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Sample records for abernathy creek washington

  1. Natural Reproductive Success and Demographic Effects of Hatchery-Origin Steelhead in Abernathy Creek, Washington : Annual Report 2008.

    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Abernathy Fish Technology Center

    2008-12-01

    Many hatchery programs for steelhead pose genetic or ecological risks to natural populations because those programs release or outplant fish from non-native stocks. The goal of many steelhead programs has been to simply provide 'fishing opportunities' with little consideration given to conservation concerns. For example, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has widely propagated and outplanted one stock of winter-run steelhead (Chambers Creek stock) and one stock of summer-run steelhead (Skamania stock) throughout western Washington. Biologists and managers now recognize potential negative effects can occur when non-native hatchery fish interact biologically with native populations. Not only do non-native stocks pose genetic and ecological risks to naturally spawning populations, but non-native fish stray as returning adults at a much higher rate than do native fish (Quinn 1993). Biologists and managers also recognize the need to (a) maintain the genetic resources associated with naturally spawning populations and (b) restore or recover natural populations wherever possible. As a consequence, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the NOAA Fisheries have been recommending a general policy that discourages the use of non-native hatchery stocks and encourages development of native broodstocks. There are two primary motivations for these recommendations: (1) reduce or minimize potential negative biological effects resulting from genetic or ecological interactions between hatchery-origin and native-origin fish and (2) use native broodstocks as genetic repositories to potentially assist with recovery of naturally spawning populations. A major motivation for the captive-rearing work described in this report resulted from NOAA's 1998 Biological Opinion on Artificial Propagation in the Columbia River Basin. In that biological opinion (BO), NOAA concluded that non-native hatchery stocks of steelhead jeopardize the continued existence of

  2. Asotin Creek model watershed plan: Asotin County, Washington

    The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ''Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ''four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ''Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity

  3. Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.

    Browne, Dave

    1995-04-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

  4. Coal resources of a portion of the Pawpaw Creek watershed, Monroe, Noble, and Washington Counties

    Struble, R.A.; Collins, H.R.; DeLong, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    A coal-resource evaluation of a portion of the Pawpaw Creek watershed was undertaken to provide data on which to base future land-use decisions for the area. An earlier investigation (Struble, et al., 1971) suggested strongly that a large resource of coal existed beneath portions of Monroe, Morgan, Noble, and Washington Counties, Ohio. The Pawpaw Creek area of investigation lies within this potential coal-resource area. Core borings in the watershed area verified the existence of a potential underground mineable coal resource - Middle Kittanning (No. 6) and Lower Kittanning (No. 5) coals - in the Pawpaw Creek area of investigation. A strippable coal resource - Meigs Creek (No. 9) - is also present in the watershed area. The strippable coal-resource estimates for the watershed are reported in three thickness categories, two overburden categories, and two reliability categories. The same thickness categories, along with three reliability categories, are used in reporting the underground mineable resource. Analyses were performed for all coals of mineable thickness and include data on major, minor, and trace elements in the coal ash and major, minor, and trace elements in the whole coal. Standard quality data such as proximate and ultimate analyses, ash and sulfur content, forms of sulfur, and Btu are given also. 8 figures, 8 tables.

  5. Outline of the water resources of the Status Creek basin, Yakima Indian Reservation, Washington

    Molenaar, Dee

    1976-01-01

    On the Yakima Indian Reservation, Washington, only about 5 percent of the Satus Creek basin--in the relatively flat eastern lowland adjacent to and including part of the Yakima River lowland--is agriculturally developed, mostly through irrigation. Because the basin 's streams do not contain adequate water for irrigation, most irrigation is by canal diversion from the adjoining Toppenish Creek basin. Irrigation application of as much as 9.25 acre-feet per acre per year, combined with the presence of poorly drained silt and clay layers in this area, and the natural upward discharge of ground water from deeper aquifers (water-bearing layers), has contributed to a waterlogging problem, which has affected about 10,500 acres, or about 25 percent of the irrigated area. In the upland of the basin, a large average annual base flow of about 30 cubic feet per second in Logy Creek indicates the presence of a potentially highly productive aquifer in young (shallow) basalt lavas underlying the higher western parts of the upland. This aquifer may provide a reservoir from which streamflow may be augmented by ground-water pumping or, alternatively, it may be used as a source of ground water for irrigation of upland areas directly. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Naturally Occurring Asbestos in Washington State: Swift Creek at the Intersection of Science, Law, and Risk Perception

    Melious, J. O.

    2012-12-01

    In the northwestern corner of Washington state, a large landslide on Sumas Mountain deposits more than 100,000 cubic yards of soil containing asbestos fibers and heavy metals into Swift Creek every year. Engineers predict that asbestos-laden soils will slide into Swift Creek for at least the next 400 years. Swift Creek joins the Sumas River, which crosses the border into Canada, serving as an international delivery system for asbestos-laden soils. When the rivers flood, as happens regularly, they deliver asbestos into field, yards, and basements. The tools available to address the Swift Creek situation are at odds with the scope and nature of the problem. Asbestos regulation primarily addresses occupational settings, where exposures can be estimated. Hazardous waste regulation primarily addresses liability for abandoned waste products from human activities. Health and environmental issues relating to naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) are fundamentally different from either regulatory scheme. Liability is not a logical lever for a naturally occurring substance, the existence of which is nobody's fault, and exposures to NOA in the environment do not necessarily resemble occupational exposures. The gaps and flaws in the legal regime exacerbate the uncertainties created by uncertainties in the science. Once it is assumed that no level of exposure is safe, legal requirements adopted in very different contexts foreclose the options for addressing the Swift Creek problem. This presentation will outline the applicable laws and how they intersect with issues of risk perception, uncertainty and politics in efforts to address the Swift Creek NOA site.

  7. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2002-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from

  8. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.

    Lovrak, Jon (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Ford, WA); Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2004-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and

  9. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program; 2002 Annual Report.

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2003-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year

  10. Paleomagnetism of the Miocene intrusive suite of Kidd Creek: Timing of deformation in the Cascade arc, southern Washington

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Swanson, D.A.; Snee, L.W.

    1998-01-01

    Paleomagnetic study of the intrusive suite of Kidd Creek in the southern Washington Cascades (23 sites in dikes and sills) was undertaken to help determine if these rocks are comagmatic and whether they postdate regional folding of the volcanic arc. Fission track and 40Ar-39Ar age determinations indicate an age of ???12.7 Ma (middle Miocene) for these rocks. The similarity of normal-polarity characteristic directions for most samples corroborate the available geochemical data indicating that these rocks are most likely comagmatic. Reversed-polarity directions for samples from four sites, however, show that emplacement of Kidd Creek intrusions spanned at least one reversal of the geomagnetic field. The paleomagnetic directions for the dikes and sills fail a fold test at the 99% confidence level indicating that the Kidd Creek rocks postdate regional folding. The mean in situ direction also indicates that the Kidd Creek and older rocks have been rotated 22?? ?? 6?? clockwise about a vertical or near-vertical axis from the expected Miocene direction. Compression and regional folding of the Cascade arc in southern Washington therefore had ended by ???12 Ma prior to the onset of deformation resulting in rotation of these rocks.

  11. Sediment Loading from Crab Creek and Other Sources to Moses Lake, Washington, 2007 and 2008

    Magirl, Christopher S.; Cox, Stephen E.; Mastin, Mark C.; Huffman, Raegan L.

    2010-01-01

    The average sediment-accumulation rate on the bed of Moses Lake since 1980, based on the identification of Mount St. Helens ash in lakebed cores, was 0.24 inches per year. Summed over the lake surface area, the average sediment-accumulation rate on the lakebed is 190,000 tons per year. Based on USGS stream-gaging station data, the average annual sediment load to Moses Lake from Crab Creek was 32,000 tons per year between 1943 and 2008; the post Mount St. Helens eruption annual load from Crab Creek was calculated to be 13,000 tons per year. The total mass input from Crab Creek and other fluvially derived sediment sources since 1980 has been about 20,000 tons per year. Eolian sediment loading to Moses Lake was about 50,000 tons per year before irrigation and land-use development largely stabilized the Moses Lake dune field. Currently, eolian input to the lake is less than 2,000 tons per year. Considering all sediment sources to the lake, most (from 80 to 90 percent) of post-1980 lakebed-sediment accumulation is from autochthonous, or locally formed, mineral matter, including diatom frustuals and carbonate shells, derived from biogenic production in phytoplankton and zooplankton. Suspended-sediment samples collected from Crab Creek and similar nearby waterways in 2007 and 2008 combined with other USGS data from the region indicated that a proposed Bureau of Reclamation supplemental feed of as much as 650 cubic feet per second through Crab Creek might initially contain a sediment load of as much as 1,500 tons per day. With time, however, this sediment load would decrease to about 10 tons per day in the sediment-supply-limited creek as available sediment in the channel is depleted. Sediment loads in the supplemental feed ultimately would be similar to loads in other bypass canals near Moses Lake. Considering the hydrology and geomorphology of the creek over multiple years, there is little evidence that the proposed supplemental feed would substantially increase the

  12. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2000 Annual Report.

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2001-03-01

    The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. These strategic changes have been the result of recommendations through the Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) and were done to enhance imprinting, improve survival and operate the two kokanee facilities more effectively. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear 200,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake.

  13. Magnetostratigraphic evidence from the Cold Creek bar for onset of ice-age cataclysmic floods in eastern Washington during the early Pleistocene

    Pluhar, Christopher J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Reidel, Steve P.; Coe, Robert S.; Nelson, Paul B.

    2006-01-01

    This study provides a detailed magnetostratigraphy of sediments composing the Cold Creek cataclysmic flood bar in the Pasco Basin, Washington. Our interpretation suggests onset of Missoula floods or similar events prior to 1.1 myr, later than previously suggested by Bjornstad et al. [Bjornstad B.N., Fecht, K.R., Pluhar, C.J., 2001]. Long history of pre-Wisconsin, Ice Age cataclysmic floods: evidence from southeastern Washington State. [Journal of Geology 109 (6), 695-713]. Nonetheless these data suggest that Channeled Scabland features formed over a much longer timespan than commonly cited, that continental ice sheets of the early Pleistocene reached as far south as those of the late Pleistocene, and that similar physiography existed in eastern Washington and perhaps Montana to both generate and route Missoula-flood-like events. This study adds paleomagnetic polarity results from 213 new samples of silts and sands derived from nine new drill cores penetrating the Cold Creek cataclysmic flood bar to our previous database of 53 samples from four boreholes, resulting in a much more robust and detailed magnetostratigraphy. Rock magnetic studies on these sediments show pure magnetite to be the predominant remanence-carrying magnetic mineral, ruling out widespread remagnetization by secondary mineralization. The magnetostratigraphy at eastern Cold Creek bar is characterized by a normal polarity interval bracketed by reversed polarities. Equating the normal zone with the Jaramillo subchron (0.99-1.07 myr) affords the simplest correlation to the magnetic polarity timescale. Western Cold Creek bar was likely deposited during the Brunhes chron (0-0.78 myr) since it exhibits mainly normal polarities with only two thin reversed-polarity horizons that we interpret as magnetic excursions during the Brunhes.

  14. Magnetostratigraphic evidence from the Cold Creek bar for onset of ice-age cataclysmic floods in eastern Washington during the early Pleistocene

    This study provides a detailed magnetostratigraphy of sediments composing the Cold Creek cataclysmic flood bar in the Pasco Basin, Washington. Our interpretation suggests onset of Missoula floods or similar events prior to 1.1 myr, later than previously suggested by Bjornstad et al. [Bjornstad B.N., Fecht, K.R., Pluhar, C.J., 2001]. Long history of pre-Wisconsin, Ice Age cataclysmic floods: evidence from southeastern Washington State. [Journal of Geology 109 (6), 695-713]. Nonetheless these data suggest that Channeled Scabland features formed over a much longer timespan than commonly cited, that continental ice sheets of the early Pleistocene reached as far south as those of the late Pleistocene, and that similar physiography existed in eastern Washington and perhaps Montana to both generate and route Missoula-flood-like events. This study adds paleomagnetic polarity results from 213 new samples of silts and sands derived from nine new drill cores penetrating the Cold Creek cataclysmic flood bar to our previous database of 53 samples from four boreholes, resulting in a much more robust and detailed magnetostratigraphy. Rock magnetic studies on these sediments show pure magnetite to be the predominant remanence-carrying magnetic mineral, ruling out widespread remagnetization by secondary mineralization. The magnetostratigraphy at eastern Cold Creek bar is characterized by a normal polarity interval bracketed by reversed polarities. Equating the normal zone with the Jaramillo subchron (0.99-1.07 myr) affords the simplest correlation to the magnetic polarity timescale. Western Cold Creek bar was likely deposited during the Brunhes chron (0-0.78 myr) since it exhibits mainly normal polarities with only two thin reversed-polarity horizons that we interpret as magnetic excursions during the Brunhes

  15. A water-quality assessment of the Muddy Fork Silver Creek watershed, Clark, Floyd, and Washington Counties, Indiana

    Hardy, Mark A.

    1978-01-01

    Data collected for a wide range of flow conditions from September 8, 1975, to July 13, 1976, reveal that human and animal waste loading of streams and pesticides use in the Muddy Fork Silver Creek watershed, Indiana, are probably the most significant water-quality problems. Generally, the type(s) of water in tributary streams in the south and southwest parts of the watershed was calcium bicarbonate and in other tributaries were calcium sulfate and magnesium sulfate. Dissolved-solids concentrations of discharge from top-spill reservoirs were lower and more consistent over a range of flows than concentrations from uncontrolled streams. Concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria and fecal streptococcal bacteria ranged from 5 to 65 ,000 colonies per 100 milliliters and from 5 to 14,000 colonies per 100 milliliters, respectively. Data on periphyton, phytoplankton, and benthic communities collected during low flow in September 1975 indicate organic loading of Muddy Fork downstream from the town of Speed. Phytoplankton community structures varied temporally and spatially. Ranges of concentration (In micrograms per kilogram) of various chlorinated hydrocarbons in samples of bed materials were: chlordane, from 0 to 14; DDT, from 0 to 19; and PCB's, from 0 to 11. Concentrations of aldrin, DDD, DDE, heptachlor, and heptachlor epoxide of 5.1 micrograms per kilogram or less were also detected. The presence of these compounds makes them potentially available for accumulation in the biological food chain. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Geomorphic and Salmon Habitat Response to Dam Removal with Minimal Constraints to Channel Evolution, Wa'atch Creek, Western Washington, U.S.A

    Ritchie, A. C.; Shellberg, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    Dam removal has become an important component of aquatic ecosystem restoration, but studies documenting the physical and ecological response to dam removal across a range of human modified hydroclimatic and physiographic settings are still lacking. This research documents channel geomorphic response and fine sediment storage in salmon spawning gravels after removing two derelict dams (largest 6m) from Wa’atch Creek, located in the temperate coastal-marine zone of the Pacific Northwest, USA. After removing dam sheet pile and earthen fill, natural river processes including sediment flushing were allowed occur. Technical engineering solutions were avoided, unlike comparably sized dam removals in western Washington that over-engineered channel stability. However, two-hundred large-logs (LWD) were placed unanchored below the dam sites and throughout the reservoir before drawdown to sort and store sediment and provide future habitat complexity. Initial sedimentation impacts were severe following dam removal, temporarily smothering the bed of the creek with a fine sediment slurry (fluid mud) from dam to delta, killing aquatic biota, and covering spawning gravels with inhospitable levels of fine sediment. Subsequently, several large floods within the first year (max 10-yr recurrence interval) flushed the channel sediment slurry and over half (11,000 m^3) of the fine sediment stored in the reservoir out to sea. Coarse sediment aggraded immediately below the dam where wood was placed in the channel, while channel incision occurred through the reservoir and into tributaries, both diminishing away from the disturbance center. Channel changes were greatest immediately following removal due to high stream power, steep energy slope and saturated unconsolidated alluvium. The rate of change in sediment volume diminished over time (2003 to 2008) due to sediment consolidation, vegetation colonization, and a reduction in energy slope. After reservoir and channel flushing, fine

  17. Determination of Premining Geochemical Background and Delineation of Extent of Sediment Contamination in Blue Creek Downstream from Midnite Mine, Stevens County, Washington

    Church, Stanley E.; Kirschner, Frederick E.; Choate, LaDonna M.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Budahn, James R.; Brown, Zoe Ann

    2008-01-01

    Geochemical and radionuclide studies of sediment recovered from eight core sites in the Blue Creek flood plain and Blue Creek delta downstream in Lake Roosevelt provided a stratigraphic geochemical record of the contamination from uranium mining at the Midnite Mine. Sediment recovered from cores in a wetland immediately downstream from the mine site as well as from sediment catchments in Blue Creek and from cores in the delta in Blue Creek cove provided sufficient data to determine the premining geochemical background for the Midnite Mine tributary drainage. These data provide a geochemical background that includes material eroded from the Midnite Mine site prior to mine development. Premining geochemical background for the Blue Creek basin has also been determined using stream-sediment samples from parts of the Blue Creek, Oyachen Creek, and Sand Creek drainage basins not immediately impacted by mining. Sediment geochemistry showed that premining uranium concentrations in the Midnite Mine tributary immediately downstream of the mine site were strongly elevated relative to the crustal abundance of uranium (2.3 ppm). Cesium-137 (137Cs) data and public records of production at the Midnite Mine site provided age control to document timelines in the sediment from the core immediately downstream from the mine site. Mining at the Midnite Mine site on the Spokane Indian Reservation between 1956 and 1981 resulted in production of more than 10 million pounds of U3O8. Contamination of the sediment by uranium during the mining period is documented from the Midnite Mine along a small tributary to the confluence of Blue Creek, in Blue Creek, and into the Blue Creek delta. During the period of active mining (1956?1981), enrichment of base metals in the sediment of Blue Creek delta was elevated by as much as 4 times the concentration of those same metals prior to mining. Cadmium concentrations were elevated by a factor of 10 and uranium by factors of 16 to 55 times premining

  18. Quality of water in an inactive uranium mine and its effects on the quality of water in Blue Creek, Stevens County, Washington, 1984-85. Water Resources Investigation

    The purpose of the report is to present the results of a study done to determine (1) the monthly and annual water budgets and probable variation in runoff for the drainage basin in which the mine is located; (2) if precipitation is the source of low pH water found in pit 3 and the retention pond; (3) the quality of water in pits 3 and 4, the retention pond, streamflow from the basin, Blue Creek upstream and downstream of the point the drainage enters, and near the mouth of Blue Creek; (4) the quality of ground water discharged from the basin into Blue Creek; and (5) the daily mean values of discharge, water temperature, specific conductance, and pH for mine drainage from the basin, Blue Creek upstream and downstream of the mine drainage, and near the mouth of Blue Creek. The report also describes a potential water-quality monitoring program that would allow the determination of annual loads of selected chemical constituents entering Blue Creek from the mine basin and information about the type of ground-water tracers and procedures needed to examine flow paths near the retention pond

  19. Water quality in the Anacostia River, Maryland and Rock Creek, Washington, D.C.: Continuous and discrete monitoring with simulations to estimate concentrations and yields of nutrients, suspended sediment, and bacteria

    Miller, Cherie V.; Chanat, Jeffrey G.; Bell, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations and loading estimates for nutrients, suspended sediment, and E. coli bacteria were summarized for three water-quality monitoring stations on the Anacostia River in Maryland and one station on Rock Creek in Washington, D.C. Both streams are tributaries to the Potomac River in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area and contribute to the Chesapeake Bay estuary. Two stations on the Anacostia River, Northeast Branch at Riverdale, Maryland and Northwest Branch near Hyattsville, Maryland, have been monitored for water quality during the study period from 2003 to 2011 and are located near the shift from nontidal to tidal conditions near Bladensburg, Maryland. A station on Paint Branch is nested above the station on the Northeast Branch Anacostia River, and has slightly less developed land cover than the Northeast and Northwest Branch stations. The Rock Creek station is located in Rock Creek Park, but the land cover in the watershed surrounding the park is urbanized. Stepwise log-linear regression models were developed to estimate the concentrations of suspended sediment, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and E. coli bacteria from continuous field monitors. Turbidity was the strongest predictor variable for all water-quality parameters. For bacteria, water temperature improved the models enough to be included as a second predictor variable due to the strong dependence of stream metabolism on temperature. Coefficients of determination (R2) for the models were highest for log concentrations of suspended sediment (0.9) and total phosphorus (0.8 to 0.9), followed by E. coli bacteria (0.75 to 0.8), and total nitrogen (0.6). Water-quality data provided baselines for conditions prior to accelerated implementation of multiple stormwater controls in the watersheds. Counties are currently in the process of enhancing stormwater controls in both watersheds. Annual yields were estimated for suspended sediment, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and E. coli bacteria using

  20. Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan

    Browne, D.; Holzmiller, J.; Koch, F.; Polumsky, S.; Schlee, D.; Thiessen, G.; Johnson, C.

    1995-04-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon``. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity. The watershed coordinator for the Asotin County Conservation District led a locally based process that combined local concerns and knowledge with technology from several agencies to produce the Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan.

  1. Methow River Studies, Washington: abundance estimates from Beaver Creek and the Chewuch River screw trap, methodology testing in the Whitefish Island side channel, and survival and detection estimates from hatchery fish releases, 2013

    Martens, Kyle D.; Fish, Teresa M.; Watson, Grace A.; Connolly, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Salmon and steelhead populations have been severely depleted in the Columbia River from factors such as the presence of tributary dams, unscreened irrigation diversions, and habitat degradation from logging, mining, grazing, and others (Raymond, 1988). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been funded by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) to provide evaluation of on-going Reclamation funded efforts to recover Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed anadromous salmonid populations in the Methow River watershed, a watershed of the Columbia River in the Upper Columbia River Basin, in north-central Washington State (fig. 1). This monitoring and evaluation program was funded to document Reclamation’s effort to partially fulfill the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion (BiOp) (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, Fisheries Division 2003). This Biological Opinion includes Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPA) to protect listed salmon and steelhead across their life cycle. Species of concern in the Methow River include Upper Columbia River (UCR) spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), UCR summer steelhead (O. mykiss), and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), which are all listed as threatened or endangered under the ESA. The work done by the USGS since 2004 has encompassed three phases of work. The first phase started in 2004 and continued through 2012. This first phase involved the evaluation of stream colonization and fish production in Beaver Creek following the modification of several water diversions (2000–2006) that were acting as barriers to upstream fish movement. Products to date from this work include: Ruttenburg (2007), Connolly and others (2008), Martens and Connolly (2008), Connolly (2010), Connolly and others (2010), Martens and Connolly (2010), Benjamin and others (2012), Romine and others (2013a), Weigel and others (2013a, 2013b, 2013c), and Martens and others (2014). The second phase, initiated in

  2. Chemical and ecological health of white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) in Rock Creek Park, Washington, D.C., 2003-04 / by Cherie V. Miller ... [et al.] ; prepared in copoeration with the National Park Service

    Miller, Cherie V.; Weyers, Holly S.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Freeman, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    Several classes of chemicals that are known or suspected contaminants were found in bed sediment in Rock Creek, including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phthalate esters, organochlorine pesticides, dioxins and furans, trace metals and metalloids (mercury, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, nickel, silver, and zinc), and polychlorinated biphenyls (total PCBs and selected aroclors). Concentrations of many of these chemicals consistently exceeded thresholdor chronic-effects gui...

  3. Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].

    Asotin County Conservation District

    2008-12-10

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

  4. Cache Creek mercury investigation

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Cache Creek watershed is located in the California Coastal range approximately 100 miles north of San Francisco in Lake, Colusa and Yolo Counties. Wildlife...

  5. [Little Dry Creek Drainage

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Map of the drainage boundary, direction of flow, canals and ditches, and streets for the drainage study plan and profile for Little Dry Creek sub area in the North...

  6. Big Creek Pit Tags

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The BCPITTAGS database is used to store data from an Oncorhynchus mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) population dynamics study in Big Creek, a coastal stream along...

  7. Vegetation - Pine Creek WA and Fitzhugh Creek WA [ds484

    California Department of Resources — This fine-scale vegetation classification and map of the Pine Creek and Fitzhugh Creek Wildlife Areas, Modoc County, California was created following FGDC and...

  8. Riparian Planting Projects Completed within Asotin Creek Watershed : 2000-2002 Asotin Creek Riparian Final Report of Accomplishments.

    Johnson, B. J. (Bradley J.)

    2002-01-01

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in Water Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 35. According to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's (WDFW) Priority WRIA's by ''At-Risk Stock Significance Map'', it is the highest priority WRIA in southeastern Washington. Summer steelhead, bull trout, and Snake River spring chinook salmon which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. WDFW manages it as a Wild Steelhead Reserve; no hatchery fish have been released here since 1997. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe, Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. Local students, volunteers and Salmon Corps members from the Nez Perce Tribe have been instrumental in the success of the Model Watershed Program on Asotin Creek. ACCD began coordinating habitat projects in 1995 with the help of BPA funding. Approximately two hundred and seventy-six projects have been implemented as of 1999. The Washington State Legislature was successful in securing funding for threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead recovery throughout the State in 1998. While these issues were new to most of the State, the ACCD has been securing and administering funding for threatened salmonids since 1994. The Asotin Creek Riparian Planting 2000-053-00 and Asotin Creek Riparian Fencing 2000-054-00 teamed BPA and the Governor

  9. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Okanogan Quadrangle, Washington

    The Okanogan Quadrangle, Washington, was evaluated to identify and delineate areas containing environments favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits using criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Reconnaissance and detailed surface studies were augmented by aerial radiometric surveys and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. The results of the investigations indicate six environments favorable for uranium deposits. They are unclassified, anatectic, allogenic, and contact-metasomatic deposits in Late Precambrian and (or) Early Paleozoic mantling metamorphic core-complex rocks of the Kettle gneiss dome; magmatic-hydrothermal deposits in the Gold Creek pluton, the Magee Creek pluton, the Wellington Peak pluton, and the Midnite Mine pluton, all located in the southeast quadrant of the quadrangle; magmatic-hydrothermal allogenic deposits in Late Paleozoic and (or) Early Mesozoic black shales in the Castle Mountain area; allogenic deposits in Early Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks in the Harvey Creek area and in Late Precambrian metasedimentary rocks in the Blue Mountain area; and sandstone deposits in Eocene sedimentary rocks possibly present in the Enterprise Valley. Seven geologic units are considered unfavorable for uranium deposits. They are all the remaining metamorphic core-complex rocks, Precambrian metasedimentary rocks,Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic rocks, and all Pleistocene and Recent deposits; and, excluding those rocks in the unevaluated areas, include all the remaining plutonic rocks, Paleozoic miogeoclinical rocks, and Upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic eugeosynclinal rocks. Three areas, the Cobey Creek-Frosty Creek area, the Oregon City Ridge-Wilmont Creek area, and the area underlain by the Middle Cambrian Metaline Formation and its stratigraphic equivalents may possibly be favorable but are unevaluated due to lack of data

  10. Scotch Creek Wildlife Area 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    Olson, Jim [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2008-11-03

    The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area is a complex of 6 separate management units located in Okanogan County in North-central Washington State. The project is located within the Columbia Cascade Province (Okanogan sub-basin) and partially addresses adverse impacts caused by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee hydroelectric dams. With the acquisition of the Eder unit in 2007, the total size of the wildlife area is now 19,860 acres. The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area was approved as a wildlife mitigation project in 1996 and habitat enhancement efforts to meet mitigation objectives have been underway since the spring of 1997 on Scotch Creek. Continuing efforts to monitor the threatened Sharp-tailed grouse population on the Scotch Creek unit are encouraging. The past two spring seasons were unseasonably cold and wet, a dangerous time for the young of the year. This past spring, Scotch Creek had a cold snap with snow on June 10th, a critical period for young chicks just hatched. Still, adult numbers on the leks have remained stable the past two years. Maintenance of BPA funded enhancements is necessary to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and to recover and sustain populations of Sharp-tailed grouse and other obligate species.

  11. Zooplankton of Mida Creek.

    Mwaluma, J.; Osore, M.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the zooplankton group was to establish an inventory of zooplankton resident in Mida creek, their diversity and quantify their abundance, spatial and temporal distribution. Apart from this, various hydrographic parameters were measured simultaneously in order to find out whether any correlation existed between the two. Among the hydrographic parameters measured were temperature, salinity, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen. In April 1996, the research team...

  12. 75 FR 27332 - AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC; Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC; Eagle Creek Land...

    2010-05-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC; Eagle Creek Water Resources... Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, and Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC.... For the transferee: Mr. Paul Ho, Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC,...

  13. Ship Creek bioassessment investigations

    Cushing, C.E.; Mueller, R.P.; Murphy, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked by Elmendorf Air Force Base (EAFB) personnel to conduct a series of collections of macroinvertebrates and sediments from Ship Creek to (1) establish baseline data on these populations for reference in evaluating possible impacts from Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) activities at two operable units, (2) compare current population indices with those found by previous investigations in Ship Creek, and (3) determine baseline levels of concentrations of any contaminants in the sediments associated with the macroinvertebrates. A specific suite of indices established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was requested for the macroinvertebrate analyses; these follow the Rapid Bioassessment Protocol developed by Plafkin et al. (1989) and will be described. Sediment sample analyses included a Microtox bioassay and chemical analysis for contaminants of concern. These analyses included, volatile organic compounds, total gasoline and diesel hydrocarbons (EPA method 8015, CA modified), total organic carbon, and an inductive-coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) metals scan. Appendix A reports on the sediment analyses. The Work Plan is attached as Appendix B.

  14. University of Washington

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The theme of the University of Washington based Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research (CHC) is understanding the biochemical, molecular and exposure...

  15. BPA riparian fencing and alternative water development projects completed within Asotin Creek Watershed ; 2000 and 2001 Asotin Creek fencing final report of accomplishments

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in Water Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 35. According to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's (WDFW) Priority WRIA's by ''At-Risk Stock Significance Map'', it is the highest priority WRIA in southeastern Washington. Summer steelhead, bull trout, and Snake River spring chinook salmon which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. WDFW manages it as a Wild Steelhead Reserve; no hatchery fish have been released here since 1997. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe, Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. Local students, volunteers and Salmon Corps members from the Nez Perce Tribe have been instrumental in the success of the Model Watershed Program on Asotin Creek. ACCD began coordinating habitat projects in 1995 with the help of BPA funding. Approximately two hundred and seventy-six projects have been implemented as of 1999. The Washington State Legislature was successful in securing funding for endangered salmon and steelhead recovery throughout the State in 1998. While these issues were new to most of the State, the ACCD has been securing and administering funding for endangered salmonids since 1994. The ''Asotin Creek Riparian Planting 2000-053-00 and Asotin Creek Riparian Fencing 2000-054-00'' teamed BPA and the Governor's Salmon Recovery Funding to plant approximately 84

  16. BPA Riparian Fencing and Alternative Water Development Projects Completed within Asotin Creek Watershed, 2000 and 2001 Asotin Creek Fencing Final Report of Accomplishments.

    Johnson, B.J. (Bradley J.)

    2002-01-01

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in Water Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 35. According to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's (WDFW) Priority WRIA's by ''At-Risk Stock Significance Map'', it is the highest priority WRIA in southeastern Washington. Summer steelhead, bull trout, and Snake River spring chinook salmon which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. WDFW manages it as a Wild Steelhead Reserve; no hatchery fish have been released here since 1997. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe, Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. Local students, volunteers and Salmon Corps members from the Nez Perce Tribe have been instrumental in the success of the Model Watershed Program on Asotin Creek. ACCD began coordinating habitat projects in 1995 with the help of BPA funding. Approximately two hundred and seventy-six projects have been implemented as of 1999. The Washington State Legislature was successful in securing funding for endangered salmon and steelhead recovery throughout the State in 1998. While these issues were new to most of the State, the ACCD has been securing and administering funding for endangered salmonids since 1994. The ''Asotin Creek Riparian Planting 2000-053-00 and Asotin Creek Riparian Fencing 2000-054-00'' teamed BPA and the Governor

  17. Bridge Creek IMW database - Bridge Creek Restoration and Monitoring Project

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The incised and degraded habitat of Bridge Creek is thought to be limiting a population of ESA-listed steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss). A logical restoration...

  18. Tidal Creek Sentinel Habitat Database

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ecological Research, Assessment and Prediction's Tidal Creeks: Sentinel Habitat Database was developed to support the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  19. Rattlesnake Creek management program proposal

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Partnership has concentrated its efforts on a voluntary approach for lowering the total water use in the Rattlesnake Creek subbasin. This will occur through the...

  20. 77 FR 13592 - AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, Eagle Creek Land...

    2012-03-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources... Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, and Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC (transferees) filed an...) 805-1469. Transferees: Mr. Bernard H. Cherry, Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek...

  1. BPA Instream Habitat Projects Completed within Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999-2001 Final Report.

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2002-10-23

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority WRIA in southeastern WA. Summer steelhead, bull trout, and Snake River spring chinook salmon which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. WDFW manages it as a Wild Steelhead Reserve, because no hatchery fish have been released here since 1997. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. Local students, volunteers and Salmon Corps Members have been instrumental in the success of the Model Watershed Program on Asotin Creek. ACCD began coordinating habitat projects in 1995 with the help of BPA funding. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented as of 1999. The Washington State Legislature was successful in securing funding for endangered salmon and steelhead recovery throughout the State in 1998. While these issues were new to most of the State, southeastern Washington had been dealing with endangered fall and spring chinook salmon since 1994. The Asotin Creek In-Stream Habitat Project teamed BPA and Governor's Salmon Recovery Funding on four instream habitat projects in the Asotin Creek Watershed. These projects provide complex instream habitat for steelhead, bull trout and spring chinook in the stream

  2. Sherman Creek Hatchery, annual report 2002

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year

  3. Sherman Creek Hatchery, annual report 2001

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the

  4. Census Snapshot: Washington

    Romero, Adam P; Rosky, Clifford J; Badgett, M. V. Lee; Gates, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, this report provides demographic and economic information about same-sex couples and same-sex couples raising children in Washington. We compare same-sex “unmarried partners,” which the Census Bureau defines as an unmarried couple who “shares living quarters and has a close personal relationship,” to different-sex married couples in Washington. In many ways, the almost 24,000 same-sex couples living in Washington are similar to married couples....

  5. Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

    1999-03-01

    Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

  6. 77 FR 42714 - Eagle Creek Hydropower, LLC, Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC...

    2012-07-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Creek Hydropower, LLC, Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene, Protests, and Comments Take notice that...

  7. Bioassessment of Black Creek, Holmes County, Mississippi

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Physical, chemical and biological components at four stations on Black Creek and one station on Harland Creek (reference site), Holmes County, Mississippi were...

  8. A fisheries evaluation of the Wapato, Sunnyside, and Toppenish Creek canal fish screening facilities, spring 1988

    Neitzel, D.A.; Abernethy, C.S.; Lusty, E.W.

    1990-03-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration, the United States Bureau of Reclamation, and the Washington State Department of Ecology are funding the construction and evaluation of fish passage and protection facilities at irrigation and hydroelectric diversions in the Yakima River Basin, Washington State. The programs provide offsite enhancement to compensate for fish and wildlife losses caused by hydroelectric development throughout the Columbia River Basin and address natural propagation of salmon to help mitigate the impact of irrigation in the Yakima River Basin. The Wapato, Sunnyside, and Toppenish Creek Screens are three of the facilities in the basin. This report evaluates the effectiveness of the screens in intercepting and returning juvenile salmonids unharmed to the river from which they were diverted. We evaluated the effectiveness of new screening facilities at the Toppenish Creek, Wapato, and Sunnyside canals in southcentral Washington State. Screen integrity tests indicated that fish released in front of the screens were prevented from entering the canal behind the screens. We conducted descaling tests at the Toppenish Creek Screens. We measured the time required for fish to move through the screen facilities. Methods used in 1988 were the same as those used at Sunnyside in 1985 and in subsequent years at Richland. Toppenish/Satus, and Wapato. 11 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  9. 78 FR 12714 - Intermountain Region, Payette National Forest, New Meadows Ranger District, Idaho; Lost Creek...

    2013-02-25

    ... District, Idaho; Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project. The Lost Creek- Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration... action alternative is selected, the Responsible Official will determine what design features,...

  10. GIARDIASIS IN WASHINGTON STATE

    The objective was to determine the potential for transmission of giardiasis through approved drinking water supplies in Washington State. The project consisted of five studies: the first was conducted during trapping seasons (1976-1979) and resulted in examining of 656 beaver sto...

  11. Crane Creek known geothermal resource area: an environmental analysis

    Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F. (eds.)

    1979-09-01

    The Crane Creek known geothermal resource area (KGRA) is located in Washington County, in southwestern Idaho. Estimated hydrothermal resource temperatures for the region are 166/sup 0/C (Na-K-Ca) and 176/sup 0/C (quartz). The KGRA is situated along the west side of the north-south trending western Idaho Fault Zone. Historic seismicity data for the region identify earthquake activity within 50 km. The hot springs surface along the margin of a siliceous sinter terrace or in adjacent sediments. Approximately 75% of the KGRA is underlain by shallow, stony soils on steep slopes indicating topographic and drainage limitations to geothermal development. Species of concern include sage grouse, antelope, and mule deer. There is a high probability of finding significant prehistoric cultural resources within the proposed area of development.

  12. Correlative estimates of discharge for three sites in the upper Lewis River Basin, Washington

    Bodhaine, G.L.

    1957-01-01

    In response to increased interest in the power possibilities of tributary streams in the headwater of Lewis River stream-gaging stations were reestablished in 1955 at three sites in the upper Lewis River basin, Washington. The one year of recent record now available and the four years of record obtained during water years 1928-31 provide a reasonable basis for estimates of monthly discharge during the intervening years. In view of the current interest in the discharge of these streams estimates of monthly discharge have been made in the Tacoma district office of the Surface Water Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey. These estimates and a description of the method of correlation are attached. The three stations and the period covered by the correlative estimates are as follows: Big Creek below Skookum Meadow near Trout Lake, Washington: Oct. 1931 to Sept. 1955 Meadow Creek below Lone Butte Meadow near Trout Lake, Washington: Oct. to Dec. 1928; Oct. 1931 to Sept. 1955 Rush Creek above falls, near Cougar, Wash.: Oct. to Dec. 1928; Dec. 1931 to Sept. 1955 Published records for water years 1928-31 and 1956 are included in the tabulation to provide discharge for the full period Oct. 1927 to Sept. 1956.

  13. Effects of Alder Mine on the Water, Sediments, and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Alder Creek, 1998 Annual Report.

    Peplow, Dan

    1999-05-28

    The Alder Mine, an abandoned gold, silver, copper, and zinc mine in Okanogan County, Washington, produces heavy metal-laden effluent that affects the quality of water in a tributary of the Methow River. The annual mass loading of heavy metals from two audits at the Alder Mine was estimated to exceed 11,000 kg per year. In this study, water samples from stations along Alder Creek were assayed for heavy metals by ICP-AES and were found to exceed Washington State's acute freshwater criteria for cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn).

  14. Pine Creek Ranch; Annual Report 2002.

    Berry, Mark E.

    2003-02-01

    This report gives information about the following four objectives: OBJECTIVE 1--Gather scientific baseline information for monitoring purposes and to assist in the development of management plans for Pine Creek Ranch; OBJECTIVE 2--Complete and implement management plans; OBJECTIVE 3--Protect, manage and enhance the assets and resources of Pine Creek Ranch; and OBJECTIVE 4--Deliverables.

  15. 33 CFR 117.917 - Battery Creek.

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Battery Creek. 117.917 Section 117.917 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.917 Battery Creek. The draw...

  16. 33 CFR 117.543 - Bear Creek.

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bear Creek. 117.543 Section 117.543 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.543 Bear Creek. (a) The draws of the...

  17. Early Learning in Washington State

    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    About 80,000 children enter kindergarten in Washington each year, and many lack basic language and behavioral skills--such as knowing letters and colors, following directions, getting along with others, and exhibiting impulse-control. In 2006, based on the recommendation of the Washington Learns Commission, Governor Christine Gregoire created the…

  18. Flood discharges and hydraulics near the mouths of Wolf Creek, Craig Branch, Manns Creek, Dunloup Creek, and Mill Creek in the New River Gorge National River, West Virginia

    Wiley, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, studied the frequency and magnitude of flooding near the mouths of five tributaries to the New River in the New River Gorge National River. The 100-year peak discharge at each tributary was determined from regional frequency equations. The 100-year discharge at Wolf Creek, Craig Branch, Manns Creek, Dunloup Creek, and Mill Creek was 3,400 cubic feet per second, 640 cubic feet per second, 8,200 cubic feet per second, 7,100 cubic feet per second, and 9,400 cubic feet per second, respectively. Flood elevations for each tributary were determined by application of a steady-state, one-dimensional flow model. Manning's roughness coefficients for the stream channels ranged from 0.040 to 0.100. Bridges that would be unable to contain the 100-year flood within the bridge opening included: the State Highway 82 bridge on Wolf Creek, the second Fayette County Highway 25 bridge upstream from the confluence with New River on Dunloup Creek, and an abandoned log bridge on Mill Creek.

  19. Panther Creek, Idaho, Habitat Rehabilitation, Final Report.

    Reiser, Dudley W.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to achieve full chinook salmon and steelhead trout production in the Panther Creek, Idaho, basin. Plans were developed to eliminate the sources of toxic effluent entering Panther Creek. Operation of a cobalt-copper mine since the 1930's has resulted in acid, metal-bearing drainage entering the watershed from underground workings and tailings piles. The report discusses plans for eliminating and/or treating the effluent to rehabilitate the water quality of Panther Creek and allow the reestablishment of salmon and trout spawning runs. (ACR)

  20. WATER QUALITY MODELING OF SUZHOU CREEK

    2002-01-01

    Water-quality models are important tools for improving river environment. In this paper, the project "Water Quality Modeling of the Suzhou Creek" was briefly described, including the choice and the principle of the model, the model study and methods, the calibration and verification of the stream model. A set of parameters about water environmental characteristic of the Suzhou Creek were put forward in the period of the third water dispatch experiment in 1999. It is necessary to point out that these parameters will change with the rehabilitation and construction of the Suzhou Creek.

  1. CREEK Project's Internal Creek Habitat Survey for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: January 1998.

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a...

  2. Congress in Washington

    Full text: Over 1200 accelerator physicists and engineers gathered in Washington mid-May for the 15th in the series of biennial Particle Accelerator Conferences (PAC) - the major US forum for accelerator physics and technology. For the first time since their inception, actual attendance declined, however the number of contributed papers stayed around 1500. CERN Director General designate Chris Llewellyn Smith spelled out the challenges with an opening talk underlining the deficiencies in today's Standard Model. From many directions comes the message that collision in the 1 TeV range must tell us something new - wherefore art thou SSC and LHC? The secondary shock waves of last year's (fortunately overturned) bid to cancel the SSC Superconducting Supercollider project still ripple around the USA, while progress towards authorization of CERN's LHC Large Hadron Collider has been slower than initially hoped. The new US administration has indicated a constant rate of SSC funding over the next four years; the figure is higher than the present budget but considerably below the originally proposed budget profile, implying that completion will be retarded by some three years beyond the end of the decade. The SSC Laboratory will clearly have problems to fight increased overall cost and sustain enthusiasm. CERN hopes for LHC blessing in time to allow machine completion by the year 2000. Pride of place at Washington went to DESY's HERA electron-proton collider - the major new facility since the previous PAC. Commissioning has been impressive and physics is well underway, with luminosity climbing towards the design figure. The varied user community of the ubiquitous synchrotron radiation facilities is now considerably larger than that of particle physics and has extensive industrial involvement. Three such machines have come into operation since the previous PAC - the 6 GeV European Synchrotron Radiation Facility at Grenoble, the 1.5 GeV Advanced Light Source

  3. Steel Creek fish, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    Sayers, R.E. Jr.; Mealing, H.G. III [Normandeau Associates, Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal plain in west-central South Carolina. The Savannah River forms the western boundary of the site. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. All but Upper Three Runs Creek receive, or in the past received, thermal effluents from nuclear production reactors. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor, and protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The lake has an average width of approximately 600 m and extends along the Steel Creek valley approximately 7000 m from the dam to the headwaters. Water level is maintained at a normal pool elevation of 58 m above mean sea level by overflow into a vertical intake tower that has multilevel discharge gates. The intake tower is connected to a horizontal conduit that passes through the dam and releases water into Steel Creek. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to meet environmental regulatory requirements associated with the restart of L-Reactor and complements the Biological Monitoring Program for L Lake. This extensive program was implemented to address portions of Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act. The Department of Energy (DOE) must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Habitat--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  5. Folds--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. The vector data file is...

  6. Land Cover Classification for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  7. Stream Centerline for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  8. Water sample locations for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  9. Bioassessment of Hollis Creek, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Physical, chemical and biological components at five stations on Hollis Creek, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi were evaluated using Rapid Bioassessment Protocols...

  10. Solid sample locations for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  11. Active Channel for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  12. Rattlesnake Creek Management Program 12-year review

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rattlesnake Creek Partnership (Partnership) was formed over 18 years ago to cooperatively develop and implement solutions to water resource problems within the...

  13. Faults--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. The vector data file is...

  14. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge. 1963. [Crane Creek].

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This aerial photograph shows the mouth of Crane Creek, facing east. Parts of Lake Erie, Willow Point, Searle, Dewey, and B T Inc. are also shown in this photo.

  15. Recent developments: Washington focus

    Congress reconvened on January 23, but most of Washington's January new involves the Administration. DOE sent two letters to USEC customers, awarded a contract for the independent financial review of the enrichment program, and released a plan for demonstrating AVLIS by 1992. A General Accounting Office (GAO) report investigating the impact of imports of Soviet EUP into the US was made public. Both Congress and the administration are reportedly considering a full-scope US-Soviet Agreement for Nuclear Cooperation. Finally, published reports indicate Congress may consider ending the customs user fee which levies a charge of 0.17% on the value of all imported goods. The fee is felt to violate the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and is not based on recovering actual Customs costs for processing a good. The fee brings the Treasury over $700 million per year, but the business community plans to lobby hard for its outright elimination or a change in authority to collect the fee based on actual costs

  16. Washington Accelerator Conference

    Highlights of the 1993 Particle Accelerator Conference, held in Washington in May, were picked out in the previous issue (page 18). Talks on the big hadron colliders reflected the sea-change in the accelerator world where the scale, complexity and cost of the front-line projects has slowed the pace of developments (not unlike the scene in particle physics itself). Speaking before the anti-SSC vote in the House of Representatives in June, Dick Briggs reviewed the situation at the SSC Superconducting Supercollider in Ellis County, Texas. The linac building is near completion and the Low Energy Booster will be ready to receive components early next year. Tunnelling for the Main Ring is advancing rapidly with four boring machines in action. Five miles of tunnel have been completed since January and the pace has now stepped up to nearly a mile each week. The superconducting magnet news is good. Following the successful initial string test of a half cell of the magnet lattice, a two-ring full cell with all associated services is being assembled. The mechanical robustness of the magnet design was confirmed when a dipole was taken to 9.7 T when cooled to 1.8 K. In the Magnet Test Lab itself, ten test stands are installed and equipped

  17. Wolf Creek Generating Station containment model

    This paper presents a CONTEMPT-LT/28 containment model that has been developed by Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation (WCNOC) to predict containment pressure and temperature behavior during the postulated events at Wolf Creek Generating Station (WCGS). The model has been validated using data provided in the WCGS Updated Safety Analysis Report (USAR). CONTEMPT-LT/28 model has been used extensively at WCGS to support plant operations, and recently, to support its 4.5% thermal power uprate project

  18. Neogene fallout tuffs from the Yellowstone hotspot in the Columbia Plateau region, Oregon, Washington and Idaho, USA.

    Barbara P Nash

    Full Text Available Sedimentary sequences in the Columbia Plateau region of the Pacific Northwest ranging in age from 16-4 Ma contain fallout tuffs whose origins lie in volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in northwestern Nevada, eastern Oregon and the Snake River Plain in Idaho. Silicic volcanism began in the region contemporaneously with early eruptions of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG, and the abundance of widespread fallout tuffs provides the opportunity to establish a tephrostratigrahic framework for the region. Sedimentary basins with volcaniclastic deposits also contain diverse assemblages of fauna and flora that were preserved during the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum, including Sucker Creek, Mascall, Latah, Virgin Valley and Trout Creek. Correlation of ashfall units establish that the lower Bully Creek Formation in eastern Oregon is contemporaneous with the Virgin Valley Formation, the Sucker Creek Formation, Oregon and Idaho, Trout Creek Formation, Oregon, and the Latah Formation in the Clearwater Embayment in Washington and Idaho. In addition, it can be established that the Trout Creek flora are younger than the Mascall and Latah flora. A tentative correlation of a fallout tuff from the Clarkia fossil beds, Idaho, with a pumice bed in the Bully Creek Formation places the remarkably well preserved Clarkia flora assemblage between the Mascall and Trout Creek flora. Large-volume supereruptions that originated between 11.8 and 10.1 Ma from the Bruneau-Jarbidge and Twin Falls volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in the central Snake River Plain deposited voluminous fallout tuffs in the Ellensberg Formation which forms sedimentary interbeds in the CRBG. These occurrences extend the known distribution of these fallout tuffs 500 km to the northwest of their source in the Snake River Plain. Heretofore, the distal products of these large eruptions had only been recognized to the east of their sources in the High Plains of Nebraska and Kansas.

  19. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Wapato, Sunnyside and Toppenish Creek Canal Fish Screening Facilities, Spring 1988 : Annual Report.

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Abernethy, C. Scott; Lusty, E. William (Pacific Northwest Laboratory)

    1990-03-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of new screening facilities at the Toppenish Creek, Wapato, and Sunnyside canals in southcentral Washington State. Screen integrity tests indicated that fish released in front of the screens were prevented from entering the canal behind the screens. Screen efficiency estimates are 99% ({+-}0.6%) for Toppenish Creek, 99% ({+-}0.3%) for Wapato, and 98% ({+-}0.5%) for Sunnyside. During 1987 at the Wapato Canal, we estimated screen efficiency was 97% ({+-}l%). We conducted descaling tests at the Toppenish Creek Screens. We estimated that 0.2% of steelhead Qncorhynchus mykiss smelts released during tests were descaled. None of the fish released through the fish return pipe were descaled. We measured the time required for fish to move through the screen facilities. The time required for 50% of the test fish to exit the Toppenish Creek Screen forebay was 4 to 9 h for rainbow trout fry and up to 39 h for steelhead smelts. The time for 50% of the test fish to exit the Wapato and Sunnyside screen forebays was less than 8 h. As with past studies, exit times varied with canal flow and species. After 39 h at Toppenish Creek, half the steelhead smelts were still in the forebay when canal flows were 20 cfs. At Sunnyside, half the chinook salmon fry exited the forebay in 1 h or less. Methods used in 1988 were the same as those used at Sunnyside in 1985 and in subsequent years at Richland, Toppenish/Satus, and Wapato. The methods and previous results have been reviewed by the Washington State Department of Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Power Planning Council, and Yakima Indian Nation.

  20. Swift Creek Hydroelectric Project rehabilitation, Swift Creek Power Company, Inc

    The purpose of this report is to re-evaluate and update the original environmental analysis of the Swift Crook Hydroelectric Project rehabilitation. That analysis and the decision to allow the proponent toproceed with the project as described in the EA alternatives 3, 4, and 5 was completed an May 8, 1981. Since that decision, no action has been taken and no special-use permit has ever been issued. The Bridger-Trton National Forest completed a Forest Plan in March of 1990 which sets current direction for all lands within the Forest and new and significant issues pertaining to the amount of water to be bypassed have been raised by the public in response to this proposed project. The original proponent, Lower Valley Power and Light, sold the project and existing facilities to Swift Crack Power Company Inc. in 1984. Swift Crock Power Company has submitted a proposal to rehabilitate the existing power generation facility in Swift Creek Canyon, which will involve some significant construction and alteration of the river corridor. Theyhave also submitted an application for relicense to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission who has asked for the Forest Service to comment on the application and to submit recommended conditions for approval (4e requirements). The proposed rehabilitation of existing facilities includes replacement of the existing damaged penstock (pipe) with a new, larger one; dredging two existing reservoirs and removal, refurbishment, and reinstallation of the turbines and generators in the two powerhouses with relocation and reconstruction of the lower powerhouse that is located on privately owned land below the Forest boundary

  1. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2000-01-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  2. Steel Creek fish: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1987

    Paller, M.H.; Heuer, J.H.; Kissick, L.A.

    1988-03-01

    Fish samples were collected from Steel Creek during 1986 and 1987 following the impoundment of the headwaters of the stream to form L-Lake, a cooling reservoir for L-Reactor which began operating late in 1985. Electrofishing and ichthyoplankton sample stations were located throughout the creek. Fykenetting sample stations were located in the creek mouth and just above the Steel Creek swamp. Larval fish and fish eggs were collected with 0.5 m plankton nets. Multivariate analysis of the electrofishing data suggested that the fish assemblages in Steel Creek exhibited structural differences associated with proximity to L-Lake, and habitat gradients of current velocity, depth, and canopy cover. The Steel Creek corridor, a lotic reach beginning at the base of the L-Lake embankment was dominated by stream species and bluegill. The delta/swamp, formed where Steel Creek enters the Savannah River floodplain, was dominated by fishes characteristic of slow flowing waters and heavily vegetated habitats. The large channel draining the swamp supported many of the species found in the swamp plus riverine and anadromous forms.

  3. Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final environmental assessment

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir

  4. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  5. Land Use Plan Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan outlines the various land uses at Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge. The Land Use Plan for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge provides a description...

  6. Geology of the Quartz Creek Pegmatite District, Gunnison County Colorado

    Staatz, Mortimer H.; Trites, A.F.

    1952-01-01

    The Quartz Creek pegmatite district includes an area about 29 square miles in the vicinity of Quartz Creek in Gunnison County,. Colo. This area contains 1,803 pegmatites that are intruded into pre-Cambrian rocks.

  7. Elevation - LiDAR Survey Minnehaha Creek, MN Watershed

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — LiDAR Bare-Earth Grid - Minnehaha Creek Watershed District. The Minnehaha Creek watershed is located primarily in Hennepin County, Minnesota. The watershed covers...

  8. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge contaminant survey results

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — As part of a baseline contaminant survey of all National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) in Missouri, fish were collected at the Squaw Creek NWR from Davis and Squaw creeks...

  9. Preliminary Biotic Survey of Cane Creek, Calhoun County, AL

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A biotic survey of Cane Creek (Calhoun County, AL) was completed in the Fall (1992) and Winter (1993) at six sites within Cane Creek to determine the effects of...

  10. Hydrology and Flood Profiles of Duck Creek and Jordan Creek Downstream from Egan Drive, Juneau, Alaska

    Curran, Janet H.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrologic and hydraulic updates for Duck Creek and the lower part of Jordan Creek in Juneau, Alaska, included computation of new estimates of peak streamflow magnitudes and new water-surface profiles for the 10-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year floods. Computations for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence interval flood magnitudes for both streams used data from U.S. Geological Survey stream-gaging stations weighted with regional regression equations for southeast Alaska. The study area for the hydraulic model consisted of three channels: Duck Creek from Taku Boulevard near the stream's headwaters to Radcliffe Road near the end of the Juneau International Airport runway, an unnamed tributary to Duck Creek from Valley Boulevard to its confluence with Duck Creek, and Jordan Creek from a pedestrian bridge upstream from Egan Drive to Crest Street at Juneau International Airport. Field surveys throughout the study area provided channel geometry for 206 cross sections, and geometric and hydraulic characteristics for 29 culverts and 15 roadway, driveway, or pedestrian bridges. Hydraulic modeling consisted of application of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Hydrologic Engineering Center River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) for steady-state flow at the selected recurrence intervals using an assumed high tide of 20 feet and roughness coefficients refined by calibration to measured water-surface elevations from a 2- to 5-year flood that occurred on November 21, 2005. Model simulation results identify inter-basin flow from Jordan Creek to the southeast at Egan Drive and from Duck Creek to Jordan Creek downstream from Egan Drive at selected recurrence intervals.

  11. Suzhou Creek Rehabilitation Project ECOLOGICAL STUDY 1998 Biological monitoring program

    Lien, L.; Haowen, Yin

    1998-01-01

    Suzhou Creek, flowing through the central parts of Shanghai, is heavy polluted by sewage, metals and organic micro pollutants. Due to the pollution, lower parts of the creek have virtually no life of fish or macro-invertebrates, and the other biological communities are totally disturbed. Even at upstream sections the flora and fauna suffer from pollution. During the last decade the contamination has been slightly reduced in the creek. A biological monitoring program was designed for the creek...

  12. Flood-inundation maps for Indian Creek and Tomahawk Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, 2014

    Peters, Arin J.; Studley, Seth E.

    2015-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.4-mile upper reach of Indian Creek from College Boulevard to the confluence with Tomahawk Creek, a 3.9-mile reach of Tomahawk Creek from 127th Street to the confluence with Indian Creek, and a 1.9-mile lower reach of Indian Creek from the confluence with Tomahawk Creek to just beyond the Kansas/Missouri border at State Line Road in Johnson County, Kansas, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Overland Park, Kansas. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgages on Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas. Near real time stages at these streamgages may be obtained on the Web from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at these sites.Flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated for each reach by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the streamgages. The hydraulic models were then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; 17 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and 14 water-surface profiles for Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas, for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the next interval above the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood level (500-year recurrence interval). The

  13. CREEK Project's Phytoplankton Pigment Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1999

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — The CREEK Project began in January of 1996 and was designed to help determine the role of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in tidal creeks of the North Inlet...

  14. 75 FR 33238 - Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station

    2010-06-11

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station AGENCY... a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed Deer Creek Station project in... interconnection agreement to construct the proposed 300 megawatt (MW) Deer Creek Station in Brookings and...

  15. 75 FR 8895 - Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station

    2010-02-26

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station AGENCY... a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the proposed Deer Creek Station in White...) Deer Creek Station in Brookings and Deuel Counties, South Dakota (Project). The proposed facility...

  16. 75 FR 43915 - Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station

    2010-07-27

    ... Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative: Deer Creek Station AGENCY: Rural Utilities... Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed Deer Creek Station Energy Facility project (Project) in Brookings... to construct, own, operate, and maintain the Deer Creek Station Energy Facility, a 300 MW...

  17. 75 FR 8036 - Monitor-Hot Creek Rangeland Project

    2010-02-23

    ... Forest Service Monitor-Hot Creek Rangeland Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent... continued livestock grazing ] within the Monitor-Hot Creek Rangeland Project area. The analysis will... conditions within the Monitor-Hot Creek Rangeland Project area towards desired conditions. The project...

  18. 77 FR 73967 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD

    2012-12-12

    ... Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 5201). The rulemaking concerned would... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD... highway bridge at Wise Avenue across Bear Creek, mile 3.4, between Dundalk and Sparrows Point, MD....

  19. 78 FR 20146 - Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    2013-04-03

    ... and soils; water resources; ecological resources; visual and scenic resources; noise; historic and... COMMISSION Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project, Sweetwater County, Wyoming... in-situ recovery (ISR) of uranium at the Lost Creek Project in Sweetwater County, Wyoming....

  20. CREEK Project's Oyster Biomass Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight tidal creeks dominated by oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated BACI (Before...

  1. Water resources of the English River, Old Mans Creek, and Clear Creek basins in Iowa

    Schwob, H.H.

    1964-01-01

    The surface and ground water resources of a 991 square mile area comprising the drainage basins of English River, Old Mans Creek and Clear Creek are presented. These basins lie to the west and southwest of Iowa City, Iowa, and all three streams are tributary to the Iowa River. The area is comprised of rolling uplands with relatively broad valleys and is devoted mainly to agriculture and livestock farming.

  2. Species status of Mill Creek Elliptio

    Davis, G.M. [Academy of Natural Sciences (United States); Mulvey, M. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This report discusses environmental effects of the Savannah River Plant on aqautic populations in Mill Creek and surrounding tributaries. Of particular concern was the status of Elliptio. Genetics and phenotypic characteristics have shown that the current classification system is not adequate for these populations. The appendices characterize genetic variability at different loci, electrophoretic data, allele frequencies, sympatric species, and anatomical characters.

  3. Washington Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program

    Walsh, T. J.; Schelling, J.

    2012-12-01

    Washington State has participated in the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) since its inception in 1995. We have participated in the tsunami inundation hazard mapping, evacuation planning, education, and outreach efforts that generally characterize the NTHMP efforts. We have also investigated hazards of significant interest to the Pacific Northwest. The hazard from locally generated earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone, which threatens tsunami inundation in less than hour following a magnitude 9 earthquake, creates special problems for low-lying accretionary shoreforms in Washington, such as the spits of Long Beach and Ocean Shores, where high ground is not accessible within the limited time available for evacuation. To ameliorate this problem, we convened a panel of the Applied Technology Council to develop guidelines for construction of facilities for vertical evacuation from tsunamis, published as FEMA 646, now incorporated in the International Building Code as Appendix M. We followed this with a program called Project Safe Haven (http://www.facebook.com/ProjectSafeHaven) to site such facilities along the Washington coast in appropriate locations and appropriate designs to blend with the local communities, as chosen by the citizens. This has now been completed for the entire outer coast of Washington. In conjunction with this effort, we have evaluated the potential for earthquake-induced ground failures in and near tsunami hazard zones to help develop cost estimates for these structures and to establish appropriate tsunami evacuation routes and evacuation assembly areas that are likely to to be available after a major subduction zone earthquake. We intend to continue these geotechnical evaluations for all tsunami hazard zones in Washington.

  4. Pine Creek Ranch, FY 2001 Annual Report.

    Berry, Mark E.

    2001-11-01

    Pine Creek Ranch was purchased in 1999 by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs using Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation funds. The 25,000 acre property will be managed in perpetuity for the benefit of fish and wildlife habitat. Major issues include: (1) Restoring quality spawning and rearing habitat for stealhead. Streams are incised and fish passage barriers exist from culverts and possibly beaver dams. In addition to stealhead habitat, the Tribes are interested in overall riparian recovery in the John Day River system for wildlife habitat, watershed values and other values such as recreation. (2) Future grazing for specific management purposes. Past grazing practices undoubtedly contributed to current unacceptable conditions. The main stem of Pine Creek has already been enrolled in the CREP program administered by the USDA, Natural Resource Conservation Service in part because of the cost-share for vegetation restoration in a buffer portion of old fields and in part because of rental fees that will help the Tribes to pay the property taxes. Grazing is not allowed in the riparian buffer for the term of the contract. (3) Noxious weeds are a major concern. (4) Encroachment by western juniper throughout the watershed is a potential concern for the hydrology of the creek. Mark Berry, Habitat Manager, for the Pine Creek Ranch requested the Team to address the following objectives: (1) Introduce some of the field staff and others to Proper Functioning Condition (PFC) assessments and concepts. (2) Do a PFC assessment on approximately 10 miles of Pine Creek. (3) Offer management recommendations. (4) Provide guidelines for monitoring.

  5. RSNA Washington: A retrospective view

    The 70th RSNA Meeting was held from Nov. 24-30, 1984 in the Convention Center in Washington. The number of 26 378 participants reached an all-time high. About 50 p.c. of them came there as representatives from industry, which clearly shows the commercial significance of the RSNA. The other part of the participants included radiologists, physicists, and technical and medical experts from clinics. (orig.)

  6. Benthic macroinvertebrate richness along Sausal Creek, Oakland, California

    Lara, D.; Ahumada, E.; Leon, Y.; Bracho, H.; Telles, C.

    2012-12-01

    Sausal Creek, 5.0 km long, is one of the principal watercourses in Oakland, California. The headwaters of Sausal Creek arise in the Oakland Hills and the creek flows southwestward through the city, discharging into the tidal canal that separates the island of Alameda from Oakland; the creek ultimately flows into San Francisco Bay. Due to the presence of rainbow trout, the stream health of Sausal Creek is a local conservation priority. In the present study, a survey of benthic macroinvertebrates in the creek was conducted and possible correlations between environmental variables and taxonomic richness were analyzed. Three stations along the creek were sampled using a 30.5cm 500 micron aquatic d-net, and temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen levels were measured in creek samples obtained at each station. Temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen levels remained constant along the creek. Taxonomic richness was highest at the upstream site of Palo Seco, located in an eastern section of the creek, and furthest downstream at Dimond Park, in the western portion of the creek. The Monterrey site, just west of Palo Seco was found to be significantly low in benthic macroinvertebrates. The Palo Seco and Monterrey sites are separated by Highway 13 and storm drain inputs may bring contaminants into the creek at this site. At the Monterrey site Sausal Creek follows the Hayward Fault, gas emissions or change in substrate may also affect the local population of benthic invertebrates. Further research will be conducted to determine what factors are contributing to this local anomaly.

  7. Summer food habits and trophic overlap of roundtail chub and creek chub in Muddy Creek, Wyoming

    Quist, M.C.; Bower, M.R.; Hubert, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    Native fishes of the Upper Colorado River Basin have experienced substantial declines in abundance and distribution, and are extirpated from most of Wyoming. Muddy Creek, in south-central Wyoming (Little Snake River watershed), contains sympatric populations of native roundtail chub (Gila robusta), bluehead sucker, (Catostomus discobolus), and flannelmouth sucker (C. tatipinnis), and represents an area of high conservation concern because it is the only area known to have sympatric populations of all 3 species in Wyoming. However, introduced creek chub (Semotilus atromaculatus) are abundant and might have a negative influence on native fishes. We assessed summer food habits of roundtail chub and creek chub to provide information on the ecology of each species and obtain insight on potential trophic overlap. Roundtail chub and creek chub seemed to be opportunistic generalists that consumed a diverse array of food items. Stomach contents of both species were dominated by plant material, aquatic and terrestrial insects, and Fishes, but also included gastropods and mussels. Stomach contents were similar between species, indicating high trophic, overlap. No length-related patterns in diet were observed for either species. These results suggest that creek chubs have the potential to adversely influence the roundtail chub population through competition for food and the native fish assemblage through predation.

  8. Wolf Creek electricity will shock ratepayers

    When the Wolf Creek nuclear plant in Topeka, Kansas starts up in 1984, ratepayers will have a 60 to 100% rate increase to cover construction costs because the state prohibits the inclusion of construction work in progress (CWIP) in the rate base. This illustrates the plight of small utilities that build nuclear plants. Kansas commissioners favor legislation that will give them the flexibility to exclude any new excess plant capacity from the rate base on the grounds that it will encourage utilities to sell excess capacity. Kansas utilities could adopt a trending, or phased-in approach, rather than ask for a single large increase in rates. The Wolf Creek utilities have not made a final decision on how to handle the impact on customers

  9. The macroinvertebrates of Magela Creek, Northern Territory

    The littoral zones of five permanent billabongs in Magela Creek were sampled monthly for macroinvertebrates. Greatest numbers of taxa and individuals were caught in the late wet season and early dry season in the shallow billabongs; in the deep billabongs, seasonal variations were not so marked. These changes appeared to be associated with the development of macrophytes, which offered food and shelter to the invertebrate fauna. The dominant groups were the Chironomidae, Oligochaetae and Ephemeroptera. The seasonal patterns of the catches were sufficiently consistent for future samples to be able to be compared with these initial ones with some confidence that any changes are real. This work is part of a larger study into the biota and water quality of Magela Creek designed to provide data on aquatic communities before mining of the Ranger uranium deposit starts

  10. Hatchery Evaluation Report/Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery - Tule Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.

    Watson, Montgomery

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery (Tule Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located along the Columbia River at Underwood, Washington, approximately 30 miles upstream of Bonneville Dam. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  11. Frogs of the Magela Creek system

    Facets of the reproductive biology of 24 species of frogs from the Magela Creek system were examined over two Wet seasons. Data are presented for the onset, duration and termination of activity, calling and breeding, and are correlated with temperature and relative humidity. Most species breed at the onset of the Wet season before the flood plain is completely inundated. For each species the eggs and form of the spawn clump are described

  12. Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years' data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143

  13. Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    Bowers, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toole, M.A.; van Duyn, Y. [Normandeau Associates Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    1992-02-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years` data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143.

  14. Evaluate habitat use and population dynamics of Lampreys in Cedar Creek; Aannual report 2000

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River Basin have declined to a remnant of their pre-1940s populations and the status of the western brook lamprey (L. richardsoni) is unknown. Identifying the biological and ecological factors limiting lamprey populations is critical to their recovery, but little research has been conducted on these species within the Columbia River Basin. This ongoing, multi-year study examines lamprey populations in Cedar Creek, Washington, a third-order tributary to the Lewis River. Adult (n= 40), metamorphosed (n= 116), transforming (n= 10), and ammocoete (n= 870) stages from both species were examined in 2000. Lamprey were captured using adult fish ladders, rotary screw traps, and lamprey electrofishers, and spawning ground surveys were conducted. US Forest Service level II and strategic point-specific habitat surveys were conducted to assess habitat requirements of both adult and larval lamprey. Multivariate statistics will be applied to determine relationships between abundance and habitat

  15. Steel creek macroinvertebrates: L Lake/steel creek biological monitoring program January 1986--December 1987

    O' Hop, J.R.; Lauritsen, D.; Magoulik, D.

    1988-04-01

    The macroinvertebrate community in Steel Creek was monitored at 13 sampling stations from January 1986 to December 1987 to assess the effects of L-Lake impoundment on the biological community downstream from the dam. The benthic macroinvertebrate communities were sampled monthly at 13 stations in Steel Creek using artificial substrates. Macroinvertebrates suspended in the water column were collected monthly at seven stations using drift nets. Emerging aquatic insects were sampled monthly at seven stations with floating emergence traps. Invertebrates on natural substrates (bottom sediments, snags, and macrophytes) were collected at seven stations in May and September in both 1986 and 1987. Macroinvertebrates were collected in February and August of 1986 and 1987 at 13 stations in Steel Creek using dip nets. 61 refs., 79 figs., 18 tabs.

  16. Water Exchange and Circulation in Selected Kenyan Creeks.

    Nguli, Michael Mutua

    2002-01-01

    Tides, currents, salinities and temperatures were studied from 1995-1998 in three selected creeks on the Kenya coast (Gazi Bay, Tudor and Kilifi Creeks) in order to improve knowledge on circulation and water exchange between the creeks and the ocean. Locally available meteorological data, tide gauge data and historical cruise data were also analysed. A meteorological mast was used for detailed studies of sea surface heat fluxes. The studies were carried out focussing on the monsoon seasons; t...

  17. Concentration of metals in fishes from Thane and Bassein creeks of Bombay, India

    Krishnamurti, A.J.; Nair, V.R.

    feeders, compared to plankton feeders and other pelagic carnivores. In general, fish from Bassein creek showed higher concentration of metals than those colected from Thane creek. As Thane-Bassein creek system experiences stress due to anthropogenic waste...

  18. Hydrologic analysis of Steel Creek and L Lake and the effects of flow reduction on Steel Creek habitat

    del Carmen, B.R.; Paller, M.H.

    1993-12-31

    This report was prepared to support a proposal to eliminate the EIS mandated spring flow requirements in Steel Creek below L Lake. The base flow in Steel Creek below L Lake was estimated using historical data. The water balance of L Lake was studied to evaluate the effects of flow reduction on the Steel Creek hydrologic system. The base flow in Steel Creek below L Lake is estimated as 0.28 cms (10 cfs). A reduction in L Lake discharge to 0.28 cms will result in a fish community similar to the one that existed before the impoundment of L Lake.

  19. Washington: a guide to geothermal energy development

    Bloomquist, R.G.; Basescu, N.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01

    Washington's geothermal potential is discussed. The following topics are covered: exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting, and economic factors of direct use projects. (MHR)

  20. A Creek to Bay Biological Assessment in Oakland, California

    Ahumada, E.; Ramirez, N.; Lopez, A.; Avila, M.; Ramirez, J.; Arroyo, D.; Bracho, H.; Casanova, A.; Pierson, E.

    2011-12-01

    In 2007, the Surface Water Ambient Monitoring Program (SWAMP) assessed the impact of trash on water quality in the Peralta Creek which is located in the Fruitvale district of Oakland, CA. This 2011 follow-up study will take further steps in evaluating the physical and biological impacts of pollution and human development on Peralta Creek and in the San Leandro Bay, where the Creek empties into the larger San Francisco Bay estuary. This study will utilize two forms of biological assessment in order to determine the level of water quality and ecosystem health of Peralta Creek and San Leandro Bay in Oakland, California. A Rapid Bioassesment Protocal (RBP) will be used as the method of biological assessment for Peralta Creek. RBP uses a biotic index of benthic macroinvertebrates to provide a measure of a water body's health. Larval trematodes found in two mud snails (Ilynassa obsoleta and Cerithidea californica) will be used to evaluate the health of the San Leandro Bay. Due to the complex life cycle of trematodes, the measure of trematode diversity and richness in host species serves as an indicator of estuarine health (Huspeni 2005). We have completed the assessment of one section of Peralta Creek, located at 2465 34th Avenue, Oakland, CA 94601. Abundance results indicate a moderately healthy creek because there were high levels of pollution tolerant benthic macroinvertebrates. The tolerant group of benthic macroinvertebrates includes such organisms as flatworms, leeches, and scuds. This is possibly due to this section of the creek being pumped up to the surface from culverts impacting the macroinvertebrate's life cycle. Another contributing factor to creek health is the amount of organic debris found in the creek, which inhibits the flow and oxygenation of the water, allowing for more pollution tolerant aquatic insects to persist. Further investigation is being conducted to fully assess the Peralta Creek watershed; from the preliminary results one can surmise that

  1. Bear Creek Project. Final environmental statement

    The Bear Creek Project consists of certain mining and milling operations involving uranium ore deposits located in Converse County, Wyoming. Mining of uranium from nine known ore bodies will take place over a period of ten years (estimated); a mill with a nominal capacity of 1000 tons per day of ore will be constructed and operated as long as ore is available. The waste material (tailings) from the mill, also produced at a rate of about 1000 tons per day, will be stored onsite in an impoundment. Environmental impacts and adverse effects are summarized

  2. Oyster Creek augmented offgas system startup

    Oyster Creek Nuclear Station was one of several boiling water reactors requiring backfit with an augmented offgas processing system. Engineering studies conducted during the first half of 1973 resulted in a performance specification for a system with a decontamination factor of 150. The system selected utilized catalytic recombiners with refrigerated charcoal adsorber tanks. Features of the system, up to the startup effort (April of 1977), are described. The various tests established to evaluate system performance under all modes of operation are described along with the results of the completed tests and status of the test program

  3. Zooplankton composition in Dharamtar creek adjoining Bombay harbour

    Tiwari, L.R.; Nair, V.R.

    Dharamtar creek (Bombay, India) creek maintained rich zooplankton standing stock (av. 30.3 ml 100 m/3) with peak production during August-November. Zooplankton production rate for the entire system amounted to 10.32 mg C.100 m/3 d/1 with an annual...

  4. 33 CFR 117.1001 - Cat Point Creek.

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cat Point Creek. 117.1001 Section 117.1001 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.1001 Cat Point Creek. The draw of...

  5. 77 FR 5201 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD

    2012-02-02

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD... across Bear Creek, mile 3.4, between Dundalk and Sparrows Point, MD. The proposed change will alter...

  6. 76 FR 71936 - Upper Deckers Creek Watershed, Preston County, WV

    2011-11-21

    ... Natural Resources Conservation Service Upper Deckers Creek Watershed, Preston County, WV AGENCY: Natural... notice that an environmental impact statement is being prepared for the Upper Deckers Creek Watershed... Domestic Assistance under No. 10.904--Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention--and is subject to...

  7. 78 FR 76750 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Chambers Creek, Steilacoom, WA

    2013-12-19

    ...The Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Chambers Creek Railway Bridge across Chambers Creek, mile 0.0, at Steilacoom, WA. The deviation is necessary to allow BNSF to perform maintenance and upgrade items to this vertical lift bridge in support of Positive Train Control requirements per the Rail Safety......

  8. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek in Association with Restoration Efforts, US Geological Survey Report, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

    2006-06-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attended to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first objective was to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort included measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective was to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective was to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the fourth year of a five-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

  9. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek in Association with Restoration Effors; US Geological Survey Reports, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.; Munz, Carrie S. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

    2006-02-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective was to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the third year of at least a five-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

  10. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Connolly, Patrick J. (US Geological Survey, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Western Fisheries Research Center, Cook, WA)

    2003-12-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the second year of at least a three-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

  11. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    Connolly, Patrick J. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

    2003-01-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1914. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for future genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the first year of a three-year study, this report is restricted to describing our work on the first two objectives only.

  12. Washington State biomass data book

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1991-07-01

    This is the first edition of the Washington State Biomass Databook. It assess sources and approximate costs of biomass fuels, presents a view of current users, identifies potential users in the public and private sectors, and lists prices of competing energy resources. The summary describes key from data from the categories listed above. Part 1, Biomass Supply, presents data increasing levels of detail on agricultural residues, biogas, municipal solid waste, and wood waste. Part 2, Current Industrial and Commercial Use, demonstrates how biomass is successfully being used in existing facilities as an alternative fuel source. Part 3, Potential Demand, describes potential energy-intensive public and private sector facilities. Part 4, Prices of Competing Energy Resources, shows current suppliers of electricity and natural gas and compares utility company rates. 49 refs., 43 figs., 72 tabs.

  13. Washington State biomass data book

    This is the first edition of the Washington State Biomass Databook. It assess sources and approximate costs of biomass fuels, presents a view of current users, identifies potential users in the public and private sectors, and lists prices of competing energy resources. The summary describes key from data from the categories listed above. Part 1, Biomass Supply, presents data increasing levels of detail on agricultural residues, biogas, municipal solid waste, and wood waste. Part 2, Current Industrial and Commercial Use, demonstrates how biomass is successfully being used in existing facilities as an alternative fuel source. Part 3, Potential Demand, describes potential energy-intensive public and private sector facilities. Part 4, Prices of Competing Energy Resources, shows current suppliers of electricity and natural gas and compares utility company rates. 49 refs., 43 figs., 72 tabs

  14. 77 FR 61466 - Washington Disaster #WA-00037

    2012-10-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Washington Disaster WA-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  15. Aerospace Training. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace is an economic powerhouse that generates jobs and fuels our economy. Washington's community and technical colleges produce the world-class employees needed to keep it that way. With about 1,250 aerospace-related firms employing more than 94,000 workers, Washington has the largest concentration of aerospace expertise in the nation. To…

  16. Respirators, internal dose, and Oyster Creek

    This article looks at the experience of Oyster Creek in relaxing the requirements for the use of respirators in all facets of plant maintenance, on the overall dose received by plant maintenance personnel. For Roger Shaw, director of radiological controls for three years at GPU Nuclear Corporation's Oyster Creek nuclear plant the correct dose balance is determined on a job-by-job basis: Does the job require a respirator, which is an effective means of decreasing worker inhalation of airborne radioactive particles? Will wearing a respirator slow down a worker, consequently increasing whole body radiation exposure by prolonging the time spent in fields of high external radiation? How does respiratory protection affect worker safety and to what degree? While changes to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's 10CFR20 have updated the radiation protection requirements for the nuclear industry, certain of the revisions have been directed specifically at reducing worker dose, Shaw said. open-quotes It basically delineates that dose is dose,close quotes Shaw said, open-quotes regardless of whether it is acquired externally or internally.close quotes The revision of Part 20 changed the industry's attitude toward internal dose, which had always been viewed negatively. open-quotes Internal dose was always seen as preventable by wearing respirators and by using engineering techniques such as ventilation control and decontamination,close quotes Shaw said, open-quotes whereas external dose, although reduced where practical, was seen as a fact of the job.close quotes

  17. 33 CFR 334.240 - Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian...

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md. 334.240 Section 334.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED...

  18. Sources of baseflow for the Minnehaha Creek Watershed, Minnesota, US

    Nieber, J. L.; Moore, T. L.; Gulliver, J. S.; Magner, J. A.; Lahti, L. B.

    2013-12-01

    Minnehaha Creek is among the most valued surface water features in the Minneapolis, MN metro area, with a waterfall as it enters the Minnehaha Creek park. Flow in Minnehaha Creek is heavily dependent on discharge from the stream's origin, Lake Minnetonka, the outlet of which is closed during drought periods to maintain water elevations in the lake resulting in low- (or no-) flow conditions in the creek. Stormwater runoff entering directly to the creek from the creek's largely urbanized watershed exacerbates extremes in flow conditions. Given the cultural and ecological value of this stream system, there is great interest in enhancing the cultural and ecosystem services provided by Minnehaha Creek through improvements in streamflow regime by reducing flashiness and sustaining increased low-flows. Determining the potential for achieving improvements in flow requires first that the current sources of water contributing to low-flows in the creek be identified and quantified. Work on this source identification has involved a number of different approaches, including analyses of the streamflow record using a hydrologic system model framework, examination of the Quaternary and bedrock geology of the region, estimation of groundwater-surface water exchange rates within the channel using hyporheic zone temperature surveys and flux meter measurements, and analyses of the stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in samples of stream water, groundwater, and rainfall. Analysis of baseflow recessions using the method of Brutsaert and Nieber (1977) indicates that only a small portion of the catchment, probably the riparian zone, contributes to baseflows. This result appears to be supported by the observation that the limestone/shale bedrock layer underlying the surficial aquifer has a non-zero permeability, and in a significant portion of the watershed the layer has been eroded away leaving the surficial aquifer ';bottomless' and highly susceptible to vertical (down) water loss

  19. Bear Creek Project. Draft environmental statement

    The Bear Creek Project consists of mining and milling operations involving uranium ore deposits located in Converse County, Wyoming. Mining of uranium from six known ore bodies will take place over ten years; a 1000 tons ore/day will be constructed and operated as long as ore is available. The tailings will be stored onsite in an impoundment. The project would convert 2700 acres from grazing use to mining/milling activities for about ten years. Mining would disturb a total of 1600 acres but, because of reclamation, the max acreage disturbed at any one time would be about 1000 acres, the average being about 650 acres. Dose rates were computed for an individual in a ranch house at the nearest ranch. Conditions for the protection of the environment are proposed. Possible environmental impacts evaluated cover air, land, water, soil, vegetation, wildlife, and community. A benefit-cost analysis is made

  20. Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory Data Management Plan

    Fey, Jeri; Anderson, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    This Data Management Plan (DMP) was created using the DMPTool. It describes all data collected as part of the the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) project, which focuses on research in the Boulder Creek watershed. The project is hosted at the Institute or Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR), University of Colorado at Boulder, USA.The goal for the Boulder Creek CZO is to create and collect meaningful and interesting research of the Earth’s critical zone by making this diverse dat...

  1. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe

  2. Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.

    Hillson, Todd D. [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-06-12

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to

  3. Bald eagle management guidelines, Oregon-Washington

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers bald eagle management guidelines in Oregon and Washington. The purpose of these guidelines is to maintain the environmental conditions that are...

  4. Southwestern Washington 36 arc-second DEM

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 36-second Southwest Washington Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 36-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  5. Southwestern Washington 6 arc-second DEM

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 6-second Southwest Washington Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 6-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  6. Willapa Bay, Washington Benthic Habitats 1995 Biotic

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 1995, the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) acquired 295 true color aerial photographs (1:12,000) of Willapa Bay, Washington, from the State of...

  7. Willapa Bay, Washington Benthic Habitats 1995 Geoform

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 1995, the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) acquired 295 true color aerial photographs (1:12,000) of Willapa Bay, Washington, from the State of...

  8. Willapa Bay, Washington Benthic Habitats 1995 Substrate

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 1995, the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) acquired 295 true color aerial photographs (1:12,000) of Willapa Bay, Washington, from the State of...

  9. Willapa Bay, Washington Benthic Habitats 1995 Geodatabase

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 1995, the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) acquired 295 true color aerial photographs (1:12,000) of Willapa Bay, Washington, from the State of...

  10. EAARL Topography George Washington Birthplace National Monument

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model or DEM) of George Washington Birthplace National Monument was produced from remotely-sensed,...

  11. Fishery management assessment Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides an assessment for fishery management on Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge. The assessment concluded that existing Refuge waters are...

  12. Historical flows for Bridge Creek above East Canal, Oregon

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bridge Creek originates along the northwestern slopes of Steens Mountain. It drains an area a fraction of the size of the Blitzen River watershed approximately 30...

  13. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  14. BackscatterC [SWATH]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  15. Bitter Creek National Wildlife Refuge Water Infrastructure Assessment Report

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a visit to Bitter Creek NWR on October 15th-18th, 2012, to locate and GPS water structures, springs, and other water sources. This report...

  16. Cross Creeks National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Cross Creeks National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  17. [Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May - August, 1960

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  18. [Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May - August, 1961

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  19. 1972 narrative report: Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The report begins by...

  20. [Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September - December, 1943

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by...

  1. [Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September - December, 1951

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by...

  2. Wildlife Inventory Plan Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document outlines wildlife monitoring guidelines for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge. The objectives of this plan are; 1 to standardize inventory...

  3. Channel centerline for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 2009

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold...

  4. Channel centerline for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 2005

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold...

  5. Aerial photo mosaic of Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1940

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold...

  6. Channel centerline for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1965

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold...

  7. Channel centerline for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1940

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold...

  8. Aquatic Invertebrates - Thornton Creek Restoration Project Effectiveness Monitoring

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA has designed and is currently implementing a hyporheic monitoring plan for the Thornton Creek watershed in North Seattle. This work is being conducted for...

  9. Fish Creek Watershed Lake Classification; NPRA, Alaska, 2016

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This study focuses on the development of a 20 attribute lake cover classification scheme for the Fish Creek Watershed (FCW), which is located in the National...

  10. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  11. Land Acquisition Priority Plan for Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan discusses land acquisition priorities for Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge). The proposed alternatives...

  12. Autumn floral inventory : Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an autumn floral inventory conducted on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge in 1991.

  13. Welcome to the Walnut Creek Nonbreeding Bird Monitoring Project

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of the bird monitoring project at Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge is divided into 28...

  14. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  15. Williams Creek National Fish Hatchery [Land Status Map

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map depicts lands owned andor administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Alchesaywilliams Creek National Fish Hatchery Complex.

  16. Recreational Fishing Plan : Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the Recreational Fishing Plan for Cypress Creek NWR. The Plan provides an introduction to the Refuge, information about conformance with statutory...

  17. Ecology of phytoplankton from Dharmatar Creek, west coast of India

    Tiwari, L.R.; Nair, V.R.

    Phytoplankton pigment, cell count and species diversity wee studied at five locations in Dharamtar Creek during September 1984 to November 1985. Chemical parameters indicated a healthy system free of any environmental stress. The water...

  18. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge [Narrative report: January - April 1957

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1957. The report begins by summarizing...

  19. Floodplain and wetlands assessment of the White Oak Creek Embayment

    1991-07-01

    This report describes the proposed methods for dealing with contaminants that have accumulated in White Oak Creek, White Oak Lake, and the White Oak Creek Embayment as a result of process releases and discharges from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Alternative methods of cleaning up the area which were considered in accordance with regulatory guidelines are listed, and information supporting the selected methods is provided. Also included are results of a site survey conducted at the White Oak Creek Embayment and the expected effects of the proposed control structures on the floodplain and wetlands. The appendix contains figures showing the nine cross-sections of the stream channel surveyed during studies of the White Oak Creek area.

  20. St. Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan CCP was written to guide management on St. Catherine Creek NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  1. Habitat Management Plan Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge Habitat Management Plan provides a longterm vision and specific guidance on managing habitats for the resources of concern...

  2. Erosion and deposition for Fanno Creek, Oregon 2012

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began investigating the sources and sinks of organic matter in Fanno Creek, a tributary of the Tualatin River, Oregon....

  3. Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Interim hunting plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This interim hunting plan for Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge) outlines hunting guidelines for the Refuge....

  4. Cross Creeks National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Cross Creeks NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  5. 1984 Cropland Management Plan Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge Cropland Management Plan focuses on the production of supplemental grain and browse foods to maintain wildlife populations...

  6. Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: September - December, 1956

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by...

  7. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge [Narrative report: September - December 1956

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by...

  8. EAARL Topography--Potato Creek Watershed, Georgia, 2010

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the Potato Creek watershed in Georgia was produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation...

  9. Pond Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Pond Creek NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  10. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Scott Creek, California

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Scott Creek map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  11. Whittlesey Creek National Wildlife Refuge Habitat Management Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Whittlesey Creek National Wildlife Refuge Habitat Management Plan provides a longterm vision and specific guidance on managing habitats for the resources of...

  12. Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Narrative: Calendar year 2000

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during calendar year 2000. The report begins with an...

  13. Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Narrative: Calendar year 1999

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during calendar year 1999. The report begins with an...

  14. Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Narrative: Calendar year 1998

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during calendar year 1998. The report begins with an...

  15. Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: May - August, 1958

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the...

  16. Narrative report Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge: January - April, 1962

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1962. The report begins by summarizing...

  17. [Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: January through April, 1960

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1960. The report begins by summarizing...

  18. Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: January through April, 1959

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1959. The report begins by summarizing...

  19. [Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: September - December, 1959

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1959. The report begins by...

  20. [Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May - August, 1959

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the...

  1. [Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: January through April, 1961

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1961. The report begins by summarizing...

  2. Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: January through April, 1958

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1958. The report begins by summarizing...

  3. Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Narrative: Fiscal year 1997

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during fiscal year 1997. The report begins with an introduction...

  4. 1964 Narrative report: Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by...

  5. Aerial photo mosaic of Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1965

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold...

  6. Survey of breeding birds, Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge, 1996

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a summary of the results of the third annual survey of breeding birds of Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge conducted in 1996. Information on...

  7. Fish Creek Federally Endangered Freshwater Mussel Impact Assessment

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment toxicity was evaluated for one site upstream and three sites downstream of a diesel fuel spill that occurred in Fish Creek (OH and IN) in September 1993...

  8. Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: January - April, 1954

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1954. The report begins by summarizing...

  9. 1965 Narrative report: Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by...

  10. 1966 Narrative report: Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by...

  11. Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Management Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Management Plan CMP for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge NWR was prepared to guide management direction of the Refuge over the next 15...

  12. Sediment contaminant assessment for Shoal Creek, Lawrence County, Tennessee

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment samples were collected from ten locations along Shoal Creek and analyzed for l9 metals and 20 organochlorine compounds. For the organic analyses,...

  13. St. Catherine Creek NWR Hunting Season Harvest Totals

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data summaries from hunting that occurs on St. Catherine Creek NWR. Reports include summarized harvest and hunter effort data and basic analysis of these data.

  14. [Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: January - April, 1944

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1944. The report begins by summarizing...

  15. St. Catherine Creek NWR Deer Hunt Harvest Data Summaries

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data summaries from deer hunts that occur on St. Catherine Creek NWR. Reports include summarized deer harvest data and basic analysis of these data.

  16. Narrative report Squaw Creek Refuge: September - December, 1954

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1954. The report begins by...

  17. Habitat Management Plan for Pond Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Pond Creek National Wildlife Refuge Habitat Management Plan provides a longterm vision and specific guidance on managing habitats for the resources of concern...

  18. St. Catherine Creek NWR Bird Point Count Data

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data collected during bird point counts at St. Catherine Creek NWR using the Lower Mississippi Valley Joint Venture protocol for forest dwelling birds.

  19. Compatibility determination [for Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This compatibility report for Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge determines that the 1992 interim hunting plan is...

  20. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Sandpoint Quadrangle, Washington, Idaho, and Montana

    The Sandpoint Quadrangle, Washington, Idaho, and Montana, was evaluated to identify and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits in accordance with criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Surface radiometric reconnaissance, geochemical sampling, and reconnaissance airborne radiometric surveying were used for overall evaluation of the quadrangle. Detailed airborne radiometric surveying, geologic mapping, and other types of surface studies were used in suspected favorable areas. Results of the work indicate favorability for Wyoming roll-front type uranium deposits in conglomerates and sandstones of the Tertiary O'Brien Creek and Tiger Formations. Synorogenic plutonic rocks are considered favorable in some areas for authigenic or anatectic deposits, and radioactive postorogenic plutons are favorable for magnetic-hydrothermal deposits. Small areas containing sulfide-bearing metamorphic rocks adjacent to radioactive plutons are favorable for allogenic deposits similar to those at the Midnite Mine 10km southwest of the quadrangle. Uraniferous conglomerates of possible Tertiary age in the southwest corner of the quadrangle may be favorable for sandstone-type uranium deposits. In the Cambrian Metaline Formation, the Josephine Breccia, contains local uranium concentrations and may be favorable for unclassified-type deposits. The overlying Ordovician Ledbetter Slate also contains uranium occurrences and might contain syngenetic or hydrothermal deposits. Although thorium-rich veins in Precambrian Belt Supergroup metasedimentary rocks in Idaho contain much less uranium than thorium, they may be favorable for polymetallic vein-type uranium deposits. Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks, nonradioactive plutonic rocks, Tertiary volcanic rocks, and Quaternary deposits are considered unfavorable for uranium deposits

  1. Results of the 2000 Creek Plantation Swamp Survey

    This report is a survey of the Creek Plantation located along the Savannah River and borders the southeast portion of the Savannah River Site. The land is primarily undeveloped and agricultural; its purpose is to engage in equestrian-related operations. A portion of Creek Plantation along the Savannah River is a low-lying swamp, known as the Savannah River Swamp, which is uninhabited and not easily accessible

  2. Results of the 2000 Creek Plantation Swamp Survey

    Fledderman, P.D.

    2000-10-30

    This report is a survey of the Creek Plantation located along the Savannah River and borders the southeast portion of the Savannah River Site. The land is primarily undeveloped and agricultural; its purpose is to engage in equestrian-related operations. A portion of Creek Plantation along the Savannah River is a low-lying swamp, known as the Savannah River Swamp, which is uninhabited and not easily accessible.

  3. Asotin Creek instream habitat alteration projects : habitat evaluation, adult and juvenile habitat utilization and water temperature monitoring : 2001 progress report

    Asotin Creek originates from a network of deeply incised streams on the slopes of the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. The watershed drains an area of 322 square miles that provides a mean annual flow of 74 cfs. The geomorphology of the watershed exerts a strong influence on biologic conditions for fish within the stream. Historic and contemporary land-use practices have had a profound impact on the kind, abundance, and distribution of anadromous salmonids in the watershed. Fish habitat in Asotin Creek and other local streams has been affected by agricultural development, grazing, tilling practices, logging, recreational activities and implementation of flood control structures (Neilson 1950). The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Master Plan was completed in 1994. The plan was developed by a landowner steering committee for the Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD), with technical support from various Federal, State and local entities. Actions identified within the plan to improve the Asotin Creek ecosystem fall into four main categories: (1) Stream and Riparian, (2) Forestland, (3) Rangeland, and (4) Cropland. Specific actions to be carried out within the stream and in the riparian area to improve fish habitat were: (1) create more pools, (2) increase the amount of large organic debris (LOD), (3) increase the riparian buffer zone through tree planting, and (4) increase fencing to limit livestock access. All of these actions, in combination with other activities identified in the Plan, are intended to stabilize the river channel, reduce sediment input, increase the amount of available fish habitat (adult and juvenile) and protect private property. Evaluation work described within this report was to document the success or failure of the program regarding the first two items listed (increasing pools and LOD). Beginning in 1996, the ACCD, with cooperation from local landowners and funding from Bonneville Power Administration began constructing instream

  4. Asotin Creek Instream Habitat Alteration Projects : Habitat Evaluation, Adult and Juvenile Habitat Utilization and Water Temperature Monitoring : 2001 Progress Report.

    Bumgarner, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    Asotin Creek originates from a network of deeply incised streams on the slopes of the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. The watershed drains an area of 322 square miles that provides a mean annual flow of 74 cfs. The geomorphology of the watershed exerts a strong influence on biologic conditions for fish within the stream. Historic and contemporary land-use practices have had a profound impact on the kind, abundance, and distribution of anadromous salmonids in the watershed. Fish habitat in Asotin Creek and other local streams has been affected by agricultural development, grazing, tilling practices, logging, recreational activities and implementation of flood control structures (Neilson 1950). The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Master Plan was completed in 1994. The plan was developed by a landowner steering committee for the Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD), with technical support from various Federal, State and local entities. Actions identified within the plan to improve the Asotin Creek ecosystem fall into four main categories: (1) Stream and Riparian, (2) Forestland, (3) Rangeland, and (4) Cropland. Specific actions to be carried out within the stream and in the riparian area to improve fish habitat were: (1) create more pools, (2) increase the amount of large organic debris (LOD), (3) increase the riparian buffer zone through tree planting, and (4) increase fencing to limit livestock access. All of these actions, in combination with other activities identified in the Plan, are intended to stabilize the river channel, reduce sediment input, increase the amount of available fish habitat (adult and juvenile) and protect private property. Evaluation work described within this report was to document the success or failure of the program regarding the first two items listed (increasing pools and LOD). Beginning in 1996, the ACCD, with cooperation from local landowners and funding from Bonneville Power Administration began constructing instream

  5. Conservation of Thane Creek and Ulhas River Estuary, India.

    Nikam, Vinay S; Kumar, Arun; Lalla, Kamal; Gupta, Kapil

    2009-07-01

    There has been a steady decrease in the area occupied by wetlands in creeks and estuaries adjacent urban areas due to unprecedented urban growth in coastal cities, for example, Thane Creek and Ulhas River Estuary near Mumbai, India. Urban cities serve as centres of employment and attract a large number of migrants from other places. In case of coastal cities, due to inadequate infrastructure, wastewater and solid waste are disposed of into wetlands and estuary. Discharge of sediments and solid waste into the creeks from drains and construction activities has resulted in decreased flow depth in the coastal waters of Thane Creek and Ulhas River Estuary. Various researchers have studied individual elements of Thane Creek and Ulhas River Estuary at micro level. However, a holistic approach for restoration and conservation of the creek and estuary is required. This paper presents the details of an integrated approach incorporating different conservation measures such as sewerage and sewage treatment, urban drainage management, solid waste management, mangrove plantation and dredging. PMID:21117428

  6. Chemical pollution profile of rehri creek area, karachi (sindh)

    The present investigation focuses on environmental issues along Rehri Creek area, which is an imperative creek of economic importance. During the study, a total of 30 samples of wastewater (industrial waste, Cattle colony waste and domestic waste) and seawater (infront of Rehri Goth and Lat Basti) from five sites along Rehri Creek area were collected for physical (pH and TSS), chemical (BODs, COD, salinity, phosphate, TKN, oil and grease and organic matter) and heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, As and Zn) analysis Results of the physicochemical analysis revealed that effluent from Cattle Colony (Site 4) is the major source of marine water pollution along Rehri Creek area as it has high levels of all parameter except pH Other two important sources are industrial effluent (Site 1) and domestic sewer drains (Site 2). Except pH and oil and grease concentration at Site 2, the levels of all the parameters in industrial and domestic drains are not within permissible limit. Heavy metal analysis reveals that the concentration of heavy metals along the Creek is higher than previously estimated. The study showed that marine water quality of Rehri Creek is grossly contaminated with the industrial and cattle colony effluents, which are dumped into the sea without any treatment and would create an alarming situation in future. The continued accumulation of pollutant is also responsible for ecological imbalances and biodiversity losses in the area. (author)

  7. CREEK Project's Nekton Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1998.

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a...

  8. CREEK Project's Microzooplankton Seasonal Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1999

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a...

  9. Geologic datasets for weights of evidence analysis in Northeast Washington: 4. mineral industry activity in Washington, 1985-1997

    Boleneus, D.E.; Derkey, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    This report includes a table of 339 sites representing mineral activities for mining and mineral exploration in the State of Washington from 1985 through 1997. The table was primarily compiled from annual reports in Washington Geologic Newsletter and Washington Geology. The information was compiled for use in a weights-of-evidence analysis of mineral resources in northeastern Washington.

  10. Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.

    Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

    2004-01-01

    Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated

  11. Regional geology of the Pine Creek Geosyncline

    The Pine Creek Geosyncline comprises about 14km of chronostratigraphic mainly pelitic and psammitic Lower Proterozoic sediments with interlayered tuff units, resting on granitic late Archaean complexes exposed as three small domes. Sedimentation took place in one basin, and most stratigraphic units are represented throughout the basin. The sediments were regionally deformed and metamorphosed at 1800Ma. Tightly folded greenschist facies strata in the centre grade into isoclinally deformed amphibolite facies metamorphics in the west and northeast. Pre and post-orogenic continental tholeiites, and post-orogenic granite diapirs intrude the Lower Proterozoic metasediments, and the granites are surrounded by hornfels zones up to 10km wide in the greenschist facies terrane. Cover rocks of Carpentarian (Middle Proterozoic) and younger ages rest on all these rocks unconformably and conceal the original basin margins. The Lower Proterozoic metasediments are mainly pelites (about 75 percent) which are commonly carbonaceous, lesser psammites and carbonates (about 10 percent each), and minor rudites (about 5 percent). Volcanic rocks make up about 10 percent of the total sequence. The environment of deposition ranges from shallow-marine to supratidal and fluviatile for most of the sequence, and to flysch in the topmost part. Poor exposure and deep weathering over much of the area hampers correlation of rock units; the correlation preferred by the authors is presented, and possible alternatives are discussed. Regional geological observations pertinent to uranium ore genesis are described. (author)

  12. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  13. Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

    2003-07-01

    Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

  14. Columbia River wildlife mitigation habitat evaluation procedures report: Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County pygmy rabbit projects

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites

  15. Locating inputs of freshwater to Lynch Cove, Hood Canal, Washington, using aerial infrared photography

    Sheibley, Rich W.; Josberger, Edward G.; Chickadel, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The input of freshwater and associated nutrients into Lynch Cove and lower Hood Canal (fig. 1) from sources such as groundwater seeps, small streams, and ephemeral creeks may play a major role in the nutrient loading and hydrodynamics of this low dissolved-oxygen (hypoxic) system. These disbursed sources exhibit a high degree of spatial variability. However, few in-situ measurements of groundwater seepage rates and nutrient concentrations are available and thus may not represent adequately the large spatial variability of groundwater discharge in the area. As a result, our understanding of these processes and their effect on hypoxic conditions in Hood Canal is limited. To determine the spatial variability and relative intensity of these sources, the U.S. Geological Survey Washington Water Science Center collaborated with the University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory to obtain thermal infrared (TIR) images of the nearshore and intertidal regions of Lynch Cove at or near low tide. In the summer, cool freshwater discharges from seeps and streams, flows across the exposed, sun-warmed beach, and out on the warm surface of the marine water. These temperature differences are readily apparent in aerial thermal infrared imagery that we acquired during the summers of 2008 and 2009. When combined with co-incident video camera images, these temperature differences allow identification of the location, the type, and the relative intensity of the sources.

  16. Ecological effects of contaminants and remedial actions in Bear Creek

    Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Burris, J.A. (C. E. Environmental, Inc., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Ecological studies of the Bear Creek watershed, which drains the area surrounding several Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities, were initiated in May 1984 and are continuing at present. These studies consisted of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek, and they were followed by a presently ongoing monitoring phase that involves reduced sampling intensities. The characterization phase utilized two approaches: (1) instream sampling of benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek to identify spatial and temporal patterns in distribution and abundance and (2) laboratory bioassays on water samples from Bear Creek and selected tributaries to identify potential sources of toxicity to biota. The monitoring phase of the ecological program relates to the long-term goals of identifying and prioritizing contaminant sources and assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions. It continues activities of the characterization phase at less frequent intervals. The Bear Greek Valley is a watershed that drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in Bear Creek Valley resulted in contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Extensive remedial actions have been proposed at waste sites, and some of the have been implemented or are now underway. The proposed study plan consists of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek in the first year followed by a reduction in sampling intensity during the monitoring phase of the plan. The results of sampling conducted from May 1984 through early 1989 are presented in this report.

  17. Ecological effects of contaminants and remedial actions in Bear Creek

    Ecological studies of the Bear Creek watershed, which drains the area surrounding several Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities, were initiated in May 1984 and are continuing at present. These studies consisted of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek, and they were followed by a presently ongoing monitoring phase that involves reduced sampling intensities. The characterization phase utilized two approaches: (1) instream sampling of benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek to identify spatial and temporal patterns in distribution and abundance and (2) laboratory bioassays on water samples from Bear Creek and selected tributaries to identify potential sources of toxicity to biota. The monitoring phase of the ecological program relates to the long-term goals of identifying and prioritizing contaminant sources and assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions. It continues activities of the characterization phase at less frequent intervals. The Bear Greek Valley is a watershed that drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in Bear Creek Valley resulted in contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Extensive remedial actions have been proposed at waste sites, and some of the have been implemented or are now underway. The proposed study plan consists of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek in the first year followed by a reduction in sampling intensity during the monitoring phase of the plan. The results of sampling conducted from May 1984 through early 1989 are presented in this report

  18. 1998 BPA habitat projects completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, WA; Ridge-Top to Ridge-Top Habitat Projects; 1998 BPA Completion Report - November 1999

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-seven acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed

  19. 1999 BPA habitat projects completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, WA; Ridge-Top to Ridge-Top Habitat Projects; 1999 BPA Completion Report - January 2000

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed

  20. Anencephaly: An Ongoing Investigation in Washington State.

    Barron, Sara

    2016-03-01

    : In the spring of 2012, a nurse in Washington State detected a cluster of babies born with anencephaly-a fatal condition in which infants are born without parts of the brain or skull. The resulting investigation initially confirmed a rate of anencephaly between January 2010 and January 2013 of 8.4 per 10,000 live births-more than four times the national average. As of November 2015, cases of anencephaly in Washington State have continued to increase, with the current rate estimated at 9.5 per 10,000 live births. While no distinct cause has yet been determined, neural tube defects-including anencephaly-are known to have multiple causes, including folic acid deficit, genetic variants in the folate pathway, and exposure to a variety of environmental and occupational toxins. This article describes many of these risk factors and explores the findings of Washington's ongoing investigation. PMID:26914056

  1. Heavy metal contents of the karasu creek sediments, Nigde, Turkey.

    Yalcin, M Gurhan; Narin, Ibrahim; Soylak, Mustafa

    2007-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination in sediments of the Karasu spring was investigated in the presented study. In this respect, sediment samples were collected from contaminant sites along the spring starting from the spring water manifestation site, base of the Akkaya dam to the dam exit site. Heavy metal concentrations were determined by X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer. Cobalt, copper, arsenic, tin, nickel, zinc, cadmium, lead, aluminum, iron, titan, chromium and manganese contents of the Karasu creek sediments are found as 18.30-69.00, 12.40-595.0 5.50-345.3, 5.80-15.1, 10.9-64.1, 28.90-103,300, 4.1-356.2, 7.70-37,840, 13,460-109,400, 11,740-62,900, 22.18-59.04, 41.70-369 and 12.09-3,480 mg/kg, respectively. Results indicate the presence of a contamination in the Karasu creek. All the metal concentrations were found to be exceeding their acceptable limit values. Eutrophication is developed in the Karasu creek and the Akkaya dam. It is thought that heavy metal accumulation in the creek is originated from discharge from mine quarries, industrial and domestic wastes. Protection zones should be defined and all necessary measures must be taken along the Karasu creek. PMID:17057990

  2. Surficial geology of the Cane Creek basin, Lauderdale County, Tennessee

    Miller, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    The surficial geology of the Cane Creek basin, in Lauderdale County, West Tennessee, was studied from 1985-88. Peoria Loess is the parent material from which soils in the Cane Creek drainage basin were derived. In general, a brown silt grades into a gray silt from 5 to I7 feet below ground surface. This color change probably represents depth to water table prior to the channelization of Cane Creek. Only at river mile 11.9 does rock outcrop near the main channel. Lower reaches of major tributaries have surficial geology similar to the main channel. In upper reaches of Hyde Creek and Fain Spring Creek, the sequence from the St&ace is sand and gravels, red-brown sandstone, sand and clay layers, and then, an orange sand layer. Coarse-grained deposits are found most often along the northern boundary of the basin and only occasionally in areas to the west and south of the main channel. Depth to sand or gravel ranges from about 0 to 158 feet in the uplands, and generally deeper than 40 feet near the main channel.

  3. Sherman Creek Hatchery, annual report 2000

    The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. These strategic changes have been the result of recommendations through the Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) and were done to enhance imprinting, improve survival and operate the two kokanee facilities more effectively. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear 200,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake

  4. Evaluate Habitat Use and Population Dynamics of Lampreys in Cedar Creek, Annual Report 2002.

    Pirtle, Jodi; Stone, Jennifer; Barndt, Scott

    2003-03-01

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River basin have declined to a remnant of their pre-1940s populations and the status of the western brook lamprey (L. richardsoni) and river lamprey (L. ayresi) is unknown. Identifying the biological and ecological factors limiting lamprey populations is critical to their recovery, but little research has been conducted on these species within the Columbia River basin. This ongoing, multi-year study examines lamprey populations in Cedar Creek, Washington, a third-order tributary to the Lewis River. This annual report describes the activities and results of the third year of this project. Adult (n = 62), metamorphosed (n = 76), transforming (n = 4), and ammocoete (n = 315) stages of Pacific and western brook lamprey were examined in 2002. Lampreys were captured using adult fish ladders, lamprey pots, rotary screw traps, and lamprey electrofishers. In addition, fifty-four spawning ground surveys were conducted during which 124 Pacific lamprey and 13 western brook lamprey nests were identified. Stream gradient of spawning grounds were surveyed to better understand spawning habitat requirements.

  5. Water‐Data Report 413723083123801 Crane Creek at Ottawa NWR-2013

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water levels and water quality parameters recorded on Crane Creek. Water-Data Report 2013 413723083123801 Crane Creek Mouth at Ottawa NWR LOCATION: Lat. 41°37'23"N,...

  6. Birch Creek, Alaska, a wild and scenic river analysis: Preliminary draft

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Upper Birch Creek, Alaska possessed values which qualify it for inclusion in the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. The upper Birch Creek and its immediate...

  7. Distribution of decapod larvae in the Bombay Harbour-Thana-Bassein Creek regions

    Ramaiah, Neelam; Abbas, M.S.; Nair, V.R

    Variations in the abundance and composition of larval decapods were studied from 90 km stretch of the Bombay Harbour-Thana Creek-Bassein Creek (BHTCBC) system for a period of 15 months. The larvae belonged to Penacidea, Caridea, Anomura...

  8. Geology of the lower Yellow Creek Area, Northwestern Colorado

    The lower Yellow Creek area is located in Rio Blanco and Moffat Counties of northwestern Colorado, about midway between the towns of Rangely and Meeker. The study area is in the northwestern part of the Piceance Creek basin, a very deep structural and sedimentary basin that formed during the Laramide orogeny. Potentially important resources in the area are oil shale and related minerals, oil and gas, coal, and uranium. Topics discussed in the report include: Stratigraphy (Subsurface rocks, Cretaceous rocks, Tertiary rocks, and Quaternary deposits); Structure (Midland anticline, graben at Pinyon Ridge, and Crooked Wash syncline, Folds and faults in the vicinity of the White River, Red Wash syncline and central graben zone, Yellow Creek anticlinal nose); Economic geology (Oil shale and associated minerals, Coal, Oil and gas, Uranium, Gravel)

  9. Connect the Book. George Washington's Teeth

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    February celebrates both National Children's Dental Health Month and President's Day (February 21), so this month's "Connect the Book" column features a book with connections to both events. George Washington, the first President of the United States (1789-1797) and known as the "Father of Our Country," had a serious dental health problem that…

  10. Natural phenomena hazards, Hanford Site, Washington

    This document presents the natural phenomena hazard loads for use in implementing DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, and supports development of double-shell tank systems specifications at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The natural phenomena covered are seismic, flood, wind, volcanic ash, lightning, snow, temperature, solar radiation, suspended sediment, and relative humidity

  11. Washington Irving and the American Indian.

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some modern scholars feel that Washington Irving vacillated between romanticism and realism in his literary treatment of the American Indian. However, a study of all his works dealing with Indians, placed in context with his non-Indian works, reveals that his attitude towards Indians was intelligent and enlightened for his time. (CM)

  12. Washington (Wash) C. Winn: In Memoriam

    2012-03-08

    Dr. Mike Miller and Dr. David Walker dicuss the career and life of noted clinical biologist, Dr. Washington C. Winn Jr.  Created: 3/8/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/12/2012.

  13. Doctors of Osteopathy Licensed in Washington.

    Senters, Jo

    Based on information gathered by the Health Manpower Project through a survey cosponsored with the Washington Osteopathic Medical Association, this report begins with a statement of philosophy of osteopathic medicine and proceeds to comment on where such professional education is available. Remarks on the type of educational background of the…

  14. Evaluation of Operations Scenarios for Managing the Big Creek Marsh

    Wilson, Ian; Rahman, Masihur; Wychreschuk, Jeremy; Lebedyk, Dan; Bolisetti, Tirupati

    2013-04-01

    Wetland management in changing climate is important for maintaining sustainable ecosystem as well as for reducing the impact of climate change on the environment as wetlands act as natural carbon sinks. The Big Creek Marsh within the Essex County is a Provincially Significant Wetland (PSW) in Ontario, Canada. The marsh is approximately 900 hectares in area and is primarily fed by streamflow from the Big Creek Watershed. The water level of this wetland has been managed by the stakeholders using a system of pumps, dykes and a controlled outlet to the Lake Erie. In order to adequately manage the Big Creek Marsh and conserve diverse aquatic plant species, Essex Region Conservation Authority (ERCA), Ontario has embarked on developing an Operations Plan to maintain desire water depths during different marsh phases, viz., Open water, Hemi and Overgrown marsh phases. The objective of the study is to evaluate the alternatives for managing water level of the Big Creek Marsh in different marsh phases. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a continuous simulation model was used to simulate streamflow entering into the marsh from the Big Creek watershed. A Water Budget (WB) model was developed for the Big Creek Marsh to facilitate in operational management of the marsh. The WB model was applied to simulate the marsh level based on operations schedules, and available weather and hydrologic data aiming to attain the target water depths for the marsh phases. This paper presents the results of simulated and target water levels, streamflow entering into the marsh, water releasing from the marsh, and water pumping into and out of the marsh under different hydrologic conditions.

  15. Identification and characterization of wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, characterize, and map the wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed. A preliminary wetland categorization system based on the Cowardin classification system (Cowardin et al. 1979) with additional site-specific topographic, vegetation, and disturbance characteristic modifiers was developed to characterize the type of wetlands that exist in the Bear Creek watershed. An additional objective was to detect possible relationships among site soils, hydrology, and the occurrence of wetlands in the watershed through a comparison of existing data with the field survey. Research needs are discussed in the context of wetland functions and values and regulatory requirements for wetland impact assessment and compensatory mitigation

  16. Identification and characterization of wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed

    Rosensteel, B.A. [JAYCOR, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trettin, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, characterize, and map the wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed. A preliminary wetland categorization system based on the Cowardin classification system (Cowardin et al. 1979) with additional site-specific topographic, vegetation, and disturbance characteristic modifiers was developed to characterize the type of wetlands that exist in the Bear Creek watershed. An additional objective was to detect possible relationships among site soils, hydrology, and the occurrence of wetlands in the watershed through a comparison of existing data with the field survey. Research needs are discussed in the context of wetland functions and values and regulatory requirements for wetland impact assessment and compensatory mitigation.

  17. 75 FR 71106 - Deer Creek Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    2010-11-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Deer Creek Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for... October 14, 2010, Deer Creek Hydro, LLC (Deer Creek Hydro) filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act (FPA), proposing to study the feasibility of the...

  18. 76 FR 65118 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Sparrows Point, MD

    2011-10-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Sparrows... Avenue) highway toll drawbridge across Bear Creek, mile 1.5, Sparrows Point, MD was replaced with a fixed... Bear Creek, mile 1.5 was removed and replaced with a fixed bridge in 1998. Prior to 1998, a...

  19. 76 FR 12947 - Bear Creek Hydro Associates, LLC; Notice of Declaration of Intention and Soliciting Comments...

    2011-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bear...: DI11-3-000. c. Date Filed: February 14, 2011. ] d. Applicant: Bear Creek Hydro Associates, LLC. e. Name of Project: Bear Creek Hydro Project. f. Location: The Bear Creek Hydro Project will be located...

  20. 75 FR 68780 - Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC; Notice of Filing

    2010-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC; Notice of Filing November 2, 2010. Take notice that on October 27, 2010, Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC (Cedar Creek) filed an appeal with the...

  1. 76 FR 62758 - Wallowa-Whitman and Umatilla National Forests, Oregon Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans

    2011-10-11

    ... Forest Service Wallowa-Whitman and Umatilla National Forests, Oregon Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans... of mining Plans of Operation in the Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans analysis area on the Whitman... proposed mining Plans in the portions of the Granite Creek Watershed under their administration. As...

  2. 76 FR 13344 - Beaver Creek Landscape Management Project, Ashland Ranger District, Custer National Forest...

    2011-03-11

    ... Environmental Impact Statement for the Beaver Creek Landscape Management Project in the Federal Register (75 FR... Creek Landscape Management Project was published in the Federal Register on October 15, 2010 (75 FR... Forest Service Beaver Creek Landscape Management Project, Ashland Ranger District, Custer National...

  3. 78 FR 62361 - Green Mountain Power Corporation; Vermont; Otter Creek Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Proposed...

    2013-10-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Green Mountain Power Corporation; Vermont; Otter Creek Hydroelectric Project... that could be affected by issuance of a new license for the Otter Creek Hydroelectric Project No. 2558..., as applicant for the Otter Creek Hydroelectric Project, has expressed an interest in this...

  4. 78 FR 26771 - Otter Creek Solar LLC; Notice of Petition for Enforcement

    2013-05-08

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Otter Creek Solar LLC; Notice of Petition for Enforcement Take notice that on May 1, 2013, Otter Creek Solar LLC (Otter Creek) filed a Petition for Enforcement, pursuant to... tariff program, called the Substainably Priced Energy Enterprise Development or SPEED Program....

  5. Postglacial volcanic deposits at Glacier Peak, Washington, and potential hazards from future eruptions; a preliminary report

    Beget, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Eruptions and other geologic events at Glacier Peak volcano in northern Washington have repeatedly affected areas near the volcano as well as areas far downwind and downstream. This report describes the evidence of this activity preserved in deposits on the west and east flanks of the volcano. On the west side of Glacier Peak the oldest postglacial deposit is a large, clayey mudflow which traveled at least 35 km down the White Chuck River valley sometime after 14,000 years ago. Subsequent large explosive eruptions produced lahars and at least 10 pyroclastic-flow deposits, including a semiwelded vitric tuff in the White Chuck River valley. These deposits, known collectively as the White Chuck assemblage, form a valley fill which is locally preserved as far as 100 km downstream from the volcano in the Stillaguamish River valley. At least some of the assemblage is about 11,670-11,500 radiocarbon years old. A small clayey lahar, containing reworked blocks of the vitric tuff, subsequently traveled at least 15 km down the White Chuck River. This lahar is overlain by lake sediments containing charred wood which is about 5,500 years old. A 150-m-thick assemblage of pyroclastic-flow deposits and lahars, called the Kennedy Creek assemblage, is in part about 5,500-5,100 radiocarbon years old. Lithic lahars from this assemblage extend at least 100 km downstream in the Skagit River drainage. The younger lahar assemblages, each containing at least three lahars and reaching at least 18 km downstream from Glacier Peak in the White Chuck River valley, are about 2,800 and 1,800 years old, respectively. These are postdated by a lahar containing abundant oxyhornblende dacite, which extends at least 30 km to the Sauk River. A still younger lahar assemblage that contains at least five lahars, and that also extends at least 30 km to the Sauk River, is older than a mature forest growing on its surface. At least one lahar and a flood deposit form a low terrace at the confluence of the

  6. 1979-1980 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

    Korosec, M.A.; Schuster, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for seven papers. Also included are a bibliography of geothermal resource information for the State of Washington, well temperature information and locations in the State of Washington, and a map of the geology of the White Pass-Tumac Mountain Area, Washington. (MHR)

  7. Key Facts about Higher Education in Washington. 2012

    Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Key Facts about Higher Education in Washington" provides vital data to chart higher education's progress and challenges. First published in 2002 by the Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, this annual report highlights "Key Facts" about Washington's postsecondary institutions--including faculty, students,…

  8. Sediment-Phosphorus Relationships in Deer Creek Reservoir

    Messer, Jay J.; Hardy, Thomas B.; Ihnat, Jean M.

    1984-01-01

    Summary and Conclusions: Laboratory analyses of sediment samples recovered from Deer Creek Reservoir showed the sediments to have amoderate potential for serving as a source of phosphorus (P) for the overlying water solumn under anaerobic conditions. This source could account for the occurrence or exacerbation of blue-green algal blooms in the upper end of the reservoir when the sediment surface becomes anaerobic ...

  9. EAARL topography-Potato Creek watershed, Georgia, 2010

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Fredericks, Xan; Jones, J.W.; Wright, C.W.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.

    2011-01-01

    This DVD contains lidar-derived first-surface (FS) and bare-earth (BE) topography GIS datasets of a portion of the Potato Creek watershed in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River basin, Georgia. These datasets were acquired on February 27, 2010.

  10. BUCKS LAKE AND CHIPS CREEK ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    Sorensen, Martin L.; Linne, J. Mitchell

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral-resource assessment of the Bucks Lake and Chips Creek Roadless Areas, California indicate several areas with mineral-resource potential. The presence or absence of these potentially auriferous deposits can best be determined by drilling through the relatively thin cover of volcanic rocks.

  11. 76 FR 13524 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA

    2011-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA AGENCY: Federal Communications... Congressional Review Act, see U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio...

  12. 78 FR 47427 - AUC, LLC Reno Creek, In Situ

    2013-08-05

    ... FR 49139; August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires participants to submit and serve all... filing requirements of the NRC's E-Filing Rule (72 FR 49139; August 28, 2007) apply to appeals of NRC... COMMISSION AUC, LLC Reno Creek, In Situ Leach Uranium Recovery Project, License Application Request...

  13. The Induced Self-Purification of Creeks and Rivers

    Mikhailovskii, V

    2000-01-01

    The clean-up of several Creeks and Rivers by induction of a self-purification process was provided. The process took place at all the sites studied with the up to 100% resulted removal of polluting agents depending on the site and nature of the contaminant. The self-purification mechanism could be used for drinking and technical water preparation.

  14. Petroleum hydrocarbons in surface sediments in Kandla creek (Gujarat)

    Kadam, A.N.

    Petroleum hydrocarbons in the surface sediments were determined gravimetrically and spectroscopically to evaluate petroleum oil pollution in the Kandla creek. They ranged from 9.6 — 140.5 and 6.5 — 23.3 μg g-1 (wet wt.) respectively. Gas...

  15. Enhanced oil and gas recovery in Michigan: Beaver Creek Field

    Pollom, R.J.; Layton, F.L.; Lorenz, J.S.; Matzkanin, A.D.; Wilson, S.E.

    1976-01-01

    The Beaver Creek Field produces from an anticlinal structure being waterflooded in the Richfield interval. It produces from one lensic rock unit whose permeability and porosity are relatively uniform throughout the field. Orderly development and prudent operating procedures have allowed the field to surpass its original primary production estimates by over 3,000,000 barrels of oil. 4 figures, 2 tables.

  16. 75 FR 14462 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology...

    2010-03-25

    ... Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA, and Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington... of Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA, and the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum... Henebry-DeLeon, NAGPRA Program Director, Department of Anthropology, Central Washington...

  17. Low-temperature geothermal resources of Washington

    Schuster, J.E. [Washington State Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA (United States). Div. of Geology and Earth Resources; Bloomquist, R.G. [Washington State Energy Office, Olympia, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This report presents information on the location, physical characteristics, and water chemistry of low-temperature geothermal resources in Washington. The database includes 941 thermal (>20C or 68F) wells, 34 thermal springs, lakes, and fumaroles, and 238 chemical analyses. Most thermal springs occur in the Cascade Range, and many are associated with stratovolcanoes. In contrast, 97 percent of thermal wells are located in the Columbia Basin of southeastern Washington. Some 83.5 percent are located in Adams, Benton, Franklin, Grant, Walla Walla, and Yakima Counties. Yakima County, with 259 thermal wells, has the most. Thermal wells do not seem to owe their origin to local sources of heat, such as cooling magma in the Earth`s upper crust, but to moderate to deep circulation of ground water in extensive aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group and interflow sedimentary deposits, under the influence of a moderately elevated (41C/km) average geothermal gradient.

  18. 78 FR 2990 - Bear Creek Storage Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    2013-01-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Bear Creek Storage Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization Take notice that on December 21, 2012, Bear Creek Storage Company, L.L.C. (Bear Creek), 569... the Natural Gas Act, and Bear Creek's blanket certificate issued in Docket No. CP10-28-000 on...

  19. 77 FR 62500 - Peabody Trout Creek Reservoir LLC; Notice of Intent To File License Application, Filing of Pre...

    2012-10-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Peabody Trout Creek Reservoir LLC; Notice of Intent To File License...: Peabody Trout Creek Reservoir LLC. e. Name of Project: Trout Creek Reservoir Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: On Trout Creek, 15 miles southwest of Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The project occupies 4.3...

  20. Pine Creek Ranch, FY 2001 annual report; ANNUAL

    Pine Creek Ranch was purchased in 1999 by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs using Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation funds. The 25,000 acre property will be managed in perpetuity for the benefit of fish and wildlife habitat. Major issues include: (1) Restoring quality spawning and rearing habitat for stealhead. Streams are incised and fish passage barriers exist from culverts and possibly beaver dams. In addition to stealhead habitat, the Tribes are interested in overall riparian recovery in the John Day River system for wildlife habitat, watershed values and other values such as recreation. (2) Future grazing for specific management purposes. Past grazing practices undoubtedly contributed to current unacceptable conditions. The main stem of Pine Creek has already been enrolled in the CREP program administered by the USDA, Natural Resource Conservation Service in part because of the cost-share for vegetation restoration in a buffer portion of old fields and in part because of rental fees that will help the Tribes to pay the property taxes. Grazing is not allowed in the riparian buffer for the term of the contract. (3) Noxious weeds are a major concern. (4) Encroachment by western juniper throughout the watershed is a potential concern for the hydrology of the creek. Mark Berry, Habitat Manager, for the Pine Creek Ranch requested the Team to address the following objectives: (1) Introduce some of the field staff and others to Proper Functioning Condition (PFC) assessments and concepts. (2) Do a PFC assessment on approximately 10 miles of Pine Creek. (3) Offer management recommendations. (4) Provide guidelines for monitoring

  1. Assessment of hydrology, water quality, and trace elements in selected placer-mined creeks in the birch creek watershed near central, Alaska, 2001-05

    Kennedy, Ben W.; Langley, Dustin E.

    2007-01-01

    Executive Summary The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, completed an assessment of hydrology, water quality, and trace-element concentrations in streambed sediment of the upper Birch Creek watershed near Central, Alaska. The assessment covered one site on upper Birch Creek and paired sites, upstream and downstream from mined areas, on Frying Pan Creek and Harrison Creek. Stream-discharge and suspended-sediment concentration data collected at other selected mined and unmined sites helped characterize conditions in the upper Birch Creek watershed. The purpose of the project was to provide the Bureau of Land Management with baseline information to evaluate watershed water quality and plan reclamation efforts. Data collection began in September 2001 and ended in September 2005. There were substantial geomorphic disturbances in the stream channel and flood plain along several miles of Harrison Creek. Placer mining has physically altered the natural stream channel morphology and removed streamside vegetation. There has been little or no effort to re-contour waste rock piles. During high-flow events, the abandoned placer-mine areas on Harrison Creek will likely contribute large quantities of sediment downstream unless the mined areas are reclaimed. During 2004 and 2005, no substantial changes in nutrient or major-ion concentrations were detected in water samples collected upstream from mined areas compared with water samples collected downstream from mined areas on Frying Pan Creek and Harrison Creek that could not be attributed to natural variation. This also was true for dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance-a measure of total dissolved solids. Sample sites downstream from mined areas on Harrison Creek and Frying Pan Creek had higher median suspended-sediment concentrations, by a few milligrams per liter, than respective upstream sites. However, it is difficult to attach much importance to the small downstream increase

  2. Hydrodynamics of a small trained tidal inlet (Currumbin Creek, Australia)

    Shaeri, S.; Tomlinson, R. B.; Etemad-Shahidi, A.; Strauss, D.; Hughes, L. P.

    2014-04-01

    Small tidal inlets are important features of coastal areas, in terms of provision of access from a back barrier water-body to the ocean as well as periodic circulation of fresh nutrients for the local ecology. Usually, dimensional and geometrical characteristics contribute significantly to morphological stability or instability of a particular inlet and necessitate an individual investigation of any desired location. In other words, generalized usage of previous empirical and experimental research of a different position can hardly be used for other places. In this regard, one of the powerful tools to understand the physical processes of a particular region is to collect as much field data as possible. Such a dataset is used to further analyse and explore the governing processes and can also be used for building a numerical computer model for supplementary studies. In this research, the results of a comprehensive field measurement at Currumbin Creek, Queensland, Australia are presented. This study is part of broader research to investigate the long term evolution of the Currumbin entrance and its adjacent beaches. Currently, an annual dredging campaign is needed to reduce the risk of flooding due to excess rainfall inundations and to maintain water quality. The majority of data were collected over a three month period consistent with the time of the 2012 dredging operation. However, due to the loss of some instrumentation, data collection for some of the parameters was repeated till the middle of May 2013. All collected data included: (1) nearshore waves and tide; (2) creek tidal variation; (3) creek flow discharge and velocity; (4) bathymetric survey of the creek; (5) beach profile evolution survey; and (6) sediment sampling. The measurement showed that the creek entrance is tidally dominated, with flood events having a major role in sediment transport into the creek. The nearshore stations' wave data illustrated the marginal effect of the beach curvature between

  3. Uranium favorability of tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Pend Oreille River valley, Washington

    Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the Pend Oreille River valley were investigated in a regional study to determine the favorability for potential uranium resources of northeastern Washington. This project involved measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water well logs. The Box Canyon Dam area north of Ione is judged to have very high favorability. Thick-bedded conglomerates interbedded with sandstones and silty sandstones compose the Tiger Formation in this area, and high radioactivity levels are found near the base of the formation. Uranophane is found along fracture surfaces or in veins. Carbonaceous material is present throughout the Tiger Formation in the area. Part of the broad Pend Oreille valley surrounding Cusick, Washington, is an area of high favorability. Potential host rocks in the Tiger Formation, consisting of arkosic sandstones interbedded with radioactive shales, probably extend throughout the subsurface part of this area. Carbonaceous material is present and some samples contain high concentrations of uranium. In addition, several other possible chemical indicators were found. The Tiger-Lost Creek area is rated as having medium favorability. The Tiger Formation contains very hard, poorly sorted granite conglomerate with some beds of arkosic sandstone and silty sandstone. The granite conglomerate was apparently derived from source rocks having relatively high uranium content. The lower part of the formation is more favorable than the upper part because of the presence of carbonaceous material, anomalously high concentrations of uranium, and other possible chemical indicators. The area west of Ione is judged to have low favorability, because of the very low permeability of the rocks and the very low uranium content

  4. 33 CFR 207.170d - Taylor Creek, navigation lock (S-193) across the entrance to Taylor Creek at Lake Okeechobee...

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Taylor Creek, navigation lock (S..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.170d Taylor Creek, navigation lock..., and navigation. (a) The owner of or agency controlling the lock shall not be required to operate...

  5. Energy Northwest: Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington

    None

    1977-10-01

    The four-state area, one of 10 Federal regions established to streamline Federal operations and encourage Federal-state-local cooperation, includes Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The sources of energy and some energy technology are first reviewed briefly. The physical characteristics and regional developments are identified. Energy reserves, production, imports, facilities, and consumption are examined for the Northwest. The following energy issues are examined: conservation, electric rates, Clean Air Act of 1970, continental shelf development, transmission corridors, centralized electric generation, electric generation mix, electric power planning, environment and safety regulations, water use, electric energy forecasts, and oil tankers. (MCW)

  6. White Oak Creek embayment sediment retention structure design and construction

    White Oak Creek is the major surface water drainage throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Samples taken from the lower portion of the creek revealed high levels of Cesium 137 and lower level of Cobalt 60 in near surface sediment. Other contaminants present in the sediment included: lead, mercury, chromium, and PCBs. In October 1990, DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) agreed to initiate a time critical removal action in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) to prevent the transport of the contaminated sediments into the Clinch River system. This paper discusses the environmental, regulatory, design, and construction issues that were encountered in conducting the remediation work

  7. Water quality monitoring report for the White Oak Creek Embayment

    Water quality monitoring activities that focused on the detection of resuspended sediments in the Clinch River were conducted in conjunction with the White Oak Creek Embayment (WOCE) time-critical Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to construct a sediment-retention structure at the mouth of White Oak Creek (WOC). Samples were collected by use of a 24-h composite sampler and through real-time water grab sampling of sediment plumes generated by the construction activities. Sampling stations were established both at the WOC mouth, immediately adjacent to the construction site, and at K-1513, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site drinking water intake approximately 9.6 km downstream in the Clinch River. Results are described

  8. Environmental Groundwater Monitoring of Jones Creek Field, Niger Delta, Nigeria

    Felix C. Ugbe

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater monitoring exercise was carried out in Jones Creek field of Western Niger Delta. The aim was to ascertain the groundwater status of the area where oil exploration has been carried out for over four decades. Ten boreholes were drilled to capture the ground water flow direction. Both in situ and laboratory analyses were conducted on the water samples to ascertain whether or not there is contamination. The status of the groundwater indicates that it meets WHO maximum permissible stan...

  9. The Flotational Mechanism of Etobicoke Creek's Self-Purification

    Fisenko, A I

    2000-01-01

    A flotational mechanism of Etobicoke Creek's self-purification has been investigated. It is shown that the froth contains a high concentration of polluting agents. Chemical analyses of the top layer of surface water in comparison to both before and after froth collector in the course of a year are provided. As a result, the concentrations of pollutants by utilizing the model froth collector are decreased.

  10. Environmental Assessment Mammoth-Duck Creek Recovery Project

    United States Forest Service

    1996-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) documents the analysis of a Proposed Action and the No Action alternative for the Mammoth-Duck Creek Recovery Project. The Proposed Action is designed to meet the following Purpose and Need within urban interface areas, Forest campgrounds and along designated Forest roads (Focus Areas): restore forest health by reducing bark beetle populations and protecting and retaining scenic vegetation; eliminate safety hazards by reducing fuels buildup and fire danger...

  11. Zooplankton composition and abundance in Mida Creek, Kenya

    Osore, M.K.W.; Mwaluma, J.M.; FIERS, F; Daro, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    In order to determine the resident assemblages of zooplankton in Mida Creek, Kenya, a survey was conducted from May 1996 to Apr. 1997 for which we studied their seasonal composition, abundance, and distribution. Twenty-seven major zooplankton taxa were identified. The order Copepoda was the most abundant taxon dominated mainly by the genera Acartia, Paracalanus, Labidocera, Temora, Centropages, and Calanopia. Other common zooplankton taxa included the Medusae, Ctenophora, Brachyura larvae, an...

  12. PATHOGENIC MICROORGANISMS ISOLATED FROM PERIWINKLES IN CREEKS SOUTH-SOUTH OF NIGERIA

    P. NWIYI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and twenty pieces of periwinkle were obtain each from Yenogoa and Oron Creek. The periwinkle were of two genera namely: Pachymelania aurita obtained from Oronk Creek located in Akwa-Ibom State, while the Tympanotonus fuscatus notably a brackish water habitat was obtained from Yenogoa in Bayelsa state both in south-south Nigeria. Evaluation of possible microbiological isolate was carried out according to Cowan and Steel’s Manuel for medical Bacterial identification. The Creek in Yenogoa presented high level of Coliform count 2.6×105cfug-1 while the Oron Creek had an unacceptable load of Salmonella count 6×106cfug-1. The total bacterial count was highest in Oron Creek 1.46×108cfug-1 from Tympanotonus fuscatus. The microorganisms isolated from both Creeks were Esherichia coli, proteus sp, salmonella sp, pseudomonas sp and Enterobacter sp. Proteus sp was the least isolated while Salmonella sp was the highest.

  13. Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State

    Garcia, N.

    1996-04-01

    President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

  14. State of Washington radiation guidance for Hanford

    Cleanup of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site is being managed through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The participants are the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the State of Washington, with the Department of Ecology being the lead for the State of Washington. Through a memorandum of understanding the Department of Health is designated as the primary state agency for protection of human health and the environment from ionizing radiation. As part of this responsibility, the Department of Health is developing radiation cleanup guidance for Hanford cleanup. Another reason for developing State guidance is that there are no federal regulations that provide guidance on residual radioactivity on lands that will be released for public use. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency both have prepared draft regulations, but the issuance of these is uncertain. The state guidance is compatible with draft federal guidance and includes numerical guidance for residual contamination, modeling parameters, look-up tables, and land use categories. This guidance will apply until such a time as they are superseded by applicable federal regulations or the state environmental radiation standard

  15. Astronomy 101 in Washington State High Schools

    Lutz, Julie H.; Garner, S.; Stetter, T.; McKeever, J.; Santo Pietro, V.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Washington in the High School (UWHS) program enables high schools to offer the 5 quarter credits Astronomy 101 (Astr 101) course for college credits. The credits are transferable to most colleges and universities. The course provides an alternative to advance placement courses and programs such as Washington's Running Start whereby high school students take courses at community colleges. Astr 101 focuses on stars, galaxies and the universe, as well as background topics such as gravitation, electromagnetic radiation and telescopes. The course satisfies the UW "natural world” and "quantitative/symbolic reasoning” distribution requirements. Students must pay a fee to enroll, but the credits cost less than half what they would cost for the course if taken on one of the UW campuses. The course can be offered as either one semester or full-year at the high school. Teachers who offer Astr 101 must be approved in advance by the UW Astronomy Department, and their syllabi and course materials approved also. Teachers receive orientation, professional development opportunities, classroom visits and support (special web site, answering questions, making arrangements for campus visits, planetarium visits) from astronomy department course coordinator. The UWHS Astr 101 program has produced positive outcomes for the astronomy department, the participating teachers and the students who complete the course. In this poster we will discuss our 5 years of experience with offering Astr 101, including benefits to the students, teachers, high schools, university and department, student outcomes, course assessments and resources for offering the course.

  16. University of Washington Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The theme of the University of Washington based Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research (CHC) is understanding the biochemical, molecular and exposure...

  17. The Phytoplankton Composition, Abundance and Temporal Variation of a Polluted Estuarine Creek in Lagos, Nigeria

    Onyema, I. C

    2007-01-01

    The phytoplankton composition, abundance and temporal variation of a polluted estuarine creek in Lagos was investigated for 6 months (February - July, 2003). Strong positive correlation (≥7.3) recorded between physico-chemical characteristics at two stations within the creek likely point to their control by similar factors, chiefly hydro-meteorological forcings and the creeks pollution status. A total of 48 taxa from 26 genera and 3 classes namely bacillariophyceae (37 taxa), cyanophyce...

  18. Impact of the changing ecology on intertidal polychaetes in an anthropogenically stressed tropical creek, India

    Quadros, G.; Sukumaran, S.; Athalye, R.P.

    C org and TN. Keywords Polychaetes C1 BIO-ENV C1 Coastal pollution C1 Creek Introduction Pollution of estuaries and creeks, especially in prox- imity of metropolitan cities, and its adverse impact on biota have been major concerns during recent years... mld (million liters per day) and from 145 to 260 mld of industrial and domestic wastes, respectively, within Thane city limits (TMC-ES 2000). The diversified industries along the banks of the creek, which include chemical, textile, pharmaceutical...

  19. Cerrito Creek step-pools: An opportunity for restoration and education at Blake Garden

    Behrends, Nathaniel

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this proposal is to examine relevant creek restoration research and existing restoration projects and to apply the resulting knowledge to the specific conditions at Blake Garden to develop a conceptual model for the restoration of this section of Cerrito Creek. This proposal builds on goals and data that were compiled as part of a prior student restoration proposal. A literature review, case studies, interviews and a site survey provide data about the restoration of similar creek...

  20. Assessing the Economic Impact of Energy Price Increases on Washington Agriculture and the Washington Economy: A General Equilibrium Approach

    Holland, David W.; Leroy Stodick; Kathleen Painter

    2007-01-01

    A general equilibrium, multi-sector economic model of the Washington economy was developed to examine the economic impact on the Washington economy, especially the agricultural industries, from increasing energy prices experienced in 2005 and 2006. The energy group includes such fossil fuel-based commodities as gasoline and diesel fuel (refined petroleum products), natural gas, nitrogenous fertilizer, and petrochemical products. The economic model shows how the Washington economy adjusts to t...

  1. Assessment of surface-water quality and water-quality control alternatives, Johnson Creek Basin, Oregon

    Edwards, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    Johnson Creek flows through a basin of approximately 51 square miles with mixed land uses over a reach of approximately 24 river miles from southeast of Gresham, Oregon, to its confluence with the Willamette River in Milwaukie, Oregon. Land uses within the basin include forested and agricultural lands, suburban residential, urban, and light industrial. Surface runoff and ground-water flow from the basin's areas of various land-use contain concentrations of some nutrients, trace elements, and organic compounds at levels exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) criteria. Concentrations of dissolved cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and silver, total recoverable chlordane, dieldrin, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) plus metabolites indicate that sources of at least one or more of these constituents exist in virtually every reach of Johnson Creek. Crystal Springs Creek is a major source of nutrients in lower Johnson Creek. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate and orthophosphorus in Johnson Creek are elevated at low flow, and are reduced by dilution when urban runoff flows into the creek during storms. Total-phosphorus concentrations exceed USEPA criteria at several sites in Johnson Creek during low flow, and at all sites during periods of storm runoff. The low-flow concentration of dissolved silver exceeded the USEPA Fresh Water Chronic Toxicity (FWCT) criterion only in Crystal Springs Creek. Concentrations of dissolved cadmium, copper, lead, and mercury exceeded FWCT criteria at selected sites in Johnson creek basin during storm runoff.

  2. Hydrology and model study of the proposed Prosperity Reservoir, Center Creek Basin, southwestern Missouri

    Harvey, Edward Joseph; Emmett, Leo F.

    1980-01-01

    A reservoir has been proposed on Center Creek, Jasper County, southwestern Missouri. Ground-water levels in the limestone uplands adjacent to the reservoir will rise when the impoundment is completed. The site is a few miles upstream from the Oronogo-Duenweg belt in the Tri-State zinc district. Grove Creek joins Center Creek downstream from the reservoir separating it from the mining belt. A model study indicates water-level rises varying from about 20 feet near the reservoir to 0.5 to 1.0 foot in the southern part of the Grove Creek drainage basin. A significant rise in the water table adjacent to the reservoir could increase mine-water discharge if Grove Creek is not an effective drain. However, it is probable that Grove Creek is an effective drain, and the higher ground-water levels in the reservoir area will increase ground-water discharge to Grove Creek, and in turn, Center Creek. The increase in ground-water discharge to Grove Creek will have the beneficial effect of diluting mine-water discharge from the Oronogo-Duenweg belt during periods of low flow. (USGS)

  3. Geology of the Blue Mountains region of Oregon, Idaho, and Washington; stratigraphy, physiography, and mineral resources of the Blue Mountains region

    Vallier, T. L., (Edited By); Brooks, H.C.

    1994-01-01

    island-arc terrane. PART 2: Mesozoic rocks exposed along the Snake River in the northern Wallowa terrane represent a volcanic island and its associated sedimentary basins within the Blue Mountains island arc of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. In the northern part of the Wallowa terrane, rock units include the Wild Sheep Creek, Doyle Creek, and Coon Hollow Formations, the (informal) Imnaha intrusion, and the (informal) Dry Creek stock. The volcanic rocks of the Ladinian to Karnian Wild Sheep Creek Formation show two stages of evolution-an early dacitic phase Gower volcanic faciesY and a late mafic phase (upper volcanic facies). The two volcanic facies are separated by eruption-generated turbidites of siliceous argillites and arkosic arenites (argillitesandstone facies). The two magmatic phases of the Wild Sheep Creek Formation may be recorded by the compositional zoning from older quartz diorite and diorite to younger gabbro in the Imnaha intrusion. Although the Late Triassic Imnaha intrusion is in fault contact with the Wild Sheep Creek Formation, it may be a subduction-related pluton and was the likely magma source for the Wild Sheep Creek Formation. Interbedded with the upper volcanic facies are eruption-generated turbidite and debris flow deposits (sandstone-breccia facies) and thick carbonate units (limestone facies). The limestone facies consists of two marker units, which may represent carbonate platform environments. Clast imbrication, fossil orientation, and cross-stratification in the Wild Sheep Creek Formation indicate a shoaling to subaerial volcanic island to the south and southeast; sediment was transported to the north and northwest. The Karnian Doyle Creek Formation consists largely of epiclastic conglomerate, sandstone, and shale that were deposited in welloxygenated basins. Vitric tuffs interbedded with these sediments suggest shallow or subaerial pyroclastic eruptions. Quartz diorite clasts in this formation may indicate uplift

  4. Paleomagnetism of an east-west transect across the Cascade arc in southern Washington: Implications for regional tectonism

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Swanson, D.A.; Evarts, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    Paleomagnetic data from a transect across the Cascade arc in southern Washington were collected to test models of vertical axis rotations for this part of the Pacific Northwest and to provide information on the tectonic history of the St. Helens seismic zone. The 75 site-mean directions are divided into three groups based on isotopic, fission track, and stratigraphic ages. Group 1 consists of samples from rocks deposited between 39 and 30 Ma and shows a mean clockwise vertical axis rotation of 34?? ?? 13??, group 2 consists of samples from rocks deposited be-tween 30 and 24 Ma and shows a mean clockwise rotation of 17?? ?? 11??, and group 3 consists of samples from rocks between 24 and 16 Ma and shows a mean clockwise rotation of 20?? ?? 12??. Although these three values of rotation are statistically indistinguishable at the 95% confidence level, we interpret them in combination with other data to indicate differential rotation across the St. Helens seismic zone (SHZ). The available paleomagnetic data for Eocene-Oligocene rocks west of the seismic zone show clockwise vertical axis rotations of 30?? ?? 8?? and 35?? ?? 9?? consistent with the value for group 1. The rotational values for groups 2 and 3 and the intrusive suite of Kidd Creek (13 Ma), despite their different ages, have similar values east of the SHZ. Comparing these groups of data east and west of the seismic zone indicates a differential rotation of 10?? ?? 3?? across it. In addition, the rates of rotation in southern Washington are similar to those for rocks in the western Cascades of Oregon and indicate that rotational deformation of Miocene age extends northward into southern Washington and eastward into the axis of the arc.

  5. Biological and Physical Inventory of Clear Creek, Orofino Creek, and the Potlatch River, Tributary Streams of the Clearwater River, Idaho, 1984 Technical Report.

    Johnson, David B.

    1985-05-01

    Clear Creek, Orofino Creek, and Potlatch Creek, three of the largest tributaries of the lower Clearwater River Basin, were inventoried during 1984. The purpose of the inventory was to identify where anadromous salmonid production occurs and to recommend enhancement alternatives to increase anadromous salmonid habitat in these streams. Anadromous and fluvial salmonids were found in all three drainages. The lower reach of Clear Creek supported a low population of rainbow-steelhead, while the middle reach supported a much greater population of rainbow-steelhead. Substantial populations of cutthroat trout were also found in the headwaters of Clear Creek. Rainbow-steelhead and brook trout were found throughout Orofino Creek. A predominant population of brook trout was found in the headwaters while a predominant population of rainbow-steelhead was found in the mainstem and lower tributaries of Orofino Creek. Rainbow-steelhead and brook trout were also found in the Potlatch River. Generally, the greatest anadromous salmonid populations in the Potlatch River were found within the middle reach of this system. Several problems were identified which would limit anadromous salmonid production within each drainage. Problems affecting Clear Creek were extreme flows, high summer water temperature, lack of riparian habitat, and high sediment load. Gradient barriers prevented anadromous salmonid passage into Orofino Creek and they are the main deterrent to salmonid production in this system. Potlatch River has extreme flows, high summer water temperature, a lack of riparian habitat and high sediment loads. Providing passage over Orofino Falls is recommended and should be considered a priority for improving salmonid production in the lower Clearwater River Basin. Augmenting flows in the Potlatch River is also recommended as an enhancement measure for increasing salmonid production in the lower Clearwater River Basin. 18 refs., 5 figs., 85 tabs.

  6. Integrated solid waste management of Seattle, Washington

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Seattle, Washington, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM systems.

  7. The University of Washington polarized ion source

    A colliding-beams polarized ion source has been in operation for nuclear physics experiments at the University of Washington tandem-linac facility since late 1987. Thermal beams of polarized atomic hydrogen or deuterium are ionized by charge exchange in collisions with a collinear, fast, neutral cesium beam. Negative ions are extracted and the polarization symmetry axis is precessed to any desired direction in a crossed-field spin precessor. The design of the cesium beam system differs from previous sources in that magnetic deflection and focusing are used and beams of several milliamperes at energies of 40 keV are produced. The source is controlled by a microprocessor based system which is connected via fiber optic links to the main linac control and data acquisition computers. To date, currents of 1μA and polarizations in excess of 90% have been produced. 3 refs., 2 figs

  8. US hydropower resource assessment for Washington

    Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Washington.

  9. Space Radar Image of Wenatchee, Washington

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image shows a segment of the Columbia River as it passes through the area of Wenatchee, Washington, about 220 kilometers (136 miles) east of Seattle. The Wenatchee Mountains, part of the Cascade Range, are shown in green at the lower left of the image. The Cascades create a 'rain shadow' for the region, limiting rainfall east of the range to less than 26 centimeters (10 inches) per year. The radar's ability to see different types of vegetation is highlighted in the contrast between the pine forests, that appear in green and the dry valley plain that shows up as dark purple. The cities of Wenatchee and East Wenatchee are the grid-like areas straddling the Columbia River in the left center of the image. With a population of about 60,000, the region produces about half of Washington state's lucrative apple crop. Several orchard areas appear as green rectangular patches to the right of the river in the lower right center. Radar images such as these can be used to monitor land use patterns in areas such as Wenatchee, that have diverse and rapidly changing urban, agricultural and wild land pressures. This image was acquired by Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 10, 1994. The image is 38 kilometers by 45 kilometers (24 miles by 30 miles) and is centered at 47.3 degrees North latitude, 120.1 degrees West longitude. North is toward the upper left. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian, and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  10. Study of Dissolved Chlorofluorocarbons in Lake Washington

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of three chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs): trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11), dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) and trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC 113), along with methyl chloroform (CH3CCl3) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) were made in water samples from Lake Washington, using Electron Capture Gas Chromatography (EC GC). The samples were collected in mid autumn, a period when the lake's upper layer undergoes rapid cooling. At the time of sampling, a strong vertical temperature gradient was present in the lake, with surface temperatures of ~14℃, and near bottom (50 meters) temperatures of ~8℃. The concentrations of dissolved CFC 12 and CFC 11 increased with depth, as expected from the higher solubilities of these gases at lower temperatures. Atmospheric measurements made at the sampling site at the time of the cruise, showed that CFC 11 and CFC 12 saturations in the near surface samples were 100 % and 106%, respectively. For the deepest sample (52 meters) CFC 11 and CFC 12 saturations were 102 % and 126 %. Because the surface layer of the lake responds to changes in atmospheric CFCs on a time scale of several weeks, the higher than equilibrium concentrations of CFC 12 observed at the time of sampling may reflect earlier episodes of elevated levels of atmospheric CFC 12 in this urban area. High concentrations of dissolved CFCs in runoff or industrial effluent might also lead to elevated CFC levels in the lake. The cold, deep water of Lake Washington is relatively isolated from the effects of surface gas exchange except during winter, and the supersaturations observe in the deep layer may reflect periods of elevated atmospheric CFC 12 levels from the previous winter season. These results were compared to summertime profiles of CFC 11 and CFC 12 made in 1994.

  11. Washington State Board of Education Strategic Plan, 2010-2011

    Washington State Board of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the Washington State Legislature significantly changed the role of the State Board of Education (SBE). While the Board retains some administrative duties, SBE is now mandated to play a broad leadership role in strategic oversight and policy for K-12 education in the state. This paper presents the strategic plan of Washington State Board…

  12. Building a Prosperous Economy. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Washington's community and technical colleges are a collective, powerful, unmatched resource for advancing prosperity through education. These 34 colleges not only connect with employers in the regions where they operate, but also with each other through common programs--like advanced manufacturing and allied health--that align with Washington's…

  13. Expanding Access and Opportunity: The Washington State Achievers Scholarship

    O'Brien, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    In 2001, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched the multi-year, multi-million dollar Washington State Achievers Scholarship program. Concerned about disparities in college participation for low-income students in the state of Washington versus their wealthier peers, the Gates Foundation partnered with the College Success Foundation (CSF),…

  14. Expanding Access and Opportunity: The Washington State Achievers Program

    Ramsey, Jennifer; Gorgol, Laura

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched a 10-year, multi-million dollar initiative, the Washington State Achievers Program (WSA), to increase opportunities for low-income students to attend postsecondary institutions in Washington State. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation granted funds to the College Success Foundation (CSF),…

  15. Population trajectory of burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) in eastern Washington

    Conway, C.J.; Pardieck, K.L.

    2006-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that burrowing owls have declined in Washington. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is currently conducting a status review for burrowing owls which will help determine whether they should be listed as threatened or endangered in the state. To provide insights into the current status of burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia), we analyzed data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey using two analytical approaches to determine their current population trajectory in eastern Washington. We used a one-sample t-test to examine whether trend estimates across all BBS routes in Washington differed from zero. We also used a mixed model analysis to estimate the rate of decline in number of burrowing owls detected between 1968 and 2005. The slope in number of burrowing owls detected was negative for 12 of the 16 BBS routes in Washington that have detected burrowing owls. Numbers of breeding burrowing owls detected in eastern Washington declined at a rate of 1.5% annually. We suggest that all BBS routes that have detected burrowing owls in past years in eastern Washington be surveyed annually and additional surveys conducted to track population trends of burrowing owls at finer spatial scales in eastern Washington. In the meantime, land management and regulatory agencies should ensure that publicly managed areas with breeding burrowing owls are not degraded and should implement education and outreach programs to promote protection of privately owned areas with breeding owls.

  16. Radium 226 in waters of the Magela creek, Northern Australia

    Sauerland, C.; Medley, P.; Martin, P. [Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist, Darwin NT (Australia)

    2004-07-01

    The Magela Creek is located in the tropical monsoonal belt of Australia, which is characterised by contrasting wet (December to March) and dry (April to November) seasons. Magela Creek drains a catchment of which about half of the total area lies upstream of the open-cut Ranger uranium mine. The main risk identified for ecosystems surrounding this mine site is from dispersion of mine waste waters during the wet season. Monitoring of biological indicator organisms, water quality (physical and chemical) and radionuclide concentrations in surface water, groundwater and biota is conducted upstream and downstream of the Ranger mine to measure possible environmental impacts of mining. Of special interest is the radionuclide radium-226, as it is predicted to dominate the effective dose to members of the critical group (i.e. the Aboriginal population living downstream of the mining site) resulting from any release of waters from the mine site, in particular through intake of food items such as freshwater mussels and fish. Receiving water standards for radium-226 have been set for the mine on the basis of radiological dose assessments in accordance with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1996). It is proposed in this paper to compare trigger values based on ICRP recommendations with trigger values developed in line with the philosophy of the new Australian Water Quality Guidelines (ANZECC and ARMCANZ 2000). Total Ra-226 activity concentrations were determined in Magela creek both upstream and downstream of the Ranger uranium mine, using alpha spectrometry with a detection limit of about 0.5 mBq/L. According to the new Water Quality Guidelines site-specific trigger values for total Ra-226 activity concentrations were statistically derived from a reference dataset. They are intended to provide an early warning system for the management of a pollutant source for the purpose of environmental protection of downstream ecosystems

  17. Indian Creek-AML: Coal slurry reclamation (Kansas case history)

    Black and Veatch, assisted by Jack Nawrot, developed conceptual and final designs and provided construction assistance to create grasslands and wetlands in order to reclaim an abandoned coal mine for the state of Kansas. The mine included spoils, a coal refuse dump, and slurry pond in the Indian Creek drainage basin in east central Kansas. The Indian Creek flowed from an off-site abandoned mine and through the coal slurry pond where its waters became more polluted. The intent of the reclamation project was to improve water quality and create a wildlife refuge. The coal refuse was covered and seeded with a diversity of vegetation including several grasses and legume. The slurry pond was developed into a series of large wetland cells to improve water quality. Prior to reclamation, the water leaving the site had a typical pH of 3.3, ranging from 2.4 to 5.6, an iron content which typically over 22 mg/L and ranging over 100 mg/L, and contained large amounts of coal slurry. The acid sediment in the slurry killed fish and caused visible damage to a new large concrete box culvert several miles downstream of the site. Post-reclamation water quality leaving the Indian Creek site showed immediate improvement even before vegetation was reestablished. The existing wetland treatment systems have been successfully treating water for over seven years with the pH of the water leaving the wetlands above 7 and soluble iron content less than 1 mg/L. Fish in the constructed wetlands support waterfowl which now nest onsite

  18. Radium 226 in waters of the Magela creek, Northern Australia

    The Magela Creek is located in the tropical monsoonal belt of Australia, which is characterised by contrasting wet (December to March) and dry (April to November) seasons. Magela Creek drains a catchment of which about half of the total area lies upstream of the open-cut Ranger uranium mine. The main risk identified for ecosystems surrounding this mine site is from dispersion of mine waste waters during the wet season. Monitoring of biological indicator organisms, water quality (physical and chemical) and radionuclide concentrations in surface water, groundwater and biota is conducted upstream and downstream of the Ranger mine to measure possible environmental impacts of mining. Of special interest is the radionuclide radium-226, as it is predicted to dominate the effective dose to members of the critical group (i.e. the Aboriginal population living downstream of the mining site) resulting from any release of waters from the mine site, in particular through intake of food items such as freshwater mussels and fish. Receiving water standards for radium-226 have been set for the mine on the basis of radiological dose assessments in accordance with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1996). It is proposed in this paper to compare trigger values based on ICRP recommendations with trigger values developed in line with the philosophy of the new Australian Water Quality Guidelines (ANZECC and ARMCANZ 2000). Total Ra-226 activity concentrations were determined in Magela creek both upstream and downstream of the Ranger uranium mine, using alpha spectrometry with a detection limit of about 0.5 mBq/L. According to the new Water Quality Guidelines site-specific trigger values for total Ra-226 activity concentrations were statistically derived from a reference dataset. They are intended to provide an early warning system for the management of a pollutant source for the purpose of environmental protection of downstream ecosystems

  19. The Clear Creek Envirohydrologic Observatory: From Vision Toward Reality

    Just, C.; Muste, M.; Kruger, A.

    2007-12-01

    As the vision of a fully-functional Clear Creek Envirohydrologic Observatory comes closer to reality, the opportunities for significant watershed science advances in the near future become more apparent. As a starting point to approaching this vision, we focused on creating a working example of cyberinfrastructure in the hydrologic and environmental sciences. The system will integrate a broad range of technologies and ideas: wired and wireless sensors, low power wireless communication, embedded microcontrollers, commodity cellular networks, the internet, unattended quality assurance, metadata, relational databases, machine-to-machine communication, interfaces to hydrologic and environmental models, feedback, and external inputs. Hardware: An accomplishment to date is "in-house" developed sensor networking electronics to compliment commercially available communications. The first of these networkable sensors are dielectric soil moisture probes that are arrayed and equipped with wireless connectivity for communications. Commercially available data logging and telemetry-enabled systems deployed at the Clear Creek testbed include a Campbell Scientific CR1000 datalogger, a Redwing 100 cellular modem, a YA Series yagi antenna, a NP12 rechargeable battery, and a BP SX20U solar panel. This networking equipment has been coupled with Hach DS5X water quality sondes, DTS-12 turbidity probes and MicroLAB nutrient analyzers. Software: Our existing data model is an Arc Hydro-based geodatabase customized with applications for extraction and population of the database with third party data. The following third party data are acquired automatically and in real time into the Arc Hydro customized database: 1) geophysical data: 10m DEM and soil grids, soils; 2) land use/land cover data; and 3) eco-hydrological: radar-based rainfall estimates, stream gage, streamlines, and water quality data. A new processing software for data analysis of Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP

  20. Native American Calendric Orientation at Town Creek Indian Mound

    Tiede, V. R.

    2005-12-01

    Evidence is presented for a newly discovered set of interior solar alignments - the equinox and summer solstice meridian transits - at a prehistoric Native American structure in the Southeast United States. Because North Carolina's Town Creek Indian Mound is the only Mississippian temple-mound accurately reconstructed from overhead photo-mosaics, the site is uniquely suited for applying the techniques of astro-archaeology (G. S. Hawkins 1983). Implications of the new findings for interpreting Muskogean ethnographic literature as well as future archaeoastronomical research at other Southeastern sites (e.g., Ocmulgee National Monument Earth Lodge, Georgia) are discussed.

  1. Evaluation of demonstration technologies: Quail creek water supply system

    The U.S. EPA is currently demonstrating central and household treatment units at several sites in the U.S. The Quail Creek System near Spicewood, Texas is one of these sites where the technology demonstration program is scheduled to be completed soon as part of the EPA's Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water demonstration initiative. The report provides a summary of the small system demonstration project and presents an evaluation of the information collected during the operation, and by the EPA in September 1992

  2. CREEK Project's Water Chemistry, Chlorophyll a, and Suspended Sediment Weekly Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-2000.

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight tidal creeks dominated by oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated BACI (Before...

  3. CREEK Project's Oyster Growth and Survival Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1999.

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a...

  4. CREEK Project: RUI: the Role of Oyster Reefs in the Structure and Function of Tidal Creeks. A Project Overview: 1996-2000.

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight tidal creeks dominated by oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated BACI (Before - After...

  5. Distribution and abundance of copepods in the pollution gradient zones of Bombay Harbour-Thana Creek-Bassein Creek, west coast of India

    Ramaiah, Neelam

    the monsoon months (June-September). Diversity indices (Shannon-Weaver's H' and Margalefs D) were higher in the outer coastal waters than in creek zone indicating lethal or sublethal effects of industrial and domestic waster on the general faunistic...

  6. 77 FR 65446 - Turtle Creek Industrial Railroad, Inc.-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Consolidated Rail...

    2012-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Turtle Creek Industrial Railroad, Inc.--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Consolidated Rail Corporation Turtle Creek Industrial Railroad, Inc. (TCKR), a noncarrier and a wholly...

  7. 77 FR 27085 - TMI Forest Products, Inc., Crane Creek Division, Morton, WA; Notice of Negative Determination...

    2012-05-08

    ... Determination was published in the Federal Register on March 6, 2012 (77 FR 13355). Pursuant to 29 CFR 90.18(c... Employment and Training Administration TMI Forest Products, Inc., Crane Creek Division, Morton, WA; Notice of... (TAA), applicable to workers and former workers of TMI Forest Products, Inc., Crane Creek...

  8. Stability of a sand spit due to dredging in an adjacent creek

    Patgaonkar, R.S.; Ilangovan, D.; Vethamony, P.; Babu, M.T.; Jayakumar, S.; Rajagopal, M.D.

    The Jatadharmohan creek lies between Mahanadi and Devi Rivers along the Orissa coast and it is separated from the sea by an elongated sand spit. It was proposed to mine a volume of 15 x 10 sup(6) m³ of sand from the creek for land filling...

  9. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond..., Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir in... inflow below the dam, will not produce flows in excess of bankfull on Pond (Cobb) Creek downstream of...

  10. 76 FR 8728 - Bear Creek Hydro Associates, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    2011-02-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Bear Creek Hydro Associates, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application... 22, 2010, the Bear Creek Hydro Associates, LLC filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act (FPA), proposing to study the ] feasibility of the...

  11. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    2010-07-01

    ..., English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries: (1)...

  12. 75 FR 38768 - Rehabilitation of Floodwater Retarding Structure No. 10 of the Mountain Creek Watershed, Ellis...

    2010-07-06

    ... Mountain Creek Watershed, Ellis County, TX AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation Service. ACTION: Notice... prepared for the rehabilitation of Floodwater Retarding Structure No. 10 of the Mountain Creek Watershed... authority of the Small Watershed Rehabilitation Amendments of 2000 (Section 313, Pub. L. 106- 472)....

  13. Bacterial Composition in Urban Watershed Creeks Impacted by Contaminants from different Sources.

    This study was conducted to monitor changes in microbial and chemical composition along Chino Creek Reach 1 region, which, in 2002, was placed on the 303(d) list as an impaired waterbody. Pollutants in the Chino Creek basin mainly consist of pathogens and nutrients due to the densely populated areas...

  14. Ecological response of foraminiferal component in the sediments of Kharo Creek, Kachchh (Gujarat), west coast of India

    Chaturvedi, S.K.; Nigam, R.; Khare, N.

    Creek, of East Coast of India, Setty (1982) and Setty and Nigam (1984) who studied foraminifera for pollution effect in Thane Creek, Bombay and Nigam and Chaturvedi (2000) of Kharo Creek of Kachchh, no other attempt has so far been made to study... flow in the creek and therefore less affected as compared to middle stream. The effect of tides on foraminifera have also been reported by other workers in vicinity of this region (Nigam, 1984). Earlier researchers have explained that turbulence...

  15. Palynologic and petrographic variation in the Otter Creek coal beds (Stephanian, Upper Carboniferous), Western Kentucky

    Helfrich, C.T.; Hower, J.C. (Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond (USA))

    1989-08-30

    The palynology and petrology of the Lisman (Lower Otter Creek) and Upper Otter Creek coals of the Stephanian portion of the Sturgis Formation of the Western Kentucky coal field was investigated in samples from mine and roadcut exposures. The Lisman coal bed exhibits an upward decrease in palynologic diversity and an upward increase in inertinite macerals. These factors suggest a change in swamp paleoecology in response to a climate which was gradually becoming drier. The Upper Creek coal bed exhibits less lateral continuity in palynomorph assemblages than does the Lisman. The Upper Otter Creek palynomorph assemblages are less diverse than the Lisman assemblages. Overall, the variation in the Upper Otter Creek coal bed cannot be attributed with certainty to any factor other than the local relief within the swamp. 17 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Evaluation of the Steel Creek ecosystem in relation to the proposed restart of L reactor

    Information is presented on the following subjects: habitat and vegetation, the avifauna, semi-aquatic and terrestrial vertebrates, and aquatic communities of Steel Creek, species of special concern, and radiocesium in Steel Creek. Two main goals of the study were the compilation of a current inventory of the flora and fauna of the Steel Creek ecosystem and an assessment of the probable impacts of radionuclides, primarily 137Cs, that were released into Steel Creek during earlier reactor operations. Although a thorough evaluation of the impacts of the L reactor restart is impossible at this time, it is concluded that the effects on the Steel Creek ecosystem will be substantial if no mitigative measures are taken

  17. 75 FR 17430 - Hopper Mountain, Bitter Creek, and Blue Ridge National Wildlife Refuges, Kern, San Luis Obispo...

    2010-04-06

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Hopper Mountain, Bitter Creek, and Blue Ridge National Wildlife Refuges, Kern... conservation plan (CCP) and environmental assessment (EA) for the Hopper Mountain, Bitter Creek, and Blue Ridge... process for developing a CCP for Hopper Mountain, Bitter Creek, and Blue Ridge NWRs in Kern, San...

  18. 78 FR 33282 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revision of Critical Habitat for Salt Creek Tiger...

    2013-06-04

    ... rule to list the Salt Creek tiger beetle as endangered was published on October 6, 2005 (70 FR 58335..., 2005 (70 FR 58335). Taxonomy and Species Description The Salt Creek tiger beetle (Cicindela nevadica... size. The Salt Creek tiger beetle is historically known from six populations (70 FR 58336, October...

  19. 77 FR 58979 - Boundary Establishment for the Au Sable, Bear Creek, Manistee, and the Pine Wild and Scenic...

    2012-09-25

    ... Forest Service Boundary Establishment for the Au Sable, Bear Creek, Manistee, and the Pine Wild and... boundary of the Au Sable, Bear Creek, Manistee, and the Pine Wild and Scenic Rivers to Congress. FOR.... 8756. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Au Sable, Bear Creek, Manistee, and the Pine Wild and...

  20. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    1992-01-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  1. Kerr-McGee launches talent at House Creek flood

    Lyle, D.

    1992-12-01

    Kerr-McGee Corp. gets tertiary status on potassium hydroxide treatment augmenting the polymer flood of House Creek Sussex Unit. Kerr-McGee took over the House Creek flood project when it bought some $65.6 million in Powder River Basin properties from Sonat Exploration Co. of Birmingham, Alabama. Those Campbell and Converse county properties included some 75,000 net acres of leases and approximately 11 MMboe in developed and undeveloped reserves. At first, Kerr-McGee planned to go ahead with Sonat's 3-to-1 line drive pattern for its flood, but further study persuaded the company to go to a 1-to-1 pattern. The original 3-to-1 pattern had three rows of producers for one row of injectors. The 1-to-1 pattern has one row of producers for one row of injectors. Even though it's technically a polymer flood, the project qualifies for tertiary recovery status because of the potassium hydroxide (KOH) treatment used to stabilize clays in the touchy Sussex Formation.

  2. Stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Date Creek Basin, Arizona

    Butz, T.R.; Tieman, D.J.; Grimes, J.G.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Pritz, P.M.

    1980-06-30

    Results of the Date Creek Basin detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are reported for 239 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Based on stream sediment geochemical data, significant concentrations of uranium are restricted to the Anderson Mine area. The 84th percentile concentrations of U-FL, U-NT, and U-FL/U-NT combined with low thorium/U-NT values reflect increased mobility and enrichment of uranium in the carbonate host rocks of that area. Elements characteristically associated with the uranium mineralization include lithium and arsenic. No well defined diffusion halos suggesting outliers of similar uranium mineralization were observed from the stream sediment data in other areas of the Date Creek Basin. Significant concentrations of U-FL or U-NT found outside the mine area are generally coincident with low U-FL/U-NT values and high concentrations of zirconium, titanium, and phosphorus. This suggests that the uranium is related to a resistate mineral assemblage derived from surrounding crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks.

  3. Stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Date Creek Basin, Arizona

    Results of the Date Creek Basin detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are reported for 239 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Based on stream sediment geochemical data, significant concentrations of uranium are restricted to the Anderson Mine area. The 84th percentile concentrations of U-FL, U-NT, and U-FL/U-NT combined with low thorium/U-NT values reflect increased mobility and enrichment of uranium in the carbonate host rocks of that area. Elements characteristically associated with the uranium mineralization include lithium and arsenic. No well defined diffusion halos suggesting outliers of similar uranium mineralization were observed from the stream sediment data in other areas of the Date Creek Basin. Significant concentrations of U-FL or U-NT found outside the mine area are generally coincident with low U-FL/U-NT values and high concentrations of zirconium, titanium, and phosphorus. This suggests that the uranium is related to a resistate mineral assemblage derived from surrounding crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks

  4. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    1992-10-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  5. Vegetation survey of Four Mile Creek wetlands. [Savannah River Plant

    Loehle, C.

    1990-11-01

    A survey of forested wetlands along upper Four Mile Creek was conducted. The region from Road 3 to the creek headwaters was sampled to evaluate the composition of woody and herbaceons plant communities. All sites were found to fall into either the Nyssa sylvatica (Black Gum) -- Persea borbonia (Red Bay) or Nyssa sylvatica -- Acer rubrum (Red Maple) types. These community types are generally species-rich and diverse. Previous studies (Greenwood et al., 1990; Mackey, 1988) demonstrated contaminant stress in areas downslope from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. In the present study there were some indications of contaminant stress. In the wetland near H-Area, shrub basal area, ground cover stratum species richness, and diversity were low. In the area surrounding the F-Area tree kill zone, ground cover stratum cover and shrub basal area were low and ground cover stratum species richness was low. The moderately stressed site at F-Area also showed reduced overstory richness and diversity and reduced ground cover stratum richness. These results could, however, be due to the very high basal area of overstory trees in both stressed F-Area sites that would reduce light availability to understory plants. No threatened or endangered plant species were found in the areas sampled. 40 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Megafloods and Clovis cache at Wenatchee, Washington

    Waitt, Richard B.

    2016-05-01

    Immense late Wisconsin floods from glacial Lake Missoula drowned the Wenatchee reach of Washington's Columbia valley by different routes. The earliest debacles, nearly 19,000 cal yr BP, raged 335 m deep down the Columbia and built high Pangborn bar at Wenatchee. As advancing ice blocked the northwest of Columbia valley, several giant floods descended Moses Coulee and backflooded up the Columbia past Wenatchee. Ice then blocked Moses Coulee, and Grand Coulee to Quincy basin became the westmost floodway. From Quincy basin many Missoula floods backflowed 50 km upvalley to Wenatchee 18,000 to 15,500 years ago. Receding ice dammed glacial Lake Columbia centuries more-till it burst about 15,000 years ago. After Glacier Peak ashfall about 13,600 years ago, smaller great flood(s) swept down the Columbia from glacial Lake Kootenay in British Columbia. The East Wenatchee cache of huge fluted Clovis points had been laid atop Pangborn bar after the Glacier Peak ashfall, then buried by loess. Clovis people came five and a half millennia after the early gigantic Missoula floods, two and a half millennia after the last small Missoula flood, and two millennia after the glacial Lake Columbia flood. People likely saw outburst flood(s) from glacial Lake Kootenay.

  7. La Push, Washington Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The La Push, Washington Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  8. Toke Point, Washington Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Toke Point, Washington Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST)...

  9. Port Angeles, Washington Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Port Angeles, Washington Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST)...

  10. LiDAR (Terrain), THURSTON COUNTY, WASHINGTON, USA

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Fugro EarthData Company furnished the collection, processing, and development of LiDAR for 825 square miles in Washington (805 square miles of Thurston County and...

  11. Southwestern Washington 1/3 arc-second DEM

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1/3-second Southwest Washington Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1/3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  12. EAARL Topography--George Washington Birthplace National Monument 2008

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first surface/bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the George Washington Birthplace National Monument in Virginia was...

  13. Monsanto Gives Washington U. $23.5 Million.

    Culliton, Barbara J.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews various provisions of a five-year, $23.5-million research agreement between Washington University and the Monsanto Company. The scientific focus of this venture will be on proteins and peptides which modify cellular behavior. (SK)

  14. Bathymetric Contours for Lake Darling, Washington County, Iowa

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digital bathymetry contours for Lake Darling in Washington Co., Iowa. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a bathymetric survey of Lake...

  15. Final Report: Feasibility Study of Biomass in Snohomish County, Washington

    Daryl Williams (Tulalip Tribes); Ray Clark (Clark Group)

    2005-01-31

    This report and its attachments summarizes the results of a unique tribal-farmer cooperative study to evaluate the feasibility of building one or more regional anaerobic digestion systems in Snohomish County, Washington.

  16. Washington Islands National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1992: Calendar Year

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Washington Islands National Wildlife Refuges Flattery Rocks, Quillayute Needles, and Copalis Rock National Wildlife Refuges...

  17. Washington Islands National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1991: Calendar Year

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Washington Islands NWRs Flattery Rocks, Quillayute Needles, and Copalis Rock NWRs outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991...

  18. Westport, Washington Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Westport, Washington Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  19. Neah Bay, Washington Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Neah Bay, Washington Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  20. BENTHIC MACROFAUNA-HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS IN WILLAPA BAY, WASHINGTON, USA

    Estuary-wide benthic macrofauna-habitat associations in Willapa Bay, Washington, United States, were determined for 4 habitats (eelgrass [Zostera marina], Atlantic cordgrass [Spartina alterniflora], mud shrimp [Upogebia pugettensis], ghost shrimp [Neotrypaea californiensis]) in 1...

  1. Washington Islands National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1988: Calendar Year

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Washington Islands NWRs (Flattery Rocks, Quillayute Needles, and Copalis Rock NWRs) outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1988...

  2. Campbell Creek Research Homes FY 2012 Annual Performance Report

    Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Khowailed, Gannate A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The Campbell Creek project is funded and managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery & and Utilization Office. Technical support is provided under contract by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute.The project was designed to determine the relative energy efficiency of typical new home construction, energy efficiency retrofitting of existing homes, and high -performance new homes built from the ground up for energy efficiency. This project will compare three houses that represented the current construction practice as a base case (Builder House CC1); a modified house that could represent a major energy- efficient retrofit (Retrofit House CC2); and a house constructed from the ground up to be a high- performance home (High Performance House CC3). In order tTo enablehave a valid comparison, it was necessary to simulate occupancy in all three houses and heavily monitor the structural components and the energy usage by component. All three houses are two story, slab on grade, framed construction. CC1 and CC2 are approximately 2,400 square feet2. CC3 has a pantry option, that is primarily used as a mechanical equipment room, that adds approximately 100 square feet2. All three houses are all-electric (with the exception of a gas log fireplace that is not used during the testing), and use air-source heat pumps for heating and cooling. The three homes are located in Knoxville in the Campbell Creek Subdivision. CC1 and CC2 are next door to each other and CC3 is across the street and a couple of houses down. The energy data collected will be used to determine the benefits of retrofit packages and high -performance new home packages. There are over 300 channels of continuous energy performance and thermal comfort data collection in the houses (100 for each house). The data will also be used to evaluate the impact of energy -efficient upgrades ton the envelope, mechanical

  3. Nonproliferation Education at the University of Washington

    The nonproliferation curriculum at the University of Washington (UW) is the product of collaboration between Pacific Northwest Center for Global Security (PNWCGS) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Jackson School of International Studies (JSIS) and Department of Political Science at the University of Washington. This collaboration began in 2001 with the establishment the Institute for Global and Regional Security Studies (IGRSS). IGRSS is housed in the Jackson School, which will celebrate its centenary in 2008 as a center for the study of world regions. PNNL also engages in a number of collaborative relationships with UW units in the natural and applied sciences. The principal goal of IGRSS has been to develop courses that draw graduates and undergraduates into careers in the field of nonproliferation. Since offering its first courses in 2002, IGRSS has assisted a substantial number of UW graduate students in submitting successful applications for nonproliferation positions in U.S. government agencies, including the Nonproliferation Graduate Program at the National Nuclear Security Administration. Since 2001, several UW undergraduates have begun careers in the field of nonproliferation, either by working at national laboratories or enrolling in non-UW graduate programs. The UW brought to its nonproliferation partnership with PNNL long-established programs in a wide range of professional programs and academic disciplines, including the 14 interdisciplinary regional and topical programs of the Jackson School of International Studies. The JSIS is an interdisciplinary and interdepartmental enterprise that brings together faculty and students from across the UW. Since the late 1940s the UW has trained experts for the nation's foreign policy community in programs focused in the languages, cultures, and histories of regions deemed critical to U.S. national security. However, since the termination of its program in nuclear engineering several

  4. Impacts of deer herbivory on vegetation in Rock Creek Park, 2001-2009

    Kraft, Cairn C.; Hatfield, Jeff S.

    2011-01-01

    Starting in 2001, vegetation data have been collected annually in 16 study modules consisting of paired (1x4 m) fenced plots and unfenced control plots located in the upland forests of Rock Creek Park, Washington, D.C. Vegetation data collected from 2001-2009 have been analyzed to determine impacts of deer herbivory on vegetation in the park. Differences between fenced plots and unfenced control plots were analyzed for the following variables: cover provided by various groups of species (woody, herbaceous, native, non-native, trees, shrubs, and woody vines), as well as by individual dominant species, vegetation thickness (a measure of percent cover projected horizontally that provides information on the vertical distribution of vegetation), and species richness overall and for groups of species (woody, herbaceous, native, non-native, trees, shrubs, and woody vines). The analyses were performed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and associated tests. Vegetation in plots protected from deer herbivory for 9 years showed significantly greater vegetative cover compared to plots not protected from deer herbivory. This effect was most pronounced for woody and shrub cover. Cover by the dominant species was not significantly greater in the fenced plots compared to the unfenced control plots, indicating that the significant differences observed for groups were not driven by single species within those groups. With respect to vegetation thickness, results indicate that protection from deer herbivory produced significantly higher levels of vegetation in the fenced plots compared to the unfenced control plots for both the Low (0-30 cm) and Middle (30-110 cm) height classes. Protection from deer herbivory has led to higher overall species richness and higher species richness for woody species, natives, and shrubs compared to plots not receiving protection. There is also evidence that plots protected from deer herbivory and those not receiving this protection

  5. New mechanisms studied for creek formation in tidal flats: From crabs to tidal channels

    Perillo, Gerardo M. E.; Iribarne, Oscar O.

    Mechanisms for the formation of creeks in tidal flats are rarely discussed in the peer-reviewed literature. Moreover, while there are general theories about how creeks form in tidal flats, there is no data to support these theories. It is generally believed that marshes inherit creeks from previous tidal flats that plants colonize, and that further modify the creeks. Recently, we have discovered new mechanisms for creek formation in three different environments of Argentina in which tidal creeks are actually originating in both fresh and salt marshes. One of the most surprising and interesting findings is that creek formation can actually be a product of the intense action of crabs (Chasmagnatus granulata). In these settings, crabs first interact with a halophytic plant (Salicornia ambigua), developing zones of high-density of crab holes, which then are utilized by groundwater and tidal action to form channels. This specific interaction forms a series of rings that, to the best of our knowledge, have not been described elsewhere in the literature.

  6. Radiological survey results at Building 22, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, D.C. (WNS001)

    A radiological survey was conducted in a portion of Building 22 at the Washington Navy Yard, Washington, D.C., on December 13, 1995. The survey was performed because former employees thought the area surveyed had some previous association with radioactive material. Employees remembered seeing radiation signs in the area and indicated that personnel occupying this area wore dosimeters. Two rooms in the survey area were surrounded by 1-ft-thick poured concrete walls and similar 6-in.-thick ceilings, and situated on top of a 1-ft-thick concrete slab, a configuration commonly used for radiation shielding in industrial radiography facilities. The radiological survey showed no gamma, beta-gamma, or alpha measurements above typical background levels. Low background radiation levels within the building indicated that even if low-level contamination were present beneath the tile, or larger amounts of contamination beneath the concrete slab, it poses no radiological hazard to building inhabitants under the present conditions. Further investigation may be required before drilling or demolition of the concrete slab. No photon radiation fields from sealed gamma sources or x-ray sources were detectable at the time of the survey. Gamma spectrometry analysis revealed no gamma emitters above typical background concentrations in one sediment and one water sample collected from a pit in the open bay area

  7. Stable isotope tracing of trout hatchery carbon to sediments and foodwebs of limestone spring creeks

    Limestone springs support productive ecosystems and fisheries, yet aquaculture may modify or impair these ecosystems. We determined trout hatchery organic contribution to spring creek sediments and foodwebs with natural abundance stable isotope methods. Hatchery feed, waste, and trout were significantly enriched in δ13C relative to autotrophs and wild fish. Spring creek sediments were enriched in δ13C toward the hatchery endmember relative to reference streams without hatcheries and relative to a larger larger-order, spring-influenced stream. Contribution of hatchery C to spring creek sediments was greatest during March and associated with greatest sediment %C. Contribution of hatchery C to pollution-tolerant isopod diet was 39-51% in a stream receiving limestone spring water via hatchery effluent. Isopods of one spring creek also relied on hatchery-derived C within one month of hatchery closure. Four years later, less pollution pollution-tolerant amphipods dominated and consumed non-vascular over vascular autotrophs (86%). Isopods of a second spring creek with an active hatchery did not appear to be using hatchery matter directly, but were enriched in δ34S relative to a spring creek tributary with no hatchery influence. Isopods in both of these streams were relatively enriched in δ15N, indicating general nutrient enrichment from surrounding agricultural land use. The contribution of hatchery vs. wild fish in diet of herons and egrets was traced with δ13C of guano. These birds were strongly dependent on stocked trout in a spring creek with a recently closed state trout hatchery, and also near another large, state-run hatchery. Heron dependence on hatchery fish in the spring creek decreased with time since hatchery closure. Use of stable isotope natural abundance techniques in karst spring creeks can reveal stream impairment due to aquaculture, specific C sources to bio-indicating consumers, losses of farmed fish to predation, and potential exposure of higher

  8. The Trophic Fate of Shrimp Farm Effluent in Mangrove Creeks of North Queensland, Australia

    Mckinnon, A. D.; Trott, L. A.; Cappo, M.; Miller, D. K.; Duggan, S.; Speare, P.; Davidson, A.

    2002-10-01

    Zooplankton and fish communities in mangrove creeks removed materials originating from the discharge of effluent from ponds used for shrimp aquaculture at two commercial farms in North Queensland, Australia. Undisturbed mangrove creeks were compared to creeks receiving effluent from shrimp farms. Shrimp farm effluent was rich in chlorophyll a (56 μg l -1) and bacteria (1·9×10 6 cells ml -1). The potential grazing impact of ciliates was higher than that of copepod nauplii or copepodids upstream. In contrast, copepods were more important downstream. Carbon removal by ciliates and copepods accounted for as much as 85% of primary production during non-discharge periods, but was less important during discharge periods. Direct measurement of microzooplankton grazing with the dilution method indicated that growth and grazing were usually in balance, but during pond discharge periods microzooplankton grazing removed >120% of primary production and 117-266% of bacterioplankton production in the mixed lower reaches of the creeks and immediately offshore. Grazing by bacterivores was saturated in the upper reaches of the creeks, but was very high near the creek mouths, where the range of specific grazing rates was 5·2-11·8 d -1. Baitfish juveniles were abundant in the creek systems, and fed either directly on macro-particulates by indiscriminate filter feeding, or by selective feeding on microfauna. Trophic processes and their associated respiratory losses are instrumental in the assimilation and dissipation of effluent materials within the creek system, and are responsible for returning concentrations of bio-available materials to ambient levels. The sustainable use of coastal environments depends to a large degree on understanding and regulating the impacts from activities within the catchment. This research provides environmental managers with direct evidence that, under certain conditions, perturbations in creek water quality and biota originating from shrimp farm

  9. Water Quality Analysis of Yosemite Creek Watershed, San Francisco, California

    Davis, J. R.; Snow, M. K.; Aquino, A.; Huang, C.; Thai, A.; Yuen, C.

    2003-12-01

    Surface water quality in urban settings can become contaminated by anthropogenic inputs. Yosemite Creek watershed is situated on the east side of San Francisco near Bayview Hunters Point and provides an ideal location for water quality investigations in urban environments. Accordingly, students from Philip and Sala Burton High School monitored water quality at three locations for their physicochemical and biological characteristics. Water was tested for pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, total dissolved solids, salinity, and oxidation reduction potential. In addition, a Hach DR 850 digital colorimeter was utilized to measure chlorine, fluorine, nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfate. The biological component was assessed via monitoring benthic macro invertebrates. Specifically, the presence of caddisfly (Trichoptera) were used to indicate low levels of contaminants and good water quality. Our results indicate that water quality and macro invertebrate populations varied spatially within the watershed. Further investigation is needed to pinpoint the precise location of contaminant inputs.

  10. White Oak Creek Watershed topographic map and related materials

    On March 22, 1978 a contract was let to Accu-Air Surveys, Inc., of Seymour, Indiana, to produce a topographic map of the White Oak Creek Watershed. Working from photography and ground control surveys, Accu-Air produced a map to ORNL's specifications. The map is in four sections (N.W., N.E., S.W., S.E.) at a scale of 1:2400. Contour intervals are 5 ft (1.5 m) with accented delineations every 25 ft (7.6 m). The scribe method was used for the finished map. Planimetric features, roads, major fence lines, drainage features, and tree lines are included. The ORNL grid is the primary coordinate system which is superimposed on the state plain coordinates

  11. Sherman Creek Hatchery; 1995-1996 Annual Report.

    Combs, Mitch [Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA (United States). Hatcheries Program

    1997-01-01

    The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations of the SCH have been modified to better achieve program goals. These strategic changes have been the result of recommendations through the Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) and were implemented to enhance imprinting, improve survival and operate the two kokanee facilities more effectively. The primary change has been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a kokanee yearling (post smolt) program. The second significant change has been to rear 120,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October to enable the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee for the yearling program.

  12. Invertebrates associated with ipomea aquatica in ogbe creek, logos, nigeria

    The association of invertebrates in Ogbe creek with Ipomea aquatica was investigated within the period from 7th September to 30th November, 2001, 167 invertebrates comprising of 19 species were harvested from 73 weeds. Corixa punctata (22.16%) was the most abundant invertebrate on Ipomea aquatica while Gyrinus notator larvae (0.60%) were the least abundant. The roots sheltered the highest number of invertebrates (113), comprising of 12 species recording a species diversity of 5.36 while the stem sheltered the lowest number of invertebrates (10) comprising of 3 species with a species diversity of 2.00. The ability of Ipomea aquaTica to harbour invertebrates was influenced by the morphological form of the plant. The root was the preferred site for the invertebrates because it was a suitable substrate for clinging and nutrient supply. (author)

  13. Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.

    McRoberts, Heidi

    2006-03-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership, more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. Starting in FY 2002, continuing into 2004, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed, and one high priority culvert was replaced in 2004. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

  14. Forecasting contaminant concentrations: Spills in the White Oak Creek Basin

    The Streamflow Synthesis and Reservoir Regulation (SSARR) model has been installed and sufficiently calibrated for use in managing accidental release of contaminants in surface waters of the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed at ORNL. The model employs existing watershed conditions, hydrologic parameters representing basin response to precipitation, and a Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) to predict variable flow conditions throughout the basin. Natural runoff from each of the hydrologically distinct subbasins is simulated and added to specified plant and process water discharges. The resulting flows are then routed through stream reaches and eventually to White Oak Lake (WOL), which is the outlet from the WOC drainage basin. In addition, the SSARR model is being used to simulate change in storage volumes and pool levels in WOL, and most recently, routing characteristics of contaminant spills through WOC and WOL. 10 figs

  15. From exploration to operation: overview of Bear Creek uranium project

    The deposits at Bear Creek, as elsewhere in the southern Powder River Basin, are typical roll-front type deposits. Uranium was transported to the sites of deposition by alkaline groundwaters, which distinctively altered the channel sandstone conduits. As the orebodies were approached, the alteration changed from the pink hematite staining to a rusty limonite stain. The best mineralization occurs in a ''C''-shaped roll at the contact between altered sandstone and finer-grained gray unoxidized sandstone. The tailings management, reclamation and stabilization plans are designed to be a walk-away system. Tailings will be ''sandwiched'' between clay layers and covered with overburden. Topsoil will then be brought in and the entire area revegetated

  16. Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; Kszos, L.A.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    1998-10-15

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biologicai Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the compiex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC, These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumuiation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macro invertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five sites, although sites maybe excluded and/or others added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and (6

  17. Environmental contaminant analysis of sea otters and prey from coastal Washington of the Washington Maritime NWR Complex

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Analyses of blood and liver samples from live captured sea otters and liver samples from beach-cast sea otter carcasses off the remote Washington coast indicate...

  18. Brood Year 2004: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation Report, June 2004 through March 2006.

    Gebhards, John S.; Hill, Robert; Daniel, Mitch [Nez Perce Tribe

    2009-02-19

    The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek to spawn through artificial propagation. This was the sixth season of adult chinook broodstock collection in Johnson Creek following collections in 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2003. Weir installation was completed on June 21, 2004 with the first chinook captured on June 22, 2004 and the last fish captured on September 6, 2004. The weir was removed on September 18, 2004. A total of 338 adult chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. Of these, 211 were of natural origin, 111 were hatchery origin Johnson Creek supplementation fish, and 16 were adipose fin clipped fish from other hatchery operations and therefore strays into Johnson Creek. Over the course of the run, 57 natural origin Johnson Creek adult chinook were retained for broodstock, transported to the South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility and held until spawned. The remaining natural origin Johnson Creek fish along with all the Johnson Creek supplementation fish were released upstream of the weir to spawn naturally. Twenty-seven Johnson Creek females were artificially spawned with 25 Johnson Creek males. Four females were diagnosed with high bacterial kidney disease levels resulting in their eggs being culled. The 27 females produced 116,598 green eggs, 16,531 green eggs were culled, with an average eye-up rate of 90.6% resulting in 90,647 eyed eggs. Juvenile fish were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery until November 2005 and then transferred to the outdoor rearing facilities during the Visual Implant Elastomer tagging operation

  19. Numerical modeling of tide-induced currents in Thane Creek, west coast of India

    Naidu, V.S.; Sarma, R.V.

    that 3.5 3 10 8 and 1.8 3 10 8 L are daily into the creek as domestic and industrial , respectively (Zingde et al. 1989). In addition to quantity of sediment, usually fine-grained, enters through various inlets and from nearby mudflats. A Water and Power... The shallow funnel-shaped Thane Creek is a semienclosed water body open to the Arabian Sea at its southwest approach. Its northern extremity is connected to the Ulhas River through a narrow channel (Fig. 1). The creek has become a busy wa- terway due...

  20. The Impacts of Acid Mine Drainage on the Black Creek Watershed, Wise County, Virginia

    Yeager, Jessica Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Black Creek is a small watershed located in Wise County, Virginia, west of the town of Norton. At the time of this survey, the watershed encompassed approximately 929 hectares of mine and forest lands with a small recreational area. Black Creek proper is a third-order stream approximately 6.7 km in length from its headwaters to its confluence with the Powell River in Kent Junction. Black Creek and several of the tributaries within the watershed were previously identified as areas impacted b...

  1. Pristine mangrove creek waters are a sink of nitrous oxide

    Maher, Damien T.; Sippo, James Z.; Tait, Douglas R.; Holloway, Ceylena; Santos, Isaac R.

    2016-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas, but large uncertainties remain in global budgets. Mangroves are thought to be a source of N2O to the atmosphere in spite of the limited available data. Here we report high resolution time series observations in pristine Australian mangroves along a broad latitudinal gradient to assess the potential role of mangroves in global N2O budgets. Surprisingly, five out of six creeks were under-saturated in dissolved N2O, demonstrating mangrove creek waters were a sink for atmospheric N2O. Air-water flux estimates showed an uptake of 1.52 ± 0.17 μmol m‑2 d‑1, while an independent mass balance revealed an average sink of 1.05 ± 0.59 μmol m‑2 d‑1. If these results can be upscaled to the global mangrove area, the N2O sink (~2.0 × 108 mol yr‑1) would offset ~6% of the estimated global riverine N2O source. Our observations contrast previous estimates based on soil fluxes or mangrove waters influenced by upstream freshwater inputs. We suggest that the lack of available nitrogen in pristine mangroves favours N2O consumption. Widespread and growing coastal eutrophication may change mangrove waters from a sink to a source of N2O to the atmosphere, representing a positive feedback to climate change.

  2. Pristine mangrove creek waters are a sink of nitrous oxide.

    Maher, Damien T; Sippo, James Z; Tait, Douglas R; Holloway, Ceylena; Santos, Isaac R

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas, but large uncertainties remain in global budgets. Mangroves are thought to be a source of N2O to the atmosphere in spite of the limited available data. Here we report high resolution time series observations in pristine Australian mangroves along a broad latitudinal gradient to assess the potential role of mangroves in global N2O budgets. Surprisingly, five out of six creeks were under-saturated in dissolved N2O, demonstrating mangrove creek waters were a sink for atmospheric N2O. Air-water flux estimates showed an uptake of 1.52 ± 0.17 μmol m(-2) d(-1), while an independent mass balance revealed an average sink of 1.05 ± 0.59 μmol m(-2) d(-1). If these results can be upscaled to the global mangrove area, the N2O sink (~2.0 × 10(8) mol yr(-1)) would offset ~6% of the estimated global riverine N2O source. Our observations contrast previous estimates based on soil fluxes or mangrove waters influenced by upstream freshwater inputs. We suggest that the lack of available nitrogen in pristine mangroves favours N2O consumption. Widespread and growing coastal eutrophication may change mangrove waters from a sink to a source of N2O to the atmosphere, representing a positive feedback to climate change. PMID:27172603

  3. Flood-inundation maps for Big Creek from the McGinnis Ferry Road bridge to the confluence of Hog Wallow Creek, Alpharetta and Roswell, Georgia

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 12.4-mile reach of Big Creek that extends from 260 feet above the McGinnis Ferry Road bridge to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgage at Big Creek below Hog Wallow Creek at Roswell, Georgia (02335757), were developed by the USGS in cooperation with the cities of Alpharetta and Roswell, Georgia. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Big Creek near Alpharetta, Georgia (02335700). Real-time stage information from this USGS streamgage may be obtained at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ and can be used in conjunction with these maps to estimate near real-time areas of inundation. The National Weather Service (NWS) is incorporating results from this study into the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood-warning system http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs for many streams where the USGS operates streamgages and provides flow data. The forecasted peak-stage information for the USGS streamgage at Big Creek near Alpharetta (02335700), available through the AHPS Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed for this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.

  4. Finding of No Significant Impact : [Proposed Hunting Plan for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This FONSI for the proposed Hunting Plan for Cypress Creek NWR states that opening the Refuge to hunting will not significantly affect the quality of the human...

  5. Quarterly Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake [National Wildlife Refuge] : February to April 1940

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Willow Creek, Benton Lake, and Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from February to April of 1940. The report...

  6. Quarterly Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake [National Wildlife Refuge] : February to April 1942

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Willow Creek, Benton Lake, and Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from February to April of 1942. The report...

  7. Quarterly Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake [National Wildlife Refuge] : August to October 1940

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for WIllow Creek, Benton Lake, and Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from August to October of 1940. The report...

  8. Quarterly Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake [National Wildlife Refuge] : August to October 1941

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for WIllow Creek, Benton Lake, and Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from August to October of 1941. The report...

  9. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1988

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1988 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the years...

  10. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1989 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  11. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1981

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1981 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the years...

  12. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1982

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1982 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the years...

  13. A proposal to study the insect fauna of Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — It is the purpose of this proposed study to identify target insect fauna on the Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge by completing comprehensive surveys of remnant...

  14. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2005

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 2005 fiscal year. The report begins with and...

  15. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2006

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 2006 fiscal year. The report begins with and...

  16. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1999

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 1999 calendar year. The report begins with and...

  17. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2008

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 2008 fiscal year. The report begins with and...

  18. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Fiscal year 2001

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 2001 fiscal year. The report begins with and...

  19. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2009

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 2009 fiscal year. The report begins with and...

  20. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2000

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 2000 fiscal year. The report begins with and...

  1. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1998

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 1998 calendar year. The report begins with and...

  2. WATER QUALITY AND BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF URBAN RUNOFF ON COYOTE CREEK. PHASE I - PRELIMINARY SURVEY

    This preliminary report describes the characteristics of urban runoff affecting Coyote Creek, sources of urban runoff pollutants, effects of urban runoff and potential controls for urban runoff. Local urban runoff characterization information is summarized, and sources of urban r...

  3. Pond Creek Coal Zone County Statistics (Geology) in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a polygon coverage of counties limited to the extent of the Pond Creek coal bed resource areas and attributed with statistics on the thickness of...

  4. Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1990

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the 1990 annual narrative report for Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge was established on...

  5. Quarterly Grain Report : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : May to August 1944

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This grain report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge discusses all grain received, disposed of during the quarterly period of May to...

  6. Quarterly Grain Report : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : January to April 1945

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This grain report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge discusses all grain received, disposed of during the quarterly period of January...

  7. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: January through December, 1965

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by...

  8. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1963

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by...

  9. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: January through December, 1966

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by...

  10. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge [Narrative report: May 1 - August 31, 1961

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  11. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: January thru December, 1964

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by...

  12. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1963

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: September, October, November, and December, 1962

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by...

  14. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge [Narrative report: September 1 - December 31, 1961

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by...

  15. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge [Narrative report: January 1 - April 30, 1962

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1962. The report begins by summarizing...

  16. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: January, February, March, and April, 1963

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1963. The report begins by summarizing...

  17. Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge [Narrative report: January 1 - April 30, 1961

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Snake Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1961. The report begins by summarizing...

  18. Biological narrative report: Squaw Creek Migratory Waterfowl Refuge for the quarter ending April 30, 1939

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the quarter ending April of 1939. The report begins by...

  19. Biological narrative report: Squaw Creek Migratory Waterfowl Refuge for the quarter ending October 31, 1939

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the quarter ending October of 1939. The report begins by...

  20. Biological narrative report: Squaw Creek Migratory Waterfowl Refuge for the quarter ending July 31, 1939

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the quarter ending July of 1939. The report begins by summarizing...

  1. Biological narrative report: Squaw Creek Migratory Waterfowl Refuge for the quarter ending January 31, 1940

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the quarter ending January of 1940. The report begins by...

  2. Wetted channel and bar features for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 2009

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold...

  3. Wetted channel and bar features for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1965

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold...

  4. Wetted channel and bar features for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1940

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold...

  5. Wetted channel and bar features for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 2005

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold...

  6. EAARL Topography--Three Mile Creek and Mobile-Tensaw Delta, Alabama, 2010

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the Mobile-Tensaw Delta region and Three Mile Creek in Alabama was produced from remotely sensed, geographically...

  7. Investigating Bald Eagle Winter and Summer Concentrations on Cat Point Creek

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objectives of this project are: 1 document the seasonal distribution and abundance patterns of Bald Eagles along Cat Point Creek within 750 feet of the Route...

  8. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2003

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 2003 fiscal year. The report begins with and...

  9. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2002

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 2002 fiscal year. The report begins with and...

  10. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 2007

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 2007 fiscal year. The report begins with and...

  11. Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge and Prairie Learning Center : Master Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge (now Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge) Master Plan is to guide the long-range development of the Refuge,...

  12. Bedrock Geology of the turkey Creek Drainage Basin, Jefferson County, Colorado

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geospatial data set describes bedrock geology of the Turkey Creek drainage basin in Jefferson County, Colorado. It was digitized from maps of fault locations...

  13. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Cypress Creek NWR (CCNWR) describes current hydrologic information, provides an assessment of...

  14. Nuisance Animal Control Plan for St. Catherine Creek NWR and Cat Island NWR

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A plan describing methods to be used for controling the populations and associated negative habitat impacts of nuisance animals on St. Catherine Creek NWR and Cat...

  15. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September to December 1953

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The...

  16. 2007 Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Lidar: Panther Creek Watershed, Yamhill County

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset represents LiDAR elevations acquired during a leaf-off and a leaf-on vegetative condition for the Upper Panther Creek Watershed in the Yamhill County...

  17. EAARL-B Topography-Big Thicket National Preserve: Village Creek Corridor Unit, Texas, 2014

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare-earth topography Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mosaic for the Village Creek Corridor Unit of Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas was produced from...

  18. EAARL-B Topography-Big Thicket National Preserve: Big Sandy Creek Corridor Unit, Texas, 2014

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first-surface topography Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mosaic for the Big Sandy Creek Corridor Unit of Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas was produced from...

  19. EAARL-B Topography—Big Thicket National Preserve: Village Creek Corridor Unit, Texas, 2014

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first-surface topography Digital Surface Model (DSM) mosaic for the Village Creek Corridor Unit of Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas was produced from...

  20. EAARL-B Topography-Big Thicket National Preserve: Big Sandy Creek Unit, Texas, 2014

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare-earth topography digital elevation model (DEM) mosaic for the Big Sandy Creek Unit of Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas, was produced from remotely...

  1. Water quality of Lower Deer Creek, Harford County, MD, home of the federally endangered Maryland darter

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Maryland darter (Etheostoma sellare) is one of the rarest fish in the world, existing in one riffle of Deer Creek, Harford County. There have been several...

  2. Biochemical indicators of heavy metal contaminants in Big Creek, Iron County, Missouri

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The size and weight of the Northern hogsuckers collected from Big Creek generally decreased with distance upstream; specimens from Site 1 (below Annapolis) were...

  3. Annual Report 1938 : Ninepipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake [National Wildlife] Refuges of Montana

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for fiscal year 1938 covers Refuge activities on Ninepipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges....

  4. Annual Report 1937 : Ninepipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake [National Wildlife] Refuges of Montana

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for fiscal year 1937 covers Refuge activities on Ninepipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges....

  5. Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge- Prairie Learning Center : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1994

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the 1994 annual narrative report for Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge). The report begins by covering the...

  6. Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge- Prairie Learning Center : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1993

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the 1993 annual narrative report for Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge). The report begins by covering the...

  7. Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge- Prairie Learning Center : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1992

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the 1992 annual narrative report for Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge). The report begins by covering the...

  8. Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge- Prairie Learning Center : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1995

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the 1995 annual narrative report for Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge). The report begins by covering the...

  9. Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge- Prairie Learning Center : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1991

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the 1991 annual narrative report for Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge). The report begins by covering the...

  10. Annual Water Management Plan : Fiscal year 1973 : Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 1993 Cypress Creek NWR Annual Water Management Plan has been developed to meet the station objectives set forth in the Master Plan. The purpose of this plan is...

  11. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : May to August 1952

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report...

  12. The Trail Inventory of St. Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all nonmotorized trails on St. Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory...

  13. Environmental contaminants in sediment and fish of Mineral Creek and the Middle Gila River, Arizona

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The lower reaches of Mineral Creek, a tributary to the Gila River in Pinal County, Arizona, were thought to be polluted by discharges from ASARCO Ray Mine located...

  14. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : January to April 1950

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pishkun, Willow Creek, and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1950. The...

  15. Mobile Acoustical Bat Monitoring Annual Summary Report CY 2012 to 2015 - Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These reports summarize bat calls collected along transects at Cypress Creek NWR between 2012 and 2015. Calls were classified using Bat Call ID ([BCID] version...

  16. Mobile Acoustical Bat Monitoring Annual Summary Report CY 2012 to 2014 - Pond Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These reports summarize bat calls collected along transects at Pond Creek NWR between 2012 and 2014. Calls were classified using Bat Call ID ([BCID] version 2.5a)...

  17. Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuges : Narrative Report : January to December 1965

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  18. Lower Arkansas River basin high priority issue : Rattlesnake creek subbasin : January 2009

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a section from Volume III: Kansas River Basins, of the Kansas Water Plan, January 2009. This section is pertaining to Rattlesnake Creek subbasin,...

  19. Pond Creek Coal Zone Point Data (Geology) in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a point coverage of attributes on data location, thickness of the Pond Creek coal bed main bench, and its elevation, in feet. The file is also found...

  20. Thickness of the Upper Hell Creek hydrogeologic unit in the Powder River structural basin

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent the thickness, in feet, of the Upper Hell Creek hydrogeologic unit in the Powder River basin. The data are presented as ASCII text files that...

  1. Thickness of the Upper Hell Creek hydrogeologic unit in the Williston structural basin

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent the thickness, in feet, of the Upper Hell Creek hydrogeologic unit in the Williston structural basin. The data are presented as ASCII text...

  2. Geomorphic Floodplain with Organic Matter (Biomass) Estimates for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  3. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report for period: May, June, July, and August, 1949

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuges : Narrative Report : January to December 1966

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  5. Altitude of the top of the Lower Hell Creek aquifer in the Williston structural basin

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent the altitude, in feet above North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88), of the Lower Hell Creek aquifer in the Williston structural basin....

  6. EAARL-B Topography-Big Thicket National Preserve: Big Sandy Creek Unit, Texas, 2014

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first-surface topography digital elevation model (DEM) mosaic for the Big Sandy Creek Unit of Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas, was produced from remotely...

  7. EAARL-B Topography-Big Thicket National Preserve: Big Sandy Creek Corridor Unit, Texas, 2014

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare-earth topography Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mosaic for the Big Sandy Creek Corridor Unit of Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas was produced from...

  8. EAARL-B Topography-Big Thicket National Preserve: Turkey Creek Unit, Texas, 2014

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare-earth topography digital elevation model (DEM) mosaic for the Turkey Creek Unit of Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas, was produced from remotely sensed,...

  9. EAARL-B Topography-Big Thicket National Preserve: Turkey Creek Unit, Texas, 2014

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first-surface topography digital elevation model (DEM) mosaic for the Turkey Creek Unit of Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas, was produced from remotely...

  10. Environmental Assessment for the Public Use Plan Whittlesey Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Environmental Assessment EA is to evaluate alternatives for public use of the Whittlesey Creek National Wildlife Refuge. The EA was prepared to...

  11. AFSC/ABL: Pink salmon data collected at Sashin Creek Weir 1934-2002

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A database describing a 67-year time series for Sashin Creek pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) data is presented. The database details the survival and other...

  12. Heavy Equipment Use Areas at Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site, Colorado

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is a vector polygon shapefile showing areas where heavy equipment use is permitted at Sand Creek Massacre NHS. The coordinates for this dataset were heads up...

  13. Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 2 of 8

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  14. An Evaluation of Ecosystem Restoration Options for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Evaluation of Ecosystem Restoration and Management Options covers the hydrogeomorphic analysis HGM for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge. This three step...

  15. Quantification of changes in seabed topography with special reference to Hansthal Creek, Gulf of Kachchh, India

    Pattanshetti, S.S.; Chauhan, O.S.; Sivakholundu, K.M.

    Variations in the bathymetry in macrotidal Hansthal Creek between 1984 and 1950 along 14 closely spaced lines, are used to quantify the volumetric changes in seabed topography in terms of erosion/accretion. Two surfaces from the bathymetric data...

  16. Pond Creek Coal Zone Remaining Resources by County in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a polygon coverage of counties limited to the extent of the Pond Creek coal zone resource areas and attributed with remaining resources (millions of...

  17. Pond Creek Coal Zone Original Resources by County in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a polygon coverage of counties limited to the extent of the Pond Creek coal zone resource areas and attributed with original resources (millions of...

  18. Cored Cottonwood Tree Sample Cluster Polygons at Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site, Colorado

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — A vector polygon dataset representing the location of sample clusters of cored trees at Sand Creek Massacre NHS as part of a University of Colorado research study.

  19. Tree Transect Starting Locations (Points) at Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site, Colorado

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — A vector point dataset representing the starting location of tree transects at Sand Creek Massacre NHS as part of a University of Colorado research study.

  20. 1983 Migratory Bird Disease Contingency Plan Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Disease Contingency Plan for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge provides background information on disease surveillance; an inventory of Refuge personnel,...

  1. Pond Creek Coal Zone County Statistics (Chemistry) in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a polygon coverage of counties limited to the extent of the Pond Creek coal zone resource areas and attributed with statistics on these coal quality...

  2. Narrative report Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge: January 1 - April 30, 1963

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1963. The report begins by summarizing...

  3. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1994

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 1994 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  4. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1993

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 1993 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  5. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1995

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  6. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1996

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 1996 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  7. Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Narrative Report: Calendar year 1994

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 1994 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  8. Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Narrative Report: Calendar year 1995

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  9. Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Narrative Report: Calendar year 1992

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 1992 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  10. Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Narrative Report: Calendar year 1996

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 1996 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  11. Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Narrative Report: Calendar year 1993

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 1993 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  12. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September to December 1959

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1959. The...

  13. Bison Grazing and Prairie Restoration at Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a letter inquiring about the type of electric fence charger used at Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge now Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge. The...

  14. Reciprocal Fire Protection Agreement between Silver Creek Rangeland Fire Protection Association and Burns Interagency Fire Zone

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the Reciprocal Fire Protection Agreement between the Silver Creek Rangeland Fire Protection Association and the Burns Interagency Fire Zone. The objectives...

  15. Annual Report 1939 : Ninepipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake [National Wildlife] Refuges of Montana

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for fiscal year 1939 covers Refuge activities on Ninepipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges....

  16. A water-quality assessment of the Feather Creek watershed, Vermillion County, Indiana

    Eikenberry, Stephen E.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical quality of surface water within the Feather Creek watershed is generally good. However, fecal bacteria concentrations are high enough to represent a potential problem, especially because of the high water-contact recreation proposed for the future reservoir.

  17. TARGET ANALYSIS OF SUZHOU CREEK REHABILITATION PROJECT STAGE II:BASED ON WATER QUALITY MODEL

    LIAO Zhen-liang; XU Zu-xin

    2004-01-01

    The Suzhou Creek is a seriously polluted tidal river in Shanghai. The Suzhou Creek Rehabilitation Project was launched in 1998, and the total investment will surpass 10 billion yuan RMB. It is important to assess the effectiveness of the project and ascertain its targets. In this study, by analyzing the achievements of Suzhou Creek Rehabilitation Project (Stage I) and its remaining problems, the main tasks of the Project Stage II are proposed. These works are wastewater interception, sediment dredging, bidirectional water diversion, and reconstruction of municipal pump stations. The water quality model established with USEPA's WASP is employed to analyze the quantitative targets of the Project Stage II. In the Project Stage II, the water quality of mainstream and tributaries will be improved continuously, the valus of CODCr, BOD5, DO in the mainstream will steadily attain Class IV according to the National Surface Water Quality Standard, and the ecological environment of Suzhou Creek with continuously recover.

  18. Impacts to Humboldt Bay NWR from forestry and dairy activities in the Salmon Creek Watershed

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The freshwater creeks, brackish water sloughs, saltwater marshes and mud flats found on the Humboldt Bay National Refuge provide habitats for at least 110 species...

  19. Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuges : Narrative Report : January to December 1968

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  20. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1987

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1987 calendar year. The report begins with a...