mechanism that dramatically increases the complexity of the proteome. However, the mechanism for regulating alternative splicing is poorly understood, and study of coordinated splicing regulation has been limited to individual cases. To study genome-wide splicing regulation, we integrate many human RNA-seq datasets to identify splicing module, which we define as a set of cassette exons co-regulated by the same splicing f...

  19. Alternative Splicing Regulation During C. elegans Development: Splicing Factors as Regulated Targets

    Sergio Barberan-Soler; Zahler, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates protein diversity and allows for post-transcriptional gene regulation. Estimates suggest that 10% of the genes in Caenorhabditis elegans undergo alternative splicing. We constructed a splicing-sensitive microarray to detect alternative splicing for 352 cassette exons and tested for changes in alternative splicing of these genes during development. We found that the microarray data predicted that 62/352 (approximately 18%) of the alternative splicing events studi...

  20. Intronic Alus influence alternative splicing.

    Galit Lev-Maor

    Full Text Available Examination of the human transcriptome reveals higher levels of RNA editing than in any other organism tested to date. This is indicative of extensive double-stranded RNA (dsRNA formation within the human transcriptome. Most of the editing sites are located in the primate-specific retrotransposed element called Alu. A large fraction of Alus are found in intronic sequences, implying extensive Alu-Alu dsRNA formation in mRNA precursors. Yet, the effect of these intronic Alus on splicing of the flanking exons is largely unknown. Here, we show that more Alus flank alternatively spliced exons than constitutively spliced ones; this is especially notable for those exons that have changed their mode of splicing from constitutive to alternative during human evolution. This implies that Alu insertions may change the mode of splicing of the flanking exons. Indeed, we demonstrate experimentally that two Alu elements that were inserted into an intron in opposite orientation undergo base-pairing, as evident by RNA editing, and affect the splicing patterns of a downstream exon, shifting it from constitutive to alternative. Our results indicate the importance of intronic Alus in influencing the splicing of flanking exons, further emphasizing the role of Alus in shaping of the human transcriptome.

  1. Impairment of alternative splice sites defining a novel gammaretroviral exon within gag modifies the oncogenic properties of Akv murine leukemia virus

    Sørensen, Annette Balle; Lund, Anders H; Kunder, Sandra;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations of an alternative splice donor site located within the gag region has previously been shown to broaden the pathogenic potential of the T-lymphomagenic gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus, while the equivalent mutations in the erythroleukemia inducing Friend murine...... leukemia virus seem to have no influence on the disease-inducing potential of this virus. In the present study we investigate the splice pattern as well as the possible effects of mutating the alternative splice sites on the oncogenic properties of the B-lymphomagenic Akv murine leukemia virus. RESULTS: By...... examination of the tumors showed that the introduced synonymous gag mutations have a significant influence on the phenotype of the induced tumors, changing the distribution of the different types as well as generating tumors of additional specificities such as de novo diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and...

  2. Origins and Impacts of New Mammalian Exons

    Jason J. Merkin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genes are composed of exons, but the evolutionary origins and functions of new internal exons are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed patterns of exon gain using deep cDNA sequencing data from five mammals and one bird, identifying thousands of species- and lineage-specific exons. Most new exons derived from unique rather than repetitive intronic sequence. Unlike exons conserved across mammals, species-specific internal exons were mostly located in 5′ UTRs and alternatively spliced. They were associated with upstream intronic deletions, increased nucleosome occupancy, and RNA polymerase II pausing. Genes containing new internal exons had increased gene expression, but only in tissues in which the exon was included. Increased expression correlated with the level of exon inclusion, promoter proximity, and signatures of cotranscriptional splicing. Altogether, these findings suggest that increased splicing at the 5′ ends of genes enhances expression and that changes in 5′ end splicing alter gene expression between tissues and between species.

  3. Reversion of the Arabidopsis rpn12a-1 exon-trap mutation by an intragenic suppressor that weakens the chimeric 5’ splice site [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/vz

    Jasmina Kurepa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the Arabidopsis 26S proteasome mutant rpn12a-1, an exon-trap T-DNA is inserted 531 base pairs downstream of the RPN12a STOP codon. We have previously shown that this insertion activates a STOP codon-associated latent 5' splice site that competes with the polyadenylation signal during processing of the pre-mRNA. As a result of this dual input from splicing and polyadenylation in the rpn12a-1 mutant, two RPN12a transcripts are produced and they encode the wild-type RPN12a and a chimeric RPN12a-NPTII protein. Both proteins form complexes with other proteasome subunits leading to the formation of wild-type and mutant proteasome versions. The net result of this heterogeneity of proteasome particles is a reduction of total cellular proteasome activity. One of the consequences of reduced proteasomal activity is decreased sensitivity to the major plant hormone cytokinin. Methods: We performed ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of rpn12a-1 and isolated revertants with wild-type cytokinin sensitivity. Results: We describe the isolation and analyses of suppressor of rpn12a-1 (sor1. The sor1 mutation is intragenic and located at the fifth position of the chimeric intron. This mutation weakens the activated 5' splice site associated with the STOP codon and tilts the processing of the RPN12a mRNA back towards polyadenylation. Conclusions: These results validate our earlier interpretation of the unusual nature of the rpn12a-1 mutation. Furthermore, the data show that optimal 26S proteasome activity requires RPN12a accumulation beyond a critical threshold. Finally, this finding reinforces our previous conclusion that proteasome function is critical for the cytokinin regulation of plant growth.

  4. Reversion of the Arabidopsis rpn12a-1 exon-trap mutation by an intragenic suppressor that weakens the chimeric 5’ splice site [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/18y

    Jasmina Kurepa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the Arabidopsis 26S proteasome mutant rpn12a-1, an exon-trap T-DNA is inserted 531 base pairs downstream of the RPN12a STOP codon. We have previously shown that this insertion activates a STOP codon-associated latent 5' splice site that competes with the polyadenylation signal during processing of the pre-mRNA. As a result of this dual input from splicing and polyadenylation in the rpn12a-1 mutant, two RPN12a transcripts are produced and they encode the wild-type RPN12a and a chimeric RPN12a-NPTII protein. Both proteins form complexes with other proteasome subunits leading to the formation of wild-type and mutant proteasome versions. The net result of this heterogeneity of proteasome particles is a reduction of total cellular proteasome activity. One of the consequences of reduced proteasomal activity is decreased sensitivity to the major plant hormone cytokinin. Methods: We performed ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of rpn12a-1 and isolated revertants with wild-type cytokinin sensitivity. Results: We describe the isolation and analyses of suppressor of rpn12a-1 (sor1. The sor1 mutation is intragenic and located at the fifth position of the chimeric intron. This mutation weakens the activated 5' splice site associated with the STOP codon and tilts the processing of the RPN12a mRNA back towards polyadenylation. Conclusions: These results validate our earlier interpretation of the unusual nature of the rpn12a-1 mutation. Furthermore, the data show that optimal 26S proteasome activity requires RPN12a accumulation beyond a critical threshold. Finally, this finding reinforces our previous conclusion that proteasome function is critical for the cytokinin-dependent regulation of plant growth.

  5. GC content around splice sites affects splicing through pre-mRNA secondary structures

    Chen Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing increases protein diversity by generating multiple transcript isoforms from a single gene through different combinations of exons or through different selections of splice sites. It has been reported that RNA secondary structures are involved in alternative splicing. Here we perform a genomic study of RNA secondary structures around splice sites in humans (Homo sapiens, mice (Mus musculus, fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster, and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans to further investigate this phenomenon. Results We observe that GC content around splice sites is closely associated with the splice site usage in multiple species. RNA secondary structure is the possible explanation, because the structural stability difference among alternative splice sites, constitutive splice sites, and skipped splice sites can be explained by the GC content difference. Alternative splice sites tend to be GC-enriched and exhibit more stable RNA secondary structures in all of the considered species. In humans and mice, splice sites of first exons and long exons tend to be GC-enriched and hence form more stable structures, indicating the special role of RNA secondary structures in promoter proximal splicing events and the splicing of long exons. In addition, GC-enriched exon-intron junctions tend to be overrepresented in tissue-specific alternative splice sites, indicating the functional consequence of the GC effect. Compared with regions far from splice sites and decoy splice sites, real splice sites are GC-enriched. We also found that the GC-content effect is much stronger than the nucleotide-order effect to form stable secondary structures. Conclusion All of these results indicate that GC content is related to splice site usage and it may mediate the splicing process through RNA secondary structures.

  6. Regulatory mechanisms for 3'-end alternative splicing and polyadenylation of the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, GFAP, transcript

    Blechingberg, Jenny; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick;

    2007-01-01

    molecular mechanisms participating in alternative GFAP expression. Usage of a polyadenylation signal within the alternatively spliced exon 7a is essential to generate the GFAP kappa and GFAP kappa transcripts. The GFAP kappa mRNA is distinct from GFAP epsilon mRNA given that it also includes intron 7a....... Polyadenylation at the exon 7a site is stimulated by the upstream splice site. Moreover, exon 7a splice enhancer motifs supported both exon 7a splicing and polyadenylation. SR proteins increased the usage of the exon 7a polyadenylation signal but not the exon 7a splicing, whereas the polypyrimidine tract binding...... (PTB) protein enhanced both exon 7a polyadenylation and exon 7a splicing. Finally, increasing transcription by the VP16 trans-activator did not affect the frequency of use of the exon 7a polyadenylation signal whereas the exon 7a splicing frequency was decreased. Our data suggest a model with the...

  7. Multiple splice defects in ABCA1 cause low HDL-C in a family with Hypoalphalipoproteinemia and premature coronary disease

    Miller Michael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations at splice junctions causing exon skipping are uncommon compared to exonic mutations, and two intronic mutations causing an aberrant phenotype have rarely been reported. Despite the high number of functional ABCA1 mutations reported to date, splice variants have been reported infrequently. We screened DNA from a 41 year-old male with low HDL-C (12 mg/dL [0.31 mmol/L] and a family history of premature coronary heart disease (CHD using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP analysis. Methods Family members with low levels of HDL-C (n = 6 were screened by SSCP for mutations in ABCA1. Samples with altered SSCP patterns were sequenced directly using either an ABI 3700 or ABI3730Xl DNA Analyzer. To screen for splicing defects, cDNA was isolated from the proband's RNA and was sequenced as above. A series of minigenes were constructed to determine the contribution of normal and defective alleles. Results Two novel splice variants in ABCA1 were identified. The first mutation was a single base pair change (T->C in IVS 7, 6 bps downstream from the exon7/intron7 junction. Amplification of cDNA and allelic subcloning identified skipping of Exon 7 that results in the elimination of 59 amino acids from the first extracellular loop of the ABCA1 protein. The second mutation was a single base pair change (G->C at IVS 31 -1, at the intron/exon junction of exon 32. This mutation causes skipping of exon 32, resulting in 8 novel amino acids followed by a stop codon and a predicted protein size of 1496 AA, compared to normal (2261 AA. Bioinformatic studies predicted an impact on splicing as confirmed by in vitro assays of constitutive splicing. Conclusion In addition to carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase (CACT deficiency and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 3, this represents only the third reported case in which 2 different splice mutations has resulted in an aberrant clinical phenotype.

  8. Multiple splice defects in ABCA1 cause low HDL-C in a family with Hypoalphalipoproteinemia and premature coronary disease

    Rhyne, Jeffrey; Mantaring, Myrna M; Gardner, David F; Miller, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutations at splice junctions causing exon skipping are uncommon compared to exonic mutations, and two intronic mutations causing an aberrant phenotype have rarely been reported. Despite the high number of functional ABCA1 mutations reported to date, splice variants have been reported infrequently. We screened DNA from a 41 year-old male with low HDL-C (12 mg/dL [0.31 mmol/L]) and a family history of premature coronary heart disease (CHD) using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Methods Family members with low levels of HDL-C (n = 6) were screened by SSCP for mutations in ABCA1. Samples with altered SSCP patterns were sequenced directly using either an ABI 3700 or ABI3730Xl DNA Analyzer. To screen for splicing defects, cDNA was isolated from the proband's RNA and was sequenced as above. A series of minigenes were constructed to determine the contribution of normal and defective alleles. Results Two novel splice variants in ABCA1 were identified. The first mutation was a single base pair change (T->C) in IVS 7, 6 bps downstream from the exon7/intron7 junction. Amplification of cDNA and allelic subcloning identified skipping of Exon 7 that results in the elimination of 59 amino acids from the first extracellular loop of the ABCA1 protein. The second mutation was a single base pair change (G->C) at IVS 31 -1, at the intron/exon junction of exon 32. This mutation causes skipping of exon 32, resulting in 8 novel amino acids followed by a stop codon and a predicted protein size of 1496 AA, compared to normal (2261 AA). Bioinformatic studies predicted an impact on splicing as confirmed by in vitro assays of constitutive splicing. Conclusion In addition to carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) deficiency and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 3, this represents only the third reported case in which 2 different splice mutations has resulted in an aberrant clinical phenotype. PMID:19133158

  9. ExSurv: A Web Resource for Prognostic Analyses of Exons Across Human Cancers Using Clinical Transcriptomes.

    Hashemikhabir, Seyedsasan; Budak, Gungor; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Survival analysis in biomedical sciences is generally performed by correlating the levels of cellular components with patients' clinical features as a common practice in prognostic biomarker discovery. While the common and primary focus of such analysis in cancer genomics so far has been to identify the potential prognostic genes, alternative splicing - a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism that affects the functional form of a protein due to inclusion or exclusion of individual exons giving rise to alternative protein products, has increasingly gained attention due to the prevalence of splicing aberrations in cancer transcriptomes. Hence, uncovering the potential prognostic exons can not only help in rationally designing exon-specific therapeutics but also increase specificity toward more personalized treatment options. To address this gap and to provide a platform for rational identification of prognostic exons from cancer transcriptomes, we developed ExSurv (https://exsurv.soic.iupui.edu), a web-based platform for predicting the survival contribution of all annotated exons in the human genome using RNA sequencing-based expression profiles for cancer samples from four cancer types available from The Cancer Genome Atlas. ExSurv enables users to search for a gene of interest and shows survival probabilities for all the exons associated with a gene and found to be significant at the chosen threshold. ExSurv also includes raw expression values across the cancer cohort as well as the survival plots for prognostic exons. Our analysis of the resulting prognostic exons across four cancer types revealed that most of the survival-associated exons are unique to a cancer type with few processes such as cell adhesion, carboxylic, fatty acid metabolism, and regulation of T-cell signaling common across cancer types, possibly suggesting significant differences in the posttranscriptional regulatory pathways contributing to prognosis. PMID:27528797

  10. ExSurv: A Web Resource for Prognostic Analyses of Exons Across Human Cancers Using Clinical Transcriptomes

    Hashemikhabir, Seyedsasan; Budak, Gungor; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Survival analysis in biomedical sciences is generally performed by correlating the levels of cellular components with patients’ clinical features as a common practice in prognostic biomarker discovery. While the common and primary focus of such analysis in cancer genomics so far has been to identify the potential prognostic genes, alternative splicing – a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism that affects the functional form of a protein due to inclusion or exclusion of individual exons giving rise to alternative protein products, has increasingly gained attention due to the prevalence of splicing aberrations in cancer transcriptomes. Hence, uncovering the potential prognostic exons can not only help in rationally designing exon-specific therapeutics but also increase specificity toward more personalized treatment options. To address this gap and to provide a platform for rational identification of prognostic exons from cancer transcriptomes, we developed ExSurv (https://exsurv.soic.iupui.edu), a web-based platform for predicting the survival contribution of all annotated exons in the human genome using RNA sequencing-based expression profiles for cancer samples from four cancer types available from The Cancer Genome Atlas. ExSurv enables users to search for a gene of interest and shows survival probabilities for all the exons associated with a gene and found to be significant at the chosen threshold. ExSurv also includes raw expression values across the cancer cohort as well as the survival plots for prognostic exons. Our analysis of the resulting prognostic exons across four cancer types revealed that most of the survival-associated exons are unique to a cancer type with few processes such as cell adhesion, carboxylic, fatty acid metabolism, and regulation of T-cell signaling common across cancer types, possibly suggesting significant differences in the posttranscriptional regulatory pathways contributing to prognosis. PMID:27528797

  11. Recursive splicing in long vertebrate genes.

    Sibley, Christopher R; Emmett, Warren; Blazquez, Lorea; Faro, Ana; Haberman, Nejc; Briese, Michael; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ryten, Mina; Weale, Michael E; Hardy, John; Modic, Miha; Curk, Tomaž; Wilson, Stephen W; Plagnol, Vincent; Ule, Jernej

    2015-05-21

    It is generally believed that splicing removes introns as single units from precursor messenger RNA transcripts. However, some long Drosophila melanogaster introns contain a cryptic site, known as a recursive splice site (RS-site), that enables a multi-step process of intron removal termed recursive splicing. The extent to which recursive splicing occurs in other species and its mechanistic basis have not been examined. Here we identify highly conserved RS-sites in genes expressed in the mammalian brain that encode proteins functioning in neuronal development. Moreover, the RS-sites are found in some of the longest introns across vertebrates. We find that vertebrate recursive splicing requires initial definition of an 'RS-exon' that follows the RS-site. The RS-exon is then excluded from the dominant mRNA isoform owing to competition with a reconstituted 5' splice site formed at the RS-site after the first splicing step. Conversely, the RS-exon is included when preceded by cryptic promoters or exons that fail to reconstitute an efficient 5' splice site. Most RS-exons contain a premature stop codon such that their inclusion can decrease mRNA stability. Thus, by establishing a binary splicing switch, RS-sites demarcate different mRNA isoforms emerging from long genes by coupling cryptic elements with inclusion of RS-exons. PMID:25970246

  12. Comparative analysis of antisense oligonucleotide sequences for targeted skipping of Exon 51 during dystrophin Pre-mRNA splicing in human muscle

    Arechavala-Gomeza, V.; Graham, I R; Popplewell, L. J.; Adams, A.M.; Aartsma-Rus, A.; Kinali, M.; Morgan, J E; van Deutekom, J C; Wilton, S D; Dickson, G.; Muntoni, F.

    2007-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that result in the absence of functional protein. In the majority of cases these are out-of-frame deletions that disrupt the reading frame. Several attempts have been made to restore the dystrophin mRNA reading frame by modulation of pre-mRNA splicing with antisense oligonucleotides (AOs), demonstrating success in cultured cells, muscle explants, and animal models. We are preparing for a phase I/IIa clinical trial...

  13. cDNA structure, alternative splicing and exon-intron organization of the predisposing tuberous sclerosis (Tsc2) gene of the Eker rat model.

    Kobayashi, T.; Nishizawa, M; Hirayama, Y; Kobayashi, E; Hino, O

    1995-01-01

    The Eker rat hereditary renal carcinoma (RC) is an excellent example of a Mendelian dominant predisposition to a specific cancer in an experimental animal. We recently reported that a germline insertion in the rat homologue of the human tuberous sclerosis gene (TSC2) gives rise to the dominantly inherited cancer in the Eker rat model. We now describe the entire cDNA (5375 bp without exons 25 and 31) and genomic structure of the rat Tsc2 gene. The deduced amino acid sequence (1743 amino acids)...

  14. Where splicing joins chromatin

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Staněk, David

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2011), s. 182-188. ISSN 1949-1034 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/0424; GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromatin * exon * alternative splicing * transcription * snRNP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  15. Pathogenic exon-trapping by SVA retrotransposon and rescue in Fukuyama muscular dystrophy

    Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Kanagawa, Motoi; Yu, Chih-Chieh; Mori, Kouhei; Oda, Tetsuya; Kuga, Atsushi; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Akman, Hasan O.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Kaji, Ryuji; Yokota, Toshifumi; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Toda, Tatsushi

    2011-01-01

    Fukuyama muscular dystrophy (FCMD; MIM253800), one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders in Japan, was the first human disease found to result from ancestral insertion of a SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) retrotransposon into a causative gene 1-3 . In FCMD, the SVA insertion occurs in the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of the fukutin gene. The pathogenic mechanism for FCMD is unknown, and no effective clinical treatments exist. Here we show that aberrant mRNA splicing, induced by SVA exon-trappi...

  16. Altered Pre-mRNA Splicing Caused by a Novel Intronic Mutation c.1443+5G>A in the Dihydropyrimidinase (DPYS Gene

    Yoko Nakajima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dihydropyrimidinase (DHP deficiency is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the DPYS gene. Patients present with highly elevated levels of dihydrouracil and dihydrothymine in their urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid. The analysis of the effect of mutations in DPYS on pre-mRNA splicing is hampered by the fact that DHP is primarily expressed in liver and kidney cells. The minigene approach can detect mRNA splicing aberrations using cells that do not express the endogenous mRNA. We have used a minigene-based approach to analyze the effects of a presumptive pre-mRNA splicing mutation in two newly identified Chinese pediatric patients with DHP deficiency. Mutation analysis of DPYS showed that both patients were compound heterozygous for a novel intronic mutation c.1443+5G>A in intron 8 and a previously described missense mutation c.1001A>G (p.Q334R in exon 6. Wild-type and the mutated minigene constructs, containing exons 7, 8 and 9 of DPYS, yielded different splicing products after expression in HEK293 cells. The c.1443+5G>A mutation resulted in altered pre-mRNA splicing of the DPYS minigene construct with full skipping of exon 8. Analysis of the DHP crystal structure showed that the deletion of exon 8 severely affects folding, stability and homooligomerization of the enzyme as well as disruption of the catalytic site. Thus, the analysis suggests that the c.1443+5G>A mutation results in aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding DHP, underlying the DHP deficiency in two unrelated Chinese patients.

  17. Mechano-Regulation of Alternative Splicing

    Liu, Huan; Tang, Liling

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing contributes to the complexity of proteome by producing multiple mRNAs from a single gene. Affymetrix exon arrays and experiments in vivo or in vitro demonstrated that alternative splicing was regulated by mechanical stress. Expression of mechano-growth factor (MGF) which is the splicing isoform of insulin-like growth factor 1(IGF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) splicing variants such as VEGF121, VEGF165, VEGF206, VEGF189, VEGF165 and VEGF145 are regulated...

  18. The splicing fate of plant SPO11 genes

    Thorben eSprink

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Towards the global understanding of plant meiosis, it seems to be essential to decipher why all as yet sequenced plants need or at least encode for two different meiotic SPO11 genes. This is in contrast to mammals and fungi, where only one SPO11 is present. Both SPO11 in plants are essential for the initiation of double strand breaks (DSBs during the meiotic prophase. In nearly all eukaryotic organisms DSB induction by SPO11 leads to meiotic DSB repair, thereby ensuring the formation of a necessary number of crossovers (CO as physical connections between the allelic chromosomes. We aim to investigate the specific functions and evolution of both SPO11 genes in land plants. Therefore, we identified and cloned the respective orthologous genes from Brassica rapa, Carica papaya, Oryza sativa and Physcomitrella patens. In parallel we determined the full length cDNA sequences of SPO11-1 and -2 from all of these plants by RT-PCR. During these experiments we observed that the analyzed plants exhibit a pattern of aberrant splicing products of both SPO11 mRNAs. Such an aberrant splicing has previously been described for Arabidopsis and therefore seems to be conserved throughout evolution. Most of the splicing forms of SPO11-1 and -2 seem to be non functional as they either showed intron retention or shortened exons accompanied by a frameshift leading to premature termination codons (PTCs in most cases. Nevertheless, we could detect one putative functional alternatively spliced mRNA for SPO11-1 and -2 each, indicating that splicing of SPO11 does not depend only on the gene sequence but also on the plant species and that it might play a regulatory role.

  19. Hollywood: a comparative relational database of alternative splicing

    Holste, Dirk; Huo, George; Tung, Vivian; Burge, Christopher B.

    2005-01-01

    RNA splicing is an essential step in gene expression, and is often variable, giving rise to multiple alternatively spliced mRNA and protein isoforms from a single gene locus. The design of effective databases to support experimental and computational investigations of alternative splicing (AS) is a significant challenge. In an effort to integrate accurate exon and splice site annotation with current knowledge about splicing regulatory elements and predicted AS events, and to link information ...

  20. A novel splice mutation of HERG in a Chinese family with long QT syndrome

    SHANG Yun-peng; XIE Xu-dong; WANG Xing-xiang; CHEN Jun-zhu; ZHU Jian-hua; TAO Qian-min; ZHENG Liang-rong

    2005-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetically heterogeneous disease in which six ion-channel genes have been identified. The phenotype-genotype relationships of the HERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) mutations are not fully understood. The objective of this study is to identify the underlying genetic basis of a Chinese family with LQTS and to characterize the clinical manifestations properties of the mutation. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analyses were conducted on DNA fragments amplified by polymerase chain reaction from five LQT-related genes. Aberrant conformers were analyzed by DNA sequencing. A novel splice mutation in C-terminus of HERG was identified in this Chinese LQTS family,leading to the deletion of 11-bp at the acceptor splice site of Exon9 [Exon9 IVS del (-12→-2)]. The mutation might affect,through deficient splicing, the putative cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) of the HERG K+ channel. This mutation resulted in a mildly affected phenotype. Only the proband had a history of syncopes, while the other three individuals with long QT interval had no symptoms. Two other mutation carriers displayed normal phenotype. No sudden death occurred in the family. The 4 affected individuals and the two silent mutation carriers were all heterozygous for the mutation. It is the first splice mutation of HERG reported in Chinese LQTS families. Clinical data suggest that the CNBD mutation may be less malignant than mutations occurring in the pore region and be partially dominant over wild-type function.

  1. Targeting RNA Splicing for Disease Therapy

    Havens, Mallory A.; Duelli, Dominik M.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Splicing of pre-messenger RNA into mature messenger RNA is an essential step for expression of most genes in higher eukaryotes. Defects in this process typically affect cellular function and can have pathological consequences. Many human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that cause splicing defects. Furthermore, a number of diseases are associated with splicing defects that are not attributed to overt mutations. Targeting splicing directly to correct disease-associated aberrant splicin...

  2. Identification of a chemical inhibitor for nuclear speckle formation: Implications for the function of nuclear speckles in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing

    Highlights: • We identified tubercidin as a compound inducing aberrant formation of the speckles. • Tubercidin causes delocalization of poly (A)+RNAs from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin induces dispersion of splicing factors from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin affects alternative pre-mRNA splicing. • Nuclear speckles play a role in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing. - Abstract: Nuclear speckles are subnuclear structures enriched with RNA processing factors and poly (A)+ RNAs comprising mRNAs and poly (A)+ non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Nuclear speckles are thought to be involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, such as pre-mRNA splicing. By screening 3585 culture extracts of actinomycetes with in situ hybridization using an oligo dT probe, we identified tubercidin, an analogue of adenosine, as an inhibitor of speckle formation, which induces the delocalization of poly (A)+ RNA and dispersion of splicing factor SRSF1/SF2 from nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Treatment with tubercidin also decreased steady-state MALAT1 long ncRNA, thought to be involved in the retention of SRSF1/SF2 in nuclear speckles. In addition, we found that tubercidin treatment promoted exon skipping in the alternative splicing of Clk1 pre-mRNA. These results suggest that nuclear speckles play a role in modulating the concentration of splicing factors in the nucleoplasm to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing

  3. Identification of a chemical inhibitor for nuclear speckle formation: Implications for the function of nuclear speckles in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing

    Kurogi, Yutaro; Matsuo, Yota; Mihara, Yuki; Yagi, Hiroaki; Shigaki-Miyamoto, Kaya; Toyota, Syukichi; Azuma, Yuko [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Igarashi, Masayuki [Laboratory of Disease Biology, Institute of Microbial Chemistry, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0021 (Japan); Tani, Tokio, E-mail: ttani@sci.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • We identified tubercidin as a compound inducing aberrant formation of the speckles. • Tubercidin causes delocalization of poly (A){sup +}RNAs from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin induces dispersion of splicing factors from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin affects alternative pre-mRNA splicing. • Nuclear speckles play a role in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing. - Abstract: Nuclear speckles are subnuclear structures enriched with RNA processing factors and poly (A){sup +} RNAs comprising mRNAs and poly (A){sup +} non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Nuclear speckles are thought to be involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, such as pre-mRNA splicing. By screening 3585 culture extracts of actinomycetes with in situ hybridization using an oligo dT probe, we identified tubercidin, an analogue of adenosine, as an inhibitor of speckle formation, which induces the delocalization of poly (A){sup +} RNA and dispersion of splicing factor SRSF1/SF2 from nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Treatment with tubercidin also decreased steady-state MALAT1 long ncRNA, thought to be involved in the retention of SRSF1/SF2 in nuclear speckles. In addition, we found that tubercidin treatment promoted exon skipping in the alternative splicing of Clk1 pre-mRNA. These results suggest that nuclear speckles play a role in modulating the concentration of splicing factors in the nucleoplasm to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

  4. SplicingTypesAnno: annotating and quantifying alternative splicing events for RNA-Seq data.

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Zuo, Fenghua; Ru, Yuanbin; Guo, Jiqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays a key role in the regulation of the central dogma. Four major types of alternative splicing have been classified as intron retention, exon skipping, alternative 5 splice sites or alternative donor sites, and alternative 3 splice sites or alternative acceptor sites. A few algorithms have been developed to detect splice junctions from RNA-Seq reads. However, there are few tools targeting at the major alternative splicing types at the exon/intron level. This type of analysis may reveal subtle, yet important events of alternative splicing, and thus help gain deeper understanding of the mechanism of alternative splicing. This paper describes a user-friendly R package, extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. SplicingTypesAnno can: (1) provide annotation for major alternative splicing at exon/intron level. By comparing the annotation from GTF/GFF file, it identifies the novel alternative splicing sites; (2) offer a convenient two-level analysis: genome-scale annotation for users with high performance computing environment, and gene-scale annotation for users with personal computers; (3) generate a user-friendly web report and additional BED files for IGV visualization. SplicingTypesAnno is a user-friendly R package for extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types at exon/intron level for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. It is publically available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/splicingtypes/files/ or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/SplicingTypesAnno.html. PMID:25720307

  5. The dark matter of the cancer genome: aberrations in regulatory elements, untranslated regions, splice sites, non-coding RNA and synonymous mutations.

    Diederichs, Sven; Bartsch, Lorenz; Berkmann, Julia C; Fröse, Karin; Heitmann, Jana; Hoppe, Caroline; Iggena, Deetje; Jazmati, Danny; Karschnia, Philipp; Linsenmeier, Miriam; Maulhardt, Thomas; Möhrmann, Lino; Morstein, Johannes; Paffenholz, Stella V; Röpenack, Paula; Rückert, Timo; Sandig, Ludger; Schell, Maximilian; Steinmann, Anna; Voss, Gjendine; Wasmuth, Jacqueline; Weinberger, Maria E; Wullenkord, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of the genome caused by oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inhibition. Deep sequencing studies including large consortia such as TCGA and ICGC identified numerous tumor-specific mutations not only in protein-coding sequences but also in non-coding sequences. Although 98% of the genome is not translated into proteins, most studies have neglected the information hidden in this "dark matter" of the genome. Malignancy-driving mutations can occur in all genetic elements outside the coding region, namely in enhancer, silencer, insulator, and promoter as well as in 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR Intron or splice site mutations can alter the splicing pattern. Moreover, cancer genomes contain mutations within non-coding RNA, such as microRNA, lncRNA, and lincRNA A synonymous mutation changes the coding region in the DNA and RNA but not the protein sequence. Importantly, oncogenes such as TERT or miR-21 as well as tumor suppressor genes such as TP53/p53, APC, BRCA1, or RB1 can be affected by these alterations. In summary, coding-independent mutations can affect gene regulation from transcription, splicing, mRNA stability to translation, and hence, this largely neglected area needs functional studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis. This review will focus on the important role and novel mechanisms of these non-coding or allegedly silent mutations in tumorigenesis. PMID:26992833

  6. A novel splicing mutation in the IQSEC2 gene that modulates the phenotype severity in a family with intellectual disability.

    Madrigal, Irene; Alvarez-Mora, Maria Isabel; Rosell, Jordi; Rodríguez-Revenga, Laia; Karlberg, Olof; Sauer, Sascha; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Mila, Montserrat

    2016-08-01

    The IQSEC2 gene is located on chromosome Xp11.22 and encodes a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the ADP-ribosylation factor family of small GTPases. This gene is known to have a significant role in cytoskeletal organization, dendritic spine morphology and synaptic organization. Variants in IQSEC2 cause moderate to severe intellectual disability in males and a variable phenotype in females because this gene escapes from X-chromosome inactivation. Here we report on the first splicing variant in IQSEC2 (g.88032_88033del; NG_021296.1) that co-segregates in a family diagnosed with an X-linked form of ID. In a percentage of the cells, the variant activates an intraexonic splice acceptor site that abolishes 26 amino acids from the highly conserved PH domain of IQSEC2 and creates a premature stop codon 36 amino acids later in exon 13. Interestingly, the percentage of aberrant splicing seems to correlate with the severity of the disease in each patient. The impact of this variant in the target tissue is unknown, but we can hypothesize that these differences may be related to the amount of abnormal IQSEC2 transcript. To our knowledge, we are reporting a novel mechanism of IQSEC2 involvement in ID. Variants that affect splicing are related to many genetic diseases and the understanding of their role in disease expands potential opportunities for gene therapy. Modulation of aberrant splicing transcripts can become a potent therapeutic approach for many of these diseases. PMID:26733290

  7. Alternative Splicing of Type II Procollagen: IIB or not IIB?

    McAlinden, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    Over two decades ago, two isoforms of the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) were discovered. These isoforms, named IIA and IIB, are generated in a developmentally-regulated manner by alternative splicing of exon 2. Chondroprogenitor cells synthesize predominantly IIA isoforms (containing exon 2) while differentiated chondrocytes produce mainly IIB transcripts (devoid of exon 2). Importantly, this IIA-to-IIB alternative splicing switch occurs only during chondrogenesis. More recently, two othe...

  8. Aberrant splicing of androgen receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity.

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Kuiper, G G; Faber, P.W.; SCHWEIKERT, H. U.; van Rooij, H C; Zegers, N.D.; Hodgins, M B; Degenhart, H J; Trapman, J; Brinkmann, A.O.

    1990-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symptoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. We report a G----T mutation in the splice donor site of intron 4 of the androgen receptor gene of a 46,XY subject lacking detectable androgen binding to the receptor and with the complete form of androgen insensitivity. This point mutation completely a...

  9. Proximity-dependent and proximity-independent trans-splicing in mammalian cells

    Viles, Kristi D.; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2008-01-01

    Most human pre-mRNAs are cis-spliced, removing introns and joining flanking exons of the same RNA molecule. However, splicing of exons present on separate pre-mRNA molecules can also occur. This trans-splicing reaction can be exploited by pre-trans-splicing molecules (PTMs), which are incapable of cis-splicing. PTM-mediated trans-splicing has been utilized to repair mutant RNAs as a novel approach to gene therapy. Herein we explore how the site of PTM expression influences trans-splicing acti...

  10. Altered PLP1 splicing causes hypomyelination of early myelinating structures

    Kevelam, Sietske H; Taube, Jennifer R; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L;

    2015-01-01

    causal mutations. In silico analysis of effects of the mutations on splicing and RNA folding was performed. In vitro gene splicing was examined in RNA from patients' fibroblasts and an immortalized immature oligodendrocyte cell line after transfection with mutant minigene splicing constructs. RESULTS......: All patients had unusual hemizygous mutations of PLP1 located in exon 3B (one deletion, one missense and two silent), which is spliced out in isoform DM20, or in intron 3 (five mutations). The deletion led to truncation of PLP1, but not DM20. Four mutations were predicted to affect PLP1/DM20...... alternative splicing by creating exonic splicing silencer motifs or new splice donor sites or by affecting the local RNA structure of the PLP1 splice donor site. Four deep intronic mutations were predicted to destabilize a long-distance interaction structure in the secondary PLP1 RNA fragment involved in...

  11. Mutations in the human adenosine deaminase gene that affect protein structure and RNA splicing

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency is one cause of the genetic disease severe combined immunodeficiency. To identify mutations responsible for ADA deficiency, the authors synthesized cDNAs to ADA mRNAs from two cell lines, GM2756 and GM2825A, derived from ADA-deficient immunodeficient patients. Sequence analysis of GM2756 cDNA clones revealed a different point mutation in each allele that causes amino acid changes of alanine to valine and arginine to histidine. One allele of GM2825A also has a point mutation that causes an alanine to valine substitution. The other allele of GM2825A was found to produce an mRNA in which exon 4 had been spliced out but had no other detrimental mutations. S1 nuclease mapping of GM2825A mRNA showed equal abundance of the full-length ADA mRNA and the ADA mRNA that was missing exon 4. Several of the ADA cDNA clones extended 5' of the major initiation start site, indicating multiple start sites for ADA transcription. The point mutations in GM2756 and GM2825A and the absence of exon 4 in GM2825A appear to be directly responsible for the ADA deficiency. Comparison of a number of normal and mutant ADA cDNA sequences showed a number of changes in the third base of codons. These change do not affect the amino acid sequence. Analyses of ADA cDNAs from different cell lines detected aberrant RNA species that either included intron 7 or excluded exon 7. Their presence is a result of aberrant splicing of pre-mRNAs and is not related to mutations that cause ADA deficiency

  12. Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Vivo by Overexpression of Antagonistic Splicing Factors

    Caceres, Javier F.; Stamm, Stefan; Helfman, David M.; Krainer, Adrian R.

    1994-09-01

    The opposing effects of SF2/ASF and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 influence alternative splicing in vitro. SF2/ASF or hnRNP A1 complementary DNAs were transiently overexpressed in HeLa cells, and the effect on alternative splicing of several cotransfected reporter genes was measured. Increased expression of SF2/ASF activated proximal 5' splice sites, promoted inclusion of a neuron-specific exon, and prevented abnormal exon skipping. Increased expression of hnRNP A1 activated distal 5' splice sites. Therefore, variations in the intracellular levels of antagonistic splicing factors influence different modes of alternative splicing in vivo and may be a natural mechanism for tissue-specific or developmental regulation of gene expression.

  13. Regulation of alternative splice site selection by reversible protein phosphorylation

    Novoyatleva, Tatyana

    2007-01-01

    Splicing is the process that removes introns and joins exons from pre-mesenger RNA (pre-mRNA). It is an essential step in pre-mRNA processing that form the mature RNA. Microarray data indicates that approximately 75% of human genes produce transcripts that are alternatively spliced. Alternative splicing is one of the major mechanisms that ultimately generate high number of protein isoforms from a limited number of genes. The proper catalysis and regulation of alternative splice site selection...

  14. Evolution of alternative splicing in primate brain transcriptomes

    Lin, Lan; Shen, Shihao; Jiang, Peng; Sato, Seiko; Davidson, Beverly L.; Xing, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a predominant form of gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. The evolution of alternative splicing provides an important mechanism for the acquisition of novel gene functions. In this work, we carried out a genome-wide phylogenetic survey of lineage-specific splicing patterns in the primate brain, via high-density exon junction array profiling of brain transcriptomes of humans, chimpanzees and rhesus macaques. We identified 509 genes showing splicing differences among t...

  15. Titin Diversity—Alternative Splicing Gone Wild

    Wei Guo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Titin is an extremely large protein found in highest concentrations in heart and skeletal muscle. The single mammalian gene is expressed in multiple isoforms as a result of alternative splicing. Although titin isoform expression is controlled developmentally and in a tissue specific manner, the vast number of potential splicing pathways far exceeds those described in any other alternatively spliced gene. Over 1 million human splice pathways for a single individual can be potentially derived from the PEVK region alone. A new splicing pattern for the human cardiac N2BA isoform type has been found in which the PEVK region includes only the N2B type exons. The alterations in splicing and titin isoform expression in human heart disease provide impetus for future detailed study of the splicing mechanisms for this giant protein.

  16. SpliceMiner: a high-throughput database implementation of the NCBI Evidence Viewer for microarray splice variant analysis

    Liu Hongfang; Ryan Michael C; Kahn Ari B; Zeeberg Barry R; Jamison D Curtis; Weinstein John N

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background There are many fewer genes in the human genome than there are expressed transcripts. Alternative splicing is the reason. Alternatively spliced transcripts are often specific to tissue type, developmental stage, environmental condition, or disease state. Accurate analysis of microarray expression data and design of new arrays for alternative splicing require assessment of probes at the sequence and exon levels. Description SpliceMiner is a web interface for querying Evidenc...

  17. A simple physical model predicts small exon length variations.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common splice variations are small exon length variations caused by the use of alternative donor or acceptor splice sites that are in very close proximity on the pre-mRNA. Among these, three-nucleotide variations at so-called NAGNAG tandem acceptor sites have recently attracted considerable attention, and it has been suggested that these variations are regulated and serve to fine-tune protein forms by the addition or removal of a single amino acid. In this paper we first show that in-frame exon length variations are generally overrepresented and that this overrepresentation can be quantitatively explained by the effect of nonsense-mediated decay. Our analysis allows us to estimate that about 50% of frame-shifted coding transcripts are targeted by nonsense-mediated decay. Second, we show that a simple physical model that assumes that the splicing machinery stochastically binds to nearby splice sites in proportion to the affinities of the sites correctly predicts the relative abundances of different small length variations at both boundaries. Finally, using the same simple physical model, we show that for NAGNAG sites, the difference in affinities of the neighboring sites for the splicing machinery accurately predicts whether splicing will occur only at the first site, splicing will occur only at the second site, or three-nucleotide splice variants are likely to occur. Our analysis thus suggests that small exon length variations are the result of stochastic binding of the spliceosome at neighboring splice sites. Small exon length variations occur when there are nearby alternative splice sites that have similar affinity for the splicing machinery.

  18. Identification of a novel EYA1 splice-site mutation in a Danish branchio-oto-renal syndrome family

    Henriksen, Ann Marie; Tümer, Zeynep; Tommerup, Niels;

    2004-01-01

    Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by variable clinical manifestations including branchial fistulae, preauricular pits, ear malformations, hearing impairment, and renal anomalies. BOR is caused by mutations in the genes EYA1 and SIX1. A Danish BOR...... family with five affected individuals in three generations was analyzed for mutations in all 17 exons of EYA1 using direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified genomic DNA. A novel splice-site mutation (IVS9+1 G>C) was detected in all affected family members but not in unaffected...... family members or in 96 controls. We conclude that this mutation is causing BOR in the family, most likely as a result of haploinsufficiency or an abnormal protein product caused by aberrant splicing of EYA1 mRNA....

  19. FULL-GENOME ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVE SPLICING IN MOUSE LIVER AFTER HEPATOTOXICANT EXPOSURE

    Alternative splicing plays a role in determining gene function and protein diversity. We have employed whole genome exon profiling using Affymetrix Mouse Exon 1.0 ST arrays to understand the significance of alternative splicing on a genome-wide scale in response to multiple toxic...

  20. Characterization of Neuronal-Specific Tra2b Knock-Out Mice and Identification of Tra2b Splicing Targets

    Storbeck, Markus

    2013-01-01

    TRA2B is a serine-arginine-rich splicing factor that contributes to the alternative splicing of exons and depletion of Tra2b in the mouse causes early embryonic lethality. It modulates splice site selection in a concentration dependent fashion and associates to target exons either directly via GAA binding motifs or indirectly via interactions with other splice factors. TRA2B is highest expressed in neuronal tissue and testis and its expression and activation are controlled via an autoregulato...

  1. Alternative splicing variants of human Fbx4 disturb cyclin D1 proteolysis in human cancer.

    Chu, Xiufeng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Jie; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Tu, Jing; Sun, Shiqin; Chen, Xiangmei; Lu, Fengmin

    2014-04-25

    Fbx4 is a specific substrate recognition component of SCF ubiquitin ligases that catalyzes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cyclin D1 and Trx1. Two isoforms of human Fbx4 protein, the full length Fbx4α and the C-terminal truncated Fbx4β have been identified, but their functions remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that the mRNA level of Fbx4 was significantly lower in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues than that in the corresponding non-tumor tissues. More importantly, we identified three novel splicing variants of Fbx4: Fbx4γ (missing 168-245 nt of exon1), Fbx4δ (missing exon6) and a N-terminal reading frame shift variant (missing exon2). Using cloning sequencing and RT-PCR, we demonstrated these novel splice variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cell lines than that in normal tissues. When expressed in Sk-Hep1 and NIH3T3 cell lines, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ and Fbx4δ could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Concordantly, these isoforms could disrupt cyclin D1 degradation and therefore increase cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, unlike the full-length isoform Fbx4α that mainly exists in cytoplasm, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ, and Fbx4δ locate in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Since cyclin D1 degradation takes place in cytoplasm, the nuclear distribution of these Fbx4 isoforms may not be involved in the down-regulation of cytoplasmic cyclin D1. These results define the impact of alternative splicing on Fbx4 function, and suggest that the attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by these novel Fbx4 isoforms provides a new insight for aberrant cyclin D1 expression in human cancers. PMID:24704453

  2. cis-Acting and trans-acting modulation of equine infectious anemia virus alternative RNA splicing

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a lentivirus distantly related to HIV-1, encodes regulatory proteins, EIAV Tat (ETat) and Rev (ERev), from a four-exon mRNA. Exon 3 of the tat/rev mRNA contains a 30-nucleotide purine-rich element (PRE) which binds both ERev and SF2/ASF, a member of the SR family of RNA splicing factors. To better understand the role of this element in the regulation of EIAV pre-mRNA splicing, we quantified the effects of mutation or deletion of the PRE on exon 3 splicing in vitro and on alternative splicing in vivo. We also determined the branch point elements upstream of exons 3 and 4. In vitro splicing of exon 3 to exon 4 was not affected by mutation of the PRE, and addition of purified SR proteins enhanced splicing independently of the PRE. In vitro splicing of exon 2 to exon 3 was dependent on the PRE; under conditions of excess SR proteins, either the PRE or the 5' splice site of exon 3 was sufficient to activate splicing. We applied isoform-specific primers in real-time RT-PCR reactions to quantitatively analyze alternative splicing in cells transfected with rev-minus EIAV provirus constructs. In the context of provirus with wild-type exon 3, greater than 80% of the viral mRNAs were multiply spliced, and of these, less than 1% excluded exon 3. Deletion of the PRE resulted in a decrease in the relative amount of multiply spliced mRNA to about 40% of the total and approximately 39% of the viral mRNA excluded exon 3. Ectopic expression of ERev caused a decrease in the relative amount of multiply spliced mRNA to approximately 50% of the total and increased mRNAs that excluded exon 3 to about 4%. Over-expression of SF2/ASF in cells transfected with wild-type provirus constructs inhibited splicing but did not significantly alter exon 3 skipping

  3. TALE-directed local modulation of H3K9 methylation shapes exon recognition

    Bieberstein, Nicole I.; Kozáková, Eva; Huranová, Martina; Thakur, Prasoon K.; Krchňáková, Zuzana; Krausová, Michaela; Oesterreich, Fernando Carrillo; Staněk, David

    2016-01-01

    In search for the function of local chromatin environment on pre-mRNA processing we established a new tool, which allows for the modification of chromatin using a targeted approach. Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector domains fused to histone modifying enzymes (TALE-HME), we show locally restricted alteration of histone methylation modulates the splicing of target exons. We provide evidence that a local increase in H3K9 di- and trimethylation promotes inclusion of the target alternative exon, while demethylation by JMJD2D leads to exon skipping. We further demonstrate that H3K9me3 is localized on internal exons genome-wide suggesting a general role in splicing. Consistently, targeting of the H3K9 demethylase to a weak constitutive exon reduced co-transcriptional splicing. Together our data show H3K9 methylation within the gene body is a factor influencing recognition of both constitutive and alternative exons. PMID:27439481

  4. TALE-directed local modulation of H3K9 methylation shapes exon recognition.

    Bieberstein, Nicole I; Kozáková, Eva; Huranová, Martina; Thakur, Prasoon K; Krchňáková, Zuzana; Krausová, Michaela; Carrillo Oesterreich, Fernando; Staněk, David

    2016-01-01

    In search for the function of local chromatin environment on pre-mRNA processing we established a new tool, which allows for the modification of chromatin using a targeted approach. Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector domains fused to histone modifying enzymes (TALE-HME), we show locally restricted alteration of histone methylation modulates the splicing of target exons. We provide evidence that a local increase in H3K9 di- and trimethylation promotes inclusion of the target alternative exon, while demethylation by JMJD2D leads to exon skipping. We further demonstrate that H3K9me3 is localized on internal exons genome-wide suggesting a general role in splicing. Consistently, targeting of the H3K9 demethylase to a weak constitutive exon reduced co-transcriptional splicing. Together our data show H3K9 methylation within the gene body is a factor influencing recognition of both constitutive and alternative exons. PMID:27439481

  5. SF3B1 Association with Chromatin Determines Splicing Outcomes

    Nir Kfir

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Much remains unknown concerning the mechanism by which the splicing machinery pinpoints short exons within intronic sequences and how splicing factors are directed to their pre-mRNA targets. One probable explanation lies in differences in chromatin organization between exons and introns. Proteomic, co-immunoprecipitation, and sedimentation analyses described here indicate that SF3B1, an essential splicing component of the U2 snRNP complex, is strongly associated with nucleosomes. ChIP-seq and RNA-seq analyses reveal that SF3B1 specifically binds nucleosomes located at exonic positions. SF3B1 binding is enriched at nucleosomes positioned over short exons flanked by long introns that are also characterized by differential GC content between exons and introns. Disruption of SF3B1 binding to such nucleosomes affects splicing of these exons similarly to SF3B1 knockdown. Our findings suggest that the association of SF3B1 with nucleosomes is functionally important for splice-site recognition and that SF3B1 conveys splicing-relevant information embedded in chromatin structure.

  6. Smooth muscle alternative splicing induced in fibroblasts by heterologous expression of a regulatory gene.

    G. C. Roberts; Gooding, C; Smith, C W

    1996-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a common mechanism for regulating gene expression in different cell types. In order to understand this important process, the trans-acting factors that enforce the choice of particular splicing pathways in different environments must be identified. We have used the rat alpha-tropomyosin gene as a model system of tissue-specific alternative splicing. Exon 3 of alpha-tropomyosin is specifically inhibited in smooth muscle cells allowing the alternative inclusion of exon 2...

  7. Impairment of pre-mRNA splicing in liver disease: Mechanisms and consequences

    Carmen; Berasain; Saioa; Gońi; Josefa; Castillo; Maria; Ujue; Latasa; Jesús; Prieto; Matias; A; Avila

    2010-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is an essential step in the process of gene expression in eukaryotes and consists of the removal ofintrons and the linking of exons to generate mature mRNAs. This is a highly regulated mechanism that allows the alternative usage of exons, the retention ofintronic sequences and the generation of exonic sequences of variable length. Most human genes undergo splicing events, and disruptions of this process have been associated with a variety of diseases, including cancer. Hepatocellular carci...

  8. Phosphorylation-Mediated Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Cancer

    Chiara Naro; Claudio Sette

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is one of the key processes involved in the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. AS catalyzes the removal of intronic sequences and the joining of selected exons, thus ensuring the correct processing of the primary transcript into the mature mRNA. The combinatorial nature of AS allows a great expansion of the genome coding potential, as multiple splice-variants encoding for different proteins may arise from a single gene. Splicing is mediated by a large...

  9. Embracing the complexity of pre-mRNA splicing

    Peter J Shepard; Klemens J Hertel

    2010-01-01

    @@ Pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental process required for the expression of most metazoan genes. It is carried out by the spliceosome, which catalyzes the removal of non-coding intronic sequences to assemble exons into mature mRNAs prior to export and translation.Defects in splicing lead to many human genetic diseases [1], and splicing mutations in a number of genes involved in growth control have been implicated in multiple types of cancer.

  10. A 3' splice site mutation in the thyroglobulin gene responsible for congenital goiter with hypothyroidism.

    Ieiri, T; Cochaux, P; Targovnik, H M; Suzuki, M; Shimoda, S; Perret, J; Vassart, G

    1991-12-01

    A case of congenital goiter with defective thyroglobulin synthesis has been studied in molecular terms. The patient is the fifth of a kindred of six, three of which have a goiter. The parents are first cousins. Segregation of thyroglobulin alleles in the family was studied by Southern blotting with a probe revealing a diallelic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The results demonstrated that the three affected siblings were homozygous for the RFLP. Northern blotting analysis of the goiter RNA with a thyroglobulin probe suggested that thyroglobulin mRNA size was slightly reduced. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 8.5-kb thyroglobulin mRNA as overlapping cDNA fragments demonstrated that a 200-bp segment was missing from the 5' region of the goiter mRNA. Subcloning and sequencing of the cDNA fragments, and of the patient genomic DNA amplified from this region, revealed that exon 4 is missing from the major thyroglobulin transcript in the goiter, and that this aberrant splicing is due to a C to G transversion at position minus 3 in the acceptor splice site of intron 3. The presence in exon 4 of a putative donor tyrosine residue (Tyrosine nr 130) involved in thyroid hormone formation provides a coherent explanation to the hypothyroid status of the patient. PMID:1752952

  11. Functional and evolutionary analysis of alternatively spliced genes is consistent with an early eukaryotic origin of alternative splicing

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Penny, David;

    2007-01-01

    , and may therefore predate multicellularity, is still unknown. To better understand the origin and evolution of alternative splicing and its usage in diverse organisms, we studied alternative splicing in 12 eukaryotic species, comparing rates of alternative splicing across genes of different functional...... classes, cellular locations, intron/exon structures and evolutionary origins. RESULTS: For each species, we find that genes from most functional categories are alternatively spliced. Ancient genes (shared between animals, fungi and plants) show high levels of alternative splicing. Genes with products...... expressed in the nucleus or plasma membrane are generally more alternatively spliced while those expressed in extracellular location show less alternative splicing. We find a clear correspondence between incidence of alternative splicing and intron number per gene both within and between genomes. In general...

  12. Ultraconserved elements are associated with homeostatic control of splicing regulators by alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay

    Ni, Julie Z.; Grate, Leslie; Donohue, John Paul; Preston, Christine; Nobida, Naomi; O’Brien, Georgeann; Shiue, Lily; Clark, Tyson A.; Blume, John E; Ares, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Many alternative splicing events create RNAs with premature stop codons, suggesting that alternative splicing coupled with nonsense-mediated decay (AS-NMD) may regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. We tested this idea in mice by blocking NMD and measuring changes in isoform representation using splicing-sensitive microarrays. We found a striking class of highly conserved stop codon-containing exons whose inclusion renders the transcript sensitive to NMD. A genomic search for additi...

  13. Alternative splicing regulation during C. elegans development: splicing factors as regulated targets.

    Sergio Barberan-Soler

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates protein diversity and allows for post-transcriptional gene regulation. Estimates suggest that 10% of the genes in Caenorhabditis elegans undergo alternative splicing. We constructed a splicing-sensitive microarray to detect alternative splicing for 352 cassette exons and tested for changes in alternative splicing of these genes during development. We found that the microarray data predicted that 62/352 (approximately 18% of the alternative splicing events studied show a strong change in the relative levels of the spliced isoforms (>4-fold during development. Confirmation of the microarray data by RT-PCR was obtained for 70% of randomly selected genes tested. Among the genes with the most developmentally regulated alternatively splicing was the hnRNP F/H splicing factor homolog, W02D3.11 - now named hrpf-1. For the cassette exon of hrpf-1, the inclusion isoform comprises 65% of hrpf-1 steady state messages in embryos but only 0.1% in the first larval stage. This dramatic change in the alternative splicing of an alternative splicing factor suggests a complex cascade of splicing regulation during development. We analyzed splicing in embryos from a strain with a mutation in the splicing factor sym-2, another hnRNP F/H homolog. We found that approximately half of the genes with large alternative splicing changes between the embryo and L1 stages are regulated by sym-2 in embryos. An analysis of the role of nonsense-mediated decay in regulating steady-state alternative mRNA isoforms was performed. We found that 8% of the 352 events studied have alternative isoforms whose relative steady-state levels in embryos change more than 4-fold in a nonsense-mediated decay mutant, including hrpf-1. Strikingly, 53% of these alternative splicing events that are affected by NMD in our experiment are not obvious substrates for NMD based on the presence of premature termination codons. This suggests that the targeting of splicing factors

  14. Exon silencing by UAGG motifs in response to neuronal excitation.

    Ping An

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays fundamental roles in neurons by generating functional diversity in proteins associated with the communication and connectivity of the synapse. The CI cassette of the NMDA R1 receptor is one of a variety of exons that show an increase in exon skipping in response to cell excitation, but the molecular nature of this splicing responsiveness is not yet understood. Here we investigate the molecular basis for the induced changes in splicing of the CI cassette exon in primary rat cortical cultures in response to KCl-induced depolarization using an expression assay with a tight neuron-specific readout. In this system, exon silencing in response to neuronal excitation was mediated by multiple UAGG-type silencing motifs, and transfer of the motifs to a constitutive exon conferred a similar responsiveness by gain of function. Biochemical analysis of protein binding to UAGG motifs in extracts prepared from treated and mock-treated cortical cultures showed an increase in nuclear hnRNP A1-RNA binding activity in parallel with excitation. Evidence for the role of the NMDA receptor and calcium signaling in the induced splicing response was shown by the use of specific antagonists, as well as cell-permeable inhibitors of signaling pathways. Finally, a wider role for exon-skipping responsiveness is shown to involve additional exons with UAGG-related silencing motifs, and transcripts involved in synaptic functions. These results suggest that, at the post-transcriptional level, excitable exons such as the CI cassette may be involved in strategies by which neurons mount adaptive responses to hyperstimulation.

  15. Spliced-leader trans-splicing in freshwater planarians.

    Zayas, Ricardo M; Bold, Tyler D; Newmark, Phillip A

    2005-10-01

    trans-Splicing, in which a spliced-leader (SL) RNA is appended to the most 5' exon of independently transcribed pre-mRNAs, has been described in a wide range of eukaryotes, from protozoans to chordates. Here we describe trans-splicing in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, a free-living member of the phylum Platyhelminthes. Analysis of an expressed sequence tag (EST) collection from this organism showed that over 300 transcripts shared one of two approximately 35-base sequences (Smed SL-1 and SL-2) at their 5' ends. Examination of genomic sequences encoding representatives of these transcripts revealed that these shared sequences were transcribed elsewhere in the genome. RNA blot analysis, 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends, as well as genomic sequence data showed that 42-nt SL sequences were derived from small RNAs of approximately 110 nt. Similar sequences were also found at the 5' ends of ESTs from the planarian Dugesia japonica. trans-Splicing has already been described in numerous representatives of the phylum Platyhelminthes (trematodes, cestodes, and polyclads); its presence in two representatives of the triclads supports the hypothesis that this mode of RNA processing is ancestral within this group. The upcoming complete genome sequence of S. mediterranea, combined with this animal's experimental accessibility and susceptibility to RNAi, provide another model organism in which to study the function of the still-enigmatic trans-splicing. PMID:15972844

  16. Functional and evolutionary analysis of alternatively spliced genes is consistent with an early eukaryotic origin of alternative splicing

    Penny David

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing has been reported in various eukaryotic groups including plants, apicomplexans, diatoms, amoebae, animals and fungi. However, whether widespread alternative splicing has evolved independently in the different eukaryotic groups or was inherited from their last common ancestor, and may therefore predate multicellularity, is still unknown. To better understand the origin and evolution of alternative splicing and its usage in diverse organisms, we studied alternative splicing in 12 eukaryotic species, comparing rates of alternative splicing across genes of different functional classes, cellular locations, intron/exon structures and evolutionary origins. Results For each species, we find that genes from most functional categories are alternatively spliced. Ancient genes (shared between animals, fungi and plants show high levels of alternative splicing. Genes with products expressed in the nucleus or plasma membrane are generally more alternatively spliced while those expressed in extracellular location show less alternative splicing. We find a clear correspondence between incidence of alternative splicing and intron number per gene both within and between genomes. In general, we find several similarities in patterns of alternative splicing across these diverse eukaryotes. Conclusion Along with previous studies indicating intron-rich genes with weak intron boundary consensus and complex spliceosomes in ancestral organisms, our results suggest that at least a simple form of alternative splicing may already have been present in the unicellular ancestor of plants, fungi and animals. A role for alternative splicing in the evolution of multicellularity then would largely have arisen by co-opting the preexisting process.

  17. Normal and abnormal mechanisms of gene splicing and relevance to inherited skin diseases

    Wessagowit, Vesarat; Nalla, Vijay K.; Rogan, Peter K; McGrath, John A

    2005-01-01

    The process of excising introns from pre-mRNA complexes is directed by specific genomic DNA sequences at intron—exon borders known as splice sites. These regions contain well-conserved motifs which allow the splicing process to proceed in a regulated and structured manner. However, as well as conventional splicing, several genes have the inherent capacity to undergo alternative splicing, thus allowing synthesis of multiple gene transcripts, perhaps with different functional properties. Within...

  18. Quantification of type II procollagen splice forms using Alternative Transcript-qPCR (AT-qPCR)

    McAlinden, Audrey; Shim, Kyu-Hwan; Wirthlin, Louisa; Ravindran, Soumya; Hering, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    During skeletal development, the onset of chondrogenic differentiation is marked by expression of the α1(II) procollagen Col2a1) gene. Exon 2 of Col2a1 codes for a cysteine-rich von Willebrand factor C-like domain. Chondroprogenitors express the exon 2-containing IIA and IID splice forms by utilizing adjacent 5′ splice sites separated by 3 base pairs. There is a shift to expression of the shorter, exon 2-lacking IIB splice form with further differentiation. Alternative splicing analysis of Co...

  19. The unusual 23S rRNA gene of Coxiella burnetii: two self-splicing group I introns flank a 34-base-pair exon, and one element lacks the canonical omegaG.

    Raghavan, Rahul; Miller, Scott R; Hicks, Linda D; Minnick, Michael F

    2007-09-01

    We describe the presence and characteristics of two self-splicing group I introns in the sole 23S rRNA gene of Coxiella burnetii. The two group I introns, Cbu.L1917 and Cbu.L1951, are inserted at sites 1917 and 1951 (Escherichia coli numbering), respectively, in the 23S rRNA gene of C. burnetii. Both introns were found to be self-splicing in vivo and in vitro even though the terminal nucleotide of Cbu.L1917 is adenine and not the canonical conserved guanine, termed OmegaG, found in Cbu.L1951 and all other group I introns described to date. Predicted secondary structures for both introns were constructed and revealed that Cbu.L1917 and Cbu.L1951 were group IB2 and group IA3 introns, respectively. We analyzed strains belonging to eight genomic groups of C. burnetii to determine sequence variation and the presence or absence of the elements and found both introns to be highly conserved (>/=99%) among them. Although phylogenetic analysis did not identify the specific identities of donors, it indicates that the introns were likely acquired independently; Cbu.L1917 was acquired from other bacteria like Thermotoga subterranea and Cbu.L1951 from lower eukaryotes like Acanthamoeba castellanii. We also confirmed the fragmented nature of mature 23S rRNA in C. burnetii due to the presence of an intervening sequence. The presence of three selfish elements in C. burnetii's 23S rRNA gene is very unusual for an obligate intracellular bacterium and suggests a recent shift to its current lifestyle from a previous niche with greater opportunities for lateral gene transfer. PMID:17644584

  20. Chromosomal aberration

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G1 phase. (author)

  1. Nanoplasmonic probes of RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Lee, Jong Uk; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    RNA splicing plays important roles in transcriptome and proteome diversity. Herein, we describe the use of a nanoplasmonic system that unveils RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing wherein the quantification of mRNA splice variants is not taken into account. With a couple of SERS-probes and plasmonic probes binding at the boundary sites of exon-2/intron-2 and intron-2/exon-3 of the pre-mature RNA of the β-globin gene, the splicing process brings the probes into the plasmonic bands. For plasmonic probes, a plasmon shift increase of ~29 nm, corresponding to intron removal and exon-2 and exon-3 connection to form the mRNA molecule, is measured by plasmonic coupling. The increased scattering intensity and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) fingerprinting reveal the clear dynamics of pre-mRNA splicing. Moreover, a time-resolved experiment of individual RNA molecules exhibited a successful splicing and an inhibited splicing event by 33 μM biflavonoid isoginkgetin, a general inhibitor of RNA splicing. The results suggest that the RNA splicing is successfully monitored with the nanoplasmonic system. Thus, this platform can be useful for studying RNA nanotechnology, biomolecular folding, alternative splicing, and maturation of microRNA.

  2. Intron-exon organization of the active human protein S gene PS. alpha. and its pseudogene PS. beta. : Duplication and silencing during primate evolution

    Ploos van Amstel, H.; Reitsma, P.H.; van der Logt, C.P.; Bertina, R.M. (University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands))

    1990-08-28

    The human protein S locus on chromosome 3 consists of two protein S genes, PS{alpha} and PS{beta}. Here the authors report the cloning and characterization of both genes. Fifteen exons of the PS{alpha} gene were identified that together code for protein S mRNA as derived from the reported protein S cDNAs. Analysis by primer extension of liver protein S mRNA, however, reveals the presence of two mRNA forms that differ in the length of their 5{prime}-noncoding region. Both transcripts contain a 5{prime}-noncoding region longer than found in the protein S cDNAs. The two products may arise from alternative splicing of an additional intron in this region or from the usage of two start sites for transcription. The intron-exon organization of the PS{alpha} gene fully supports the hypothesis that the protein S gene is the product of an evolutional assembling process in which gene modules coding for structural/functional protein units also found in other coagulation proteins have been put upstream of the ancestral gene of a steroid hormone binding protein. The PS{beta} gene is identified as a pseudogene. It contains a large variety of detrimental aberrations, viz., the absence of exon I, a splice site mutation, three stop codons, and a frame shift mutation. Overall the two genes PS{alpha} and PS{beta} show between their exonic sequences 96.5% homology. Southern analysis of primate DNA showed that the duplication of the ancestral protein S gene has occurred after the branching of the orangutan from the African apes. A nonsense mutation that is present in the pseudogene of man also could be identified in one of the two protein S genes of both chimpanzee and gorilla. This implicates that silencing of one of the two protein S genes must have taken place before the divergence of the three African apes.

  3. Characteristics of transposable element exonization within human and mouse.

    Noa Sela

    Full Text Available Insertion of transposed elements within mammalian genes is thought to be an important contributor to mammalian evolution and speciation. Insertion of transposed elements into introns can lead to their activation as alternatively spliced cassette exons, an event called exonization. Elucidation of the evolutionary constraints that have shaped fixation of transposed elements within human and mouse protein coding genes and subsequent exonization is important for understanding of how the exonization process has affected transcriptome and proteome complexities. Here we show that exonization of transposed elements is biased towards the beginning of the coding sequence in both human and mouse genes. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs revealed that exonization of transposed elements can be population-specific, implying that exonizations may enhance divergence and lead to speciation. SNP density analysis revealed differences between Alu and other transposed elements. Finally, we identified cases of primate-specific Alu elements that depend on RNA editing for their exonization. These results shed light on TE fixation and the exonization process within human and mouse genes.

  4. In vitro Splicing of Influenza Viral NS1 mRNA and NS1-β -globin Chimeras: Possible Mechanisms for the Control of Viral mRNA Splicing

    Plotch, Stephen J.; Krug, Robert M.

    1986-08-01

    In influenza virus-infected cells, the splicing of the viral NS1 mRNA catalyzed by host nuclear enzymes is controlled so that the steady-state amount of the spliced NS2 mRNA is only 5-10% of that of the unspliced NS1 mRNA. Here we examine the splicing of NS1 mRNA in vitro, using nuclear extracts from HeLa cells. We show that in addition to its consensus 5' and 3' splice sites, NS1 mRNA has an intron branch-point adenosine residue that was functional in lariat formation. Nonetheless, this RNA was not detectably spliced in vitro under conditions in which a human β -globin precursor was efficiently spliced. Using chimeric RNA precursors containing both NS1 and β -globin sequences, we show that the NS1 5' splice site was effectively utilized by the β -globin branch-point sequence and 3' splice site to form a spliced RNA, whereas the NS1 3' splice site did not function in detectable splicing in vitro, even in the presence of the β -globin branch-point sequence or in the presence of both the branch-point sequence and 5' exon and splice site from β -globin With the chimeric precursors that were not detectably spliced, as with NS1 mRNA itself, a low level of a lariat structure containing only intron and not 3' exon sequences was formed. The inability of the consensus 3' splice site of NS1 mRNA to function effectively in in vitro splicing suggests that this site is structurally inaccessible to components of the splicing machinery. Based on these results, we propose two mechanisms whereby NS1 mRNA splicing in infected cells is controlled via the accessibility of its 3' splice site.

  5. Fractionation and characterization of a yeast mRNA splicing extract.

    S. C. Cheng; Abelson, J

    1986-01-01

    We have fractionated a yeast whole cell extract that can accurately splice synthetic actin and CYH2 pre-mRNAs. Three fractions, designated I, II, and III, have been separated by use of ammonium sulfate fractionation and chromatography on heparin agarose. Each fraction alone has no splicing activity. Fractions I and II allow the first step of the splicing reaction to proceed, giving rise to the splicing intermediates, free exon 1, and intron-exon 2. Addition of fraction III completes the react...

  6. Alternative splicing variants of human Fbx4 disturb cyclin D1 proteolysis in human cancer

    Chu, Xiufeng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Jie; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Tu, Jing [Department of Microbiology and Infectious Disease Center, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Sun, Shiqin [College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical University-Daqing, Daqing, Heilongjiang 163319 (China); Chen, Xiangmei, E-mail: xm_chen6176@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Microbiology and Infectious Disease Center, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Lu, Fengmin [Department of Microbiology and Infectious Disease Center, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • The expression of Fbx4 was significantly lower in HCC tissues. • Novel splicing variants of Fbx4 were identified. • These novel variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cells. • The novel Fbx4 isoforms could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. • These isoforms showed less capability for cyclin D1 binding and degradation. - Abstract: Fbx4 is a specific substrate recognition component of SCF ubiquitin ligases that catalyzes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cyclin D1 and Trx1. Two isoforms of human Fbx4 protein, the full length Fbx4α and the C-terminal truncated Fbx4β have been identified, but their functions remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that the mRNA level of Fbx4 was significantly lower in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues than that in the corresponding non-tumor tissues. More importantly, we identified three novel splicing variants of Fbx4: Fbx4γ (missing 168–245nt of exon1), Fbx4δ (missing exon6) and a N-terminal reading frame shift variant (missing exon2). Using cloning sequencing and RT-PCR, we demonstrated these novel splice variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cell lines than that in normal tissues. When expressed in Sk-Hep1 and NIH3T3 cell lines, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ and Fbx4δ could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Concordantly, these isoforms could disrupt cyclin D1 degradation and therefore increase cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, unlike the full-length isoform Fbx4α that mainly exists in cytoplasm, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ, and Fbx4δ locate in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Since cyclin D1 degradation takes place in cytoplasm, the nuclear distribution of these Fbx4 isoforms may not be involved in the down-regulation of cytoplasmic cyclin D1. These results define the impact of alternative splicing on Fbx4 function, and suggest that the attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by these novel Fbx4 isoforms provides a new insight for aberrant

  7. First Exon Length Controls Active Chromatin Signatures and Transcription

    Nicole I. Bieberstein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we explore the role of splicing in transcription, employing both genome-wide analysis of human ChIP-seq data and experimental manipulation of exon-intron organization in transgenic cell lines. We show that the activating histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K9ac map specifically to first exon-intron boundaries. This is surprising, because these marks help recruit general transcription factors (GTFs to promoters. In genes with long first exons, promoter-proximal levels of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac are greatly reduced; consequently, GTFs and RNA polymerase II are low at transcription start sites (TSSs and exhibit a second, promoter-distal peak from which transcription also initiates. In contrast, short first exons lead to increased H3K4me3 and H3K9ac at promoters, higher expression levels, accuracy in TSS usage, and a lower frequency of antisense transcription. Therefore, first exon length is predictive for gene activity. Finally, splicing inhibition and intron deletion reduce H3K4me3 levels and transcriptional output. Thus, gene architecture and splicing determines transcription quantity and quality as well as chromatin signatures.

  8. Adenosine to Inosine editing frequency controlled by splicing efficiency.

    Licht, Konstantin; Kapoor, Utkarsh; Mayrhofer, Elisa; Jantsch, Michael F

    2016-07-27

    Alternative splicing and adenosine to inosine (A to I) RNA-editing are major factors leading to co- and post-transcriptional modification of genetic information. Both, A to I editing and splicing occur in the nucleus. As editing sites are frequently defined by exon-intron basepairing, mRNA splicing efficiency should affect editing levels. Moreover, splicing rates affect nuclear retention and will therefore also influence the exposure of pre-mRNAs to the editing-competent nuclear environment. Here, we systematically test the influence of splice rates on RNA-editing using reporter genes but also endogenous substrates. We demonstrate for the first time that the extent of editing is controlled by splicing kinetics when editing is guided by intronic elements. In contrast, editing sites that are exclusively defined by exonic structures are almost unaffected by the splicing efficiency of nearby introns. In addition, we show that editing levels in pre- and mature mRNAs do not match. This phenomenon can in part be explained by the editing state of an RNA influencing its splicing rate but also by the binding of the editing enzyme ADAR that interferes with splicing. PMID:27112566

  9. Haploinsufficiency for Core Exon Junction Complex Components Disrupts Embryonic Neurogenesis and Causes p53-Mediated Microcephaly.

    Mao, Hanqian; McMahon, John J; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Zefeng; Silver, Debra L

    2016-09-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is an RNA binding complex comprised of the core components Magoh, Rbm8a, and Eif4a3. Human mutations in EJC components cause neurodevelopmental pathologies. Further, mice heterozygous for either Magoh or Rbm8a exhibit aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly. Yet despite the requirement of these genes for neurodevelopment, the pathogenic mechanisms linking EJC dysfunction to microcephaly remain poorly understood. Here we employ mouse genetics, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses to demonstrate that haploinsufficiency for each of the 3 core EJC components causes microcephaly via converging regulation of p53 signaling. Using a new conditional allele, we first show that Eif4a3 haploinsufficiency phenocopies aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly of Magoh and Rbm8a mutant mice. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of embryonic brains at the onset of neurogenesis identifies common pathways altered in each of the 3 EJC mutants, including ribosome, proteasome, and p53 signaling components. We further demonstrate all 3 mutants exhibit defective splicing of RNA regulatory proteins, implying an EJC dependent RNA regulatory network that fine-tunes gene expression. Finally, we show that genetic ablation of one downstream pathway, p53, significantly rescues microcephaly of all 3 EJC mutants. This implicates p53 activation as a major node of neurodevelopmental pathogenesis following EJC impairment. Altogether our study reveals new mechanisms to help explain how EJC mutations influence neurogenesis and underlie neurodevelopmental disease. PMID:27618312

  10. Coding exon-structure aware realigner (CESAR) utilizes genome alignments for accurate comparative gene annotation.

    Sharma, Virag; Elghafari, Anas; Hiller, Michael

    2016-06-20

    Identifying coding genes is an essential step in genome annotation. Here, we utilize existing whole genome alignments to detect conserved coding exons and then map gene annotations from one genome to many aligned genomes. We show that genome alignments contain thousands of spurious frameshifts and splice site mutations in exons that are truly conserved. To overcome these limitations, we have developed CESAR (Coding Exon-Structure Aware Realigner) that realigns coding exons, while considering reading frame and splice sites of each exon. CESAR effectively avoids spurious frameshifts in conserved genes and detects 91% of shifted splice sites. This results in the identification of thousands of additional conserved exons and 99% of the exons that lack inactivating mutations match real exons. Finally, to demonstrate the potential of using CESAR for comparative gene annotation, we applied it to 188 788 exons of 19 865 human genes to annotate human genes in 99 other vertebrates. These comparative gene annotations are available as a resource (http://bds.mpi-cbg.de/hillerlab/CESAR/). CESAR (https://github.com/hillerlab/CESAR/) can readily be applied to other alignments to accurately annotate coding genes in many other vertebrate and invertebrate genomes. PMID:27016733

  11. Novel Kidins220/ARMS Splice Isoforms: Potential Specific Regulators of Neuronal and Cardiovascular Development.

    Nathalie Schmieg

    Full Text Available Kidins220/ARMS is a transmembrane protein playing a crucial role in neuronal and cardiovascular development. Kidins220/ARMS is a downstream target of neurotrophin receptors and interacts with several signalling and trafficking factors. Through computational modelling, we found two potential sites for alternative splicing of Kidins220/ARMS. The first is located between exon 24 and exon 29, while the second site replaces exon 32 by a short alternative terminal exon 33. Here we describe the conserved occurrence of several Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms at RNA and protein levels. Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms display spatio-temporal regulation during development with distinct patterns in different neuronal populations. Neurotrophin receptor stimulation in cortical and hippocampal neurons and neuroendocrine cells induces specific Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms and alters the appearance kinetics of the full-length transcript. Remarkably, alternative terminal exon splicing generates Kidins220/ARMS variants with distinct cellular localisation: Kidins220/ARMS containing exon 32 is targeted to the plasma membrane and neurite tips, whereas Kidins220/ARMS without exon 33 mainly clusters the full-length protein in a perinuclear intracellular compartment in PC12 cells and primary neurons, leading to a change in neurotrophin receptor expression. Overall, this study demonstrates the existence of novel Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms with unique properties, revealing additional complexity in the functional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, and potentially other signalling pathways involved in neuronal and cardiovascular development.

  12. HP1 Is Involved in Regulating the Global Impact of DNA Methylation on Alternative Splicing

    Ahuvi Yearim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The global impact of DNA methylation on alternative splicing is largely unknown. Using a genome-wide approach in wild-type and methylation-deficient embryonic stem cells, we found that DNA methylation can either enhance or silence exon recognition and affects the splicing of more than 20% of alternative exons. These exons are characterized by distinct genetic and epigenetic signatures. Alternative splicing regulation of a subset of these exons can be explained by heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1, which silences or enhances exon recognition in a position-dependent manner. We constructed an experimental system using site-specific targeting of a methylated/unmethylated gene and demonstrate a direct causal relationship between DNA methylation and alternative splicing. HP1 regulates this gene’s alternative splicing in a methylation-dependent manner by recruiting splicing factors to its methylated form. Our results demonstrate DNA methylation’s significant global influence on mRNA splicing and identify a specific mechanism of splicing regulation mediated by HP1.

  13. Alternative splice variants of the human PD-1 gene

    Nielsen, Christian; Ohm-Laursen, Line; Barington, Torben;

    2005-01-01

    PD-1 is an immunoregulatory receptor expressed on the surface of activated T cells, B cells, and monocytes. We describe four alternatively spliced PD-1 mRNA transcripts (PD-1Deltaex2, PD-1Deltaex3, PD-1Deltaex2,3, and PD-1Deltaex2,3,4) in addition to the full length isoform. PD-1Deltaex2 and PD-1......Deltaex3 are generated by alternative splicing where exon 2 (extracellular IgV-like domain) and exon 3 (transmembrane domain) respectively are spliced out. PD-1Deltaex3 is therefore likely to encode a soluble form of PD-1. PD-1Deltaex2,3 lacks exon 2 and 3. These three variants have unaffected open...

  14. Genetic variations and alternative splicing. The Glioma associated oncogene 1, GLI1.

    Peter eZaphiropoulos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is a post-transcriptional regulatory process that is attaining stronger recognition as a modulator of gene expression. Alternative splicing occurs when the primary RNA transcript is differentially processed into more than one mature RNAs. This is the result of a variable definition/inclusion of the exons, the sequences that are excised from the primary RNA to form the mature RNAs. Consequently, RNA expression can generate a collection of differentially spliced RNAs, which may distinctly influence subsequent biological events, such as protein synthesis or other biomolecular interactions. Still the mechanisms that control exon definition and exon inclusion are not fully clarified. This mini-review highlights advances in this field as well as the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in affecting splicing decisions. The Glioma associated oncogene 1, GLI1, is taken as an example in addressing the role of nucleotide substitutions for splicing regulation.

  15. Expression of Two Novel Alternatively Spliced COL2A1 Isoforms During Chondrocyte Differentiation

    McAlinden, Audrey; Johnstone, Brian; Kollar, John; Kazmi, Najam; Hering, Thomas M.

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) is developmentally-regulated during chondrogenesis. Type IIA procollagen (+ exon 2) is synthesized by chondroprogenitor cells while type IIB procollagen (- exon 2) is synthesized by differentiated chondrocytes. Here, we report expression of two additional alternatively spliced COL2A1 isoforms during chondrocyte differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). One isoform, named IIC, contains only the first 34 n...

  16. Computational Analysis of an Evolutionarily Conserved VertebrateMuscle Alternative Splicing Program

    Das, Debopriya; Clark, Tyson A.; Schweitzer, Anthony; Marr,Henry; Yamamoto, Miki L.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Arribere, Josh; Minovitsky,Simon; Dubchak, Inna; Blume, John E.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-06-15

    A novel exon microarray format that probes gene expression with single exon resolution was employed to elucidate critical features of a vertebrate muscle alternative splicing program. A dataset of 56 microarray-defined, muscle-enriched exons and their flanking introns were examined computationally in order to investigate coordination of the muscle splicing program. Candidate intron regulatory motifs were required to meet several stringent criteria: significant over-representation near muscle-enriched exons, correlation with muscle expression, and phylogenetic conservation among genomes of several vertebrate orders. Three classes of regulatory motifs were identified in the proximal downstream intron, within 200nt of the target exons: UGCAUG, a specific binding site for Fox-1 related splicing factors; ACUAAC, a novel branchpoint-like element; and UG-/UGC-rich elements characteristic of binding sites for CELF splicing factors. UGCAUG was remarkably enriched, being present in nearly one-half of all cases. These studies suggest that Fox and CELF splicing factors play a major role in enforcing the muscle-specific alternative splicing program, facilitating expression of a set of unique isoforms of cytoskeletal proteins that are critical to muscle cell differentiation. Supplementary materials: There are four supplementary tables and one supplementary figure. The tables provide additional detailed information concerning the muscle-enriched datasets, and about over-represented oligonucleotide sequences in the flanking introns. The supplementary figure shows RT-PCR data confirming the muscle-enriched expression of exons predicted from the microarray analysis.

  17. Determinants of the Usage of Splice-Associated cis-Motifs Predict the Distribution of Human Pathogenic SNPs

    Wu, XianMing; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2016-01-01

    Where in genes do pathogenic mutations tend to occur and does this provide clues as to the possible underlying mechanisms by which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) cause disease? As splice-disrupting mutations tend to occur predominantly at exon ends, known also to be hot spots of cis-exonic splice control elements, we examine the relationship between the relative density of such exonic cis-motifs and pathogenic SNPs. In particular, we focus on the intragene distribution of exonic splicing enhancers (ESE) and the covariance between them and disease-associated SNPs. In addition to showing that disease-causing genes tend to be genes with a high intron density, consistent with missplicing, five factors established as trends in ESE usage, are considered: relative position in exons, relative position in genes, flanking intron size, splice sites usage, and phase. We find that more than 76% of pathogenic SNPs are within 3–69 bp of exon ends where ESEs generally reside, this being 13% more than expected. Overall from enrichment of pathogenic SNPs at exon ends, we estimate that approximately 20–45% of SNPs affect splicing. Importantly, we find that within genes pathogenic SNPs tend to occur in splicing-relevant regions with low ESE density: they are found to occur preferentially in the terminal half of genes, in exons flanked by short introns and at the ends of phase (0,0) exons with 3′ non-“AGgt” splice site. We suggest the concept of the “fragile” exon, one home to pathogenic SNPs owing to its vulnerability to splice disruption owing to low ESE density. PMID:26545919

  18. A selective splicing variant of hepcidin mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    Toki, Yasumichi; Sasaki, Katsunori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Masayo; Hatayama, Mayumi; Ito, Satoshi; Ikuta, Katsuya; Shindo, Motohiro; Hasebe, Takumu; Nakajima, Shunsuke; Sawada, Koji; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Torimoto, Yoshihiro; Ohtake, Takaaki; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Hepcidin is a main regulator of iron metabolism, of which abnormal expression affects intestinal absorption and reticuloendothelial sequestration of iron by interacting with ferroportin. It is also noted that abnormal iron accumulation is one of the key factors to facilitate promotion and progression of cancer including hepatoma. By RT-PCR/agarose gel electrophoresis of hepcidin mRNA in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HLF, a smaller mRNA band was shown in addition to the wild-type hepcidin mRNA. From sequencing analysis, this additional band was a selective splicing variant of hepcidin mRNA lacking exon 2 of HAMP gene, producing the transcript that encodes truncated peptide lacking 20 amino acids at the middle of preprohepcidin. In the present study, we used the digital PCR, because such a small amount of variant mRNA was difficult to quantitate by the conventional RT-PCR amplification. Among seven hepatoma-derived cell lines, six cell lines have significant copy numbers of this variant mRNA, but not in one cell line. In the transient transfection analysis of variant-type hepcidin cDNA, truncated preprohepcidin has a different character comparing with native preprohepcidin: its product is insensitive to digestion, and secreted into the medium as a whole preprohepcidin form without maturation. Loss or reduction of function of HAMP gene by aberrantly splicing may be a suitable phenomenon to obtain the proliferating advantage of hepatoma cells. PMID:27264950

  19. Altered PLP1 splicing causes hypomyelination of early myelinating structures

    Kevelam, Sietske H; Taube, Jennifer R; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L; Bertini, Enrico; Sperle, Karen; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Travaglini, Lorena; Sistermans, Erik A; Bernard, Geneviève; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Østergaard, John R; Friederich, Richard L; Fawzi Elsaid, Mahmoud; Schieving, Jolanda H; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Orcesi, Simona; Steenweg, Marjan E; van Berkel, Carola G M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Abbink, Truus E M; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Hobson, Grace M; Wolf, Nicole I

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic etiology of the X-linked disorder “Hypomyelination of Early Myelinating Structures” (HEMS). Methods We included 16 patients from 10 families diagnosed with HEMS by brain MRI criteria. Exome sequencing was used to search for causal mutations. In silico analysis of effects of the mutations on splicing and RNA folding was performed. In vitro gene splicing was examined in RNA from patients’ fibroblasts and an immortalized immature oligodendrocyte cell line after transfection with mutant minigene splicing constructs. Results All patients had unusual hemizygous mutations of PLP1 located in exon 3B (one deletion, one missense and two silent), which is spliced out in isoform DM20, or in intron 3 (five mutations). The deletion led to truncation of PLP1, but not DM20. Four mutations were predicted to affect PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing by creating exonic splicing silencer motifs or new splice donor sites or by affecting the local RNA structure of the PLP1 splice donor site. Four deep intronic mutations were predicted to destabilize a long-distance interaction structure in the secondary PLP1 RNA fragment involved in regulating PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing. Splicing studies in fibroblasts and transfected cells confirmed a decreased PLP1/DM20 ratio. Interpretation Brain structures that normally myelinate early are poorly myelinated in HEMS, while they are the best myelinated structures in Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease, also caused by PLP1 alterations. Our data extend the phenotypic spectrum of PLP1-related disorders indicating that normal PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing is essential for early myelination and support the need to include intron 3 in diagnostic sequencing. PMID:26125040

  20. Inducible Expression and Splicing of Candida Group Ⅰ Ribozyme in E.coli

    SHANG Yuan; WANG Chen; ZHANG Yi

    2005-01-01

    The Ca. LSU intron flanking a 129 bp exon upstream and a 100 bp exon downstream was inserted into the lacZ gene on pRS426 to transform E. coli. Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR showed that splicing of Ca. LSU in E.coli is efficient upon inducible expression of the precursor RNA. In contrast, co-transcriptional self-splicing of the intron in vitro is much less active. Therefore, this E. coli splicing system can be used as a better model to investigate the effect of the ribozyme inhibitors on Ca. LSU splicing in living cell. We examined the effects of neomycin sulfate and pentamidine on Ca. LSU splicing in E. coli, and found that these drugs does-dependently inhibit the intron splicing.However, heomycin is more potent than pentamidine in this action.

  1. Genome-wide analysis of SRSF10-regulated alternative splicing by deep sequencing of chicken transcriptome

    Xuexia Zhou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Splicing factor SRSF10 is known to function as a sequence-specific splicing activator that is capable of regulating alternative splicing both in vitro and in vivo. We recently used an RNA-seq approach coupled with bioinformatics analysis to identify the extensive splicing network regulated by SRSF10 in chicken cells. We found that SRSF10 promoted both exon inclusion and exclusion. Functionally, many of the SRSF10-verified alternative exons are linked to pathways of response to external stimulus. Here we describe in detail the experimental design, bioinformatics analysis and GO/pathway enrichment analysis of SRSF10-regulated genes to correspond with our data in the Gene Expression Omnibus with accession number GSE53354. Our data thus provide a resource for studying regulation of alternative splicing in vivo that underlines biological functions of splicing regulatory proteins in cells.

  2. Assessing the impact of alternative splicing on the diversity and evolution of the proteome in plants

    Severing, E.I.

    2011-01-01

    Splicing is one of the key processing steps during the maturation of a gene’s primary transcript into the mRNA molecule used as a template for protein production. Splicing involves the removal of segments called introns and re-joining of the remaining segments called exons. It is by now well e

  3. SpliceMiner: a high-throughput database implementation of the NCBI Evidence Viewer for microarray splice variant analysis

    Liu Hongfang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are many fewer genes in the human genome than there are expressed transcripts. Alternative splicing is the reason. Alternatively spliced transcripts are often specific to tissue type, developmental stage, environmental condition, or disease state. Accurate analysis of microarray expression data and design of new arrays for alternative splicing require assessment of probes at the sequence and exon levels. Description SpliceMiner is a web interface for querying Evidence Viewer Database (EVDB. EVDB is a comprehensive, non-redundant compendium of splice variant data for human genes. We constructed EVDB as a queryable implementation of the NCBI Evidence Viewer (EV. EVDB is based on data obtained from NCBI Entrez Gene and EV. The automated EVDB build process uses only complete coding sequences, which may or may not include partial or complete 5' and 3' UTRs, and filters redundant splice variants. Unlike EV, which supports only one-at-a-time queries, SpliceMiner supports high-throughput batch queries and provides results in an easily parsable format. SpliceMiner maps probes to splice variants, effectively delineating the variants identified by a probe. Conclusion EVDB can be queried by gene symbol, genomic coordinates, or probe sequence via a user-friendly web-based tool we call SpliceMiner (http://discover.nci.nih.gov/spliceminer. The EVDB/SpliceMiner combination provides an interface with human splice variant information and, going beyond the very valuable NCBI Evidence Viewer, supports fluent, high-throughput analysis. Integration of EVDB information into microarray analysis and design pipelines has the potential to improve the analysis and bioinformatic interpretation of gene expression data, for both batch and interactive processing. For example, whenever a gene expression value is recognized as important or appears anomalous in a microarray experiment, the interactive mode of SpliceMiner can be used quickly and easily to

  4. Comprehensive splicing graph analysis of alternative splicing patterns in chicken, compared to human and mouse

    Ranganathan Shoba

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative transcript diversity manifests itself as a prime cause of complexity in higher eukaryotes. Recently, transcript diversity studies have suggested that 60–80% of human genes are alternatively spliced. We have used a splicing pattern approach for the bioinformatics analysis of Alternative Splicing (AS in chicken, human and mouse. Exons involved in splicing are subdivided into distinct and variant exons, based on the prevalence of the exons across the transcripts. Four possible permutations of these two different groups of exons were categorised as class I (distinct-variant, class II (distinct-variant, class III (variant-distinct and class IV (variant-variant. This classification quantifies the variation in transcript diversity in the three species. Results In all, 3901 chicken AS genes have been compared with 16,715 human and 16,491 mouse AS genes, with 23% of chicken genes being alternatively spliced, compared to 68% in humans and 57% in mice. To minimize any gene structure bias in the input data, comparative genome analysis has been carried out on the orthologous subset of AS genes for the three species. Gene-level analysis suggested that chicken genes show fewer AS events compared to human and mouse. An event-level analysis showed that the percentage of AS events in chicken is similar to that of human, which implies that a smaller number of chicken genes show greater transcript diversity. Overall, chicken genes were found to have fewer transcripts per gene and shorter introns than human and mouse genes. Conclusion In chicken, the majority of genes generate only two or three isoforms, compared to almost eight in human and six in mouse. We observed that intron definition is expressed strongly when compared to exon definition for chicken genome, based on 3% intron retention in chicken, compared to 2% in human and mouse. Splicing patterns with variant exons account for 33% of AS chicken orthologous genes compared to

  5. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1

    Larsen, Knud Erik; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Farajzadeh, Leila;

    2015-01-01

    (90%) and to mouse (84%) synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing......RNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa) synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP) and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1) of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human...... variants and a novel splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation....

  6. CTCF:from insulators to alternative splicing regulation

    Alberto R Kornblihtt

    2012-01-01

    The zinc-finger DNA-binding protein CTCF has been known for being a constituent of insulators.A recent paper in Nature reports an unforeseen intragenic role for CTCF that links DNA methylation with alternative splicing.By binding to its target DNA site placed within an alternative exon,CTCF creates a roadblock to transcriptional elongation that favors inclusion of the exon into mature mRNA.DNA methylation prevents CTCF binding,which releases pol Ⅱ transient blockage and promotes exon exclusion.

  7. SEQassembly: A Practical Tools Program for Coding Sequences Splicing

    Lee, Hongbin; Yang, Hang; Fu, Lei; Qin, Long; Li, Huili; He, Feng; Wang, Bo; Wu, Xiaoming

    CDS (Coding Sequences) is a portion of mRNA sequences, which are composed by a number of exon sequence segments. The construction of CDS sequence is important for profound genetic analysis such as genotyping. A program in MATLAB environment is presented, which can process batch of samples sequences into code segments under the guide of reference exon models, and splice these code segments of same sample source into CDS according to the exon order in queue file. This program is useful in transcriptional polymorphism detection and gene function study.

  8. Splicing Programs and Cancer

    Sophie Germann; Lise Gratadou; Martin Dutertre; Didier Auboeuf

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies report splicing alterations in a multitude of cancers by using gene-by-gene analysis. However, understanding of the role of alternative splicing in cancer is now reaching a new level, thanks to the use of novel technologies allowing the analysis of splicing at a large-scale level. Genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing...

  9. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E; Lapin, Morten; Kristjansdottir, Karen; Petersen, Ulrika S S; Bang, Jeanne Mari V; Guerra, Barbara; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Carey, John C; Yu, Ping; Vaughn, Cecily; Calhoun, Amy; Larsen, Martin R; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Stevenson, David A; Andresen, Brage S

    2016-05-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE) and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS). We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping. PMID:27195699

  10. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    Anne-Mette Hartung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome (CS may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS. We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping.

  11. FineSplice, enhanced splice junction detection and quantification: a novel pipeline based on the assessment of diverse RNA-Seq alignment solutions.

    Gatto, Alberto; Torroja-Fungairiño, Carlos; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A; Barton, Paul J R; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique

    2014-04-01

    Alternative splicing is the main mechanism governing protein diversity. The recent developments in RNA-Seq technology have enabled the study of the global impact and regulation of this biological process. However, the lack of standardized protocols constitutes a major bottleneck in the analysis of alternative splicing. This is particularly important for the identification of exon-exon junctions, which is a critical step in any analysis workflow. Here we performed a systematic benchmarking of alignment tools to dissect the impact of design and method on the mapping, detection and quantification of splice junctions from multi-exon reads. Accordingly, we devised a novel pipeline based on TopHat2 combined with a splice junction detection algorithm, which we have named FineSplice. FineSplice allows effective elimination of spurious junction hits arising from artefactual alignments, achieving up to 99% precision in both real and simulated data sets and yielding superior F1 scores under most tested conditions. The proposed strategy conjugates an efficient mapping solution with a semi-supervised anomaly detection scheme to filter out false positives and allows reliable estimation of expressed junctions from the alignment output. Ultimately this provides more accurate information to identify meaningful splicing patterns. FineSplice is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/p/finesplice/. PMID:24574529

  12. hnRNP A1 contacts exon 5 to promote exon 6 inclusion of apoptotic Fas gene

    Oh, Hyun kyung; Lee, Eunkyung; Jang, Ha Na; Lee, Jaehoon; MOON, HEEGYUM; Sheng, Zhi; Jun, Youngsoo; LOH, TIING JEN; Cho, Sunghee; Zhou, Jianhua; Green, Michael R.; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2013-01-01

    Fas is a transmembrane cell surface protein recognized by Fas ligand (FasL). When FasL binds to Fas, the target cells undergo apoptosis. A soluble Fas molecule that lacks the transmembrane domain is produced from skipping of exon 6 encoding this region in alternative splicing procedure. The soluble Fas molecule has the opposite function of intact Fas molecule, protecting cells from apoptosis. Here we show that knockdown of hnRNP A1 promotes exon 6 skipping of Fas pre-mRNA, whereas overexpress...

  13. Antisense oligonucleotide induced exon skipping and the dystrophin gene transcript: cocktails and chemistries

    Fletcher Sue

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs can interfere with exon recognition and intron removal during pre-mRNA processing, and induce excision of a targeted exon from the mature gene transcript. AOs have been used in vitro and in vivo to redirect dystrophin pre-mRNA processing in human and animal cells. Targeted exon skipping of selected exons in the dystrophin gene transcript can remove nonsense or frame-shifting mutations that would otherwise have lead to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, the most common childhood form of muscle wasting. Results Although many dystrophin exons can be excised using a single AO, several exons require two motifs to be masked for efficient or specific exon skipping. Some AOs were inactive when applied individually, yet pronounced exon excision was induced in transfected cells when the AOs were used in select combinations, clearly indicating synergistic rather than cumulative effects on splicing. The necessity for AO cocktails to induce efficient exon removal was observed with 2 different chemistries, 2'-O-methyl modified bases on a phosphorothioate backbone and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers. Similarly, other trends in exon skipping, as a consequence of 2'-O-methyl AO action, such as removal of additional flanking exons or variations in exon skipping efficiency with overlapping AOs, were also seen when the corresponding sequences were prepared as phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers. Conclusion The combination of 2 AOs, directed at appropriate motifs in target exons was found to induce very efficient targeted exon skipping during processing of the dystrophin pre-mRNA. This combinatorial effect is clearly synergistic and is not influenced by the chemistry of the AOs used to induce exon excision. A hierarchy in exon skipping efficiency, observed with overlapping AOs composed of 2'-O-methyl modified bases, was also observed when these same sequences were evaluated as phosphorodiamidate morpholino

  14. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing switches modulate gene expression in late erythropoiesis

    Yamamoto, Miki L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Kang, Jeong-Ah; Schweitzer, Anthony C.; Wickrema, Amittha; Conboy, John G.

    2009-02-03

    Differentiating erythroid cells execute a unique gene expression program that insures synthesis of the appropriate proteome at each stage of maturation. Standard expression microarrays provide important insight into erythroid gene expression but cannot detect qualitative changes in transcript structure, mediated by RNA processing, that alter structure and function of encoded proteins. We analyzed stage-specific changes in the late erythroid transcriptome via use of high-resolution microarrays that detect altered expression of individual exons. Ten differentiation-associated changes in erythroblast splicing patterns were identified, including the previously known activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 splicing. Six new alternative splicing switches involving enhanced inclusion of internal cassette exons were discovered, as well as 3 changes in use of alternative first exons. All of these erythroid stage-specific splicing events represent activated inclusion of authentic annotated exons, suggesting they represent an active regulatory process rather than a general loss of splicing fidelity. The observation that 3 of the regulated transcripts encode RNA binding proteins (SNRP70, HNRPLL, MBNL2) may indicate significant changes in the RNA processing machinery of late erythroblasts. Together, these results support the existence of a regulated alternative pre-mRNA splicing program that is critical for late erythroid differentiation.

  15. Seemingly neutral polymorphic variants may confer immunity to splicing-inactivating mutations

    Nielsen, Karsten Bork; Sørensen, Suzette; Cartegni, Luca;

    2007-01-01

    assays to show that a missense mutation in exon 5 of the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) gene primarily causes exon skipping by inactivating a crucial exonic splicing enhancer (ESE), thus leading to loss of a functional protein and to MCAD deficiency. This ESE functions by antagonizing a....... Our findings illustrate a mechanism for dramatic context-dependent effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms on gene-expression regulation and show that it is essential that potential deleterious effects of mutations on splicing be evaluated in the context of the relevant haplotype.......The idea that point mutations in exons may affect splicing is intriguing and adds an additional layer of complexity when evaluating their possible effects. Even in the best-studied examples, the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we use patient cells, model minigenes, and in vitro...

  16. Detecting differential usage of exons from RNA-seq data

    Anders, Simon; Reyes, Alejandro; Huber, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    RNA-seq is a powerful tool for the study of alternative splicing and other forms of alternative isoform expression. Understanding the regulation of these processes requires sensitive and specific detection of differential isoform abundance in comparisons between conditions, cell types, or tissues. We present DEXSeq, a statistical method to test for differential exon usage in RNA-seq data. DEXSeq uses generalized linear models and offers reliable control of false discoveries by taking biologic...

  17. Identification of a novel splicing form of amelogenin gene in a reptile, Ctenosaura similis.

    Xinping Wang

    Full Text Available Amelogenin, the major enamel matrix protein in tooth development, has been demonstrated to play a significant role in tooth enamel formation. Previous studies have identified the alternative splicing of amelogenin in many mammalian vertebrates as one mechanism for amelogenin heterogeneous expression in teeth. While amelogenin and its splicing forms in mammalian vertebrates have been cloned and sequenced, the amelogenin gene, especially its splicing forms in non-mammalian species, remains largely unknown. To better understand the mechanism underlying amelogenin evolution, we previously cloned and characterized an amelogenin gene sequence from a squamate, the green iguana. In this study, we employed RT-PCR to amplify the amelogenin gene from the black spiny-tailed iguana Ctenosaura similis teeth, and discovered a novel splicing form of the amelogenin gene. The transcript of the newly identified iguana amelogenin gene (named C. Similis-T2L is 873 nucleotides long encoding an expected polypeptide of 206 amino acids. The C. Similis-T2L contains a unique exon denominated exon X, which is located between exon 5 and exon 6. The C. Similis-T2L contains 7 exons including exon 1, 2, 3, 5, X, 6, and 7. Analysis of the secondary and tertiary structures of T2L amelogenin protein demonstrated that exon X has a dramatic effect on the amelogenin structures. This is the first report to provide definitive evidence for the amelogenin alternative splicing in non-mammalian vertebrates, revealing a unique exon X and the splicing form of the amelogenin gene transcript in Ctenosaura similis.

  18. Deletion of Dystrophin In-Frame Exon 5 Leads to a Severe Phenotype: Guidance for Exon Skipping Strategies.

    Toh, Zhi Yon Charles; Thandar Aung-Htut, May; Pinniger, Gavin; Adams, Abbie M; Krishnaswarmy, Sudarsan; Wong, Brenda L; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy severity depends upon the nature and location of the DMD gene lesion and generally correlates with the dystrophin open reading frame. However, there are striking exceptions where an in-frame genomic deletion leads to severe pathology or protein-truncating mutations (nonsense or frame-shifting indels) manifest as mild disease. Exceptions to the dystrophin reading frame rule are usually resolved after molecular diagnosis on muscle RNA. We report a moderate/severe Becker muscular dystrophy patient with an in-frame genomic deletion of DMD exon 5. This mutation has been reported by others as resulting in Duchenne or Intermediate muscular dystrophy, and the loss of this in-frame exon in one patient led to multiple splicing events, including omission of exon 6, that disrupts the open reading frame and is consistent with a severe phenotype. The patient described has a deletion of dystrophin exon 5 that does not compromise recognition of exon 6, and although the deletion does not disrupt the reading frame, his clinical presentation is more severe than would be expected for classical Becker muscular dystrophy. We suggest that the dystrophin isoform lacking the actin-binding sequence encoded by exon 5 is compromised, reflected by the phenotype resulting from induction of this dystrophin isoform in mouse muscle in vivo. Hence, exon skipping to address DMD-causing mutations within DMD exon 5 may not yield an isoform that confers marked clinical benefit. Additional studies will be required to determine whether multi-exon skipping strategies could yield more functional dystrophin isoforms, since some BMD patients with larger in-frame deletions in this region have been reported with mild phenotypes. PMID:26745801

  19. Deletion of Dystrophin In-Frame Exon 5 Leads to a Severe Phenotype: Guidance for Exon Skipping Strategies.

    Zhi Yon Charles Toh

    Full Text Available Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy severity depends upon the nature and location of the DMD gene lesion and generally correlates with the dystrophin open reading frame. However, there are striking exceptions where an in-frame genomic deletion leads to severe pathology or protein-truncating mutations (nonsense or frame-shifting indels manifest as mild disease. Exceptions to the dystrophin reading frame rule are usually resolved after molecular diagnosis on muscle RNA. We report a moderate/severe Becker muscular dystrophy patient with an in-frame genomic deletion of DMD exon 5. This mutation has been reported by others as resulting in Duchenne or Intermediate muscular dystrophy, and the loss of this in-frame exon in one patient led to multiple splicing events, including omission of exon 6, that disrupts the open reading frame and is consistent with a severe phenotype. The patient described has a deletion of dystrophin exon 5 that does not compromise recognition of exon 6, and although the deletion does not disrupt the reading frame, his clinical presentation is more severe than would be expected for classical Becker muscular dystrophy. We suggest that the dystrophin isoform lacking the actin-binding sequence encoded by exon 5 is compromised, reflected by the phenotype resulting from induction of this dystrophin isoform in mouse muscle in vivo. Hence, exon skipping to address DMD-causing mutations within DMD exon 5 may not yield an isoform that confers marked clinical benefit. Additional studies will be required to determine whether multi-exon skipping strategies could yield more functional dystrophin isoforms, since some BMD patients with larger in-frame deletions in this region have been reported with mild phenotypes.

  20. Identification of human chromosome 9 specific genes using exon amplification.

    Church, D M; Banks, L T; Rogers, A C; Graw, S L; Housman, D E; Gusella, J F; Buckler, A J

    1993-11-01

    We have recently developed a method, exon amplification, that is designed for isolation of exon sequences from genomic DNA. To assess the efficacy of this method we have analyzed cosmid genomic clones derived from human chromosome 9, and have cloned several products from this analysis. Approximately 63% of cosmids produced at least one product derived from functioning splice sites within the target genomic fragment, and in many cases multiple products were isolated. In addition, an easily identifiable class of false positives was produced from 56% of cosmids analyzed; these are readily eliminated from subsequent study. Sequence analysis and database searches revealed that the majority (87%) of the putative exon clones were unique, the remainder being derived from repetitive sequences. Analysis of sequence conservation by Southern blotting in addition to cDNA screening experiments suggested that most, if not all, of these unique sequences represent true exons. The results of these studies indicate that exon amplification is a rapid and reliable approach for isolation of exon sequences from mammalian genomic DNA. PMID:7506603

  1. Exon definition as a potential negative force against intron losses in evolution

    Niu Deng-Ke

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous studies have indicated that the wide variation in intron density (the number of introns per gene) among different eukaryotes largely reflects varying degrees of intron loss during evolution. The most popular model, which suggests that organisms lose introns through a mechanism in which reverse-transcribed cDNA recombines with the genomic DNA, concerns only one mutational force. Hypothesis Using exons as the units of splicing-site recognition, exon definition const...

  2. Epigenetic inactivation and aberrant transcription of CSMD1 in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Scholnick Steven B

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p23.2 region of human chromosome 8 is frequently deleted in several types of epithelial cancer and those deletions appear to be associated with poor prognosis. Cub and Sushi Multiple Domains 1 (CSMD1 was positionally cloned as a candidate for the 8p23 suppressor but point mutations in this gene are rare relative to the frequency of allelic loss. In an effort to identify alternative mechanisms of inactivation, we have characterized CSMD1 expression and epigenetic modifications in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Results Only one of the 20 cell lines examined appears to express a structurally normal CSMD1 transcript. The rest express transcripts which either lack internal exons, terminate abnormally or initiate at cryptic promoters. None of these truncated transcripts is predicted to encode a functional CSMD1 protein. Cell lines that express little or no CSMD1 RNA exhibit DNA methylation of a specific region of the CpG island surrounding CSMD1's first exon. Conclusion Correlating methylation patterns and expression suggests that it is modification of the genomic DNA preceding the first exon that is associated with gene silencing and that methylation of CpG dinucleotides further 3' does not contribute to inactivation of the gene. Taken together, the cell line data suggest that epigenetic silencing and aberrant splicing rather than point mutations may be contributing to the reduction in CSMD1 expression in squamous cancers. These mechanisms can now serve as a focus for further analysis of primary squamous cancers.

  3. On splice site prediction using weight array models: a comparison of smoothing techniques

    In most eukaryotic genes, protein-coding exons are separated by non-coding introns which are removed from the primary transcript by a process called 'splicing'. The positions where introns are cut and exons are spliced together are called 'splice sites'. Thus, computational prediction of splice sites is crucial for gene finding in eukaryotes. Weight array models are a powerful probabilistic approach to splice site detection. Parameters for these models are usually derived from m-tuple frequencies in trusted training data and subsequently smoothed to avoid zero probabilities. In this study we compare three different ways of parameter estimation for m-tuple frequencies, namely (a) non-smoothed probability estimation, (b) standard pseudo counts and (c) a Gaussian smoothing procedure that we recently developed

  4. On splice site prediction using weight array models: a comparison of smoothing techniques

    Taher, Leila; Meinicke, Peter; Morgenstern, Burkhard

    2007-11-01

    In most eukaryotic genes, protein-coding exons are separated by non-coding introns which are removed from the primary transcript by a process called "splicing". The positions where introns are cut and exons are spliced together are called "splice sites". Thus, computational prediction of splice sites is crucial for gene finding in eukaryotes. Weight array models are a powerful probabilistic approach to splice site detection. Parameters for these models are usually derived from m-tuple frequencies in trusted training data and subsequently smoothed to avoid zero probabilities. In this study we compare three different ways of parameter estimation for m-tuple frequencies, namely (a) non-smoothed probability estimation, (b) standard pseudo counts and (c) a Gaussian smoothing procedure that we recently developed.

  5. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    Highlights: → Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. → Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. → Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2Apro modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2Apro potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2Apro abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2Apro, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2Apro on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  6. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    Alvarez, Enrique, E-mail: ealvarez@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Nicolas Cabrera, 1 Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M. [Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Nicolas Cabrera, 1 Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  7. Tafazzin splice variants and mutations in Barth syndrome.

    Kirwin, Susan M; Manolakos, Athena; Barnett, Sarah Swain; Gonzalez, Iris L

    2014-01-01

    Barth syndrome is caused by mutations in the TAZ (tafazzin) gene on human chromosome Xq28. The human tafazzin gene produces four major mRNA splice variants; two of which have been shown to be functional (TAZ lacking exon 5 and full-length) in complementation studies with yeast and Drosophila. This study characterizes the multiple alternative splice variants of TAZ mRNA and their proportions in blood samples from a cohort of individuals with Barth syndrome (BTHS). Because it has been reported that collection and processing methods can affect the expression of various genes, we tested and chose a stabilizing medium for collecting, shipping and processing of the blood samples of these individuals. In both healthy controls and in BTHS individuals, we found a greater variety of alternatively spliced forms than previously described, with a sizeable proportion of minor splice variants besides the four dominant isoforms. Individuals with certain exonic and intronic splice mutations produce additional mutant mRNAs that could be translated into two or more proteins with different amino acid substitutions in a single individual. A fraction of the minor splice variants is predicted to be non-productive. PMID:24342716

  8. Novel splice site mutation in the growth hormone receptor gene in Turkish patients with Laron-type dwarfism.

    Arman, Ahmet; Ozon, Alev; Isguven, Pinar S; Coker, Ajda; Peker, Ismail; Yordam, Nursen

    2008-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is involved in growth, and fat and carbohydrate metabolism. Interaction of GH with the GH receptor (GHR) is necessary for systemic and local production of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) which mediates GH actions. Mutations in the GHR cause severe postnatal growth failure; the disorder is an autosomal recessive genetic disease resulting in GH insensitivity, called Laron syndrome. It is characterized by dwarfism with elevated serum GH and low levels of IGF-I. We analyzed the GHR gene for mutations and polymorphisms in eight patients with Laron-type dwarfism from six families. We found three missense mutations (S40L, V125A, I526L), one nonsense mutation (W157X), and one splice site mutation in the extracellular domain of GHR. Furthermore, G168G and exon 3 deletion polymorphisms were detected in patients with Laron syndrome. The splice site mutation, which is a novel mutation, was located at the donor splice site of exon 2/ intron 2 within GHR. Although this mutation changed the highly conserved donor splice site consensus sequence GT to GGT by insertion of a G residue, the intron splicing between exon 2 and exon 3 was detected in the patient. These results imply that the splicing occurs arthe GT site in intron 2, leaving the extra inserted G residue at the end of exon 2, thus changing the open reading frame of GHR resulting in a premature termination codon in exon 3. PMID:18404972

  9. Optical Aberrations and Wavefront

    Nihat Polat

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The deviation of light to create normal retinal image in the optical system is called aberration. Aberrations are divided two subgroup: low-order aberrations (defocus: spherical and cylindrical refractive errors and high-order aberrations (coma, spherical, trefoil, tetrafoil, quadrifoil, pentafoil, secondary astigmatism. Aberrations increase with aging. Spherical aberrations are compensated by positive corneal and negative lenticular spherical aberrations in youth. Total aberrations are elevated by positive corneal and positive lenticular spherical aberrations in elderly. In this study, we aimed to analyze the basic terms regarding optic aberrations which have gained significance recently. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 306-11

  10. Operon Conservation and the Evolution of trans-Splicing in the Phylum Nematoda

    Guiliano, David B.; Blaxter, Mark L.

    2006-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is unique among model animals in that many of its genes are cotranscribed as polycistronic pre-mRNAs from operons. The mechanism by which these operonic transcripts are resolved into mature mRNAs includes trans-splicing to a family of SL2-like spliced leader exons. SL2-like spliced leaders are distinct from SL1, the major spliced leader in C. elegans and other nematode species. We surveyed five additional nematode species, representing three of the five maj...

  11. Operon conservation and the evolution of trans-splicing in the phylum Nematoda

    Guiliano, David B.; Blaxter, Mark L.

    2006-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is unique among model animals in that many of its genes are cotranscribed as polycistronic pre-mRNAs from operons. The mechanism by which these operonic transcripts are resolved into mature mRNAs includes trans-splicing to a family of SL2-like spliced leader exons. SL2-like spliced leaders are distinct from SL1, the major spliced leader in C. elegans and other nematode species. We surveyed five additional nematode species, representing three of the five maj...

  12. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy.

    Miskew Nichols, Bailey; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J A; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  13. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice.

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P; Clark, John M; Reynolds, Stuart E; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Feil, Edward J; Urrutia, Araxi O

    2015-10-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  14. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Thomas Julie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide computational analysis of alternative splicing (AS in several flowering plants has revealed that pre-mRNAs from about 30% of genes undergo AS. Chlamydomonas, a simple unicellular green alga, is part of the lineage that includes land plants. However, it diverged from land plants about one billion years ago. Hence, it serves as a good model system to study alternative splicing in early photosynthetic eukaryotes, to obtain insights into the evolution of this process in plants, and to compare splicing in simple unicellular photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic eukaryotes. We performed a global analysis of alternative splicing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using its recently completed genome sequence and all available ESTs and cDNAs. Results Our analysis of AS using BLAT and a modified version of the Sircah tool revealed AS of 498 transcriptional units with 611 events, representing about 3% of the total number of genes. As in land plants, intron retention is the most prevalent form of AS. Retained introns and skipped exons tend to be shorter than their counterparts in constitutively spliced genes. The splice site signals in all types of AS events are weaker than those in constitutively spliced genes. Furthermore, in alternatively spliced genes, the prevalent splice form has a stronger splice site signal than the non-prevalent form. Analysis of constitutively spliced introns revealed an over-abundance of motifs with simple repetitive elements in comparison to introns involved in intron retention. In almost all cases, AS results in a truncated ORF, leading to a coding sequence that is around 50% shorter than the prevalent splice form. Using RT-PCR we verified AS of two genes and show that they produce more isoforms than indicated by EST data. All cDNA/EST alignments and splice graphs are provided in a website at http://combi.cs.colostate.edu/as/chlamy. Conclusions The extent of AS in Chlamydomonas that we observed is much

  15. Overexpression of Dyrk1A regulates cardiac troponin T splicing in cells and mice.

    Lu, Shu; Yin, Xiaomin

    2016-05-13

    The human heart expresses four isoforms of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) through alternative splicing of exons 4 and 5 of the cTnT gene. Alternative splicing of cTnT exon 5 is developmentally regulated. cTnT isoforms containing exon 5 are expressed in the fetal and neonatal heart but not in the mature heart. SRp55 is an essential splicing factor involved in cTnT exon 5 splicing and it is phosphorylated by Dyrk1A (dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A). In the present study, we found Dyrk1A interacted with SRp55 and enhanced its promotion of cTnT exon 5 inclusion. The shift from cTnT exon 5 inclusion to exclusion during development was delayed in the heart of Ts65Dn mice due to Dyrk1A overexpression. These results provide new insight into the role of Dyrk1A in the neonatal cardiac development. PMID:27049307

  16. SRSF2 Mutations Contribute to Myelodysplasia by Mutant-Specific Effects on Exon Recognition.

    Kim, Eunhee; Ilagan, Janine O; Liang, Yang; Daubner, Gerrit M; Lee, Stanley C-W; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Li, Yue; Chung, Young Rock; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Murphy, Michele E; Cho, Hana; Kim, Min-Kyung; Zebari, Ahmad S; Aumann, Shlomzion; Park, Christopher Y; Buonamici, Silvia; Smith, Peter G; Deeg, H Joachim; Lobry, Camille; Aifantis, Iannis; Modis, Yorgo; Allain, Frederic H-T; Halene, Stephanie; Bradley, Robert K; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2015-05-11

    Mutations affecting spliceosomal proteins are the most common mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), but their role in MDS pathogenesis has not been delineated. Here we report that mutations affecting the splicing factor SRSF2 directly impair hematopoietic differentiation in vivo, which is not due to SRSF2 loss of function. By contrast, SRSF2 mutations alter SRSF2's normal sequence-specific RNA binding activity, thereby altering the recognition of specific exonic splicing enhancer motifs to drive recurrent mis-splicing of key hematopoietic regulators. This includes SRSF2 mutation-dependent splicing of EZH2, which triggers nonsense-mediated decay, which, in turn, results in impaired hematopoietic differentiation. These data provide a mechanistic link between a mutant spliceosomal protein, alterations in the splicing of key regulators, and impaired hematopoiesis. PMID:25965569

  17. Computational Analysis of Full-length cDNAs Reveals Frequent Coupling Between Transcriptional and Splicing Programs

    Chern, Tzu-Ming; Paul, Nicodeme; Nimwegen, Erik Van; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing studies revealed that the majority of human and mouse multi-exon genes have multiple splice forms. High-density oligonucleotide array-based measurements have further established that many exons are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. The mechanisms underlying the tissue-dependent expression of most alternative exons remain, however, to be understood. In this study, we focus on one possible mechanism, namely the coupling of (tissue specific) transcription regulati...

  18. Footprints of a trypanosomatid RNA world: pre-small subunit rRNA processing by spliced leader addition trans-splicing

    Mario Gustavo Mayer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The addition of a capped mini-exon [spliced leader (SL] through trans-splicing is essential for the maturation of RNA polymerase (pol II-transcribed polycistronic pre-mRNAs in all members of the Trypanosomatidae family. This process is an inter-molecular splicing reaction that follows the same basic rules of cis-splicing reactions. In this study, we demonstrated that mini-exons were added to precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA are transcribed by RNA pol I, including the 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS region. Additionally, we detected the SL-5'ETS molecule using three distinct methods and located the acceptor site between two known 5'ETS rRNA processing sites (A' and A1 in four different trypanosomatids. Moreover, we detected a polyadenylated 5'ETS upstream of the trans-splicing acceptor site, which also occurs in pre-mRNA trans-splicing. After treatment with an indirect trans-splicing inhibitor (sinefungin, we observed SL-5'ETS decay. However, treatment with 5-fluorouracil (a precursor of RNA synthesis that inhibits the degradation of pre-rRNA led to the accumulation of SL-5'ETS, suggesting that the molecule may play a role in rRNA degradation. The detection of trans-splicing in these molecules may indicate broad RNA-joining properties, regardless of the polymerase used for transcription.

  19. Increased dosage of Dyrk1A alters alternative splicing factor (ASF)-regulated alternative splicing of tau in Down syndrome.

    Shi, Jianhua; Zhang, Tianyi; Zhou, Chunlei; Chohan, Muhammad Omar; Gu, Xiaosong; Wegiel, Jerzy; Zhou, Jianhua; Hwang, Yu-Wen; Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2008-10-17

    Two groups of tau, 3R- and 4R-tau, are generated by alternative splicing of tau exon 10. Normal adult human brain expresses equal levels of them. Disruption of the physiological balance is a common feature of several tauopathies. Very early in their life, individuals with Down syndrome (DS) develop Alzheimer-type tau pathology, the molecular basis for which is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Dyrk1A, a kinase encoded by a gene in the DS critical region, phosphorylates alternative splicing factor (ASF) at Ser-227, Ser-234, and Ser-238, driving it into nuclear speckles and preventing it from facilitating tau exon 10 inclusion. The increased dosage of Dyrk1A in DS brain due to trisomy of chromosome 21 correlates to an increase in 3R-tau level, which on abnormal hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau results in neurofibrillary degeneration. Imbalance of 3R- and 4R-tau in DS brain by Dyrk1A-induced dysregulation of alternative splicing factor-mediated alternative splicing of tau exon 10 represents a novel mechanism of neurofibrillary degeneration and may help explain early onset tauopathy in individuals with DS. PMID:18658135

  20. Pre-mRNA trans-splicing: from kinetoplastids to mammals, an easy language for life diversity

    Mario Gustavo Mayer

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery that genes are split into intron and exons, the studies of the mechanisms involved in splicing pointed to presence of consensus signals in an attempt to generalize the process for all living cells. However, as discussed in the present review, splicing is a theme full of variations. The trans-splicing of pre-mRNAs, the joining of exons from distinct transcripts, is one of these variations with broad distribution in the phylogenetic tree. The biological meaning of this phenomenon is discussed encompassing reactions resembling a possible noise to mechanisms of gene expression regulation. All of them however, can contribute to the generation of life diversity.

  1. Functional importance of different patterns of correlation between adjacent cassette exons in human and mouse

    Zhang Xuegong

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing expands transcriptome diversity and plays an important role in regulation of gene expression. Previous studies focus on the regulation of a single cassette exon, but recent experiments indicate that multiple cassette exons within a gene may interact with each other. This interaction can increase the potential to generate various transcripts and adds an extra layer of complexity to gene regulation. Several cases of exon interaction have been discovered. However, the extent to which the cassette exons coordinate with each other remains unknown. Results Based on EST data, we employed a metric of correlation coefficients to describe the interaction between two adjacent cassette exons and then categorized these exon pairs into three different groups by their interaction (correlation patterns. Sequence analysis demonstrates that strongly-correlated groups are more conserved and contain a higher proportion of pairs with reading frame preservation in a combinatorial manner. Multiple genome comparison further indicates that different groups of correlated pairs have different evolutionary courses: (1 The vast majority of positively-correlated pairs are old, (2 most of the weakly-correlated pairs are relatively young, and (3 negatively-correlated pairs are a mixture of old and young events. Conclusion We performed a large-scale analysis of interactions between adjacent cassette exons. Compared with weakly-correlated pairs, the strongly-correlated pairs, including both the positively and negatively correlated ones, show more evidence that they are under delicate splicing control and tend to be functionally important. Additionally, the positively-correlated pairs bear strong resemblance to constitutive exons, which suggests that they may evolve from ancient constitutive exons, while negatively and weakly correlated pairs are more likely to contain newly emerging exons.

  2. mRNA-Associated Processes and Their Influence on Exon-Intron Structure in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Lepennetier, Gildas; Catania, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    mRNA-associated processes and gene structure in eukaryotes are typically treated as separate research subjects. Here, we bridge this separation and leverage the extensive multidisciplinary work on Drosophila melanogaster to examine the roles that capping, splicing, cleavage/polyadenylation, and telescripting (i.e, the protection of nascent transcripts from premature cleavage/polyadenylation by the splicing factor U1) might play in shaping exon-intron architecture in protein-coding genes. Our findings suggest that the distance between subsequent internal 5' splice sites (5'ss) in Drosophila genes is constrained such that telescripting effects are maximized, in theory, and thus nascent transcripts are less vulnerable to premature termination. Exceptionally weak 5'ss and constraints on intron-exon size at the gene 5' end also indicate that capping might enhance the recruitment of U1 and, in turn, promote telescripting at this location. Finally, a positive correlation between last exon length and last 5'ss strength suggests that optimal donor splice sites in the proximity of the pre-mRNA tail may inhibit the processing of downstream polyadenylation signals more than weak donor splice sites do. These findings corroborate and build upon previous experimental and computational studies on Drosophila genes. They support the possibility, hitherto scantly explored, that mRNA-associated processes impose significant constraints on the evolution of eukaryotic gene structure. PMID:27172210

  3. Two new splice variants in porcine PPARGC1A

    Peelman Luc J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PPARGC1A is a coactivator with a vital and central role in fat and energy metabolism. It is considered to be a candidate gene for meat quality in pigs and is involved in the development of obesity and diabetes in humans. How its many functions are regulated, is however still largely unclear. Therefore a transcription profile of PPARGC1A in 32 tissues and 4 embryonic developmental stages in the pig was constructed by screening its cDNA for possible splice variants with exon-spanning primers. Findings This led to the discovery of 2 new splice variants in the pig, which were subsequently also detected in human tissues. In these variants, exon 8 was either completely or partly (the last 66 bp were conserved spliced out, potentially coding for a much shorter protein of respectively 337 and 359 amino acids (aa, of which the first 291 aa would be the same compared to the complete protein (796 aa. Conclusion Considering the functional domains of the PPARGC1A protein, it is very likely these splice variants considerably affect the function of the protein and alternative splicing could be one of the mechanisms by which the diverse functions of PPARGC1A are regulated.

  4. Variants Within TSC2 Exons 25 and 31 Are Very Unlikely to Cause Clinically Diagnosable Tuberous Sclerosis.

    Ekong, Rosemary; Nellist, Mark; Hoogeveen-Westerveld, Marianne; Wentink, Marjolein; Panzer, Jessica; Sparagana, Steven; Emmett, Warren; Dawson, Natalie L; Malinge, Marie Claire; Nabbout, Rima; Carbonara, Caterina; Barberis, Marco; Padovan, Sergio; Futema, Marta; Plagnol, Vincent; Humphries, Steve E; Migone, Nicola; Povey, Sue

    2016-04-01

    Inactivating mutations in TSC1 and TSC2 cause tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The 2012 international consensus meeting on TSC diagnosis and management agreed that the identification of a pathogenic TSC1 or TSC2 variant establishes a diagnosis of TSC, even in the absence of clinical signs. However, exons 25 and 31 of TSC2 are subject to alternative splicing. No variants causing clinically diagnosed TSC have been reported in these exons, raising the possibility that such variants would not cause TSC. We present truncating and in-frame variants in exons 25 and 31 in three individuals unlikely to fulfil TSC diagnostic criteria and examine the importance of these exons in TSC using different approaches. Amino acid conservation analysis suggests significantly less conservation in these exons compared with the majority of TSC2 exons, and TSC2 expression data demonstrates that the majority of TSC2 transcripts lack exons 25 and/or 31 in many human adult tissues. In vitro assay of both exons shows that neither exon is essential for TSC complex function. Our evidence suggests that variants in TSC2 exons 25 or 31 are very unlikely to cause classical TSC, although a role for these exons in tissue/stage specific development cannot be excluded. PMID:26703369

  5. Complex Alternative Splicing

    Park, Jung Woo; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a powerful means of controlling gene expression and increasing protein diversity. Most genes express a limited number of mRNA isoforms, but there are several examples of genes that use alternative splicing to generate hundreds, thousands, and even tens of thousands of isoforms. Collectively such genes are considered to undergo complex alternative splicing. The best example is the Drosophila Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene, which can generate 38,016 is...

  6. Where splicing joins chromatin

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Staněk, David

    2011-01-01

    There are numerous data suggesting that two key steps in gene expression—transcription and splicing influence each other closely. For a long time it was known that chromatin modifications regulate transcription, but only recently it was shown that chromatin and histone modifications play a significant role in pre-mRNA splicing. Here we summarize interactions between splicing machinery and chromatin and discuss their potential functional significance. We focus mainly on histone acetylation and...

  7. DBIRD complex integrates alternative mRNA splicing with RNA polymerase II transcript elongation

    Close, Pierre; East, Philip; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara;

    2012-01-01

    Alternative messenger RNA splicing is the main reason that vast mammalian proteomic complexity can be achieved with a limited number of genes. Splicing is physically and functionally coupled to transcription, and is greatly affected by the rate of transcript elongation. As the nascent pre...... and help to integrate transcript elongation with mRNA splicing remain unclear. Here we characterize the human interactome of chromatin-associated mRNP particles. This led us to identify deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1) and ZNF326 (which we call ZNF-protein interacting with nuclear mRNPs and DBC1...... (ZIRD)) as subunits of a novel protein complex--named DBIRD--that binds directly to RNAPII. DBIRD regulates alternative splicing of a large set of exons embedded in (A + T)-rich DNA, and is present at the affected exons. RNA-interference-mediated DBIRD depletion results in region-specific decreases in...

  8. SPA: a probabilistic algorithm for spliced alignment.

    Erik van Nimwegen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent large-scale cDNA sequencing efforts show that elaborate patterns of splice variation are responsible for much of the proteome diversity in higher eukaryotes. To obtain an accurate account of the repertoire of splice variants, and to gain insight into the mechanisms of alternative splicing, it is essential that cDNAs are very accurately mapped to their respective genomes. Currently available algorithms for cDNA-to-genome alignment do not reach the necessary level of accuracy because they use ad hoc scoring models that cannot correctly trade off the likelihoods of various sequencing errors against the probabilities of different gene structures. Here we develop a Bayesian probabilistic approach to cDNA-to-genome alignment. Gene structures are assigned prior probabilities based on the lengths of their introns and exons, and based on the sequences at their splice boundaries. A likelihood model for sequencing errors takes into account the rates at which misincorporation, as well as insertions and deletions of different lengths, occurs during sequencing. The parameters of both the prior and likelihood model can be automatically estimated from a set of cDNAs, thus enabling our method to adapt itself to different organisms and experimental procedures. We implemented our method in a fast cDNA-to-genome alignment program, SPA, and applied it to the FANTOM3 dataset of over 100,000 full-length mouse cDNAs and a dataset of over 20,000 full-length human cDNAs. Comparison with the results of four other mapping programs shows that SPA produces alignments of significantly higher quality. In particular, the quality of the SPA alignments near splice boundaries and SPA's mapping of the 5' and 3' ends of the cDNAs are highly improved, allowing for more accurate identification of transcript starts and ends, and accurate identification of subtle splice variations. Finally, our splice boundary analysis on the human dataset suggests the existence of a novel non

  9. SPA: A Probabilistic Algorithm for Spliced Alignment

    van Nimwegen, Erik; Paul, Nicodeme; Sheridan, Robert; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2006-01-01

    Recent large-scale cDNA sequencing efforts show that elaborate patterns of splice variation are responsible for much of the proteome diversity in higher eukaryotes. To obtain an accurate account of the repertoire of splice variants, and to gain insight into the mechanisms of alternative splicing, it is essential that cDNAs are very accurately mapped to their respective genomes. Currently available algorithms for cDNA-to-genome alignment do not reach the necessary level of accuracy because they use ad hoc scoring models that cannot correctly trade off the likelihoods of various sequencing errors against the probabilities of different gene structures. Here we develop a Bayesian probabilistic approach to cDNA-to-genome alignment. Gene structures are assigned prior probabilities based on the lengths of their introns and exons, and based on the sequences at their splice boundaries. A likelihood model for sequencing errors takes into account the rates at which misincorporation, as well as insertions and deletions of different lengths, occurs during sequencing. The parameters of both the prior and likelihood model can be automatically estimated from a set of cDNAs, thus enabling our method to adapt itself to different organisms and experimental procedures. We implemented our method in a fast cDNA-to-genome alignment program, SPA, and applied it to the FANTOM3 dataset of over 100,000 full-length mouse cDNAs and a dataset of over 20,000 full-length human cDNAs. Comparison with the results of four other mapping programs shows that SPA produces alignments of significantly higher quality. In particular, the quality of the SPA alignments near splice boundaries and SPA's mapping of the 5′ and 3′ ends of the cDNAs are highly improved, allowing for more accurate identification of transcript starts and ends, and accurate identification of subtle splice variations. Finally, our splice boundary analysis on the human dataset suggests the existence of a novel non-canonical splice

  10. Physiologically generated presenilin 1 lacking exon 8 fails to rescue brain PS1-/- phenotype and forms complexes with wildtype PS1 and nicastrin.

    Brautigam, Hannah; Moreno, Cesar L; Steele, John W; Bogush, Alexey; Dickstein, Dara L; Kwok, John B J; Schofield, Peter R; Thinakaran, Gopal; Mathews, Paul M; Hof, Patrick R; Gandy, Sam; Ehrlich, Michelle E

    2015-01-01

    The presenilin 1 (PSEN1) L271V mutation causes early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease by disrupting the alternative splicing of the PSEN1 gene, producing some transcripts harboring the L271V point mutation and other transcripts lacking exon 8 (PS1(∆exon8)). We previously reported that PS1 L271V increased amyloid beta (Aβ) 42/40 ratios, while PS1(∆exon8) reduced Aβ42/40 ratios, indicating that the former and not the exon 8 deletion transcript is amyloidogenic. Also, PS1(∆exon8) did not rescue Aβ generation in PS1/2 double knockout cells indicating its identity as a severe loss-of-function splice form. PS1(∆exon8) is generated physiologically raising the possibility that we had identified the first physiological inactive PS1 isoform. We studied PS1(∆exon8) in vivo by crossing PS1(∆exon8) transgenics with either PS1-null or Dutch APP(E693Q) mice. As a control, we crossed APP(E693Q) with mice expressing a deletion in an adjacent exon (PS1(∆exon9)). PS1(∆exon8) did not rescue embryonic lethality or Notch-deficient phenotypes of PS1-null mice displaying severe loss of function in vivo. We also demonstrate that this splice form can interact with wildtype PS1 using cultured cells and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP)/bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Further co-IP demonstrates that PS1(∆exon8) interacts with nicastrin, participating in the γ-secretase complex formation. These data support that catalytically inactive PS1(∆exon8) is generated physiologically and participates in protein-protein interactions. PMID:26608390

  11. Physiologically generated presenilin 1 lacking exon 8 fails to rescue brain PS1−/− phenotype and forms complexes with wildtype PS1 and nicastrin

    Brautigam, Hannah; Moreno, Cesar L.; Steele, John W.; Bogush, Alexey; Dickstein, Dara L.; Kwok, John B.J.; Schofield, Peter R.; Thinakaran, Gopal; Mathews, Paul M.; Hof, Patrick R.; Gandy, Sam; Ehrlich, Michelle E.

    2015-01-01

    The presenilin 1 (PSEN1) L271V mutation causes early-onset familial Alzheimer’s disease by disrupting the alternative splicing of the PSEN1 gene, producing some transcripts harboring the L271V point mutation and other transcripts lacking exon 8 (PS1∆exon8). We previously reported that PS1 L271V increased amyloid beta (Aβ) 42/40 ratios, while PS1∆exon8 reduced Aβ42/40 ratios, indicating that the former and not the exon 8 deletion transcript is amyloidogenic. Also, PS1∆exon8 did not rescue Aβ generation in PS1/2 double knockout cells indicating its identity as a severe loss-of-function splice form. PS1∆exon8 is generated physiologically raising the possibility that we had identified the first physiological inactive PS1 isoform. We studied PS1∆exon8 in vivo by crossing PS1∆exon8 transgenics with either PS1-null or Dutch APPE693Q mice. As a control, we crossed APPE693Q with mice expressing a deletion in an adjacent exon (PS1∆exon9). PS1∆exon8 did not rescue embryonic lethality or Notch-deficient phenotypes of PS1-null mice displaying severe loss of function in vivo. We also demonstrate that this splice form can interact with wildtype PS1 using cultured cells and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP)/bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Further co-IP demonstrates that PS1∆exon8 interacts with nicastrin, participating in the γ–secretase complex formation. These data support that catalytically inactive PS1∆exon8 is generated physiologically and participates in protein-protein interactions. PMID:26608390

  12. Method of predicting Splice Sites based on signal interactions

    Deogun Jitender S

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting and proper ranking of canonical splice sites (SSs is a challenging problem in bioinformatics and machine learning communities. Any progress in SSs recognition will lead to better understanding of splicing mechanism. We introduce several new approaches of combining a priori knowledge for improved SS detection. First, we design our new Bayesian SS sensor based on oligonucleotide counting. To further enhance prediction quality, we applied our new de novo motif detection tool MHMMotif to intronic ends and exons. We combine elements found with sensor information using Naive Bayesian Network, as implemented in our new tool SpliceScan. Results According to our tests, the Bayesian sensor outperforms the contemporary Maximum Entropy sensor for 5' SS detection. We report a number of putative Exonic (ESE and Intronic (ISE Splicing Enhancers found by MHMMotif tool. T-test statistics on mouse/rat intronic alignments indicates, that detected elements are on average more conserved as compared to other oligos, which supports our assumption of their functional importance. The tool has been shown to outperform the SpliceView, GeneSplicer, NNSplice, Genio and NetUTR tools for the test set of human genes. SpliceScan outperforms all contemporary ab initio gene structural prediction tools on the set of 5' UTR gene fragments. Conclusion Designed methods have many attractive properties, compared to existing approaches. Bayesian sensor, MHMMotif program and SpliceScan tools are freely available on our web site. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Manyuan Long, Arcady Mushegian and Mikhail Gelfand.

  13. Deletion of exon 20 of the Familial Dysautonomia gene Ikbkap in mice causes developmental delay, cardiovascular defects, and early embryonic lethality.

    Paula Dietrich

    Full Text Available Familial Dysautonomia (FD is an autosomal recessive disorder that affects 1/3,600 live births in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, and leads to death before the age of 40. The disease is characterized by abnormal development and progressive degeneration of the sensory and autonomic nervous system. A single base pair substitution in intron 20 of the Ikbkap gene accounts for 98% of FD cases, and results in the expression of low levels of the full-length mRNA with simultaneous expression of an aberrantly spliced mRNA in which exon 20 is missing. To date, there is no animal model for the disease, and the essential cellular functions of IKAP--the protein encoded by Ikbkap--remain unknown. To better understand the normal function of IKAP and in an effort to generate a mouse model for FD, we have targeted the mouse Ikbkap gene by homologous recombination. We created two distinct alleles that result in either loss of Ikbkap expression, or expression of an mRNA lacking only exon 20. Homozygosity for either mutation leads to developmental delay, cardiovascular and brain malformations, accompanied with early embryonic lethality. Our analyses indicate that IKAP is essential for expression of specific genes involved in cardiac morphogenesis, and that cardiac failure is the likely cause of abnormal vascular development and embryonic lethality. Our results also indicate that deletion of exon 20 abolishes gene function. This implies that the truncated IKAP protein expressed in FD patients does not retain any significant biological function.

  14. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues.

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5'-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5'-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  15. Mismatched single stranded antisense oligonucleotides can induce efficient dystrophin splice switching

    Kole Ryszard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense oligomer induced exon skipping aims to reduce the severity of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by redirecting splicing during pre-RNA processing such that the causative mutation is by-passed and a shorter but partially functional Becker muscular dystrophy-like dystrophin isoform is produced. Normal exons are generally targeted to restore the dystrophin reading frame however, an appreciable subset of dystrophin mutations are intra-exonic and therefore have the potential to compromise oligomer efficiency, necessitating personalised oligomer design for some patients. Although antisense oligomers are easily personalised, it remains unclear whether all patient polymorphisms within antisense oligomer target sequences will require the costly process of producing and validating patient specific compounds. Methods Here we report preclinical testing of a panel of splice switching antisense oligomers, designed to excise exon 25 from the dystrophin transcript, in normal and dystrophic patient cells. These patient cells harbour a single base insertion in exon 25 that lies within the target sequence of an oligomer shown to be effective at removing exon 25. Results It was anticipated that such a mutation would compromise oligomer binding and efficiency. However, we show that, despite the mismatch an oligomer, designed and optimised to excise exon 25 from the normal dystrophin mRNA, removes the mutated exon 25 more efficiently than the mutation-specific oligomer. Conclusion This raises the possibility that mismatched AOs could still be therapeutically applicable in some cases, negating the necessity to produce patient-specific compounds.

  16. Splicing-Sensitive DNA-Microarrays: Peculiarities and Applicationin Biomedical Research (Review

    D.I. Knyazev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (АS provides a variety of protein and mature mRNA isoforms encoded by a single gene, and is the essential component of cell and tissue differentiation and functioning. DNA-microarrays are highly productive transcriptome research technique both at the level of total gene expression assessment and alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms exploration. The study of AS patterns requires thorough probe design to achieve appropriate accuracy of the analysis. There are two types of splicing-sensitive DNA-microarrays. The first type contain probes targeted to internal exonic sequences (exon bodies; the second type contain probes targeted to exon bodies and exon–exon and exon–intron junctions. So, the first section focused on probe sequence design, general features of splicing-sensitive DNA-microarrays and their main advantages and limitations. The results of AS research obtained using DNA-microarrays have been reviewed in special section. In particular, DNA-microarrays were used to reveal a number pre-mRNA processing and splicing mechanisms, to investigate AS patterns associated with cancer, cell and tissue differentiation. Splicing machinery regulation was demonstrated to be an essential step during carcinogenesis and differentiation. The examples of application of splicing-sensitive DNA-microarrays for diagnostic markers discovering and pathology mechanism elucidation were also reviewed. Investigations of AS role in pluripotency, stem cell commitment, immune and infected cells functioning during immune response are the promising future directions. Splicing-sensitive DNA-microarrays are relatively inexpensive but powerful research tool that give reason to suppose their introduction in clinical practice within the next few years.

  17. The expression of the human steroid sulfatase-encoding gene is driven by alternative first exons.

    Dalla Valle, Luisa; Toffolo, Vania; Nardi, Alessia; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio; Belvedere, Paola; Colombo, Lorenzo

    2007-10-01

    We have analyzed steroid sulfatase (STS) gene transcription in 10 human tissues: ovary, adrenal cortex, uterus, thyroid, liver, pancreas, colon, mammary gland, dermal papilla of the hair follicle, and peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. Overall, six different promoters were found to drive STS expression, giving rise to transcripts with unique first exons that were labeled 0a, 0b, 0c, 1a, 1c, and 1d, of which the last two and 0c are newly reported. All of them, except exon 1d, vary in length owing to the occurrence of multiple transcriptional start sites. While placental exon 1a is partially coding, the other five first exons are all untranslated. Three of these (0a, 0b, and 0c) are spliced to the common partially coding exon 1b, whereas the other two (1c and 1d) are spliced to the coding exon 2, which occurs in all transcripts. Whatever the ATG actually used, the differences are restricted to the signal peptide which is post-transcriptionally cleaved. Transcripts with exons 0a and 0b have the broadest tissue distribution, occurring, in 6 out of the 12 tissues so far investigated, while the other first exons are restricted to one or two tissues. The proximal promoter of each first exon was devoid of TATA box or initiator element and lacked consensus elements for transcription factors related to steroidogenesis, suggesting that regulatory sequences are probably placed at greater distance. In conclusion, the regulation of STS transcription appears to be more complex than previously thought, suggesting that this enzyme plays a substantial role in intercellular integration. PMID:17601726

  18. The Regulation of IGF-1 Gene Transcription and Splicing during Development and Aging

    Anita eOberbauer

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly known that the insulin-like growth factor-I gene contains six exons that can be differentially spliced to create multiple transcript variants. Further, there are two mutually exclusive leader exons each having multiple promoter sites that are variably used. The mature IGF-I protein derived from the multiplicity of transcripts does not differ suggesting a regulatory role for the various transcript isoforms. The variant forms possess different stabilities, binding partners, and a...

  19. Role of six single nucleotide polymorphisms, risk factors in coronary disease, in OLR1 alternative splicing

    Tejedor Vaquero, Juan Ram??n, 1984-; Tilgner, Hagen; Iannone, Camilla; Guig?? Serra, Roderic; Valc??rcel, J. (Juan)

    2015-01-01

    The OLR1 gene encodes the oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1), which is responsible for the cellular uptake of oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), foam cell formation in atheroma plaques and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Alternative splicing (AS) of OLR1 exon 5 generates two protein isoforms with antagonistic functions in Ox-LDL uptake. Previous work identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium that influence the inclusion levels of OLR1 exon 5 and correl...

  20. Computational Analysis of Full-length cDNAs Reveals Frequent Coupling Between Transcriptional and Splicing Programs

    Chern, Tzu-Ming; Paul, Nicodeme; van Nimwegen, Erik; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing studies revealed that the majority of human and mouse multi-exon genes have multiple splice forms. High-density oligonucleotide array-based measurements have further established that many exons are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. The mechanisms underlying the tissue-dependent expression of most alternative exons remain, however, to be understood. In this study, we focus on one possible mechanism, namely the coupling of (tissue specific) transcription regulation with alternative splicing. We analyzed the FANTOM3 and H-Invitational datasets of full-length mouse and human cDNAs, respectively, and found that in transcription units with multiple start sites, the inclusion of at least 15% and possibly up to 30% of the ‘cassette’ exons correlates with the use of specific transcription start sites (TSS). The vast majority of TSS-associated exons are conserved between human and mouse, yet the conservation is weaker when compared with TSS-independent exons. Additionally, the currently available data only support a weak correlation between the probabilities of TSS association of orthologous exons. Our analysis thus suggests frequent coupling of transcriptional and splicing programs, and provides a large dataset of exons on which the molecular basis of this coupling can be further studied. PMID:18276623

  1. Sequence of DNA flanking the exons of the HEXA gene, and identification of mutations in Tay-Sachs disease.

    Triggs-Raine, B L; Akerman, B R; Clarke, J T; Gravel, R A

    1991-01-01

    The rapid identification of mutations causing Tay-Sachs disease requires the capacity to readily screen the regions of the HEXA gene most likely to be affected by mutation. We have sequenced the portions of the introns flanking each of the 14 HEXA exons in order to specify oligonucleotide primers for the PCR-dependent amplification of each exon and splice-junction sequence. The amplified products were analyzed, by electrophoresis in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels, for the presence of eithe...

  2. Systematic analysis of alternative first exons in plant genomes

    Zeng Changqing

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing (AS contributes significantly to protein diversity, by selectively using different combinations of exons of the same gene under certain circumstances. One particular type of AS is the use of alternative first exons (AFEs, which can have consequences far beyond the fine-tuning of protein functions. For example, AFEs may change the N-termini of proteins and thereby direct them to different cellular compartments. When alternative first exons are distant, they are usually associated with alternative promoters, thereby conferring an extra level of gene expression regulation. However, only few studies have examined the patterns of AFEs, and these analyses were mainly focused on mammalian genomes. Recent studies have shown that AFEs exist in the rice genome, and are regulated in a tissue-specific manner. Our current understanding of AFEs in plants is still limited, including important issues such as their regulation, contribution to protein diversity, and evolutionary conservation. Results We systematically identified 1,378 and 645 AFE-containing clusters in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. From our data sets, we identified two types of AFEs according to their genomic organisation. In genes with type I AFEs, the first exons are mutually exclusive, while most of the downstream exons are shared among alternative transcripts. Conversely, in genes with type II AFEs, the first exon of one gene structure is an internal exon of an alternative gene structure. The functionality analysis indicated about half and ~19% of the AFEs in Arabidopsis and rice could alter N-terminal protein sequences, and ~5% of the functional alteration in type II AFEs involved protein domain addition/deletion in both genomes. Expression analysis indicated that 20~66% of rice AFE clusters were tissue- and/or development- specifically transcribed, which is consistent with previous observations; however, a much smaller percentage of Arabidopsis

  3. Alternative Splicing of G9a Regulates Neuronal Differentiation

    Ana Fiszbein; Luciana E. Giono; Ana Quaglino; Bruno G. Berardino; Lorena Sigaut; Catalina von Bilderling; Ignacio E. Schor; Juliana H. Enriqué Steinberg; Mario Rossi; Lía I. Pietrasanta; Julio J. Caramelo; Anabella Srebrow; Alberto R. Kornblihtt

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin modifications are critical for the establishment and maintenance of differentiation programs. G9a, the enzyme responsible for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation in mammalian euchromatin, exists as two isoforms with differential inclusion of exon 10 (E10) through alternative splicing. We find that the G9a methyltransferase is required for differentiation of the mouse neuronal cell line N2a and that E10 inclusion increases during neuronal differentiation of cultured cells, as well as i...

  4. Towards understanding pre-mRNA splicing mechanisms and the role of SR proteins.

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; van Wijnen, Andre J; Azizi, Parisa; Abiri, Rambod; Ashkani, Sadegh; Taheri, Sima

    2016-08-10

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing provides a source of vast protein diversity by removing non-coding sequences (introns) and accurately linking different exonic regions in the correct reading frame. The regulation of alternative splicing is essential for various cellular functions in both pathological and physiological conditions. In eukaryotic cells, this process is commonly used to increase proteomic diversity and to control gene expression either co- or post-transcriptionally. Alternative splicing occurs within a megadalton-sized, multi-component machine consisting of RNA and proteins; during the splicing process, this complex undergoes dynamic changes via RNA-RNA, protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions. Co-transcriptional splicing functionally integrates the transcriptional machinery, thereby enabling the two processes to influence one another, whereas post-transcriptional splicing facilitates the coupling of RNA splicing with post-splicing events. This review addresses the structural aspects of spliceosomes and the mechanistic implications of their stepwise assembly on the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. Moreover, the role of phosphorylation-based, signal-induced changes in the regulation of the splicing process is demonstrated. PMID:27154819

  5. spliceR

    Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Porse, Bo Torben; Sandelin, Albin;

    2014-01-01

    RNA-seq data is currently underutilized, in part because it is difficult to predict the functional impact of alternate transcription events. Recent software improvements in full-length transcript deconvolution prompted us to develop spliceR, an R package for classification of alternative splicing...

  6. Alternative promoter usage and mRNA splicing pathways for parathyroid hormone-related protein in normal tissues and tumours.

    Southby, J.; O'Keeffe, L. M.; Martin, T.J.; Gillespie, M T

    1995-01-01

    The parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) gene consists of nine exons and allows the production of multiple PTHrP mRNA species via the use of three promoters and 5' and 3' alternative splicing; as a result of 3' alternative splicing one of three protein isoforms may be produced. This organisation has potential for tissue-specific splicing patterns. We examined PTHrP mRNA expression and splicing patterns in a series of tumours and normal tissues, using the sensitive reverse transcription...

  7. Transcriptome analysis reveals differential splicing events in IPF lung tissue.

    Tracy Nance

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a complex disease in which a multitude of proteins and networks are disrupted. Interrogation of the transcriptome through RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq enables the determination of genes whose differential expression is most significant in IPF, as well as the detection of alternative splicing events which are not easily observed with traditional microarray experiments. We sequenced messenger RNA from 8 IPF lung samples and 7 healthy controls on an Illumina HiSeq 2000, and found evidence for substantial differential gene expression and differential splicing. 873 genes were differentially expressed in IPF (FDR<5%, and 440 unique genes had significant differential splicing events in at least one exonic region (FDR<5%. We used qPCR to validate the differential exon usage in the second and third most significant exonic regions, in the genes COL6A3 (RNA-Seq adjusted pval = 7.18e-10 and POSTN (RNA-Seq adjusted pval = 2.06e-09, which encode the extracellular matrix proteins collagen alpha-3(VI and periostin. The increased gene-level expression of periostin has been associated with IPF and its clinical progression, but its differential splicing has not been studied in the context of this disease. Our results suggest that alternative splicing of these and other genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of IPF. We have developed an interactive web application which allows users to explore the results of our RNA-Seq experiment, as well as those of two previously published microarray experiments, and we hope that this will serve as a resource for future investigations of gene regulation in IPF.

  8. Nucleotide sequence of a Euglena gracilis chloroplast genome region coding for the elongation factor Tu; evidence for a spliced mRNA.

    Montandon, P E; Stutz, E

    1983-01-01

    We characterize a 1.95 kb transcription product of the Euglena gracilis chloroplast DNA fragment Eco-N + Q by S1 nuclease analysis and DNA sequencing and show that it is the product of three splicing events. Exon 1 (0.45 kb), exon 2 (0.74 kb) and 175 nucleotides of exon 3 (0.53 kb) code for the chloroplast elongation factor protein (EF-Tu). The remaining part of exon 3 and exon 4 (0.23 kb) have unidentified open reading frames. The chloroplast EF-Tu protein has 408 aminoacids and is to 70% ho...

  9. Alternative splicing modulated by genetic variants demonstrates accelerated evolution regulated by highly conserved proteins.

    Hsiao, Yun-Hua Esther; Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lin, Xianzhi; Chan, Tak-Ming; Wang, Rena; Xiao, Xinshu

    2016-04-01

    Identification of functional genetic variants and elucidation of their regulatory mechanisms represent significant challenges of the post-genomic era. A poorly understood topic is the involvement of genetic variants in mediating post-transcriptional RNA processing, including alternative splicing. Thus far, little is known about the genomic, evolutionary, and regulatory features of genetically modulated alternative splicing (GMAS). Here, we systematically identified intronic tag variants for genetic modulation of alternative splicing using RNA-seq data specific to cellular compartments. Combined with our previous method that identifies exonic tags for GMAS, this study yielded 622 GMAS exons. We observed that GMAS events are highly cell type independent, indicating that splicing-altering genetic variants could have widespread function across cell types. Interestingly, GMAS genes, exons, and single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) all demonstrated positive selection or accelerated evolution in primates. We predicted that GMAS SNVs often alter binding of splicing factors, with SRSF1 affecting the most GMAS events and demonstrating global allelic binding bias. However, in contrast to their GMAS targets, the predicted splicing factors are more conserved than expected, suggesting thatcis-regulatory variation is the major driving force of splicing evolution. Moreover, GMAS-related splicing factors had stronger consensus motifs than expected, consistent with their susceptibility to SNV disruption. Intriguingly, GMAS SNVs in general do not alter the strongest consensus position of the splicing factor motif, except the more than 100 GMAS SNVs in linkage disequilibrium with polymorphisms reported by genome-wide association studies. Our study reports many GMAS events and enables a better understanding of the evolutionary and regulatory features of this phenomenon. PMID:26888265

  10. Structural and functional analyses of Barth syndrome-causing mutations and alternative splicing in the tafazzin acyltransferase domain

    Atsushi Hijikata

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tafazzin is a mitochondrial phospholipid transacylase, and its mutations cause Barth syndrome (BTHS. Human tafazzin gene produces four distinct alternatively spliced transcripts. To understand the molecular mechanisms of tafazzin deficiency, we performed an atomic resolution analysis of the influence of the BTHS mutations and of alternative splicing on the structure and function of tafazzin. From the three-dimensional (3D homology modeling of tafazzin, we identified candidate amino acid residues that contribute to cardiolipin binding and to mitochondrial membrane associations that facilitate acyl-transfer reactions. Primate specific exon 5, which is alternatively spliced, is predicted to correspond to an intrinsically unstructured region in the protein. We proposed that this region should change the substrate-binding affinity and/or contribute to primate-specific molecular interactions. Exon 7, another alternatively spliced exon, encodes a region forming a part of the putative substrate-binding cleft, suggesting that the gene products lacking exon 7 will lose their substrate-binding ability. We demonstrate a clear localization of the BTHS mutations at residues responsible for membrane association, substrate binding, and the conformational stability of tafazzin. These findings provide new insights into the function of defective tafazzin and the pathogenesis of BTHS at the level of protein 3D structure and the evolution of alternatively spliced exons in primates.

  11. Structural and functional analyses of Barth syndrome-causing mutations and alternative splicing in the tafazzin acyltransferase domain.

    Hijikata, Atsushi; Yura, Kei; Ohara, Osamu; Go, Mitiko

    2015-06-01

    Tafazzin is a mitochondrial phospholipid transacylase, and its mutations cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Human tafazzin gene produces four distinct alternatively spliced transcripts. To understand the molecular mechanisms of tafazzin deficiency, we performed an atomic resolution analysis of the influence of the BTHS mutations and of alternative splicing on the structure and function of tafazzin. From the three-dimensional (3D) homology modeling of tafazzin, we identified candidate amino acid residues that contribute to cardiolipin binding and to mitochondrial membrane associations that facilitate acyl-transfer reactions. Primate specific exon 5, which is alternatively spliced, is predicted to correspond to an intrinsically unstructured region in the protein. We proposed that this region should change the substrate-binding affinity and/or contribute to primate-specific molecular interactions. Exon 7, another alternatively spliced exon, encodes a region forming a part of the putative substrate-binding cleft, suggesting that the gene products lacking exon 7 will lose their substrate-binding ability. We demonstrate a clear localization of the BTHS mutations at residues responsible for membrane association, substrate binding, and the conformational stability of tafazzin. These findings provide new insights into the function of defective tafazzin and the pathogenesis of BTHS at the level of protein 3D structure and the evolution of alternatively spliced exons in primates. PMID:25941633

  12. Exon array data analysis using Affymetrix power tools and R statistical software

    2011-01-01

    The use of microarray technology to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale has been well established for more than a decade. Methods to process and analyse the vast quantity of expression data generated by a typical microarray experiment are similarly well-established. The Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST array is a relatively new type of array, which has the capability to assess expression at the individual exon level. This allows a more comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, and in particular enables the study of alternative splicing, a gene regulation mechanism important in both normal conditions and in diseases. Some aspects of exon array data analysis are shared with those for standard gene expression data but others present new challenges that have required development of novel tools. Here, I will introduce the exon array and present a detailed example tutorial for analysis of data generated using this platform. PMID:21498550

  13. The splicing activator DAZAP1 integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation and migration

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Roy, Sreerupa Ghose; Tsai, Yihsuan S.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Graves, Lee M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a critical stage of gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli. Here we show that DAZAP1, an RNA-binding protein involved in mammalian development and spermatogenesis, promotes inclusion of weak exons through specific recognition of diverse cis-elements. The carboxy-terminal proline-rich domain of DAZAP1 interacts with and neutralizes general splicing inhibitors, and is sufficient to activate splicing when recruited to pre-mRNA. This domain is phosphorylated by the MEK/Erk (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) pathway and this modification is essential for the splicing regulatory activity and the nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of DAZAP1. Using mRNA-seq, we identify endogenous splicing events regulated by DAZAP1, many of which are involved in maintaining cell growth. Knockdown or over-expression of DAZAP1 causes a cell proliferation defect. Taken together, these studies reveal a molecular mechanism that integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation.

  14. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1

    Knud Larsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, idiopathic and familial, is characterized by degradation of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies (LB in the substantia nigra. LBs contain aggregated proteins of which α-synuclein is the major component. The protein synphilin-1 interacts and colocalizes with α-synuclein in LBs. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize porcine synphilin-1 and isoforms hereof with the future perspective to use the pig as a model for Parkinson's disease. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA was cloned by reverse transcriptase PCR. The spatial expression of SNCAIP mRNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1 of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human (90% and to mouse (84% synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing variants and a novel splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation.

  15. Multiple determinants of splicing repression activity in the polypyrimidine tract binding proteins, PTBP1 and PTBP2.

    Keppetipola, Niroshika M; Yeom, Kyu-Hyeon; Hernandez, Adrian L; Bui, Tessa; Sharma, Shalini; Black, Douglas L

    2016-08-01

    Most human genes generate multiple protein isoforms through alternative pre-mRNA splicing, but the mechanisms controlling alternative splicing choices by RNA binding proteins are not well understood. These proteins can have multiple paralogs expressed in different cell types and exhibiting different splicing activities on target exons. We examined the paralogous polypyrimidine tract binding proteins PTBP1 and PTBP2 to understand how PTBP1 can exhibit greater splicing repression activity on certain exons. Using both an in vivo coexpression assay and an in vitro splicing assay, we show that PTBP1 is more repressive than PTBP2 per unit protein on a target exon. Constructing chimeras of PTBP1 and 2 to determine amino acid features that contribute to their differential activity, we find that multiple segments of PTBP1 increase the repressive activity of PTBP2. Notably, when either RRM1 of PTBP2 or the linker peptide separating RRM2 and RRM3 are replaced with the equivalent PTBP1 sequences, the resulting chimeras are highly active for splicing repression. These segments are distinct from the known region of interaction for the PTBP1 cofactors Raver1 and Matrin3 in RRM2. We find that RRM2 of PTBP1 also increases the repression activity of an otherwise PTBP2 sequence, and that this is potentially explained by stronger binding by Raver1. These results indicate that multiple features over the length of the two proteins affect their ability to repress an exon. PMID:27288314

  16. The polypyrimidine tract binding protein regulates desaturase alternative splicing and PUFA composition

    Reardon, Holly T; Park, Woo Jung; Zhang, Jimmy; Lawrence, Peter; Kothapalli, Kumar S. D.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The Δ6 desaturase, encoded by FADS2, plays a crucial role in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid synthesis. These fatty acids are essential components of the central nervous system, and they act as precursors for eicosanoid signaling molecules and as direct modulators of gene expression. The polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB or hnRNP I) is a splicing factor that regulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Here, PTB is shown to bind an exonic splicing silencer element and repress alternative s...

  17. Kinetin improves IKBKAP mRNA splicing in patients with familial dysautonomia

    Axelrod, Felicia B.; Liebes, Leonard; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle; Mendoza, Sandra; Mull, James; Leyne, Maire; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is caused by an intronic splice mutation in the IKBKAP gene that leads to partial skipping of exon 20 and tissue-specific reduction in I-κ-B kinase complex associated protein/ elongation protein 1 (IKAP/ELP-1) expression. Kinetin (6-furfurylaminopurine) has been shown to improve splicing and increase wild-type IKBKAP mRNA and IKAP protein expression in FD cell lines and carriers. To determine if oral kinetin treatment could alter mRNA splicing in FD subjects and was...

  18. Alternative splicing of Caspase 9 is modulated by the PI3K/Akt pathway via phosphorylation of SRp30a

    Shultz, Jacqueline C.; Rachel W Goehe; Wijesinghe, D. Shanaka; Murudkar, Charuta; Hawkins, Amy J.; Shay, Jerry W.; Minna, John D.; Chalfant, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the functional importance of alternative splice variations in cancer pathophysiology. Two splice variants are derived from the CASP9 gene via the inclusion (Casp9a) or exclusion (Casp9b) of a four exon cassette. Here we show that alternative splicing of Casp9 is dysregulated in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) regardless of their pathological classification. Based on these findings we hypothesized that survival pathways activated by oncogenic mutation regulate...

  19. SpliceDisease database: linking RNA splicing and disease

    WANG, Juan; Jie ZHANG; Li, Kaibo; Zhao, Wei; Cui, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    RNA splicing is an important aspect of gene regulation in many organisms. Splicing of RNA is regulated by complicated mechanisms involving numerous RNA-binding proteins and the intricate network of interactions among them. Mutations in cis-acting splicing elements or its regulatory proteins have been shown to be involved in human diseases. Defects in pre-mRNA splicing process have emerged as a common disease-causing mechanism. Therefore, a database integrating RNA splicing and disease associa...

  20. Splicing regulators: targets and drugs

    Yeo, Gene Wei-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Silencing of splicing regulators by RNA interference, combined with splicing-specific microarrays, has revealed a complex network of distinct alternative splicing events in Drosophila, while a high-throughput screen of more than 6,000 compounds has identified drugs that interfere specifically and directly with one class of splicing regulators in human cells.

  1. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT-PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain. PMID:20512402

  2. Misregulation of Alternative Splicing in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome.

    Li, Ronghui; Dong, Qiping; Yuan, Xinni; Zeng, Xin; Gao, Yu; Chiao, Cassandra; Li, Hongda; Zhao, Xinyu; Keles, Sunduz; Wang, Zefeng; Chang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the human MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects girls. Despite decades of work, the molecular function of MeCP2 is not fully understood. Here we report a systematic identification of MeCP2-interacting proteins in the mouse brain. In addition to transcription regulators, we found that MeCP2 physically interacts with several modulators of RNA splicing, including LEDGF and DHX9. These interactions are disrupted by RTT causing mutations, suggesting that they may play a role in RTT pathogenesis. Consistent with the idea, deep RNA sequencing revealed misregulation of hundreds of splicing events in the cortex of Mecp2 knockout mice. To reveal the functional consequence of altered RNA splicing due to the loss of MeCP2, we focused on the regulation of the splicing of the flip/flop exon of Gria2 and other AMPAR genes. We found a significant splicing shift in the flip/flop exon toward the flop inclusion, leading to a faster decay in the AMPAR gated current and altered synaptic transmission. In summary, our study identified direct physical interaction between MeCP2 and splicing factors, a novel MeCP2 target gene, and established functional connection between a specific RNA splicing change and synaptic phenotypes in RTT mice. These results not only help our understanding of the molecular function of MeCP2, but also reveal potential drug targets for future therapies. PMID:27352031

  3. Misregulation of Alternative Splicing in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome.

    Ronghui Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects girls. Despite decades of work, the molecular function of MeCP2 is not fully understood. Here we report a systematic identification of MeCP2-interacting proteins in the mouse brain. In addition to transcription regulators, we found that MeCP2 physically interacts with several modulators of RNA splicing, including LEDGF and DHX9. These interactions are disrupted by RTT causing mutations, suggesting that they may play a role in RTT pathogenesis. Consistent with the idea, deep RNA sequencing revealed misregulation of hundreds of splicing events in the cortex of Mecp2 knockout mice. To reveal the functional consequence of altered RNA splicing due to the loss of MeCP2, we focused on the regulation of the splicing of the flip/flop exon of Gria2 and other AMPAR genes. We found a significant splicing shift in the flip/flop exon toward the flop inclusion, leading to a faster decay in the AMPAR gated current and altered synaptic transmission. In summary, our study identified direct physical interaction between MeCP2 and splicing factors, a novel MeCP2 target gene, and established functional connection between a specific RNA splicing change and synaptic phenotypes in RTT mice. These results not only help our understanding of the molecular function of MeCP2, but also reveal potential drug targets for future therapies.

  4. Alternative splicing regulates the expression of G9A and SUV39H2 methyltransferases, and dramatically changes SUV39H2 functions

    Mauger, Oriane; Klinck, Roscoe; Chabot, Benoit; Muchardt, Christian; Allemand, Eric; Batsche, Eric

    2015-01-01

    International audience Alternative splicing is the main source of proteome diversity. Here, we have investigated how alternative splicing affects the function of two human histone methyltransferases (HMTase): G9A and SUV39H2. We show that exon 10 in G9A and exon 3 in SUV39H2 are alternatively included in a variety of tissues and cell lines, as well as in a different species. The production of these variants is likely tightly regulated because both constitutive and alternative splicing fact...

  5. Genetic analysis of complement C1s deficiency associated with systemic lupus erythematosus highlights alternative splicing of normal C1s gene

    Armano, MT; Ferriani, VP; Florido, MP;

    2008-01-01

    ' fibroblasts when analyzed by confocal microscopy. We show that all four siblings are homozygous for a mutation at position 938 in exon 6 of the C1s cDNA that creates a premature stop codon. Our investigations led us to reveal the presence of previously uncharacterized splice variants of C1s mRNA transcripts...... in normal human cells. These variants are derived from the skipping of exon 3 and from the use of an alternative 3' splice site within intron 1 which increases the size of exon 2 by 87 nucleotides....

  6. Optical Fiber Fusion Splicing

    Yablon, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date treatment of optical fiber fusion splicing incorporating all the recent innovations in the field. It provides a toolbox of general strategies and specific techniques that the reader can apply when optimizing fusion splices between novel fibers. It specifically addresses considerations important for fusion splicing of contemporary specialty fibers including dispersion compensating fiber, erbium-doped gain fiber, polarization maintaining fiber, and microstructured fiber. Finally, it discusses the future of optical fiber fusion splicing including silica and non-silica based optical fibers as well as the trend toward increasing automation. Whilst serving as a self-contained reference work, abundant citations from the technical literature will enable readers to readily locate primary sources.

  7. Synaptic and epidermal accumulations of human acetylcholinesterase are encoded by alternative 3'-terminal exons.

    Seidman, S; Sternfeld, M; Ben Aziz-Aloya, R; Timberg, R; Kaufer-Nachum, D; Soreq, H.

    1995-01-01

    Tissue-specific heterogeneity among mammalian acetylcholinesterases (AChE) has been associated with 3' alternative splicing of the primary AChE gene transcript. We have previously demonstrated that human AChE DNA encoding the brain and muscle AChE form and bearing the 3' exon E6 (ACHE-E6) induces accumulation of catalytically active AChE in myotomes and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) of 2- and 3-day-old Xenopus embryos. Here, we explore the possibility that the 3'-terminal exons of two altern...

  8. Structure of the exon junction core complex with a trapped DEAD-box ATPase bound to RNA

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Ballut, Lionel; Johansen, Jesper Sanderhoff;

    2006-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, a multiprotein exon junction complex is deposited on spliced messenger RNAs. The complex is organized around a stable core, which serves as a binding platform for numerous factors that influence messenger RNA function. Here, we present the crystal structure of a tetrameric...

  9. Multiple splicing types of OsRIX4, an RAD21 homolog in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    DONG HaiTao; LI DeBao; GUO XiaoQin; PEI YanXi; DAI ChengEn; FANG YongQi; TU QiChao; ZHUANG JieYun; ZHAO Dong; ZHENG KangLe

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes multiple splicing types of OsRIX4, an RAD21 homolog in rice. A type of alternative splicing (AS), distinctive from all five previously known splicing types, was identified in which interior sequences of a constitutive exon could be spliced. Translation of the transcript produced with this AS type was demonstrated at the protein level. Expression of multiple transcripts was organ specific. The expression abundance of transcripts, OsRIX4-4 and OsRIX4-5, was positively correlated with fertility in rice. The splicing type identified in the present study provided the means to further understand and define different mRNA splicing types in plants and suggested that post-transcription processing of mRNA and its regulation mechanism are complex.

  10. Splice junction mutation in some Ashkenazi Jews with Tay-Sachs disease: Evidence against a single defect within this ethnic group

    Tay-Sachs disease is an inherited disorder in which the α chain of the lysosomal enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase A bears the mutation. Ashkenazi Jews are found to be carriers for a severe type of Tay-Sachs disease, the classic form, 10 times more frequently than the general population. Ashkenazi Jewish patients with classic Tay-Sachs disease have appeared to be clinically and biochemically identical, and the usual assumption has been that they harbor the same α-chain mutation. The author has isolated the α-chain gene from an Ashkenazi Jewish patient, GM2968, with classic Tay-Sachs disease and compared its nucleotide sequences with that of the normal α-chain gene in the promoter region, exon and splice junction regions, and polyadenylylation signal area. Only one difference was observed between these sequences. The alteration is presumed to be functionally significant and to result in aberrant mRNA splicing. Utilizing the polymerase chain reaction to amplify the region encompassing the mutation, the author developed an assay to screen patients and heterozygote carriers for this mutation. Surprisingly, in each of two Ashkenazi patients, only one α-chain allele harbored the splice junction mutation. Only one parent of each of these patients was positive for the defect. Another Ashkenazi patient did not bear this mutation at all nor did either of the subject's parents. The data are consistent with the presence of more than one mutation underlying the classic form of Tay-Sachs disease in the Ashkenazi Jewish population

  11. Splice junction mutation in some Ashkenazi Jews with Tay-Sachs disease: Evidence against a single defect within this ethnic group

    Myerowitz, R. (National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1988-06-01

    Tay-Sachs disease is an inherited disorder in which the {alpha} chain of the lysosomal enzyme {beta}-N-acetylhexosaminidase A bears the mutation. Ashkenazi Jews are found to be carriers for a severe type of Tay-Sachs disease, the classic form, 10 times more frequently than the general population. Ashkenazi Jewish patients with classic Tay-Sachs disease have appeared to be clinically and biochemically identical, and the usual assumption has been that they harbor the same {alpha}-chain mutation. The author has isolated the {alpha}-chain gene from an Ashkenazi Jewish patient, GM2968, with classic Tay-Sachs disease and compared its nucleotide sequences with that of the normal {alpha}-chain gene in the promoter region, exon and splice junction regions, and polyadenylylation signal area. Only one difference was observed between these sequences. The alteration is presumed to be functionally significant and to result in aberrant mRNA splicing. Utilizing the polymerase chain reaction to amplify the region encompassing the mutation, the author developed an assay to screen patients and heterozygote carriers for this mutation. Surprisingly, in each of two Ashkenazi patients, only one {alpha}-chain allele harbored the splice junction mutation. Only one parent of each of these patients was positive for the defect. Another Ashkenazi patient did not bear this mutation at all nor did either of the subject's parents. The data are consistent with the presence of more than one mutation underlying the classic form of Tay-Sachs disease in the Ashkenazi Jewish population.

  12. A View of Pre-mRNA Splicing from RNase R Resistant RNAs

    Hitoshi Suzuki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During pre-mRNA splicing, exons in the primary transcript are precisely connected to generate an mRNA. Intron lariat RNAs are formed as by-products of this process. In addition, some exonic circular RNAs (circRNAs may also result from exon skipping as by-products. Lariat RNAs and circRNAs are both RNase R resistant RNAs. RNase R is a strong 3' to 5' exoribonuclease, which efficiently degrades linear RNAs, such as mRNAs and rRNAs; therefore, the circular parts of lariat RNAs and the circRNAs can be segregated from eukaryotic total RNAs by their RNase R resistance. Thus, RNase R resistant RNAs could provide unexplored splicing information not available from mRNAs. Analyses of these RNAs identified repeating splicing phenomena, such as re-splicing of mature mRNAs and nested splicing. Moreover, circRNA might function as microRNA sponges. There is an enormous variety of endogenous circRNAs, which are generally synthesized in cells and tissues.

  13. Analysis of Maxi-K alpha subunit splice variants in human myometrium

    Morrison John J

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (Maxi-K channels are implicated in the modulation of human uterine contractions and myometrial Ca2+ homeostasis. However, the regulatory mechanism(s governing the expression of Maxi-K channels with decreased calcium sensitivity at parturition are unclear. The objectives of this study were to investigate mRNA expression of the Maxi-K alpha subunit, and that of its splice variants, in human non-pregnant and pregnant myometrium, prior to and after labour onset, to determine whether altered expression of these splice variants is associated with decreased calcium sensitivity observed at labour onset. Methods Myometrial biopsies were obtained at hysterectomy (non-pregnant, NP, and at Caesarean section, at elective (pregnant not-in-labour, PNL and intrapartum (pregnant in-labour, PL procedures. RNA was extracted from all biopsies and quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to investigate for possible differential expression of the Maxi-K alpha subunit, and that of its splice variants, between these functionally-distinct myometrial tissue sets. Results RT-PCR analysis identified the presence of a 132 bp and an 87 bp spliced exon of the Maxi-K alpha subunit in all three myometrial tissue sets. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated a decrease in the expression of the Maxi-K alpha subunit with labour onset. While there was no change in the proportion of Maxi-K alpha subunits expressing the 87 bp spliced exon, the proportion of alpha subunits expressing the 132 bp spliced exon was significantly increased with labour onset, compared to both non-pregnant and pregnant not-in-labour tissues. An increased proportion of 132 bp exon-containing alpha subunit variants with labour onset is of interest, as channels expressing this spliced exon have decreased calcium and voltage sensitivities. Conclusions Our findings suggest that decreased Maxi-K alpha subunit mRNA expression in human myometrium at

  14. Characterization of a splicing mutation in group A xeroderma pigmentosum

    The molecular basis of group A xeroderma pigmentosum (WP) was investigated by comparison of the nucleotide sequences of multiple clones of the XP group A complementing gene (XPAC) from a patient with group A XP with that of a normal gene. The clones showed a G → C substitution at the 3' splice acceptor site of intron 3, which altered the obligatory AG acceptor dinucleotide to AC. Nucleotide sequencing of cDNAs amplified by the polymerase chain reaction revealed that this single base substitution abolishes the canonical 3' splice site, thus creating two abnormally spliced mRNA forms. The larger form is identical with normal mRNA except for a dinucleotide deletion at the 5' end of exon 4. This deletion results in a frameshift with premature translation termination in exon 4. The smaller form has a deletion of the entire exon 3 and the dinucleotide at the 5' end of exon 4. The result of a transfection study provided additional evidence that this single base substitution is the disease-causing mutation. This single base substitution creates a new cleavage site for the restriction nuclease AlwNI. Analysis of AlwNI restriction fragment length polymorphism showed a high frequency of this mutation in Japanese patients with group A XP: 16 of 21 unrelated Japanese patients were homozygous and 4 were heterozygous for this mutation. However, 11 Caucasians and 2 Blacks with group A XP did not have this mutant allele. The polymorphic AlwNI restriction fragments are concluded to be useful for diagnosis of group A XP in Japanese subjects, including prenatal cases and carriers

  15. Expression microarray analysis reveals alternative splicing of LAMA3 and DST genes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Ryan Li

    Full Text Available Prior studies have demonstrated tumor-specific alternative splicing events in various solid tumor types. The role of alternative splicing in the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is unclear. Our study queried exon-level expression to implicate splice variants in HNSCC tumors.We performed a comparative genome-wide analysis of 44 HNSCC tumors and 25 uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP tissue samples at an exon expression level. In our comparison we ranked genes based upon a novel score-the Maximum-Minimum Exon Score (MMES--designed to predict the likelihood of an alternative splicing event occurring. We validated predicted alternative splicing events using quantitative RT-PCR on an independent cohort.After MMES scoring of 17,422 genes, the top 900 genes with the highest scores underwent additional manual inspection of expression patterns in a graphical analysis. The genes LAMA3, DST, VEGFC, SDHA, RASIP1, and TP63 were selected for further validation studies because of a high frequency of alternative splicing suggested in our graphical analysis, and literature review showing their biological relevance and known splicing patterns. We confirmed TP63 as having dominant expression of the short DeltaNp63 isoform in HNSCC tumor samples, consistent with prior reports. Two of the six genes (LAMA3 and DST validated by quantitative RT-PCR for tumor-specific alternative splicing events (Student's t test, P<0.001.Alternative splicing events of oncologically relevant proteins occur in HNSCC. The number of genes expressing tumor-specific splice variants needs further elucidation, as does the functional significance of selective isoform expression.

  16. Classifying MLH1 and MSH2 variants using bioinformatic prediction, splicing assays, segregation and tumor characteristics

    Arnold, Sven; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Barker, Melissa; Jaskowski, Lesley; Walsh, Michael D.; Birney, Genevieve; Woods, Michael O.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A; Brown, Melissa A.; Sean V Tavtigian; Goldgar, David E.; Young, Joanne P; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable methods for predicting functional consequences of variants in disease genes would be beneficial in the clinical setting. This study was undertaken to predict, and confirm in vitro, splicing aberrations associated with mismatch repair (MMR) variants identified in familial colon cancer patients. Six programs were used to predict the effect of 13 MLH1 and 6 MSH2 gene variants on pre-mRNA splicing. mRNA from cycloheximide-treated lymphoblastoid cell lines of variant carriers was screened...

  17. HMMSplicer: a tool for efficient and sensitive discovery of known and novel splice junctions in RNA-Seq data.

    Michelle T Dimon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-throughput sequencing of an organism's transcriptome, or RNA-Seq, is a valuable and versatile new strategy for capturing snapshots of gene expression. However, transcriptome sequencing creates a new class of alignment problem: mapping short reads that span exon-exon junctions back to the reference genome, especially in the case where a splice junction is previously unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we introduce HMMSplicer, an accurate and efficient algorithm for discovering canonical and non-canonical splice junctions in short read datasets. HMMSplicer identifies more splice junctions than currently available algorithms when tested on publicly available A. thaliana, P. falciparum, and H. sapiens datasets without a reduction in specificity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HMMSplicer was found to perform especially well in compact genomes and on genes with low expression levels, alternative splice isoforms, or non-canonical splice junctions. Because HHMSplicer does not rely on pre-built gene models, the products of inexact splicing are also detected. For H. sapiens, we find 3.6% of 3' splice sites and 1.4% of 5' splice sites are inexact, typically differing by 3 bases in either direction. In addition, HMMSplicer provides a score for every predicted junction allowing the user to set a threshold to tune false positive rates depending on the needs of the experiment. HMMSplicer is implemented in Python. Code and documentation are freely available at http://derisilab.ucsf.edu/software/hmmsplicer.

  18. Characterization of a novel splicing variant in the RAPTOR gene

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays an essential role in the regulation of cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Raptor, the regulatory associated protein of mTOR, is an important member in this signaling pathway. In the present report, we identified and characterized a novel splicing variant of this gene, RAPTORv2, in which exons 14-17, 474 bp in total, are omitted from the mRNA. This deletion does not change the open reading frame, but causes a nearly complete absence of HEAT repeats, which were shown to be involved in the binding of mTOR substrates. Real time PCR performed on 48 different human tissues demonstrated the ubiquitous presence of this splice variant. Quantification of mRNA levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) from 56 unrelated HapMap individuals revealed that the expression of this splicing form is quite variable. One synonymous SNP, rs2289759 in exon 14, was predicted by ESEfinder to cause a significant gain/loss of SRp55 and/or SF2/ASF binding sites, and thus potentially influence splicing. This prediction was confirmed by linear regression analysis between the ratio of RAPTORv2 to total RAPTOR mRNA levels and the SNP genotype in the above 56 individuals (r = 0.281 and P = 0.036). Moreover, the functional evaluation indicated that this splicing isoform is expected to retain the ability to bind mTOR, but is unlikely to bind mTOR substrates, hence affecting signal transduction and further cell proliferation

  19. Translational and regulatory challenges for exon skipping therapies.

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ferlini, Alessandra; Goemans, Nathalie; Pasmooij, Anna M G; Wells, Dominic J; Bushby, Katerine; Vroom, Elizabeth; Balabanov, Pavel

    2014-10-01

    Several translational challenges are currently impeding the therapeutic development of antisense-mediated exon skipping approaches for rare diseases. Some of these are inherent to developing therapies for rare diseases, such as small patient numbers and limited information on natural history and interpretation of appropriate clinical outcome measures. Others are inherent to the antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping approach, which employs small modified DNA or RNA molecules to manipulate the splicing process. This is a new approach and only limited information is available on long-term safety and toxicity for most AON chemistries. Furthermore, AONs often act in a mutation-specific manner, in which case multiple AONs have to be developed for a single disease. A workshop focusing on preclinical development, trial design, outcome measures, and different forms of marketing authorization was organized by the regulatory models and biochemical outcome measures working groups of Cooperation of Science and Technology Action: "Networking towards clinical application of antisense-mediated exon skipping for rare diseases." The workshop included participants from patient organizations, academia, and members of staff from the European Medicine Agency and Medicine Evaluation Board (the Netherlands). This statement article contains the key outcomes of this meeting. PMID:25184444

  20. Structure of the human laminin {gamma}2 chain gene (LAMC2): Alternative splicing with different tissue distribution of two transcripts

    Airenne, T.; Haakana, H.; Kallunki, T. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland)] [and others

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the exon-intron structure and tissue distribution of the laminin {gamma}2 chain (LAMC2) gene, which is mutated in some cases of junctional epidermolysis bullosa. The article also discusses the transcription and splicing of this gene, which result in alternative uses of the last two exons of the gene. The different tissue distributions of the transcripts indicate different functions for the gene in vivo. 36 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Splicing factors control C. elegans behavioural learning in a single neuron by producing DAF-2c receptor

    Tomioka, Masahiro; Naito, Yasuki; Kuroyanagi, Hidehito; Iino, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates protein diversity essential for neuronal properties. However, the precise mechanisms underlying this process and its relevance to physiological and behavioural functions are poorly understood. To address these issues, we focused on a cassette exon of the Caenorhabditis elegans insulin receptor gene daf-2, whose proper variant expression in the taste receptor neuron ASER is critical for taste-avoidance learning. We show that inclusion of daf-2 exon 11.5 is restri...

  2. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Mediated Exon Skipping for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Progress and Challenges.

    Arechavala-Gomeza, V.; Anthony, K.; Morgan, J; Muntoni, F.

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common childhood neuromuscular disorder. It is caused by mutations in the DMD gene that disrupt the open reading frame (ORF) preventing the production of functional dystrophin protein. The loss of dystrophin ultimately leads to the degeneration of muscle fibres, progressive weakness and premature death. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) targeted to splicing elements within DMD pre-mRNA can induce the skipping of targeted exons, restoring the ORF an...

  3. Identification and characterization of naturally occurring splice variants of SAMHD1

    Welbourn Sarah

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sterile Alpha Motif and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1 is a recently identified host factor that restricts HIV-1 replication in dendritic and myeloid cells. SAMHD1 is a dNTPase that presumably reduces the cellular dNTP levels to levels too low for retroviral reverse transcription to occur. However, HIV-2 and SIV encoded Vpx counteracts the antiviral effects of SAMHD1 by targeting the protein for proteasomal degradation. SAMHD1 is encoded by a multiply spliced mRNA and consists of 16 coding exons. Results Here, we identified two naturally occurring splice variants lacking exons 8–9 and 14, respectively. Like wildtype SAMHD1, both splice variants localize primarily to the nucleus, interact with Vpx, and retain some sensitivity to Vpx-dependent degradation. However, the splice variants differ from full-length SAMHD1 in their metabolic stability and catalytic activity. While full-length SAMHD1 is metabolically stable in uninfected cells, both splice variants were inherently metabolically unstable and were rapidly degraded even in the absence of Vpx. Vpx strongly increased the rate of degradation of full-length SAMHD1 and further accelerated the degradation of the splice variants. However, the effect of Vpx on the splice variants was more modest due to the inherent instability of these proteins. Analysis of dNTPase activity indicates that neither splice variant is catalytically active. Conclusions The identification of SAMHD1 splice variants exposes a potential regulatory mechanism that could enable the cell to control its dNTPase activity on a post-transcriptional level.

  4. Semi-supervised Learning Predicts Approximately One Third of the Alternative Splicing Isoforms as Functional Proteins

    Yanqi Hao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing acts on transcripts from almost all human multi-exon genes. Notwithstanding its ubiquity, fundamental ramifications of splicing on protein expression remain unresolved. The number and identity of spliced transcripts that form stably folded proteins remain the sources of considerable debate, due largely to low coverage of experimental methods and the resulting absence of negative data. We circumvent this issue by developing a semi-supervised learning algorithm, positive unlabeled learning for splicing elucidation (PULSE; http://www.kimlab.org/software/pulse, which uses 48 features spanning various categories. We validated its accuracy on sets of bona fide protein isoforms and directly on mass spectrometry (MS spectra for an overall AU-ROC of 0.85. We predict that around 32% of “exon skipping” alternative splicing events produce stable proteins, suggesting that the process engenders a significant number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We also provide insights into the distribution of positive isoforms in various functional classes and into the structural effects of alternative splicing.

  5. Identification of a novel function of CX-4945 as a splicing regulator.

    Hyeongki Kim

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is a nearly ubiquitous versatile process that controls gene expression and creates numerous protein isoforms with different functions from a single gene. The significance of alternative splicing has been confirmed by the increasing number of human diseases that are caused by misregulation of splicing events. Very few compounds, however, have been reported to act as inhibitors of alternative splicing, and their potential clinical use needs to be evaluated. Here, we report that CX-4945, a previously well-characterized inhibitor of casein kinase 2 (CK2 and a molecule currently in clinical trials (Phase II for cancer treatment, regulates splicing in mammalian cells in a CK2-independent manner. Transcriptome-wide analysis using exon array also showed a widespread alteration in alternative splicing of numerous genes. We found that CX-4945 potently inhibits the Cdc2-like kinases (Clks in vitro and in turn, leads to suppression of the phosphorylation of serine/arginine-rich (SR proteins in mammalian cells. Surprisingly, the overall efficacy of CX-4945 on Clks (IC50 = 3-90 nM was stronger than that of TG-003, the strongest inhibitor reported to date. Of the Clks, Clk2 was most strongly inhibited by CX-4945 in an ATP-competitive manner. Our research revealed an unexpected activity of the drug candidate CX-4945 as a potent splicing modulator and also suggested a potential application for therapy of diseases caused by abnormal splicing.

  6. Detection of Splice Sites Using Support Vector Machine

    Varadwaj, Pritish; Purohit, Neetesh; Arora, Bhumika

    Automatic identification and annotation of exon and intron region of gene, from DNA sequences has been an important research area in field of computational biology. Several approaches viz. Hidden Markov Model (HMM), Artificial Intelligence (AI) based machine learning and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) techniques have extensively and independently been used by various researchers to cater this challenging task. In this work, we propose a Support Vector Machine based kernel learning approach for detection of splice sites (the exon-intron boundary) in a gene. Electron-Ion Interaction Potential (EIIP) values of nucleotides have been used for mapping character sequences to corresponding numeric sequences. Radial Basis Function (RBF) SVM kernel is trained using EIIP numeric sequences. Furthermore this was tested on test gene dataset for detection of splice site by window (of 12 residues) shifting. Optimum values of window size, various important parameters of SVM kernel have been optimized for a better accuracy. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves have been utilized for displaying the sensitivity rate of the classifier and results showed 94.82% accuracy for splice site detection on test dataset.

  7. Alternative splicing and muscular dystrophy

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to proteomic diversity and to the control of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this reasons, alternative splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human disorders. The aim of this review is to focus on the relevance of alternative splicing for muscle function and muscle disease. We begin by giving a brief overview of alternative splicing, musc...

  8. Two novel splicing mutations in the SLC45A2 gene cause Oculocutaneous Albinism Type IV by unmasking cryptic splice sites.

    Straniero, Letizia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Soldà, Giulia; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Andreucci, Elena; Bargiacchi, Sara; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Asselta, Rosanna; Primignani, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type IV (OCA4) is one of the four commonly recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the SLC45A2 gene. Here, we investigated the genetic basis of OCA4 in an Italian child. The mutational screening of the SLC45A2 gene identified two novel potentially pathogenic splicing mutations: a synonymous transition (c.888G>A) involving the last nucleotide of exon 3 and a single-nucleotide insertion (c.1156+2dupT) within the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of intron 5. As computer-assisted analysis for mutant splice-site prediction was not conclusive, we investigated the effects on pre-mRNA splicing of these two variants by using an in vitro minigene approach. Production of mutant transcripts in HeLa cells demonstrated that both mutations cause the almost complete abolishment of the physiologic donor splice site, with the concomitant unmasking of cryptic donor splice sites. To our knowledge, this work represents the first in-depth molecular characterization of splicing defects in a OCA4 patient. PMID:26016411

  9. Progress on research of the alternative splicing of human cytochrome P450 pre-mRNA%人细胞色素P450前mRNA的可变剪接研究进展

    诸葛坚; 余应年

    2005-01-01

    Human genes typically contain multiple introns, and in many cases the exons can be joined more than one way to generate multiple rnRNAs, encoding distinct protein isoforms. This process is called alternative splicing. The article summarized the human cytochrome P450 pre-mRNA alternative splicing and their regulatory mechanism and impacts on biological functions.

  10. A novel splice variant in the N-propeptide of COL5A1 causes an EDS phenotype with severe kyphoscoliosis and eye involvement.

    Sofie Symoens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS is a heritable connective tissue disorder characterized by hyperextensible skin, joint hypermobility and soft tissue fragility. The classic subtype of EDS is caused by mutations in one of the type V collagen genes (COL5A1 and COL5A2. Most mutations affect the type V collagen helical domain and lead to a diminished or structurally abnormal type V collagen protein. Remarkably, only two mutations were reported to affect the extended, highly conserved N-propeptide domain, which plays an important role in the regulation of the heterotypic collagen fibril diameter. We identified a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide mutation, resulting in an unusual but severe classic EDS phenotype and a remarkable splicing outcome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide acceptor-splice site mutation (IVS6-2A>G, NM_000093.3_c.925-2A>G in a patient with cutaneous features of EDS, severe progressive scoliosis and eye involvement. Two mutant transcripts were identified, one with an exon 7 skip and one in which exon 7 and the upstream exon 6 are deleted. Both transcripts are expressed and secreted into the extracellular matrix, where they can participate in and perturb collagen fibrillogenesis, as illustrated by the presence of dermal collagen cauliflowers. Determination of the order of intron removal and computational analysis showed that simultaneous skipping of exons 6 and 7 is due to the combined effect of delayed splicing of intron 7, altered pre-mRNA secondary structure, low splice site strength and possibly disturbed binding of splicing factors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide acceptor-splice site mutation in intron 6, which not only affects splicing of the adjacent exon 7, but also causes a splicing error of the upstream exon 6. Our findings add further insights into the COL5A1 splicing order and show for the first time that a single COL5A1 acceptor-splice site

  11. Computational analysis and prediction for exons of PAC579 genomic sequence

    黄弋; 覃文新; 万大方; 赵新泰; 顾健人

    2001-01-01

    To isolate the novel genes related to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we sequenced P1-derived artificial chromosome PAC579 (D17S926 locus) mapped in the minimum LOH (loss of heterozygosity) deletion region of chromosome 17p13.3 in HCC, Four novel genes mapped in this genomic sequence area were isolated and cloned by wet-lab experiments, and the exons of these genes were located. 0-60 kb of this genomic sequence including the genes of interest was scanned with five different computational exon prediction programs as well as four splice site recognition programs. After analyzing and comparing the computationally predicted results with the wet-lab experiment results, some potential exons were predicted in the genomic sequence by using these programs.

  12. Evidence for association of multi-exon skipping events with tumors

    Jianning BI; Tao PENG; Yanda LI

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing(AS)has been shown to be frequently present in human tumors.Specifically,it has been observed in some experimental studies that multi-exon skipping(MES)events often appear in tumorous tissues.Prompted by this observation,we conducted a genomewide analysis of MES events to investigate their association with tumors.The results show that MES events are more likely associated with tumors than single-exon skipping (SES) and the degree of association increases with the number of skipped exons.Furthermore,MES events are found to be less conserved than their SES counterparts,which provides additional evidence for our results because disease-associated AS events should be eliminated during evolution.Interestingly,these differences still existed even after comparison Of MES and SES events with similarlength skipped regions.These results demonstrate that MES events mav be associated with tumors and suggest that MES isoforms might be useful in cancer diagnosis.

  13. The A1 and A1B proteins of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoparticles modulate 5' splice site selection in vivo.

    Yang, X.; Bani, M. R.; S J Lu; Rowan, S.; Ben-David, Y; Chabot, B

    1994-01-01

    Recent in vitro results suggest that the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoparticle (hnRNP) A1 protein modulates alternative splicing by favoring distal 5' splice site (5'SS) selection and exon skipping. We used a mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cell line (CB3C7) deficient in the expression of hnRNP A1 to test whether variations in hnRNP A1 and AlB protein levels affected alternative splicing in vivo. In contrast to A1-expressing MEL cell lines, CB3C7 cells preferentially selected the proximal 13S ...

  14. Aberration Corrected Emittance Exchange

    Nanni, Emilio A

    2015-01-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (RF) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dog-leg emittance exchange setup with a 5 cell RF deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of emittances differing by 4 orders of magnitude, i.e. an initial transverse emittance of $\\epsilon_x=1$ pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of $\\epsilon_z=10$ nm-rad.

  15. Survey on Nucleotide Encoding Techniques and SVM Kernel Design for Human Splice Site Prediction

    A.T.M. Golam Bari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Splice site prediction in DNA sequence is a basic search problem for finding exon/intron and intron/exon boundaries. Removing introns and then joining the exons together forms the mRNA sequence. These sequences are the input of the translation process. It is a necessary step in the central dogma of molecular biology. The main task of splice site prediction is to find out the exact GT and AG ended sequences. Then it identifies the true and false GT and AG ended sequences among those candidate sequences. In this paper, we survey research works on splice site prediction based on support vector machine (SVM. The basic difference between these research works is nucleotide encoding technique and SVM kernel selection. Some methods encode the DNA sequence in a sparse way whereas others encode in a probabilistic manner. The encoded sequences serve as input of SVM. The task of SVM is to classify them using its learning model. The accuracy of classification largely depends on the proper kernel selection for sequence data as well as a selection of kernel parameter. We observe each encoding technique and classify them according to their similarity. Then we discuss about kernel and their parameter selection. Our survey paper provides a basic understanding of encoding approaches and proper kernel selection of SVM for splice site prediction.

  16. High-throughput proteomics detection of novel splice isoforms in human platelets.

    Power, Karen A

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an intrinsic regulatory mechanism of all metazoans. Recent findings suggest that 100% of multiexonic human genes give rise to splice isoforms. AS can be specific to tissue type, environment or developmentally regulated. Splice variants have also been implicated in various diseases including cancer. Detection of these variants will enhance our understanding of the complexity of the human genome and provide disease-specific and prognostic biomarkers. We adopted a proteomics approach to identify exon skip events - the most common form of AS. We constructed a database harboring the peptide sequences derived from all hypothetical exon skip junctions in the human genome. Searching tandem mass spectrometry (MS\\/MS) data against the database allows the detection of exon skip events, directly at the protein level. Here we describe the application of this approach to human platelets, including the mRNA-based verification of novel splice isoforms of ITGA2, NPEPPS and FH. This methodology is applicable to all new or existing MS\\/MS datasets.

  17. Single-molecule RNA observation in vivo reveals dynamics of co-transcriptional splicing

    Ferguson, M. L.; Coulon, A.; de Turris, V.; Palangat, M.; Chow, C. C.; Singer, R. H.; Larson, D. R.

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of pre-mRNA and the splicing of that pre-mRNA to form completed transcripts requires coordination between two large multi-subunit complexes (the transcription elongation complex and the spliceosome). How this coordination occurs in vivo is unknown. Here we report the first experimental observation of transcription and splicing occurring at the same gene in living cells. By utilizing the PP7/MS2 fluorescent RNA reporter system, we can directly observe two distinct regions of the nascent RNA, allowing us to measure the rise and fall time of the intron and exon of a reporter gene stably integrated into a human cell line. The reporter gene consists of a beta globin gene where we have inserted a 24 RNA hairpin cassette into the intron/exon. Upon synthesis, the RNA hairpins are tightly bound by fluorescently-labeled PP7/MS2 bacteriophage coat proteins. After gene induction, a single locus of active transcription in the nucleus shows fluorescence intensity changes characteristic of the synthesis and excision of the intron/exon. Using fluctuation analysis, we determine the elongation rate to be 1.5 kb/min. From the temporal cross correlation function, we determine that splicing of this gene must be co-transcriptional with a splicing time of ~100 seconds before termination and a ~200 second pause at termination. We propose that dual-color RNA imaging may be extended to investigate other mechanisms of transcription, gene regulation, and RNA processing.

  18. Tuning of alternative splicing--switch from proto-oncogene to tumor suppressor.

    Shchelkunova, Aleksandra; Ermolinsky, Boris; Boyle, Meghan; Mendez, Ivan; Lehker, Michael; Martirosyan, Karen S; Kazansky, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    STAT5B, a specific member of the STAT family, is intimately associated with prostate tumor progression. While the full form of STAT5B is thought to promote tumor progression, a naturally occurring truncated isoform acts as a tumor suppressor. We previously demonstrated that truncated STAT5 is generated by insertion of an alternatively spliced exon and results in the introduction of an early termination codon. Present approaches targeting STAT proteins based on inhibition of functional domains of STAT's, such as DNA-binding, cooperative binding (protein-protein interaction), dimerization and phosphorylation will halt the action of the entire gene, both the proto-oncogenic and tumor suppressor functions of Stat5B. In this report we develop a new approach aimed at inhibiting the expression of full-length STAT5B (a proto-oncogene) while simultaneously enhancing the expression of STAT5∆B (a tumor suppressor). We have demonstrated the feasibility of using steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) with a complimentary sequence to the targeted exon-intron boundary to enhance alternative intron/exon retention (up to 10%). The functional effect of the intron/exon proportional tuning was validated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. The new scheme applies specific steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides and opens an opportunity for anti-tumor treatment as well as for the alteration of functional abilities of other STAT proteins. PMID:23289016

  19. Tuning of Alternative Splicing - Switch From Proto-Oncogene to Tumor Suppressor

    Aleksandra Shchelkunova, Boris Ermolinsky, Meghan Boyle, Ivan Mendez, Michael Lehker, Karen S. Martirosyan, Alexander V. Kazansky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available STAT5B, a specific member of the STAT family, is intimately associated with prostate tumor progression. While the full form of STAT5B is thought to promote tumor progression, a naturally occurring truncated isoform acts as a tumor suppressor. We previously demonstrated that truncated STAT5 is generated by insertion of an alternatively spliced exon and results in the introduction of an early termination codon. Present approaches targeting STAT proteins based on inhibition of functional domains of STAT's, such as DNA-binding, cooperative binding (protein-protein interaction, dimerization and phosphorylation will halt the action of the entire gene, both the proto-oncogenic and tumor suppressor functions of Stat5B.In this report we develop a new approach aimed at inhibiting the expression of full-length STAT5B (a proto-oncogene while simultaneously enhancing the expression of STAT5∆B (a tumor suppressor. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs with a complimentary sequence to the targeted exon-intron boundary to enhance alternative intron/exon retention (up to 10%. The functional effect of the intron/exon proportional tuning was validated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. The new scheme applies specific steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides and opens an opportunity for anti-tumor treatment as well as for the alteration of functional abilities of other STAT proteins.

  20. Tuning of Alternative Splicing - Switch From Proto-Oncogene to Tumor Suppressor

    Shchelkunova, Aleksandra; Ermolinsky, Boris; Boyle, Meghan; Mendez, Ivan; Lehker, Michael; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Kazansky, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    STAT5B, a specific member of the STAT family, is intimately associated with prostate tumor progression. While the full form of STAT5B is thought to promote tumor progression, a naturally occurring truncated isoform acts as a tumor suppressor. We previously demonstrated that truncated STAT5 is generated by insertion of an alternatively spliced exon and results in the introduction of an early termination codon. Present approaches targeting STAT proteins based on inhibition of functional domains of STAT's, such as DNA-binding, cooperative binding (protein-protein interaction), dimerization and phosphorylation will halt the action of the entire gene, both the proto-oncogenic and tumor suppressor functions of Stat5B. In this report we develop a new approach aimed at inhibiting the expression of full-length STAT5B (a proto-oncogene) while simultaneously enhancing the expression of STAT5∆B (a tumor suppressor). We have demonstrated the feasibility of using steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) with a complimentary sequence to the targeted exon-intron boundary to enhance alternative intron/exon retention (up to 10%). The functional effect of the intron/exon proportional tuning was validated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. The new scheme applies specific steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides and opens an opportunity for anti-tumor treatment as well as for the alteration of functional abilities of other STAT proteins. PMID:23289016

  1. Functional Characterization of NIPBL Physiological Splice Variants and Eight Splicing Mutations in Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    María E. Teresa-Rodrigo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS is a congenital developmental disorder characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, growth retardation, cognitive impairment, limb defects, hirsutism, and multisystem involvement. Mutations in five genes encoding structural components (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21 or functionally associated factors (NIPBL, HDAC8 of the cohesin complex have been found in patients with CdLS. In about 60% of the patients, mutations in NIPBL could be identified. Interestingly, 17% of them are predicted to change normal splicing, however, detailed molecular investigations are often missing. Here, we report the first systematic study of the physiological splicing of the NIPBL gene, that would reveal the identification of four new splicing isoforms ΔE10, ΔE12, ΔE33,34, and B’. Furthermore, we have investigated nine mutations affecting splice-sites in the NIPBL gene identified in twelve CdLS patients. All mutations have been examined on the DNA and RNA level, as well as by in silico analyses. Although patients with mutations affecting NIPBL splicing show a broad clinical variability, the more severe phenotypes seem to be associated with aberrant transcripts resulting in a shift of the reading frame.

  2. Assessment of orthologous splicing isoforms in human and mouse orthologous genes

    Horner David S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent discoveries have highlighted the fact that alternative splicing and alternative transcripts are the rule, rather than the exception, in metazoan genes. Since multiple transcript and protein variants expressed by the same gene are, by definition, structurally distinct and need not to be functionally equivalent, the concept of gene orthology should be extended to the transcript level in order to describe evolutionary relationships between structurally similar transcript variants. In other words, the identification of true orthology relationships between gene products now should progress beyond primary sequence and "splicing orthology", consisting in ancestrally shared exon-intron structures, is required to define orthologous isoforms at transcript level. Results As a starting step in this direction, in this work we performed a large scale human- mouse gene comparison with a twofold goal: first, to assess if and to which extent traditional gene annotations such as RefSeq capture genuine splicing orthology; second, to provide a more detailed annotation and quantification of true human-mouse orthologous transcripts defined as transcripts of orthologous genes exhibiting the same splicing patterns. Conclusions We observed an identical exon/intron structure for 32% of human and mouse orthologous genes. This figure increases to 87% using less stringent criteria for gene structure similarity, thus implying that for about 13% of the human RefSeq annotated genes (and about 25% of the corresponding transcripts we could not identify any mouse transcript showing sufficient similarity to be confidently assigned as a splicing ortholog. Our data suggest that current gene and transcript data may still be rather incomplete - with several splicing variants still unknown. The observation that alternative splicing produces large numbers of alternative transcripts and proteins, some of them conserved across species and others truly species

  3. Regulation of the Ras-MAPK and PI3K-mTOR Signalling Pathways by Alternative Splicing in Cancer

    Zahava Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is a fundamental step in regulation of gene expression of many tumor suppressors and oncogenes in cancer. Signalling through the Ras-MAPK and PI3K-mTOR pathways is misregulated and hyperactivated in most types of cancer. However, the regulation of the Ras-MAPK and PI3K-mTOR signalling pathways by alternative splicing is less well established. Recent studies have shown the contribution of alternative splicing regulation of these signalling pathways which can lead to cellular transformation, cancer development, and tumor maintenance. This review will discuss findings in the literature which describe new modes of regulation of components of the Ras-MAPK and PI3K-mTOR signalling pathways by alternative splicing. We will also describe the mechanisms by which signals from extracellular stimuli can be communicated to the splicing machinery and to specific RNA-binding proteins that ultimately control exon definition events.

  4. Spliced leader trans-splicing in the nematode Trichinella spiralis uses highly polymorphic, noncanonical spliced leaders

    Pettitt, Jonathan; Müller, Berndt; Stansfield, Ian; Connolly, Bernadette

    2008-01-01

    The trans-splicing of short spliced leader (SL) RNAs onto the 5′ ends of mRNAs occurs in a diverse range of taxa. In nematodes, all species so far characterized utilize a characteristic, conserved spliced leader, SL1, as well as variants that are employed in the resolution of operons. Here we report the identification of spliced leader trans-splicing in the basal nematode Trichinella spiralis, and show that this nematode does not possess a canonical SL1, but rather has at least 15 distinct sp...

  5. The reciprocal regulation between splicing and 3'-end processing.

    Kaida, Daisuke

    2016-07-01

    Most eukaryotic precursor mRNAs are subjected to RNA processing events, including 5'-end capping, splicing and 3'-end processing. These processing events were historically studied independently; however, since the early 1990s tremendous efforts by many research groups have revealed that these processing factors interact with each other to control each other's functions. U1 snRNP and its components negatively regulate polyadenylation of precursor mRNAs. Importantly, this function is necessary for protecting the integrity of the transcriptome and for regulating gene length and the direction of transcription. In addition, physical and functional interactions occur between splicing factors and 3'-end processing factors across the last exon. These interactions activate or inhibit splicing and 3'-end processing depending on the context. Therefore, splicing and 3'-end processing are reciprocally regulated in many ways through the complex protein-protein interaction network. Although interesting questions remain, future studies will illuminate the molecular mechanisms underlying the reciprocal regulation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:499-511. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1348 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27019070

  6. In silico screening based on predictive algorithms as a design tool for exon skipping oligonucleotides in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Yusuke Echigoya

    Full Text Available The use of antisense 'splice-switching' oligonucleotides to induce exon skipping represents a potential therapeutic approach to various human genetic diseases. It has achieved greatest maturity in exon skipping of the dystrophin transcript in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, for which several clinical trials are completed or ongoing, and a large body of data exists describing tested oligonucleotides and their efficacy. The rational design of an exon skipping oligonucleotide involves the choice of an antisense sequence, usually between 15 and 32 nucleotides, targeting the exon that is to be skipped. Although parameters describing the target site can be computationally estimated and several have been identified to correlate with efficacy, methods to predict efficacy are limited. Here, an in silico pre-screening approach is proposed, based on predictive statistical modelling. Previous DMD data were compiled together and, for each oligonucleotide, some 60 descriptors were considered. Statistical modelling approaches were applied to derive algorithms that predict exon skipping for a given target site. We confirmed (1 the binding energetics of the oligonucleotide to the RNA, and (2 the distance in bases of the target site from the splice acceptor site, as the two most predictive parameters, and we included these and several other parameters (while discounting many into an in silico screening process, based on their capacity to predict high or low efficacy in either phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (89% correctly predicted and/or 2'O Methyl RNA oligonucleotides (76% correctly predicted. Predictions correlated strongly with in vitro testing for sixteen de novo PMO sequences targeting various positions on DMD exons 44 (R² 0.89 and 53 (R² 0.89, one of which represents a potential novel candidate for clinical trials. We provide these algorithms together with a computational tool that facilitates screening to predict exon skipping efficacy at each

  7. Modification of Alternative Splicing of Bcl-x Pre-mRNA in Bladder Cancer Cells

    ZHU Zhaohui; XING Shi'an; CHENG Ping; ZENG Fuqing; LU Gongcheng

    2006-01-01

    To modify the splicing pattern of Bcl-x and compare the effect of this approach with that of the antisense gene therapy in BIU-87 cell line of bladder cancer, by using 5'-Bcl-x AS to target downstream alternative 5'-Bcl-x splice site to shift splicing from Bcl-xL to Bcl-xS and 3'-Bcl-x AS antisense to the 3'-splice site of exon Ⅲ in Bcl-x pre- mRNA to down regulation of Bcl-xL expression,the inhibitory effects on cancer cells by modification of alternative splicing and antisense gene therapy were observed and compared by microscopy, MTT Assay, RT-PCR, FACS, Westhern bloting and clone formation. The growth of cells BIU-87 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Its inhibitory effect began 12 h after the exposure, reaching a maximum value after 72h. The number of cells decreased in S phase and the number increased in G1 phase. The ability to form foci was reduced and the antisense gene therapy was approximately half as efficient as modification of alternative splicing in inducing apoptosis. It is concluded that modification of splicing pattern of Bcl-x pre-mRNA in bladder cancer cell BIU-87 is better than antisense gene therapy in terms of tumor inhibition.

  8. Novel RNA structural features of an alternatively splicing group II intron from Clostridium tetani.

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes in bacterial and organellar genomes that function as self-splicing introns and as retroelements. Previously, we reported that the group II intron C.te.I1 of Clostridium tetani alternatively splices in vivo to produce five distinct coding mRNAs. Accurate fusion of upstream and downstream reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the usual 5' GUGYG motif. This site is specified by the ribozyme through an altered intron/exon-binding site 1 (IBS1-EBS1) pairing. Here we use mutagenesis and self-splicing assays to investigate in more detail the significance of the structural features of the C.te.I1 ribozyme. The shifted 5' splice site is shown to be affected by structures in addition to IBS1-EBS1, and unlike other group II introns, C.te.I1 appears to require a spacer between IBS1 and the GUGYG motif. In addition, the mechanism of 3' exon recognition is modified from the ancestral IIB mechanism to a IIA-like mechanism that appears to be longer than the typical single base-pair interaction and may extend up to 4 bp. The novel ribozyme properties that have evolved for C.te.I1 illustrate the plasticity of group II introns in adapting new structural and catalytic properties that can be utilized to affect gene expression. PMID:24751650

  9. Alternative splicing of a group II intron in a surface layer protein gene in Clostridium tetani.

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Simon, Dawn M; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes and retroelements found in bacteria, and are thought to have been the ancestors of nuclear pre-mRNA introns. Whereas nuclear introns undergo prolific alternative splicing in some species, group II introns are not known to carry out equivalent reactions. Here we report a group II intron in the human pathogen Clostridium tetani, which undergoes four alternative splicing reactions in vivo. Together with unspliced transcript, five mRNAs are produced, each encoding a distinct surface layer protein isoform. Correct fusion of exon reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the canonical boundary motif. The shifted junction is accomplished by an altered IBS1-EBS1 pairing between the intron and 5' exon. Growth of C. tetani under a variety of conditions did not result in large changes in alternative splicing levels, raising the possibility that alternative splicing is constitutive. This work demonstrates a novel type of gene organization and regulation in bacteria, and provides an additional parallel between group II and nuclear pre-mRNA introns. PMID:24214997

  10. Nuclear m(6)A Reader YTHDC1 Regulates mRNA Splicing.

    Xiao, Wen; Adhikari, Samir; Dahal, Ujwal; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Hao, Ya-Juan; Sun, Bao-Fa; Sun, Hui-Ying; Li, Ang; Ping, Xiao-Li; Lai, Wei-Yi; Wang, Xing; Ma, Hai-Li; Huang, Chun-Min; Yang, Ying; Huang, Niu; Jiang, Gui-Bin; Wang, Hai-Lin; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Yang, Yun-Gui

    2016-02-18

    The regulatory role of N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) and its nuclear binding protein YTHDC1 in pre-mRNA splicing remains an enigma. Here we show that YTHDC1 promotes exon inclusion in targeted mRNAs through recruiting pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF3 (SRp20) while blocking SRSF10 (SRp38) mRNA binding. Transcriptome assay with PAR-CLIP-seq analysis revealed that YTHDC1-regulated exon-inclusion patterns were similar to those of SRSF3 but opposite of SRSF10. In vitro pull-down assay illustrated a competitive binding of SRSF3 and SRSF10 to YTHDC1. Moreover, YTHDC1 facilitates SRSF3 but represses SRSF10 in their nuclear speckle localization, RNA-binding affinity, and associated splicing events, dysregulation of which, as the result of YTHDC1 depletion, can be restored by reconstitution with wild-type, but not m(6)A-binding-defective, YTHDC1. Our findings provide the direct evidence that m(6)A reader YTHDC1 regulates mRNA splicing through recruiting and modulating pre-mRNA splicing factors for their access to the binding regions of targeted mRNAs. PMID:26876937

  11. Shank3-mutant mice lacking exon 9 show altered excitation/inhibition balance, enhanced rearing, and spatial memory deficit

    Jiseok Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Shank3 is a postsynaptic scaffolding protein implicated in synapse development and autism spectrum disorders. The Shank3 gene is known to produce diverse splice variants whose functions have not been fully explored. In the present study, we generated mice lacking Shank3 exon 9 (Shank3∆9 mice, and thus missing 5 out of 10 known Shank3 splice variants containing the N-terminal ankyrin repeat region, including the longest splice variant, Shank3a. Our X-gal staining results revealed that Shank3 proteins encoded by exon 9-containing splice variants are abundant in upper cortical layers, striatum, hippocampus, and thalamus, but not in the olfactory bulb or cerebellum, despite the significant Shank3 mRNA levels in these regions. The hippocampal CA1 region of Shank3∆9 mice exhibited reduced excitatory transmission at Schaffer collateral synapses and increased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory synaptic events in pyramidal neurons. In contrast, prelimbic layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex displayed decreased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory synaptic events, indicating alterations in the ratio of excitation/inhibition (E/I ratio in the Shank3∆9 brain. These mice displayed a mild increase in rearing in a novel environment and mildly impaired spatial memory, but showed normal social interaction and repetitive behavior. These results suggest that ankyrin repeat-containing Shank3 splice variants are important for E/I balance, rearing behavior, and spatial memory.

  12. CELF family RNA-binding protein UNC-75 regulates two sets of mutually exclusive exons of the unc-32 gene in neuron-specific manners in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Hidehito Kuroyanagi

    Full Text Available An enormous number of alternative pre-mRNA splicing patterns in multicellular organisms are coordinately defined by a limited number of regulatory proteins and cis elements. Mutually exclusive alternative splicing should be strictly regulated and is a challenging model for elucidating regulation mechanisms. Here we provide models of the regulation of two sets of mutually exclusive exons, 4a-4c and 7a-7b, of the Caenorhabditis elegans uncoordinated (unc-32 gene, encoding the a subunit of V0 complex of vacuolar-type H(+-ATPases. We visualize selection patterns of exon 4 and exon 7 in vivo by utilizing a trio and a pair of symmetric fluorescence splicing reporter minigenes, respectively, to demonstrate that they are regulated in tissue-specific manners. Genetic analyses reveal that RBFOX family RNA-binding proteins ASD-1 and FOX-1 and a UGCAUG stretch in intron 7b are involved in the neuron-specific selection of exon 7a. Through further forward genetic screening, we identify UNC-75, a neuron-specific CELF family RNA-binding protein of unknown function, as an essential regulator for the exon 7a selection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays specify a short fragment in intron 7a as the recognition site for UNC-75 and demonstrate that UNC-75 specifically binds via its three RNA recognition motifs to the element including a UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch. The UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch in the reporter minigenes is actually required for the selection of exon 7a in the nervous system. We compare the amounts of partially spliced RNAs in the wild-type and unc-75 mutant backgrounds and raise a model for the mutually exclusive selection of unc-32 exon 7 by the RBFOX family and UNC-75. The neuron-specific selection of unc-32 exon 4b is also regulated by UNC-75 and the unc-75 mutation suppresses the Unc phenotype of the exon-4b-specific allele of unc-32 mutants. Taken together, UNC-75 is the neuron-specific splicing factor and regulates both sets of the mutually exclusive

  13. Genetic variations regulate alternative splicing in the 5' untranslated regions of the mouse glioma-associated oncogene 1, Gli1

    Zaphiropoulos Peter G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is one of the key mechanisms that generate biological diversity. Even though alternative splicing also occurs in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs of mRNAs, the understanding of the significance and the regulation of these variations is rather limited. Results We investigated 5' UTR mRNA variants of the mouse Gli1 oncogene, which is the terminal transcriptional effector of the Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway. In addition to identifying novel transcription start sites, we demonstrated that the expression ratio of the Gli1 splice variants in the 5' UTR is regulated by the genotype of the mouse strain analyzed. The GT allele, which contains the consensus intronic dinucleotides at the 5' splice site of intron 1B, favors exon 1B inclusion, while the GC allele, having a weaker 5' splice site sequence, promotes exon 1B skipping. Moreover, the alternative Gli1 5' UTRs had an impact on translational capacity, with the shorter and the exon 1B-skipped mRNA variants being most effective. Conclusions Our findings implicate novel, genome-based mechanisms as regulators of the terminal events in the mouse HH signaling cascade.

  14. A Novel Splicing Variant of Mouse Interleukin (IL)-24 Antagonizes IL-24-induced Apoptosis*S⃞

    Sahoo, Anupama; Jung, Yun Min; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Yi, Hwa-Jung; Lee, Suho; Chang, Sunghoe; Park, Zee-Yong; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing of mRNA enables functionally diverse protein isoforms to be expressed from a single gene, allowing transcriptome diversification. Interleukin (IL)-24/MDA-7 is a member of the IL-10 gene family, and FISP (IL-4-induced secreted protein), its murine homologue, is selectively expressed and secreted by T helper 2 lymphocytes. A novel splice variant of mouse IL-24/FISP, designated FISP-sp, lacks 29 nucleotides from the 5′-end of exon 4 of FISP. The level...

  15. Alternative splicing of MALT1 controls signalling and activation of CD4+ T cells

    Meininger, Isabel; Griesbach, Richard A.; Hu, Desheng; Gehring, Torben; Seeholzer, Thomas; Bertossi, Arianna; Kranich, Jan; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Eitelhuber, Andrea C; Greczmiel, Ute; Gewies, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Brocker, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo

    2016-01-01

    MALT1 channels proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling to downstream signalling pathways. With MALT1A and MALT1B two conserved splice variants exist and we demonstrate here that MALT1 alternative splicing supports optimal T-cell activation. Inclusion of exon7 in MALT1A facilitates the recruitment of TRAF6, which augments MALT1 scaffolding function, but not protease activity. Naive CD4+ T cells express almost exclusively MALT1B and MALT1A expression is induced by TCR stimulation. We identify...

  16. Identification of small molecule and genetic modulators of AON-induced dystrophin exon skipping by high-throughput screening.

    Debra A O'Leary

    Full Text Available One therapeutic approach to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD recently entering clinical trials aims to convert DMD phenotypes to that of a milder disease variant, Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD, by employing antisense oligonucleotides (AONs targeting splice sites, to induce exon skipping and restore partial dystrophin function. In order to search for small molecule and genetic modulators of AON-dependent and independent exon skipping, we screened approximately 10,000 known small molecule drugs, >17,000 cDNA clones, and >2,000 kinase- targeted siRNAs against a 5.6 kb luciferase minigene construct, encompassing exon 71 to exon 73 of human dystrophin. As a result, we identified several enhancers of exon skipping, acting on both the reporter construct as well as endogenous dystrophin in mdx cells. Multiple mechanisms of action were identified, including histone deacetylase inhibition, tubulin modulation and pre-mRNA processing. Among others, the nucleolar protein NOL8 and staufen RNA binding protein homolog 2 (Stau2 were found to induce endogenous exon skipping in mdx cells in an AON-dependent fashion. An unexpected but recurrent theme observed in our screening efforts was the apparent link between the inhibition of cell cycle progression and the induction of exon skipping.

  17. iGEMS: an integrated model for identification of alternative exon usage events.

    Sood, Sanjana; Szkop, Krzysztof J; Nakhuda, Asif; Gallagher, Iain J; Murie, Carl; Brogan, Robert J; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kainulainen, Heikki; Atherton, Philip J; Kujala, Urho M; Gustafsson, Thomas; Larsson, Ola; Timmons, James A

    2016-06-20

    DNA microarrays and RNAseq are complementary methods for studying RNA molecules. Current computational methods to determine alternative exon usage (AEU) using such data require impractical visual inspection and still yield high false-positive rates. Integrated Gene and Exon Model of Splicing (iGEMS) adapts a gene-level residuals model with a gene size adjusted false discovery rate and exon-level analysis to circumvent these limitations. iGEMS was applied to two new DNA microarray datasets, including the high coverage Human Transcriptome Arrays 2.0 and performance was validated using RT-qPCR. First, AEU was studied in adipocytes treated with (n = 9) or without (n = 8) the anti-diabetes drug, rosiglitazone. iGEMS identified 555 genes with AEU, and robust verification by RT-qPCR (∼90%). Second, in a three-way human tissue comparison (muscle, adipose and blood, n = 41) iGEMS identified 4421 genes with at least one AEU event, with excellent RT-qPCR verification (95%, n = 22). Importantly, iGEMS identified a variety of AEU events, including 3'UTR extension, as well as exon inclusion/exclusion impacting on protein kinase and extracellular matrix domains. In conclusion, iGEMS is a robust method for identification of AEU while the variety of exon usage between human tissues is 5-10 times more prevalent than reported by the Genotype-Tissue Expression consortium using RNA sequencing. PMID:27095197

  18. The neurogenetics of alternative splicing

    Vuong, CK; Black, DL; S. Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Alternative precursor-mRNA splicing is a key mechanism for regulating gene expression in mammals and is controlled by specialized RNA-binding proteins. The misregulation of splicing is implicated in multiple neurological disorders. We describe recent mouse genetic studies of alternative splicing that reveal its critical role in both neuronal development and the function of mature neurons. We discuss the challenges in understanding the extensive genetic programmes controlled by proteins that r...

  19. Fusion splicing of silicon optical fibres

    Xiao, L.M.; Healy, N; Gibson, U.; Hawkins, T.; Jones, M.; Ballato, J; A. C. Peacock

    2015-01-01

    The first splicing experiments between silicon optical fibres (SOFs) and conventional fibres are investigated. An optimized fusion splicing approach for a polycrystalline SOF is demonstrated and the material properties after splicing are characterized.

  20. Disruption of the developmentally-regulated Col2a1 pre-mRNA alternative splicing switch in a transgenic knock-in mouse model

    Lewis, Renate; Ravindran, Soumya; Wirthlin, Louisa; Traeger, Geoffrey; Fernandes, Russell J.; McAlinden, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the generation of a knock-in mouse model to address the role of type II procollagen (Col2a1) alternative splicing in skeletal development and maintenance. Alternative splicing of Col2a1 precursor mRNA is a developmentally-regulated event that only occurs in chondrogenic tissue. Normally, chondroprogenitor cells synthesize predominantly exon 2-containing mRNA isoforms (type IIA and IID) while Col2a1 mRNA devoid of exon 2 (type IIB) is the major isoform produced by d...

  1. Computational analysis and prediction for exons of PAC579 genomic sequence

    HUANG; Yi(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Milanesi. L.. Kolchanov, N., Rogozin, I. et al.. Sequence functional inference, in Guide to Human Genome Computing (ed.Bishop. M. J.). Cambridge: Academic Press, 1994, 249-312.[2]Solovyev. V. V., Salamov, A. A., Lawrence, C. B., Predicting internal exons by oligonucleotide composition and discriminant analysis of spliceable open reading frames, Nucleic Acids Res., 1994.22(24): 5156-5163.[3]Borodovsky, M., McIninch, J., GeneMark: parallel gene recognition for both DNA stands, Comp, Chem,, 1993, 17:123-133.[4]Guigo. R.. Knudsen, S, Drake, N. et al., Prediction of gene structure, J. Mol. Biol., 1992, 226(1): 141-157.[5]Kulp, D., Haussler, D., Reese, M. G. et al., A generalized Hidden Markov Model for the recognition of human genes in DNA. ISMB-96. St. Louise: AAAI/MIT Press, 1996.[6]Snyder. E. E.. Stormo, G. D., Identification of protein coding regions in genomic DNA, J. Mol. Biol., 1995, 248(1): 1-18.[7]Xu. Y., Einstein, J. R., Mural, R. J. et al., An improved system for exon recognition and gene modeling in human DNA sequences, in Proc. Int. Conf. lntell. Syst. Mol. Biol., Menlo Park, CA: AAAI Press, 1994, 2: 376-384.[8]Burset. M., Guigo, R., Evaluation of gene structure prediction programs, Genomics, 1996, 34(3): 353-367.[9]Burge. C.. Karlin, S., Prediction of complete gene structures in human genomic DNA, J. Mol. Biol., 1997, 268(l): 78-94.[10]Zhang. M. Q., Identification of protein coding regions in the human genome by quadratic discriminant analysis, Proc. Natl.Acad. Sci. USA, 1997,94(2): 565-568.[11]Mount. S. M., A catalogue of splice junction sequences, Nucleic Acids Res., 1982, 10(2): 459-472.[12]Qin Wenxin. Gu Jianren, Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 17p13.3 in human malignant tumors, Chinese Bulletin of Life Sciences (in Chinese), 1999, 11(2): 75-77.[13]Li, D., Cao, Y., He, L. et al., Aberrations of p53 gene in human hepatocellular carcinoma from China, Carcinogenesis,1993. 14(2): 169-173.[14

  2. Alternative splicing at C terminus of Ca(V)1.4 calcium channel modulates calcium-dependent inactivation, activation potential, and current density.

    Tan, Gregory Ming Yeong; Yu, Dejie; Wang, Juejin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The Ca(V)1.4 voltage-gated calcium channel is predominantly expressed in the retina, and mutations to this channel have been associated with human congenital stationary night blindness type-2. The L-type Ca(V)1.4 channel displays distinct properties such as absence of calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and slow voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI) due to the presence of an autoinhibitory domain (inhibitor of CDI) in the distal C terminus. We hypothesized that native Ca(V)1.4 is subjected to extensive alternative splicing, much like the other voltage-gated calcium channels, and employed the transcript scanning method to identify alternatively spliced exons within the Ca(V)1.4 transcripts isolated from the human retina. In total, we identified 19 alternative splice variations, of which 16 variations have not been previously reported. Characterization of the C terminus alternatively spliced exons using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology revealed a splice variant that exhibits robust CDI. This splice variant arose from the splicing of a novel alternate exon (43*) that can be found in 13.6% of the full-length transcripts screened. Inclusion of exon 43* inserts a stop codon that truncates half the C terminus. The Ca(V)1.4 43* channel exhibited robust CDI, a larger current density, a hyperpolarized shift in activation potential by ∼10 mV, and a slower VDI. Through deletional experiments, we showed that the inhibitor of CDI was responsible for modulating channel activation and VDI, in addition to CDI. Calcium currents in the photoreceptors were observed to exhibit CDI and are more negatively activated as compared with currents elicited from heterologously expressed full-length Ca(V)1.4. Naturally occurring alternative splice variants may in part contribute to the properties of the native Ca(V)1.4 channels. PMID:22069316

  3. Hexose enhances oligonucleotide delivery and exon skipping in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice

    Han, Gang; Gu, Ben; Cao, Limin; Gao, Xianjun; Wang, Qingsong; Seow, Yiqi; Zhang, Ning; Matthew J A Wood; Yin, HaiFang

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate-based infusion solutions are widely used in the clinic. Here we show that co-administration of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) with glucose enhances exon-skipping activity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mdx mice. We identify a glucose–fructose (GF) formulation that potentiates PMO activity, completely corrects aberrant Dmd transcripts, restores dystrophin levels in skeletal muscles and achieves functional rescue without detectable toxicity. This activity is a...

  4. A cryptic BAP1 splice mutation in a family with uveal and cutaneous melanoma, and paraganglioma

    Wadt, K.; Choi, J.; Chung, J.Y.;

    2012-01-01

    line BAP1 mutations has yet to be established. Here, we report a novel germ line BAP1 splice mutation, c.1708C>G (p.Leu570fs*40), in a multiple-case Danish UMM family with a spectrum of other tumors. Whole-exome sequencing identified an apparent missense mutation of BAP1 in UMM, CMM, as well as...... paraganglioma, breast cancer, and suspected mesothelioma cases in the family. Bioinformatic analysis and splicing assays demonstrated that this mutation creates a strong cryptic splice donor, resulting in aberrant splicing and a truncating frameshift of the BAP1 transcript. Somatic loss of the wild-type allele...... was also confirmed in the UMM and paraganglioma tumors. Our findings further support BAP1 as a melanoma susceptibility gene and extend the potential predisposition spectrum to paraganglioma....

  5. Cloning and Alternative Splicing Analysis of Bombyx mori Transformer-2 Gene using Silkworm EST Database

    Bao-Long NIU; Zhi-Qi MENG; Yue-Zhi TAO; Shun-Lin LU; Hong-Biao WENG; Li-Hua HE; Wei-Feng SHEN

    2005-01-01

    We have identified Bombyx mori transformer-2 gene (Bmtra-2) cDNA by blasting the EST database of B. mori. It was expressed in the whole life of the male and female silkworm and was observed as a band of 1.3 kb by Northern blot analysis. By comparing corresponding ESTs to the Bmtra-2 DNA sequence,it was revealed that there were eight exons and seven introns, and all splice sites of exons/introns conformed to the GT/AG rule. Bmtra-2 pre-mRNA can produce multiple mRNAs encoding six distinct isoforms of BmTRA-2 protein using an alternative splicing pathway during processing. Six types of Bmtra-2 cDNA clones were identified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. All isoforms of BmTRA-2 protein contain two arginine/serine-rich domains and one RNA recognition motif, showing striking organizational similarity to Drosophila TRA-2 proteins.

  6. Electroporation Enhanced Effect of Dystrophin Splice Switching PNA Oligomers in Normal and Dystrophic Muscle

    Hjortkjær, Camilla Brolin; Shiraishi, Takehiko; Hojman, Pernille;

    2015-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a synthetic DNA mimic that has shown potential for discovery of novel splice switching antisense drugs. However, in vivo cellular delivery has been a limiting factor for development, and only few successful studies have been reported. As a possible modality for...... improvement of in vivo cellular availability, we have investigated the effect of electrotransfer upon intramuscular (i.m.) PNA administration in vivo. Antisense PNA targeting exon 23 of the murine dystrophin gene was administered by i.m. injection to the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of normal NMRI and...... dystrophic mdx mice with or without electroporation. At low, single PNA doses (1.5, 3, or 10 µg/TA), electroporation augmented the antisense exon skipping induced by an unmodified PNA by twofold to fourfold in healthy mouse muscle with optimized electric parameters, measured after 7 days. The PNA splice...

  7. Conservation and sex-specific splicing of the doublesex gene in the economically important pest species Lucilia cuprina

    Carolina Concha; Fang Li; Maxwell J. Scott

    2010-09-01

    Genetic control of sex determination in insects has been best characterized in Drosophila melanogaster, where the master gene Sxl codes for RNA that is sex specifically spliced to produce a functional protein only in females. SXL regulates the sex-specific splicing of transformer (tra) RNA which, in turn, regulates the splicing of dsx RNA to produce functional male and female proteins. In the Australian sheep blowfly (Lucilia cuprina), the tra gene (Lctra) is required for female development and Lctra transcripts are sex-specifically spliced such that only female Lctra mRNA codes for functional protein. In males, a factor encoded by the Y-linked male determining gene is thought to prevent the female-mode of splicing of Lctra RNA. To further our understanding of the sex determination regulatory hierarchy in L. cuprina, we have isolated the dsx gene (Lcdsx) from this species. We found that the Lcdsx transcripts are sex-specifically spliced in a similar manner as their counterparts in D. melanogaster, housefly and tephritids. The LcDSX proteins are well conserved and the male form of DSX contains a motif encoded by a male-specific exon that is within the female-specific intron. This intron/exon arrangement had previously been found only in the housefly dsx gene, suggesting this may be a unique feature of dsx genes of Calyptratae species.

  8. A unique, consistent identifier for alternatively spliced transcript variants.

    Alberto Riva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As research into alternative splicing reveals the fundamental importance of this phenomenon in the genome expression of higher organisms, there is an increasing need for a standardized, consistent and unique identifier for alternatively spliced isoforms. Such an identifier would be useful to eliminate ambiguities in references to gene isoforms, and would allow for the reliable comparison of isoforms from different sources (e.g., known genes vs. computational predictions. Commonly used identifiers for gene transcripts prove to be unsuitable for this purpose. METHODOLOGY: We propose an algorithm to compute an isoform signature based on the arrangement of exons and introns in a primary transcript. The isoform signature uniquely identifies a transcript structure, and can therefore be used as a key in databases of alternatively spliced isoforms, or to compare alternative splicing predictions produced by different methods. In this paper we present the algorithm to generate isoform signatures, we provide some examples of its application, and we describe a web-based resource to generate isoform signatures and use them in database searches. CONCLUSIONS: Isoform signatures are simple, so that they can be easily generated and included in publications and databases, but flexible enough to unambiguously represent all possible isoform structures, including information about coding sequence position and variable transcription start and end sites. We believe that the adoption of isoform signatures can help establish a consistent, unambiguous nomenclature for alternative splicing isoforms. The system described in this paper is freely available at http://genome.ufl.edu/genesig/, and supplementary materials can be found at http://genome.ufl.edu/genesig-files/.

  9. Two-exon skipping within MLPH is associated with coat color dilution in rabbits.

    Stefanie Lehner

    Full Text Available Coat color dilution turns black coat color to blue and red color to cream and is a characteristic in many mammalian species. Matings among Netherland Dwarf, Loh, and Lionhead Dwarf rabbits over two generations gave evidence for a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance of coat colour dilution. Histological analyses showed non-uniformly distributed, large, agglomerating melanin granules in the hair bulbs of coat color diluted rabbits. We sequenced the cDNA of MLPH in two dilute and one black rabbit for polymorphism detection. In both color diluted rabbits, skipping of exons 3 and 4 was present resulting in altered amino acids at p.QGL[37-39]QWA and a premature stop codon at p.K40*. Sequencing of genomic DNA revealed a c.111-5C>A splice acceptor mutation within the polypyrimidine tract of intron 2 within MLPH. This mutation presumably causes skipping of exons 3 and 4. In 14/15 dilute rabbits, the c.111-5C>A mutation was homozygous and in a further dilute rabbit, heterozygous and in combination with a homozygous frame shift mutation within exon 6 (c.585delG. In conclusion, our results demonstrated a colour dilution associated MLPH splice variant causing a strongly truncated protein (p.Q37QfsX4. An involvement of further MLPH-associated mutations needs further investigations.

  10. Fine-scale variation and genetic determinants of alternative splicing across individuals.

    Jasmin Coulombe-Huntington

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, thanks to the increasing throughput of new technologies, we have begun to explore the full extent of alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS in the human transcriptome. This is unveiling a vast layer of complexity in isoform-level expression differences between individuals. We used previously published splicing sensitive microarray data from lymphoblastoid cell lines to conduct an in-depth analysis on splicing efficiency of known and predicted exons. By combining publicly available AS annotation with a novel algorithm designed to search for AS, we show that many real AS events can be detected within the usually unexploited, speculative majority of the array and at significance levels much below standard multiple-testing thresholds, demonstrating that the extent of cis-regulated differential splicing between individuals is potentially far greater than previously reported. Specifically, many genes show subtle but significant genetically controlled differences in splice-site usage. PCR validation shows that 42 out of 58 (72% candidate gene regions undergo detectable AS, amounting to the largest scale validation of isoform eQTLs to date. Targeted sequencing revealed a likely causative SNP in most validated cases. In all 17 incidences where a SNP affected a splice-site region, in silico splice-site strength modeling correctly predicted the direction of the micro-array and PCR results. In 13 other cases, we identified likely causative SNPs disrupting predicted splicing enhancers. Using Fst and REHH analysis, we uncovered significant evidence that 2 putative causative SNPs have undergone recent positive selection. We verified the effect of five SNPs using in vivo minigene assays. This study shows that splicing differences between individuals, including quantitative differences in isoform ratios, are frequent in human populations and that causative SNPs can be identified using in silico predictions. Several cases affected disease-relevant genes and

  11. High resolution melting for mutation scanning of TP53 exons 5–8

    p53 is commonly inactivated by mutations in the DNA-binding domain in a wide range of cancers. As mutant p53 often influences response to therapy, effective and rapid methods to scan for mutations in TP53 are likely to be of clinical value. We therefore evaluated the use of high resolution melting (HRM) as a rapid mutation scanning tool for TP53 in tumour samples. We designed PCR amplicons for HRM mutation scanning of TP53 exons 5 to 8 and tested them with DNA from cell lines hemizygous or homozygous for known mutations. We assessed the sensitivity of each PCR amplicon using dilutions of cell line DNA in normal wild-type DNA. We then performed a blinded assessment on ovarian tumour DNA samples that had been previously sequenced for mutations in TP53 to assess the sensitivity and positive predictive value of the HRM technique. We also performed HRM analysis on breast tumour DNA samples with unknown TP53 mutation status. One cell line mutation was not readily observed when exon 5 was amplified. As exon 5 contained multiple melting domains, we divided the exon into two amplicons for further screening. Sequence changes were also introduced into some of the primers to improve the melting characteristics of the amplicon. Aberrant HRM curves indicative of TP53 mutations were observed for each of the samples in the ovarian tumour DNA panel. Comparison of the HRM results with the sequencing results revealed that each mutation was detected by HRM in the correct exon. For the breast tumour panel, we detected seven aberrant melt profiles by HRM and subsequent sequencing confirmed the presence of these and no other mutations in the predicted exons. HRM is an effective technique for simple and rapid scanning of TP53 mutations that can markedly reduce the amount of sequencing required in mutational studies of TP53

  12. High resolution melting for mutation scanning of TP53 exons 5–8

    Fox Stephen B

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 is commonly inactivated by mutations in the DNA-binding domain in a wide range of cancers. As mutant p53 often influences response to therapy, effective and rapid methods to scan for mutations in TP53 are likely to be of clinical value. We therefore evaluated the use of high resolution melting (HRM as a rapid mutation scanning tool for TP53 in tumour samples. Methods We designed PCR amplicons for HRM mutation scanning of TP53 exons 5 to 8 and tested them with DNA from cell lines hemizygous or homozygous for known mutations. We assessed the sensitivity of each PCR amplicon using dilutions of cell line DNA in normal wild-type DNA. We then performed a blinded assessment on ovarian tumour DNA samples that had been previously sequenced for mutations in TP53 to assess the sensitivity and positive predictive value of the HRM technique. We also performed HRM analysis on breast tumour DNA samples with unknown TP53 mutation status. Results One cell line mutation was not readily observed when exon 5 was amplified. As exon 5 contained multiple melting domains, we divided the exon into two amplicons for further screening. Sequence changes were also introduced into some of the primers to improve the melting characteristics of the amplicon. Aberrant HRM curves indicative of TP53 mutations were observed for each of the samples in the ovarian tumour DNA panel. Comparison of the HRM results with the sequencing results revealed that each mutation was detected by HRM in the correct exon. For the breast tumour panel, we detected seven aberrant melt profiles by HRM and subsequent sequencing confirmed the presence of these and no other mutations in the predicted exons. Conclusion HRM is an effective technique for simple and rapid scanning of TP53 mutations that can markedly reduce the amount of sequencing required in mutational studies of TP53.

  13. IL-1β promotes Th17 differentiation by inducing alternative splicing of FOXP3

    Mailer, Reiner K. W.; Anne-Laure Joly; Sang Liu; Szabolcs Elias; Jesper Tegner; John Andersson

    2015-01-01

    CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for maintaining immunological self-tolerance. Treg cell development and function depend on the transcription factor FOXP3, which is present in several distinct isoforms due to alternative splicing. Despite the importance of FOXP3 in the proper maintenance of Treg cells, the regulation and functional consequences of FOXP3 isoform expression remains poorly understood. Here, we show that in human Treg cells IL-1β promotes excision of FOXP3 exon ...

  14. A Gene Gun-mediated Nonviral RNA trans-splicing Strategy for Col7a1 Repair.

    Peking, Patricia; Koller, Ulrich; Hainzl, Stefan; Kitzmueller, Sophie; Kocher, Thomas; Mayr, Elisabeth; Nyström, Alexander; Lener, Thomas; Reichelt, Julia; Bauer, Johann W; Murauer, Eva M

    2016-01-01

    RNA trans-splicing represents an auspicious option for the correction of genetic mutations at RNA level. Mutations within COL7A1 causing strong reduction or absence of type VII collagen are associated with the severe skin blistering disease dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. The human COL7A1 mRNA constitutes a suitable target for this RNA therapy approach, as only a portion of the almost 9 kb transcript has to be delivered into the target cells. Here, we have proven the feasibility of 5' trans-splicing into the Col7a1 mRNA in vitro and in vivo. We designed a 5' RNA trans-splicing molecule, capable of replacing Col7a1 exons 1-15 and verified it in a fluorescence-based trans-splicing model system. Specific and efficient Col7a1 trans-splicing was confirmed in murine keratinocytes. To analyze trans-splicing in vivo, we used gene gun delivery of a minicircle expressing a FLAG-tagged 5' RNA trans-splicing molecule into the skin of wild-type mice. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis of bombarded skin sections revealed vector delivery and expression within dermis and epidermis. Furthermore, we have detected trans-spliced type VII collagen protein using FLAG-tag antibodies. In conclusion, we describe a novel in vivo nonviral RNA therapy approach to restore type VII collagen expression for causative treatment of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. PMID:26928235

  15. Functional correction by antisense therapy of a splicing mutation in the GALT gene.

    Coelho, Ana I; Lourenço, Sílvia; Trabuco, Matilde; Silva, Maria João; Oliveira, Anabela; Gaspar, Ana; Diogo, Luísa; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Vicente, João B; Rivera, Isabel

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, antisense therapy has emerged as an increasingly important therapeutic approach to tackle several genetic disorders, including inborn errors of metabolism. Intronic mutations activating cryptic splice sites are particularly amenable to antisense therapy, as the canonical splice sites remain intact, thus retaining the potential for restoring constitutive splicing. Mutational analysis of Portuguese galactosemic patients revealed the intronic variation c.820+13A>G as the second most prevalent mutation, strongly suggesting its pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize this intronic variation, to elucidate its pathogenic molecular mechanism(s) and, ultimately, to correct it by antisense therapy. Minigene splicing assays in two distinct cell lines and patients' transcript analyses showed that the mutation activates a cryptic donor splice site, inducing an aberrant splicing of the GALT pre-mRNA, which in turn leads to a frameshift with inclusion of a premature stop codon (p.D274Gfs*17). Functional-structural studies of the recombinant wild-type and truncated GALT showed that the latter is devoid of enzymatic activity and prone to aggregation. Finally, two locked nucleic acid oligonucleotides, designed to specifically recognize the mutation, successfully restored the constitutive splicing, thus establishing a proof of concept for the application of antisense therapy as an alternative strategy for the clearly insufficient dietary treatment in classic galactosemia. PMID:25052314

  16. The regulation of IGF-1 gene transcription and splicing during development and aging.

    Anita eOberbauer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly known that the insulin-like growth factor-I gene contains six exons that can be differentially spliced to create multiple transcript variants. Further, there are two mutually exclusive leader exons each having multiple promoter sites that are variably used. The mature IGF-I protein derived from the multiplicity of transcripts does not differ suggesting a regulatory role for the various transcript isoforms. The variant forms possess different stabilities, binding partners, and activity indicating a pivotal role for the isoforms. Research has demonstrated differential expression of the IGF-I mRNA transcripts in response to steroids, growth hormone, and developmental cues. Many studies of different tissues have focused on assessing the presence, or putative action, of the transcript isoforms with little consideration of the transcriptional mechanisms that generate the variants or the translational use of the transcript isoforms. Control points for the latter include epigenetic regulation of splicing and promoter usage in response to development or injury, RNA binding proteins and miRNA effects on transcript stability, and preferential use of two leader exons by GH and other hormones. This review will detail the current knowledge of the mechanical, hormonal, and developmental stimuli regulating IGF1 promoter usage and splicing machinery used to create the variants.

  17. The Regulation of IGF-1 Gene Transcription and Splicing during Development and Aging.

    Oberbauer, A M

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly known that the insulin-like growth factor-I gene contains six exons that can be differentially spliced to create multiple transcript variants. Further, there are two mutually exclusive leader exons each having multiple promoter sites that are variably used. The mature IGF-I protein derived from the multiplicity of transcripts does not differ suggesting a regulatory role for the various transcript isoforms. The variant forms possess different stabilities, binding partners, and activity indicating a pivotal role for the isoforms. Research has demonstrated differential expression of the IGF-I mRNA transcripts in response to steroids, growth hormone, and developmental cues. Many studies of different tissues have focused on assessing the presence, or putative action, of the transcript isoforms with little consideration of the transcriptional mechanisms that generate the variants or the translational use of the transcript isoforms. Control points for the latter include epigenetic regulation of splicing and promoter usage in response to development or injury, RNA binding proteins and microRNA effects on transcript stability, and preferential use of two leader exons by GH and other hormones. This review will detail the current knowledge of the mechanical, hormonal, and developmental stimuli regulating IGF-1 promoter usage and splicing machinery used to create the variants. PMID:23533068

  18. Revealing the function of a novel splice-site mutation of CHD7 in CHARGE syndrome.

    Lee, Byeonghyeon; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Sagong, Borum; Koparir, Asuman; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Choi, Jae Young; Seven, Mehmet; Yuksel, Adnan; Kim, Un-Kyung; Ozen, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Most cases of CHARGE syndrome are sporadic and autosomal dominant. CHD7 is a major causative gene of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we screened CHD7 in two Turkish patients demonstrating symptoms of CHARGE syndrome such as coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth, genital abnomalities and ear anomalies. Two mutations of CHD7 were identified including a novel splice-site mutation (c.2443-2A>G) and a previously known frameshift mutation (c.2504_2508delATCTT). We performed exon trapping analysis to determine the effect of the c.2443-2A>G mutation at the transcriptional level, and found that it caused a complete skip of exon 7 and splicing at a cryptic splice acceptor site. Our current study is the second study demonstrating an exon 7 deficit in CHD7. Results of previous studies suggest that the c.2443-2A>G mutation affects the formation of nasal tissues and the neural retina during early development, resulting in choanal atresia and coloboma, respectively. The findings of the present study will improve our understanding of the genetic causes of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:26551301

  19. RNA-binding protein RBM20 represses splicing to orchestrate cardiac pre-mRNA processing.

    Maatz, Henrike; Jens, Marvin; Liss, Martin; Schafer, Sebastian; Heinig, Matthias; Kirchner, Marieluise; Adami, Eleonora; Rintisch, Carola; Dauksaite, Vita; Radke, Michael H; Selbach, Matthias; Barton, Paul J R; Cook, Stuart A; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Gotthardt, Michael; Landthaler, Markus; Hubner, Norbert

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the RNA-binding protein RBM20 have been implicated in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a major cause of chronic heart failure, presumably through altering cardiac RNA splicing. Here, we combined transcriptome-wide crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP-seq), RNA-seq, and quantitative proteomics in cell culture and rat and human hearts to examine how RBM20 regulates alternative splicing in the heart. Our analyses revealed the presence of a distinct RBM20 RNA-recognition element that is predominantly found within intronic binding sites and linked to repression of exon splicing with RBM20 binding near 3' and 5' splice sites. Proteomic analysis determined that RBM20 interacts with both U1 and U2 small nuclear ribonucleic particles (snRNPs) and suggested that RBM20-dependent splicing repression occurs through spliceosome stalling at complex A. Direct RBM20 targets included several genes previously shown to be involved in DCM as well as genes not typically associated with this disease. In failing human hearts, reduced expression of RBM20 affected alternative splicing of several direct targets, indicating that differences in RBM20 expression may affect cardiac function. Together, these findings identify RBM20-regulated targets and provide insight into the pathogenesis of human heart failure. PMID:24960161

  20. Comparison of the unlabeled and labeled pre-mRNA splicing assays in vitro

    TIAN XU BU; JING XIN HONG; ZHI YAO; JIE YANG

    2006-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental process required for the expression of most metazoan genes. It is carried out by the spliceosome that catalyzes the removal of non-coding intron sequences to ligate exons into mature mRNA prior to transport and translation. The purpose of our study is to explore whether the in vitro unlabeled pre-mRNA splicing assay could be performed as an alternative method of splicing reaction other than the radiolabeled one. Two different splicing methods in vitro, 32P labeled and unlabeled pre-mRNA as the substrates in the reaction, were investigated. The radiolabeled products were visualized by autoradiography while the unlabeled products were observed by Ethidium Bromide (EB)staining. As a result, although there are more unspecific bands in the EB staining assay than 32P labeled one, the RNA products of in vitro splicing could be observed clearly. This suggests that the unlabeled pre-mRNA splicing assay can be an optional substitution for the isotope-labeled assay.

  1. Mechanistic Evaluation for Mixed-field Agglutination in the K562 Cell Study Model with Exon 3 Deletion of A1 Gene.

    Chen, Ding-Ping; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Lin, Chi-Jui; Wang, Wei-Ting; Sun, Chien-Feng

    2015-01-01

    In the case of blood type B3 with typical mixed-field agglutination of RBCs in the presence of anti-B or anti-AB antibody, a number of genetic alternations have been reported. It is well known that the IVS3+5G→A mutation in the B gene destroys the consensus of the splice donor site leading to exon 3 skipping during mRNA splicing. The lack of exon 3 likely causes a short stem region, producing an unstable B3 protein, and is concomitant with a decrease in B3 protein expression. Whether the phenomenon also appears in the type A blood group is of question. In this study, we evaluate whether exon 3 deletion in the blood type A gene also results in mixed-field phenotype. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate cDNA encoding A1 gene with exon 3 deletion. The cDNA was stably expressed in K562 cells. The expression of A antigen was compared with expression in parental K562 cells that did not express A antigen and in the stable K562 cell line expressing A(1) cDNA by flow cytometry analyses. The expression of A antigen in A1 stable cells and parental K562 cells was set as 100% and 0%, respectively. The mean relative percentage of A antigen expression for the cells of A1 with exon 3 deletion was 59.9% of A1 stable cells. Consistent with the observations of B3, which is B gene with exon 3 deletion, mixed field agglutination was observed for the cells expressing A1 with exon 3 deletion. Exon 3 deletion results in mixed field phenotype in both type A and B RBCs. However, the degree of antigen expression change for exon 3 deletion in A gene was less severe when compared with the deletion occurred in B gene. PMID:26663798

  2. Alternative Splicing of G9a Regulates Neuronal Differentiation.

    Fiszbein, Ana; Giono, Luciana E; Quaglino, Ana; Berardino, Bruno G; Sigaut, Lorena; von Bilderling, Catalina; Schor, Ignacio E; Steinberg, Juliana H Enriqué; Rossi, Mario; Pietrasanta, Lía I; Caramelo, Julio J; Srebrow, Anabella; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-03-29

    Chromatin modifications are critical for the establishment and maintenance of differentiation programs. G9a, the enzyme responsible for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation in mammalian euchromatin, exists as two isoforms with differential inclusion of exon 10 (E10) through alternative splicing. We find that the G9a methyltransferase is required for differentiation of the mouse neuronal cell line N2a and that E10 inclusion increases during neuronal differentiation of cultured cells, as well as in the developing mouse brain. Although E10 inclusion greatly stimulates overall H3K9me2 levels, it does not affect G9a catalytic activity. Instead, E10 increases G9a nuclear localization. We show that the G9a E10(+) isoform is necessary for neuron differentiation and regulates the alternative splicing pattern of its own pre-mRNA, enhancing E10 inclusion. Overall, our findings indicate that by regulating its own alternative splicing, G9a promotes neuron differentiation and creates a positive feedback loop that reinforces cellular commitment to differentiation. PMID:26997278

  3. Alternative Splicing of G9a Regulates Neuronal Differentiation

    Ana Fiszbein

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin modifications are critical for the establishment and maintenance of differentiation programs. G9a, the enzyme responsible for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation in mammalian euchromatin, exists as two isoforms with differential inclusion of exon 10 (E10 through alternative splicing. We find that the G9a methyltransferase is required for differentiation of the mouse neuronal cell line N2a and that E10 inclusion increases during neuronal differentiation of cultured cells, as well as in the developing mouse brain. Although E10 inclusion greatly stimulates overall H3K9me2 levels, it does not affect G9a catalytic activity. Instead, E10 increases G9a nuclear localization. We show that the G9a E10+ isoform is necessary for neuron differentiation and regulates the alternative splicing pattern of its own pre-mRNA, enhancing E10 inclusion. Overall, our findings indicate that by regulating its own alternative splicing, G9a promotes neuron differentiation and creates a positive feedback loop that reinforces cellular commitment to differentiation.

  4. A Network of Splice Isoforms for the Mouse.

    Li, Hong-Dong; Menon, Rajasree; Eksi, Ridvan; Guerler, Aysam; Zhang, Yang; Omenn, Gilbert S; Guan, Yuanfang

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the primary mammalian species used for studying alternative splicing events. Recent studies have generated computational models to predict functions for splice isoforms in the mouse. However, the functional relationship network, describing the probability of splice isoforms participating in the same biological process or pathway, has not yet been studied in the mouse. Here we describe a rich genome-wide resource of mouse networks at the isoform level, which was generated using a unique framework that was originally developed to infer isoform functions. This network was built through integrating heterogeneous genomic and protein data, including RNA-seq, exon array, protein docking and pseudo-amino acid composition. Through simulation and cross-validation studies, we demonstrated the accuracy of the algorithm in predicting isoform-level functional relationships. We showed that this network enables the users to reveal functional differences of the isoforms of the same gene, as illustrated by literature evidence with Anxa6 (annexin a6) as an example. We expect this work will become a useful resource for the mouse genetics community to understand gene functions. The network is publicly available at: http://guanlab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/isoformnetwork. PMID:27079421

  5. HnRNP C, YB-1 and hnRNP L coordinately enhance skipping of human MUSK exon 10 to generate a Wnt-insensitive MuSK isoform

    Nasrin, Farhana; Rahman, Mohammad Alinoor; Masuda, Akio; Ohe, Kenji; Takeda, Jun-ichi; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-01-01

    Muscle specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) is an essential postsynaptic transmembrane molecule that mediates clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChR). MUSK exon 10 is alternatively skipped in human, but not in mouse. Skipping of this exon disrupts a cysteine-rich region (Fz-CRD), which is essential for Wnt-mediated AChR clustering. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of alternative splicing, we exploited block-scanning mutagenesis with human minigene and identified a 20-nucleoti...

  6. Alternative splicing regulated by butyrate in bovine epithelial cells.

    Sitao Wu

    Full Text Available As a signaling molecule and an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs, butyrate exerts its impact on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. This study examined the effect of butyrate on alternative splicing in bovine epithelial cells using RNA-seq technology. Junction reads account for 11.28 and 12.32% of total mapped reads between the butyrate-treated (BT and control (CT groups. 201,326 potential splicing junctions detected were supported by ≥ 3 junction reads. Approximately 94% of these junctions conformed to the consensus sequence (GT/AG while ~3% were GC/AG junctions. No AT/AC junctions were observed. A total of 2,834 exon skipping events, supported by a minimum of 3 junction reads, were detected. At least 7 genes, their mRNA expression significantly affected by butyrate, also had exon skipping events differentially regulated by butyrate. Furthermore, COL5A3, which was induced 310-fold by butyrate (FDR <0.001 at the gene level, had a significantly higher number of junction reads mapped to Exon#8 (Donor and Exon#11 (Acceptor in BT. This event had the potential to result in the formation of a COL5A3 mRNA isoform with 2 of the 69 exons missing. In addition, 216 differentially expressed transcript isoforms regulated by butyrate were detected. For example, Isoform 1 of ORC1 was strongly repressed by butyrate while Isoform 2 remained unchanged. Butyrate physically binds to and inhibits all zinc-dependent HDACs except HDAC6 and HDAC10. Our results provided evidence that butyrate also regulated deacetylase activities of classical HDACs via its transcriptional control. Moreover, thirteen gene fusion events differentially affected by butyrate were identified. Our results provided a snapshot into complex transcriptome dynamics regulated by butyrate, which will facilitate our understanding of the biological effects of butyrate and other HDAC

  7. Interplay between U2 snRNP and 3' splice factor(s) for branch point selection on human beta-globin pre-mRNA.

    Alibert, C; Tazi, J; Temsamani, J; Jeanteur, P; Brunel, C; Cathala, G

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the interaction of U2 snRNP with the branch-3' splice site region of three human beta-globin pre-mRNAs carrying nearly complete (BamHI RNA), 24 nt (Avall RNA) and 14 nt (Accl RNA) of exon 2. All supported splicing, but mRNAs yields were respectively 2 and 10 times lower for Avall and Accl RNAs than for BamHI. Analysis of RNase T1-resistant fragments immunoprecipitated by an anti-(U2)RNP antibody at early times of the splicing reaction showed that the protection encompasses bot...

  8. Quantitative profiling of Drosophila melanogaster Dscam1 isoforms reveals no changes in splicing after bacterial exposure.

    Sophie A O Armitage

    Full Text Available The hypervariable Dscam1 (Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 gene can produce thousands of different ectodomain isoforms via mutually exclusive alternative splicing. Dscam1 appears to be involved in the immune response of some insects and crustaceans. It has been proposed that the diverse isoforms may be involved in the recognition of, or the defence against, diverse parasite epitopes, although evidence to support this is sparse. A prediction that can be generated from this hypothesis is that the gene expression of specific exons and/or isoforms is influenced by exposure to an immune elicitor. To test this hypothesis, we for the first time, use a long read RNA sequencing method to directly investigate the Dscam1 splicing pattern after exposing adult Drosophila melanogaster and a S2 cell line to live Escherichia coli. After bacterial exposure both models showed increased expression of immune-related genes, indicating that the immune system had been activated. However there were no changes in total Dscam1 mRNA expression. RNA sequencing further showed that there were no significant changes in individual exon expression and no changes in isoform splicing patterns in response to bacterial exposure. Therefore our studies do not support a change of D. melanogaster Dscam1 isoform diversity in response to live E. coli. Nevertheless, in future this approach could be used to identify potentially immune-related Dscam1 splicing regulation in other host species or in response to other pathogens.

  9. A secreted form of the human lymphocyte cell surface molecule CD8 arises from alternative splicing

    The human lymphocyte differentiation antigen CD8 is encoded by a single gene that gives rise to a 33- to 34-kDa glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface as a dimer and in higher molecular mass forms. The authors demonstrate that the mRNA is alternatively spliced so that an exon encoding a transmembrane domain is deleted. This gives rise to a 30-kDa molecule that is secreted and exists primarily as a monomer. mRNA corresponding to both forms is present in peripheral blood lymphocytes, Con A-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes, and three CD8+ T-cell lines, with the membrane form being the major species. However, differences in the ratio of mRNA for membrane CD8 and secreted CD8 exist. In addition, the splicing pattern observed differs from the pattern found for the mouse CD8 gene. This mRNA is also alternatively spliced, but an exon encoding a cytoplasmic region is deleted, giving rise to a cell surface molecule that differs in its cytoplasmic tail from the protein encoded by the longer mRNA. Neither protein is secreted. This is one of the first examples of a different splicing pattern between two homologous mouse and human genes giving rise to very different proteins. This represents one mechanism of generating diversity during speciation

  10. MapSplice: Accurate mapping of RNA-seq reads for splice junction discovery

    Kai WANG; Singh, Darshan; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J.; Huang, Yan; Savich, Gleb L.; He, Xiaping; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Grimm, Sara A; Perou, Charles M; MacLeod, James N; Chiang, Derek Y.; Prins, Jan F.; Liu, Jinze

    2010-01-01

    The accurate mapping of reads that span splice junctions is a critical component of all analytic techniques that work with RNA-seq data. We introduce a second generation splice detection algorithm, MapSplice, whose focus is high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of splices as well as CPU and memory efficiency. MapSplice can be applied to both short (

  11. A biophysical model for identifying splicing regulatory elements and their interactions.

    Ji Wen

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA is a crucial step in the expression of most eukaryotic genes. Splicing factors (SFs play an important role in AS regulation by binding to the cis-regulatory elements on the pre-mRNA. Although many splicing factors (SFs and their binding sites have been identified, their combinatorial regulatory effects remain to be elucidated. In this paper, we derive a biophysical model for AS regulation that integrates combinatorial signals of cis-acting splicing regulatory elements (SREs and their interactions. We also develop a systematic framework for model inference. Applying the biophysical model to a human RNA-Seq data set, we demonstrate that our model can explain 49.1%-66.5% variance of the data, which is comparable to the best result achieved by biophysical models for transcription. In total, we identified 119 SRE pairs between different regions of cassette exons that may regulate exon or intron definition in splicing, and 77 SRE pairs from the same region that may arise from a long motif or two different SREs bound by different SFs. Particularly, putative binding sites of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F/H and E/K are identified as interacting SRE pairs, and have been shown to be consistent with the interaction models proposed in previous experimental results. These results show that our biophysical model and inference method provide a means of quantitative modeling of splicing regulation and is a useful tool for identifying SREs and their interactions. The software package for model inference is available under an open source license.

  12. Exonization of active mouse L1s: a driver of transcriptome evolution?

    Badge Richard

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE-1s, L1s have been recently implicated in the regulation of mammalian transcriptomes. Results Here, we show that members of the three active mouse L1 subfamilies (A, GF and TF contain, in addition to those on their sense strands, conserved functional splice sites on their antisense strands, which trigger multiple exonization events. The latter is particularly intriguing in the light of the strong antisense orientation bias of intronic L1s, implying that the toleration of antisense insertions results in an increased potential for exonization. Conclusion In a genome-wide analysis, we have uncovered evidence suggesting that the mobility of the large number of retrotransposition-competent mouse L1s (~2400 potentially active L1s in NCBIm35 has significant potential to shape the mouse transcriptome by continuously generating insertions into transcriptional units.

  13. Perispeckles are major assembly sites for the exon junction core complex

    Daguenet, Elisabeth; Baguet, Aurélie; Degot, Sébastien; Schmidt, Ute; Alpy, Fabien; Wendling, Corinne; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Kessler, Pascal; Rio, Marie-Christine; Le Hir, Hervé; Bertrand, Edouard; Tomasetto, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is loaded onto mRNAs as a consequence of splicing and regulates multiple posttranscriptional events. MLN51, Magoh, Y14, and eIF4A3 form a highly stable EJC core, but where this tetrameric complex is assembled in the cell remains unclear. Here we show that EJC factors are enriched in domains that we term perispeckles and are visible as doughnuts around nuclear speckles. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses and EJC assembly mutants show that perispeckl...

  14. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: Tight linkage to proteolipid protein gene exon variant

    Trofatter, J.A.; Dlouhy, S.R.; DeMyer, W.; Conneally, P.M.; Hodes, M.E. (Indiana Univ. Medical Center, Indianapolis (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is a human X chromosome-linked dysmyelination disorder of the central nervous system for which the genetic defect has not yet been established. The jimpy mutation jp of the mouse is an X chromosome-linked disorder of myelin formation. The mutation is at an intron/exon splice site in the mouse gene for proteolipid protein (PLP). With the jimpy mouse mutation as a precedent, we focused our attention on the human PLP gene, which if found at Xq22. The polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify the exons of the PLP gene of an affected male used to amplify the exons of the PLP gene of an affected male from a large Indiana PMD kindred. DNA sequencing showed a C {yields} T transition at nucleotide 40 of the second exon. An affected third cousin also showed this sequence variation, while two unaffected male relatives (sons of an obligate carrier female) had the normal cytidine nucleotide. Allele-specific oligonucleotides were used to generate data for linkage studies on the above mentioned PMD kindred. The results show tight linkage of PMD to PLP with a lod (logarithm of odds) score of 4.62. In six other unrelated PMD kindreds, only the normal-sequence oligonucleotide hybridized, which indicates genetic heterogeneity. The radical nature of the predicted amino acid change (proline to leucine), suggests that the PMD-causing defect may have been delineated in one kindred.

  15. Engineering splicing factors with designed specificities

    Wang, Yang; Cheong, Cheom-Gil; Hall, Traci M Tanaka; Wang, Zefeng

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is generally regulated by trans-acting factors that specifically bind pre-mRNA to activate or inhibit the splicing reaction. This regulation is critical for normal gene expression, and dysregulation of splicing is closely associated with human diseases. Here we engineer artificial splicing factors by combining sequence-specific RNA-binding domains of human Pumilio1 with functional domains that regulate splicing. We applied these factors to modulate different types of alte...

  16. Canine and human gastrointestinal stromal tumors display similar mutations in c-KIT exon 11

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are common mesenchymal neoplasms in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and dogs. Little is known about the pathogenesis of these tumors. This study evaluated the role of c-KIT in canine GISTs; specifically, we investigated activating mutations in exons 8, 9, 11, 13, and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of platelet-derived growth factor receptor, alpha polypeptide (PDGFRA), all of which have been implicated in human GISTs. Seventeen canine GISTs all confirmed to be positive for KIT immunostaining were studied. Exons 8, 9, 11, 13 and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of PDGFRA, were amplified from DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Of these seventeen cases, six amplicons of exon 11 of c-KIT showed aberrant bands on gel electrophoresis. Sequencing of these amplicons revealed heterozygous in-frame deletions in six cases. The mutations include two different but overlapping six base pair deletions. Exons 8, 9, 13, and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of PDGFRA had no abnormalities detected by electrophoresis and sequencing did not reveal any mutations, other than synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in exon 11 of c-KIT and exons 12 and 14 of PDGFRA. The deletion mutations detected in canine GISTs are similar to those previously found in the juxtamembrane domain of c-KIT in canine cutaneous mast cell tumors in our laboratory as well as to those reported in human GISTs. Interestingly, none of the other c-KIT or PDGFRA exons showed any abnormalities in our cases. This finding underlines the critical importance of c-KIT in the pathophysiology of canine GISTs. The expression of KIT and the identification of these activating mutations in c-KIT implicate KIT in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Our results indicate that mutations in c-KIT may be of prognostic significance and that targeting KIT may be a rational approach to treatment of these malignant tumors. This study further

  17. Clinical, in silico, and experimental evidence for pathogenicity of two novel splice site mutations in the SH3TC2 gene

    Laššuthová, P.; Gregor, Martin; Sarnová, Lenka; Machalová, Eliška; Sedláček, Radislav; Seeman, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 26, 3-4 (2012), s. 413-420. ISSN 0167-7063 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/10/2044 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : exon trapping * peripheral neuropathy * SH3TC2 gene * splice site mutation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.159, year: 2012

  18. Ectopic expression of a novel CD22 splice-variant regulates survival and proliferation in malignant T cells from cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) patients

    Bagdonaite, Ieva; Wandall, Hans H; Litvinov, Ivan V; Nastasi, Claudia; Becker, Jürgen C; Dabelsteen, Sally; Geisler, Carsten; Bonefeld, Charlotte M; Zhang, Qian; Wasik, Mariusz A; Zhou, Youwen; Sasseville, Denis; Ødum, Niels; Woetmann, Anders

    2015-01-01

    CD22 is a member of the Sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin (Siglec) family of lectins described to be exclusively present in B lymphocytes and B cell-derived neoplasms. Here, we describe a novel splice form of CD22 (designated CD22∆N), which lacks the N-terminal domain as demonstrated by exon...

  19. A new method for screening splice variants using gene-specific primer for reverse transcription followed by nested PCR approaches%利用GSP逆转录结合巢式PCR技术鉴定剪接变体的新方法及其在小鼠TrkC基因变体发现中的应用

    张艳春; 严瑞芬; 吴永红; 张成岗

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop a new method for screening splice variants using gene-specific reverse primer ( GSP ) to specifically reverse transcribe ( RT ) the target genes followed by nested PCR( nPCR ) approaches. Methods The reverse primer for transcription and nPCR primers of the known splicing variant No. I and variant No. 2 of the mouse TrlcC gene were used to obtain the GSP-transcribed cDNA products, followed by two or three rounds of nPCR. The PCR products were separated and extracted by 1. 5% agarase gel electrophoresis and subcloned into the pMD19-T vector for direct sequencing and similarity analysis with the known cDNA sequence of the TrkC gene in the RefSeq database. Results Not only was the known variant ( splicing variant No. I ) of the TrlcC gene obtained, but the new splicing variant was found. The 1669 bp from 520 to 2188 of the sequence of splicing variant No. 1 of the TrkC gene was spliced in the newly identified variant No. 3 , indicating a splicing pattern of cassette exon. Conclusion This method of screening gene splice variants using RT-GSPs and nPCR is a simple and valuable approach to screening novel splice variants, which is important for the function studies of eukaryotic genes and for understanding the mechanism of aberrant splicing-related diseases.%目的 利用基因特异性引物(gene specific primer,GSP)逆转录结合巢式PCR(nPCR)技术,建立鉴定剪接变体的新方法.方法 以小鼠TrkC基因为例,参考其已知变体1和变体2的序列分别设计GSP和nPCR引物,以逆转录产物为模板进行nPCR反应,扩增产物采用1.5%琼脂糖凝胶分离并回收具有递减趋势的DNA片段,利用T/A克隆技术亚克隆到载体pMD19-T进行直接测序,并与小鼠RefSeq数据库进行比对.结果 利用GSP逆转录结合nPCR技术不仅可鉴定出TrkC基因的已知剪接变体,而且还能够筛选到TrkC基因的新剪接变体并命名为变体3,与变体1相比属于盒式外显子剪接模式,缺失了变体1的520

  20. Splicing analysis of 14 BRCA1 missense variants classifies nine variants as pathogenic

    Ahlborn, Lise B; Dandanell, Mette; Steffensen, Ane Y;

    2015-01-01

    needed to classify whether these uncertain variants are pathogenic or benign. In this study, we investigated 14 BRCA1 variants by in silico splicing analysis and mini-gene splicing assay. All 14 alterations were missense variants located within the BRCT domain of BRCA1 and had previously been examined by...... functional analysis at the protein level. Results from a validated mini-gene splicing assay indicated that nine BRCA1 variants resulted in splicing aberrations leading to truncated transcripts and thus can be considered pathogenic (c.4987A>T/p.Met1663Leu, c.4988T>A/p.Met1663Lys, c.5072C>T/p.Thr1691Ile, c...... have no or an uncertain effect on the protein level, whereas one variant (c.5072C>T/p.Thr1691Ile) were shown to have a strong effect on the protein level as well. In conclusion, our study emphasizes that in silico splicing prediction and mini-gene splicing analysis are important for the classification...

  1. Identification of alternatively spliced TIMP-1 mRNA in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissue

    Usher, Pernille Autzen; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Bartels, Annette;

    2007-01-01

    TIMP-1 is a promising new candidate as a prognostic marker in colorectal and breast cancer. We now describe the discovery of two alternatively spliced variants of TIMP-1 mRNA. The two variants lacking exon 2 (del-2) and 5 (del-5), respectively, were identified in human cancer cell lines by RT......-PCR. The del-2 variant was, furthermore, detected in extracts from 12 colorectal cancer tissue samples. By western blotting additional bands of lower molecular mass than full-length TIMP-1 were identified in tumor tissue, but not in plasma samples obtained from cancer patients. The two splice variants of...

  2. Alternative splicing in the human gene for the core protein A1 generates another hnRNP protein.

    Buvoli, M; Cobianchi, F; Bestagno, M G; Mangiarotti, A.; Bassi, M T; Biamonti, G; Riva, S

    1990-01-01

    The human hnRNP core protein A1 (34 kd) is encoded by a 4.6 kb gene split into 10 exons. Here we show that the A1 gene can be differentially spliced by the addition of an extra exon. The new transcript encodes a minor protein of the hnRNP complex, here defined A1B protein, with a calculated mol. wt of 38 kd, that coincides with a protein previously designated as B2 by some authors. In vitro translation of the mRNAs selected by hybridization with A1 cDNA produced two proteins of 34 and 38 kd; ...

  3. Functional characterisation of an intron retaining K+ transporter of barley reveals intron-mediated alternate splicing

    Shahzad, K.

    2015-01-01

    Intron retention in transcripts and the presence of 5 and 3 splice sites within these introns mediate alternate splicing, which is widely observed in animals and plants. Here, functional characterisation of the K+ transporter, HvHKT2;1, with stably retained introns from barley (Hordeum vulgare) in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and transcript profiling in yeast and transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is presented. Expression of intron-retaining HvHKT2;1 cDNA (HvHKT2;1-i) in trk1, trk2 yeast strain defective in K+ uptake restored growth in medium containing hygromycin in the presence of different concentrations of K+ and mediated hypersensitivity to Na+. HvHKT2;1-i produces multiple transcripts via alternate splicing of two regular introns and three exons in different compositions. HKT isoforms with retained introns and exon skipping variants were detected in relative expression analysis of (i) HvHKT2;1-i in barley under native conditions, (ii) in transgenic tobacco plants constitutively expressing HvHKT2;1-i, and (iii) in trk1, trk2 yeast expressing HvHKT2;1-i under control of an inducible promoter. Mixed proportions of three HKT transcripts: HvHKT2;1-e (first exon region), HvHKT2;1-i1 (first intron) and HvHKT2;1-i2 (second intron) were observed. The variation in transcript accumulation in response to changing K+ and Na+ concentrations was observed in both heterologous and plant systems. These findings suggest a link between intron-retaining transcripts and different splice variants to ion homeostasis, and their possible role in salt stress.

  4. Genomic organization and the tissue distribution of alternatively spliced isoforms of the mouse Spatial gene

    Mattei Marie-Geneviève

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The stromal component of the thymic microenvironment is critical for T lymphocyte generation. Thymocyte differentiation involves a cascade of coordinated stromal genes controlling thymocyte survival, lineage commitment and selection. The "Stromal Protein Associated with Thymii And Lymph-node" (Spatial gene encodes a putative transcription factor which may be involved in T-cell development. In the testis, the Spatial gene is also expressed by round spermatids during spermatogenesis. Results The Spatial gene maps to the B3-B4 region of murine chromosome 10 corresponding to the human syntenic region 10q22.1. The mouse Spatial genomic DNA is organised into 10 exons and is alternatively spliced to generate two short isoforms (Spatial-α and -γ and two other long isoforms (Spatial-δ and -ε comprising 5 additional exons on the 3' site. Here, we report the cloning of a new short isoform, Spatial-β, which differs from other isoforms by an additional alternative exon of 69 bases. This new exon encodes an interesting proline-rich signature that could confer to the 34 kDa Spatial-β protein a particular function. By quantitative TaqMan RT-PCR, we have shown that the short isoforms are highly expressed in the thymus while the long isoforms are highly expressed in the testis. We further examined the inter-species conservation of Spatial between several mammals and identified that the protein which is rich in proline and positive amino acids, is highly conserved. Conclusions The Spatial gene generates at least five alternative spliced variants: three short isoforms (Spatial-α, -β and -γ highly expressed in the thymus and two long isoforms (Spatial-δ and -ε highly expressed in the testis. These alternative spliced variants could have a tissue specific function.

  5. Novel splicing variant of the human orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 gene

    徐评议; 乐卫东

    2004-01-01

    Background Nurr1 is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors. The objective of the present study was to identify novel splicing variants of the gene in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues and determine their functions. Methods Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was used to screen for Nurr1 splice variants in the adult human central nervous system (CNS) and in other tissues such as lymphocytes, and liver, muscle, and kidney cells. Functional assays of the variants were performed by measuring Nurr1 response element (NuRE) transcriptional activity in vitro. Results In this study, the authors identified a novel splicing variant of Nurr1 within exon 5, found in multiple adult human tissues, including lymphocytes, and liver, muscle, and kidney cells, but not in the brain or spinal cord. Sequencing analysis showed the variant has a 75 bp deletion between nucleotides 1402 and 1476. A functional assay of the Nurr1-c splicing variant, performed by measuring NuRE transcriptional activity in vitro, detected a 39% lower level of luciferase (LUC) activity (P<0.05).Conclusion A novel splicing variant of Nurr1 exists in human non-neuronal tissues and functional assays suggest that the variant may act as an alternate transcription regulator.

  6. Microbial and Natural Metabolites That Inhibit Splicing: A Powerful Alternative for Cancer Treatment.

    Martínez-Montiel, Nancy; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora Hilda; Martínez-Montiel, Mónica; Gaspariano-Cholula, Mayra Patricia; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca D

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, genes are frequently interrupted with noncoding sequences named introns. Alternative splicing is a nuclear mechanism by which these introns are removed and flanking coding regions named exons are joined together to generate a message that will be translated in the cytoplasm. This mechanism is catalyzed by a complex machinery known as the spliceosome, which is conformed by more than 300 proteins and ribonucleoproteins that activate and regulate the precision of gene expression when assembled. It has been proposed that several genetic diseases are related to defects in the splicing process, including cancer. For this reason, natural products that show the ability to regulate splicing have attracted enormous attention due to its potential use for cancer treatment. Some microbial metabolites have shown the ability to inhibit gene splicing and the molecular mechanism responsible for this inhibition is being studied for future applications. Here, we summarize the main types of natural products that have been characterized as splicing inhibitors, the recent advances regarding molecular and cellular effects related to these molecules, and the applications reported so far in cancer therapeutics. PMID:27610372

  7. A computational approach for prediction of donor splice sites with improved accuracy.

    Meher, Prabina Kumar; Sahu, Tanmaya Kumar; Rao, A R; Wahi, S D

    2016-09-01

    Identification of splice sites is important due to their key role in predicting the exon-intron structure of protein coding genes. Though several approaches have been developed for the prediction of splice sites, further improvement in the prediction accuracy will help predict gene structure more accurately. This paper presents a computational approach for prediction of donor splice sites with higher accuracy. In this approach, true and false splice sites were first encoded into numeric vectors and then used as input in artificial neural network (ANN), support vector machine (SVM) and random forest (RF) for prediction. ANN and SVM were found to perform equally and better than RF, while tested on HS3D and NN269 datasets. Further, the performance of ANN, SVM and RF were analyzed by using an independent test set of 50 genes and found that the prediction accuracy of ANN was higher than that of SVM and RF. All the predictors achieved higher accuracy while compared with the existing methods like NNsplice, MEM, MDD, WMM, MM1, FSPLICE, GeneID and ASSP, using the independent test set. We have also developed an online prediction server (PreDOSS) available at http://cabgrid.res.in:8080/predoss, for prediction of donor splice sites using the proposed approach. PMID:27302911

  8. A novel point mutation within the EDA gene causes an exon dropping in mature RNA in Holstein Friesian cattle breed affected by X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    Pariset Lorraine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is a disorder characterized by abnormal development of tissues and organs of ectodermal origin caused by mutations in the EDA gene. The bovine EDA gene encodes the ectodysplasin A, a membrane protein expressed in keratinocytes, hair follicles and sweat glands, which is involved in the interactions between cell and cell and/or cell and matrix. Four mutations causing ectodermal dysplasia in cattle have been described so far. Results We identified a new single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at the 9th base of exon 8 in the EDA gene in two calves of Holstein Friesian cattle breed affected by ectodermal dysplasia. This SNP is located in the exonic splicing enhancer (ESEs recognized by SRp40 protein. As a consequence, the spliceosome machinery is no longer able to recognize the sequence as exonic and causes exon skipping. The mutation determines the deletion of the entire exon (131 bp in the RNA processing, causing a severe alteration of the protein structure and thus the disease. Conclusion We identified a mutation, never described before, that changes the regulation of alternative splicing in the EDA gene and causes ectodermal dysplasia in cattle. The analysis of the SNP allows the identification of carriers that can transmit the disease to the offspring. This mutation can thus be exploited for a rational and efficient selection of unequivocally healthy cows for breeding.

  9. MapSplice: accurate mapping of RNA-seq reads for splice junction discovery.

    Wang, Kai; Singh, Darshan; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J; Huang, Yan; Savich, Gleb L; He, Xiaping; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Grimm, Sara A; Perou, Charles M; MacLeod, James N; Chiang, Derek Y; Prins, Jan F; Liu, Jinze

    2010-10-01

    The accurate mapping of reads that span splice junctions is a critical component of all analytic techniques that work with RNA-seq data. We introduce a second generation splice detection algorithm, MapSplice, whose focus is high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of splices as well as CPU and memory efficiency. MapSplice can be applied to both short (<75 bp) and long reads (≥ 75 bp). MapSplice is not dependent on splice site features or intron length, consequently it can detect novel canonical as well as non-canonical splices. MapSplice leverages the quality and diversity of read alignments of a given splice to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that MapSplice achieves higher sensitivity and specificity than TopHat and SpliceMap on a set of simulated RNA-seq data. Experimental studies also support the accuracy of the algorithm. Splice junctions derived from eight breast cancer RNA-seq datasets recapitulated the extensiveness of alternative splicing on a global level as well as the differences between molecular subtypes of breast cancer. These combined results indicate that MapSplice is a highly accurate algorithm for the alignment of RNA-seq reads to splice junctions. Software download URL: http://www.netlab.uky.edu/p/bioinfo/MapSplice. PMID:20802226

  10. Differential expression of exons 1a and 1c in mRNAs for sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 in human and mouse organs and cultured cells.

    Shimomura, I; Shimano, H; Horton, J D; Goldstein, J L; Brown, M S

    1997-01-01

    The 5' end of the mRNA-encoding sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) exists in two forms, designated 1a and 1c. The divergence results from the use of two transcription start sites that produce two separate 5' exons, each of which is spliced to a common exon 2. Here we show that the ratio of SREBP-1c to 1a transcripts varies markedly among organs of the adult mouse. At one extreme is the liver, in which the 1c transcript predominates by a 9:1 ratio. High 1c:1a ratios are also...

  11. mRNA trans-splicing in gene therapy for genetic diseases.

    Berger, Adeline; Maire, Séverine; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Sahel, José-Alain; Hantraye, Philippe; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing, or SMaRT, is a promising strategy to design innovative gene therapy solutions for currently intractable genetic diseases. SMaRT relies on the correction of mutations at the post-transcriptional level by modifying the mRNA sequence. To achieve this, an exogenous RNA is introduced into the target cell, usually by means of gene transfer, to induce a splice event in trans between the exogenous RNA and the target endogenous pre-mRNA. This produces a chimeric mRNA composed partly of exons of the latter, and partly of exons of the former, encoding a sequence free of mutations. The principal challenge of SMaRT technology is to achieve a reaction as complete as possible, i.e., resulting in 100% repairing of the endogenous mRNA target. The proof of concept of SMaRT feasibility has already been established in several models of genetic diseases caused by recessive mutations. In such cases, in fact, the repair of only a portion of the mutant mRNA pool may be sufficient to obtain a significant therapeutic effect. However in the case of dominant mutations, the target cell must be freed from the majority of mutant mRNA copies, requiring a highly efficient trans-splicing reaction. This likely explains why only a few examples of SMaRT approaches targeting dominant mutations are reported in the literature. In this review, we explain in details the mechanism of trans-splicing, review the different strategies that are under evaluation to lead to efficient trans-splicing, and discuss the advantages and limitations of SMaRT. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:487-498. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1347 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27018401

  12. Mediation of buprenorphine analgesia by a combination of traditional and truncated mu opioid receptor splice variants.

    Grinnell, Steven G; Ansonoff, Michael; Marrone, Gina F; Lu, Zhigang; Narayan, Ankita; Xu, Jin; Rossi, Grace; Majumdar, Susruta; Pan, Ying-Xian; Bassoni, Daniel L; Pintar, John; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2016-10-01

    Buprenorphine has long been classified as a mu analgesic, although its high affinity for other opioid receptor classes and the orphanin FQ/nociceptin ORL1 receptor may contribute to its other actions. The current studies confirmed a mu mechanism for buprenorphine analgesia, implicating several subsets of mu receptor splice variants. Buprenorphine analgesia depended on the expression of both exon 1-associated traditional full length 7 transmembrane (7TM) and exon 11-associated truncated 6 transmembrane (6TM) MOR-1 variants. In genetic models, disruption of delta, kappa1 or ORL1 receptors had no impact on buprenorphine analgesia, while loss of the traditional 7TM MOR-1 variants in an exon 1 knockout (KO) mouse markedly lowered buprenorphine analgesia. Loss of the truncated 6TM variants in an exon 11 KO mouse totally eliminated buprenorphine analgesia. In distinction to analgesia, the inhibition of gastrointestinal transit and stimulation of locomotor activity were independent of truncated 6TM variants. Restoring expression of a 6TM variant with a lentivirus rescued buprenorphine analgesia in an exon 11 KO mouse that still expressed the 7TM variants. Despite a potent and robust stimulation of (35) S-GTPγS binding in MOR-1 expressing CHO cells, buprenorphine failed to recruit β-arrestin-2 binding at doses as high as 10 µM. Buprenorphine was an antagonist in DOR-1 expressing cells and an inverse agonist in KOR-1 cells. Buprenorphine analgesia is complex and requires multiple mu receptor splice variant classes but other actions may involve alternative receptors. PMID:27223691

  13. Tissue-specific splicing mutation in acute intermittent porphyria

    An inherited deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase in humans is responsible for the autosomal dominant disease acute intermittent porphyria. Different classes of mutations have been described at the protein level suggesting that this is a heterogeneous disease. It was previously demonstrated that porphobilinogen deaminase is encoded by two distinct mRNA species expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Analysis of the genomic sequences indicated that these two mRNAs are transcribed from two promoters and only differ in their first exon. The first mutation identified in the human porphobilinogen deaminase gene is a single-base substitution (G → A) in the canonical 5' splice donor site of intron 1. This mutation leads to a particular subtype of acute intermittent porphyria characterized by the restriction of the enzymatic defect to nonerythropoietic tissues. Hybridization analysis using olignonucleotide probes after in vitro amplification of genomic DNA offers another possibility of detecting asymptomatic carriers of the mutation in affected families

  14. Tissue-specific splicing mutation in acute intermittent porphyria

    Grandchamp, B.; Picat, C. (Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire, Paris (France)); Mignotte, V.; Romeo, P.H.; Goossens, M. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Creteil (France)); Wilson, J.H.P.; Sandkuyl, L. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Te Velde, K. (Saint Geertruiden Hospital, Deventer (Netherlands)); Nordmann, Y. (Hopital Louis Mourier, Colombes (France))

    1989-01-01

    An inherited deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase in humans is responsible for the autosomal dominant disease acute intermittent porphyria. Different classes of mutations have been described at the protein level suggesting that this is a heterogeneous disease. It was previously demonstrated that porphobilinogen deaminase is encoded by two distinct mRNA species expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Analysis of the genomic sequences indicated that these two mRNAs are transcribed from two promoters and only differ in their first exon. The first mutation identified in the human porphobilinogen deaminase gene is a single-base substitution (G {yields} A) in the canonical 5{prime} splice donor site of intron 1. This mutation leads to a particular subtype of acute intermittent porphyria characterized by the restriction of the enzymatic defect to nonerythropoietic tissues. Hybridization analysis using olignonucleotide probes after in vitro amplification of genomic DNA offers another possibility of detecting asymptomatic carriers of the mutation in affected families.

  15. Heat Stress Upregulates the Expression of TLR4 and Its Alternative Splicing Variant in Bama Miniature Pigs

    JU Xiang-hong; XU Han-jin; YONG Yan-hong; AN Li-long; XU Ying-mei; JIAO Pei-rong; LIAO Ming

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a cellular mechanism in eukaryotes that results in considerable diversity of gene products. It plays an important role in several diseases and cellular signal regulation. Heat stress is a major factor that induces immunosuppression in pigs. Little is known about the correlation between alternative splicing and heat stress in pigs. Therefore, this study aimed to clone, sequence and quantify the alternative splicing variant of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in Bama miniature pigs (Sus scrofa domestica) following exposure to heat stress. The results showed that the second exon of TLR4 was spliced and 167 bp shorter in the alternative splicing variant, and the protein was putatively identiifed as a type of truncated membrane protein consisting of extramembrane, transmembrane and intramembrane regions lacking a signal peptide. Further, it was not a non-classical secretory protein. Five potential reference genes were screened for their potential as reliable standards to quantify the expression of TLR4 alternative spliced variants by real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The stability of these reference genes was ranked using the geNorm and NormFinder programs, and ribosomal protein L4 (RPL4) and TATA box-binding protein (TBP) were found to be the two genes showing the most stable expression in the in vitro cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during heat shock. The mRNA level of the TLR4 gene (both classical and spliced) in stressed pigs increased signiifcantly (P<0.05). Further, the expression levels of the alternative spliced variant of TLR4 (TLR4-ASV) showed a 2-3 folds increase in heat-stressed PBMCs as compared to control pigs. The results of the present study suggested that heat shock might modulate the host immune response by regulating the expressions of TLR4 and its alternative splicing variant.

  16. Hexose enhances oligonucleotide delivery and exon skipping in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

    Han, Gang; Gu, Ben; Cao, Limin; Gao, Xianjun; Wang, Qingsong; Seow, Yiqi; Zhang, Ning; Wood, Matthew J A; Yin, HaiFang

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate-based infusion solutions are widely used in the clinic. Here we show that co-administration of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) with glucose enhances exon-skipping activity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mdx mice. We identify a glucose-fructose (GF) formulation that potentiates PMO activity, completely corrects aberrant Dmd transcripts, restores dystrophin levels in skeletal muscles and achieves functional rescue without detectable toxicity. This activity is attributed to enhancement of GF-mediated PMO uptake in the muscle. We demonstrate that PMO cellular uptake is energy dependent, and that ATP from GF metabolism contributes to enhanced cellular uptake of PMO in the muscle. Collectively, we show that GF potentiates PMO activity by replenishing cellular energy stores under energy-deficient conditions in mdx mice. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into hexose-mediated oligonucleotide delivery and have important implications for the development of DMD exon-skipping therapy. PMID:26964641

  17. Polarizing the Neuron through Sustained Co-expression of Alternatively Spliced Isoforms.

    Yap, Karen; Xiao, Yixin; Friedman, Brad A; Je, H Shawn; Makeyev, Eugene V

    2016-05-10

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an important source of proteome diversity in eukaryotes. However, how this affects protein repertoires at a single-cell level remains an open question. Here, we show that many 3'-terminal exons are persistently co-expressed with their alternatives in mammalian neurons. In an important example of this scenario, cell polarity gene Cdc42, a combination of polypyrimidine tract-binding, protein-dependent, and constitutive splicing mechanisms ensures a halfway switch from the general (E7) to the neuron-specific (E6) alternative 3'-terminal exon during neuronal differentiation. Perturbing the nearly equimolar E6/E7 ratio in neurons results in defects in both axonal and dendritic compartments and suggests that Cdc42E7 is involved in axonogenesis, whereas Cdc42E6 is required for normal development of dendritic spines. Thus, co-expression of a precise blend of functionally distinct splice isoforms rather than a complete switch from one isoform to another underlies proper structural and functional polarization of neurons. PMID:27134173

  18. ASPicDB: a database of annotated transcript and protein variants generated by alternative splicing

    Martelli, Pier L.; D’Antonio, Mattia; Bonizzoni, Paola; Castrignanò, Tiziana; D’Erchia, Anna M.; D’Onorio De Meo, Paolo; Fariselli, Piero; Finelli, Michele; Licciulli, Flavio; Mangiulli, Marina; Mignone, Flavio; Pavesi, Giulio; Picardi, Ernesto; Rizzi, Raffaella; Rossi, Ivan; Valletti, Alessio; Zauli, Andrea; Zambelli, Federico; Casadio, Rita; Pesole, Graziano

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is emerging as a major mechanism for the expansion of the transcriptome and proteome diversity, particularly in human and other vertebrates. However, the proportion of alternative transcripts and proteins actually endowed with functional activity is currently highly debated. We present here a new release of ASPicDB which now provides a unique annotation resource of human protein variants generated by alternative splicing. A total of 256 939 protein variants from 17 191 multi-exon genes have been extensively annotated through state of the art machine learning tools providing information of the protein type (globular and transmembrane), localization, presence of PFAM domains, signal peptides, GPI-anchor propeptides, transmembrane and coiled-coil segments. Furthermore, full-length variants can be now specifically selected based on the annotation of CAGE-tags and polyA signal and/or polyA sites, marking transcription initiation and termination sites, respectively. The retrieval can be carried out at gene, transcript, exon, protein or splice site level allowing the selection of data sets fulfilling one or more features settled by the user. The retrieval interface also enables the selection of protein variants showing specific differences in the annotated features. ASPicDB is available at http://www.caspur.it/ASPicDB/. PMID:21051348

  19. Survivin 2α: a novel Survivin splice variant expressed in human malignancies

    Honsey Laura E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin and its alternative splice forms are involved in critical cellular processes, including cell division and programmed cell death. Survivin is expressed in the majority of human cancers, but minimally in differentiated normal tissues. Expression levels correlate with tumor aggressiveness and resistance to therapy. Results In the present study, we identify and characterize a novel survivin isoform that we designate survivin 2α. Structurally, the transcript consists of 2 exons: exon 1 and exon 2, as well as a 3' 197 bp region of intron 2. Acquisition of a new in-frame stop codon within intron 2 results in an open reading frame of 225 nucleotides, predicting a truncated 74 amino acid protein. Survivin 2α is expressed at high levels in several malignant cell lines and primary tumors. Functional assays show that survivin 2α attenuates the anti-apoptotic activity of survivin. Subcellular localization and immunoprecipitation of survivin 2α suggests a physical interaction with survivin. Conclusion We characterized a novel survivin splice variant that we designated survivin 2α. We hypothesize that survivin 2α can alter the anti-apoptotic functions of survivin in malignant cells. Thus survivin 2α may be useful as a therapeutic tool in sensitizing chemoresistant tumor cells to chemotherapy.

  20. Divergent functions through alternative splicing: the Drosophila CRMP gene in pyrimidine metabolism, brain, and behavior.

    Morris, Deanna H; Dubnau, Josh; Park, Jae H; Rawls, John M

    2012-08-01

    DHP and CRMP proteins comprise a family of structurally similar proteins that perform divergent functions, DHP in pyrimidine catabolism in most organisms and CRMP in neuronal dynamics in animals. In vertebrates, one DHP and five CRMP proteins are products of six genes; however, Drosophila melanogaster has a single CRMP gene that encodes one DHP and one CRMP protein through tissue-specific, alternative splicing of a pair of paralogous exons. The proteins derived from the fly gene are identical over 90% of their lengths, suggesting that unique, novel functions of these proteins derive from the segment corresponding to the paralogous exons. Functional homologies of the Drosophila and mammalian CRMP proteins are revealed by several types of evidence. Loss-of-function CRMP mutation modifies both Ras and Rac misexpression phenotypes during fly eye development in a manner that is consistent with the roles of CRMP in Ras and Rac signaling pathways in mammalian neurons. In both mice and flies, CRMP mutation impairs learning and memory. CRMP mutant flies are defective in circadian activity rhythm. Thus, DHP and CRMP proteins are derived by different processes in flies (tissue-specific, alternative splicing of paralogous exons of a single gene) and vertebrates (tissue-specific expression of different genes), indicating that diverse genetic mechanisms have mediated the evolution of this protein family in animals. PMID:22649077

  1. EASI—enrichment of alternatively spliced isoforms

    Julian P Venables; Burn, John

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing produces more than one protein from the majority of genes and the rarer forms can have dominant functions. Instability of alternative transcripts can also hinder the study of regulation of gene expression by alternative splicing. To investigate the true extent of alternative splicing we have developed a simple method of enriching alternatively spliced isoforms (EASI) from PCRs using beads charged with Thermus aquaticus single-stranded DNA-binding protein (T.Aq ssb). This ...

  2. ASD: a bioinformatics resource on alternative splicing

    Stamm, Stefan; Riethoven, Jean-Jack; Le Texier, Vincent; Gopalakrishnan, Chellappa; Kumanduri, Vasudev; Tang, Yesheng; Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L.; Thanaraj, Thangavel Alphonse

    2005-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important regulatory mechanism of mammalian gene expression. The alternative splicing database (ASD) consortium is systematically collecting and annotating data on alternative splicing. We present the continuation and upgrade of the ASD [T. A. Thanaraj, S. Stamm, F. Clark, J. J. Riethoven, V. Le Texier, J. Muilu (2004) Nucleic Acids Res. 32, D64–D69] that consists of computationally and manually generated data. Its largest parts are AltSplice, a value-added database...

  3. Evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplication

    Su, Zhixi; Wang, Jianmin; Yu, Jun; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Gu, Xun

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are two major sources of proteomic function diversity. Here, we study the evolutionary trend of alternative splicing after gene duplication by analyzing the alternative splicing differences between duplicate genes. We observed that duplicate genes have fewer alternative splice (AS) forms than single-copy genes, and that a negative correlation exists between the mean number of AS forms and the gene family size. Interestingly, we found that the loss of ...

  4. A novel BRD4-NUT fusion in an undifferentiated sinonasal tumor highlights alternative splicing as a contributing oncogenic factor in NUT midline carcinoma.

    Stirnweiss, A; McCarthy, K; Oommen, J; Crook, M L; Hardy, K; Kees, U R; Wilton, S D; Anazodo, A; Beesley, A H

    2015-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a fatal cancer that arises in various tissues along the upper midline of the body. The defining molecular feature of NMC is a chromosomal translocation that joins (in the majority of cases) the nuclear testis gene NUT (NUTM1) to the bromodomain protein family member 4 (BRD4) and thereby creating a fusion oncogene that disrupts cellular differentiation and drives the disease. In this study, we report the case of an adolescent NMC patient presenting with severe facial pain, proptosis and visual impairment due to a mass arising from the ethmoid sinus that invaded the right orbit and frontal lobe. Treatment involved radical resection, including exenteration of the affected eye with the view to consolidate treatment with radiation therapy; however, the patient experienced rapid tumor progression and passed away 79 days post resection. Molecular analysis of the tumor tissue identified a novel in-frame BRD4-NUT transcript, with BRD4 exon 15 fused to the last 124 nucleotides of NUT exon 2 (BRD4-NUT ex15:ex2Δnt1-585). The partial deletion of NUT exon 2 was attributed to a mid-exonic genomic breakpoint and the subsequent activation of a cryptic splice site further downstream within the exon. Inhibition of the canonical 3' acceptor splice site of NUT intron 1 in cell lines expressing the most common NMC fusion transcripts (PER-403, BRD4-NUT ex11:ex2; PER-624, BRD4-NUT ex15:ex2) induced alternative splicing from the same cryptic splice site as identified in the patient. Detection of low levels of an in-frame BRD4-NUT ex11:ex2Δnt1-585 transcript in PER-403 confirmed endogenous splicing from this alternative exon 2 splice site. Although further studies are necessary to assess the clinical relevance of the increasing number of variant fusions described in NMC, the findings presented in this case identify alternative splicing as a mechanism that contributes to this pathogenic complexity. PMID:26551281

  5. P67-phox (NCF2 lacking exons 11 and 12 is functionally active and leads to an extremely late diagnosis of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD.

    Joachim Roesler

    Full Text Available Two brothers in their fifties presented with a medical history of suspected fungal allergy, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, alveolitis, and invasive aspergillosis and pulmonary fistula, respectively. Eventually, after a delay of 50 years, chronic granulomatous disease (CGD was diagnosed in the index patient. We found a new splice mutation in the NCF2 (p67-phox gene, c.1000 + 2T → G, that led to several splice products one of which lacked exons 11 and 12. This deletion was in frame and allowed for remarkable residual NADPH oxidase activity as determined by transduction experiments using a retroviral vector. We conclude that p67-phox which lacks the 34 amino acids encoded by the two exons can still exert considerable functional activity. This activity can partially explain the long-term survival of the patients without adequate diagnosis and treatment, but could not prevent progressing lung damage.

  6. Dynamic Histone Acetylation of H3K4me3 Nucleosome Regulates MCL1 Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    Khan, Dilshad H; Gonzalez, Carolina; Tailor, Nikesh; Hamedani, Mohammad K; Leygue, Etienne; Davie, James R

    2016-10-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a cotranscriptional process affected by the chromatin architecture along the body of coding genes. Recruited to the pre-mRNA by splicing factors, histone deacetylases (HDACs) and K-acetyltransferases (KATs) catalyze dynamic histone acetylation along the gene. In colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells, HDAC inhibition specifically increased KAT2B occupancy as well as H3 and H4 acetylation of the H3K4 trimethylated (H3K4me3) nucleosome positioned over alternative exon 2 of the MCL1 gene, an event paralleled with the exclusion of exon 2. These results were reproduced in MDA-MB-231, but not in MCF7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. These later cells have much higher levels of demethylase KDM5B than either HCT 116 or MDA-MB-231 cells. We show that H3K4me3 steady-state levels and H3K4me3 occupancy at the end of exon 1 and over exon 2 of the MCL1 gene were lower in MCF7 than in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, in MCF7 cells, there was minimal effect of HDAC inhibition on H3/H4 acetylation and H3K4me3 levels along the MCL1 gene and no change in pre-mRNA splicing choice. These results show that, upon HDAC inhibition, the H3K4me3 mark plays a critical role in the exclusion of exon 2 from the MCL1 pre-mRNA. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2196-2204, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864447

  7. HS3D, A Dataset of Homo Sapiens Splice Regions, and its Extraction Procedure from a Major Public Database

    Pollastro, Pasquale; Rampone, Salvatore

    The aim of this work is to describe a cleaning procedure of GenBank data, producing material to train and to assess the prediction accuracy of computational approaches for gene characterization. A procedure (GenBank2HS3D) has been defined, producing a dataset (HS3D - Homo Sapiens Splice Sites Dataset) of Homo Sapiens Splice regions extracted from GenBank (Rel.123 at this time). It selects, from the complete GenBank Primate Division, entries of Human Nuclear DNA according with several assessed criteria; then it extracts exons and introns from these entries (actually 4523 + 3802). Donor and acceptor sites are then extracted as windows of 140 nucleotides around each splice site (3799 + 3799). After discarding windows not including canonical GT-AG junctions (65 + 74), including insufficient data (not enough material for a 140 nucleotide window) (686 + 589), including not AGCT bases (29 + 30), and redundant (218 + 226), the remaining windows (2796 + 2880) are reported in the dataset. Finally, windows of false splice sites are selected by searching canonical GT-AG pairs in not splicing positions (271 937 + 332 296). The false sites in a range +/- 60 from a true splice site are marked as proximal. HS3D, release 1.2 at this time, is available at the Web server of the University of Sannio: http://www.sci.unisannio.it/docenti/rampone/.

  8. Perispeckles are major assembly sites for the exon junction core complex.

    Daguenet, Elisabeth; Baguet, Aurélie; Degot, Sébastien; Schmidt, Ute; Alpy, Fabien; Wendling, Corinne; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Kessler, Pascal; Rio, Marie-Christine; Le Hir, Hervé; Bertrand, Edouard; Tomasetto, Catherine

    2012-05-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is loaded onto mRNAs as a consequence of splicing and regulates multiple posttranscriptional events. MLN51, Magoh, Y14, and eIF4A3 form a highly stable EJC core, but where this tetrameric complex is assembled in the cell remains unclear. Here we show that EJC factors are enriched in domains that we term perispeckles and are visible as doughnuts around nuclear speckles. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses and EJC assembly mutants show that perispeckles do not store free subunits, but instead are enriched for assembled cores. At the ultrastructural level, perispeckles are distinct from interchromatin granule clusters that may function as storage sites for splicing factors and intermingle with perichromatin fibrils, where nascent RNAs and active RNA Pol II are present. These results support a model in which perispeckles are major assembly sites for the tetrameric EJC core. This subnuclear territory thus represents an intermediate region important for mRNA maturation, between transcription sites and splicing factor reservoirs and assembly sites. PMID:22419818

  9. Alternative splicing and trans-splicing events revealed by analysis of the Bombyx mori transcriptome

    Shao, Wei; Zhao, Qiong-Yi; Wang, Xiu-Ye; Xu, Xin-Yan; Tang, Qing; Li, Muwang; Li, Xuan; Xu, Yong-Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing and trans-splicing events have not been systematically studied in the silkworm Bombyx mori. Here, the silkworm transcriptome was analyzed by RNA-seq. The authors identified 320 novel genes, modified 1140 gene models, and found thousands of alternative splicing and 58 trans-splicing events. Studies of three SR proteins show that both their alternative splicing patterns and mRNA products are conserved from insect to human, and one isoform of Srsf6 with a retained intron is ...

  10. Splice Site, Frameshift and Chimeric GFAP Mutations in Alexander Disease

    Flint, Daniel; Li, Rong; Webster, Lital S.; Naidu, Sakkubai; Kolodny, Edwin; Percy, Alan; van der Knaap, Marjo; Powers, James M.; Mantovani, John F.; Ekstein, Josef; Goldman, James E.; Messing, Albee; Brenner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is a usually fatal astrogliopathy primarily caused by mutations in the gene encoding GFAP, an intermediate filament protein expressed in astrocytes. We describe three patients with unique characteristics, and whose mutations have implications for AxD diagnosis and studies of intermediate filaments. Patient 1 is the first reported case with a non-coding mutation. The patient has a splice site change producing an in-frame deletion of exon 4 in about 10% of the transcripts. Patient 2 has an insertion and deletion at the extreme end of the coding region, resulting in a short frameshift. In addition, the mutation was found in buccal DNA but not in blood DNA, making this patient the first reported chimera. Patient 3 has a single base deletion near the C-terminal end of the protein, producing a short frameshift. These findings recommend inclusion of intronic splice site regions in genetic testing for AxD, indicate that alteration of only a small fraction of GFAP can produce disease, and provide caution against tagging intermediate filaments at their C-terminal end for cell biological investigations. PMID:22488673

  11. Plug-and-Play Genetic Access to Drosophila Cell Types using Exchangeable Exon Cassettes

    Fengqiu Diao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded effectors are important tools for probing cellular function in living animals, but improved methods for directing their expression to specific cell types are required. Here, we introduce a simple, versatile method for achieving cell-type-specific expression of transgenes that leverages the untapped potential of “coding introns” (i.e., introns between coding exons. Our method couples the expression of a transgene to that of a native gene expressed in the cells of interest using intronically inserted “plug-and-play” cassettes (called “Trojan exons” that carry a splice acceptor site followed by the coding sequences of T2A peptide and an effector transgene. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach in Drosophila using lines containing suitable MiMIC (Minos-mediated integration cassette transposons and a palette of Trojan exons capable of expressing a range of commonly used transcription factors. We also introduce an exchangeable, MiMIC-like Trojan exon construct that can be targeted to coding introns using the Crispr/Cas system.

  12. Plug-and-Play Genetic Access to Drosophila Cell Types Using Exchangeable Exon Cassettes

    Diao, Fengqiu; Ironfield, Holly; Luan, Haojiang; Diao, Feici; Shropshire, William C.; Ewer, John; Marr, Elizabeth; Potter, Christopher J.; Landgraf, Matthias; White, Benjamin H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Genetically encoded effectors are important tools for probing cellular function in living animals, but improved methods for directing their expression to specific cell types are required. Here we introduce a simple, versatile method for achieving cell type-specific expression of transgenes that leverages the untapped potential of “coding introns” (i.e. introns between coding exons). Our method couples the expression of a transgene to that of a native gene expressed in the cells of interest using intronically inserted “plug-and-play” cassettes (called “Trojan exons”) that carry a splice acceptor site followed by the coding sequences of T2A peptide and an effector transgene. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach in Drosophila using lines containing suitable MiMIC transposons and a palette of Trojan exons capable of expressing a range of commonly used transcription factors. We also introduce an exchangeable, MiMIC-like Trojan exon construct that can be targeted to coding introns using the Crispr/Cas system. PMID:25732830

  13. MED12 exon 2 mutations in phyllodes tumors of the breast

    Exon 2 of MED12, a subunit of the transcriptional mediator complex, has been frequently mutated in uterine leiomyomas and breast fibroadenomas; however, it has been rarely mutated in other tumors. Although the mutations were also found in uterine leiomyosarcomas, the frequency was significantly lower than in uterine leiomyomas. Here, we examined the MED12 mutation in phyllodes tumors, another biphasic tumor with epithelial and stromal components related to breast fibroadenomas. Mutations in MED12 exon 2 were analyzed in nine fibroadenomas and eleven phyllodes tumors via Sanger sequencing. A panel of cancer- and sarcoma-related genes was also analyzed using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing. Six mutations in fibroadenomas, including those previously reported (6/9, 67%), and five mutations in phyllodes tumors (5/11, 45%) were observed. Three mutations in the phyllodes tumors were missense mutations at Gly44, which is common in uterine leiomyomas and breast fibroadenomas. In addition, two deletion mutations (in-frame c.133-144del12 and loss of splice acceptor c.100-68-137del106) were observed in the phyllodes tumors. No other recurrent mutation was observed with next-generation sequencing. Frequent mutations in MED12 exon 2 in the phyllodes tumors suggest that it may share genetic etiology with uterine leiomyoma, a subgroup of uterine leiomyosarcomas and breast fibroadenoma

  14. Ancient nature of alternative splicing and functions of introns

    Zhou, Kemin; Salamov, Asaf; Kuo, Alan; Aerts, Andrea; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-21

    Using four genomes: Chamydomonas reinhardtii, Agaricus bisporus, Aspergillus carbonarius, and Sporotricum thermophile with EST coverage of 2.9x, 8.9x, 29.5x, and 46.3x respectively, we identified 11 alternative splicing (AS) types that were dominated by intron retention (RI; biased toward short introns) and found 15, 35, 52, and 63percent AS of multiexon genes respectively. Genes with AS were more ancient, and number of AS correlated with number of exons, expression level, and maximum intron length of the gene. Introns with tendency to be retained had either stop codons or length of 3n+1 or 3n+2 presumably triggering nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), but introns retained in major isoforms (0.2-6percent of all introns) were biased toward 3n length and stop codon free. Stopless introns were biased toward phase 0, but 3n introns favored phase 1 that introduced more flexible and hydrophilic amino acids on both ends of introns which would be less disruptive to protein structure. We proposed a model in which minor RI intron could evolve into major RI that could facilitate intron loss through exonization.

  15. Aberrations in asymmetrical electron lenses

    Starting from well established knowledge in light-optics we explore the question if electron-optical aberration can be improved in asymmetrical electron lenses. We show that spherical as well as chromatic aberration coefficients are reduced in asymmetric electrostatic einzel lenses when the center electrode is moved away from the center position towards the entrance electrode. Relative improvements up to 40% for both the chromatic and the spherical aberration coefficients can be obtained. We use analytical and numerical calculations to confirm this result for exemplary cases of a lens with fixed length and working distance. The agreement of the two calculation methods is very good. We then derive an estimate for the electron-optical aberration coefficients from light-optics. The derived expressions for chromatic and spherical aberrations are somewhat simpler than the ones derived from electron-optics as they involve integrals only over the electrostatic potential, not over the electron paths. The estimated formulas still agree well with the electron optical calculations. Overall, we are tempted to suggest that the enormous knowledge base of light optics can provide considerable guidance for electron-optical applications. -- Highlights: ► Develops the analogy between light and electron optics in aberration calculations. ► Optimized spherical and chromatic aberrations for an electrostatic einzel lens. ► Comparison between analytic and numerical aberration calculations.

  16. Exon-skipping and mRNA decay in human liver tissue: molecular consequences of pathogenic bile salt export pump mutations.

    Dröge, Carola; Schaal, Heiner; Engelmann, Guido; Wenning, Daniel; Häussinger, Dieter; Kubitz, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The bile salt export pump BSEP mediates bile formation. Over 150 BSEP mutations are associated with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC-2), with few characterised specifically. We examined liver tissues from two PFIC-2 patients compound heterozygous for the splice-site mutation c.150 + 3A > C and either c.2783_2787dup5 resulting in a frameshift with a premature termination codon (child 1) or p.R832C (child 2). Splicing was analysed with a minigene system and mRNA sequencing from patients' livers. Protein expression was shown by immunofluorescence. Using the minigene, c.150 + 3A > C causes complete skipping of exon 3. In liver tissue of child 1, c.2783_2787dup5 was found on DNA but not on mRNA level, implying nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) when c.2783_2787dup5 is present. Still, BSEP protein as well as mRNA with and without exon 3 were detectable and can be assigned to the c.150 + 3A > C allele. Correctly spliced transcripts despite c.150 + 3A > C were also confirmed in liver of child 2. In conclusion, we provide evidence (1) for effective NMD due to a BSEP frameshift mutation and (2) partial exon-skipping due to c.150 + 3A > C. The results illustrate that the extent of exon-skipping depends on the genomic and cellular context and that regulation of splicing may have therapeutic potential. PMID:27114171

  17. Expression of novel isoforms of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1) generated by alternative splicing of the CPT-ibeta gene.

    Yu, G S; Lu, Y C; Gulick, T

    1998-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) catalyses the rate-determining step in mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation. The enzyme has two cognate structural genes that are preferentially expressed in liver (alpha) or fat and muscle (beta). We hypothesized the existence of additional isoforms in heart to account for unique kinetic characteristics of enzyme activity in this tissue. Hybridization and PCR screening of a human cardiac cDNA library revealed the expression of two novel CPT-I isoforms generated by alternative splicing of the CPT-Ibeta transcript, in addition to the beta and alpha cDNA species previously described. Ribonuclease protection and reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR assays confirmed the presence of mRNA species of each splicing variant in heart, skeletal muscle and liver, with differing relative concentrations in the tissues. The novel splicing variants omit exons or utilize a cryptic splice donor site within an exon. Deduced polypeptide sequences of the novel enzymes include omissions in the region of putative membrane-spanning and malonyl-CoA regulatory domains compared with the previously described CPT-Is, implying that the encoded enzymes will exhibit unique features with respect to outer mitochondrial membrane topology and response to physiological and pharmacological inhibitors. PMID:9693124

  18. Malignant Tregs express low molecular splice forms of FOXP3 in Sézary syndrome

    Krejsgaard, T; Gjerdrum, L M; Ralfkiaer, E;

    2008-01-01

    growth of non-malignant T cells. The Treg phenotype and the production of suppressive cytokines are driven by aberrant activation of Jak3 independent of the FOXP3 splice forms. In contrast to wt FOXP3, the low molecular splice forms of FOXP3 have no inhibitory effect on nuclear factor-kappaB (NF...... SS. We demonstrate that malignant T cells in 8 of 15 patients stain positive with an anti-FOXP3 antibody. Western blotting analysis shows expression of two low molecular splice forms of FOXP3, but not of wild-type (wt) FOXP3. The malignant T cells produce interleukin-10 and TGF-beta and suppress the......-kappaB) activity in reporter assays which is in keeping with a constitutive NF-kappaB activity in the malignant T cells. In conclusion, we show that the malignant T cells express low molecular splice forms of FOXP3 and function as Tregs. Furthermore, we provide evidence that FOXP3 splice forms are functionally...

  19. Dysregulation of splicing proteins in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Raja, Remya; Sathe, Gajanan; Chavan, Sandip; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Patil, Arun H; Solanki, Hitendra; Renuse, Santosh; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A; Mathur, Premendu P; Prasad, T S Keshava; Kumar, Prashant; Califano, Joseph A; Sidransky, David; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2016-02-01

    ABSRTRACT Signaling plays an important role in regulating all cellular pathways. Altered signaling is one of the hallmarks of cancers. Phosphoproteomics enables interrogation of kinase mediated signaling pathways in biological systems. In cancers, this approach can be utilized to identify aberrantly activated pathways that potentially drive proliferation and tumorigenesis. To identify signaling alterations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), we carried out proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of HNSCC cell lines using a combination of tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling approach and titanium dioxide-based enrichment. We identified 4,920 phosphosites corresponding to 2,212 proteins in six HNSCC cell lines compared to a normal oral cell line. Our data indicated significant enrichment of proteins associated with splicing. We observed hyperphosphorylation of SRSF protein kinase 2 (SRPK2) and its downstream substrates in HNSCC cell lines. SRPK2 is a splicing kinase, known to phosphorylate serine/arginine (SR) rich domain proteins and regulate splicing process in eukaryotes. Although genome-wide studies have reported the contribution of alternative splicing events of several genes in the progression of cancer, the involvement of splicing kinases in HNSCC is not known. In this study, we studied the role of SRPK2 in HNSCC. Inhibition of SRPK2 resulted in significant decrease in colony forming and invasive ability in a panel of HNSCC cell lines. Our results indicate that phosphorylation of SRPK2 plays a crucial role in the regulation of splicing process in HNSCC and that splicing kinases can be developed as a new class of therapeutic target in HNSCC. PMID:26853621

  20. Molecular characterization of MHC class II in the Australian invasive cane toad reveals multiple splice variants.

    Lillie, Mette; Cui, Jian; Shine, Richard; Belov, Katherine

    2016-07-01

    The cane toad has gained notoriety for its invasion across the Australian landscape, with significant impacts on the native Australian fauna. The invasion has accelerated over time, with invading cane toads adapted for highly dispersive traits. This, however, has come at the cost of the immune system, with lower investment in some immune functions. To investigate the cane toad's immunogenetics, we characterized four major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class IIA and three MHC class IIB loci. Preliminary observations suggest very low allelic diversity at all loci. We also observed various splice isoforms. One isoform seen at one class IIA and two class IIB loci was missing exon 2, which is essential to peptide binding and presentation. The other isoform, observed at a class IIA locus, is likely to be a soluble MHC product. These results may suggest a significant role of alternative splicing of MHC loci in the Australian cane toad. PMID:27233954

  1. Permanent Neonatal Diabetes Caused by Creation of an Ectopic Splice Site within the INS Gene

    Gastaldo, Elena; Harries, Lorna W.; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Castaño, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic etiology in a patient who presented with permanent neonatal diabetes at 2 months of age. Methodology/Principal Findings Regulatory elements and coding exons 2 and 3 of the INS gene were amplified and sequenced from genomic and complementary DNA samples. A novel heterozygous INS mutation within the terminal intron of the gene was identified in the proband and her affected father. This mutation introduces an ectopic splice site leading to the insertion of 29 nucleotides from the intronic sequence into the mature mRNA, which results in a longer and abnormal transcript. Conclusions/Significance This study highlights the importance of routinely sequencing the exon-intron boundaries and the need to carry out additional studies to confirm the pathogenicity of any identified intronic genetic variants. PMID:22235272

  2. A splice variant of RILP induces lysosomal clustering independent of dynein recruitment

    The small GTPase Rab7 controls fusion and transport of late endocytic compartments. A critical mediator is the Rab7 effector RILP that recruits the minus-end dynein-dynactin motor complex to these compartments. We identified a natural occurring splice variant of RILP (RILPsv) lacking only 27 amino acids encoded by exon VII. Both variants bind Rab7, prolong its GTP-bound state, and induce clustering of late endocytic compartments. However, RILPsv does not recruit the dynein-dynactin complex, implicating exon VII in motor recruitment. Clustering might still occur via dimerization, since both RILP and RILPsv are able to form hetero- and homo-dimers. Moreover, both effectors compete for Rab7 binding but with different outcome for dynein-dynactin recruitment and transport. Hence, RILPsv provides an extra dimension to the control of vesicle fusion and transport by the small GTPase Rab7

  3. Alternative Splicing of Neuronal Differentiation Factor TRF2 Regulated by HNRNPH1/H2

    Ioannis Grammatikakis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During neuronal differentiation, use of an alternative splice site on the rat telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2 mRNA generates a short TRF2 protein isoform (TRF2-S capable of derepressing neuronal genes. However, the RNA-binding proteins (RBPs controlling this splicing event are unknown. Here, using affinity pull-down analysis, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H1 and H2(HNRNPH as RBPs specifically capable of interacting with the spliced RNA segment (exon 7 of Trf2 pre-mRNA. HNRNPH proteins prevent the production of the short isoform of Trf2 mRNA, as HNRNPH silencing selectively elevates TRF2-S levels. Accordingly, HNRNPH levels decline while TRF2-S levels increase during neuronal differentiation. In addition, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of hnRNPH2 selectively accelerates the NGF-triggered differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma cells into neurons. In sum, HNRNPH is a splicing regulator of Trf2 pre-mRNA that prevents the expression of TRF2-S, a factor implicated in neuronal differentiation.

  4. Alternative Splicing of Neuronal Differentiation Factor TRF2 Regulated by HNRNPH1/H2.

    Grammatikakis, Ioannis; Zhang, Peisu; Panda, Amaresh C; Kim, Jiyoung; Maudsley, Stuart; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Yang, Xiaoling; Martindale, Jennifer L; Motiño, Omar; Hutchison, Emmette R; Mattson, Mark P; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-05-01

    During neuronal differentiation, use of an alternative splice site on the rat telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) mRNA generates a short TRF2 protein isoform (TRF2-S) capable of derepressing neuronal genes. However, the RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) controlling this splicing event are unknown. Here, using affinity pull-down analysis, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H1 and H2(HNRNPH) as RBPs specifically capable of interacting with the spliced RNA segment (exon 7) of Trf2 pre-mRNA. HNRNPH proteins prevent the production of the short isoform of Trf2 mRNA, as HNRNPH silencing selectively elevates TRF2-S levels. Accordingly, HNRNPH levels decline while TRF2-S levels increase during neuronal differentiation. In addition, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of hnRNPH2 selectively accelerates the NGF-triggered differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma cells into neurons. In sum, HNRNPH is a splicing regulator of Trf2 pre-mRNA that prevents the expression of TRF2-S, a factor implicated in neuronal differentiation. PMID:27117401

  5. Expression of a novel splicing variant of Pcp2 in closely related laboratory rodents.

    Przybyła, M A; Nowacka-Chmielewska, M M; Barski, J J

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje cell protein-2 (PCP2), also known as L7, is a member of the GoLoco protein family with highly cell-specific expression, being restricted to cerebellar Purkinje cells and retinal bipolar neurons in various species. However, its function in these tissues is unknown. Previous studies have suggested that PCP2 is a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, or a guanine nucleotide exchange factor. The Pcp2 gene is known to have many splice variants in both cerebellar Purkinje cells and retinal bipolar neurons. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a novel Pcp2 splice variant is conserved in closely related laboratory rodents (mice, rats, and hamsters). After analyzing alternative splicing of this gene in the Purkinje cells and retinas of these rodent species, we confirmed the presence of the novel longer transcript in mice. However, assessment of Pcp2 transcripts using polymerase chain reaction amplification of complementary DNA revealed this long splice variant containing the additional exon 3B to be absent from rats and hamsters. Thus, the novel Pcp2 transcript is particular to mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells and retinal bipolar neurons. It is likely to have arisen in this species, as a result of spontaneous mutation or de novo rearrangements. This gene presumably serves a very specific and, as yet, unknown function in the eyes and/or Purkinje cells of mice. PMID:27525924

  6. Regulation of alternative splicing of Bcl-x by IL-6, GM-CSF and TPA

    Chang You LI; Jia You CHU; Jian Kun YU; Xiao Qin HUANG; Xiao Juan LIU; Li SHI; Yan Chun CHE; Jiu Yong XIE

    2004-01-01

    The splicing of many alternative exons in the precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) is regulated by extracellular factors but the underlying molecular bases remain unclear. Here we report the differential regulation of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing by extracellular factors and their distinctrequirements for pre-mRNA elements. In K562 leukemia cells, treatment with interleukin-6 (IL-6) or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) reduced the proportion of the Bcl-xL variant mRNA while treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) had no effect. In U251 glioma cells, however, TPA efficientlyincreased the Bcl-xL level. These regulations were also seen for a transfected splicing reporter mini-gene. Further analyses of deletion mutants indicate that nucleotides 1-176 of the downstream intron are required for the IL-6 effect, whereas additional nucleotides 177-284 are essential for the GM-CSF effect. As for the TPA effect, only nucleotides 1-76 are required in the downstream intron. Thus, IL-6, GM-CSF and TPA differentially regulate Bcl-x splicing and require specific intronic pre-mRNA sequences for their respective effects.

  7. Alternative Splicing Regulates the Subcellular Localization of Divalent Metal Transporter 1 Isoforms

    Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Tanaka, Naotaka; Nishida-Kitayama, Junko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Kishi, Fumio

    2002-01-01

    Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) is responsible for dietary-iron absorption from apical plasma membrane in the duodenum and iron acquisition from the transferrin cycle endosomes in peripheral tissues. Two isoforms of the DMT1 transcript generated by alternative splicing of the 3′ exons have been identified in mouse, rat, and human. These isoforms can be distinguished by the different C-terminal amino acid sequences and by the presence (DMT1A) or absence (DMT1B) of an iron response element ...

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of Gene Structure and Alternative Splicing in α-Actinins

    Lek, Monkol; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Yang, Nan; North, Kathryn N.

    2009-01-01

    The α-actinins are an important family of actin-binding proteins with the ability to cross-link actin filaments when in dimer form. Members of the α-actinin family share a domain topology composed of highly conserved actin-binding and EF-hand domains separated by a rod domain composed of spectrin-like repeats. Functional diversity within this family has arisen through exon duplication and the formation of alternate splice isoforms as well as gene duplications during the evolution of vertebrat...

  9. Mutations in a novel, cryptic exon of the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor gene cause male pseudohermaphroditism.

    Nina Kossack

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Male pseudohermaphroditism, or Leydig cell hypoplasia (LCH, is an autosomal recessive disorder in individuals with a 46,XY karyotype, characterized by a predominantly female phenotype, a blind-ending vagina, absence of breast development, primary amenorrhea, and the presence of testicular structures. It is caused by mutations in the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor gene (LHCGR, which impair either LH/CG binding or signal transduction. However, molecular analysis has revealed that the LHCGR is apparently normal in about 50% of patients with the full clinical phenotype of LCH. We therefore searched the LHCGR for novel genomic elements causative for LCH. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present study we have identified a novel, primate-specific bona fide exon (exon 6A within the LHCGR gene. It displays composite characteristics of an internal/terminal exon and possesses stop codons triggering nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD in LHCGR. Transcripts including exon 6A are physiologically highly expressed in human testes and granulosa cells, and result in an intracellular, truncated LHCGR protein of 209 amino acids. We sequenced exon 6A in 16 patients with unexplained LCH and detected mutations in three patients. Functional studies revealed a dramatic increase in the expression of the mutated internal exon 6A transcripts, indicating aberrant NMD. These altered ratios of LHCGR transcripts result in the generation of predominantly nonfunctional LHCGR isoforms, thereby preventing proper expression and functioning. CONCLUSIONS: The identification and characterization of this novel exon not only identifies a new regulatory element within the genomic organization of LHCGR, but also points toward a complex network of receptor regulation, including events at the transcriptional level. These findings add to the molecular diagnostic tools for LCH and extend our understanding of the endocrine regulation of sexual differentiation.

  10. Gene transcription and splicing of T-type channels are evolutionarily-conserved strategies for regulating channel expression and gating.

    Adriano Senatore

    Full Text Available T-type calcium channels operate within tightly regulated biophysical constraints for supporting rhythmic firing in the brain, heart and secretory organs of invertebrates and vertebrates. The snail T-type gene, LCa(v3 from Lymnaea stagnalis, possesses alternative, tandem donor splice sites enabling a choice of a large exon 8b (201 aa or a short exon 25c (9 aa in cytoplasmic linkers, similar to mammalian homologs. Inclusion of optional 25c exons in the III-IV linker of T-type channels speeds up kinetics and causes hyperpolarizing shifts in both activation and steady-state inactivation of macroscopic currents. The abundant variant lacking exon 25c is the workhorse of embryonic Ca(v3 channels, whose high density and right-shifted activation and availability curves are expected to increase pace-making and allow the channels to contribute more significantly to cellular excitation in prenatal tissue. Presence of brain-enriched, optional exon 8b conserved with mammalian Ca(v3.1 and encompassing the proximal half of the I-II linker, imparts a ~50% reduction in total and surface-expressed LCa(v3 channel protein, which accounts for reduced whole-cell calcium currents of +8b variants in HEK cells. Evolutionarily conserved optional exons in cytoplasmic linkers of Ca(v3 channels regulate expression (exon 8b and a battery of biophysical properties (exon 25c for tuning specialized firing patterns in different tissues and throughout development.

  11. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-12-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3‧-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods.

  12. Alternative splicing of the neurofibromatosis type 1 pre-mRNA is regulated by the muscleblind-like proteins and the CUG-BP and ELAV-like factors

    Fleming Victoria A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is often subjected to complex regulatory control that involves many protein factors and cis-acting RNA sequence elements. One major challenge is to identify all of the protein players and define how they control alternative expression of a particular exon in a combinatorial manner. The Muscleblind-like (MBNL and CUG-BP and ELAV-Like family (CELF proteins are splicing regulatory proteins, which function as antagonists in the regulation of several alternative exons. Currently only a limited number of common targets of MBNL and CELF are known that are antagonistically regulated by these two groups of proteins. Results Recently, we identified neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 exon 23a as a novel target of negative regulation by CELF proteins. Here we report that MBNL family members are positive regulators of this exon. Overexpression of MBNL proteins promote exon 23a inclusion in a low MBNL-expressing cell line, and simultaneous siRNA-mediated knockdown of MBNL1 and MBNL2 family members in a high MBNL-expressing cell line promotes exon 23a skipping. Importantly, these two groups of proteins antagonize each other in regulating inclusion of exon 23a. Furthermore, we analyzed the binding sites of these proteins in the intronic sequences upstream of exon 23a by UV cross-linking assays. We show that in vitro, in addition to the previously identified preferred binding sequence UGCUGU, the MBNL proteins need the neighboring sequences for optimal binding. Conclusion This study along with our previous work that demonstrated roles for Hu, CELF, and TIA-1 and TIAR proteins in the regulation of NF1 exon 23a establish that this exon is under tight, complex control.

  13. SpliceProt: a protein sequence repository of predicted human splice variants.

    Tavares, Raphael; de Miranda Scherer, Nicole; Pauletti, Bianca Alves; Araújo, Elói; Folador, Edson Luiz; Espindola, Gabriel; Ferreira, Carlos Gil; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Passetti, Fabio

    2014-02-01

    The mechanism of alternative splicing in the transcriptome may increase the proteome diversity in eukaryotes. In proteomics, several studies aim to use protein sequence repositories to annotate MS experiments or to detect differentially expressed proteins. However, the available protein sequence repositories are not designed to fully detect protein isoforms derived from mRNA splice variants. To foster knowledge for the field, here we introduce SpliceProt, a new protein sequence repository of transcriptome experimental data used to investigate for putative splice variants in human proteomes. Current version of SpliceProt contains 159 719 non-redundant putative polypeptide sequences. The assessment of the potential of SpliceProt in detecting new protein isoforms resulting from alternative splicing was performed by using publicly available proteomics data. We detected 173 peptides hypothetically derived from splice variants, which 54 of them are not present in UniprotKB/TrEMBL sequence repository. In comparison to other protein sequence repositories, SpliceProt contains a greater number of unique peptides and is able to detect more splice variants. Therefore, SpliceProt provides a solution for the annotation of proteomics experiments regarding splice isofoms. The repository files containing the translated sequences of the predicted splice variants and a visualization tool are freely available at http://lbbc.inca.gov.br/spliceprot. PMID:24273012

  14. Modulation of p53β and p53γ expression by regulating the alternative splicing of TP53 gene modifies cellular response

    Marcel, V; Fernandes, K; Terrier, O; LANE, D. P.; Bourdon, J-C

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the tumor suppressor p53 protein, also termed p53α, the TP53 gene produces p53β and p53γ through alternative splicing of exons 9β and 9γ located within TP53 intron 9. Here we report that both TG003, a specific inhibitor of Cdc2-like kinases (Clk) that regulates the alternative splicing pre-mRNA pathway, and knockdown of SFRS1 increase expression of endogenous p53β and p53γ at mRNA and protein levels. Development of a TP53 intron 9 minigene shows that TG003 treatment and knockdo...

  15. Alternative mRNA Splicing from the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) Gene Generates Isoforms with Distinct Subcellular mRNA Localization Patterns in Astrocytes

    Thomsen, Rune; Daugaard, Tina Fuglsang; Holm, Ida E;

    2013-01-01

    The intermediate filament network of astrocytes includes Glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap) as a major component. Gfap mRNA is alternatively spliced resulting in generation of different protein isoforms where Gfapa is the most predominant isoform. The Gfapd isoform is expressed in proliferating...... mRNA localization patterns were dependent on the different 39-exon sequences included in Gfapd and Gfapa mRNA. The presented results show that alternative Gfap mRNA splicing results in isoform-specific mRNA localization patterns with resulting different local mRNA concentration ratios which have...

  16. Linking splicing to Pol II transcription stabilizes pre-mRNAs and influences splicing patterns.

    Hicks, Martin J; Chin-Rang Yang; Matthew V Kotlajich; Hertel, Klemens J.

    2006-01-01

    RNA processing is carried out in close proximity to the site of transcription, suggesting a regulatory link between transcription and pre-mRNA splicing. Using an in vitro transcription/splicing assay, we demonstrate that an association of RNA polymerase II ( Pol II) transcription and pre-mRNA splicing is required for efficient gene expression. Pol II-synthesized RNAs containing functional splice sites are protected from nuclear degradation, presumably because the local concentration of the sp...

  17. Control of Alternative Splicing by Signal-dependent Degradation of Splicing-regulatory Proteins*S⃞

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J.; Marengo, Matthew S.; Wassarman, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a major gene expression regulatory mechanism in metazoan organisms. Proteins that bind pre-mRNA elements and control assembly of splicing complexes regulate utilization of pre-mRNA alternative splice sites. To understand how signaling pathways impact this mechanism, an RNA interference screen in Drosophila S2 cells was used to identify proteins that regulate TAF1 (TBP-associated factor 1) alternative splicing in response to activation o...

  18. Competition between Pre-mRNAs for the splicing machinery drives global regulation of splicing

    Munding, EM; Shiue, L; Katzman, S.; Donohue, J; Ares, M

    2013-01-01

    During meiosis in yeast, global splicing efficiency increases and then decreases. Here we provide evidence that splicing improves due to reduced competition for the splicing machinery. The timing of this regulation corresponds to repression and reactivation of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) during meiosis. In vegetative cells, RPG repression by rapamycin treatment also increases splicing efficiency. Downregulation of the RPG-dedicated transcription factor gene IFH1 genetically suppresses two ...

  19. Regulation of Splicing Factors by Alternative Splicing and NMD Is Conserved between Kingdoms Yet Evolutionarily Flexible

    Liana F Lareau; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraconserved elements, unusually long regions of perfect sequence identity, are found in genes encoding numerous RNA-binding proteins including arginine-serine rich (SR) splicing factors. Expression of these genes is regulated via alternative splicing of the ultraconserved regions to yield mRNAs that are degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a process termed unproductive splicing (Lareau et al. 2007; Ni et al. 2007). As all human SR genes are affected by alternative splicing and N...

  20. Evolutionary conservation of alternative splicing in chicken

    Katyal, S.; Gao, Z.; Liu, R.-Z.; R Godbout

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing represents a source of great diversity for regulating protein expression and function. It has been estimated that one-third to two-thirds of mammalian genes are alternatively spliced. With the sequencing of the chicken genome and analysis of transcripts expressed in chicken tissues, we are now in a position to address evolutionary conservation of alternative splicing events in chicken and mammals. Here, we compare chicken and mammalian transcript sequences of 41 alternati...

  1. SPA: a probabilistic algorithm for spliced alignment.

    Erik van Nimwegen; Nicodeme Paul; Robert Sheridan; Mihaela Zavolan

    2006-01-01

    Recent large-scale cDNA sequencing efforts show that elaborate patterns of splice variation are responsible for much of the proteome diversity in higher eukaryotes. To obtain an accurate account of the repertoire of splice variants, and to gain insight into the mechanisms of alternative splicing, it is essential that cDNAs are very accurately mapped to their respective genomes. Currently available algorithms for cDNA-to-genome alignment do not reach the necessary level of accuracy because the...

  2. Unproductive alternative splicing and nonsense mRNAs: A widespread phenomenon among plant circadian clock genes

    Filichkin Sergei A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent mapping of eukaryotic transcriptomes and spliceomes using massively parallel RNA sequencing (RNA-seq has revealed that the extent of alternative splicing has been considerably underestimated. Evidence also suggests that many pre-mRNAs undergo unproductive alternative splicing resulting in incorporation of in-frame premature termination codons (PTCs. The destinies and potential functions of the PTC-harboring mRNAs remain poorly understood. Unproductive alternative splicing in circadian clock genes presents a special case study because the daily oscillations of protein expression levels require rapid and steep adjustments in mRNA levels. Results We conducted a systematic survey of alternative splicing of plant circadian clock genes using RNA-seq and found that many Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock-associated genes are alternatively spliced. Results were confirmed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR, and/or Sanger sequencing. Intron retention events were frequently observed in mRNAs of the CCA1/LHY-like subfamily of MYB transcription factors. In contrast, the REVEILLE2 (RVE2 transcript was alternatively spliced via inclusion of a "poison cassette exon" (PCE. The PCE type events introducing in-frame PTCs are conserved in some mammalian and plant serine/arginine-rich splicing factors. For some circadian genes such as CCA1 the ratio of the productive isoform (i.e., a representative splice variant encoding the full-length protein to its PTC counterpart shifted sharply under specific environmental stress conditions. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that unproductive alternative splicing is a widespread phenomenon among plant circadian clock genes that frequently generates mRNA isoforms harboring in-frame PTCs. Because LHY and CCA1 are core components of the plant central circadian oscillator, the conservation of alternatively spliced variants between CCA1 and LHY

  3. Intra-domain Cross-talk Regulates Serine-arginine Protein Kinase 1-dependent Phosphorylation and Splicing Function of Transformer 2β1.

    Jamros, Michael A; Aubol, Brandon E; Keshwani, Malik M; Zhang, Zhaiyi; Stamm, Stefan; Adams, Joseph A

    2015-07-10

    Transformer 2β1 (Tra2β1) is a splicing effector protein composed of a core RNA recognition motif flanked by two arginine-serine-rich (RS) domains, RS1 and RS2. Although Tra2β1-dependent splicing is regulated by phosphorylation, very little is known about how protein kinases phosphorylate these two RS domains. We now show that the serine-arginine protein kinase-1 (SRPK1) is a regulator of Tra2β1 and promotes exon inclusion in the survival motor neuron gene 2 (SMN2). To understand how SRPK1 phosphorylates this splicing factor, we performed mass spectrometric and kinetic experiments. We found that SRPK1 specifically phosphorylates 21 serines in RS1, a process facilitated by a docking groove in the kinase domain. Although SRPK1 readily phosphorylates RS2 in a splice variant lacking the N-terminal RS domain (Tra2β3), RS1 blocks phosphorylation of these serines in the full-length Tra2β1. Thus, RS2 serves two new functions. First, RS2 positively regulates binding of the central RNA recognition motif to an exonic splicing enhancer sequence, a phenomenon reversed by SRPK1 phosphorylation on RS1. Second, RS2 enhances ligand exchange in the SRPK1 active site allowing highly efficient Tra2β1 phosphorylation. These studies demonstrate that SRPK1 is a regulator of Tra2β1 splicing function and that the individual RS domains engage in considerable cross-talk, assuming novel functions with regard to RNA binding, splicing, and SRPK1 catalysis. PMID:26013829

  4. Aberrations in asymmetrical electron lenses.

    Fitzgerald, J P S; Word, R C; Könenkamp, R

    2012-08-01

    Starting from well established knowledge in light-optics we explore the question if electron-optical aberration can be improved in asymmetrical electron lenses. We show that spherical as well as chromatic aberration coefficients are reduced in asymmetric electrostatic einzel lenses when the center electrode is moved away from the center position towards the entrance electrode. Relative improvements up to 40% for both the chromatic and the spherical aberration coefficients can be obtained. We use analytical and numerical calculations to confirm this result for exemplary cases of a lens with fixed length and working distance. The agreement of the two calculation methods is very good. We then derive an estimate for the electron-optical aberration coefficients from light-optics. The derived expressions for chromatic and spherical aberrations are somewhat simpler than the ones derived from electron-optics as they involve integrals only over the electrostatic potential, not over the electron paths. The estimated formulas still agree well with the electron optical calculations. Overall, we are tempted to suggest that the enormous knowledge base of light optics can provide considerable guidance for electron-optical applications. PMID:22206603

  5. Optimization of Peptide Nucleic Acid Antisense Oligonucleotides for Local and Systemic Dystrophin Splice Correction in the mdx Mouse

    Yin, Haifang; Betts, Corinne; Saleh, Amer F; Ivanova, Gabriela D; Lee, Hyunil; Seow, Yiqi; Kim, Dalsoo; Gait, Michael J.; Wood, Matthew JA

    2010-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) have the capacity to alter the processing of pre-mRNA transcripts in order to correct the function of aberrant disease-related genes. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle degenerative disease that arises from mutations in the DMD gene leading to an absence of dystrophin protein. AOs have been shown to restore the expression of functional dystrophin via splice correction by intramuscular and systemic delivery in animal models of DMD and ...

  6. Three new alternative splicing variants of human cytochrome P450 2D6 mRNA in human extratumoral liver tissue

    Jian Zhuge; Ying-Nian Yu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To identify the new alternative splicing variants of human CYP2D6 in human extratumoral liver tissue with RT-PCR and sequencing.METHODS: Full length of human CYP2D6 cDNAs was amplificated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from a human extratumoral liver tissue and cloned into pGEM-T vector. The cDNA was sequenced.Exons from 1 to 4 of human CYP2D6 cDNAs were also amplificated by RT-PCR from extratumoral liver tissues of17 human hepatocellular carcinomas. Some RT-PCR products were sequenced. Exons 1 to 4 of CYP2D6 gene were amplified by PCR from extratumoral liver tissue DNA.Two PCR products from extratumoral liver tissues expressing skipped mRNA were partially sequenced.RESULTS: One of the CYP2D6cDNAs had 470 nucleotides from 79 to 548 (3' portion of exons 1 to 5' portion of exon 4),and was skipped. Exons 1 to 4 of CYP2D6 cDNA were assayed with RT-PCR in 17 extratumoral liver tissues. Both wild type and skipped mRNAs were expressed in 4 samples,only wild type mRNA was expressed in 5 samples, and only skipped mRNA was expressed in 8 samples. Two more variants were identified by sequencing the RT-PCR products of exons 1 to 4 of CYP2D6cDNA. The second variant skipped 411 nucleotides from 175 to 585. This variant was identified in 4 different liver tissues by sequencing the RT-PCR products. We sequenced partially 2 of the PCR products amplified of CYP2D6 exon 1 to exon 4 from extratumoral liver tissue genomic DNA that only expressed skipped mRNA by RT-PCR. No point mutations around exon 1, intron 1, and exon 4, and no deletion in CYP2D6gene were detected. The third variant was the skipped exon 3, and 153 bp was lost.CONCLUSION: Three new alternative splicing variants of CYP2D6 mRNA have been identified. They may not be caused by gene mutation and may lose CYP2D6 activity and act as a down-regulator of CYP2D6.

  7. Alternative mRNA Splicing: Control by Combination

    Mabon, Stephen A; Tom Misteli

    2005-01-01

    Alternative splicing in mammalian cells has been suggested to be largely controlled by combinatorial binding of basal splicing factors to pre-mRNA templates. This model predicts that distinct sets of pre-mRNA splicing factors are associated with alternatively spliced transcripts. However, no experimental evidence for differential recruitment of splicing factors to transcripts with distinct splicing fates is available. Here we have used quantitative single-cell imaging to test this key predict...

  8. Identification of novel chicken estrogen receptor-alpha messenger ribonucleic acid isoforms generated by alternative splicing and promoter usage.

    Griffin, C; Flouriot, G; Sonntag-Buck, V; Nestor, P; Gannon, F

    1998-11-01

    Using the rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends (RACE) methodology we have identified three new chicken estrogen receptor-alpha (cER alpha) messenger RNA (mRNA) variants in addition to the previously described form (isoform A). Whereas one of the new variants (isoform B) presents a 5'-extremity contiguous to the 5'-end of isoform A, the two other forms (isoforms C and D) are generated by alternative splicing of upstream exons (C and D) to a common site situated 70 nucleotides upstream of the translation start site in the previously assigned exon 1 (A). The 3'-end of exon 1C has been located at position -1334 upstream of the transcription start site of the A isoform (+1). Whereas the genomic location of exon 1D is unknown, 700 bp 5' to this exon were isolated by genomic walking, and their sequence was determined. The transcription start sites of the cER alpha mRNA isoforms were defined. In transfection experiments, the regions immediately upstream of the A-D cER alpha mRNA isoforms were shown to possess cell-specific promoter activities. Three of these promoters were down-regulated in the presence of estradiol and ER alpha protein. It is concluded, therefore, that the expression of the four different cER alpha mRNA isoforms is under the control of four different promoters. Finally, RT-PCR, S1 nuclease mapping, and primer extension analysis of these different cER alpha mRNA isoforms revealed a differential pattern of expression of the cER alpha gene in chicken tissues. Together, the results suggest that alternative 5'-splicing and promoter usage may be mechanisms used to modulate the levels of expression of the chicken ER alpha gene in a tissue-specific and/or developmental stage-specific manner. PMID:9794473

  9. Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP polymorphisms affect mRNA splicing, HDL levels, and sex-dependent cardiovascular risk.

    Audrey C Papp

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in and around the Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP gene have been associated with HDL levels, risk for coronary artery disease (CAD, and response to therapy. The mechanism of action of these polymorphisms has yet to be defined. We used mRNA allelic expression and splice isoform measurements in human liver tissues to identify the genetic variants affecting CETP levels. Allelic CETP mRNA expression ratios in 56 human livers were strongly associated with several variants 2.5-7 kb upstream of the transcription start site (e.g., rs247616 p = 6.4 × 10(-5, allele frequency 33%. In addition, a common alternatively spliced CETP isoform lacking exon 9 (Δ9, has been shown to prevent CETP secretion in a dominant-negative manner. The Δ 9 expression ranged from 10 to 48% of total CETP mRNA in 94 livers. Increased formation of this isoform was exclusively associated with an exon 9 polymorphism rs5883-C>T (p = 6.8 × 10(-10 and intron 8 polymorphism rs9930761-T>C (5.6 × 10(-8 (in high linkage disequilibrium with allele frequencies 6-7%. rs9930761 changes a key splicing branch point nucleotide in intron 8, while rs5883 alters an exonic splicing enhancer sequence in exon 9.The effect of these polymorphisms was evaluated in two clinical studies. In the Whitehall II study of 4745 subjects, both rs247616 and rs5883T/rs9930761C were independently associated with increased HDL-C levels in males with similar effect size (rs247616 p = 9.6 × 10(-28 and rs5883 p = 8.6 × 10(-10, adjusted for rs247616. In an independent multiethnic US cohort of hypertensive subjects with CAD (INVEST-GENE, rs5883T/rs9930761C alone were significantly associated with increased incidence of MI, stroke, and all-cause mortality in males (rs5883: OR 2.36 (CI 1.29-4.30, p = 0.005, n = 866. These variants did not reach significance in females in either study. Similar to earlier results linking low CETP activity with poor outcomes in males, our results suggest genetic, sex

  10. Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) polymorphisms affect mRNA splicing, HDL levels, and sex-dependent cardiovascular risk.

    Papp, Audrey C; Pinsonneault, Julia K; Wang, Danxin; Newman, Leslie C; Gong, Yan; Johnson, Julie A; Pepine, Carl J; Kumari, Meena; Hingorani, Aroon D; Talmud, Philippa J; Shah, Sonia; Humphries, Steve E; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms in and around the Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) gene have been associated with HDL levels, risk for coronary artery disease (CAD), and response to therapy. The mechanism of action of these polymorphisms has yet to be defined. We used mRNA allelic expression and splice isoform measurements in human liver tissues to identify the genetic variants affecting CETP levels. Allelic CETP mRNA expression ratios in 56 human livers were strongly associated with several variants 2.5-7 kb upstream of the transcription start site (e.g., rs247616 p = 6.4 × 10(-5), allele frequency 33%). In addition, a common alternatively spliced CETP isoform lacking exon 9 (Δ9), has been shown to prevent CETP secretion in a dominant-negative manner. The Δ 9 expression ranged from 10 to 48% of total CETP mRNA in 94 livers. Increased formation of this isoform was exclusively associated with an exon 9 polymorphism rs5883-C>T (p = 6.8 × 10(-10)) and intron 8 polymorphism rs9930761-T>C (5.6 × 10(-8)) (in high linkage disequilibrium with allele frequencies 6-7%). rs9930761 changes a key splicing branch point nucleotide in intron 8, while rs5883 alters an exonic splicing enhancer sequence in exon 9.The effect of these polymorphisms was evaluated in two clinical studies. In the Whitehall II study of 4745 subjects, both rs247616 and rs5883T/rs9930761C were independently associated with increased HDL-C levels in males with similar effect size (rs247616 p = 9.6 × 10(-28) and rs5883 p = 8.6 × 10(-10), adjusted for rs247616). In an independent multiethnic US cohort of hypertensive subjects with CAD (INVEST-GENE), rs5883T/rs9930761C alone were significantly associated with increased incidence of MI, stroke, and all-cause mortality in males (rs5883: OR 2.36 (CI 1.29-4.30), p = 0.005, n = 866). These variants did not reach significance in females in either study. Similar to earlier results linking low CETP activity with poor outcomes in males, our results suggest genetic, sex

  11. Characterization of BRCA1 and BRCA2 splicing variants: a collaborative report by ENIGMA consortium members

    Thomassen, Mads; Blanco, Ana; Montagna, Marco;

    2012-01-01

    laboratories. Splicing analysis was performed by reverse transcriptase PCR or mini gene assay, and sequencing to identify aberrant transcripts. The findings were compared to bioinformatic predictions using four programs. The posterior probability of pathogenicity was estimated using multifactorial likelihood...... was initiated to evaluate and implement strategies to characterize the clinical significance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants. As an initial project of the ENIGMA Splicing Working Group, we report splicing and multifactorial likelihood analysis of 25 BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants from seven different...... analysis, including co-occurrence with a deleterious mutation, segregation and/or report of family history. Abnormal splicing patterns expected to lead to a non-functional protein were observed for 7 variants (BRCA1 c.441+2T>A, c.4184_4185+2del, c.4357+1G>A, c.4987-2A>G, c.5074G>C, BRCA2 c.316+5G>A, and c...

  12. Large-scale comparative analysis of splicing signals and their corresponding splicing factors in eukaryotes

    Schwartz, Schraga; Silva, João(CFTP, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049, Lisboa, Portugal); Burstein, David; Pupko, Tal; Eyras, Eduardo; Ast, Gil

    2008-01-01

    Introns are among the hallmarks of eukaryotic genes. Splicing of introns is directed by three main splicing signals: the 5′ splice site (5′ss), the branch site (BS), and the polypyrimdine tract/3′splice site (PPT-3′ss). To study the evolution of these splicing signals, we have conducted a systematic comparative analysis of these signals in over 1.2 million introns from 22 eukaryotes. Our analyses suggest that all these signals have dramatically evolved: The PPT is weak among most fungi, inter...

  13. Alternative splicing of the tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) gene in human and mouse tissues

    Xu, Lin; Sterner, C.; Maheshwar, M.M. [and others

    1995-06-10

    The recently isolated gene for tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) encodes a 5.5.kb transcript that is widely expressed. The TSC2 gene product, named tuberin, is a 1784-amino-acid protein that shows a small stretch of homology to the GTPase activating protein rap1GAP. We have detected a novel variant of the TSC2 mRNA lacking 129 nucleotides, predicting an in-frame deletion of 43 amino acids spanning codons 946-988 of tuberin. This 129-bp deletion precisely corresponds to exon 25 of the TSC2 gene suggesting that alternative splicing leads to production of two forms of transcripts designated isoforms 1 and 2. Further molecular analysis revealed a third isoform exhibiting a deletion of 44 amino acids spanning codons 946-989 of tuberin. Amino acid 989 is a Ser residue encoded by the first codon of exon 26. The two isoforms also exist in newborn and adult mouse tissues, reinforcing the potential functional importance of these alternatively spliced products. These alternative isoforms should have implications for efforts aimed at identifying mutations in TSC patients. The distinct polypeptides encoded by the TSC2 gene may have different targets as well as functions involved in the regulation of cell growth. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Electroporation Enhanced Effect of Dystrophin Splice Switching PNA Oligomers in Normal and Dystrophic Muscle.

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko; Hojman, Pernille; Krag, Thomas O; Nielsen, Peter E; Gehl, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a synthetic DNA mimic that has shown potential for discovery of novel splice switching antisense drugs. However, in vivo cellular delivery has been a limiting factor for development, and only few successful studies have been reported. As a possible modality for improvement of in vivo cellular availability, we have investigated the effect of electrotransfer upon intramuscular (i.m.) PNA administration in vivo. Antisense PNA targeting exon 23 of the murine dystrophin gene was administered by i.m. injection to the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of normal NMRI and dystrophic mdx mice with or without electroporation. At low, single PNA doses (1.5, 3, or 10 µg/TA), electroporation augmented the antisense exon skipping induced by an unmodified PNA by twofold to fourfold in healthy mouse muscle with optimized electric parameters, measured after 7 days. The PNA splice switching was detected at the RNA level up to 4 weeks after a single-dose treatment. In dystrophic muscles of the MDX mouse, electroporation increased the number of dystrophin-positive fibers about 2.5-fold at 2 weeks after a single PNA administration compared to injection only. In conclusion, we find that electroporation can enhance PNA antisense effects in muscle tissue. PMID:26623939

  15. Familial glucocorticoid resistance caused by a splice site deletion in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene

    Karl, M.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Encio, I.J.; Stratakis, C.A.; Hurley, D.M.; Accili, D.; Chrousos, G.P. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States) Erasmus Univ. of Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1993-03-01

    The clinical syndrome of generalized, compensated glucocorticoid resistance is characterized by increased cortisol secretion without clinical evidence of hyper- or hypocortisolism, and manifestations of androgen and/or mineralocorticoid excess. This condition results from partial failure of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to modulate transcription of its target genes. The authors studied the molecular mechanisms of this syndrome in a Dutch kindred, whose affected members had hypercortisolism and approximately half of normal GRs, and whose proband was a young woman with manifestations of hyperandrogenism. Using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify and sequence each of the nine exons of the GR gene [alpha], along with their 5[prime]- and 3[prime]-flanking regions, the authors identified a 4-base deletion at the 3[prime]-boundary of exon 6 in one GR allele ([Delta][sub 4]), which removed a donor splice site in all three affected members studied. In contrast, the sequence of exon 6 in the two unaffected siblings was normal. A single nucleotide substitution causing an amino acid substitution in the amino terminal domain of the GR (asparagine to serine, codon 363) was also discovered in exon 2 of the other allele (G[sub 1220]) in the proband, in one of her affected brothers and in her unaffected sister. This deletion in the glucocorticoid receptor gene was associated with the expression of only one allele and a decrease of GR protein by 50% in affected members of this glucocorticoid resistant family. The mutation identified in exon 2 did not segregate with the disease and appears to be of no functional significance. The presence of the null allele was apparently compensated for by increased cortisol production at the expense of concurrent hyperandrogenism. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields.

    Harvey, J E; Shack, R V

    1978-09-15

    This paper is an attempt to provide new insight into the behavior of near-field scalar diffraction phenomena by showing that the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral is equivalent to the Fourier transform integral of a generalized pupil function which includes a term that represents phase errors in the aperture. This term can be interpreted as describing a conventional wavefront aberration function. The resulting aberration coefficients are calculated and expressed in terms of the aperture diameter, observation distance, and appropriate field parameter for several different geometrical configurations of incident beam and observation space. These aberrations, which are inherently associated with the diffraction process, are precisely the effects ignored when making the usual Fresnel and Fraunhofer approximations. PMID:20203910

  17. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  18. Intronic L1 retrotransposons and nested genes cause transcriptional interference by inducing intron retention, exonization and cryptic polyadenylation.

    Kristel Kaer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcriptional interference has been recently recognized as an unexpectedly complex and mostly negative regulation of genes. Despite a relatively few studies that emerged in recent years, it has been demonstrated that a readthrough transcription derived from one gene can influence the transcription of another overlapping or nested gene. However, the molecular effects resulting from this interaction are largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using in silico chromosome walking, we searched for prematurely terminated transcripts bearing signatures of intron retention or exonization of intronic sequence at their 3' ends upstream to human L1 retrotransposons, protein-coding and noncoding nested genes. We demonstrate that transcriptional interference induced by intronic L1s (or other repeated DNAs and nested genes could be characterized by intron retention, forced exonization and cryptic polyadenylation. These molecular effects were revealed from the analysis of endogenous transcripts derived from different cell lines and tissues and confirmed by the expression of three minigenes in cell culture. While intron retention and exonization were comparably observed in introns upstream to L1s, forced exonization was preferentially detected in nested genes. Transcriptional interference induced by L1 or nested genes was dependent on the presence or absence of cryptic splice sites, affected the inclusion or exclusion of the upstream exon and the use of cryptic polyadenylation signals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that transcriptional interference induced by intronic L1s and nested genes could influence the transcription of the large number of genes in normal as well as in tumor tissues. Therefore, this type of interference could have a major impact on the regulation of the host gene expression.

  19. Identification of a third region of cell-specific alternative splicing in human fibronectin mRNA

    The authors describe here a third region of variability in human fibronectin (FN) due to alternative RNA splicing. Two other positions of alternative splicing have been reported previously (ED and IIICS). The third region involves a 273-nucleotide exon encoding exactly one 91-amino acid repeat of type III homology, located between the DNA- and the cell-binding domains of FN, which is either included in or excluded from FN mRNA. The two mRNA variants arising by an exon-skipping mechanism are present in cells known to synthesize the cellular form of FN. However, liver cells, which are the source of plasma FN, produce only messengers without the extra type III sequence. Therefore, the region described here resembles, both structurally and functionally, the previously described ED (for extra domain) region, located toward the C terminus of the molecule between the cell- and heparin- (hep 2) binding domains. The authors conclude that both the extra type III repeat (names EDII) and ED represent sequences restricted to cellular FN. Combination of all the possible patterns of splicing in the three regions described to date may generate up to 20 distinct FN polypeptides from a single gene

  20. PrimerSeq:Design and Visualization of RT-PCR Primers for Alternative Splicing Using RNA-seq Data

    Collin Tokheim; Juw Won Park; Yi Xing

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of multi-exon genes in higher eukaryotes are alternatively spliced and changes in alternative splicing (AS) can impact gene function or cause disease. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has become a powerful technology for transcriptome-wide analysis of AS, but RT-PCR still remains the gold-standard approach for quantifying and validating exon splicing levels. We have developed PrimerSeq, a user-friendly software for systematic design and visualization of RT-PCR primers using RNA-seq data. PrimerSeq incorporates user-provided tran-scriptome profiles (i.e., RNA-seq data) in the design process, and is particularly useful for large-scale quantitative analysis of AS events discovered from RNA-seq experiments. PrimerSeq features a graphical user interface (GUI) that displays the RNA-seq data juxtaposed with the expected RT-PCR results. To enable primer design and visualization on user-provided RNA-seq data and transcript annotations, we have developed PrimerSeq as a stand-alone software that runs on local computers. PrimerSeq is freely available for Windows and Mac OS X along with source code at http://primerseq.sourceforge.net/. With the growing popularity of RNA-seq for transcriptome stud-ies, we expect PrimerSeq to help bridge the gap between high-throughput RNA-seq discovery of AS events and molecular analysis of candidate events by RT-PCR.

  1. A Splice Defect in the EDA Gene in Dogs with an X-Linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia (XLHED) Phenotype.

    Waluk, Dominik P; Zur, Gila; Kaufmann, Ronnie; Welle, Monika M; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord; Müller, Eliane J; Leeb, Tosso; Galichet, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) caused by variants in the EDA gene represents the most common ectodermal dysplasia in humans. We investigated three male mixed-breed dogs with an ectodermal dysplasia phenotype characterized by marked hypotrichosis and multifocal complete alopecia, almost complete absence of sweat and sebaceous glands, and altered dentition with missing and abnormally shaped teeth. Analysis of SNP chip genotypes and whole genome sequence data from the three affected dogs revealed that the affected dogs shared the same haplotype on a large segment of the X-chromosome, including the EDA gene. Unexpectedly, the whole genome sequence data did not reveal any nonsynonymous EDA variant in the affected dogs. We therefore performed an RNA-seq experiment on skin biopsies to search for changes in the transcriptome. This analysis revealed that the EDA transcript in the affected dogs lacked 103 nucleotides encoded by exon 2. We speculate that this exon skipping is caused by a genetic variant located in one of the large introns flanking this exon, which was missed by whole genome sequencing with the illumina short read technology. The altered EDA transcript splicing most likely causes the observed ectodermal dysplasia in the affected dogs. These dogs thus offer an excellent opportunity to gain insights into the complex splicing processes required for expression of the EDA gene, and other genes with large introns. PMID:27449516

  2. Tissue specific expression of the splice variants of the mouse vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase a4 subunit

    We have identified splicing variants of the mouse a4 subunit which have the same open reading frame but have a different 5'-noncoding sequence. Further determination of the 5'-upstream region of the a4 gene in mouse indicated the presence of two first exons (exon 1a and exon 1b) which include the 5'-noncoding sequence of each variant. The mRNAs of both splicing variants (a4-I and a4-II) show a similar expression pattern in mouse kidney by in situ hybridization. However, tissue and developmental expression patterns of the variants are different. In addition to strong expression in kidney, a4-I expression was detected in heart, lung, skeletal muscle, and testis, whereas a4-II is expressed in lung, liver, and testis. During development, a4-I was expressed beginning with the early embryonic stage, but a4-II mRNA was detected from day17. These results suggest that each a4 variant has both a tissue and developmental stage specific function

  3. Evaluation of a 5-tier scheme proposed for classification of sequence variants using bioinformatic and splicing assay data: inter-reviewer variability and promotion of minimum reporting guidelines.

    Walker, Logan C; Whiley, Phillip J; Houdayer, Claude; Hansen, Thomas V O; Vega, Ana; Santamarina, Marta; Blanco, Ana; Fachal, Laura; Southey, Melissa C; Lafferty, Alan; Colombo, Mara; De Vecchi, Giovanna; Radice, Paolo; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2013-10-01

    Splicing assays are commonly undertaken in the clinical setting to assess the clinical relevance of sequence variants in disease predisposition genes. A 5-tier classification system incorporating both bioinformatic and splicing assay information was previously proposed as a method to provide consistent clinical classification of such variants. Members of the ENIGMA Consortium Splicing Working Group undertook a study to assess the applicability of the scheme to published assay results, and the consistency of classifications across multiple reviewers. Splicing assay data were identified for 235 BRCA1 and 176 BRCA2 unique variants, from 77 publications. At least six independent reviewers from research and/or clinical settings comprehensively examined splicing assay methods and data reported for 22 variant assays of 21 variants in four publications, and classified the variants using the 5-tier classification scheme. Inconsistencies in variant classification occurred between reviewers for 17 of the variant assays. These could be attributed to a combination of ambiguity in presentation of the classification criteria, differences in interpretation of the data provided, nonstandardized reporting of results, and the lack of quantitative data for the aberrant transcripts. We propose suggestions for minimum reporting guidelines for splicing assays, and improvements to the 5-tier splicing classification system to allow future evaluation of its performance as a clinical tool. PMID:23893897

  4. Enzyme activity analysis of CYP2C18 with exon 5 skipped

    Jian ZHU-GE; Ying-nian YU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the enzyme activity of CYP2C18 variant with exon 5 skipped. METHODS: A full length CYP2C18 cDNA X1 and an exon 5 skipped variant CYP2C18 X2 were separately subcloned into mammalian expression vector pREP9 to transfect HepG2 cells. The expression of CYP2C 18 mRNA in transgenic cells and human liver tissues were determined by RT-PCR. The enzyme activity of CYP2C18 to oxidate tolbutamide in postmitochondrial supernate (S9) fraction was determined by HPLC. The cytotoxicity of ifosfamide to transgenic cells was evaluated by MTT test. RESULTS: HepG2-CYP2C18 X1 cells showed strong expression of the full length CYP2C18 mRNA.On the other hand, HepG2-CYP2C 18 X2 cells had only infinitesimal expression of the exon-skipped CYP2C 18 as well as the full length CYP2C 18, while non-transfected HepG2 cell only demonstrated an infinitesimal expression of the full length CYP2C 18. The expression of CYP2C 18 exons 2 to 7 was also analyzed by RT-PCR in 7 extratumoral liver tissues. Among them, 3 samples expressed only wild type mRNA, whereas 4 samples expressed both wild type and alternative splicing products. The tolbutamide hydroxylase activity of CYP2C 18 was tested, and it was shown that HepG2-2C18 X1 cells had higher enzyme activity than those of HepG2-2C18 X2 and HepG2 cells. The relative survival of HepG2-CYP2C 18 X1 cells was lower than that of HepG2 cells with 1, 2, and 4 mmol/L ifosfamide treatments. In contrast, the relative survival of HepG2-CYP2C 18 X2 cell was the same as that of HepG2 cell in 0.5 and 1 mmol/L of ifosfamide, but lower than that of HepG2 cell in 2 and 4 mmol/L of ifosfamide. CONCLUSION:CYP2C 18 X 1 could metabolize tolbutamide and ifosfamide efficiently. The exon 5-skipped CYP2C 18 X2 could not metabolize tolbutamide, and could not metabolize ifosfamide effectively at low concentrations.

  5. Deletions in cox2 mRNA result in loss of splicing and RNA editing and gain of novel RNA editing sites.

    Stefanie Grüttner

    Full Text Available As previously demonstrated, the maize cox2 RNA is fully edited in cauliflower mitochondria. Use of constructs with a deleted cox2 intron, however, led to a loss of RNA editing at almost all editing sites, with only a few sites still partially edited. Likewise, one deletion in exon 1 and three in exon 2 abolish RNA editing at all cox2 sites analyzed. Furthermore, intron splicing is abolished using these deletions. Mutation of a cytosine residue, which is normally edited and localized directly adjacent to the intron, to thymidine did not result in restoration of splicing, indicating that the loss of splicing was not due to loss of RNA editing. One deletion in exon 2 did not lead to loss of splicing. Instead, most editing sites were found to be edited, only three were not edited. Unexpectedly, we observed additional RNA editing events at new sites. Thus it appears that deletions in the cox2 RNA sequence can have a strong effect on RNA processing, leading to loss of splicing, loss of editing at all sites, or even to a gain of new editing sites. As these effects are not limited to the vicinity of the respective deletions, but appear to be widespread or even affect all editing sites, they may not be explained by the loss of PPR binding sites. Instead, it appears that several parts of the cox2 transcript are required for proper RNA processing. This indicates the roles of the RNA sequence and structural elements in the recognition of the editing sites.

  6. A duchenne muscular dystrophy gene hot spot mutation in dystrophin-deficient cavalier king charles spaniels is amenable to exon 51 skipping.

    Gemma L Walmsley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, which afflicts 1 in 3500 boys, is one of the most common genetic disorders of children. This fatal degenerative condition is caused by an absence or deficiency of dystrophin in striated muscle. Most affected patients have inherited or spontaneous deletions in the dystrophin gene that disrupt the reading frame resulting in unstable truncated products. For these patients, restoration of the reading frame via antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach. The major DMD deletion "hot spot" is found between exons 45 and 53, and skipping exon 51 in particular is predicted to ameliorate the dystrophic phenotype in the greatest number of patients. Currently the mdx mouse is the most widely used animal model of DMD, although its mild phenotype limits its suitability in clinical trials. The Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD model has a severe phenotype, but due to its large size, is expensive to use. Both these models have mutations in regions of the dystrophin gene distant from the commonly mutated DMD "hot spot". METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe the severe phenotype, histopathological findings, and molecular analysis of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy (CKCS-MD. The dogs harbour a missense mutation in the 5' donor splice site of exon 50 that results in deletion of exon 50 in mRNA transcripts and a predicted premature truncation of the translated protein. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated skipping of exon 51 in cultured myoblasts from an affected dog restored the reading frame and protein expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Given the small size of the breed, the amiable temperament and the nature of the mutation, we propose that CKCS-MD is a valuable new model for clinical trials of antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping and other therapeutic approaches for DMD.

  7. A TALEN-Exon Skipping Design for a Bethlem Myopathy Model in Zebrafish.

    Zlatko Radev

    Full Text Available Presently, human collagen VI-related diseases such as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD and Bethlem myopathy (BM remain incurable, emphasizing the need to unravel their etiology and improve their treatments. In UCMD, symptom onset occurs early, and both diseases aggravate with ageing. In zebrafish fry, morpholinos reproduced early UCMD and BM symptoms but did not allow to study the late phenotype. Here, we produced the first zebrafish line with the human mutation frequently found in collagen VI-related disorders such as UCMD and BM. We used a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN to design the col6a1ama605003-line with a mutation within an essential splice donor site, in intron 14 of the col6a1 gene, which provoke an in-frame skipping of exon 14 in the processed mRNA. This mutation at a splice donor site is the first example of a template-independent modification of splicing induced in zebrafish using a targetable nuclease. This technique is readily expandable to other organisms and can be instrumental in other disease studies. Histological and ultrastructural analyzes of homozygous and heterozygous mutant fry and 3 months post-fertilization (mpf fish revealed co-dominantly inherited abnormal myofibers with disorganized myofibrils, enlarged sarcoplasmic reticulum, altered mitochondria and misaligned sarcomeres. Locomotion analyzes showed hypoxia-response behavior in 9 mpf col6a1 mutant unseen in 3 mpf fish. These symptoms worsened with ageing as described in patients with collagen VI deficiency. Thus, the col6a1ama605003-line is the first adult zebrafish model of collagen VI-related diseases; it will be instrumental both for basic research and drug discovery assays focusing on this type of disorders.

  8. A TALEN-Exon Skipping Design for a Bethlem Myopathy Model in Zebrafish.

    Radev, Zlatko; Hermel, Jean-Michel; Elipot, Yannick; Bretaud, Sandrine; Arnould, Sylvain; Duchateau, Philippe; Ruggiero, Florence; Joly, Jean-Stéphane; Sohm, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Presently, human collagen VI-related diseases such as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM) remain incurable, emphasizing the need to unravel their etiology and improve their treatments. In UCMD, symptom onset occurs early, and both diseases aggravate with ageing. In zebrafish fry, morpholinos reproduced early UCMD and BM symptoms but did not allow to study the late phenotype. Here, we produced the first zebrafish line with the human mutation frequently found in collagen VI-related disorders such as UCMD and BM. We used a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) to design the col6a1ama605003-line with a mutation within an essential splice donor site, in intron 14 of the col6a1 gene, which provoke an in-frame skipping of exon 14 in the processed mRNA. This mutation at a splice donor site is the first example of a template-independent modification of splicing induced in zebrafish using a targetable nuclease. This technique is readily expandable to other organisms and can be instrumental in other disease studies. Histological and ultrastructural analyzes of homozygous and heterozygous mutant fry and 3 months post-fertilization (mpf) fish revealed co-dominantly inherited abnormal myofibers with disorganized myofibrils, enlarged sarcoplasmic reticulum, altered mitochondria and misaligned sarcomeres. Locomotion analyzes showed hypoxia-response behavior in 9 mpf col6a1 mutant unseen in 3 mpf fish. These symptoms worsened with ageing as described in patients with collagen VI deficiency. Thus, the col6a1ama605003-line is the first adult zebrafish model of collagen VI-related diseases; it will be instrumental both for basic research and drug discovery assays focusing on this type of disorders. PMID:26221953

  9. Molecular characterization of metastatic exon 11 mutant gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) beyond KIT/PDGFRα genotype evaluated by next generation sequencing (NGS)

    Saponara, Maristella; Urbini, Milena; Astolfi, Annalisa; Indio, Valentina; Ercolani, Giorgio; Del Gaudio, Massimo; Santini, Donatella; Pirini, Maria Giulia; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Nannini, Margherita; Lolli, Cristian; Mandrioli, Anna; GATTO, LIDIA; Brandi, Giovanni; Biasco, Guido

    2015-01-01

    About 85% of GISTs are associated with KIT and PDGFRα gene mutations, which predict response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Although the outcomes in patients affected by GIST have dramatically improved, tumor progression control still remains a challenge. The aim of this study is the genomic characterization of individual metastatic KIT-exon 11-mutant GIST to identify additional aberrations and simultaneous molecular events representing potential therapeutic targets. Seven patients with metas...

  10. Alternative splicing of interleukin-33 and type 2 inflammation in asthma.

    Gordon, Erin D; Simpson, Laura J; Rios, Cydney L; Ringel, Lando; Lachowicz-Scroggins, Marrah E; Peters, Michael C; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Gonzalez, Jeanmarie R; MacLeod, Hannah J; Christian, Laura S; Yuan, Shaopeng; Barry, Liam; Woodruff, Prescott G; Ansel, K Mark; Nocka, Karl; Seibold, Max A; Fahy, John V

    2016-08-01

    Type 2 inflammation occurs in a large subgroup of asthmatics, and novel cytokine-directed therapies are being developed to treat this population. In mouse models, interleukin-33 (IL-33) activates lung resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells (ILC2s) to initiate airway type 2 inflammation. In human asthma, which is chronic and difficult to model, the role of IL-33 and the target cells responsible for persistent type 2 inflammation remain undefined. Full-length IL-33 is a nuclear protein and may function as an "alarmin" during cell death, a process that is uncommon in chronic stable asthma. We demonstrate a previously unidentified mechanism of IL-33 activity that involves alternative transcript splicing, which may operate in stable asthma. In human airway epithelial cells, alternative splicing of the IL-33 transcript is consistently present, and the deletion of exons 3 and 4 (Δ exon 3,4) confers cytoplasmic localization and facilitates extracellular secretion, while retaining signaling capacity. In nonexacerbating asthmatics, the expression of Δ exon 3,4 is strongly associated with airway type 2 inflammation, whereas full-length IL-33 is not. To further define the extracellular role of IL-33 in stable asthma, we sought to determine the cellular targets of its activity. Comprehensive flow cytometry and RNA sequencing of sputum cells suggest basophils and mast cells, not ILC2s, are the cellular sources of type 2 cytokines in chronic asthma. We conclude that IL-33 isoforms activate basophils and mast cells to drive type 2 inflammation in chronic stable asthma, and novel IL-33 inhibitors will need to block all biologically active isoforms. PMID:27432971

  11. Spliced

    Addison, Courtney Page

    2016-01-01

    Human gene therapy (HGT) aims to cure disease by inserting or editing the DNA of patients with genetic conditions. Since foundational genetic techniques came into use in the 1970s, the field has developed to the point that now three therapies have market approval, and over 1800 clinical trials have......-work stretches out from science to enlist diverse publics, social formations and the natural world in the pursuit of legitimacy....

  12. Position dependence of the rous sarcoma virus negative regulator of splicing element reflects proximity to a 5' splice site

    Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) requires incomplete splicing of its viral transcripts to maintain efficient replication. A splicing inhibitor element, the negative regulator of splicing (NRS), is located near the 5' end of the RNA but the significance of this positioning is not known. In a heterologous intron the NRS functions optimally when positioned close to the authentic 5' splice site. This observation led us to investigate the basis of the position dependence. Four explanations were put forth and stressed the role of three major elements involved in splicing, the 3' splice site, the 5' splice site, and the 5' end cap structure. NRS function was unrelated to its position relative to the 3' splice site or the cap structure and appeared to depend on its position relative to the authentic 5' splice site. We conclude that position dependence may reflect distance constraints necessary for competition of the NRS with the authentic 5' splice site for pairing with the 3' splice sites

  13. Splicing mutation of a gene within the Duchenne muscular dystrophy family.

    Zhu, Y B; Gan, J H; Luo, J W; Zheng, X Y; Wei, S C; Hu, D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the mutation site and phenotype of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene in a DMD family. The DMD gene is by far the largest known gene in humans. Up to 34% of the point mutations reported to date affect splice sites of the DMD gene. However, no hotspot mutation has been reported. Capture sequencing of second-generation exons was used to investigate the DMD gene in a proband. Sanger sequencing was performed for mutation scanning in eight family members. Scale-invariant feature transform and PolyPhen were applied to predict the functional impact of protein mutations. A hemizygous splicing mutation IVS44ds +1G-A (c.6438 +1G>A) that induces abnormal splicing variants during late transcription and produces abnormal proteins was located in intron 44. Four missense mutations (p.Arg2937Gln, p.Asp882Gly, p.Lys2366Gln, and p.Arg1745His) that are known multiple-polymorphic sites were found in the coding region of the DMD gene. A heterozygous c.6438+1G>A mutation was detected on the X chromosome of the proband's mother and maternal grandmother. PMID:27421007

  14. Changes in Alternative Splicing in Apis Mellifera Bees Fed Apis Cerana Royal Jelly

    Shi Yuan Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Western honey bee (Apis mellifera is a social insect characterized by caste differentiation in which the queen bee and worker bees display marked differences in morphology, behavior, reproduction, and longevity despite their identical genomes. The main causative factor in caste differentiation is the food fed to queen larvae, termed royal jelly (RJ. Alternative splicing (AS is an important RNA-mediated post-transcriptional process in eukaryotes. Here we report AS changes in A. mellifera after being fed either A. mellifera RJ or A. cerana RJ. The results demonstrated that the RJ type affected 4 types of AS in adult A. mellifera: exon skipping, intron retention, alternative 5’ splice sites, and alternative 3’splice sites. After feeding with A. cerana RJ, AS occurred in many genes in adult A. mellifera that encode proteins involved in development, growth, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and substance metabolism. This study provides the first evidence that heterospecific RJ can influence the AS of many genes related to honey bee development and growth.

  15. Cancer-associated splicing variant of tumor suppressor AIMP2/p38: pathological implication in tumorigenesis.

    Jin Woo Choi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although ARS-interacting multifunctional protein 2 (AIMP2, also named as MSC p38 was first found as a component for a macromolecular tRNA synthetase complex, it was recently discovered to dissociate from the complex and work as a potent tumor suppressor. Upon DNA damage, AIMP2 promotes apoptosis through the protective interaction with p53. However, it was not demonstrated whether AIMP2 was indeed pathologically linked to human cancer. In this work, we found that a splicing variant of AIMP2 lacking exon 2 (AIMP2-DX2 is highly expressed by alternative splicing in human lung cancer cells and patient's tissues. AIMP2-DX2 compromised pro-apoptotic activity of normal AIMP2 through the competitive binding to p53. The cells with higher level of AIMP2-DX2 showed higher propensity to form anchorage-independent colonies and increased resistance to cell death. Mice constitutively expressing this variant showed increased susceptibility to carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. The expression ratio of AIMP2-DX2 to normal AIMP2 was increased according to lung cancer stage and showed a positive correlation with the survival of patients. Thus, this work identified an oncogenic splicing variant of a tumor suppressor, AIMP2/p38, and suggests its potential for anti-cancer target.

  16. Class I self-splicing introns are found in the T-even bacteriophage family

    The thymidylate synthase gene (td) and ribonucleotide reductase B2 subunit gene (nrdB) EMBO both of bacteriophage T4 in origin, are procaryotic intron-containing protein-encoding genes. To screen for other procaryotic introns, southern hybridization analysis of several procaryotic genomes was carried out, using T4 phage td DNA restriction fragments and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides defining strategic td exon and intron regions. Furthermore, the labeling pattern of total RNA with [α-32P]GTP, a typical reaction of self-splicing RNAs (class I), was examined. Experimental data implicate multiple self-splicing introns only in the T-even phages: five (1, 0.9, 0.83, 0.75 and 0.6 kb) in T4 and three (1, 0.9 and 0.75 kb) each in T2 and T6 phages. Northern hybridization analysis of total RNA extracted from T-even phage-infected cells confirms that the 1 kb RNA from each phage is in fact the excised intron segment from the precursor RNA transcribed from an intron-containing td gene in each case. This RNA cyclizes to form a contiguous circular molecule. The 0.6 kb RNA is most likely the T4 phage nrdB intron which seems to be absent from the corresponding gene in T2 and T6. The remaining RNA species are candidates for other self-splicing introns in these phages

  17. Splice-mediated insertion of an Alu sequence inactivates ornithine δ-aminotransferase: A role for Alu elements in human mutation

    In studies of mutations causing deficiency of ornithine δ-aminotransferase the authors found an allele whose mature mRNA has a 142-nucleotide insertion at the junction of sequences from exons 3 and 4. The insert derives from an Alu element in ornithine δ-aminotransferase intron 3 oriented in the direction opposite to transcription (an antisense Alu). A guanine → cytosine transversion creates a donor splice site in this Alu, activating a cryptic acceptor splice site at its 5' end and causing splice-mediated insertion of an Alu fragment into the mature ornithine-δ-aminotransferase mRNA. The authors note that the complement of the Alu consensus sequence has at least two cryptic acceptor sites and several potential donor sequences and predict that similar mutations will be found in other genes

  18. Cytokines interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha regulate different transcriptional and alternative splicing networks in primary beta-cells

    Ortis, Fernanda; Naamane, Najib; Flamez, Daisy;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cytokines contribute to pancreatic beta-cell death in type 1 diabetes. This effect is mediated by complex gene networks that remain to be characterized. We presently utilized array analysis to define the global expression pattern of genes, including spliced variants, modified by the...... expression of genes involved in the maintenance of beta-cell phenotype and growth/regeneration. Cytokines induced hypoxia-inducible factor-alpha, which in this context has a proapoptotic role. Cytokines also modified the expression of >20 genes involved in RNA splicing, and exon array analysis showed...... cytokine-induced changes in alternative splicing of >50% of the cytokine-modified genes. CONCLUSIONS: The present study doubles the number of known genes expressed in primary beta-cells, modified or not by cytokines, and indicates the biological role for several novel cytokine-modified pathways in beta...

  19. Dynamics of co-transcriptional pre-mRNA folding influences the induction of dystrophin exon skipping by antisense oligonucleotides.

    Keng Boon Wee

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs mediated exon skipping offers potential therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, the identification of effective AON target sites remains unsatisfactory for lack of a precise method to predict their binding accessibility. This study demonstrates the importance of co-transcriptional pre-mRNA folding in determining the accessibility of AON target sites for AON induction of selective exon skipping in DMD. Because transcription and splicing occur in tandem, AONs must bind to their target sites before splicing factors. Furthermore, co-transcriptional pre-mRNA folding forms transient secondary structures, which redistributes accessible binding sites. In our analysis, to approximate transcription elongation, a "window of analysis" that included the entire targeted exon was shifted one nucleotide at a time along the pre-mRNA. Possible co-transcriptional secondary structures were predicted using the sequence in each step of transcriptional analysis. A nucleotide was considered "engaged" if it formed a complementary base pairing in all predicted secondary structures of a particular step. Correlation of frequency and localisation of engaged nucleotides in AON target sites accounted for the performance (efficacy and efficiency of 94% of 176 previously reported AONs. Four novel insights are inferred: (1 the lowest frequencies of engaged nucleotides are associated with the most efficient AONs; (2 engaged nucleotides at 3' or 5' ends of the target site attenuate AON performance more than at other sites; (3 the performance of longer AONs is less attenuated by engaged nucleotides at 3' or 5' ends of the target site compared to shorter AONs; (4 engaged nucleotides at 3' end of a short target site attenuates AON efficiency more than at 5' end.

  20. Identification of a novel splice variant of human PD-L1 Mrna encoding an isoform-lacking Igv-like domain

    Xian-hui HE; Li-hui XU; Yi LIU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the expression and regulation of PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods: The cDNA encoding human PD-L1 precursor was cloned from the total RNA extracted from the resting and phorbol dibutyrate plus ionomycin- or phytohemagglutinin-activated PBMC, by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and independent clones were sequenced and analyzed. The expression and subcellular localization were examined in transiently transfected cells. The PD-L1 gene expression in different PBMC was also analyzed by RT-PCR. Results: A novel human PD-L1 splice variant was identified from the activated PBMC. It was generated by splicing out exon 2 encoding an immunoglobulin variable domain (Igv)-like domain but retaining all other exons without a frame-shift. Consequently, the putative translated protein contained all other domains including the transmembrane region except for the Igv-like domain. Furthermore, the conventional isoform was expressed on the plasma surface whereas the novel isoform showed a pattern of intmcellular membrane distribution in transiently transfected K562 cells. In addition, the expression pattern of the PD-L1 splice variant was variable in different individuals and in different cellular status. Conclusion: PD-L1 expression may be regulated at the posttranscriptional level through alternative splicing, and modulation of the PD-L1 isoform expression may influence the outcome of specific immune responses in the peripheral tissues.