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Sample records for aberdeen proving ground

  1. Clean-ups at Aberdeen Proving Ground

    The Department of Defense has utilized radiative material in numerous applications over several decades. Aberdeen Proving Ground has been an integral player in the Army's Research, Development, and Testing of items incorporating radionuclides, as well as developing new and innovative applications. As new information becomes available and society progresses, we find that the best management practices used decades, or even sometimes years earlier are inadequate to meet the current demands. Aberdeen Proving Ground is committed to remediating historic disposal sites, and utilizing the best available technology in current operations to prevent future adverse impact. Two projects which are currently ongoing at Aberdeen Proving Ground illustrates these points. The first, the remediation of contaminated metal storage areas, depicts how available technology has provided a means for recycling material whereby preventing the continued stock piling, and allowing for the decommissioning of the areas. The second, the 26Th Street Disposal Site Removal Action, shows how historic methods of disposition were inadequate to meet today's needs

  2. Unexploded ordnance issues at Aberdeen Proving Ground: Background information

    Rosenblatt, D.H.

    1996-11-01

    This document summarizes currently available information about the presence and significance of unexploded ordnance (UXO) in the two main areas of Aberdeen Proving Ground: Aberdeen Area and Edgewood Area. Known UXO in the land ranges of the Aberdeen Area consists entirely of conventional munitions. The Edgewood Area contains, in addition to conventional munitions, a significant quantity of chemical-munition UXO, which is reflected in the presence of chemical agent decomposition products in Edgewood Area ground-water samples. It may be concluded from current information that the UXO at Aberdeen Proving Ground has not adversely affected the environment through release of toxic substances to the public domain, especially not by water pathways, and is not likely to do so in the near future. Nevertheless, modest but periodic monitoring of groundwater and nearby surface waters would be a prudent policy.

  3. Geophysical study of the Building 103 Dump, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.

    1992-12-01

    The Building 103 Dump is one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, resistivity, ground-penetrating radar, and seismic refraction, were conducted. These surveys indicate that much of the area is free of debris. However, prominent magnetic and resistivity anomalies occur along well-defined lineaments, suggestive of a dendritic stream pattern. Prior to the onset of dumping, the site was described as a ``sand pit,`` which suggests that headward erosion of Canal Creek tributaries cut into the surficial aquifer. Contaminants dumped into the landfill would have direct access to the surficial aquifer and thus to Canal Creek. Seismic refraction profiling indicates 6--12 ft of fill material now rests on the former land surface. Only the northern third of the former landfill was geophysically surveyed.

  4. Geophysics: Building E5190 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1992-07-01

    Building E5190 is one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek area of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May 1992. A noninvasive geophysical survey, including the complementary technologies of magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, was conducted around the perimeter as a guide to developing a sampling and monitoring program prior to decommissioning and dismantling the building. The magnetics surveys indicated that multistation, positive magnetic sources are randomly distributed north and west of the building. Two linear trends were noted: one that may outline buried utility lines and another that is produced by a steel-covered trench. The resistivity profiling indicated three conductive zones: one due to increased moisture in a ditch, one associated with buried utility lines, and a third zone associated with the steel-covered trench. Ground-penetrating radar imaging detected two significant anomalies, which were correlated with small-amplitude magnetic anomalies. The objectives of the study -- to detect and locate objects and to characterize a located object were achieved.

  5. Geophysics: Building E5476 decommissiong, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    Building E5476 was one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The large number of magnetic sources surrounding the building are believed to be contained in construction fill. The smaller anomalies, for the most part, were not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. Large magnetic anomalies near the southwest comer of the building are due to aboveground standpipes and steel-reinforced concrete. Two high-resistivity areas, one projecting northeast from the building and another south of the original structure, may indicate the presence of organic pore fluids in the subsurface. A conductive lineament protruding from the south wall that is enclosed by the southem, high-resistivity feature is not associated with an equivalent magnetic anomaly. Magnetic and electrical anomalies south of the old landfill boundary are probably not associated with the building. The boundary is marked by a band of magnetic anomalies and a conductive zone trending northwest to southeast. The cause of high resistivities in a semicircular area in the southwest comer, within the landfill area, is unexplained

  6. Environmental geophysics at Beach Point, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    McGinnis, L.D.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Miller, S.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reclamation Engineering and Geosciences Section; Mandell, W.A. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Wrobel, J. [Dept. of Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Geophysical studies at Beach Point Peninsula, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies permit construction of the most reasonable scenario linking dense, nonaqueous-phase liquid contaminants introduced at the surface with their pathway through the surficial aquifer. Subsurface geology and contaminant presence were identified by drilling, outcrop mapping, and groundwater sampling and analyses. Suspected sources of near-surface contaminants were defined by magnetic and conductivity measurements. Negative conductivity anomalies may be associated with unlined trenches. Positive magnetic and conductivity anomalies outline suspected tanks and pipes. The anomalies of greatest concern are those spatially associated with a concrete slab that formerly supported a mobile clothing impregnating plant. Resistivity and conductivity profiling and depth soundings were used to identify an electrical anomaly extending through the surficial aquifer to the basal pleistocene unconformity, which was mapped by using seismic reflection methods. The anomaly may be representative of a contaminant plume connected to surficial sources. Major activities in the area included liquid rocket fuel tests, rocket fuel fire suppression tests, pyrotechnic material and smoke generator tests, and the use of solvents at a mobile clothing impregnating plant.

  7. Depleted uranium risk assessment at Aberdeen Proving Ground

    The Environmental Science Group at Los Alamos and the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) are assessing the risk of depleted uranium (DU) testing at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG). Conceptual and mathematical models of DU transfer through the APG ecosystem have been developed in order to show the mechanisms by which DU migrates or remains unavailable to different flora and fauna and to humans. The models incorporate actual rates of DU transfer between different ecosystem components as much as possible. Availability of data on DU transport through different pathways is scarce and constrains some of the transfer rates that can be used. Estimates of transfer rates were derived from literature sources and used in the mass-transfer models when actual transfer rates were unavailable. Objectives for this risk assessment are (1) to assess if DU transports away from impact areas; (2) to estimate how much, if any, DU migrates into Chesapeake Bay; (3) to determine if there are appreciable risks to the ecosystems due to DU testing; (4) to estimate the risk to human health as a result of DU testing

  8. Environmental geophysics at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Daudt, C.R.; McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    Geophysical data collected at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, were used in the characterization of the natural hydrogeologic framework of the J-Field area and in the identification of buried disturbances (trenches and other evidences of contamination). Seismic refraction and reflection data and electrical resistivity data have aided in the characterization of the leaky confining unit at the base of the surficial aquifer (designated Unit B of the Tertiary Talbot Formation). Excellent reflectors have been observed for both upper and lower surfaces of Unit B that correspond to stratigraphic units observed in boreholes and on gamma logs. Elevation maps of both surfaces and an isopach map of Unit B, created from reflection data at the toxic burning pits site, show a thickening of Unit B to the east. Abnormally low seismic compressional-wave velocities suggest that Unit B consists of gassy sediments whose gases are not being flushed by upward or downward moving groundwater. The presence of gases suggests that Unit B serves as an efficient aquitard that should not be penetrated by drilling or other activities. Electromagnetic, total-intensity magnetic, and ground-penetrating radar surveys have aided in delineating the limits of two buried trenches, the VX burning pit and the liquid smoke disposal pit, both located at the toxic burning pits site. The techniques have also aided in determining the extent of several other disturbed areas where soils and materials were pushed out of disposal pits during trenching activities. Surveys conducted from the Prototype Building west to the Gunpowder River did not reveal any buried trenches.

  9. High resolution seismic reflection profiling at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland

    The effectiveness of shallow high resolution seismic reflection (i.e., resolution potential) to image geologic interfaces between about 70 and 750 ft at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland (APG), appears to vary locally with the geometric complexity of the unconsolidated sediments that overlay crystalline bedrock. The bedrock surface (which represents the primary geologic target of this study) was imaged at each of three test areas on walkaway noise tests and CDP (common depth point) stacked data. Proven high resolution techniques were used to design and acquire data on this survey. Feasibility of the technique and minimum acquisition requirements were determined through evaluation and correlation of walkaway noise tests, CDP survey lines, and a downhole velocity check shot survey. Data processing and analysis revealed several critical attributes of shallow seismic data from APG that need careful consideration and compensation on reflection data sets. This survey determined: (1) the feasibility of the technique, (2) the resolution potential (both horizontal and vertical) of the technique, (3) the optimum source for this site, (4) the optimum acquisition geometries, (5) general processing flow, and (6) a basic idea of the acoustic variability across this site. Source testing involved an accelerated weight drop, land air gun, downhole black powder charge, sledge hammer/plate, and high frequency vibrator. Shallow seismic reflection profiles provided for a more detailed picture of the geometric complexity and variability of the distinct clay sequences (aquatards), previously inferred from drilling to be present, based on sparse drill holes and basewide conceptual models. The seismic data also reveal a clear explanation for the difficulties previously noted in correlating individual, borehole-identified sand or clay units over even short distances

  10. Health assessment for Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Aberdeen, Maryland, Region 3. CERCLIS Nos. MD3210021355 and MD10020036. Preliminary report

    1989-01-19

    The Aberdeen Proving Grounds site is located in Aberdeen (Harford County) Maryland. Preliminary on-site groundwater and surface water sampling results have identified various metals, phosphorus, and volatile organic compounds. They include: 1,2-dichloroethylene, chloroform, 1,2-dichloroethane, trichloroethylene, benzene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, 1,4-dithiane and 1,2-dichloroethylene. In addition, it has been reported that among the substances disposed of on-site are significant quantities of toxic metals, cyanide compounds, phosphorus, phosgene, napalm, and mustard gas. The site is considered to be of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the likelihood of human exposure to hazardous substances. Potential environmental pathways include those related to contaminated groundwater, surface water, on-site soils, and volatilization of contaminants in ambient air.

  11. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2000-02-25

    The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment.

  12. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment

    The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment

  13. Evaluation of depleted uranium in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds, Arizona. Final report

    This report represents an evaluation of depleted uranium (DU) introduced into the environment at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds (APG), Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) Arizona. This was a cooperative project between the Environmental Sciences and Statistical Analyses Groups at LANL and with the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology at Colorado State University. The project represents a unique approach to assessing the environmental impact of DU in two dissimilar ecosystems. Ecological exposure models were created for each ecosystem and sensitivity/uncertainty analyses were conducted to identify exposure pathways which were most influential in the fate and transport of DU in the environment. Research included field sampling, field exposure experiment, and laboratory experiments. The first section addresses DU at the APG site. Chapter topics include bioenergetics-based food web model; field exposure experiments; bioconcentration by phytoplankton and the toxicity of U to zooplankton; physical processes governing the desorption of uranium from sediment to water; transfer of uranium from sediment to benthic invertebrates; spead of adsorpion by benthic invertebrates; uptake of uranium by fish. The final section of the report addresses DU at the YPG site. Chapters include the following information: Du transport processes and pathway model; field studies of performance of exposure model; uptake and elimination rates for kangaroo rates; chemical toxicity in kangaroo rat kidneys

  14. Evaluation of depleted uranium in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds, Arizona. Final report

    Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.H.; Myers, O.B.; Bestgen, H.T.; Jenkins, D.G. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

    1995-01-01

    This report represents an evaluation of depleted uranium (DU) introduced into the environment at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds (APG), Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) Arizona. This was a cooperative project between the Environmental Sciences and Statistical Analyses Groups at LANL and with the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology at Colorado State University. The project represents a unique approach to assessing the environmental impact of DU in two dissimilar ecosystems. Ecological exposure models were created for each ecosystem and sensitivity/uncertainty analyses were conducted to identify exposure pathways which were most influential in the fate and transport of DU in the environment. Research included field sampling, field exposure experiment, and laboratory experiments. The first section addresses DU at the APG site. Chapter topics include bioenergetics-based food web model; field exposure experiments; bioconcentration by phytoplankton and the toxicity of U to zooplankton; physical processes governing the desorption of uranium from sediment to water; transfer of uranium from sediment to benthic invertebrates; spead of adsorpion by benthic invertebrates; uptake of uranium by fish. The final section of the report addresses DU at the YPG site. Chapters include the following information: Du transport processes and pathway model; field studies of performance of exposure model; uptake and elimination rates for kangaroo rates; chemical toxicity in kangaroo rat kidneys.

  15. Initial building investigations at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: Objectives and methodology

    Brubaker, K.L.; Dougherty, J.M.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1994-12-01

    As part of an environmental-contamination source-definition program at Aberdeen Proving Ground, detailed internal and external inspections of 23 potentially contaminated buildings are being conducted to describe and characterize the state of each building as it currently exists and to identify areas potentially contaminated with toxic or other hazardous substances. In addition, a detailed geophysical investigation is being conducted in the vicinity of each target building to locate and identify subsurface structures, associated with former building operations, that are potential sources of contamination. This report describes the objectives of the initial building inspections, including the geophysical investigations, and discusses the methodology that has been developed to achieve these objectives.

  16. Ecological survey of M-Field, Edgewood Area Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Downs, J.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Fitzner, R.E.; Rogers, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    An ecological survey was conducted on M-Field, at the Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. M-Field is used routinely to test army smokes and obscurants, including brass flakes, carbon fibers, and fog oils. The field has been used for testing purposes for the past 40 years, but little documented history is available. Under current environmental regulations, the test field must be assessed periodically to document the presence or potential use of the area by threatened and endangered species. The M-Field area is approximately 370 acres and is part of the US Army`s Edgewood Area at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland. The grass-covered field is primarily lowlands with elevations from about 1.0 to 8 m above sea level, and several buildings and structures are present on the field. The ecological assessment of M-Field was conducted in three stages, beginning with a preliminary site visit in May to assess sampling requirements. Two field site visits were made June 3--7, and August 12--15, 1991, to identify the biota existing on the site. Data were gathered on vegetation, small mammals, invertebrates, birds, large mammals, amphibians, and reptiles.

  17. Ecological survey of M-Field, Edgewood Area Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Downs, J.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Fitzner, R.E.; Rogers, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    An ecological survey was conducted on M-Field, at the Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. M-Field is used routinely to test army smokes and obscurants, including brass flakes, carbon fibers, and fog oils. The field has been used for testing purposes for the past 40 years, but little documented history is available. Under current environmental regulations, the test field must be assessed periodically to document the presence or potential use of the area by threatened and endangered species. The M-Field area is approximately 370 acres and is part of the US Army's Edgewood Area at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland. The grass-covered field is primarily lowlands with elevations from about 1.0 to 8 m above sea level, and several buildings and structures are present on the field. The ecological assessment of M-Field was conducted in three stages, beginning with a preliminary site visit in May to assess sampling requirements. Two field site visits were made June 3--7, and August 12--15, 1991, to identify the biota existing on the site. Data were gathered on vegetation, small mammals, invertebrates, birds, large mammals, amphibians, and reptiles.

  18. Interim progress report -- geophysics: Decommissioning of Buildings E5974 and E5978, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    Buildings E5974 and E5978, located near the mouth of Canal Creek, were among 10 potentially contaminated sites in the Westwood and Canal Creek areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including the complementary technologies of magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeters of the buildings to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The magnetic anomalies and the electrically conductive areas around these buildings have a spatial relationship similar to that observed in low-lying sites in the Canal Creek area; they are probably associated with construction fill. Electrically conductive terrain is dominant on the eastern side of the site, and resistive terrain predominates on the west. The smaller magnetic anomalies are not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. The high resistivities in the northwest quadrant are believed to be caused by a natural sand lens. The causes of three magnetic anomalies in the high-resistivity area are unidentified, but they are probably anthropogenic

  19. Geophysics: Building E5190 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground. Interim progress report

    Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1992-07-01

    Building E5190 is one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek area of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May 1992. A noninvasive geophysical survey, including the complementary technologies of magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, was conducted around the perimeter as a guide to developing a sampling and monitoring program prior to decommissioning and dismantling the building. The magnetics surveys indicated that multistation, positive magnetic sources are randomly distributed north and west of the building. Two linear trends were noted: one that may outline buried utility lines and another that is produced by a steel-covered trench. The resistivity profiling indicated three conductive zones: one due to increased moisture in a ditch, one associated with buried utility lines, and a third zone associated with the steel-covered trench. Ground-penetrating radar imaging detected two significant anomalies, which were correlated with small-amplitude magnetic anomalies. The objectives of the study -- to detect and locate objects and to characterize a located object were achieved.

  20. Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a freshwater tidal wetland, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Smith, Barrett L.; Johnson, Mark A.; Fleck, William B.

    1997-01-01

    Ground-water contaminant plumes that are flowing toward or currently discharging to wetland areas present unique remediation problems because of the hydrologic connections between ground water and surface water and the sensitive habitats in wetlands. Because wetlands typically have a large diversity of microorganisms and redox conditions that could enhance biodegradation, they are ideal environments for natural attenuation of organic contaminants, which is a treatment method that would leave the ecosystem largely undisturbed and be cost effective. During 1992-97, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated the natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOC's) in a contaminant plume that discharges from a sand aquifer to a freshwater tidal wetland along the West Branch Canal Creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Characterization of the hydrogeology and geochemistry along flowpaths in the wetland area and determination of the occurrence and rates of biodegradation and sorption show that natural attenuation could be a feasible remediation method for the contaminant plume that extends along the West Branch Canal Creek.

  1. Environmental geophysics at the Southern Bush River Peninsula, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Davies, B.E.; Miller, S.F.; McGinnis, L.D. [and others

    1995-05-01

    Geophysical studies have been conducted at five sites in the southern Bush River Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The goals of the studies were to identify areas containing buried metallic objects and to provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework of the site. These studies indicate that, during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low sea level resulted in a complex pattern of channel-fill deposits. Paleochannels of various sizes and orientations have been mapped throughout the study area by means of ground-penetrating radar and EM-31 techniques. The EM-31 paleochannel signatures are represented onshore either by conductivity highs or lows, depending on the depths and facies of the fill sequences. A companion study shows the features as conductivity highs where they extend offshore. This erosional and depositional system is environmentally significant because of the role it plays in the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the site. Magnetic and electromagnetic anomalies outline surficial and buried debris throughout the areas surveyed. On the basis of geophysical measurements, large-scale (i.e., tens of feet) landfilling has not been found in the southern Bush River Peninsula, though smaller-scale dumping of metallic debris and/or munitions cannot be ruled out.

  2. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results

    Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

    2000-03-14

    This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

  3. Contamination source review for Building E3180, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Zellmer, S.D.; Smits, M.P.; Rueda, J.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report was prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to document the results of a contamination source review of Building E3180 at the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) in Maryland. The report may be used to assist the US Army in planning for the future use or disposition of this building. The review included a historical records search, physical inspection, photographic documentation, geophysical investigation, collection of air samples, and review of available records regarding underground storage tanks associated with Building E3180. The field investigations were performed by ANL during 1994. Building,E3180 (current APG designation) is located near the eastern end of Kings Creek Road, north of Kings Creek, and about 0.5 miles east of the airstrip within APG`s Edgewood Area. The building was constructed in 1944 as a facsimile of a Japanese pillbox and used for the development of flame weapons systems until 1957 (EAI Corporation 1989). The building was not used from 1957 until 1965, when it was converted and used as a flame and incendiary laboratory. During the 1970s, the building was converted to a machine (metal) shop and used for that purpose until 1988.

  4. Ecological risk assessment of depleted uranium in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground

    A preliminary ecological risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the effects of depleted uranium (DU) in the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) ecosystem and its potential for human health effects. An ecological risk assessment of DU should include the processes of hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Ecological risk assessments also should explicitly examine risks incurred by nonhuman as well as human populations, because risk assessments based only on human health do not always protect other species. To begin to assess the potential ecological risk of DU release to the environment we modeled DU transport through the principal components of the aquatic ecosystem at APG. We focused on the APG aquatic system because of the close proximity of the Chesapeake Bay and concerns about potential impacts on this ecosystem. Our objective in using a model to estimate environmental fate of DU is to ultimately reduce the uncertainty about predicted ecological risks due to DU from APG. The model functions to summarize information on the structure and functional properties of the APG aquatic system, to provide an exposure assessment by estimating the fate of DU in the environment, and to evaluate the sources of uncertainty about DU transport

  5. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results

    This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field

  6. Contamination source review for Building E3162, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Miller, G.A.; Draugelis, A.K.; Rueda, J.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report was prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to document the results of a contamination source review for Building E3162 at the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) in Maryland. The report may be used to assist the US Army in planning for the future use or disposition of this building. The review included a historical records search, physical inspection, photographic documentation, geophysical investigation, and collection of air samples. The field investigations were performed by ANL during 1994 and 1995. Building E3162 (APG designation) is part of the Medical Research Laboratories Building E3160 Complex. This research laboratory complex is located west of Kings Creek, east of the airfield and Ricketts Point Road, and south of Kings Creek Road in the Edgewood Area of APG. The original structures in the E3160 Complex were constructed during World War 2. The complex was originally used as a medical research laboratory. Much of the research involved wound assessment involving chemical warfare agents. Building E3162 was used as a holding and study area for animals involved in non-agent burns. The building was constructed in 1952, placed on inactive status in 1983, and remains unoccupied. Analytical results from these air samples revealed no distinguishable difference in hydrocarbon and chlorinated solvent levels between the two background samples and the sample taken inside Building E3162.

  7. Work plan for conducting an ecological risk assessment at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [and others

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Management Division of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland, and activities at the Edgewood Area since World War II have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. The J-Field site was used to destroy chemical agents and munitions by open burning and open detonation. This work plan presents the approach proposed to conduct an ecological risk assessment (ERA) as part of the RI/FS program at J-Field. This work plan identifies the locations and types of field studies proposed for each area of concern (AOC), the laboratory studies proposed to evaluate toxicity of media, and the methodology to be used in estimating doses to ecological receptors and discusses the approach that will be used to estimate and evaluate ecological risks at J-Field. Eight AOCs have been identified at J-Field, and the proposed ERA is designed to evaluate the potential for adverse impacts to ecological receptors from contaminated media at each AOC, as well as over the entire J-Field site. The proposed ERA approach consists of three major phases, incorporating field and laboratory studies as well as modeling. Phase 1 includes biotic surveys of the aquatic and terrestrial habitats, biological tissue sampling and analysis, and media toxicity testing at each AOC and appropriate reference locations. Phase 2 includes definitive toxicity testing of media from areas of known or suspected contamination or of media for which the Phase 1 results indicate toxicity or adverse ecological effects. In Phase 3, the uptake models initially developed in Phase 2 will be finalized, and contaminant dose to each receptor from all complete pathways will be estimated.

  8. Potential health impacts from range fires at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

    Willians, G.P.; Hermes, A.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Hartmann, H.M.; Tomasko, D.

    1998-03-01

    This study uses atmospheric dispersion computer models to evaluate the potential for human health impacts from exposure to contaminants that could be dispersed by fires on the testing ranges at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. It was designed as a screening study and does not estimate actual human health risks. Considered are five contaminants possibly present in the soil and vegetation from past human activities at APG--lead, arsenic, trichloroethylene (TCE), depleted uranium (DU), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT); and two chemical warfare agents that could be released from unexploded ordnance rounds heated in a range fire--mustard and phosgene. For comparison, dispersion of two naturally occurring compounds that could be released by burning of uncontaminated vegetation--vinyl acetate and 2-furaldehyde--is also examined. Data from previous studies on soil contamination at APG are used in conjunction with conservative estimates about plant uptake of contaminants, atmospheric conditions, and size and frequency of range fires at APG to estimate dispersion and possible human exposure. The results are compared with US Environmental Protection Agency action levels. The comparisons indicate that for all of the anthropogenic contaminants except arsenic and mustard, exposure levels would be at least an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding action levels. Because of the compoundingly conservative nature of the assumptions made, they conclude that the potential for significant human health risks from range fires is low. The authors recommend that future efforts be directed at fire management and control, rather than at conducting additional studies to more accurately estimate actual human health risk from range fires.

  9. Potential health impacts from range fires at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    This study uses atmospheric dispersion computer models to evaluate the potential for human health impacts from exposure to contaminants that could be dispersed by fires on the testing ranges at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. It was designed as a screening study and does not estimate actual human health risks. Considered are five contaminants possibly present in the soil and vegetation from past human activities at APG--lead, arsenic, trichloroethylene (TCE), depleted uranium (DU), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT); and two chemical warfare agents that could be released from unexploded ordnance rounds heated in a range fire--mustard and phosgene. For comparison, dispersion of two naturally occurring compounds that could be released by burning of uncontaminated vegetation--vinyl acetate and 2-furaldehyde--is also examined. Data from previous studies on soil contamination at APG are used in conjunction with conservative estimates about plant uptake of contaminants, atmospheric conditions, and size and frequency of range fires at APG to estimate dispersion and possible human exposure. The results are compared with US Environmental Protection Agency action levels. The comparisons indicate that for all of the anthropogenic contaminants except arsenic and mustard, exposure levels would be at least an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding action levels. Because of the compoundingly conservative nature of the assumptions made, they conclude that the potential for significant human health risks from range fires is low. The authors recommend that future efforts be directed at fire management and control, rather than at conducting additional studies to more accurately estimate actual human health risk from range fires

  10. Inorganic and organic ground-water chemistry in the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Lorah, M.M.; Vroblesky, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Groundwater chemical data were collected from November 1986 through April 1987 in the first phase of a 5-year study to assess the possibility of groundwater contamination in the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Water samples were collected from 87 observation wells screened in Coastal Plain sediments; 59 samples were collected from the Canal Creek aquifer, 18 from the overlying surficial aquifer, and 10 from the lower confined aquifer. Dissolved solids, chloride, iron, manganese, fluoride, mercury, and chromium are present in concentrations that exceed the Federal maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Elevated chloride and dissolved-solids concentrations appear to be related from contaminant plumes but also could result from brackish-water intrusion. Excessive concentrations of iron and manganese were the most extensive water quality problems found among the inorganic constituents and are derived from natural dissolution of minerals and oxide coatings in the aquifer sediments. Volatile organic compounds are present in the Canal Creek and surficial aquifers, but samples from the lower confined aquifer do not show any evidence of contamination by inorganic or organic chemicals. The volatile organic contaminants detected in the groundwater and their maximum concentrations (in micrograms/L) include 1,1,2,2- tetrachloroethane (9,000); carbon tetrachloride (480); chloroform (460); 1,1,2-trichloroethane (80); 1,2-dichloroethane (990); 1,1-dichloroethane (3.1); tetrachloroethylene (100); trichloroethylene (1,800); 1,2-trans- dichloroethylene (1,200); 1,1-dichloroethylene (4.4); vinyl chloride (140); benzene (70); and chlorobenzene (39). On the basis of information on past activities in the study area, some sources of the volatile organic compounds include: (1) decontaminants and degreasers; (2) clothing-impregnating operations; (3) the manufacture of impregnite material; (4) the manufacture of tear gas; and (5) fuels used in garages and at

  11. Long-term fate of depleted uranium at Aberdeen and Yuma Proving Grounds: Human health and ecological risk assessments

    Ebinger, M.H.; Beckman, R.J.; Myers, O.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.; Bestgen, H.T. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term consequences of depleted uranium (DU) in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) and Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) for the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) of the US Army. Specifically, we examined the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to humans and ecosystems caused by exposure to DU at both installations. We developed contaminant transport models of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at APG and terrestrial ecosystems at YPG to assess potential adverse effects from DU exposure. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the initial models showed the portions of the models that most influenced predicted DU concentrations, and the results of the sensitivity analyses were fundamental tools in designing field sampling campaigns at both installations. Results of uranium (U) isotope analyses of field samples provided data to evaluate the source of U in the environment and the toxicological and radiological doses to different ecosystem components and to humans. Probabilistic doses were estimated from the field data, and DU was identified in several components of the food chain at APG and YPG. Dose estimates from APG data indicated that U or DU uptake was insufficient to cause adverse toxicological or radiological effects. Dose estimates from YPG data indicated that U or DU uptake is insufficient to cause radiological effects in ecosystem components or in humans, but toxicological effects in small mammals (e.g., kangaroo rats and pocket mice) may occur from U or DU ingestion. The results of this study were used to modify environmental radiation monitoring plans at APG and YPG to ensure collection of adequate data for ongoing ecological and human health risk assessments.

  12. Long-term fate of depleted uranium at Aberdeen and Yuma Proving Grounds: Human health and ecological risk assessments

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term consequences of depleted uranium (DU) in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) and Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) for the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) of the US Army. Specifically, we examined the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to humans and ecosystems caused by exposure to DU at both installations. We developed contaminant transport models of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at APG and terrestrial ecosystems at YPG to assess potential adverse effects from DU exposure. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the initial models showed the portions of the models that most influenced predicted DU concentrations, and the results of the sensitivity analyses were fundamental tools in designing field sampling campaigns at both installations. Results of uranium (U) isotope analyses of field samples provided data to evaluate the source of U in the environment and the toxicological and radiological doses to different ecosystem components and to humans. Probabilistic doses were estimated from the field data, and DU was identified in several components of the food chain at APG and YPG. Dose estimates from APG data indicated that U or DU uptake was insufficient to cause adverse toxicological or radiological effects. Dose estimates from YPG data indicated that U or DU uptake is insufficient to cause radiological effects in ecosystem components or in humans, but toxicological effects in small mammals (e.g., kangaroo rats and pocket mice) may occur from U or DU ingestion. The results of this study were used to modify environmental radiation monitoring plans at APG and YPG to ensure collection of adequate data for ongoing ecological and human health risk assessments

  13. Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Field Sampling Plan

    Benioff, P.; Biang, R.; Dolak, D.; Dunn, C.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wang, Y.; Yuen, C.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Management Division (EMD) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland (Figure 1. 1). Since World War II activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). Considerable archival information about J-Field exists as a result of efforts by APG staff to characterize the hazards associated with the site. Contamination of J-Field was first detected during an environmental survey of the Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 by the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) (predecessor to the US Army Environmental Center [AEC]). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA -environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field. Contamination at J-Field was also detected during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science in 1983. The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved the installation and sampling of nine wells and the collection and analysis of surficial and deep composite soil samples. In 1986, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit (MD3-21-002-1355) requiring a basewide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field was issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 1987, the US Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phased hydrogeologic assessment in data were collected to model, groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed, a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today.

  14. Design and analysis of a natural-gradient ground-water tracer test in a freshwater tidal wetland, West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Tenbus, Frederick J.

    2005-01-01

    A natural-gradient ground-water tracer test was designed and conducted in a tidal freshwater wetland at West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The objectives of the test were to characterize solute transport at the site, obtain data to more accurately determine the ground-water velocity in the upper wetland sediments, and to compare a conservative, ionic tracer (bromide) to a volatile tracer (sulfur hexafluoride) to ascertain whether volatilization could be an important process in attenuating volatile organic compounds in the ground water. The tracer test was conducted within the upper peat unit of a layer of wetland sediments that also includes a lower clayey unit; the combined layer overlies an aquifer. The area selected for the test was thought to have an above-average rate of ground-water discharge based on ground-water head distributions and near-surface detections of volatile organic compounds measured in previous studies. Because ground-water velocities in the wetland sediments were expected to be slow compared to the underlying aquifer, the test was designed to be conducted on a small scale. Ninety-seven ?-inch-diameter inverted-screen stainless-steel piezometers were installed in a cylindrical array within approximately 25 cubic feet (2.3 cubic meters) of wetland sediments, in an area with a vertically upward hydraulic gradient. Fluorescein dye was used to qualitatively evaluate the hydrologic integrity of the tracer array before the start of the tracer test, including verifying the absence of hydraulic short-circuiting due to nonnatural vertical conduits potentially created during piezometer installation. Bromide and sulfur hexafluoride tracers (0.139 liter of solution containing 100,000 milligrams per liter of bromide ion and 23.3 milligrams per liter of sulfur hexafluoride) were co-injected and monitored to generate a dataset that could be used to evaluate solute transport in three dimensions. Piezometers were sampled 2 to 15 times

  15. Assessment of soil, surface-water, and ground-water contamination at selected sites at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Water resources investigations

    Phelan, D.J.; Olsen, L.D.; Cashel, M.L.; Tegeler, J.L.; Marchand, E.H.

    1998-08-01

    J-Field is located at the southernmost tip of the Gunpowder Neck Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay, in Harford County, Maryland. J-Field has been used by the U. S. Army since World War I as a testing ground for munitions, including chemical- warfare agents. From shortly after World War II into the 1970`s, chemical- warfare agents, high-explosive munitions, and industrial chemicals were tested and disposed of at J-Field by open-pit burning and by high-explosive demolition. Only emergency disposal operations have been conducted at J-Field since the early 1980`s. Soil, surface-water, and ground-water contamination has resulted from the migration of unburned chemicals and fuels from the disposal areas. Discharge of contaminants from ground water and runoff has resulted in surface- water contamination in the marshes and ponds in J-Field. This investigation was conducted from 1989 to 1994 as part of a remedial investigation of J-Field in response to Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) requirements. The nature and extent of contamination was assessed at five sites: the toxic-materials disposal area, the white-phosphorus disposal area, the riot-control-agent disposal area, the Robins Point demolition area, and the prototype building area. The toxic-materials disposal area was the most contaminated of the five sites investigated. Most of the soil- and surface- water contamination was detected in the marsh area to the east of the disposal pits. High concentrations of lead, antimony, cadmium, copper, and mercury were detected in soils at the edge of this marsh. Lead concentrations as high as 51 micrograms per liter (micrograms/L) and concentrations of other trace metals were highest in surface water at the edge of the marsh.

  16. Characterization of Preferential Ground-Water Seepage From a Chlorinated Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer to West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, 2002-04

    Majcher, Emily H.; Phelan, Daniel J.; Lorah, Michelle M.; McGinty, Angela L.

    2007-01-01

    Wetlands act as natural transition zones between ground water and surface water, characterized by the complex interdependency of hydrology, chemical and physical properties, and biotic effects. Although field and laboratory demonstrations have shown efficient natural attenuation processes in the non-seep wetland areas and stream bottom sediments of West Branch Canal Creek, chlorinated volatile organic compounds are present in a freshwater tidal creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volatile organic compound concentrations in surface water indicate that in some areas of the wetland, preferential flow paths or seeps allow transport of organic compounds from the contaminated sand aquifer to the overlying surface water without undergoing natural attenuation. From 2002 through 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division of the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, characterized preferential ground-water seepage as part of an ongoing investigation of contaminant distribution and natural attenuation processes in wetlands at this site. Seep areas were discrete and spatially consistent during thermal infrared surveys in 2002, 2003, and 2004 throughout West Branch Canal Creek wetlands. In these seep areas, temperature measurements in shallow pore water and sediment more closely resembled those in ground water than those in nearby surface water. Generally, pore water in seep areas contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds had lower methane and greater volatile organic compound concentrations than pore water in non-seep wetland sediments. The volatile organic compounds detected in shallow pore water in seeps were spatially similar to the dominant volatile organic compounds in the underlying Canal Creek aquifer, with both parent and anaerobic daughter compounds detected. Seep locations characterized as focused seeps contained the highest concentrations of chlorinated parent compounds

  17. Focused feasibility study for surface soil at the main pits and pushout area, J-field toxic burning pits area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Patton, T.; Benioff, P.; Biang, C.; Butler, J. [and others

    1996-06-01

    The Environmental Management Division of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). J-Field is located within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland. Since World War II, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning/open detonation. Portions of J-Field continue to be used for the detonation and disposal of unexploded ordnance (UXO) by open burning/open detonation under authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  18. Water-quality and water-level data for a freshwater tidal wetland, West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, October 1998-September 1999

    Spencer, Tracey A.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Mount, Mastin M.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents water-quality data for ground-water and surface-water samples and water-level data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from October 1998 through September 1999 at West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The report also provides a description of the sampling and analytical methods that were used to collect and analyze the samples, and includes an evaluation of the quality-assurance data. The ground-water sampling network includes 88 wells or piezometers, including four 2-inch wells, two 4-inch wells, thirty 0.75-inch piezo-meters, and fifty-two 0.25-inch piezometers. Water levels were measured in 105 wells or piezometers. Surface-water samples were collected at five sites. Samples were collected from wells and 0.75-inch piezometers for measurement of field parameters, and analysis of inorganic and organic constituents during three sampling rounds: March, May through June, and July through August of 1999. Inorganic constituents and organic constituents were analyzed in samples collected from 0.25-inch piezometers during three sampling rounds in February through March, May, and September of 1999. Water levels were measured in October and November of 1998, and in February and May of 1999. Surface-water samples were collected between February and August of 1999 for analysis of organic constituents.

  19. Environmental geophysics: Buildings E5485, E5487, and E5489 decommissioning - the open-quotes Ghost Townclose quotes complex, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Buildings E5485, E5487, and E5489, referred to informally as the open-quotes Ghost Townclose quotes complex, are potentially contaminated sites in the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, EM-31, EM-61, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted to assist a sampling and monitoring program prior to decommissioning and dismantling of the buildings. The buildings are located on a marginal wetland bordering the west branch of Canal Creek. The dominant geophysical signature in the open-quotes Ghost Town close quotes complex is a pattern of northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast anomalies that appear to be associated with a trench/pipe/sewer system, documented by the presence of a manhole. Combinations of anomalies suggest that line sources include nonmetallic and ferromagnetic materials in trenches. On the basis of anomaly associations, the sewer lines probably rest in a trench, back-filled with conductive, amphibolitic, crushed rock. Where the sewer lines connect manholes or junctions with other lines, ferromagnetic materials are present. Isolated, unidentified magnetic anomalies litter the area around Building E5487, particularly to the north. Three small magnetic sources are located east of Building E5487

  20. New and improved methods for monitoring air quality and the terrestrial environment: Applications at Aberdeen Proving Ground-Edgewood area. Annual report, 1 April--14 November 1997

    Bromenshenk, J.J.; Smith, G.C.

    1998-03-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) have been shown to be multi-media monitors of chemical exposures and resultant effects. This five-year project has developed an automated system to assess in real-time colony behavioral responses to stressors, both anthropogenic and natural, including inclement weather. Field trials at the Aberdeen Proving Ground-Edgewood included the Old O Field and J field landfills, the Canal Creek and Bush River areas, and a Churchville, MD reference site. Preliminary results show varying concentrations of bioavailable inorganic elements and chlorinated hydrocarbons in bee colonies from all Maryland sites. Industrial solvents in the air inside beehives exhibited the greatest between site differences, with the highest levels occurring in hives near landfills at Old O Field, J Field, and at some sites in the Bush River and Canal Creek areas. Compared to 1996, the 1997 levels of solvents in Old O Field hives decreased by an order of magnitude, and colony performance significantly improved, probably as a consequence of capping the landfill. Recent chemical monitoring accomplishments include development of a new apparatus to quantitatively calibrate TD/GC/MS analysis, a QA/QC assessment of factors that limit the precision of these analyses, and confirmation of transport of aqueous contaminants into the hive. Real-time effects monitoring advances include development of an extensive array of software tools for automated data display, inspection, and numerical analysis and the ability to deliver data from remote locations in real time through Internet or Intranet connections.

  1. Preliminary assessment of risk from toxic materials that might be mobilized in the decommissioning of Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032

    Rosenblatt, D.H.; Brubaker, K.L.

    1991-12-01

    Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032 is scheduled for decommissioning, that is, for demolition. Because the building was formerly used for small-scale operations with incendiary and toxic chemical agents, it presents unusual concerns for occupational and public health safety during the demolition. For this reason, an anticipatory risk assessment was conducted, taking into consideration the building`s history, properties of potential residual contaminants (particularly chemical and incendiary agents), and assumptions relating to meteorological conditions and envisioned modes of demolition. Safe maximum levels in concrete floors for the worst case were estimated to be: white phosphorus, 3200 mg/kg; mustard, 94 mg/kg; nerve agent GA (tabun), 6 mg/kg; cyanide, 500 mg/kg; and sulfide, 1400 mg/kg. These values will serve as planning guidance for the activities to follow. It is emphasized that the estimates must be reviewed, and perhaps revised, after sampling and analysis are completed, the demolition methodology is chosen, and dust emissions are measured under operating conditions.

  2. Preliminary assessment of risk from toxic materials that might be mobilized in the decommissioning of Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032

    Rosenblatt, D.H.; Brubaker, K.L.

    1991-12-01

    Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032 is scheduled for decommissioning, that is, for demolition. Because the building was formerly used for small-scale operations with incendiary and toxic chemical agents, it presents unusual concerns for occupational and public health safety during the demolition. For this reason, an anticipatory risk assessment was conducted, taking into consideration the building's history, properties of potential residual contaminants (particularly chemical and incendiary agents), and assumptions relating to meteorological conditions and envisioned modes of demolition. Safe maximum levels in concrete floors for the worst case were estimated to be: white phosphorus, 3200 mg/kg; mustard, 94 mg/kg; nerve agent GA (tabun), 6 mg/kg; cyanide, 500 mg/kg; and sulfide, 1400 mg/kg. These values will serve as planning guidance for the activities to follow. It is emphasized that the estimates must be reviewed, and perhaps revised, after sampling and analysis are completed, the demolition methodology is chosen, and dust emissions are measured under operating conditions.

  3. Microbial Consortia Development and Microcosm and Column Experiments for Enhanced Bioremediation of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds, West Branch Canal Creek Wetland Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Majcher, Emily H.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated solvents, including 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform, are reaching land surface in localized areas of focused ground-water discharge (seeps) in a wetland and tidal creek in the West Branch Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, the U.S. Geological Survey is developing enhanced bioremediation methods that simulate the natural anaerobic degradation that occurs without intervention in non-seep areas of the wetland. A combination of natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation could provide a remedy for the discharging ground-water plumes that would minimize disturbance to the sensitive wetland ecosystem. Biostimulation (addition of organic substrate or nutrients) and bioaugmentation (addition of microbial consortium), applied either by direct injection at depth in the wetland sediments or by construction of a permeable reactive mat at the seep surface, were tested as possible methods to enhance anaerobic degradation in the seep areas. For the first phase of developing enhanced bioremediation methods for the contaminant mixtures in the seeps, laboratory studies were conducted to develop a microbial consortium to degrade 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and its chlorinated daughter products under anaerobic conditions, and to test biostimulation and bioaugmentation of wetland sediment and reactive mat matrices in microcosms. The individual components required for the direct injection and reactive mat methods were then combined in column experiments to test them under groundwater- flow rates and contaminant concentrations observed in the field. Results showed that both direct injection and the reactive mat are promising remediation methods, although the success of direct injection likely would depend on adequately distributing and maintaining organic substrate throughout the wetland sediment in the seep

  4. Anaerobic degradation of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and association with microbial communities in a freshwater tidal wetland, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland : laboratory experiments and comparisons to field data

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Voytek, Mary A.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Jones, Elizabeth J., (Phillips)

    2003-01-01

    Defining biodegradation rates and processes is a critical part of assessing the feasibility of monitored natural attenuation as a remediation method for ground water containing organic contaminants. During 1998?2001, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a microbial study at a freshwater tidal wetland along the West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, as part of an investigation of natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the wetland sediments. Geochemical analyses and molecular biology techniques were used to investigate factors controlling anaerobic degradation of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TeCA), and to characterize the microbial communities that potentially are important in its degradation. Rapid TeCA and daughter product degradation observed in laboratory experiments and estimated with field data confirm that natural attenuation is a feasible remediation method at this site. The diverse microbial community that seems to be involved in TeCA degradation in the wetland sediments varies with changing spatial and seasonal conditions, allowing continued effective natural attenuation throughout the year. Rates of TeCA degradation in anaerobic microcosm experiments conducted with wetland sediment collected from two different sites (WB23 and WB30) and during three different seasons (March?April 1999, July?August 1999, and October?November 2000) showed little spatial variability but high seasonal variability. Initial first-order degradation rate constants for TeCA ranged from 0.10?0.01 to 0.16?0.05 per day (half-lives of 4.3 to 6.9 days) for March?April 1999 and October?November 2000 microcosms incubated at 19 degrees Celsius, whereas lower rate constants of 0 ? 0.03 and 0.06 ? 0.03 per day were obtained in July?August 1999 microcosms incubated at 19 degrees Celsius. Microbial community profiles showed that low microbial biomass and microbial diversity in the summer, possibly due to competition for nutrients by the

  5. Aerosol tests conducted at Aberdeen Proving Grounds MD.

    Brockmann, John E.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Servantes, Brandon Lee; Hankins, Matthew Granholm

    2012-06-01

    Test data are reported that demonstrate the deposition from a spray dispersion system (Illinois Tool Works inductively charging rotary atomization nozzle) for application of decontamination solution to various surfaces in the passenger cabin of a Boeing 737 aircraft. The decontamination solution (EnviroTru) was tagged with a known concentration of fluorescein permitting determination of both airborne decontaminant concentration and surface deposited decontaminant solution so that the effective deposition rates and surface coverage could be determined and correlated with the amount of material sprayed. Six aerosol dispersion tests were conducted. In each test, aluminum foil deposition coupons were set out throughout the passenger area and the aerosol was dispersed. The aerosol concentration was measured with filter samplers as well as with optical techniques Average aerosol deposition ranged from 3 to 15 grams of decontamination solution per square meter. Some disagreement was observed between various instruments utilizing different measurement principles. These results demonstrate a potentially effective method to disperse decontaminant to interior surfaces of a passenger aircraft.

  6. Renewable Energy Opportunties at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah

    Orrell, Alice C.; Kora, Angela R.; Russo, Bryan J.; Horner, Jacob A.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Weimar, Mark R.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Nesse, Ronald J.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2010-05-31

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Dugway Proving Ground, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment.

  7. NASA SPoRT GOES-R Proving Ground Activities

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Fuell, Kevin K.; Jedloec, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program is a partner with the GOES-R Proving Ground (PG) helping prepare forecasters understand the unique products to come from the GOES-R instrument suite. SPoRT is working collaboratively with other members of the GOES-R PG team and Algorithm Working Group (AWG) scientists to develop and disseminate a suite of proxy products that address specific forecast problems for the WFOs, Regional and National Support Centers, and other NOAA users. These products draw on SPoRT s expertise with the transition and evaluation of products into operations from the MODIS instrument and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The MODIS instrument serves as an excellent proxy for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) that will be aboard GOES-R. SPoRT has transitioned and evaluated several multi-channel MODIS products. The true and false color products are being used in natural hazard detection by several SPoRT partners to provide better observation of land features, such as fires, smoke plumes, and snow cover. Additionally, many of SPoRT s partners are coastal offices and already benefit from the MODIS sea surface temperature composite. This, along with other surface feature observations will be developed into ABI proxy products for diagnostic use in the forecast process as well as assimilation into forecast models. In addition to the MODIS instrument, the NALMA has proven very valuable to WFOs with access to these total lightning data. These data provide situational awareness and enhanced warning decision making to improve lead times for severe thunderstorm and tornado warnings. One effort by SPoRT scientists includes a lightning threat product to create short-term model forecasts of lightning activity. Additionally, SPoRT is working with the AWG to create GLM proxy data from several of the ground based total lightning networks, such as the NALMA. The evaluation will focus on the vastly improved spatial

  8. Potential Cislunar and Interplanetary Proving Ground Excursion Trajectory Concepts

    McGuire, Melissa L.; Strange, Nathan J.; Burke, Laura M.; MacDonald, Mark A.; McElrath, Timothy P.; Landau, Damon F.; Lantoine, Gregory; Hack, Kurt J.; Lopez, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    NASA has been investigating potential translunar excursion concepts to take place in the 2020s that would be used to test and demonstrate long duration life support and other systems needed for eventual Mars missions in the 2030s. These potential trajectory concepts could be conducted in the proving ground, a region of cislunar and near-Earth interplanetary space where international space agencies could cooperate to develop the technologies needed for interplanetary spaceflight. Enabled by high power Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) technologies, the excursion trajectory concepts studied are grouped into three classes of increasing distance from the Earth and increasing technical difficulty: the first class of excursion trajectory concepts would represent a 90-120 day round trip trajectory with abort to Earth options throughout the entire length, the second class would be a 180-210 day round trip trajectory with periods in which aborts would not be available, and the third would be a 300-400 day round trip trajectory without aborts for most of the length of the trip. This paper provides a top-level summary of the trajectory and mission design of representative example missions of these three classes of excursion trajectory concepts.

  9. Depleted uranium human health risk assessment, Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana

    The risk to human health from fragments of depleted uranium (DU) at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG) was estimated using two types of ecosystem pathway models. A steady-state, model of the JPG area was developed to examine the effects of DU in soils, water, and vegetation on deer that were hunted and consumed by humans. The RESRAD code was also used to estimate the effects of farming the impact area and consuming the products derived from the farm. The steady-state model showed that minimal doses to humans are expected from consumption of deer that inhabit the impact area. Median values for doses to humans range from about 1 mrem (±2.4) to 0.04 mrem (±0.13) and translate to less than 1 x 10-6 detriments (excess cancers) in the population. Monte Carlo simulation of the steady-state model was used to derive the probability distributions from which the median values were drawn. Sensitivity analyses of the steady-state model showed that the amount of DU in airborne dust and, therefore, the amount of DU on the vegetation surface, controlled the amount of DU ingested by deer and by humans. Human doses from the RESRAD estimates ranged from less than 1 mrem/y to about 6.5 mrem/y in a hunting scenario and subsistence fanning scenario, respectively. The human doses exceeded the 100 mrem/y dose limit when drinking water for the farming scenario was obtained from the on-site aquifer that was presumably contaminated with DU. The two farming scenarios were unrealistic land uses because the additional risk to humans due to unexploded ordnance in the impact area was not figured into the risk estimate. The doses estimated with RESRAD translated to less than 1 x 10-6 detriments to about 1 x 10-3 detriments. The higher risks were associated only with the farming scenario in which drinking water was obtained on-site

  10. Depleted uranium human health risk assessment, Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-04-29

    The risk to human health from fragments of depleted uranium (DU) at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG) was estimated using two types of ecosystem pathway models. A steady-state, model of the JPG area was developed to examine the effects of DU in soils, water, and vegetation on deer that were hunted and consumed by humans. The RESRAD code was also used to estimate the effects of farming the impact area and consuming the products derived from the farm. The steady-state model showed that minimal doses to humans are expected from consumption of deer that inhabit the impact area. Median values for doses to humans range from about 1 mrem ({plus_minus}2.4) to 0.04 mrem ({plus_minus}0.13) and translate to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments (excess cancers) in the population. Monte Carlo simulation of the steady-state model was used to derive the probability distributions from which the median values were drawn. Sensitivity analyses of the steady-state model showed that the amount of DU in airborne dust and, therefore, the amount of DU on the vegetation surface, controlled the amount of DU ingested by deer and by humans. Human doses from the RESRAD estimates ranged from less than 1 mrem/y to about 6.5 mrem/y in a hunting scenario and subsistence fanning scenario, respectively. The human doses exceeded the 100 mrem/y dose limit when drinking water for the farming scenario was obtained from the on-site aquifer that was presumably contaminated with DU. The two farming scenarios were unrealistic land uses because the additional risk to humans due to unexploded ordnance in the impact area was not figured into the risk estimate. The doses estimated with RESRAD translated to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments to about 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} detriments. The higher risks were associated only with the farming scenario in which drinking water was obtained on-site.

  11. Estimation of fatigue damage caused by actual roads and maneuvers on proving ground

    G.H. Farrahi; A Khalaj

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to estimate the cumulative fatigue damage in a vehicle component and to calculate the number of cycles driven on the proving ground to achieve the equivalent accumulated fatigue damage in design life.Design/methodology/approach: In order to achieve our objective, using ADAMS software, standard roads and proving ground events on which the vehicle model was to be driven were simulated. The load time history results were applied to an FEM model created in ...

  12. Estimation of fatigue damage caused by actual roads and maneuvers on proving ground

    G.H. Farrahi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this paper is to estimate the cumulative fatigue damage in a vehicle component and to calculate the number of cycles driven on the proving ground to achieve the equivalent accumulated fatigue damage in design life.Design/methodology/approach: In order to achieve our objective, using ADAMS software, standard roads and proving ground events on which the vehicle model was to be driven were simulated. The load time history results were applied to an FEM model created in MSC/Nastran. Modal transient dynamic analysis was used to obtain the stress time history in the test component.Findings: The results showed that fast cornering has a greater damage effect than slow and moderate cornering. For primary evaluation of fatigue life (in our case the cornering analysis is sufficient. The proving ground events had much more destruction effect than actual roads as the fatigue damage accumulated on our test component. Driving 1568 cycles (2462 km on a proving ground was equal to driving 200000 km on actual roads.Research limitations/implications: The next stage in this research may be to study the effect of dimensions of proving ground events on accumulated fatigue damage.Practical implications: By using CAE and VPG the time and cost of developing the new models of vehicles decreases.Originality/value: The number of cycles which should be driven on the studied proving ground to achieve the accumulated fatigue damage in design life has been esimated.

  13. Research Objectives for Human Missions in the Proving Ground of Cis-Lunar Space

    Niles, P. B.; Eppler, D. B.; Kennedy, K. J.; Lewis, R.; Spann, J. F.; Sullivan, T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in as early as 2023, crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit will begin enabled by the new capabilities of the SLS and Orion vehicles. This will initiate the "Proving Ground" phase of human exploration with Mars as an ultimate destination. The primary goal of the Proving Ground is to demonstrate the capability of suitably long duration spaceflight without need of continuous support from Earth, i.e. become Earth Independent. A major component of the Proving Ground phase is to conduct research activities aimed at accomplishing major objectives selected from a wide variety of disciplines including but not limited to: Astronomy, Heliophysics, Fundamental Physics, Planetary Science, Earth Science, Human Systems, Fundamental Space Biology, Microgravity, and In A major component of the Proving Ground phase is to conduct research activities aimed at accomplishing major objectives selected from a wide variety of disciplines including but not limited to: Astronomy, Heliophysics, Fundamental Physics, Planetary Science, Earth Science, Human Systems, Fundamental Space Biology, Microgravity, and In Situ Resource Utilization. Mapping and prioritizing the most important objectives from these disciplines will provide a strong foundation for establishing the architecture to be utilized in the Proving Ground.

  14. Concept of Operations for a Prospective "Proving Ground" in the Lunar Vicinity

    Love, Stanley G.; Hill, James J.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is studying a "Proving Ground" near the Moon to conduct human space exploration missions in preparation for future flights to Mars. This paper describes a concept of operations ("conops") for activities in the Proving Ground, focusing on the construction and use of a mobile Cislunar Transit Habitat capable of months-long excursions within and beyond the Earth-Moon system. Key elements in the conops include the Orion spacecraft (with mission kits for docking and other specialized operations) and the Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket. Potential additions include commercial launch vehicles and logistics carriers, solar electric propulsion stages to move elements between different orbits and eventually take them on excursions to deep space, a node module with multiple docking ports, habitation and life support blocks, and international robotic and piloted lunar landers. The landers might include reusable ascent modules which could remain docked to in-space elements between lunar sorties. The architecture will include infrastructure for launch preparation, communication, mission control, and range safety. The conops describes "case studies" of notional missions chosen to guide the design of the architecture and its elements. One such mission is the delivery of a 10-ton pressurized element, co-manifested with an Orion on a Block 1B Space Launch System rocket, to the Proving Ground. With a large solar electric propulsion stage, the architecture could enable a year-long mission to land humans on a near-Earth asteroid. In the last case, after returning to near-lunar space, two of the asteroid explorers could join two crewmembers freshly arrived from Earth for a Moon landing, helping to safely quantify the risk of landing deconditioned crews on Mars. The conops also discusses aborts and contingency operations. Early return to Earth may be difficult, especially during later Proving Ground missions. While adding risk, limited-abort conditions provide needed practice

  15. SPoRT's Participation in the GOES-R Proving Ground Activity

    Jedlovec, Gary; Fuell, Kevin; Smith, Matthew; Stano, Geoffrey; Molthan, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The next generation geostationary satellite, GOES-R, will carry two new instruments with unique atmospheric and surface observing capabilities, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), to study short-term weather processes. The ABI will bring enhanced multispectral observing capabilities with frequent refresh rates for regional and full disk coverage to geostationary orbit to address many existing and new forecast challenges. The GLM will, for the first time, provide the continuous monitoring of total lightning flashes over a hemispherical region from space. NOAA established the GOES-R Proving Ground activity several years ago to demonstrate the new capabilities of these instruments and to prepare forecasters for their day one use. Proving Ground partners work closely with algorithm developers and the end user community to develop and transition proxy data sets representing GOES-R observing capabilities. This close collaboration helps to maximize refine algorithms leading to the delivery of a product that effectively address a forecast challenge. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has been a participant in the NOAA GOES-R Proving Ground activity by developing and disseminating selected GOES-R proxy products to collaborating WFOs and National Centers. Established in 2002 to demonstrate the weather and forecasting application of real-time EOS measurements, the SPoRT program has grown to be an end-to-end research to operations activity focused on the use of advanced NASA modeling and data assimilation approaches, nowcasting techniques, and unique high-resolution multispectral data from EOS satellites to improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional and local scale. Participation in the Proving Ground activities extends SPoRT s activities and taps its experience and expertise in diagnostic weather analysis, short-term weather forecasting, and the transition of research and experimental

  16. Research Objectives for Human Missions in the Proving Ground of Cis-Lunar Space

    Spann, James; Niles, Paul B.; Eppler, Dean B.; Kennedy, Kriss J.; Lewis, Ruthan.; Sullivan, Thomas A.

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: This talk will introduce the preliminary findings in support of NASA's Future Capabilities Team. In support of the ongoing studies conducted by NASA's Future Capabilities Team, we are tasked with collecting research objectives for the Proving Ground activities. The objectives could include but are certainly not limited to: demonstrating crew well being and performance over long duration missions, characterizing lunar volatiles, Earth monitoring, near Earth object search and identification, support of a far-side radio telescope, and measuring impact of deep space environment on biological systems. Beginning in as early as 2023, crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit will begin enabled by the new capabilities of the SLS and Orion vehicles. This will initiate the "Proving Ground" phase of human exploration with Mars as an ultimate destination. The primary goal of the Proving Ground is to demonstrate the capability of suitably long duration spaceflight without need of continuous support from Earth, i.e. become Earth Independent. A major component of the Proving Ground phase is to conduct research activities aimed at accomplishing major objectives selected from a wide variety of disciplines including but not limited to: Astronomy, Heliophysics, Fundamental Physics, Planetary Science, Earth Science, Human Systems, Fundamental Space Biology, Microgravity, and In Situ Resource Utilization. Mapping and prioritizing the most important objectives from these disciplines will provide a strong foundation for establishing the architecture to be utilized in the Proving Ground. Possible Architectures: Activities and objectives will be accomplished during the Proving Ground phase using a deep space habitat. This habitat will potentially be accompanied by a power/propulsion bus capable of moving the habitat to accomplish different objectives within cis-lunar space. This architecture can also potentially support staging of robotic and tele-robotic assets as well as

  17. Research Objectives for Human Missions in the Proving Ground of Cis-Lunar Space

    Spann, James; Niles, Paul; Eppler, Dean; Kennedy, Kriss; Lewis, Ruthan; Sullivan, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Introduction: This talk will introduce the preliminary findings in support of NASA's Future Capabilities Team. In support of the ongoing studies conducted by NASA's Future Capabilities Team, we are tasked with collecting re-search objectives for the Proving Ground activities. The objectives could include but are certainly not limited to: demonstrating crew well being and performance over long duration missions, characterizing lunar volatiles, Earth monitoring, near Earth object search and identification, support of a far-side radio telescope, and measuring impact of deep space environment on biological systems. Beginning in as early as 2023, crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit will be enabled by the new capabilities of the SLS and Orion vehicles. This will initiate the "Proving Ground" phase of human exploration with Mars as an ultimate destination. The primary goal of the Proving Ground is to demonstrate the capability of suitably long dura-tion spaceflight without need of continuous support from Earth, i.e. become Earth Independent. A major component of the Proving Ground phase is to conduct research activities aimed at accomplishing major objectives selected from a wide variety of disciplines including but not limited to: Astronomy, Heliophysics, Fun-damental Physics, Planetary Science, Earth Science, Human Systems, Fundamental Space Biology, Microgravity, and In Situ Resource Utilization. Mapping and prioritizing the most important objectives from these disciplines will provide a strong foundation for establishing the architecture to be utilized in the Proving Ground. Possible Architectures: Activities and objectives will be accomplished during the Proving Ground phase using a deep space habitat. This habitat will potentially be accompanied by a power/propulsion bus capable of moving the habitat to accomplish different objectives within cis-lunar space. This architecture can also potentially support stag-ing of robotic and tele-robotic assets as well as

  18. Remediation application strategies for depleted uranium contaminated soils at the US Army Yuma Proving Ground

    The US Army Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), located in the southwest portion of Arizona conducts firing of projectiles into the Gunpoint (GP-20) firing range. The penetrators are composed of titanium and DU. The purpose of this project was to determine feasible cleanup technologies and disposal alternatives for the cleanup of the depleted uranium (DU) contaminated soils at YPG. The project was split up into several tasks that include (a) collecting and analyzing samples representative of the GP-20 soils, (b) evaluating the data results, (c) conducting a literature search of existing proven technologies for soil remediation, and (0) making final recommendations for implementation of this technology to the site. As a result of this study, several alternatives for the separation, treatment, and disposal procedures are identified that would result in meeting the cleanup levels defined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for unrestricted use of soils and would result in a significant cost savings over the life of the firing range

  19. Remediation application strategies for depleted uranium contaminated soils at the US Army Yuma Proving Ground

    Vandel, D.S.; Medina, S.M.; Weidner, J.R.

    1994-03-01

    The US Army Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), located in the southwest portion of Arizona conducts firing of projectiles into the Gunpoint (GP-20) firing range. The penetrators are composed of titanium and DU. The purpose of this project was to determine feasible cleanup technologies and disposal alternatives for the cleanup of the depleted uranium (DU) contaminated soils at YPG. The project was split up into several tasks that include (a) collecting and analyzing samples representative of the GP-20 soils, (b) evaluating the data results, (c) conducting a literature search of existing proven technologies for soil remediation, and (0) making final recommendations for implementation of this technology to the site. As a result of this study, several alternatives for the separation, treatment, and disposal procedures are identified that would result in meeting the cleanup levels defined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for unrestricted use of soils and would result in a significant cost savings over the life of the firing range.

  20. GOES-R Proving Ground Activities at the NASA Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center

    Molthan, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    SPoRT is actively involved in GOES-R Proving Ground activities in a number of ways: (1) Applying the paradigm of product development, user training, and interaction to foster interaction with end users at NOAA forecast offices national centers. (2) Providing unique capabilities in collaboration with other GOES-R Proving Ground partners (a) Hybrid GOES-MODIS imagery (b) Pseudo-GLM via regional lightning mapping arrays (c) Developing new RGB imagery from EUMETSAT guidelines

  1. Feasibility of using plants to assist in the remediation of heavy metal contamination at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Final report

    Jastrow, J.D.

    1995-11-03

    Most remedial technologies currently being used at hazardous waste sites (e.g., containment, excavation, soil washing, or incineration) are expensive. Further, in some locations technologies involving excavation could increase off-site releases of hazardous materials by destabilizing the site. Thus, interest in the development of in situ bioremediation technologies has grown substantially over the last decade. The idea of phytoremediation (i.e., using plants to clean up toxic wastes) is generating increasing attention from scientists, industry, and government agencies. The attractiveness of phytoremediation stems from its potential (1) to be less expensive than technologies involving the human engineering costs of soil manipulation, and (2) to initiate simultaneously both the clean up of hazardous materials and site restoration. The purpose of this project was to investigate the potential for using plants to remediate J-Field soils contaminated with heavy metals. Phragmites australis, one of the dominant species in the Toxic Burning Pits (TBP) area and other contaminated sites within J-Field, appears to be both tolerant of heavy metal contaminated soil conditions and capable of producing large amounts of biomass. Consequently, this project has concentrated on characterizing heavy metal accumulation by Phragmites australis growing in the TBP area relative to soil concentrations and availabilities. This type of information is necessary to determine the feasibility of using this species to assist in the remediation of metal contaminated soils at J-Field.

  2. An Evaluation of Activated Bismuth Isotopes in Environmental Samples From the Former Western Pacific Proving Grounds

    Robison, W.L.; Brunk, J.A.; Jokela, T.A.

    2000-03-21

    {sup 207}Bi (t{sub 1/2}=32.2 y) was generated by activation of weapons material during a few ''clean'' nuclear tests at the U.S. Western Pacific Proving Grounds of Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. The radionuclides first appeared in the Enewetak environment during 1958 and in the environment of Bikini during 1956. Crater sediments from Bikini with high levels of {sup 207}Bi were analyzed by gamma spectrometry in an attempt to determine the relative concentrations of {sup 208}Bi (t{sup 1/2} = 3.68 x 10{sup 5} y). The bismuth isotopes were probably generated during the ''clean'', 9.3 Mt Poplar test held on 7/12/58. The atom ratio of {sup 208}Bi to {sup 207}Bi (R value) ranges from {approx}12 to over 200 in sections of core sediments from the largest nuclear crater at Bikini atoll. The presence of bismuth in the device is suggested to account for R values in excess of 10.

  3. Generator, mechanical, smoke: For dual-purpose unit, XM56, Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, Arizona

    Driver, C.J.; Ligotke, M.W.; Moore, E.B. Jr. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Bowers, J.F. (Dugway Proving Ground, UT (United States))

    1991-10-01

    The US Army Chemical Research, Development and Engineering Center (CRDEC) is planning to perform a field test of the XM56 smoke generator at the US Army Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), Arizona. The XM56, enabling the use of fog oil in combination with other materials, such as graphite flakes, is part of an effort to improve the efficiency of smoke generation and to extend the effectiveness of the resulting obscurant cloud to include the infrared spectrum. The plan field operation includes a road test and concurrent smoke- generation trials. Three M1037 vehicles with operation XM56 generators will be road-tested for 100 h. Smoke will be generated for 30 min from a single stationary XM56 four times during the road test, resulting in a total of 120 min of smoke generation. The total aerial release of obscurant materials during this test is expected to be 556 kg (1,220 lb) of fog oil and 547 kg (1,200 lb) of graphite flakes. This environmental assessment has evaluated the consequences of the proposed action. Air concentrations and surface deposition levels were estimated using an atmospheric dispersion model. Degradation of fog oil and incorporation of graphite in the soil column will limit the residual impacts of the planned action. No significant impacts to air, water, and soil quality are anticipated. risks to the environment posed by the proposed action were determined to be minimal or below levels previously found to pose measurable impacts. Cultural resources are present on YPG and have been identified in adjacent areas; therefore, off-road activities should be preceded by a cultural resource survey. A Finding of No Significant Impact is recommended. 61 refs., 1 fig.

  4. GSA's Green Proving Ground: Identifying, Testing and Evaluating Innovative Technologies; Preprint

    Kandt, A.; Lowell, M.

    2012-05-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the GPG program and its objectives as well as a summary and status update of the 16 technologies selected for enhanced testing and evaluation in 2011. The federal government's General Services Administration's (GSA) Public Buildings Service (PBS) acquires space on behalf of the federal government through new construction and leasing, and acts as a caretaker for federal properties across the country. PBS owns or leases 9,624 assets and maintains an inventory of more than 370.2 million square feet of workspace, and as such has enormous potential for implementing energy efficient and renewable energy technologies to reduce energy and water use and associated emissions. The Green Proving Ground (GPG) program utilizes GSA's real estate portfolio to test and evaluate innovative and underutilized sustainable building technologies and practices. Findings are used to support the development of GSA performance specifications and inform decision making within GSA, other federal agencies, and the real estate industry. The program aims to drive innovation in environmental performance in federal buildings and help lead market transformation through deployment of new technologies. In 2011, the GPG program selected 16 technologies or practices for rigorous testing and evaluation. Evaluations are currently being performed in collaboration with the Department of Energy's National Laboratories, and a steady stream of results will be forthcoming throughout 2012. This paper will provide an overview of the GPG program and its objectives as well as a summary and status update of the 16 technologies selected for enhanced testing and evaluation in 2011. Lastly, it provides a general overview of the 2012 program.

  5. Environmental radiation monitoring plan for depleted uranium and beryllium areas, Yuma Proving Ground

    This Environmental Radiation Monitoring Plan (ERM) discusses sampling soils, vegetation, and biota for depleted uranium (DU) and beryllium (Be) at Yuma Proving Ground (YPG). The existing ERM plan was used and modified to more adequately assess the potential of DU and Be migration through the YPG ecosystem. The potential pathways for DU and Be migration are discussed and include soil to vegetation, soil to animals, vegetation to animals, animals to animals, and animals to man. Sample collection will show DU deposition and will be used to estimate DU migration. The number of samples from each area varies and depends on if the firing range of interest is currently used for DU testing (GP 17A) or if the range is not used currently for DU testing (GP 20). Twenty to thirty-five individual mammals or lizards will be sampled from each transect. Air samples and samples of dust in the air fall will be collected in three locations in the active ranges. Thirty to forty-five sediment samples will be collected from different locations in the arroys near the impact areas. DU and Be sampling in the Hard Impact and Soft Impact areas changed only slightly from the existing ERM. The modifications are changes in sample locations, addition of two sediment transport locations, addition of vegetation samples, mammal samples, and air sampling from three to five positions on the impact areas. Analysis of samples for DU or total U by inductively-coupled mass spectroscopy (ICP/MS), cc spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis (NAA), and kinetic phosphorimetric analysis (KPA) are discussed, and analysis for Be by ICP/MS are recommended. Acquiring total U (no isotope data) from a large number of samples and analysis of those samples with relatively high total U concentrations results in fewer isotopic identifications but more information on U distribution. From previous studies, total U concentrations greater than about 3 times natural background are usually DU by isotopic confirmation

  6. The Space Launch System and the Proving Ground: Pathways to Mars

    Klaus, K.

    2014-12-01

    Introduction: The Space Launch System (SLS) is the most powerful rocket ever built and provides a critical heavy-lift launch capability. We present mission concepts relevant to NASA's Cislunar Proving Ground and the Global Exploration Roadmap (GER).Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM): ARM in part is a mission to the lunar vicinity. The ARM mission requirements result in system design based on a modified version of our 702 spacecraft. Including a NASA Docking System (NDS) on the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle allows for easier crewed exploration integration and execution. Exploration Augmentation Module (EAM): Crew operations at a redirected asteroid could be significantly enhanced by providing additional systems and EVA capabilities beyond those available from the Orion only. An EAM located with the asteroid would improve the science and technical return of the asteroid mission while also increasing Orion capability through resource provision and providing an abort location and safe haven for contingencies. The EAM could be repurposed as a cislunar exploration platform that advances scientific research, enables lunar surface exploration and provides a deep space vehicle assembly and servicing site. International Space Station (ISS) industry partners have been working for the past several years on concepts for using ISS development methods and assets to support a broad range of missions. These concepts have matured along with planning details for NASA's SLS and Orion for a platform located in the Earth-Moon Libration (EML) system or Distant Retrograde Orbit (DRO).Lunar Surface: The mission objectives are to provide lunar surface access for crew and cargo and to provide as much reuse as possible. Subsequent missions to the surface can reuse the same lander and Lunar Transfer Vehicle.Mars Vicinity: The International space community has declared that our unified horizon goal is for a human mission to Mars. Translunar infrastructure and heavy lift capability are key to this

  7. Depleted uranium risk assessment for Jefferson Proving Ground using data from environmental monitoring and site characterization. Final report

    This report documents the third risk assessment completed for the depleted uranium (DU) munitions testing range at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG), Indiana, for the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation command. Jefferson Proving Ground was closed in 1995 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act and the testing mission was moved to Yuma Proving Ground. As part of the closure of JPG, assessments of potential adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem were conducted. This report integrates recent information obtained from site characterization surveys at JPG with environmental monitoring data collected from 1983 through 1994 during DU testing. Three exposure scenarios were evaluated for potential adverse effects to human health: an occasional use scenario and two farming scenarios. Human exposure was minimal from occasional use, but significant risk were predicted from the farming scenarios when contaminated groundwater was used by site occupants. The human health risk assessments do not consider the significant risk posed by accidents with unexploded ordnance. Exposures of white-tailed deer to DU were also estimated in this study, and exposure rates result in no significant increase in either toxicological or radiological risks. The results of this study indicate that remediation of the DU impact area would not substantially reduce already low risks to humans and the ecosystem, and that managed access to JPG is a reasonable model for future land use options

  8. Finding and proving the exact ground state of a generalized Ising model by convex optimization and MAX-SAT

    Huang, Wenxuan; Dacek, Stephen; Rong, Ziqin; Urban, Alexander; Cao, Shan; Luo, Chuan; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-01-01

    Lattice models, also known as generalized Ising models or cluster expansions, are widely used in many areas of science and are routinely applied to alloy thermodynamics, solid-solid phase transitions, magnetic and thermal properties of solids, and fluid mechanics, among others. However, the problem of finding the true global ground state of a lattice model, which is essential for all of the aforementioned applications, has remained unresolved, with only a limited number of results for highly simplified systems known. In this article, we present the first general algorithm to find the exact ground states of complex lattice models and to prove their global optimality, resolving this fundamental problem in condensed matter and materials theory. We transform the infinite-discrete-optimization problem into a pair of combinatorial optimization (MAX-SAT) and non-smooth convex optimization (MAX-MIN) problems, which provide upper and lower bounds on the ground state energy respectively. By systematically converging th...

  9. An evaluation of activated bismuth isotopes in environmental samples from the former Western Pacific Proving Grounds

    207Bi (T1/2 =32.2 y) was generated by activation of weapons material during a few 'clean' nuclear tests at the U.S. Westren Pacific Provung Grounds of Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. The radionuclides first appeared in the Enewetak environment during 1958 and in the environment of Bikini during 1956. Crater sediments from Bikini with high levels of 207Bi were analyzed by gamma-spectrometry in an attempt to determine the relative concentrations of 208Bi (T1/2 = 3.68 x 105 y). The bismuth isotopes were probably generated during the 'clean', 9.3 Mt Poplar test held on 7/12/58. The atom ratio of 208Bi to 207Bi (R value) ranges from ∼ 12 to over 200 in sections of core sediments from the largest nuclear crater at Bikini atoll. The presence of bismuth in the device is suggested to account for R values in excess of 10. (author)

  10. SPoRT Participation in the GOES-R and JPSS Proving Grounds

    Jedlovec, Gary; Fuell, Kevin; Smith, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    For the last several years, the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) project at has been working with the various algorithm working groups and science teams to demonstrate the utility of future operational sensors for GOES-R and the suite of instruments for the JPSS observing platforms. For GOES-R, imagery and products have been developed from polar-orbiting sensors such as MODIS and geostationary observations from SEVIRI, simulated imagery, enhanced products derived from existing GOES satellites, and data from ground-based observing systems to generate pseudo or proxy products for the ABI and GLM instruments. The suite of products include GOES-POES basic and RGB hybrid imagery, total lightning flash products, quantitative precipitation estimates, and convective initiation products. SPoRT is using imagery and products from VIIRS, CrIS, ATMS, and OMPS to show the utility of data and products from their operational counterparts on JPSS. The products include VIIRS imagery in swath form, the GOES-POES hybrid, a suite of RGB products including the air mass RGB using water vapor and ozone channels from CrIS, and several DNB products. Over a dozen SPoRT collaborative WFOs and several National Centers are involved in an intensive evaluation of the operational utility of these products.

  11. Demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF): Apache Longbow - Hell Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground

    This ecological risk assessment for a testing program at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, is a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF; Suter et al. 2001). The demonstration is intended to illustrate how risk assessment guidance concerning-generic military training and testing activities and guidance concerning a specific type of activity (e.g., low-altitude aircraft overflights) may be implemented at a military installation. MERAF was developed with funding from the Strategic Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense. Novel aspects of MERAF include: (1) the assessment of risks from physical stressors using an ecological risk assessment framework, (2) the consideration of contingent or indirect effects of stressors (e.g., population-level effects that are derived from habitat or hydrological changes), (3) the integration of risks associated with different component activities or stressors, (4) the emphasis on quantitative risk estimates and estimates of uncertainty, and (5) the modularity of design, permitting components of the framework to be used in various military risk assessments that include similar activities. The particular subject of this report is the assessment of ecological risks associated with a testing program at Cibola Range of Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The program involves an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, i.e., M60-A1 tanks. Thus, the three component activities of the Apache-Hellfire test were: (1) helicopter overflight, (2) missile firing, and (3) tracked vehicle movement. The demonstration was limited, to two ecological endpoint entities (i.e., potentially susceptible and valued populations or communities): woody desert wash communities and mule deer populations. The core assessment area is composed of about 126 km2 between the Chocolate and Middle Mountains. The core time of the program is a three-week period, including fourteen days of

  12. JPSS Proving Ground Activities with NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center

    Schultz, L. A.; Smith, M. R.; Fuell, K.; Stano, G. T.; LeRoy, A.; Berndt, E.

    2015-12-01

    Instruments aboard the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of satellites will provide imagery and other data sets relevant to operational weather forecasts. To prepare current and future weather forecasters in application of these data sets, Proving Ground activities have been established that demonstrate future JPSS capabilities through use of similar sensors aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, and the S-NPP mission. As part of these efforts, NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center in Huntsville, Alabama partners with near real-time providers of S-NPP products (e.g., NASA, UW/CIMSS, UAF/GINA, etc.) to demonstrate future capabilities of JPSS. This includes training materials and product distribution of multi-spectral false color composites of the visible, near-infrared, and infrared bands of MODIS and VIIRS. These are designed to highlight phenomena of interest to help forecasters digest the multispectral data provided by the VIIRS sensor. In addition, forecasters have been trained on the use of the VIIRS day-night band, which provides imagery of moonlit clouds, surface, and lights emitted by human activities. Hyperspectral information from the S-NPP/CrIS instrument provides thermodynamic profiles that aid in the detection of extremely cold air aloft, helping to map specific aviation hazards at high latitudes. Hyperspectral data also support the estimation of ozone concentration, which can highlight the presence of much drier stratospheric air, and map its interaction with mid-latitude or tropical cyclones to improve predictions of their strengthening or decay. Proving Ground activities are reviewed, including training materials and methods that have been provided to forecasters, and forecaster feedback on these products that has been acquired through formal, detailed assessment of their applicability to a given forecast threat or task. Future opportunities for collaborations around the delivery of training are proposed

  13. Demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF): Apache Longbow - Hell Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground

    Efroymson, R.A.

    2002-05-09

    This ecological risk assessment for a testing program at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, is a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF; Suter et al. 2001). The demonstration is intended to illustrate how risk assessment guidance concerning-generic military training and testing activities and guidance concerning a specific type of activity (e.g., low-altitude aircraft overflights) may be implemented at a military installation. MERAF was developed with funding from the Strategic Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense. Novel aspects of MERAF include: (1) the assessment of risks from physical stressors using an ecological risk assessment framework, (2) the consideration of contingent or indirect effects of stressors (e.g., population-level effects that are derived from habitat or hydrological changes), (3) the integration of risks associated with different component activities or stressors, (4) the emphasis on quantitative risk estimates and estimates of uncertainty, and (5) the modularity of design, permitting components of the framework to be used in various military risk assessments that include similar activities. The particular subject of this report is the assessment of ecological risks associated with a testing program at Cibola Range of Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The program involves an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, i.e., M60-A1 tanks. Thus, the three component activities of the Apache-Hellfire test were: (1) helicopter overflight, (2) missile firing, and (3) tracked vehicle movement. The demonstration was limited, to two ecological endpoint entities (i.e., potentially susceptible and valued populations or communities): woody desert wash communities and mule deer populations. The core assessment area is composed of about 126 km{sup 2} between the Chocolate and Middle Mountains. The core time of the program is a three-week period, including fourteen days of

  14. The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Ecological Risk Assessment for Missile Firing

    A multiple stressor risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework. The focus was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, M60-A1 tanks. This paper describes the ecological risk assessment for the missile launch and detonation. The primary stressor associated with this activity was sound. Other minor stressors included the detonation impact, shrapnel, and fire. Exposure to desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) was quantified using the Army sound contour program BNOISE2, as well as distances from the explosion to deer. Few effects data were available from related studies. Exposure-response models for the characterization of effects consisted of human 'disturbance' and hearing damage thresholds in units of C-weighted decibels (sound exposure level) and a distance-based No Observed Adverse Effects Level for moose and cannonfire. The risk characterization used a weight-of-evidence approach and concluded that risk to mule deer behavior from the missile firing was likely for a negligible number of deer, but that no risk to mule deer abundance and reproduction is expected

  15. RCRA delisting of agent-decontaminated waste and remediation waste at Dugway Proving Ground: A program update

    Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.; O`Neill, H.J. [and others

    1996-03-01

    In July 1988, the state of Utah issued regulations that declared residues resulting from the demilitarization, treatment, and testing of military chemical agents to be hazardous wastes. These residues were designated as corrosive, reactive, toxic, and acute hazardous (Hazardous Waste No. F999). These residues are not listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which is the primary law governing management of hazardous waste in the United States. The RCRAI regulations (40 CFR 260-280), the Utah Administrative Code (R-315), and other state hazardous waste programs list specific wastes as hazardous but allow generators to petition the regulator to {open_quotes}delist{close_quotes} if it can be demonstrated that such wastes are not hazardous. In 1994, the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command FECOM initiated a project with the Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to demonstrate that certain categories of F999 residues are not hazardous waste and to achieve delisting. The initial focus is on delisting agent-decontaminated residues and soil with a history of contamination at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), Utah. An overview of the DPG delisting program was presented at the 1995 American Defense Preparedness Association Environmental Symposium. Since that time, much progress has been made. The purpose of this paper is to review the DPG delisting program and discuss overall progress. Emphasis is placed on progress with regard to analytical methods that will be used to demonstrate that the target residues do not contain hazardous amounts of chemical agent.

  16. The Aberdeen Impedance Imaging System.

    Kulkarni, V; Hutchison, J M; Mallard, J R

    1989-01-01

    The Aberdeen Impedance Imaging System is designed to reconstruct 2 dimensional images of the average distribution of the amplitude and phase of the complex impedance within a 3 dimensional region. The system uses the four electrode technique in a 16 electrode split-array. The system hardware consists of task-orientated electronic modules for: driving a constant current, multiplexing the current drive, demultiplexing peripheral voltages, differential amplification, phase sensitive detection and low-pass filtration, digitisation with a 14 bit analog to digital converter (ADC), and -control logic for the ADC and multiplexors. A BBC microprocessor (Master series), initiates a controlled sequence for the collection of a number of data sets which are averaged and stored on disk. Image reconstruction is by a process of convolution-backprojection similar to the fan-beam reconstruction of computerised tomography and is also known as Equipotential Backprojection. In imaging impedance changes associated with fracture healing the changes may be large enough to allow retrieval of both the amplitude and phase of the complex impedance. Sequential imaging of these changes would necessitate monitoring electronic and electrode drift by imaging an equivalent region of the contralateral limb. Differential images could be retrieved when the image of the normal limb is the image template. Better characterisation of tissues would necessitate a cleaner retrieval of the quadrature signal. PMID:2742979

  17. Constructing and proving the ground state of a generalized Ising model by the cluster tree optimization algorithm

    Huang, Wenxuan; Dacek, Stephen; Rong, Ziqin; Ding, Zhiwei; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-01-01

    Generalized Ising models, also known as cluster expansions, are an important tool in many areas of condensed-matter physics and materials science, as they are often used in the study of lattice thermodynamics, solid-solid phase transitions, magnetic and thermal properties of solids, and fluid mechanics. However, the problem of finding the global ground state of generalized Ising model has remained unresolved, with only a limited number of results for simple systems known. We propose a method to efficiently find the periodic ground state of a generalized Ising model of arbitrary complexity by a new algorithm which we term cluster tree optimization. Importantly, we are able to show that even in the case of an aperiodic ground state, our algorithm produces a sequence of states with energy converging to the true ground state energy, with a provable bound on error. Compared to the current state-of-the-art polytope method, this algorithm eliminates the necessity of introducing an exponential number of variables to ...

  18. Cities, Towns and Villages, File name = BORDERLINES. County boundary also contains bounds for Aberdeen Proving Ground and the municipalities of Havre de Grace, Bel Air, & Aberdeen. http://www.harfordcountymd.gov/gis/Index.cfm, Published in 2010, 1:9600 (1in=800ft) scale, Harford County Government.

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cities, Towns and Villages dataset, published at 1:9600 (1in=800ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2010. It...

  19. Concepts and procedures required for successful reduction of tensor magnetic gradiometer data obtained from an unexploded ordnance detection demonstration at Yuma Proving Grounds, Arizona

    Bracken, Robert E.; Brown, Philip J., II

    2006-01-01

    On March 12, 2003, data were gathered at Yuma Proving Grounds, in Arizona, using a Tensor Magnetic Gradiometer System (TMGS). This report shows how these data were processed and explains concepts required for successful TMGS data reduction. Important concepts discussed include extreme attitudinal sensitivity of vector measurements, low attitudinal sensitivity of gradient measurements, leakage of the common-mode field into gradient measurements, consequences of thermal drift, and effects of field curvature. Spatial-data collection procedures and a spin-calibration method are addressed. Discussions of data-reduction procedures include tracking of axial data by mathematically matching transfer functions among the axes, derivation and application of calibration coefficients, calculation of sensor-pair gradients, thermal-drift corrections, and gradient collocation. For presentation, the magnetic tensor at each data station is converted to a scalar quantity, the I2 tensor invariant, which is easily found by calculating the determinant of the tensor. At important processing junctures, the determinants for all stations in the mapped area are shown in shaded relief map-view. Final processed results are compared to a mathematical model to show the validity of the assumptions made during processing and the reasonableness of the ultimate answer obtained.

  20. The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Introduction and Problem Formulation for a Multiple Stressor Risk Assessment

    An ecological risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF). The focus of the assessment was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, i.e., M60-A1 tanks. The problem formulation for the assessment included conceptual models for three component activities of the test, helicopter overflight, missile firing, and tracked vehicle movement, and two ecological endpoint entities, woody desert wash communities and desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) populations. An activity-specific risk assessment framework was available to provide guidance for assessing risks associated with aircraft overflights. Key environmental features of the study area include barren desert pavement and tree-lined desert washes. The primary stressors associated with helicopter overflights were sound and the view of the aircraft. The primary stressor associated with Hellfire missile firing was sound. The principal stressor associated with tracked vehicle movement was soil disturbance, and a resulting, secondary stressor was hydrological change. Water loss to washes and wash vegetation was expected to result from increased ponding, infiltration and/or evaporation associated with disturbances to desert pavement. A plan for estimating integrated risks from the three military activities was included in the problem formulation

  1. A progress report on results of test drilling and ground-water investigations of the Snake Plain aquifer, southeastern Idaho: Part 1: Mud Lake Region, 1969-70 and Part 2: Observation Wells South of Arco and West of Aberdeen

    Crosthwaite, E.G.

    1973-01-01

    The results of drilling test holes to depths of approximately 1,000 feet in the Mud Lake region show that a large part of the region is underlain by both sedimentary deposits and basalt flows. At some locations, predominantly sedimentary deposits were penetrated; at others, basalt flows predominated. The so-called Mud Lake-Market Lake barrier denotes a change in geology. From the vicinity of the barrier area, as described by Stearns, Crandall, and Steward (1938, p. 111), up the water-table gradient for at least a few tens of miles, the saturated geologic section consists predominantly of beds of sediments that are intercalated with numerous basalt flows. Downgradient from the barrier, sedimentary deposits are not common and practically all the water-bearing formations are basalt, at least to the depths explored so far. Thus, the barrier is a transition zone from a sedimentary-basaltic sequence to a basaltic sequence. The sedimentary-basaltic sequence forms a complex hydrologic system in which water occurs under water-table conditions in the upper few tens of feet of saturated material and under artesian conditions in the deeper material in the southwest part of the region. The well data indicate that southwest of the barrier, artesian pressures are not significant. Southwest of the barrier, few sedimentary deposits occur in the basalt section and, as described by Mundorff, Crosthwaite, and Kilburn (1964). ground water occurs in a manner typical of the Snake Plain aquifer. In several wells, artesian pressures are higher in the deeper formations than in the shallower ones, but the reverse was found in a few wells. The available data are not adequate to describe the water-bearing characteristics of the artesian aquifer nor the effects that pumping in one zone would have on adjacent zones. The water-table aquifer yields large quantities of water to irrigation wells.

  2. Virtual Proving Ground-Based Rear Suspension Fatigue Analysis%基于虚拟试验场的后悬架疲劳分析

    吴光强; 李运超; 盛云

    2009-01-01

    Considering common artificial assumptions in traditional CAE analysis such as the structural nonlinear of tire,contact nonlinear between tire and road surface,stiffness and damping characteristics of rubber connector , this paper presents a description of the process of calculating road load by using explicit time integration in virtual proving ground where builds an integrated intensify road and full vehicle finite element model. Then the road load is applied to the rear suspension model which is described by elastic-plastic material to obtain stress-stain time history. Fatigue crack initiation life can be got by strain-life method and effect of mean stress is also considered.%利用虚拟试验场技术建立耐久性强化路面和整车有限元模型,考虑轮胎的结构非线性因素、轮胎和路面的接触非线性以及橡胶连接件的刚度和阻尼特性等传统计算机辅助分析常使用的人为假定,通过显示时间积分获得道路载荷.基于弹塑性材料模型对后悬架施加道路载荷得到其应力应变历程,应用应变寿命法预测疲劳裂纹萌生寿命,并考虑了平均应力对疲劳寿命的影响.

  3. 3-D Waveguide Effects of Topographical Structural Variation on Full Waveform Propagation: 3-D Finite Difference Modeling Comparisons with Field Data From Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona

    Anderson, T. S.; Miller, R.; Greenfield, R.; Fisk, D.

    2002-12-01

    The propagation of seismic waves through regions of complex topography is not thoroughly understood. Surface waves, are of particular interest, as they are large in amplitude and can characterize the source depth, magnitude, and frequency content. The amplitude and frequency content of seismic waves that propagate in regions with large topographical variations are affected by both the scattering and blockage of the wave energy. The ability to predict the 3-d scattering due to topography will improve the understanding of both regional scale surface wave magnitudes, and refine surface wave discriminants as well as at the local scale (Smart Weapons Test Range, Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The result of the KGS characterization study is a high-resolution 3-d model that is used in our seismic simulations. The velocities Vs, Vp are calculated by tomography and refraction, attenuation coefficients estimated from the surface wave and from p-waves and are provided in a model with attributes resolved in 3-d to 0.5 meters. In the present work, we present comparisons of synthetic data with seismic data collected at the Smart Weapons Test Range to benchmark the accuracy achieved in simulating 3-d wave propagation in the vicinity of a topographical anomaly (trench). Synthetic seismograms are generated using a 3-d 8th order staggered grid visco-elastic finite difference code that accounts for topography. The geologic model is based on the Yuma site characterization. The size of these calculations required use of the DoD High Performance Computers and parallelized code. Results are compared with field data. Preliminary results show an excellent match with field data using the 3-d fdtd technique.

  4. Background chemistry for chemical warfare agents and decontamination processes in support of delisting waste streams at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground, Utah

    Rosenblatt, D.H.; Small, M.J.; Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.

    1996-04-01

    The State of Utah, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (DSHW), has declared residues resulting from the demilitarization, treatment, cleanup, and testing of military chemical agents to be hazardous wastes. These residues have been designated as corrosive, reactive, toxic, and acute hazardous (Hazardous Waste No. F999). The RCRA regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 260-280), the Utah Administrative Code (R-315), and other state hazardous waste programs list specific wastes as hazardous but allow generators to petition the regulator to {open_quotes}delist,{close_quotes} if it can be demonstrated that such wastes are not hazardous. The U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) believes that certain categories of F999 residues are not hazardous and has obtained assistance from Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to make the delisting demonstration. The objective of this project is to delist chemical agent decontaminated residues resulting from materials testing activities and to delist a remediation residue (e.g., contaminated soil). To delist these residues, it must be demonstrated that the residues (1) do not contain hazardous quantities of the listed agents; (2) do not contain hazardous quantities of constituents listed in 40 CFR Part 261, Appendix VIII; (3) do not exhibit other characteristics that could define the residues as hazardous; and (4) do not fail a series of acute toxicity tests. The first phase will focus on a subset of the F999 wastes generated at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), where the Army tests the effects of military chemical agents and agent-decontamination procedures on numerous military items. This effort is identified as Phase I of the Delisting Program. Subsequent phases will address other DPG chemical agent decontaminated residues and remediation wastes and similar residues at other installations.

  5. Genetic characterization of Aberdeen Angus cattle using molecular markers

    Vasconcellos Luciana Pimentel de Mello Klocker

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberdeen Angus beef cattle from the Brazilian herd were studied genetically using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP of the kappa-casein - HinfI (CSN3 - HinfI, beta-lactoglobulin - HaeIII (LGB - HaeIII and growth hormone AluI (GH- AluI genes, as well as four microsatellites (TEXAN15, CSFM50, BM1224 and BM7160. The RFLP genotypes were determined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by digestion with restriction endonucleases and electrophoresis in agarose gels. With the exception of the microsatellite BM7160, which was analyzed in an automatic sequencer, the PCR products were genotyped by silver staining. The allele and genotype frequencies, heterozygosities and gene diversity were estimated. The values for these parameters of variability were comparable to other cattle breeds. The genetic relationship of the Aberdeen Angus to other breeds (Caracu, Canchim, Charolais, Guzerath, Gyr, Nelore, Santa Gertrudis and Simmental was investigated using Nei's genetic distance. Cluster analysis placed the Aberdeen Angus in an isolated group in the Bos taurus breeds branch. This fact is in agreement with the geographic origin of this breed.

  6. Concealed thrusts in the Middle Gangetic plain, India - A ground penetrating radar study proves the truth against the geomorphic features supporting normal faulting

    Pati, Pitambar; Parkash, B.; Awasthi, A. K.; Acharya, Vivekanand; Singh, Satvindar

    2011-01-01

    As no evidence for thrusting has yet been reported from the Indo-Gangetic plain so, the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) has been considered to be the southern most limit of the Siwaliks to the Indo-Gangetic plain. The present study highlights the thrusting activities between the Gandak and Kosi megafan area in the Middle Gangetic plain. As these thrust sheets are concealed beneath thick sediment cover, direct surficial studies of the discontinuity planes are not possible. Further, the topographic breaks formed by the backward erosion of the uplifted thrust faces resemble normal faults with hanging walls to south. Due to gradual decreasing upliftment and/or erosion from north to south, the area shows a step like topographic appearance. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) studies reveal the concealed thrust planes beneath the sediments and the topographic breaks looking like normal faults are interpreted to be the relief created by backward erosion of the thrust sheets along with the overlying sediments. Out of four GPR profiles taken using 100 MHz antennae, three are across the topographic breaks along which most of the terminal fans are formed and one across the basement fault to study its subsurface nature. Initially GPR failed to strike any subsurface discontinuities at the topographic breaks. However, at certain distance to the south of the topographic breaks, GPR was able to strike the northerly dipping subsurface discontinuity planes. By combining the seismological signatures (distribution of earthquake epicenters) with geomorphology, these discontinuities are identified as thrusts. The GPR profiles show a gradual decrease of dip of the thrust planes from north to south across the area. Hence, by the geomorphology, seismological behavior, topography, orientation and continuity, other topographic breaks can be compared with the proven thrusts. GPR study on the basement fault revealed that the NE-SW trending basement faults are not active in the area. The compression

  7. An air quality survey and emissions inventory at Aberdeen Harbour

    Marr, I. L.; Rosser, D. P.; Meneses, C. A.

    A network of 10 stations, with passive sampling for VOCs (including benzene), NO 2, and SO 2, over 2-week periods, grab sampling for CO, and 48-h pumped sampling for PM 10, was set up to make an air quality survey for 12 months around Aberdeen Harbour. Benzene, CO, SO 2 and PM 10 were always well below the AQS target values. However, NO 2 frequently showed a pronounced gradient across the harbour reaching its highest concentrations at the city end, indicating that the road traffic was the principal source of the pollution. This was backed up by the predominance of aromatics in the VOCs in the city centre, derived from petrol engined vehicles, compared to the predominance of alkanes and alkenes around the docks, derived from diesel engined heavy trucks and possibly ships. Black carbon on the PM 10 filters also showed a gradient with highest levels in the city centre. It is proposed that for such surveys in future, NO 2 and black carbon would be the two most informative parameters. This emissions inventory has shown first, that trucks contribute very little to the total, and second, that the ro-ro ferries are the major contributors as they burn light fuel oil while the oil platform supply vessels burn low-sulphur marine gas oil with around 0.1% S. When the whole picture of the emissions from the city is considered, the emissions from the harbour constitute only a small part.

  8. On Mathematical Proving

    Stefaneas, Petros; Vandoulakis, Ioannis M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper outlines a logical representation of certain aspects of the process of mathematical proving that are important from the point of view of Artificial Intelligence. Our starting-point is the concept of proof-event or proving, introduced by Goguen, instead of the traditional concept of mathematical proof. The reason behind this choice is that in contrast to the traditional static concept of mathematical proof, proof-events are understood as processes, which enables their use in Artificial Intelligence in such contexts, in which problem-solving procedures and strategies are studied. We represent proof-events as problem-centered spatio-temporal processes by means of the language of the calculus of events, which captures adequately certain temporal aspects of proof-events (i.e. that they have history and form sequences of proof-events evolving in time). Further, we suggest a "loose" semantics for the proof-events, by means of Kolmogorov's calculus of problems. Finally, we expose the intented interpretations for our logical model from the fields of automated theorem-proving and Web-based collective proving.

  9. Proving Fixed Points

    Grall, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method to characterize the fixed points described in Tarski's theorem for complete lattices. The method is deductive: the least and greatest fixed points are "proved" in some inference system defined from deduction rules. We also apply the method to two other fixed point theorems, a generalization of Tarski's theorem to chain-complete posets and Bourbaki-Witt's theorem. Finally, we compare the method with the traditional iterative method resorting to ordinals and the original imp...

  10. Shivers Junior/Senior High School: Aberdeen School District in Mississippi. Case Study in Sustainable Design.

    Zimmerman, David

    Design information, floor plan, photos, and energy use data are presented of a combined 45,000 square foot junior/senior high school in Mississippi's Aberdeen School District, built in 1956, and retrofitted over time to improve its usability. Exterior and interior photos are presented showing classrooms, the cafeteria, and gymnasium. Data are…

  11. Analysis of cosmic-ray-muon induced spallation neutrons in Aberdeen Tunnel experiment in Hong Kong

    Cui, Kexi; 崔科晰

    2014-01-01

    The muon-induced radioactive isotopes, especially neutrons, are dangerous background component for rare-event detection in underground experiments, like neutrino-less double-beta decay and dark matter search. Understanding these cosmogenic backgrounds is crucial for these experiments. An underground experiment aiming at measuring the cosmic-ray muons' flux and their neutron production yield in liquid scintillator through spallation process is being carried out in the Aberdeen Tunnel laborator...

  12. Improvising innovation in UK urban district heating: The convergence of social and environmental agendas in Aberdeen

    Research on district heating has focused on technical-economic appraisal of its contribution to energy and carbon saving in urban centres. There is however lack of analysis of political and social processes which govern its actual take up. This paper examines these processes through a case study of Aberdeen, Scotland. Interviews and documentary analysis are used to examine the 2002 development of Aberdeen Heat and Power (AHP), an independent energy services company (ESCo). Technical-economic feasibility was a necessary component of appraisal, but not sufficient to govern decision-making. In the UK centralised energy market, DH investment is unattractive to commercial investors, and local authorities lack capacity and expertise in energy provision. In Aberdeen, the politics of fuel poverty converged with climate politics, creating an a-typical willingness to innovate through improvisation. The welfare priority resulted in creation of a non-profit locally-owned ESCo, using cost- rather than market-based heat tariffs. AHP has developed three combined heat and power energy centres and heat networks, supplying 34 MWh/pa of heat. Carbon savings are estimated to be 45% in comparison with electric heating, and heating costs are reduced by a similar amount. The conclusion outlines potential policy improvements. - Highlights: • UK policy proposes district heating for urban low carbon heat. • Technical and economic feasibility are insufficient to drive take-up. • In Aberdeen convergence of social and environmental goals gave impetus to improvisation. • The resulting non-profit ESCo has three CHP and district heat networks, supplying 34 MWh of heat pa. • Carbon and cost savings are 45% in comparison with electric heating

  13. Field proving liquid ultrasonic meters

    Antunes, Bernardo de Castro [Emerson Process Management, Houston, TX (United States). Daniel Measurement and Control Division

    2009-07-01

    Field proving liquid ultrasonic flowmeters is not a straightforward task since these meters are designed for large volumes and flowrates transfers and provers capacities are limited. Some techniques to overcome these issues are provided on API MPMS. Pulse interpolation, master metering, a large number of proving runs are some of these techniques. This works intents to present these procedures and practices in order to give the operators a briefly view of the techniques which will lead to better proving results. (author)

  14. Molecular Signature of the Ebola Virus Associated with the Fishermen Community Outbreak in Aberdeen, Sierra Leone, in February 2015

    Gruber, Cesare E. M.; Carletti, Fabrizio; Meschi, Silvia; Castilletti, Concetta; Vairo, Francesco; Biava, Mirella; Minosse, Claudia; Strada, Gino; Portella, Gina; Miccio, Rossella; Minardi, Valeria; Rolla, Luca; Kamara, Abdul; Chillemi, Giovanni; Desideri, Alessandro; Di Caro, Antonino; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Ebola virus from a health worker linked to a cluster of cases occurring in the fishing community of Aberdeen, Sierra Leone (February 2015), which were characterized by unusually severe presentation. The sequence, clustering in the SL subclade 3.2.4, harbors mutations potentially relevant for pathogenesis. PMID:26404609

  15. An evaluation of Yuma Proving Grounds ballistic arsenal scoring methods

    Von Krueger, Kristopher E.

    2005-01-01

    Yuma Test Center (YTC) is a primary testing and evaluation facility for the United States Army's 30mm M230 automatic gun. The current program used by YTC to evaluate 30mm rounds is an old, complex, FORTRAN package called Accuracy Scoring Program (ASCORE). Due to the age and complexity of ASCORE, questions about its reliability in ballistic calculations have been raised. These reliability questions are important, because ASCORE is used by YTC to evaluate whether all such weapons systems meet D...

  16. An apparatus for studying spallation neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory

    Blyth, S C; Chen, X C; Chu, M C; Hahn, R L; Ho, T H; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Lau, Y P; Lee, K P; Leung, J K C; Leung, K Y; Lin, G L; Lin, Y C; Luk, K B; Luk, W H; Ngai, H Y; Ngan, S Y; Pun, C S J; Shih, K; Tam, Y H; Tsang, R H M; Wang, C H; Wong, C M; Wong, H L; Wong, H H C; Wong, K K; Yeh, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design, construction and performance of an apparatus installed in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory in Hong Kong for studying spallation neutrons induced by cosmic-ray muons under a vertical rock overburden of 611 meter water equivalent (m.w.e.). The apparatus comprises of six horizontal layers of plastic-scintillator hodoscopes for determining the direction and position of the incident cosmic-ray muons. Sandwiched between the hodoscope planes is a neutron detector filled with 650 kg of liquid scintillator doped with about 0.06% of Gadolinium by weight for improving the e?ciency of detecting the spallation neutrons. Performance of the apparatus is also presented.

  17. The Mathematical Nature of Reasoning-and-Proving Opportunities in Geometry Textbooks

    Otten, Samuel; Gilbertson, Nicholas J.; Males, Lorraine M.; Clark, D. Lee

    2014-01-01

    International calls have been made for reasoning-and-proving to permeate school mathematics. It is important that efforts to heed this call are grounded in an understanding of the opportunities to reason-and-prove that already exist, especially in secondary-level geometry where reasoning-and-proving opportunities are prevalent but not thoroughly…

  18. Disposition of fuel elements from the Aberdeen and Sandia pulse reactor (SPR-II) assemblies

    Mckerley, Bill [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bustamante, Jacqueline M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Drypolcher, Anthony F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hickey, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We describe the disposition of fuel from the Aberdeen (APR) and the Sandia Pulse Reactors (SPR-II) which were used to provide intense neutron bursts for radiation effects testing. The enriched Uranium - 10% Molybdenum fuel from these reactors was shipped to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size reduction prior to shipment to the Savannah River Site (SRS) for final disposition in the H Canyon facility. The Shipper/Receiver Agreements (SRA), intra-DOE interfaces, criticality safety evaluations, safety and quality requirements and key materials management issues required for the successful completion of this project will be presented. This work is in support of the DOE Consolidation and Disposition program. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has operated pulse nuclear reactor research facilities for the Department of Energy since 1961. The Sandia Pulse Reactor (SPR-II) was a bare metal Godiva-type reactor. The reactor facilities have been used for research and development of nuclear and non-nuclear weapon systems, advanced nuclear reactors, reactor safety, simulation sources and energy related programs. The SPR-II was a fast burst reactor, designed and constructed by SNL that became operational in 1967. The SPR-ll core was a solid-metal fuel enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. The uranium was alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum to ensure the phase stabilization of the fuel. The core consisted of six fuel plates divided into two assemblies of three plates each. Figure 1 shows a cutaway diagram of the SPR-II Reactor with its decoupling shroud. NNSA charged Sandia with removing its category 1 and 2 special nuclear material by the end of 2008. The main impetus for this activity was based on NNSA Administrator Tom D'Agostino's six focus areas to reenergize NNSA's nuclear material consolidation and disposition efforts. For example, the removal of SPR-II from SNL to DAF was part of this undertaking. This project was in support of NNSA's efforts

  19. 77 FR 38775 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletions

    2012-06-29

    ... they are providing additional information. End of Certification The following products and services are..., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC). Rivanna Station Complex, 2055... the products proposed for deletion from the Procurement List. End of Certification The...

  20. Proving allelopathy in crop-weed interactions

    Allelopathy (plant/plant chemical warfare) is difficult to prove, especially when competition for resources is the dominant component of plant/plant interference (interference = allelopathy +competition). This paper describes experimental approaches for proving allelopathy and points out common pit...

  1. Symbolic logic and mechanical theorem proving

    Chang, Chin-Liang

    1969-01-01

    This book contains an introduction to symbolic logic and a thorough discussion of mechanical theorem proving and its applications. The book consists of three major parts. Chapters 2 and 3 constitute an introduction to symbolic logic. Chapters 4-9 introduce several techniques in mechanical theorem proving, and Chapters 10 an 11 show how theorem proving can be applied to various areas such as question answering, problem solving, program analysis, and program synthesis.

  2. Bringing Theorem Proving to the (sonic) Masses

    Gallego Arias, Emilio Jesús; Pin, Benoît; Jouvelot, Pierre,

    2015-01-01

    We explore the intersection of interactive theorem proving and digital signal processing through the use of web-based, rich interfaces. Traditionally, the barrier to entry to interactive theorem proving has been high.Provers are complex systems using obscure programming languages, and libraries may be underdocumented and use formalisms and notations far from the standard domain-specific practice. Thus, it doesn't come at a surprise that interactive theorem proving has seldom been explored in ...

  3. Intelligence, Social Class of Origin, Childhood Behavior Disturbance and Education as Predictors of Status Attainment in Midlife in Men: The Aberdeen Children of the 1950s Study

    von Stumm, Sophie; Macintyre, Sally; Batty, David G.; Clark, Heather; Deary, Ian J.

    2010-01-01

    In a birth cohort of 6281 men from Aberdeen, Scotland, social class of origin, childhood intelligence, childhood behavior disturbance and education were examined as predictors of status attainment in midlife (46 to 51 years). Social class of origin, intelligence and behavior disturbance were conceptualized as correlated predictors, whose effects…

  4. Batch Proving and Proof Scripting in PVS

    Munoz, Cesar A.

    2007-01-01

    The batch execution modes of PVS are powerful, but highly technical, features of the system that are mostly accessible to expert users. This paper presents a PVS tool, called ProofLite, that extends the theorem prover interface with a batch proving utility and a proof scripting notation. ProofLite enables a semi-literate proving style where specification and proof scripts reside in the same file. The goal of ProofLite is to provide batch proving and proof scripting capabilities to regular, non-expert, users of PVS.

  5. Proving relations between modular graph functions

    Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    We consider modular graph functions that arise in the low energy expansion of the four graviton amplitude in type II string theory. The vertices of these graphs are the positions of insertions of vertex operators on the toroidal worldsheet, while the links are the scalar Green functions connecting the vertices. Graphs with four and five links satisfy several non--trivial relations, which have been proved recently. We prove these relations by using elementary properties of Green functions and the details of the graphs. We also prove a relation between modular graph functions with six links.

  6. Características da carcaça de bovinos Canchim e Aberdeen Angus e de seus cruzamentos recíprocos terminados em confinamento Carcass traits of Canchim, Aberdeen Angus and reciprocal crosses finished in confinement

    Daniel Perotto; José Luiz Moletta; Antonio Carlos Cubas

    1999-01-01

    Foram analisadas quatorze características quantitativas das carcaças de 137 machos bovinos inteiros pertencentes aos grupos Canchim (Ca), Aberdeen Angus (Ab), 3/4Ca+1/4Ab, 3/4Ab+1/4Ca, 5/8Ca+3/8Ab e 5/8Ab+3/8Ca, nascidos na Estação Experimental Fazenda Modelo, em Ponta Grossa-PR, no período de 1988 a 1993. As médias para a idade e para o peso ao início do confinamento, duração do confinamento, idade e peso ao abate foram, respectivamente, 737 dias, 356kg, 97 dias, 834 dias e 468kg. Durante o ...

  7. Tradução e adaptação cultural do Questionário Aberdeen para Veias Varicosas Translation and cultural adaptation of Aberdeen Varicose Veins Questionnaire

    Flávia de Jesus Leal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Atualmente há um crescente interesse por instrumentos de avaliação em saúde produzidos e validados em todo o mundo. Apesar disso, ainda não temos no Brasil instrumentos que avaliem o impacto da doença venosa crônica na vida de seu portador. Para utilização dessas medidas torna-se necessária a realização da tradução e da adaptação cultural ao idioma em questão. OBJETIVO: Traduzir e adaptar culturalmente para a população brasileira o Aberdeen Varicose Veins Questionnaire (AVVQ- Brasil. MÉTODOS: O processo consistiu de duas traduções e duas retrotraduções realizadas por tradutores independentes, da avaliação das versões seguida da elaboração de versão consensual e de pré-teste comentado. RESULTADOS: Os pacientes do pré-teste eram do sexo feminino, com média de idade de 49,9 anos, média de tempo de resposta 7,73 minutos, que variou entre 4,55 minutos (tempo mínimo a 10,13 minutos (tempo máximo. Escolaridade: 20% analfabetismo funcional, 1º grau completo e 2º grau completo; 30% 1º grau incompleto; e 10% 3º grau completo. Gravidade clínica 40% C3 e C6S, 10% C2 e C5, havendo cinco termos incompreendidos na aplicação. CONCLUSÕES: A versão na língua portuguesa do Aberdeen Varicose Veins Questionnaire está traduzida e adaptada para uso na população brasileira, podendo ser utilizada após posterior análise de suas propriedades clinimétricas.BACKGROUND: Currently there is a growing interest in health assessment tools produced and validated throughout the world. Nevertheless, it is still inadequate the number of instruments that assess the impact of chronic venous disease in the life of its bearer. To use these measures it is necessary to accomplish the translation and cultural adaptation to the language in question. OBJECTIVE: Translate to Portuguese and culturally adapted for the Brazilian population the Aberdeen Varicose Veins Questionnaire (AVVQ-Brazil. METHODS: The process consisted of two

  8. Interval logic. Proof theory and theorem proving

    Rasmussen, Thomas Marthedal

    2002-01-01

    Real-time systems are computer systems which have to meet real-time constraints. To increase the confidence in such systems, formal methods and formal verification are utilized. The class of logics known as interval logics can be used for expressing properties and requirements of real-time systems...... labelled natural deduction system. We conduct theoretical investigations of the systems with respect to subformula properties, proof search, etc. The generic theorem proving system Isabelle is used as a framework for encoding both proof theoretical systems. We consider a number of examples/small case....... By theorem proving we understand the activity of proving theorems of a logic with the assistance of a computer. The goal of this thesis is to improve theorem proving support for interval logics such that larger and more realistic case-studies of real-time systems can be conducted using these...

  9. Stratégie bas carbone écossaise : l’exemple de la ville d’Aberdeen

    Guyet, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    A l’instar de l’Ecosse, le modèle énergétique de la ville d’Aberdeen se caractérise par un paradoxe : comment transformer une économie reposant essentiellement sur le gaz et le pétrole en un modèle de développement bas carbone ? Sans renier la manne financière que représente encore à court terme les énergies fossiles, l’Ecosse poursuit également une stratégie de déploiement d’énergie bas carbone dans le secteur de l’électricité et de la chaleur. Elle a même défini des objectifs...

  10. Childhood IQ and life course socioeconomic position in relation to alcohol induced hangovers in adulthood: the Aberdeen children of the 1950s study

    Batty, G D; Deary, I J; MacIntyre, S

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between scores on IQ tests in childhood and alcohol induced hangovers in middle aged men and women. Design, Setting, and Participants: A cohort of 12 150 people born in Aberdeen (Scotland) who took part in a school based survey in 1962 when IQ test scores were extracted from educational records. Between 2000 and 2003, 7184 (64%) responded to questionnaire inquiries regarding drinking behaviour. Main outcome measures: Self reported hangovers attr...

  11. Lumbar Disc Screening Using Back Pain Questionnaires: Oswestry Low Back Pain Score, Aberdeen Low Back Pain Scale, and Acute Low Back Pain Screening Questionnaire

    Kim, Do Yeon; Oh, Chang Hyun; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Park, Hyung Chun; Park, Chong Oon

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usefulness of back pain questionnaires for lumbar disc screening among Korean young males. Methods We carried out a survey for lumbar disc screening through back pain questionnaires among the volunteers with or without back pain. Three types of back pain questionnaire (Oswestry Low Back Pain Score, Aberdeen Low Back Pain Scale, and Acute Low Back Pain Screeing Questionnaire) were randomly assigned to the examinees. The authors reviewed lumbar imaging studies (simple ...

  12. Heterose sobre os pesos de bovinos Canchim e Aberdeen Angus e de seus cruzamentos recíprocos Heterosis upon weights in Canchim and Aberdeen Angus calves and in their reciprocal crosses

    DANIEL PEROTTO

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho foi conduzido para estimar a heterose sobre os pesos ao nascimento (PNT, à desmama (P210 e ao ano (P365 e sobre os ganhos de pesos médios diários do nascimento à desmama (G210 e da desmama ao ano (G365 nas quatro primeiras gerações do sistema de cruzamentos alternados entre as raças Canchim (C e Aberdeen Angus (A. Os dados de 1.147 bezerros nascidos de 1981 a 1998 foram analisados pelo método dos mínimos quadrados, ajustando-se um modelo linear que incluiu os efeitos linear e quadrático da idade da mãe do bezerro e os efeitos fixos de sexo, grupo genético, mês e ano de nascimento do bezerro. Estimativas de heterose e de outras diferenças genéticas foram estimadas por contrastes entre médias e testadas pelo teste t. O contraste "CA" foi positivo e significativo (PThe study was conducted to estimate heterosis upon birth weight (PNT, weaning weight (P210, yearling weight (P365 and daily weight gain from birth to weaning (G210 and from weaning to one year of age (G365 in the first, second, third and fourth generations of a rotational crossbreeding system between Canchim (C and Aberdeen Angus (A. Data from 1,147 calves born from 1981 to 1998 were analyzed by least squares procedures fitting a linear model that included the linear and the quadratic effects of age of the dam of the calf plus the fixed effects of sex, genetic group, month and year of birth of calf. Estimates of heterosis and of other genetic differences were obtained by linear contrasts of appropriate means and tested by the t test. The contrast CA was positive and significant (P<0.001 for all five traits. The contrast F1CAF1AC was negative and highly significant (P<0.001 for P210 and for G210 and significant (P<0.05 for P365. The F1 generation exhibited heterosis of 4.8% for P210 and of 4.9% for G210. Maternal heterosis was 3.7%, 5.8%, 6.3% and 20.4%, respectively, for P210, G210, P365 and G365. The heterosis estimated for the mean of the third and fourth

  13. Ground Metric Learning

    Cuturi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Transportation distances have been used for more than a decade now in machine learning to compare histograms of features. They have one parameter: the ground metric, which can be any metric between the features themselves. As is the case for all parameterized distances, transportation distances can only prove useful in practice when this parameter is carefully chosen. To date, the only option available to practitioners to set the ground metric parameter was to rely on a priori knowledge of the features, which limited considerably the scope of application of transportation distances. We propose to lift this limitation and consider instead algorithms that can learn the ground metric using only a training set of labeled histograms. We call this approach ground metric learning. We formulate the problem of learning the ground metric as the minimization of the difference of two polyhedral convex functions over a convex set of distance matrices. We follow the presentation of our algorithms with promising experimenta...

  14. On proving syntactic properties of CPS programs

    Danvy, Olivier; Dzafic, Belmina; Pfenning, Frank

    1999-01-01

    Higher-order program transformations raise new challenges for proving properties of their output, since they resist traditional, first-order proof techniques. In this work, we consider (1) the “one-pass” continuation-passing style (CPS) transformation, which is second-order, and (2) the occurrences...... of parameters of continuations in its output. To this end, we specify the one-pass CPS transformation relationally and we use the proof technique of logical relations....

  15. On proving syntactic properties of CPS programs

    Danvy, Olivier; Dzafic, Belmina; Pfenning, Frank

    Higher-order program transformations raise new challenges for proving properties of their output, since they resist traditional, first-order proof techniques. In this work, we consider (1) the “one-pass” continuation-passing style (CPS) transformation, which is second-order, and (2) the occurrences...... of parameters of continuations in its output. To this end, we specify the one-pass CPS transformation relationally and we use the proof technique of logical relations....

  16. Automated theorem proving theory and practice

    Newborn, Monty

    2001-01-01

    As the 21st century begins, the power of our magical new tool and partner, the computer, is increasing at an astonishing rate. Computers that perform billions of operations per second are now commonplace. Multiprocessors with thousands of little computers - relatively little! -can now carry out parallel computations and solve problems in seconds that only a few years ago took days or months. Chess-playing programs are on an even footing with the world's best players. IBM's Deep Blue defeated world champion Garry Kasparov in a match several years ago. Increasingly computers are expected to be more intelligent, to reason, to be able to draw conclusions from given facts, or abstractly, to prove theorems-the subject of this book. Specifically, this book is about two theorem-proving programs, THEO and HERBY. The first four chapters contain introductory material about automated theorem proving and the two programs. This includes material on the language used to express theorems, predicate calculus, and the rules of...

  17. Theorem Proving In Higher Order Logics

    Carreno, Victor A. (Editor); Munoz, Cesar A.; Tahar, Sofiene

    2002-01-01

    The TPHOLs International Conference serves as a venue for the presentation of work in theorem proving in higher-order logics and related areas in deduction, formal specification, software and hardware verification, and other applications. Fourteen papers were submitted to Track B (Work in Progress), which are included in this volume. Authors of Track B papers gave short introductory talks that were followed by an open poster session. The FCM 2002 Workshop aimed to bring together researchers working on the formalisation of continuous mathematics in theorem proving systems with those needing such libraries for their applications. Many of the major higher order theorem proving systems now have a formalisation of the real numbers and various levels of real analysis support. This work is of interest in a number of application areas, such as formal methods development for hardware and software application and computer supported mathematics. The FCM 2002 consisted of three papers, presented by their authors at the workshop venue, and one invited talk.

  18. An audit to review the characteristics and management of placenta praevia at Aberdeen Maternity Hospital, 2009-2011.

    Pande, B; Shetty, A

    2014-07-01

    Placenta praevia (PP) is an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity. We reviewed the characteristics and management of PP at the Aberdeen Maternity Hospital (AMH) to evaluate performance. In the years 2009-2011, a total of 60 cases with confirmed PP underwent caesarean section (CS) at the AMH. Two-fifths of cases had previous CS and two-thirds were posterior praevias. Four-fifths were major praevias. Diagnosis was mostly by trans-abdominal scanning (TAS). A little less than two-thirds underwent hospital admission (half of them for antepartum haemorrhage). Most received steroid and ferrous sulphate as appropriate. The majority were delivered at greater than 36 weeks' gestation. There was good support in theatre by senior obstetricians and anaesthetists. Cell salvage was used in theatre. Overall, the outcomes were good. Improvements could be made on documentation of counselling preoperatively and practice of trans-vaginal scans (TVS) to confirm low lying placentae even at the 20-week scan for better diagnosis, as per the RCOG guidelines. PMID:24702527

  19. Bell's inequalities definitely proved

    According to quantum physics, two bonded particles instantly adopt the same behaviour when we measure them, whatever be the distance between them. For Einstein, this phenomenon could only be explained by the existence of hidden parameters which were not taken by quantum physics into account. Since the 1970's, experiments have been testing these ideas, based on the Bell's inequalities theorem which states that Einstein's assumptions are true within specific limits. The article more particularly presents and comments a recent experiment performed in Orsay which demonstrates that these hidden variables do not exist and prove the validity of Bell's inequalities. The researchers explain why previous experiments did not reach these results: they displayed detection and localisation defects

  20. Características da carcaça de bovinos Canchim e Aberdeen Angus e de seus cruzamentos recíprocos terminados em confinamento Carcass traits of Canchim, Aberdeen Angus and reciprocal crosses finished in confinement

    Daniel Perotto

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisadas quatorze características quantitativas das carcaças de 137 machos bovinos inteiros pertencentes aos grupos Canchim (Ca, Aberdeen Angus (Ab, 3/4Ca+1/4Ab, 3/4Ab+1/4Ca, 5/8Ca+3/8Ab e 5/8Ab+3/8Ca, nascidos na Estação Experimental Fazenda Modelo, em Ponta Grossa-PR, no período de 1988 a 1993. As médias para a idade e para o peso ao início do confinamento, duração do confinamento, idade e peso ao abate foram, respectivamente, 737 dias, 356kg, 97 dias, 834 dias e 468kg. Durante o confinamento, os garrotes receberam silagem de milho à vontade mais uma ração concentrada (79% de NDT, 17,8% de PB fornecida à base de 1% do peso vivo do animal por dia. Os grupos Ca e Ab diferiram entre si para todas as características, exceto para percentagem de costilhar (PEC. O Ca foi superior ao Ab para peso de carcaça quente (PCQ, rendimento de carcaça quente (RCQ, área de olho de lombo (AOL, conformação, percentagem de músculos (PEM, peso da porção comestível da carcaça (PPC e peso de carcaça quente por dia de vida ao abate (PCQ/DDV. O Ab superou o Ca quanto à espessura de gordura de cobertura (ECG e à percentagem de gordura (PEG. Houve heterose para PCQ, RCQ, AOL, PPC e PCQ/DDV. As duas gerações avançadas de cruzamentos alternados Ca x Ab apresentaram desempenho superior à média das raças paternas para PCQ, RCQ, AOL, PPC e PCQ/DDV. O desempenho de um esquema alternado de cruzamentos entre Ca e Ab seria melhor que o de qualquer dessas duas criada isoladamente.Fourteen quantitative carcass traits of 137 Canchim; 5/8 Charolais + 3/8 Zebu, (Ca, Aberdeen Angus (Ab, 3/4Ca+1/4Ab, 3/4Ab+1/4Ca, 5/8Ca+3/8Ab and 5/8Ab+3/8Ca, born at Est. Exp. Fazenda Modelo, in Ponta Grossa-PR, Brazil, from 1988 to 1993, were analyzed. Averages for age at beginning of confinement, initial weight, length of confinement period, final age and final weight were, respectively, 737 days, 356kg, 97 days, 834 days and 468kg. During the confinement period

  1. Valutazione economica dello studio PROVE-IT

    Lorenzo G. Mantovani

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the PROVE-IT (“Intensive versus moderate lipid lowering with statins after acute coronary syndromes” was a comparison of pravastatin 40 mg/die versus atorvastatin 80 mg/die in patients with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Aim: our aim was to investigate the economic consequence of high dose of atorvastatin vs usual-dose of pravastatin in Italian patients with a history of acute coronary syndrome. Methods: the analysis is conducted on the basis of clinical outcomes of the PROVE-IT study. We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis, comparing high dose of atorvastatin (80 mg/die versus usual-dose of pravastatin (40 mg/die in the perspective of the Italian National Health Service. We identified and quantified medical costs: drug costs according to the Italian National Therapeutic Formulary and hospitalizations were quantified based on the Italian National Health Service tariffs (2006. Effects were measured in terms of mortality and morbidity reduction (number of deaths, life years gained and frequency of hospitalizations. We considered an observation period of 24 months. The costs borne after the first 12 months were discounted using an annual rate of 3%. We conducted one and multi-way sensitivity analyses on unit cost and effectiveness. We also conducted a threshold analysis. Results: the cost of pravastatin or atorvastatin therapy over the 2 years period amounted to approximately 1.3 millions euro and 870,000 euro per 1,000 patients respectively. Atorvastatin was more efficacious compared to pravastatin and the overall cost of care per 1,000 patients over 24 months of follow-up was estimated at 3.2 millions euro in the pravastatin and 2.5 millions euro in the atorvastatin group, resulting into a cost saving of about 700,000 euro that is 27% of total costs occurred in the pravastatin group. Discussion: this study demonstrates that high does atorvastatin treatment leads to a reduction of direct costs for the National Health System

  2. a Test to Prove Cloud Whitening THEORY!

    Buttram, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Climate science researchers believe our planet can possibly tolerate twice the present carbon dioxide levels with no upwards temperature change, IF we could increase the amount of energy reflected back out into space by about 2.0%. (c)Cloudtec basically alters a blend of seawater and applies heat derived from magma to it at a temperature exceeding 2,000 degrees F. The interaction of seawater and magma displaces the oxygen, causing the volume of water to vaporize and expand over 4,000 times - transforming billions of tons of seawater into thousands of cubic miles of white, maritime, stratocumulus clouds to reflect the incident Sun's rays back out into space. A 6 month test to prove Cloud Whitening Theory will cost 6 million dollars. (No profit added.) This study will enable everyone on the planet with a computer the transparency to use satellite imagery and check out for themselves - if and when Cloud Whitening is occurring. If Cloud Whitening Theory is validated, (c)Cloudtec's innovation can strategically create the clouds we need to reflect the Sun's rays back out into space and help neutralize the projected 3.6 degrees F rise in temperature. Based on reasonable calculations of anthropogenic global warming: this one move alone would be comparable to slashing global carbon dioxide emissions by over 60% over the next 40 years.

  3. Ground subgroups

    Rozikov, U. A.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we give a concept of ground subgroup for finite and countable groups. By our definition such a subgroup of a group depends on a given subset of the group and on a given partition of the subset. For finite and free groups we describe some sets of ground subgroups. We apply the ground subgroups to describe ground states of a model of statistical mechanics.

  4. Ground Wars

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    Political campaigns today are won or lost in the so-called ground war--the strategic deployment of teams of staffers, volunteers, and paid part-timers who work the phones and canvass block by block, house by house, voter by voter. Ground Wars provides an in-depth ethnographic portrait of two such...... of ground war tactics for how we understand political campaigns and what it means to participate in them. He shows how ground wars are waged using resources well beyond those of a given candidate and their staff. These include allied interest groups and civic associations, party-provided technical...... professionals. Yet he also quashes the romantic idea that canvassing is a purer form of grassroots politics. In today's political ground wars, Nielsen demonstrates, even the most ordinary-seeming volunteer knocking at your door is backed up by high-tech targeting technologies and party expertise. Ground Wars...

  5. Human genetics after the bomb: Archives, clinics, proving grounds and board rooms.

    Lindee, Susan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper I track the history of post-1945 human genetics and genomics emphasizing the importance of ideas about risk to the scientific study and medical management of human heredity. Drawing on my own scholarship as it is refracted through important new work by other scholars both junior and senior, I explore how radiation risk and then later disease risk mattered to the development of genetics and genomics, particularly in the United States. In this context I excavate one of the central ironies of post-war human genetics: while studies of DNA as the origin and cause of diseases have been lavishly supported by public institutions and private investment around the world, the day-to-day labor of intensive clinical innovation has played a far more important role in the actual human experience of genetic disease and genetic risk for affected families. This has implications for the archival record, where clinical interactions are less readily accessible to historians. This paper then suggests that modern genomics grew out of radiation risk; that it was and remains a risk assessment science; that it is temporally embedded as a form of both prediction and historical reconstruction; and that it has become a big business focused more on risk and prediction (which can be readily marketed) than on effective clinical intervention. PMID:26456508

  6. De brest à Aberdeen, la croisière 48 du Glomar Challenger From Brest to Aberdee, Glomar Challenger Sails on Leg 48

    L'équipe Scientifique Embarquée

    2006-01-01

    La croisière 48 du Glomar Challenger s'est déroulée en 1976 entre Brest et Aberdeen sur la marge septentrionale du Golfe de Gascogne et le Banc de Rockall. Les sept sites forés ont permis de comparer la structure et l'histoire géologique de deux marges de types différents, formées par rifting, l'une dans une mer épicontinentale, l'autre dans un craton. L'histoire de la subsidence a pu être établie. De nombreux hiatus ont été mis en évidence dans les séries déposées en mer profonde, dont certa...

  7. Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks

    Stylianides, Gabriel J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite widespread agreement that the activity of "reasoning-and-proving" should be central to all students' mathematical experiences, many students face serious difficulties with this activity. Mathematics textbooks can play an important role in students' opportunities to engage in reasoning-and-proving: research suggests that many decisions that…

  8. 20 CFR 219.23 - Evidence to prove death.

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence to prove death. 219.23 Section 219... EVIDENCE REQUIRED FOR PAYMENT Evidence of Age and Death § 219.23 Evidence to prove death. (a) Preferred evidence of death. The best evidence of a person's death is— (1) A certified copy of or extract from...

  9. The Earth is Flat, and I Can Prove It!

    Klinger, Art

    1998-01-01

    Describes an educational program that asks students to attempt to prove that the earth is spherical and that it rotates. Presents tips to pique student interest and charts related to sensing the spin, nonrotation notions, flat earth fallacies, evidence that the earth is spherical and rotates, and the role of watersheds in proving that the earth…

  10. Grounded Intersectionality

    Marfelt, Mikkel Mouritz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to build on contemporary intersectional literature to develop a grounded methodological framework for the study of social differences. Design/methodology/approach – A systematic literature review serves as the foundation for a discussion of the challenges as...

  11. Ground Zero.

    Lozada, Marlene

    1998-01-01

    Many public school districts have adopted a policy of zero tolerance toward drug use, weapon possession, and sexual harassment on school grounds. Although a study by the National Center for Education Statistics reported no evidence that zero tolerance policies have lowered school crime rates, prominent education groups favor them. (JOW)

  12. Automated Theorem Proving for Cryptographic Protocols with Automatic Attack Generation

    Jan Juerjens; Thomas A. Kuhn

    2016-01-01

    Automated theorem proving is both automatic and can be quite efficient. When using theorem proving approaches for security protocol analysis, however, the problem is often that absence of a proof of security of a protocol may give little hint as to where the security weakness lies, to enable the protocol designer to improve the protocol. For our approach to verify cryptographic protocols using automated theorem provers for first-order logic (such as e-SETHEO or SPASS), we demonstrate a method...

  13. Ground Pollution Science

    This book deals with ground pollution science and soil science, classification of soil and fundamentals, ground pollution and human, ground pollution and organic matter, ground pollution and city environment, environmental problems of the earth and ground pollution, soil pollution and development of geological features of the ground, ground pollution and landfill of waste, case of measurement of ground pollution.

  14. De brest à Aberdeen, la croisière 48 du Glomar Challenger From Brest to Aberdee, Glomar Challenger Sails on Leg 48

    L'équipe Scientifique Embarquée

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available La croisière 48 du Glomar Challenger s'est déroulée en 1976 entre Brest et Aberdeen sur la marge septentrionale du Golfe de Gascogne et le Banc de Rockall. Les sept sites forés ont permis de comparer la structure et l'histoire géologique de deux marges de types différents, formées par rifting, l'une dans une mer épicontinentale, l'autre dans un craton. L'histoire de la subsidence a pu être établie. De nombreux hiatus ont été mis en évidence dans les séries déposées en mer profonde, dont certains sont contemporains d'événements connus sur le plateau continental. Des marnes noires riches en matière organique d'origine détritique ont été trouvées dans le golfe de Gascogne. Elles ont pu se déposer aussi bien en mer profonde que sur le plateau continental. Des mesures de paléomagnétisme, de flux de chaleur et des diagraphies ont été effectuées avec succès. Leg 48 by the Glomar Challenger took place in 1976, between Brest and Aberdeen, on the northern margin of the Bay of Biscay and the Rockall Bank. The seven drilling sites enabled a comparison ta be made of the structure and geological history of two different types of margins, both formed by rifting, one in an epicontinental sea and the other in a craton. The history of subsidence was determined. A great many gaps were revealed in the series deposited in deep water, including some that are contemporary with events known on the continental shelf. Blackshales rich in organic motter of detrital origin were found in the Bay of Biscay. They may have been deposited either in deep water or on the continental shelf. Successful paleomagnetism and heat flow measurements were made, along with well logging.

  15. Qualidade do sêmen de touros das raças Aberdeen Angus e Brangus-Ibagé em frente à degeneração testicular experimental induzida por dexametasona Bulls semen quality of Aberdeen Angus and Brangus-Ibagé breeds after experimental testicular degeneration induced by dexamethasone

    Marilise Mesquita Horn

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Foi administrada dexametasona para indução de degeneração testicular experimental em touros de uma raça taurina pura (Aberdeen Angus e de sua sintética derivada (Brangus-Ibagé. O objetivo deste estudo foi o de averiguar a diferença de sensibilidade na função gametogênica em frente à degeneração experimental. Para tal, foram avaliados os aspectos físicos e morfológicos do sêmen. Os dados obtidos foram analisados considerando o dia de coleta e genótipo. Os resultados revelaram que os dois grupos raciais comportaram-se semelhantemente ao longo das coletas. A despeito do número de animais empregados, o uso da degeneração testicular experimental possibilitou evidenciar que não há diferença entre as duas raças quanto à intensidade da degeneração e tempo necessário para o restabelecimento do quadro espermático normal.Testicular degeneration was induced by dexamethasone injection in bulls from a European breed Aberdeen Angus and a derived synthetic crossbreed (Brangus-Ibagé. Aiming to investigate differential sensibility on gametogenic function in these genotypes, physical and morphological semen characteristics were evaluated. The data analysed considered the day of the semen samples and the breed. Our results reveal that both breeds behave similarly during the experimental period. Even considering the number of bulls used in this experiment, the employed methodology gives no evidence of any difference between breeds, intensity of degeneration or time required to the reestablishment of normal sperm frequencies after experimental induction of testicular degeneration.

  16. 'Grounded' Politics

    Schmidt, Garbi

    2012-01-01

    play within one particular neighbourhood: Nørrebro in the Danish capital, Copenhagen. The article introduces the concept of grounded politics to analyse how groups of Muslim immigrants in Nørrebro use the space, relationships and history of the neighbourhood for identity political statements....... The article further describes how national political debates over the Muslim presence in Denmark affect identity political manifestations within Nørrebro. By using Duncan Bell’s concept of mythscape (Bell, 2003), the article shows how some political actors idealize Nørrebro’s past to contest the present...

  17. The Complexity of Proving the Discrete Jordan Curve Theorem

    Nguyen, Phuong

    2010-01-01

    The Jordan Curve Theorem (JCT) states that a simple closed curve divides the plane into exactly two connected regions. We formalize and prove the theorem in the context of grid graphs, under different input settings, in theories of bounded arithmetic that correspond to small complexity classes. The theory $V^0(2)$ (corresponding to $AC^0(2)$) proves that any set of edges that form disjoint cycles divides the grid into at least two regions. The theory $V^0$ (corresponding to $AC^0$) proves that any sequence of edges that form a simple closed curve divides the grid into exactly two regions. As a consequence, the Hex tautologies and the st-connectivity tautologies have polynomial size $AC^0(2)$-Frege-proofs, which improves results of Buss which only apply to the stronger proof system $TC^0$-Frege.

  18. Not All Opportunities to Prove Are the Same

    Gilbertson, Nicholas J.; Otten, Samuel; Males, Lorraine M.; Clark, D. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Confusion can arise from the subtle difference between proving a general and a particular statement, especially when general statements are presented by textbooks in ways that make them appear particular in nature. The authors discuss the implications for teaching proof in light of the current opportunities in high school geometry textbooks.

  19. Overcoming the Obstacle of Poor Knowledge in Proving Geometry Tasks

    Zlatan Magajna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Proving in school geometry is not just about validating the truth of a claim. In the school setting, the main function of the proof is to convince someone that a claim is true by providing an explanation. Students consider proving to be difficult; in fact, they find the very concept of proof demanding. Proving a claim in planar geometry involves several processes, the most salient being visual observation and deductive argumentation. These two processes are interwoven, but often poor observation hinders deductive argumentation. In the present article, we consider the possibility of overcoming the obstacle of a student’s poor observation by making use of computer-aided observation with appropriate software. We present the results of two small-scale research projects, both of which indicate that students are able to work out considerably more deductions if computer-aided observation is used. Not all students use computer-aided observation effectively in proving tasks: some find an exhaustive computer-provided list of properties confusing and are not able to choose the properties that are relevant to the task.

  20. Proving test on the reliability for nuclear valves

    Since valves are the most common components, they could be the most frequent causes of troubles in nuclear power plants. This proving test, therefore, has an important meaning to examine and verify the reliability of various valves under simulating conditions of abnormal and transient operations of the nuclear power plant. The test was performed mainly for the various types and pressure ratings of valves which were used in the primary and secondary systems in BWR and PWR nuclear power plants and which had major operating or safety related functions in those nuclear power plants. The results of the proving test, confirmed for more than four years, showed relatively favourable performance of the tested valves. It is concluded that performances of valves including operability, seat sealing and structural integrity were proved under the thermal cycling, vibration and pipe reaction load conditions. Operating functions during and after accident such as loss of coolant accident were satisfactory. From these results, it was considered that the purpose of this proving test was satisfactorily fulfilled. Several data accumulated by the test would be useful to get better reliability if it was evaluated with the actually experienced data of valves in the nuclear power plants. (Nogami, K.)

  1. Responsibility for proving and defining in abstract algebra class

    Fukawa-Connelly, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    There is considerable variety in inquiry-oriented instruction, but what is common is that students assume roles in mathematical activity that in a traditional, lecture-based class are either assumed by the teacher (or text) or are not visible at all in traditional math classrooms. This paper is a case study of the teaching of an inquiry-based undergraduate abstract algebra course. In particular, gives a theoretical account of the defining and proving processes. The study examines the intellectual responsibility for the processes of defining and proving that the professor devolved to the students. While the professor wanted the students to engage in all aspects of defining and proving, he was only successful at devolving responsibility for certain aspects and much more successful at devolving responsibility for proving than conjecturing or defining. This study suggests that even a well-intentioned instructor may not be able to devolve responsibility to students for some aspects of mathematical practice without using a research-based curriculum or further professional development.

  2. Field experiment on transgenic cassava proves successful in South China

    2007-01-01

    @@ A pioneer study on field tests of transgenic cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) by a Sino-Swiss research consortium has proved successful. The experiment was carried out in 2006 at an experimental station in Haikou, capital of south China's Hainan Province.

  3. Pengembangan Perangkat Pembelajaran Geometri Ruang dengan Model Proving Theorem

    Bambang Eko Susilo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Kemampuan berpikir kritis dan kreatif mahasiswa masih lemah. Hal ini ditemukan pada mahasiswa yang mengambil mata kuliah Geometri Ruang yaitu dalam membuktikan soal-soal pembuktian (problem to proof. Mahasiswa masih menyelesaikan secara algoritmik atau prosedural sehingga diperlukan pengembangan perangkat pembelajaran Geometri Ruang berbasis kompetensi dan konservasi dengan model Proving Theorem. Dalam penelitian ini perangkat perkuliahan yang dikembangkan yaitu Silabus, Satuan Acara Perkuliahan (SAP, Kontrak Perkuliahan, Media Pembelajaran, Bahan Ajar, Tes UTS dan UAS serta Angket Karakter Konservasi telah dilaksanakan dengan baik dengan kriteria (1 validasi perangkat pembelajaran mata kuliah Geometri ruang berbasis kompetensi dan konservasi dengan model proving theorem berkategori baik dan layak digunakan dan (2 keterlaksanaan RPP pada pembelajaran yang dikembangkan secara keseluruhan berkategori baik.Critical and creative thinking abilities of students still weak. It is found in students who take Space Geometry subjects that is in solving problems to to prove. Students still finish in algorithmic or procedural so that the required the development of Space Geometry learning tools based on competency and conservation with Proving Theorem models. This is a research development which refers to the 4-D models that have been modified for the Space Geometry learning tools, second semester academic year 2014/2015. Instruments used include validation sheet, learning tools and character assessment questionnaire. In this research, the learning tools are developed, namely Syllabus, Lesson Plan, Lecture Contract, Learning Media, Teaching Material, Tests, and Character Conservation Questionnaire had been properly implemented with the criteria (1 validation of Space Geometry learning tools based on competency and conservation with Proving Theorem models categorized good and feasible to use, and (2 the implementation of Lesson Plan on learning categorized

  4. Euthanasia: above ground, below ground.

    Magnusson, R S

    2004-10-01

    The key to the euthanasia debate lies in how best to regulate what doctors do. Opponents of euthanasia frequently warn of the possible negative consequences of legalising physician assisted suicide and active euthanasia (PAS/AE) while ignoring the covert practice of PAS/AE by doctors and other health professionals. Against the background of survey studies suggesting that anything from 4% to 10% of doctors have intentionally assisted a patient to die, and interview evidence of the unregulated, idiosyncratic nature of underground PAS/AE, this paper assesses three alternatives to the current policy of prohibition. It argues that although legalisation may never succeed in making euthanasia perfectly safe, legalising PAS/AE may nevertheless be safer, and therefore a preferable policy alternative, to prohibition. At a minimum, debate about harm minimisation and the regulation of euthanasia needs to take account of PAS/AE wherever it is practised, both above and below ground. PMID:15467073

  5. Protocol for a phase 1 homeopathic drug proving trial

    Dahler Joern

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study protocol adapts the traditional homeopathic drug proving methodology to a modern clinical trial design. Method Multi-centre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1 trial with 30 healthy volunteers. The study consists of a seven day run-in period, a five day intervention period and a 16 day post-intervention observation period. Subjects, investigators and the statisticians are blinded from the allocation to the study arm and from the identity of the homeopathic drug. The intervention is a highly diluted homeopathic drug (potency C12 = 1024, Dose: 5 globules taken 5 times per day over a maximum period of 5 days. The placebo consists of an optically identical carrier substance (sucrose globules. Subjects document the symptoms they experience in a semi-structured online diary. The primary outcome parameter is the number of specific symptoms that characterise the intervention compared to the placebo after a period of three weeks. Secondary outcome parameters are qualitative differences in profiles of characteristic and proving symptoms and the total number of all proving symptoms. The number of symptoms will be quantitatively analysed on an intention-to-treat basis using ANCOVA with the subject's expectation and baseline values as covariates. Content analysis according to Mayring is adapted to suit the homeopathic qualitative analysis procedure. Discussion Homeopathic drug proving trials using the terminology of clinical trials according GCP and fulfilling current requirements for research under the current drug regulations is feasible. However, within the current regulations, homeopathic drug proving trials are classified as phase 1 trials, although their aim is not to explore the safety and pharmacological dynamics of the drug, but rather to find clinical indications according to the theory of homeopathy. To avoid bias, it is necessary that neither the subjects nor the investigators know the identity of

  6. Interações entre monensina sódica, óleo de soja e fontes de nitrogênio no desempenho de novilhos Aberdeen Angus em confinamento

    Lana Rogério de Paula; Fox Danny G.

    2001-01-01

    Quarenta novilhos Aberdeen Angus foram usados para avaliar o efeito da monensina, óleo de soja e fontes de nitrogênio (farelo de soja ou uréia) sobre o desempenho de novilhos em dietas com 90% de concentrado. A monensina diminuiu o consumo de matéria seca em dietas contendo farelo de soja e o peso corporal aos 56 e 112 dias. O óleo diminuiu o ganho de peso nos períodos de 57-112 dias e 1-112 dias, enquanto a monensina diminuiu o ganho de peso nestes períodos nas dietas contendo farelo de soja...

  7. Using Theorem Proving to Verify Properties of Agent Programs

    Alechina, N.; Dastani, M.; Khan, F.; Logan, B.; Meyer, J.-J. Ch.

    We present a sound and complete logic for automatic verification of simpleAPL programs. simpleAPL is a simplified version of agent programming languages such as 3APL and 2APL designed for the implementation of cognitive agents with beliefs, goals and plans. Our logic is a variant of PDL, and allows the specification of safety and liveness properties of agent programs. We prove a correspondence between the operational semantics of simpleAPL and the models of the logic for two example program execution strategies. We show how to translate agent programs written in simpleAPL into expressions of the logic, and give an example in which we show how to verify correctness properties for a simple agent program using theorem-proving.

  8. Proving the suitability of magnetoelectric stimuli for tissue engineering applications

    C. Ribeiro; Correia, Vítor Manuel Gomes; Martins, P.; Gama, F. M.; Lanceros-Méndez, S.

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach for tissue engineering applications based on the use of magnetoelectric materials is presented. This work proves that magnetoelectric Terfenol-D/poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) composites are able to provide mechanical and electrical stimuli to MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells and that those stimuli can be remotely triggered by an applied magnetic field. Cell proliferation is enhanced up to 25% when cells are cultured under mechanical (up to 110 ppm) and electrica...

  9. Logic for computer science foundations of automatic theorem proving

    Gallier, Jean H

    2015-01-01

    This advanced text for undergraduate and graduate students introduces mathematical logic with an emphasis on proof theory and procedures for algorithmic construction of formal proofs. The self-contained treatment is also useful for computer scientists and mathematically inclined readers interested in the formalization of proofs and basics of automatic theorem proving. Topics include propositional logic and its resolution, first-order logic, Gentzen's cut elimination theorem and applications, and Gentzen's sharpened Hauptsatz and Herbrand's theorem. Additional subjects include resolution in fir

  10. Heterosis para el peso y la ganancia de peso desde el nacimiento hasta los 18 meses en el cruce de bovinos aberdeen angus por cebú.

    Arango Ulloa Astrid Johanna

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available En la presente investigación se tuvieron en cuenta 2032 observaciones para el análisis de peso al nacimiento, ganancia predestete y peso al destete y 603 para ganancia de peso posdestete y peso a los 18 meses, de machos y hembras nacidas entre 1994 y 1996 en la "Hacienda Cuba", localizada en el municipio de Montelíbano, departamento de Córboba. Para determinar la influencia de los diferentes factores genéticos y no genéticos sobre las variables estudiadas, se utilizó el programa de mínimos cuadrados de Harvey (1988. En los modelos para el peso al nacimiento, ganancia diaria predestete, peso al destete, ganancia diaria posdestete y peso a los 18 meses fueron considerados los siguientes factores: año de nacimiento, época de nacimiento, grupo genético de la cría, (Aberdeen Angus x Cebú y Cebú Comercial,sexo de la cría, mes de destete, época de destete, año de destete, mes de pesaje a los 18 meses. Según el modelo estudiado se tuvieron en cuenta como variables al destete, el peso al nacimiento y el peso ajustado al destete. La mayor parte de los factores no genéticos tuvieron efecto significativo (P<0,05, no siendo significativa la época de destete para el modelo de peso a los 18 meses.

  11. The effects of breed and level of nutrition on whole-body and muscle protein metabolism in pure-bred Aberdeen angus and Charolais beef steers.

    Lobley, G E; Sinclair, K D; Grant, C M; Miller, L; Mantle, D; Calder, A G; Warkup, C C; Maltin, C A

    2000-09-01

    Eighteen pure-bred steers (live weight 350 kg) from each of two breeds, Aberdeen Angus (AA) and Charolais (CH), were split into three equal groups (six animals each) and offered three planes of nutrition during a 20-week period. The same ration formulation was offered to all animals with amounts adjusted at 3-week intervals to give predicted average weight gains of either 1.0 kg/d (M/M group) or 1.4 kg/d (H/H group). The remaining group (M/H) were offered the same amount of ration as the M/M group until 10 weeks before slaughter when the ration was increased to H. Data on animal performance, carcass characteristics and fibre-type composition in skeletal muscle are presented elsewhere (Maltin et al. 2000; Sinclair et al. 2000). On three occasions (17, 10 and 2 weeks before slaughter) the animals were transferred to metabolism stalls for 1 week, during which total urine collection for quantification of Ntau-methylhistidine (Ntau-MeH) elimination was performed for 4 d. On the last day, animals were infused for 11 h with [2H5]phenylalanine with frequent blood sampling (to allow determination of whole-body phenylalanine flux) followed by biopsies from m. longissimus lumborum and m. vastus lateralis to determine the fractional synthesis rate of mixed muscle protein. For both breeds, the absolute amount of Ntau-MeH eliminated increased with animal age or weight (P meat eating quality (Sinclair et al. 2000). PMID:10967606

  12. Proving Causation With Epidemiological Evidence in Tobacco Lawsuits.

    Lee, Sun Goo

    2016-03-01

    Recently, a series of lawsuits were filed in Korea claiming tort liability against tobacco companies. The Supreme Court has already issued decisions in some cases, while others are still pending. The primary issue in these cases is whether the epidemiological evidence submitted by the plaintiffs clearly proves the causal relationship between smoking and disease as required by civil law. Proving causation is difficult in tobacco lawsuits because factors other than smoking are involved in the development of a disease, and also because of the lapse of time between smoking and the manifestation of the disease. The Supreme Court (Supreme Court Decision, 2011Da22092, April 10, 2014) has imposed some limitations on using epidemiological evidence to prove causation in tobacco lawsuits filed by smokers and their family members, but these limitations should be reconsidered. First, the Court stated that a disease can be categorized as specific or non-specific, and for each disease type, causation can be proven by different types of evidence. However, the concept of specific diseases is not compatible with multifactor theory, which is generally accepted in the field of public health. Second, when the epidemiological association between the disease and the risk factor is proven to be significant, imposing additional burdens of proof on the plaintiff may considerably limit the plaintiff's right to recovery, but the Court required the plaintiffs to provide additional information such as health condition and lifestyle. Third, the Supreme Court is not giving greater weight to the evidential value of epidemiological study results because the Court focuses on the fact that these studies were group-level, not individual-level. However, group-level studies could still offer valuable information about individual members of the group, e.g., probability of causation. PMID:27055545

  13. An entry in the 1992 Overbeek theorem-proving contest

    Lusk, E.L.; McCune, W.W.

    1992-11-01

    The Conference on Automated Deduction (CADE) has been for nearly twenty years a meeting where both theoreticians and system implementors present their work. Feeling perhaps that the conference was becoming dominated by the theoreticians, Ross Overbeek proposed at CADE-10 in 1990 a contest to stimulate work on the implementation and use of theorem-proving systems. The challenge was to prove a set of theorems, and do so with a uniform approach. That is, it was not allowed to set parameters in the system to specialize it for individual problems. There were actually two separate contests, one represented by a set of seven problems designed to test basic inference components, and the other represented by a set of ten problems designed to test equality-based systems. This paper describes our experiences in preparing to enter the contest with OTTER and Roo, two systems developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Roo is a parallel version of OTTER, but has such different behavior in some cases that we treat them as separate entries. We entered each of them in both contests. Some of the problems are difficult ones; and although many of the problems had been done before with OTTER, in each case we had set OTTER`S many input parameters in a way customized to the problem at hand, and chosen a set of support that appeared to us to be most natural. It was a challenge to come up with a uniform set of parameter settings and a information algorithm for picking the set of support that would allow OTTER to prove each of the theorems.

  14. An entry in the 1992 Overbeek theorem-proving contest

    Lusk, E.L.; McCune, W.W.

    1992-11-01

    The Conference on Automated Deduction (CADE) has been for nearly twenty years a meeting where both theoreticians and system implementors present their work. Feeling perhaps that the conference was becoming dominated by the theoreticians, Ross Overbeek proposed at CADE-10 in 1990 a contest to stimulate work on the implementation and use of theorem-proving systems. The challenge was to prove a set of theorems, and do so with a uniform approach. That is, it was not allowed to set parameters in the system to specialize it for individual problems. There were actually two separate contests, one represented by a set of seven problems designed to test basic inference components, and the other represented by a set of ten problems designed to test equality-based systems. This paper describes our experiences in preparing to enter the contest with OTTER and Roo, two systems developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Roo is a parallel version of OTTER, but has such different behavior in some cases that we treat them as separate entries. We entered each of them in both contests. Some of the problems are difficult ones; and although many of the problems had been done before with OTTER, in each case we had set OTTER'S many input parameters in a way customized to the problem at hand, and chosen a set of support that appeared to us to be most natural. It was a challenge to come up with a uniform set of parameter settings and a information algorithm for picking the set of support that would allow OTTER to prove each of the theorems.

  15. Revision of Code of Ethics proving to be complicated procedure

    Sullivan, Patrick

    1995-01-01

    Although the CMA Code of Ethics is only a 10-page booklet, revising it is proving to be complicated and time consuming. It is currently undergoing its first major revision in 25 years in an attempt to bring it up to date with changes within the medical profession and medical practice. The work was to have been completed in time for presentation to General Council during the 1995 annual meeting, but because of its complexity and the need for consensus the revised code will not be presented to ...

  16. Proving test on stress corrosion cracking of pipings

    In September, 1974, stress corrosion cracking was discovered around the welded joints of stainless steel pipings in the recirculating system in the Dresden No. 2 BWR. The similar occurrence of stress corrosion cracking has been reported in a number of nuclear power stations in the US and Japan since then, and their operation was stopped for the inspection, repair and remodeling. In order to eliminate the anxiety of public on nuclear power generation, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry planned the proving test on the stress corrosion cracking of pipings, in other words, the proving test on the reliability of the heat-affected zones of welded parts. Using the test facility simulating the actual plant, the effectiveness of various measures against stress corrosion cracking was examined, and it was attempted to demonstrate the reliability of the actual stainless steel pipings and to confirm the safety. Also, the soundness of the equipments in reactors after the long time operation was investigated. The test plan, general simulation test, accelerated SCC test, cracking behavior confirmation test, and the state of progress of these tests as of the end of December, 1981, are reported. (Kako, I.)

  17. The First-Order Theory of Ground Tree Rewrite Systems

    Göller, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    We prove that the complexity of the uniform first-order theory of ground tree rewrite graphs is in ATIME(2^{2^{poly(n)}},O(n)). Providing a matching lower bound, we show that there is some fixed ground tree rewrite graph whose first-order theory is hard for ATIME(2^{2^{poly(n)}},poly(n)) with respect to logspace reductions. Finally, we prove that there exists a fixed ground tree rewrite graph together with a single unary predicate in form of a regular tree language such that the resulting structure has a non-elementary first-order theory.

  18. Proceedings International Workshop on Strategies in Rewriting, Proving, and Programming

    Kirchner, Hélène; 10.4204/EPTCS.44

    2010-01-01

    This volume contains selected papers from the proceedings of the First International Workshop on Strategies in Rewriting, Proving, and Programming (IWS 2010), which was held on July 9, 2010, in Edinburgh, UK. Strategies are ubiquitous in programming languages, automated deduction and reasoning systems. In the two communities of Rewriting and Programming on one side, and of Deduction and Proof engines (Provers, Assistants, Solvers) on the other side, workshops have been launched to make progress towards a deeper understanding of the nature of strategies, their descriptions, their properties, and their usage, in all kinds of computing and reasoning systems. Since more recently, strategies are also playing an important role in rewrite-based programming languages, verification tools and techniques like SAT/SMT engines or termination provers. Moreover strategies have come to be viewed more generally as expressing complex designs for control in computing, modeling, proof search, program transformation, and access c...

  19. New biology of red rain extremophiles prove cometary panspermia

    Louis, G; Louis, Godfrey

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the extraordinary biology of the microorganisms from the mysterious red rain of Kerala, India. These chemosynthetic organisms grow optimally at an extreme high temperature of 300 degrees C in hydrothermal conditions and can metabolize inorganic and organic compounds including hydrocarbons. Stages found in their life cycle show reproduction by a special multiple fission process and the red cells found in the red rain are identified as the resting spores of these microbes. While these extreme hyperthermophiles contain proteins, our study shows the absence of DNA in these organisms, indicating a new primitive domain of life with alternate thermostable genetics. This new biology proves our earlier hypothesis that these microbes are of extraterrestrial origin and also supports our earlier argument that the mysterious red rain of Kerala is due to the cometary delivery of the red spores into the stratosphere above Kerala.

  20. Thomas Cragg Proves to Be a Good Observer (Abstract)

    Howe, R.; Clette, F.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) Thomas Cragg proves to be a good observer, enough to be included in the restricted club of 21 long-duration stations without major stability problems over the interval 1945-2015. Although, his counts seem to make a slight downward jump in 1983, and there is a sharp decline in the last two years of his observing career (aging?). Cragg's observations will be used for the equivalent comparison with the new reconstructed sunspot number that is produced from the 21 stations showing the same features in the past six solar cycles. This reconstructed number is fully independent from the original Zürich sunspot number. It actually confirms the corrections being applied to the original sunspot number series (a more simple approach simply multiplying the original series by the correction factor established for the Locarno Observatory's drift), as published in the 2014 paper, by Frédéric Clette, SILSO, Royal Observatory of Belgium.

  1. Recent Advances in Automated Theorem Proving on Inequalities

    杨路

    1999-01-01

    Automated theorem proving on inequalities is always considered as a difficult topic in the area of automated reasoning.The relevant algorithms depend fundamentally on real algebra and real geometry,and the computational complexity increases very quickly with the dimension,that is,the number of parameters.Some well-known algorithms are complete theoretically but inefficient in practice,which cannot verify non-trivial propositions in batches.A dimension-decreasing algorithm presented here can treat radicals efficiently and make the dimensions the lowest. Based upon this algorithm,a generic program called “BOTTEMA”was implemented on a personal computer.More than 1000 algebraic and geometric inequalities including hundreds of open problems have been verified in this way.This makes it possible to check a finite many inequalities instead of solving a global-optimization problem.

  2. Formal Analysis of Soft Errors using Theorem Proving

    Sofiène Tahar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Modeling and analysis of soft errors in electronic circuits has traditionally been done using computer simulations. Computer simulations cannot guarantee correctness of analysis because they utilize approximate real number representations and pseudo random numbers in the analysis and thus are not well suited for analyzing safety-critical applications. In this paper, we present a higher-order logic theorem proving based method for modeling and analysis of soft errors in electronic circuits. Our developed infrastructure includes formalized continuous random variable pairs, their Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF properties and independent standard uniform and Gaussian random variables. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach by modeling and analyzing soft errors in commonly used dynamic random access memory sense amplifier circuits.

  3. SOME EXPERIMENTALLY PROVED HERBS IN PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE

    Javed Ahmad Khan et al

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Peptic ulcer is a worldwide health problem because of its high morbidity, mortality and enormous financial implication. An estimated 15,000 deaths per year occur as a consequence of complicated PUD. A large number of drugs for peptic ulcer disease are available in mainstream medicine but they are associated with numerous side effects like arrhythmias, impotence, gynaecomastia and haematopoietic changes and the recurrence is also very common. In recent times, focus on plant research has increased all over the world and a large body of evidence has been collected to show immense potential of medicinal plants used in various traditional systems. Here, an attempt is made to summarise experimentally proved herbs used in PUD during last decade.

  4. A Hybrid Approach to Proving Memory Reference Monotonicity

    Oancea, Cosmin E.

    2013-01-01

    Array references indexed by non-linear expressions or subscript arrays represent a major obstacle to compiler analysis and to automatic parallelization. Most previous proposed solutions either enhance the static analysis repertoire to recognize more patterns, to infer array-value properties, and to refine the mathematical support, or apply expensive run time analysis of memory reference traces to disambiguate these accesses. This paper presents an automated solution based on static construction of access summaries, in which the reference non-linearity problem can be solved for a large number of reference patterns by extracting arbitrarily-shaped predicates that can (in)validate the reference monotonicity property and thus (dis)prove loop independence. Experiments on six benchmarks show that our general technique for dynamic validation of the monotonicity property can cover a large class of codes, incurs minimal run-time overhead and obtains good speedups. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Preliminary assessment of potential well yields and the potential for artificial recharge of the Elm and Middle James aquifers in the Aberdeen area, South Dakota

    Emmons, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    A complex hydrologic system exists in the glacial drift overlying the bedrock in the Aberdeen, South Dakota, area. The hydrologic system has been subdivided into three aquifers: the Elm, Middle James, and Deep James. These sand-and-gravel outwash aquifers generally are separated from each other by till or other fine-grained sediments. The Elm aquifer is the uppermost and largest of the aquifers and underlies about 204 sq mi of the study area. The maximum altitude of the top of the Elm aquifer is 1,400 ft and the minimum altitude of the bottom is 1,225 ft. The Middle James aquifer underlies about 172 sq mi of the study area. The maximum altitude of the top of the Middle James aquifer is 1,250 ft and the minimum altitude of the bottom is 1 ,150 ft. The lower-most Deep James aquifer was not evaluated. The quality of the water from the Elm and Middle James aquifer varies considerably throughout the study area. The predominant chemical constituents in the water from the aquifers are sodium and sulfate ions; however, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, or chloride may dominate locally. The calculated theoretical total well yield from the Elm and Middle James aquifers ranges from a minimum of 64 cu ft/sec, which may be conservative, to a maximum of 640 cu ft/sec. Based on available data, yields of 100 to 150 cu ft/sec probably can be obtained from properly sited and constructed wells. The feasibility of artificially recharging an aquifer, using the technique of water spreading, depends on the geologic and hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer and of the sediments overlying the aquifer through which the recharge water must percolate. The sites suitable for artificial recharge in the study area were defined as those areas where the average aquifer thickness was > 20 ft and the average thickness of the fine-grained sediments overlying the aquifer was artificial recharge. Infiltration rates in the study area are estimated to range from 1.3 to 4.3 ft/day. Using an infiltration

  6. Proteomic profiling of bovine M. longissimus lumborum from Crossbred Aberdeen Angus and Belgian Blue sired steers varying in genetic merit for carcass weight.

    Keady, Sarah M; Kenny, David A; Ohlendieck, Kay; Doyle, Sean; Keane, M G; Waters, Sinéad M

    2013-02-01

    Bovine skeletal muscle is a tissue of significant value to the beef industry and global economy. Proteomic analyses offer the opportunity to detect molecular mechanisms regulating muscle growth and intramuscular fat accumulation. The current study aimed to investigate differences in protein abundance in skeletal muscle tissue of cattle from two breeds of contrasting maturity (early vs. late maturing), adiposity, and muscle growth potential, namely, Belgian Blue (BB) × Holstein Friesian and Aberdeen Angus (AA) × Holstein Friesian. Twenty AA (n = 10) and BB (n = 10) sired steers, the progeny of sires of either high or low genetic merit, expressed as expected progeny difference for carcass weight (EPDcwt), and bred through AI, were evaluated as 4 genetic groups, BB-High, BB-Low, AA-High, and AA-Low (n = 5 per treatment). Chemical composition analysis of M. longissimus lumborum showed greater protein and moisture and decreased lipid concentrations for BB-sired compared with AA-sired steers. To investigate the effects of both sire breed and EPDcwt on M. longissimus lumborum, proteomic analysis was performed using 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry. Proteins were identified from their peptide sequences, using the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and Swiss-prot databases. Metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis (glycogen phosphorylase, phosphoglycerate mutase) and the citric acid cycle (aconitase 2, oxoglutarate dehydrogenase) were increased in AA- vs. BB-sired steers. Expression of proteins involved in cell structure, such as myosin light chain isoforms and troponins I and T, were also altered due to sire breed. Furthermore, heat shock protein β-1 and peroxiredoxin 6, involved in cell defense, had increased abundance in muscle of AA-sired relative to BB-sired steers. Protein abundance of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, enolase-3, and pyruvate kinase was greater in AA-sired animals of High compared with Low

  7. Proving the PP-Wave/CFT_2 Duality

    Gava, E; Gava, Edi

    2002-01-01

    We study the duality between IIB string theory on a pp-wave background, arising as a Penrose limit of the $AdS_3 \\times S^3\\times M$, where $M$ is $T^4$ (or $K3$), and the 2D CFT which is given by the ${\\cal N}=(4,4)$ orbifold $(M)^N/S_N$, resolved by a blowing-up mode. After analizying the action of the supercharges on both sides, we establish a correspondence between the states of the two theories. In particular and for the $T^4$ case, we identify both massive and massless oscillators on the pp-wave, with certain classes of excited states in the resolved CFT carrying large $R$-charge $n$. For the former, the excited states involve fractional modes of the generators of the ${\\cal N}=4$ chiral algebra acting on the $Z_n$ ground states. For the latter, they involve, fractional modes of the $U(1)^4_L\\times U(1)^4_R$ super-current algebra acting on the $Z_n$ ground states. By using conformal perturbation theory we compute the leading order correction to the conformal dimensions of the first class of states, due ...

  8. Why prove it again? alternative proofs in mathematical practice

    Dawson, Jr , John W

    2015-01-01

    This monograph considers several well-known mathematical theorems and asks the question, “Why prove it again?” while examining alternative proofs.   It  explores the different rationales mathematicians may have for pursuing and presenting new proofs of previously established results, as well as how they judge whether two proofs of a given result are different.  While a number of books have examined alternative proofs of individual theorems, this is the first that presents comparative case studies of other methods for a variety of different theorems. The author begins by laying out the criteria for distinguishing among proofs and enumerates reasons why new proofs have, for so long, played a prominent role in mathematical practice.  He then outlines various purposes that alternative proofs may serve.  Each chapter that follows provides a detailed case study of alternative proofs for particular theorems, including the Pythagorean Theorem, the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic, Desargues’ Theorem, the...

  9. Proving the correctness of client/server software

    Eyad Alkassar; Sebastian Bogan; Wolfgang J Paul

    2009-02-01

    Remote procedure calls (RPCs) lie at the heart of any client/server software. Thus, formal specification and verification of RPC mechanisms is a prerequisite for the verification of any such software. In this paper, we present a mathematical specification of an RPC mechanism and we outline how to prove the correctness of an implementation — say written in C — of this mechanism at the code level. We define a formal model of user processes running concurrently under a simple operating system, which provides inter-process communication and portmapper system calls. A simple theory of non-interference permits us to use conventional sequential program analysis between system calls (within the concurrent model). An RPC mechanism is specified and the correctness proof for server implementations, using this mechanism, is outlined. To the best of our knowledge this is the first treatment of the correctness of an entire RPC mechanism at the code level.

  10. Ground water and energy

    1980-11-01

    This national workshop on ground water and energy was conceived by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Assessments. Generally, OEA needed to know what data are available on ground water, what information is still needed, and how DOE can best utilize what has already been learned. The workshop focussed on three areas: (1) ground water supply; (2) conflicts and barriers to ground water use; and (3) alternatives or solutions to the various issues relating to ground water. (ACR)

  11. Efeitos genéticos aditivos diretos e maternos e heterozigóticos sobre os desempenhos pré e pós-desmama em uma população multirracial Aberdeen Angus × Nelore Direct, maternal additive genetic and heterozygotic effects for pre- and post-weaning traits in a multi-breed Aberdeen Angus-Nelore population

    Carlos Júnior Kippert

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar os efeitos aditivos direto e materno e os efeitos não-aditivos e heterozigóticos sobre os desempenhos pré e pós-desmama e desenvolver equações para predizer o desempenho de genótipos de uma população multirracial Aberdeen Angus (Angus × Nelore. Nas análises, foram utilizados dois modelos. O modelo 1 foi adotado para as características pré-desmama peso à desmama ajustado para 205 dias (P205 e ganho de peso médio diário do nascimento à desmama (GMDND, considerando fixos os efeitos de grupo de contemporâneos (GC e de grupo genético (GG, além das co-variáveis idade do bezerro à desmama (IBD e idade da vaca ao parto (IVP. Para as características pós-desmama peso ao sobreano ajustado para 550 dias de idade (P550 e ganho médio de peso da desmama ao sobreano (GMDDS, utilizou-se o mesmo modelo, apenas substituindo a co-variável IBD pela idade do bezerro ao sobreano (IBS. O modelo 2 (M2, de regressão múltipla, foi utilizado depois que os dados foram ajustados para GC, IVP e IBD (P205 ou IBS (P550 e contemplou os efeitos genéticos aditivos diretos e maternos de raça e os efeitos de heterozigoses direta e materna. Os resultados das análises comprovaram diferenças entre os cruzamentos, uma vez que os animais com elevada heterozigose materna apresentaram melhor desempenho para P205 e GMDND, tendência semelhante à observada para a heterozigose direta. A influência do efeito direto sobre as características P550 e GMDDS foi maior que a do efeito materno. Os efeitos aditivos diretos da raça Angus determinaram maior desempenho. Não houve diferença significativa entre os valores estimados pelo modelo 1 e os preditos pelo modelo 2 para P205, P550 e GMDDS.The objective of this study was to estimate direct and maternal additive genetic, non-additive and heterozygotic effects for pre and post-weaning traits and to develop equations to predict growth performance in a multi-breed Aberdeen Angus (Angus

  12. Radioactive waste disposal into the ground

    Disposal into ground has sometimes proved to be an expedient and simple method. Where ground disposal has become an established practice, the sites have so far been limited to those remote from population centres; but in other respects, such as in climate and soil conditions, their characteristics vary widely. Experience gained at these sites has illustrated the variety of problems in radioactive waste migration and the resulting pollution and environmental radiation levels that may reasonably be anticipated at other sites, whether remote from population centres or otherwise.

  13. Automated Theorem Proving in High-Quality Software Design

    Schumann, Johann; Swanson, Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The amount and complexity of software developed during the last few years has increased tremendously. In particular, programs are being used more and more in embedded systems (from car-brakes to plant-control). Many of these applications are safety-relevant, i.e. a malfunction of hardware or software can cause severe damage or loss. Tremendous risks are typically present in the area of aviation, (nuclear) power plants or (chemical) plant control. Here, even small problems can lead to thousands of casualties and huge financial losses. Large financial risks also exist when computer systems are used in the area of telecommunication (telephone, electronic commerce) or space exploration. Computer applications in this area are not only subject to safety considerations, but also security issues are important. All these systems must be designed and developed to guarantee high quality with respect to safety and security. Even in an industrial setting which is (or at least should be) aware of the high requirements in Software Engineering, many incidents occur. For example, the Warshaw Airbus crash, was caused by an incomplete requirements specification. Uncontrolled reuse of an Ariane 4 software module was the reason for the Ariane 5 disaster. Some recent incidents in the telecommunication area, like illegal "cloning" of smart-cards of D2GSM handies, or the extraction of (secret) passwords from German T-online users show that also in this area serious flaws can happen. Due to the inherent complexity of computer systems, most authors claim that only a rigorous application of formal methods in all stages of the software life cycle can ensure high quality of the software and lead to real safe and secure systems. In this paper, we will have a look, in how far automated theorem proving can contribute to a more widespread application of formal methods and their tools, and what automated theorem provers (ATPs) must provide in order to be useful.

  14. Ground state degeneracy of interacting spinless fermions

    Wei, Zhong-Chao; Han, Xing-Jie; Xie, Zhi-Yuan; Xiang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    We propose an eigenoperator scheme to study the lattice model of interacting spinless fermions at half filling and show that this model possesses a hidden form of reflection positivity in its Majorana fermion representation. Based on this observation, we prove rigourously that the ground state of this model is either unique or doubly degenerate if the lattice size N is even, and is always doubly degenerate if N is odd. This proof holds in all dimensions with arbitrary lattice structures.

  15. The ground based plan

    The paper presents a report of ''The Ground Based Plan'' of the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council. The ground based plan is a plan for research in astronomy and planetary science by ground based techniques. The contents of the report contains a description of:- the scientific objectives and technical requirements (the basis for the Plan), the present organisation and funding for the ground based programme, the Plan, the main scientific features and the further objectives of the Plan. (U.K.)

  16. Communication, concepts and grounding

    Velde, van der F.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the relation between communication and conceptual grounding. In the brain, neurons, circuits and brain areas are involved in the representation of a concept, grounding it in perception and action. In terms of grounding we can distinguish between communication within the brain

  17. Grounds Maintenance Evaluation.

    Chesapeake Public Schools, VA. Office of Program Evaluation.

    The Grounds Shop of the Chesapeake Public School Division (Virginia) Department of School Plants was evaluated in 1995-96. The goals of the grounds maintenance program are to provide safe and attractive grounds for students, parents, and staff of the school district. The evaluation examined the extent to which these goals are being met by using…

  18. Constructivist Grounded Theory?

    Barney G. Glaser, PhD, Hon. PhD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractI refer to and use as scholarly inspiration Charmaz’s excellent article on constructivist grounded theory as a tool of getting to the fundamental issues on why grounded theory is not constructivist. I show that constructivist data, if it exists at all, is a very, very small part of the data that grounded theory uses.

  19. Evaluation of permeability of compacted bentonite ground considering heterogeneity by geostatistics

    The permeability of the bentonite ground as an engineered barrier is possibly designed to the value which is lower than that determined in terms of required performance because of heterogeneous distribution of permeability in the ground, which might be considerable when the ground is created by the compaction method. The effect of heterogeneity in the ground on the permeability of the bentonite ground should be evaluated by overall permeability of the ground, whereas in practice, the effect is evaluated by the distribution of permeability in the ground. Thus, in this study, overall permeability of the bentonite ground is evaluated from the permeability of the bentonite ground is evaluated from the permeability distribution determined using the geostatistical method with the dry density data as well as permeability data of the undisturbed sample recovered from the bentonite ground. Consequently, it was proved through this study that possibility of overestimation of permeability of the bentonite ground can be reduced if the overall permeability is used. (author)

  20. DESTRUCTION CONDITIONS WHEN DITTING HOMOGENEOUS GROUND AND GROUND WITH INCLUSION

    Nichke, V.; Demishkan, V.

    2005-01-01

    On the base of analyses strained state the strong a ground with inclusion, and take into account a bigger traction effort of a modern bulldozers, was shoved as destroyed a rocks ground, a ground with inclusion, homogeneous a ground.

  1. Eficiência produtiva em vacas primíparas das raças Aberdeen Angus e Charolês Productive efficiency of Angus and Charolais primiparous cows

    Edson Luis de Azambuja Ribeiro

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi conduzido com o objetivo de avaliar o desempenho produtivo de vacas de corte. Foram utilizadas 30 vacas da raça Aberdeen Angus e 32 da raça Charolês primíparas, prenhes no início do experimento, com bezerros puros ou mestiços Nelore. As vacas foram submetidas a diferentes tratamentos alimentares durante o inverno e a primavera: T1 - pastagem natural, T2 - pastagem cultivada por 60 dias (24 horas/dia, do início de setembro ao início de novembro, T3 - acesso à pastagem cultivada por duas horas diárias, por um período de 60 dias (de início de julho ao início de setembro, T4 - acesso à pastagem cultivada por duas horas diárias, por um período de 60 dias (de início de julho ao início de setembro, e mais 60 dias (24 horas/dia de pastagem cultivada do início de setembro ao início de novembro. As medidas de eficiência produtiva foram: EPPARTO = (P205/PVP*100; EPDESMAME = (P205/PVD*100; EPMBPARTO = (P205/PVP0,75; EPMBDESMAME = (P205/PVD0,75; e EPNDT = NDTTOTAL/P205, em que P205 é o peso ao desmame dos bezerros; PVP e PVD, os pesos das vacas ao parto e ao desmame, respectivamente; e NDTTOTAL, a exigência em energia para manutenção e produção de leite das vacas. As vacas Aberdeen Angus, com bezerros machos e aquelas com bezerros mestiços, foram mais eficientes. Vacas que utilizaram a pastagem cultivada por um período de tempo maior (T4 tiveram melhor desempenho do que aquelas que permaneceram apenas em pastagem natural(T1; as vacas dos outros tratamentos tiveram desempenhos intermediários.The objective of this work was to evaluate the productive efficiency of beef cows. Thirty Angus and 32 Charolais primiparous cows, pregnant at the beginning of the experiment with straightbred or crossbred calves, were evaluated. The cows were submitted to different feeding management during winter and spring: T1 -- Native pasture, T2 -- Cultivated pasture for 60 days (24 hours/day, from early September to early November, T3

  2. Study on the sudden changes in ground tilt and earthquakes

    牛安福; 张晶; 江在森; 贾民育

    2003-01-01

    @@ Introduction Many observation facts, rock-rupture experimental results, and theoretical research achievements proved that the sudden changes in ground deformation are the most possible earthquake short-term precursors. The observed sudden changes in deformation that related to the earthquake preparation are here called the precursory. The sudden change is mainly characterized by the highly changing velocity and greatly accumulated deformation amplitude.

  3. Pesticides in Ground Water

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    1996-01-01

    Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588.......Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588....

  4. Ground energy coupling

    Metz, P. D.

    The feasibility of ground coupling for various heat pump systems was investigated. Analytical heat flow models were developed to approximate design ground coupling devices for use in solar heat pump space conditioning systems. A digital computer program called GROCS (GRound Coupled Systems) was written to model 3-dimensional underground heat flow in order to simulate the behavior of ground coupling experiments and to provide performance predictions which have been compared to experimental results. GROCS also has been integrated with TRNSYS. Soil thermal property and ground coupling device experiments are described. Buried tanks, serpentine earth coils in various configurations, lengths and depths, and sealed vertical wells are being investigated. An earth coil used to heat a house without use of resistance heating is described.

  5. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  6. Zero Energy Ground State in the Three--Body System

    Gridnev, Dmitry K

    2009-01-01

    We consider a 3--body system in $\\mathbb{R}^3$ with non--positive potentials and non--negative essential spectrum. Under certain requirements on the fall off of pair potentials it is proved that if one pair has a zero energy resonance then a square integrable zero energy ground state of three particles does not exist. This complements the analysis in \\cite{1}, where it was demonstrated that zero energy ground states is possible in the absence of zero energy resonances in particle pairs. As a corollary it is proved that one can tune the coupling constants of pair potentials so that for any given $R, \\epsilon >0$: (a) the bottom of essential spectrum is at zero; (b) there is a negative energy ground state $\\psi(\\xi)$, where $\\int |\\psi(\\xi)|^2 = 1$; (c) $\\int_{|\\xi| \\leq R} |\\psi(\\xi)|^2 < \\epsilon$.

  7. The ground truth about metadata and community detection in networks

    Peel, Leto; Clauset, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Across many scientific domains, there is common need to automatically extract a simplified view or a coarse-graining of how a complex system's components interact. This general task is called community detection in networks and is analogous to searching for clusters in independent vector data. It is common to evaluate the performance of community detection algorithms by their ability to find so-called \\textit{ground truth} communities. This works well in synthetic networks with planted communities because such networks' links are formed explicitly based on the planted communities. However, there are no planted communities in real world networks. Instead, it is standard practice to treat some observed discrete-valued node attributes, or metadata, as ground truth. Here, we show that metadata are not the same as ground truth, and that treating them as such induces severe theoretical and practical problems. We prove that no algorithm can uniquely solve community detection, and we prove a general No Free Lunch the...

  8. Interações entre monensina sódica, óleo de soja e fontes de nitrogênio no desempenho de novilhos Aberdeen Angus em confinamento

    Lana Rogério de Paula

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Quarenta novilhos Aberdeen Angus foram usados para avaliar o efeito da monensina, óleo de soja e fontes de nitrogênio (farelo de soja ou uréia sobre o desempenho de novilhos em dietas com 90% de concentrado. A monensina diminuiu o consumo de matéria seca em dietas contendo farelo de soja e o peso corporal aos 56 e 112 dias. O óleo diminuiu o ganho de peso nos períodos de 57-112 dias e 1-112 dias, enquanto a monensina diminuiu o ganho de peso nestes períodos nas dietas contendo farelo de soja como fonte de nitrogênio. O óleo de soja piorou a eficiência alimentar em todos os períodos e o farelo de soja, comparado com dietas com uréia, nos períodos de 57-112 dias e 1-112 dias. A monensina melhorou a eficiência alimentar em 7,4% para as dietas contendo farelo de soja, na ausência de óleo de soja, mas não alterou a eficiência alimentar para as dietas contendo uréia. Por outro lado, a monensina piorou a eficiência alimentar em 13% para as dietas contendo farelo de soja e óleo de soja.

  9. Airport Ground Staff Scheduling

    Clausen, Tommy

    Modern airports are centers of transportation that service a large number of aircraft and passengers every day. To facilitate this large volume of transportation, airports are subject to many logistical and decision problems that must continuously be solved to make sure each flight and passenger...... ownership. As airports are in competition to attract airline routes, efficient and reliable ground handling operations are imperative for the viability and continued growth of both airports and airlines. The increasing liberalization of the ground handling market prompts ground handling operators to...... planning, to highly detailed scheduling problems arising in the highly dynamic environment of airports....

  10. Ground Source Heat Pumps

    Lale Valizade

    2013-01-01

    A heat pump is a device that is able to transfer heat from one fluid at a lower temperature to another at a higher temperature. Ground source heat pumps are generally classified by the type of ground loop. The coefficient of performance (COP) is used to define the heating performance of heat pumps. Both the COP and EER values are valid only at the specific test conditions used in the rating. A ground source pump could reach 450%, compared with an efficient gas boiler of 90% obviously this is ...

  11. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the sta...

  12. 18 CFR 1309.8 - Who has the burden of proving that an action is excepted?

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who has the burden of proving that an action is excepted? 1309.8 Section 1309.8 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION WITH RESPECT TO AGE § 1309.8 Who has the burden of proving...

  13. Ground Enterprise Management System Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Emergent Space Technologies Inc. proposes to develop the Ground Enterprise Management System (GEMS) for spacecraft ground systems. GEMS will provide situational...

  14. Ground motion predictions

    Nuclear generated ground motion is defined and then related to the physical parameters that cause it. Techniques employed for prediction of ground motion peak amplitude, frequency spectra and response spectra are explored, with initial emphasis on the analysis of data collected at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). NTS postshot measurements are compared with pre-shot predictions. Applicability of these techniques to new areas, for example, Plowshare sites, must be questioned. Fortunately, the Atomic Energy Commission is sponsoring complementary studies to improve prediction capabilities primarily in new locations outside the NTS region. Some of these are discussed in the light of anomalous seismic behavior, and comparisons are given showing theoretical versus experimental results. In conclusion, current ground motion prediction techniques are applied to events off the NTS. Predictions are compared with measurements for the event Faultless and for the Plowshare events, Gasbuggy, Cabriolet, and Buggy I. (author)

  15. Exchange of moisture between atmosphere and ground regarding tritium transfer

    Two measuring equipment have been developed in the framework of this study which fulfill important conditions to avoid microclimatic interferences during measurement by using site-specific ground samples and embedding these in the ground surface. The beta-absorption lysimeter allows the detection of a minimum deposit height of 0.001 mm in a 1 mm sample layer. The conductivity moisture probe is to measure the moisture diffusion within the first 80 mm of the upper ground with a vertical spacial resolution of 2 mm. It is possible to measure a minimum water content increase of 0.02 wt% per 2 mm ground layer using this probe. The influences of single microclimatic parameter on condensation and evaporation were investigated and a transport equation was developed. Investigations in the Negev proved the application ability of the measuring equipment. The application of the transport equation showed very good agreement with the measured values. When the ground surface starts to cool in the afternoon, there is a countercurrent moisture transport from the atmosphere and the deeper ground layers which lead to a higher water content in the upper ground layer. At about 50 mm depth there is an overlapping layer of the two moisture flows which remains almost constant over the 24 h cycle. This exchange zone of atmospheric humidity and ground water must be paid great attention with regard to HTO transfer. (orig./HP)

  16. Grounded Theory approach

    Ali Rabbani Khorasghani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAccording to social changes in global level, social scientist introduced new theories to explanation of socialphenomena. According to appearance new theories, research methods have changed. The Idea is that,Simultaneity with Appearance post positivist theories, research approaches such a grounded theory hasestablished. This method, acts in the base of qualitative methods and use systematic complex of multipleProcedures to gathering data for theory development upon induction. This method with characteristics as ifflexibility, reflexivity, has caused many of researchers used it. In the present article, we paid to introductionof grounded theory and its critics.

  17. Dynamic Ground Clearance

    Hamache, Violette

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a test method which will consider the variation of the ground clearance when driving, the so-called dynamic ground clearance. This has been done through the analysis of a specific application: the tractors in grain used in Brazil. Series of real life tests are run in order to obtain data on the tire compressions and the suspension travels. The tractor used is a 6x4 and is loaded with a trailer. When investigating critical cases, the minimum dynamic groun...

  18. Ground Fault Line Selection with Improved Residual Flow Incremental Method

    Wenhong Li

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the shortcoming of single-phase ground fault line selection method in the resonant grounded system such as the uncertainty of its device by fast compensation with the automatic compensation equipment, an arc suppression and residual flow incremental method is proposed to effectively choose the earth fault line. Firstly, when the single-phase ground fault occurs, the arc suppression coil parameters are adjusted to realize compensation and arc suppression. Then the arc suppression coil inductance values are modulated to make the zero-sequence current of fault line changed, at the same time, the zero-sequence current value is detected and its change will be captured to select the fault line. The simulation experiments prove that the arc grounding over voltage damage can be effectively reduced by arc suppression coil full compensation and fault line can be effectively selected by arc suppression and residual flow increment method.

  19. Monitoring of arched sched ground layer

    Arched Shed was a part of controlled area of NPP A1 site in Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia). It had been used for temporary storage of loose radioactive waste (RAW) which has been characterized within the BIDSF project C13, Characterisation of Loose Radioactive Waste'. Stored RAW has been treated and sorted within the project ',Realization of the 2nd stage of Decommissioning Project of NPP A1'. Area of Arched Shed represents approximately 270 m2 (45 m x 6 m). Ground layer of the AS consists mostly of soil with solid elements (stones and gravel). The aim of monitoring was to remove the contaminated soil up to 1 m below ground level. Requirement for detail monitoring of the Arched Shed ground layer resulted from conclusions of the BIDSF project C13 which has proved that massic activity 137Cs of soil was up to few thousands Bq·kg-1 in underground layer. Dominant easy to measure radionuclide in the soil is 137Cs which has been used as a key radionuclide for methodology of in-situ soil monitoring. Following methods has been applied during characterization: dose rate survey, sampling from defined ground layer followed by laboratory gamma spectrometry analysis by the accredited testing laboratory of radiation dosimetry VUJE (S-219) and in-situ scintillation gamma spectrometry by 1.5''x1.5'' LaBr detector. Massic activity of the remaining soil (not excavated) comply the criteria for free release into the environment (Government Regulation of Slovak Republic 345/2006 Coll.). Area was filled up by non-contaminated soil up to the ground level of surroundings. Afterward the area was covered with geotextile and concrete panels and nowadays it is ready for further usage within the NPP A1 decommissioning project as a place for treatment, conditioning and disposal of contaminated soil and concrete. (authors)

  20. Aerospace Safety Results from a Rover/Nerva Post-Operational Destruct Test

    Berry, R. E.

    1965-11-18

    The destruction of a full scale mockup ROVER/NERVA propulsion engine· was performed under the direction of the joint AEC/NASA Space Nuclear Propulsion Office. The instrumentation was developed and installed by Aberdeen Proving Ground and Sandia Corporation. The data collected included information about the destruct debris velocity, size, weight, and spacial distribution. These data are a satisfactory source term for the computer analysis of the ROVER/NERVA Program safety.

  1. Study of polonium and lead in shellfish (Mytilus Edulis) from NORM discharge area of Aberdeen Bay and Ythan Estuary of Scotland and radiological impact to the local people and environment

    Introduction The problem of NORM in the oil and gas industry is a result of deposits of radioactive (Ra,BaSO4) scale within pipelines and processing equipment. The build-up of the scale has a significant impact on the activities of the operating company involved and is therefore a costly problem. The pipes and other equipment must therefore be cleaned on a regular basis or disposed of and replaced. Once the LSA scale has been removed from oil processing equipment the main route of disposal is into the sea. This scale contains mainly radium, lead and its daughter products, which have a long half-lives and high radiotoxicity. The volume of NORM waste produced by the petroleum industry is quite impressive. There are 230 oil and gas producing platforms in UK waters together with around 40 onshore oil and gas producing wells. All are involved in NORM production and discharging the NORM contaminated waste to the North Sea. Discharge of radioactive scale waste from offshore platforms into the surface waters of sea has been a matter of concern due to possible environmental effects of radioelements contained in such waters. Subject to certain conditions this is allowed under the UK Radioactive Substances Act 1993 which controls the release of radioactive materials into the environment. In the case for North sea oil and gas field waste, waste from the cleaning of contaminated plant and equipment is either discharged to sea off shore, discharged to sea from a pipeline in Aberdeen or stored at the Dounraey nuclear facility. Although allowed since 1981 no one has ascertained if these conditions are ensuring full protection of fish consumers. Furthermore, the disposal of large amounts of contaminated wastes resulting from the various stages of oil processing can pose an environmental problem due to its content of long lived radionuclides (226Ra t1/2 = 1600 y and 210Pb t1/2 = 22 years). In order that an accurate estimate of the contribution of polonium from NORM discharges can be

  2. The LOFT Ground Segment

    Bozzo, E.; Antonelli, A.; Argan, A.;

    2014-01-01

    we summarize the planned organization of the LOFT ground segment (GS), as established in the mission Yellow Book 1 . We describe the expected GS contributions from ESA and the LOFT consortium. A review is provided of the planned LOFT data products and the details of the data flow, archiving and...

  3. Coal and coffee grounds

    Landais, C.

    The Sopad Nestle plant in Dieppe is the number 1 plant in France producing soluble coffee and chicory. Since 1983, it recovers and uses a production byproduct, coffee grounds as fuel, with coal, with an ignifluid boiler (hot fluidized bed), built by Fives-Cail-Babcock.

  4. Collison and Grounding

    Wang, G.; Ji, C.; Kuhala, P.;

    2006-01-01

    COMMITTEE MANDATE Concern for structural arrangements on ships and floating structures with regard to their integrity and adequacy in the events of collision and grounding, with the view towards risk assessment and management. Consideration shall be given to the frequency of occurrence, the...

  5. Singlet Ground State Magnetism:

    Loidl, A.; Knorr, K.; Kjems, Jørgen;

    1979-01-01

    The magneticGamma 1 –Gamma 4 exciton of the singlet ground state system TbP has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering above the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature. Considerable dispersion and a pronounced splitting was found in the [100] and [110] directions. Both the band width and the...

  6. Echoes at Ground Zero

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    An excerpt from the opening piece in "Everything That Rises: A Book of Convergences" by Lawrence Weschler is presented where the author is talking with Joel Meyerowitz, the only photographer granted unimpeded access to the clean-up operations at ground zero after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. The two discuss the parallels between…

  7. Shadow of ground zero

    Haaland, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The history of the development of nuclear weapons starting with the detonation of the A-bombs on Japan is reviewed. An overview of nuclear weapon effects is presented. The effects of electromagnetic pulse (EMP), initial nuclear radiation, thermal radiation and blast are discussed with reference to how people outside can survive when ground zero is only a few miles away. 8 references. (ACR)

  8. Technology at Ground Zero.

    Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the robots used to aid in rescue and recovery at Ground Zero after the September 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center. The robots were developed as a result of national Science Foundation Quick Response Research Awards. Describes several awards that were made following the attack. (JOW)

  9. Four frequency ground scatterometer

    Dickerson, E. T.

    1982-01-01

    The FM-CW Radar, used as a microwave scatterometer is described. Scatterometer system design, scatterometer system calibration, parameter calculation and correction for data acquisition, ground scatterometer data acquistion at Jornada Experimental Range, and Kansas radar cross-calibration test are discussed.

  10. Mechanics of Ship Grounding

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    In these notes first a simplified mathematical model is presented for analysis of ship hull loading due to grounding on relatively hard and plane sand, clay or rock sea bottoms. In a second section a more rational calculation model is described for the sea bed soil reaction forces on the sea bott...

  11. The Development of the Proving Process Within a Dynamic Geometry Environment

    Danh Nam Nguyen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we classify student’s proving level and design an interactive help system (IHS corresponding with these levels in order to investigate the development of the proving process within a dynamic geometry environment. This help system was also used to provide tertiary students with a strategy for proving and to improve their proving levels. The open-ended questions and explorative tasks in the IHS make a contribution to support students’ learning of proving, especially during the processes of realizing invariants, formulating conjectures, producing arguments, and writing proofs. This research wants to react on the well-known students’ difficulties in writing a formal proof. The hypothesis of this work is that these difficulties are based on the lack of students’ understanding the relationship between argumentation and proof. Therefore, we used Toulmin model to analyze student’s argumentation structure and examine the role of abduction in writing a deductive proof. Furthermore, this paper also provides mathematics teachers with three basic conditions for understanding the development of the proving process and teaching strategies for assisting their students in constructing formal proofs.

  12. The van der Waals-Maxwell phase transition, hidden in Sommerfeld-Dirac hydrogen theory, proves that symmetry in the Coulomb bond is broken

    Van Hooydonk, G

    2012-01-01

    Left unnoticed for almost a century, 1916 Sommerfeld H theory hides a van der Waals-Maxwell phase transition in the Coulomb lepton-nucleon attraction of ground state H. This classical 19th century symmetry breaking effect, important for CPT, is confirmed by observed H nS(sub1/2 and nP(sub1/2) series. It proves that trying to produce antihydrogen H with e(sup+)+ p(sup-)\\rightarrow Hbar does not make sense. Since hydrogen is the major constituent of the Universe, the energy equilibrium of Hbar antimatter and H matter states in natural hydrogen is in line with the Big Bang hypothesis.

  13. Ground state microstructure of a ferrofluid thin layer

    Prokopieva, T. A.; Danilov, V. A.; Kantorovich, S. S., E-mail: sofia@icp.uni-stuttgart.de [Ural State University (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    Using a fine weave of theoretical analysis and computer simulations, we found various aggregates of magnetic single-domain nanoparticles, which can form in a quasi-two-dimensional (q2D) ferrofluid layer at low temperatures. Our theoretical investigation allowed us to obtain exact expressions and their asymptotes for the energies of each configuration. Thus, for ferrofluid q2D layers it proved possible to identify the ground states as a function of the particle number, size, and other system parameters. Our suggested approach can be used for the investigation of ground state structures in systems with more complex interparticle interactions.

  14. Ground state microstructure of a ferrofluid thin layer

    Using a fine weave of theoretical analysis and computer simulations, we found various aggregates of magnetic single-domain nanoparticles, which can form in a quasi-two-dimensional (q2D) ferrofluid layer at low temperatures. Our theoretical investigation allowed us to obtain exact expressions and their asymptotes for the energies of each configuration. Thus, for ferrofluid q2D layers it proved possible to identify the ground states as a function of the particle number, size, and other system parameters. Our suggested approach can be used for the investigation of ground state structures in systems with more complex interparticle interactions.

  15. Zero Energy Ground State in the Three-Body System

    Gridnev, Dmitry K.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a 3--body system in $\\mathbb{R}^3$ with non--positive potentials and non--negative essential spectrum. Under certain requirements on the fall off of pair potentials it is proved that if at least one pair of particles has a zero energy resonance then a square integrable zero energy ground state of three particles does not exist. This complements the analysis in \\cite{1}, where it was demonstrated that square integrable zero energy ground states are possible given that in all two--b...

  16. Ground motion effects

    Ground motion caused by natural earthquakes or by nuclear explosion causes buildings and other structures to respond in such manner as possibly to have high unit stresses and to be subject to damage or-in some cases-collapse. Even minor damage may constitute a hazard to persons within or adjacent to buildings. The risk of damage may well be the governing restraint on the uses of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. Theory is advanced regarding structural-dynamic response but real buildings and structures are complex, highly variable, and often difficult to model realistically. This paper discusses the state of knowledge, the art of damage prediction and safety precautions, and shows ground motion effects from explosions of underground nuclear devices in the continental United States including events Salmon, Gasbuggy, Boxcar, Faultless and Benham. (author)

  17. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...... scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...

  18. Grounded Theory approach

    Ali Rabbani Khorasghani; Mohammad Abbaszadeh

    2010-01-01

    AbstractAccording to social changes in global level, social scientist introduced new theories to explanation of socialphenomena. According to appearance new theories, research methods have changed. The Idea is that,Simultaneity with Appearance post positivist theories, research approaches such a grounded theory hasestablished. This method, acts in the base of qualitative methods and use systematic complex of multipleProcedures to gathering data for theory development upon induction. This meth...

  19. Technical report on the Piping Reliability Proving Tests at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) conducts Piping Reliability Proving Tests from 1975 to 1992 based upon the contracts between JAERI and Science and Technology Agency of Japan (STA) under the auspices of the special account law for electric power development promotion. The purpose of these tests are to prove the structural reliability of the primary cooling piping constituting a part of the pressure boundary in the light water reactor power plants. The tests with large experimental facilities had ended already in 1990. Presently piping reliability analysis by the probabilistic fracture mechanics method is being done. Until now annual reports concerning the proving tests were produced and submitted to STA, whereas this report summarizes the test results done during these 16 years. Objectives of the piping reliability proving tests are to prove that the primary piping of the light water reactor (1) be reliable throughout the service period, (2) have no possibility of rupture, (3) bring no detrimental influence on the surrounding instrumentations or equipments near the break location even if it ruptured suddenly. To attain these objectives (i) pipe fatigue tests, (ii) unstable pipe fracture tests, (iii) pipe rupture tests and also the analyses by computer codes were done. After carrying out these tests, it is verified that the piping is reliable throughout the service period. The authors of this report are T. Isozaki, K. Shibata, S. Ueda, R. Kurihara, K. Onizawa and A. Kohsaka. The parts they wrote are shown in contents. (author)

  20. Crystalline beam ground state

    In order to employ molecular dynamics (MD) methods, commonly used in condensed matter physics, we have derived the equations of motion for a beam of charged particles in the rotating rest frame of the reference particle. We include in the formalism that the particles are confined by the guiding and focusing magnetic fields, and that they are confined in a conducting vacuum pipe while interacting with each other via a Coulomb force. Numerical simulations using MD methods has been performed to obtain the equilibrium crystalline beam structure. The effect of the shearing force, centrifugal force, and azimuthal variation of the focusing strength are investigated. It is found that a constant gradient storage ring can not give a crystalline beam, but that an alternating-gradient (AG) structure can. In such a machine the ground state is, except for one-dimensional (1-D) crystals, time dependent. The ground state is a zero entropy state, despite the time-dependent, periodic variation of the focusing force. The nature of the ground state, similar to that found by Schiffer et al. depends upon the density and the relative focusing strengths in the transverse directions. At low density, the crystal is 1-D. As the density increases, it transforms into various kinds of 2-D and 3-D crystals. If the energy of the beam is higher than the transition energy of the machine, the crystalline structure can not be formed for lack of radial focusing

  1. Eliminating Redundant Search Space on Backtracking for Forward Chaining Theorem Proving

    Lifeng He; Yuyan Chao; Hidenori Itoh

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces some improvements on the intelligent backtracking strategyfor forward chaining theorem proving. How to decide a minimal useful consequent atom set for a refutation derived at a node in a proof tree is discussed. In most cases, an unnecessary non-Horn clause used for forward chaining will be split only once. The increase of the search spaceby invoking unnecessary forward chaining clauses will be nearly linear, not exponential anymore.In this paper, the principle of the proposed method and its correctness are introduced. Moreover,some examples are provided to show that the proposed approach is powerful for forward chaining theorem proving.

  2. Circular reasoning: who first proved that $C/d$ is a constant?

    Richeson, David

    2013-01-01

    We answer the question: who first proved that $C/d$ is a constant? We argue that Archimedes proved that the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter is a constant independent of the circle and that the circumference constant equals the area constant ($C/d=A/r^{2}$). He stated neither result explicitly, but both are implied by his work. His proof required the addition of two axioms beyond those in Euclid's \\emph{Elements}; this was the first step toward a rigorous theory of arc l...

  3. Ground penetrating radar

    Daniels, David J

    2004-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar has come to public attention in recent criminal investigations, but has actually been a developing and maturing remote sensing field for some time. In the light of recent expansion of the technique to a wide range of applications, the need for an up-to-date reference has become pressing. This fully revised and expanded edition of the best-selling Surface-Penetrating Radar (IEE, 1996) presents, for the non-specialist user or engineer, all the key elements of this technique, which span several disciplines including electromagnetics, geophysics and signal processing. The

  4. Common Ground and Delegation

    Dobrajska, Magdalena; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Lyngsie, Jacob

    preconditions of increasing delegation. We argue that key HR practices?namely, hiring, training and job-rotation?are associated with delegation of decision-making authority. These practices assist in the creation of shared knowledge conditions between managers and employees. In turn, such a ?common ground......-scale questionnaire survey with unique population-wide employer-employee data. We find evidence of a direct and positive influence of hiring decisions (proxied by common educational background), and the training and job rotation of employees on delegation. Moreover, we find a positive interaction between common...

  5. A conception of ecological providing ground

    Full text: Ecological proving ground is a multifunctional intersectoral and interterritorial complex. The proving ground is created to organize the work of the Regional System of Ecological Safety, its structure and elements, and their unification and conversion into national system. It's also created for the working out of some questions of technical policy and normative-legal regulation in the field of ecology. The main task is the elaboration of mechanisms for the co-operation of the legislative executive bodies and their regional structure in the process of creation adoption and working of the Complex Regional System of Ecological Safety. The directions of polygon's activity: 1. Sanitary-epidemic protection of population. 2. Radiational Safety. 3. Chemical Safety. 4. Monitoring of Ecological situation and normalization of the environment. 4.1. Control of contamination of the waters. 4.2. Control of contamination of the air. 4.3. Ecological monitoring of soil. 4.4. State and protection of flora and fauna. 5. Ecologically pure agricultural production on the territory of the polygon. 5.1. Radiational and chemical control of agricultural areas and production. 5.2. Production of pure products. 6. The creation of normative, legal, informational, methodical and metrological supply of polygon's activity. 7. Optimization of the models of ecological situation. 8. Ecological informational-educational activity. The choice of territory for the polygon is based on the following statements: the intensity of ecological situation; the topography of the environment; the density of population; the availability of scientific base; the intensity of social movements. Some experience, that would allow to improve existing ecological legislation and spread some tried methods of supply of ecological safety on the territory of Russia, will be gained as a result. (author)

  6. A Simple Application of Lightweight Fusion to Proving the Equivalence of Abstract Machines

    Danvy, Olivier; Millikin, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    We show how Ohori and Sasano's recent lightweight fusion by fixed-point promotion provides a simple way to prove the equivalence of the two standard styles of specification of abstract machines: (1) as a transition function together with a `driver loop' implementing the iteration of this transition...

  7. Wind tunnel experiments to prove a hydraulic passive torque control concept for variable speed wind turbines

    Diepeveen, N.F.B.; Jarquin-Laguna, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the results are presented of experiments to prove an innovative concept for passive torque control of variable speed wind turbines using fluid power technology. It is demonstrated that by correctly configuring the hydraulic drive train, the wind turbine rotor operates at or near maximu

  8. A Gas Chromatography Experiment for Proving the Application of Quantum Symmetry Restrictions in Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules.

    Dosiere, M.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment in which gas chromatography is used to prove the application of quantum symmetry restrictions in homonuclear diatomic molecules. Comparisons between experimental results and theoretical computed values show good agreement, within one to two…

  9. Proof and Proving: Logic, Impasses, and the Relationship to Problem Solving

    Savic, Milos

    2012-01-01

    Becoming a skillful prover is critical for success in advanced undergraduate and graduate mathematics courses. In this dissertation, I report my investigations of proof and the proving process in three separate studies. In the first study, I examined the amount of logic used in student-constructed proofs to help in the design of…

  10. Analysis of ground state in random bipartite matching

    Shi, Gui-Yuan; Liao, Hao; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    In human society, a lot of social phenomena can be concluded into a mathematical problem called the bipartite matching, one of the most well known model is the marriage problem proposed by Gale and Shapley. In this article, we try to find out some intrinsic properties of the ground state of this model and thus gain more insights and ideas about the matching problem. We apply Kuhn-Munkres Algorithm to find out the numerical ground state solution of the system. The simulation result proves the previous theoretical analysis using replica method. In the result, we also find out the amount of blocking pairs which can be regarded as a representative of the system stability. Furthermore, we discover that the connectivity in the bipartite matching problem has a great impact on the stability of the ground state, and the system will become more unstable if there were more connections between men and women.

  11. The LOFT Ground Segment

    Bozzo, E; Argan, A; Barret, D; Binko, P; Brandt, S; Cavazzuti, E; Courvoisier, T; Herder, J W den; Feroci, M; Ferrigno, C; Giommi, P; Götz, D; Guy, L; Hernanz, M; Zand, J J M in't; Klochkov, D; Kuulkers, E; Motch, C; Lumb, D; Papitto, A; Pittori, C; Rohlfs, R; Santangelo, A; Schmid, C; Schwope, A D; Smith, P J; Webb, N A; Wilms, J; Zane, S

    2014-01-01

    LOFT, the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing, was one of the ESA M3 mission candidates that completed their assessment phase at the end of 2013. LOFT is equipped with two instruments, the Large Area Detector (LAD) and the Wide Field Monitor (WFM). The LAD performs pointed observations of several targets per orbit (~90 minutes), providing roughly ~80 GB of proprietary data per day (the proprietary period will be 12 months). The WFM continuously monitors about 1/3 of the sky at a time and provides data for about ~100 sources a day, resulting in a total of ~20 GB of additional telemetry. The LOFT Burst alert System additionally identifies on-board bright impulsive events (e.g., Gamma-ray Bursts, GRBs) and broadcasts the corresponding position and trigger time to the ground using a dedicated system of ~15 VHF receivers. All WFM data are planned to be made public immediately. In this contribution we summarize the planned organization of the LOFT ground segment (GS), as established in the mission Yellow Book 1 . We...

  12. LISA Pathfinder ground testing

    Guzman, Felipe; LISA Pathfinder Team

    2010-01-01

    The space-based gravitational wave observatory LISA is a joint NASA-ESA mission that requires challenging technology to ensure pure geodetic trajectories of test masses and the interferometric measurement of distance variations between them. The LISA Pathfinder mission is an ESA-launched technology demonstrator of key LISA subsystems such as spacecraft control with micronewton thrusters, test mass drag-free control, and precision laser interferometry between free-flying test masses. Ground testing of pre-flight hardware of the Gravitational Reference Sensor and Optical Metrology subsystems is currently ongoing. Studies have been carried out on very sensitive torsion pendulums that effectively reproduce a free-fall condition for the test mass within a horizontal plane in the lab, down to frequencies loop operation, demonstrating the required optical metrology sensitivity to test mass displacement. This poster presents the current status in the development and implementation of LISA Pathfinder pre-flight systems and latest results of the ongoing ground testing efforts.

  13. Ground water and energy

    1980-05-01

    In view of complex environmental/energy decisions, the Environmental Impacts Division of the Office of Technology Impacts develops analytical methods for conducting policy analyses supporting decision making. The methods development process often begins with a workshop of leading experts and specialists in the relevant disciplines and issue areas; workshop findings are subsequently utilized by OTI to form a more solid foundation for viable policies. The National Workshop on Ground Water and Energy Production was envisioned as a tool through which OTI could obtain insights, information, and methods (on environmental, economical, physical, political, legal, and social issues) to use in its analyses, models, and assessments. To accomplish this, the Workshop comprised both plenary sessions and individual working groups. The former provided opportunities for all participants to explore issues from a broad perspective, whereas the latter enabled participants to focus on the three following areas: ground water supply; conflicts and barriers to its use; and alternatives or solutions to the various issues. This report summarizes information and insights gained by the Office of Technology Impacts during the course of the Workshop. The Key Findings section summarizes the most important facts discovered during the Workshop. The three general topics that follow (Supply, Conflicts and Barriers, and Alternatives) are those described in the Core Issues statements. The statements are reflective of the recommendations and analyses prepared by the several working groups.

  14. Searching for fixed point combinators by using automated theorem proving: A preliminary report

    In this report, we establish that the use of an automated theorem- proving program to study deep questions from mathematics and logic is indeed an excellent move. Among such problems, we focus mainly on that concerning the construction of fixed point combinators---a problem considered by logicians to be significant and difficult to solve, and often computationally intensive and arduous. To be a fixed point combinator, Θ must satisfy the equation Θx = x(Θx) for all combinators x. The specific questions on which we focus most heavily ask, for each chosen set of combinators, whether a fixed point combinator can be constructed from the members of that set. For answering questions of this type, we present a new, sound, and efficient method, called the kernel method, which can be applied quite easily by hand and very easily by an automated theorem-proving program. For the application of the kernel method by a theorem-proving program, we illustrate the vital role that is played by both paramodulation and demodulation---two of the powerful features frequently offered by an automated theorem-proving program for treating equality as if it is ''understood.'' We also state a conjecture that, if proved, establishes the completeness of the kernel method. From what we can ascertain, this method---which relies on the introduced concepts of kernel and superkernel---offers the first systematic approach for searching for fixed point combinators. We successfully apply the new kernel method to various sets of combinators and, for the set consisting of the combinators B and W, construct an infinite set of fixed point combinators such that no two of the combinators are equal even in the presence of extensionality---a law that asserts that two combinators are equal if they behave the same. 18 refs

  15. Searching for fixed point combinators by using automated theorem proving: A preliminary report

    Wos, L.; McCune, W.

    1988-09-01

    In this report, we establish that the use of an automated theorem- proving program to study deep questions from mathematics and logic is indeed an excellent move. Among such problems, we focus mainly on that concerning the construction of fixed point combinators---a problem considered by logicians to be significant and difficult to solve, and often computationally intensive and arduous. To be a fixed point combinator, THETA must satisfy the equation THETAx = x(THETAx) for all combinators x. The specific questions on which we focus most heavily ask, for each chosen set of combinators, whether a fixed point combinator can be constructed from the members of that set. For answering questions of this type, we present a new, sound, and efficient method, called the kernel method, which can be applied quite easily by hand and very easily by an automated theorem-proving program. For the application of the kernel method by a theorem-proving program, we illustrate the vital role that is played by both paramodulation and demodulation---two of the powerful features frequently offered by an automated theorem-proving program for treating equality as if it is ''understood.'' We also state a conjecture that, if proved, establishes the completeness of the kernel method. From what we can ascertain, this method---which relies on the introduced concepts of kernel and superkernel---offers the first systematic approach for searching for fixed point combinators. We successfully apply the new kernel method to various sets of combinators and, for the set consisting of the combinators B and W, construct an infinite set of fixed point combinators such that no two of the combinators are equal even in the presence of extensionality---a law that asserts that two combinators are equal if they behave the same. 18 refs.

  16. 20 CFR 1002.22 - Who has the burden of proving discrimination or retaliation in violation of USERRA?

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who has the burden of proving discrimination... Protection from Employer Discrimination and Retaliation § 1002.22 Who has the burden of proving discrimination or retaliation in violation of USERRA? The individual has the burden of proving that a status...

  17. Regional differences in subduction ground motions

    Beauval, Céline; Abrahamson, N; Theodulidis, N; Delavaud, E; Rodriguez, L; Scherbaum, F; Haendel, A

    2012-01-01

    A few ground-motion prediction models have been published in the last years, for predicting ground motions produced by interface and intraslab earthquakes. When one must carry out a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis in a region including a subduction zone, GMPEs must be selected to feed a logic tree. In the present study, the aim is to identify which models provide the best fit to the dataset M6+, global or local models. The subduction regions considered are Japan, Taiwan, Central and South America, and Greece. Most of the data comes from the database built to develop the new BCHydro subduction global GMPE (Abrahamson et al., submitted). We show that this model is among best-fitting models in all cases, followed closely by Zhao et al. (2006), whereas the local Lin and Lee (2008) is well predicting the data in Taiwan and also in Greece. The Scherbaum et al. (2009) LLH method prove to be efficient in providing one number quantifying the overall fit, but additional analysis on the between-event and within-ev...

  18. The application of GPS time information in the telemetry ground station

    GPS time information is a kind of practicable information resource that can be shared all over the world. Now it is the most accurate wireless time information. The major of this paper is the application information of GPS time information in telemetry. The main point introduces how to make use of the GPS time information to produce GPS-IRIG-B time code for proving ground and how to send time information to related equipment in telemetry ground station

  19. Contemporary approaches to studying and mapping of active water exchange zone of ground water

    Moraru, C. Ye

    2016-03-01

    The article deals with a zone of ground water active exchange. New principles of the zone study and mapping under the platform hydrogeological condition are discussed. The assessment and distribution techniques are suggested for the active water exchange zone under the condition of hydrogeological parameterization uncertainty. The efficiency and significance of the suggested techniques are proved using the example of ground water in the southwest of Black Sea artesian basin.

  20. Ground-penetrating rada

    Thuma, W. R.

    The theory and applications of digital Ground-Penetrating Radar were discussed at a 5-day seminar held at the China University of Geosciences in Wuhan, People's Republic of China, in April. Cohosted by the Department of Applied Geophysics and Canada-China Geoscience, more than 60 senior geophysicists, engineers, technical specialists, university professors and researchers attended.Focus of the meeting was the expanded uses of the new deep-penetrating fully digital PulseEKKO, which is gaining wide acceptance around the world. Attendees showed intense interest in this new and unique technology. Applications covered were groundwater and mineral exploration; engineering, construction and toxic waste site surveying; tunnel and underground mine probing for potential geological hazards, blind ore zones, karst cavities and solution pathways; and locating buried objects such as petroleum storage tanks, unexploded bombs and archeological remains.

  1. Wind-induced ground motion

    Naderyan, Vahid; Hickey, Craig J.; Raspet, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Wind noise is a problem in seismic surveys and can mask the seismic signals at low frequency. This research investigates ground motions caused by wind pressure and shear stress perturbations on the ground surface. A prediction of the ground displacement spectra using the measured ground properties and predicted pressure and shear stress at the ground surface is developed. Field measurements are conducted at a site having a flat terrain and low ambient seismic noise. Triaxial geophones are deployed at different depths to study the wind-induced ground vibrations as a function of depth and wind velocity. Comparison of the predicted to the measured wind-induced ground displacement spectra shows good agreement for the vertical component but significant underprediction for the horizontal components. To validate the theoretical model, a test experiment is designed to exert controlled normal pressure and shear stress on the ground using a vertical and a horizontal mass-spring apparatus. This experiment verifies the linear elastic rheology and the quasi-static displacements assumptions of the model. The results indicate that the existing surface shear stress models significantly underestimate the wind shear stress at the ground surface and the amplitude of the fluctuation shear stress must be of the same order of magnitude as the normal pressure. Measurement results show that mounting the geophones flush with the ground provides a significant reduction in wind noise on all three components of the geophone. Further reduction in wind noise with depth of burial is small for depths up to 40 cm.

  2. Wind tunnel experiments to prove a hydraulic passive torque control concept for variable speed wind turbines

    Diepeveen, N. F. B.; Jarquin-Laguna, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper the results are presented of experiments to prove an innovative concept for passive torque control of variable speed wind turbines using fluid power technology. It is demonstrated that by correctly configuring the hydraulic drive train, the wind turbine rotor operates at or near maximum aerodynamic efficiency for below rated wind speeds. The experiments with a small horizontal-axis wind turbine rotor, coupled to a hydraulic circuit, were conducted at the Open Jet Facility of the Delft University of Technology. In theory, the placement of a nozzle at the end of the hydraulic circuit causes the pressure and hence the rotor torque to increase quadratically with flow speed and hence rotation speed. The rotor torque is limited by a pressure relief valve. Results from the experiments proved the functionality of this passive speed control concept. By selecting the correct nozzle outlet area the rotor operates at or near the optimum tip speed ratio.

  3. Wind tunnel experiments to prove a hydraulic passive torque control concept for variable speed wind turbines

    In this paper the results are presented of experiments to prove an innovative concept for passive torque control of variable speed wind turbines using fluid power technology. It is demonstrated that by correctly configuring the hydraulic drive train, the wind turbine rotor operates at or near maximum aerodynamic efficiency for below rated wind speeds. The experiments with a small horizontal-axis wind turbine rotor, coupled to a hydraulic circuit, were conducted at the Open Jet Facility of the Delft University of Technology. In theory, the placement of a nozzle at the end of the hydraulic circuit causes the pressure and hence the rotor torque to increase quadratically with flow speed and hence rotation speed. The rotor torque is limited by a pressure relief valve. Results from the experiments proved the functionality of this passive speed control concept. By selecting the correct nozzle outlet area the rotor operates at or near the optimum tip speed ratio

  4. A Transformational Approach for Proving Properties of the CHR Constraint Store

    Pilozzi, Paolo; Schrijvers, Tom; Bruynooghe, Maurice

    Proving termination of, or generating efficient control for Constraint Handling Rules (CHR) programs requires information about the kinds of constraints that can show up in the CHR constraint store. In contrast to Logic Programming (LP), there are not many tools available for deriving such information for CHR. Hence, instead of building analyses for CHR from scratch, we define a transformation from CHR to Prolog and reuse existing analysis tools for Prolog.

  5. Can we prove a bank guilty of creating systemic risk?: a minority report

    Danielsson, Jon; Kevin R. James; Valenzuela, Marcela; Zer, Ilknur

    2015-01-01

    Since increasing a bank's capital requirement to improve the stability of the financial system imposes costs upon the bank, a regulator should ideally be able to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that banks classified as systemically risky really do create systemic risk before subjecting them to this capital punishment. Evaluating the performance of two leading systemic risk models, we show that estimation error alone prevents the reliable identification of the most systemically risky banks. We...

  6. Proving or Improving: On Health Care Research as a Form of Self-Reflection

    Mol, Annemarie

    2006-01-01

    As it is, clinical trials are the gold standard of health care research, employed to prove that the care practices they study are good. Here, the author suggests that we would do better to develop research methods that work toward another goal: to improve care practices. This requires that we no longer foreground the effectiveness but, instead, investigate the various effects of interventions. If undesirable, they might then be tinkered with. As a part of this, the effects on bodily parameter...

  7. Progress in Computer-Assisted Inductive Theorem Proving by Human-Orientedness and Descente Infinie?

    Wirth, Claus-Peter

    2009-01-01

    In this short position paper we briefly review the development history of automated inductive theorem proving and computer-assisted mathematical induction. We think that the current low expectations on progress in this field result from a faulty narrow-scope historical projection. Our main motivation is to explain--on an abstract but hopefully sufficiently descriptive level--why we believe that future progress in the field is to result from human-orientedness and descente infinie.

  8. Can antiosteoporotic therapy reduce mortality in MRI-proved acute osteoporotic vertebral fractures?

    Chen, Ying-Chou; Su, Fu-Mei; Cheng, Tien-Tsai; Lin, Wei-Che; Lui, Chun-Chung

    2016-05-01

    Patients with MRI-proved acute painful vertebral fractures in whom conservative pain management fails are frequently referred for vertebroplasty. This study investigated the effects of treating osteoporosis on the mortality rate of patients with MRI-proved acute osteoporosis-related vertebral fractures who had undergone vertebroplasty. We retrospectively reviewed the cases of osteoporosis patients with MRI-proved acute vertebral fractures who had been treated with vertebroplasty from January 2001 to December 2007. The long-term outcomes of the patients who received antiosteoporotic therapy were compared with those of patients who received no therapy. A total of 304 patients (247 female patients and 57 male patients; mean age, 74.1 ± 7.7 years) were enrolled in the study. The patients who received antiosteoporotic therapy had a significantly lower mortality rate than did patients who did not receive antiosteoporotic therapy (P = 0.001; hazard ratio, 0.396, 95 % confidence interval, 0.273-0.575). At the end of the study, 183 patients were alive, and 121 had died. Effective treatment for osteoporosis may improve survival in patients with osteoporosis-related vertebral fractures after vertebroplasty. PMID:26040410

  9. Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points

    Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ground control is required to georeferenced airborne and spaceborne images. The production of ortho-photogrammetric data requires ground control that is traditionally provided as Ground Control Points (GCPs) by GNSS measurements in the field. However, it can be difficult to acquire accurate ground control points due to required turn-around time, high costs or impossible access. CompassData, Inc. a specialist in ground control, has expanded its service to deliver Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points (RSGCPs®). TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X are two satellites with such high accuracy of their orbital positions and SAR data that RSGCPs® can be produced to a sub-meter quality depending on certain parameters and circumstances. The technology and required parameters are discussed in this paper as well as the resulting accuracies.

  10. Ground duct ventilation in greenhouses

    Riera Sayol, Guiu

    2014-01-01

    A greenhouse climate control system is simulated in MATLAB and Simulink. The model calculates for every 20 minutes the temperatures and energy consumption over a whole year. Ground ducts are used in order to save energy which is stored in the ground when there is an excess of heat during the day. This energy is used when the temperature is not high enough, generally in the early morning. Additionally, the ground ducts reduce the usage of windows, due to better dehumidification and...

  11. Measurement of ground water flow

    The borehole methods developed by the authors to determine the filtering rate and flow direction of ground water were used in 11 investigational fields. The work mainly took place in cooperation with scientific institutions, authorities and communal societies and dealt with the problems of ground water extraction, environmental protection, and engineering geology. In about 160 ground water borehols, approximately 3600 borehole meters were measured altogether. (orig./HK)

  12. Ground-water travel time

    The Containment and Isolation Working Group considered issues related to the postclosure behavior of repositories in crystalline rock. This working group was further divided into subgroups to consider the progress since the 1978 GAIN Symposium and identify research needs in the individual areas of regional ground-water flow, ground-water travel time, fractional release, and cumulative release. The analysis and findings of the Ground-Water Travel Time Subgroup are presented

  13. Burial Ground Expansion Hydrogeologic Characterization

    Gaughan , T.F.

    1999-02-26

    Sirrine Environmental Consultants provided technical oversight of the installation of eighteen groundwater monitoring wells and six exploratory borings around the location of the Burial Ground Expansion.

  14. Ground and microgravity results of a circumferentially microgrooved capillary evaporator

    A circumferentially microgrooved capillary evaporator is here proposed as a reliable alternative for ground and spacecraft thermal control system applications. In this paper, experimental results concerning the start-up and thermal behavior of a capillary evaporator at steady state operation are presented. A capillary pumped loop was developed and tested at ground and microgravity conditions, using deionized water as the working fluid. The capillary evaporator has internally machined circumferential grooves with an average opening of 33 μm opening at 215 μm step into a 19.05 mm (3/4 in) diameter aluminum tube. The corresponding capillary pumping pressure is about 1.5 kPa. In both tests, power inputs up to 10 W (4.55 kW/m2) were successfully applied to the external surface of the evaporator, showing good performance under ground and microgravity conditions. The capillary evaporator as proposed proved to be a reliable alternative for industrial and space applications. - Highlights: • Circumferentially grooved capillary evaporators as alternative for thermal control. • Successful start-up operation at ground and microgravity conditions. • Successful steady state operation at ground and microgravity conditions. • Easy repriming in case of dry-out

  15. Research on Atmospheric Disturbance Correction method of ground-based radar interferometry

    The high-frequency signal is often used as the communication signal of Ground-based radar, which is susceptible to atmospheric effects. An atmospheric disturbance correction of radar signal is required to obtain the monitoring accuracy of better than millimeter in precision deformation monitoring using ground-based radar interferometry. In this paper, we analyzed the experimental-data change of ground-based radar in the atmospheric disturbance statistically and proposed a correction method based on the discrete stable point in the global environment. The following experiment proved that this method can optimize the measurement results for the scene of small-scale

  16. Characterization of ground state entanglement by single-qubit operations and excitation energies

    Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F; Verrucchi, P; Giampaolo, Salvatore M.; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Siena, Silvio De; Verrucchi, Paola

    2006-01-01

    We consider single-qubit unitary operations and study the associated excitation energies above the ground state of interacting quantum spins. We prove that there exists a unique operation such that the vanishing of the corresponding excitation energy determines a necessary and sufficient condition for the separability of the ground state. We show that the energy difference associated to factorization exhibits a monotonic behavior with the one-tangle and the entropy of entanglement, including non analiticity at quantum critical points. The single-qubit excitation energy thus provides an independent, directly observable characterization of ground state entanglement, and a simple relation connecting two universal physical resources, energy and nonlocal quantum correlations.

  17. How cytogenetical methods help victims prove radiation exposure and claim right for social support: NCERM experience

    Russian citizens who were irradiated because of radiation disasters, nuclear weapons testing and some other sources have a right to some social support and financial compensation. In order to get this compensation people have to prove that they were irradiated. As it is, not all victims for a variety of reasons have formal documents. Thus they apply for cytogenetic investigation to prove irradiation months, years and even decades after irradiation. Since 1992 the cytogenetic investigations related to radiation exposure were performed in NRCERM for more than 700 people. At the beginning of this investigation FISH method was not certified as a biodosimenty test in Russia. Only dicentric analysis was approved as a proof of irradiation. It is known that the rate of dicentrics decrease in time, but the residual level of cytogenetical markers could be revealed a long time after a radiation accident. Thus the dicentric analysis was performed for the people who applied for biological indication of radiation exposure at that time. Rates of dicentrics exceeding control levels were revealed in half the people who applied for radiation conformation. Now FISH method is certified in Russia and both cytogenetic tests of biodosimetry (dicentrics and FISH) are available for all comers. Increased levels of translocations were found in 8 cases (the dose rate from 0.16 to 0.64 Gy). On the basis of the results of cytogenetic tests official documents were supplied to these people and they were entitled to apply for radiation exposure compensation. Thus cytogenetic tests are very effective and in some cases the only possible way for the victims to prove irradiation exposure and to apply for radiation exposure compensation a long time after an accident.

  18. Ground-penetrating radar methods

    Ground-penetrating radar geophysical methods are finding greater and greater use in agriculture. With the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) method, an electromagnetic radio energy (radar) pulse is directed into the subsurface, followed by measurement of the elapsed time taken by the radar signal as it ...

  19. Ground Attenuation of Railroad Noise

    Makarewicz, R.; Rasmussen, Karsten Bo; Kokowski, P.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of ground effect on railroad noise is described using the concept of the peak A-weighted sound exposure level, and A-weighted sound exposure level. The train is modelled by a continuous line of incoherent point sources that have a cosine directivity. The ground effect is included by...

  20. Ground water and climate change

    As the world’s largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food secu¬rity will probably intensify under climate chan...

  1. Surface casing vent flow and gas migration remedial elimination - new technique proves economic and highly successful

    A new technique for surface casing vent flow and gas migration remedial elimination was described. This technique, which is cost effective and meets environmental requirements, consists of formation evaluation and the application of abrasive hydro-jetting, hydraulic fracturing, and fine particle cement squeezing. Field results in Alberta proved that the technique was highly successful. These field experiments also showed that: (1) impermeable formations could be successfully cement squeezed by inducing hydraulic fractures; (2) calcareous shales were ideal formations in which to apply the technique; (3) cased hole logging or wire line perforating was not required; and (4) the cap rock method is environmentally friendly. 1 tab., 11 figs., 10 refs

  2. Seismic proving test of ultimate piping strength (current status of preliminary tests)

    In 1998 Fiscal Year, the 6 year program of piping tests was initiated with the following objectives: i) to clarify the elasto-plastic response and ultimate strength of nuclear piping, ii) to ascertain the seismic safety margin of the current seismic design code for piping, and iii) to assess new allowable stress rules. In order to resolve extensive technical issues before proceeding on to the seismic proving test of a large-scale piping system, a series of preliminary tests of materials, piping components and simplified piping systems is intended. In this paper, the current status of the material tests and the piping component tests is reported. (author)

  3. TEMPLAR : efficient determination of relevant axioms in big formula sets for theorem proving

    Frank, Mario

    2014-01-01

    This document presents a formula selection system for classical first order theorem proving based on the relevance of formulae for the proof of a conjecture. It is based on unifiability of predicates and is also able to use a linguistic approach for the selection. The scope of the technique is the reduction of the set of formulae and the increase of the amount of provable conjectures in a given time. Since the technique generates a subset of the formula set, it can be used as a preprocessor f...

  4. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate

    1981-12-01

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long-term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above ground climate control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dew point ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of earth tempering as a practice and of specific earth-sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically; while the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate control techniques. Also contained in the report are reviews of above and below ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 29 locations in the United States.

  5. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate

    1981-12-01

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above ground climate control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dew point ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of Earth tempering as a practice and of specific Earth sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically; while the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate control techniques. Reviews of above and below ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground are included. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 20 locations in the United States.

  6. Measurement of displacements in large boreholes with a strain-gauged proving ring

    A strain-gauged proving-ring transducer was designed and deployed to measure small diametral displacements in 0.61-m diameter by 4.9-m deep boreholes in rock. The rock surrounding the boreholes was previously heated by storage of spent nuclear fuel assemblies and electrical resistance heaters. Borehole displacement measurements were made subsequent to removal of the spent fuel assemblies to document the rock response and to provide data for comparison with thermal-stress calculations. A transducer was designed to measure displacements in the range of 10 to 100 μm, to function in a time-varying temperature regime of 300 to 600C at a relative humidity of 100%, to be of low stiffness, and to be easily and quickly installed. The strain-gauged proving-ring technology provided a viable means of recording displacements in large (0.61 m) diameter boreholes in rock which are subjected to a time-varying thermal field. Design of a relatively simple transducer to measure borehole displacements was moderately successful. Inadquate environmental protection of the strain gauges resulted in 6 of 14 transducers failing with a mean life of 85 days. The surviving transducers performed adequately, based on comparisons of pretest and post-test calibration results. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  7. Proving test on the performance of a Multiple-Excitation Simulator

    Seismic excitation test on large scale piping systems is scheduled to be carried out by the Nuclear power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) using the large-scale, high-performance vibration table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory, under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). In the test, the piping systems simulate the main steam piping system and the main feed water piping system in the nuclear power plants. In this study, a fundamental test was carried out to prove the performance of the Multiple Excitation Simulator which consists of the hydraulic actuator and the control system. An L-shaped piping system and a hydraulic actuator were installed on the shaking table. Acceleration and displacement generated by the actuator were measured. The performance of the actuator and the control system was discussed comparing the measured values and the target values on the time histories and the response spectrum of the acceleration. As a result, it was proved that the actuator and the control system have good performance and will be applicable to the verification test

  8. Field trial of composite fiber-optic overhead ground wire

    Kubota, S.; Kawahira, H.; Nakajima, T.; Matsubara, I.; Saito, Y.; Kitayama, Y.

    A composite fiber-optic ground wire (OPGW), which provides additional communication capabilities for system protection and control of overhead power transmission systems has been developed. After laboratory tests, the OPGW was strung along a live power transmission line in a mountainous region and has been confirmed to have sufficient performance to establish a high-speed digital transmission network able to withstand actual conditions. The field line, constructed substantially by existing techniques, has proved that the new OPGW, accessories such as clamps and joint boxes, installation technique, and on-tower splicing method can be effectively utilized to produce a protection and control system with extremely stable characteristics.

  9. Grounding Damage to Conventional Vessels

    Lützen, Marie; Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2003-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with rational design of conventional vessels with regard to bottom damage generated in grounding accidents. The aim of the work described here is to improve the design basis, primarily through analysis of new statistical data for grounding damage. The current...... relation between the amount of deformed structure and the energy absorption. Finally, the paper shows how damage statistics for existing, conventional vessels can be used together with theoretical prediction methods for determining grounding damage distributions for new vessel types not included in the...

  10. Principle and Design of a Single-phase Inverter Based Grounding System for Neutral-to-ground Voltage Compensation in Distribution Networks

    Wang, Wen; Yan, Lingjie; Zeng, Xiangjun;

    2016-01-01

    . In this paper, an active grounding system based on single-phase inverter and its control parameter design method is proposed to achieve this objective. Relationship between its output current and neutral-to-ground voltage is derived to explain the principle of neutral-to-ground voltage compensation....... Then, a practical current detection method is proposed to specify the reference of compensated current. A current control method consisting of proportional resonant (PR) and proportional integral (PI) with capacitive current feedback is then proposed to guarantee sufficient output current accuracy and...... stability margin subjecting to large range of load change. The PI method is taken as the comparative method and the performances of both control methods are presented in detail. Experimental results prove the effectiveness and novelty of the proposed grounding system and control method....

  11. An Abstract Model for Proving Safety of Multi-lane Traffic Manoeuvres

    Hilscher, Martin; Linker, Sven; Olderog, Ernst-Rüdiger;

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to prove safety (collision freedom) of multi-lane motorway traffic with lane-change manoeuvres. This is ultimately a hybrid verification problem due to the continuous dynamics of the cars. We abstract from the dynamics by introducing a new spatial interval logic based on the...... view of each car. To guarantee safety, we present two variants of a lane-change controller, one with perfect knowledge of the safety envelopes of neighbouring cars and one which takes only the size of the neighbouring cars into account. Based on these controllers we provide a local safety proof for...... unboundedly many cars by showing that at any moment the reserved space of each car is disjoint from the reserved space of any other car....

  12. Combination of Model Checking and Theorem Proving to Verify Embedded Software

    XIAO Jian-yu; ZHANG De-yun; DONG Hao; CHEN Hai-quan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a scheme of combining model checking and theorem proving techniques to verify high trustworthy embedded software is proposed. The software model described in state machine of unified model language is transformed into the input modeling language of a model checker in which the model is analyzed with associated property specifications expressed in temporal logic. The software model which has been verified by model checker is then transformed into abstract specifications of a theorem prover , in which the model will be refined, verified and translated into source C code. The transformation rules from state machine to input language of model checker and abstract specifications of theorem prover are given. The experiment shows that the proposed scheme can effectively improve the development and verification of high trustworthy embedded software.

  13. Preventing the ax: proving education productivity and linking productivity to cost using the edvision methodology.

    Edwards, G B

    2001-01-01

    Education productivity, resource consumption, and the link between productivity and cost continue to be critical dimensions that need to be managed effectively in the face of continued downsizing and restructuring. EdVision is a fiscal based methodology that measures all three dimensions. The methodology was initially developed in the early 1990s and has been refined over the past 7 years. EdVision links productivity to cost by assessing Total Direct Expense per Education Relative Value Unit (RVU). Benchmarking this new indicator is key to moving toward an accurate measure of education prductivity and cost across organizations. EdVision allows education and training departments to prove their productivity and base resource decisions on data, thereby reducing vulnerability to unnecessary budget cuts. PMID:11840011

  14. Inter-country transportation of irradiated dried Korean fish to prove its quality and identity

    Commercial packages of sliced-dried Pollack (64 kg) were gamma-irradiated at 5 kGy and transported along with the non-irradiated control from Korea to India via both air and ocean cargos. The samples received at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre were stored at ambient temperature up to 6 months after irradiation and periodically examined for their qualities. Sensory evaluation by 35 panel members from the Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai, India showed that 60% of the panelists preferred irradiated Pollack to the non-irradiated one. Irradiated samples showed an acceptable quality over 6 months at ambient temperature from the hygienic and organoleptic point of view. Irradiated samples could be identified from the non-irradiated ones by the analysis of thermoluminescence and hydrocarbons. This trial proved the feasibility of inter-country transportation of irradiated dried Pollack

  15. Seismic proving test of process computer systems with a seismic floor isolation system

    Fujimoto, S.; Niwa, H.; Kondo, H. [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The authors have carried out seismic proving tests for process computer systems as a Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) project sponsored by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). This paper presents the seismic test results for evaluating functional capabilities of process computer systems with a seismic floor isolation system. The seismic floor isolation system to isolate the horizontal motion was composed of a floor frame (13 m x 13 m), ball bearing units, and spring-damper units. A series of seismic excitation tests was carried out using a large-scale shaking table of NUPEC. From the test results, the functional capabilities during large earthquakes of computer systems with a seismic floor isolation system were verified.

  16. Seismic proving test of process computer systems with a seismic floor isolation system

    The authors have carried out seismic proving tests for process computer systems as a Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) project sponsored by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). This paper presents the seismic test results for evaluating functional capabilities of process computer systems with a seismic floor isolation system. The seismic floor isolation system to isolate the horizontal motion was composed of a floor frame (13 m x 13 m), ball bearing units, and spring-damper units. A series of seismic excitation tests was carried out using a large-scale shaking table of NUPEC. From the test results, the functional capabilities during large earthquakes of computer systems with a seismic floor isolation system were verified

  17. Reasoning in the OWL 2 Full Ontology Language using First-Order Automated Theorem Proving

    Schneider, Michael

    2011-01-01

    OWL 2 has been standardized by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) as a family of ontology languages for the Semantic Web. The most expressive of these languages is OWL 2 Full, but to date no reasoner has been implemented for this language. Consistency and entailment checking are known to be undecidable for OWL 2 Full. We have translated a large fragment of the OWL 2 Full semantics into first-order logic, and used automated theorem proving systems to do reasoning based on this theory. The results are promising, and indicate that this approach can be applied in practice for effective OWL reasoning, beyond the capabilities of current Semantic Web reasoners. This is an extended version of a paper with the same title that has been published at CADE 2011, LNAI 6803, pp. 446-460. The extended version provides appendices with additional resources that were used in the reported evaluation.

  18. Home Grounds and Animals, 2016

    Latimer, Joyce G.; Close, David

    2016-01-01

    This manual provides current information about care of crop and ornamental plants in home gardens, and lawns and grounds. It also notes methods for treating diseases and dealing with plant pests and diseases.

  19. Space to Ground (... and Beyond)

    Buxton, Roxanne; Hanson, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Case Management Working Group (CMWG) data from Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (CEVIS) on ISS (International Space Station) imported by Ground Software (GSW), processed and archived in different formats.

  20. Ground Water and Climate Change

    Taylor, Richard G.; Scanlon, Bridget; Doell, Petra; Rodell, Matt; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Longuevergne, Laurent; Leblanc, Marc; Famiglietti, James S.; Edmunds, Mike; Konikow, Leonard; Green, Timothy R.; Chen, Jianyao; Taniguchi, Makoto; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; MacDonald, Alan; Fan, Ying; Maxwell, Reed M.; Yechieli, Yossi; Gurdak, Jason J.; Allen, Diana M.; Shamsudduha, Mohammad; Hiscock, Kevin; Yeh, Pat J. -F; Holman, Ian; Treidel, Holger

    2013-01-01

    As the world's largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate change as more frequent and intense climate extremes (droughts and floods) increase variability in precipitation, soil moisture and surface water. Here we critically review recent research assessing the impacts of climate on ground water through natural and human-induced processes as well as through groundwater-driven feedbacks on the climate system. Furthermore, we examine the possible opportunities and challenges of using and sustaining groundwater resources in climate adaptation strategies, and highlight the lack of groundwater observations, which, at present, limits our understanding of the dynamic relationship between ground water and climate.

  1. Ground Enterprise Management System Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft ground systems are on the cusp of achieving "plug-and-play" capability, i.e., they are approaching the state in which the various components can be...

  2. Ground water and climate change

    Taylor, Richard G; Scanlon, Bridget; Döll, Petra; Rodell, Matt; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Longuevergne, Laurent; Leblanc, Marc; Famiglietti, James S.; Edmunds, Mike; Konikow, Leonard; Green, Timothy R.; Chen, Jianyao; Taniguchi, Makoto; Bierkens, Marc F P

    2013-01-01

    As the world’s largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate change as more frequent and intense climate extremes (droughts and floods) increase variability in precipitation, soil moisture and surface water. Here we critically review recent research assessing the...

  3. Air sparging and soil vapor extraction to remediate ground water

    An Air Sparging and Soil Vapor Extraction System was chosen to remediate petroleum impacted ground water over traditional remedial alternatives, such as ''pump and treat'', to expedite site closure. Field pilot testing, computer modeling and cost benefit analyses performed for several alternatives. Air Sparging and Soil Vapor Extraction pilot studies proved this technology to be the most effective with respect to remedial and economic concerns. Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) were closed at the facility located in North Eastern North Carolina in August of 1992. During UST closure, petroleum impacted ground water and soils were encountered. ATEC performed a Comprehensive Site assessment to delineate the impacted soil and ground water plume. Following completion of the site assessment, a Corrective Action Plan was prepared. As part of the Corrective Action Plan preparation, field pilot testing was performed to evaluate remedial alternatives and provide information for full scale design. The full scale treatment system was installed and started in January 1994. This effective Remedial System was selected over other options due to successful pilot testing results with site closure petitioning scheduled within 12 to 14 months after start up. The Air Sparging System, properly applied, is an effective and ''quick'' remedial option with no generation of ground water for disposal and permitting. This paper concentrates on the Air Sparging application applied at this North Carolina site. Although Vapor extraction was also implemented, this presentation does not elaborate on vapor extraction design or implementation and only discusses vapor extraction where it is directly related to the Air Sparging System

  4. Flexible propulsors in ground effect

    We present experimental evidence for the hydrodynamic benefits of swimming ‘in ground effect’, that is, near a solid boundary. This situation is common to fish that swim near the substrate, especially those that are dorsoventrally compressed, such as batoids and flatfishes. To investigate flexible propulsors in ground effect, we conduct force measurements and particle image velocimetry on flexible rectangular panels actuated at their leading edge near the wall of a water channel. For a given actuation mode, the panels swim faster near the channel wall while maintaining the same propulsive economy. In conditions producing net thrust, panels produce more thrust near the ground. When operating in resonance, swimming near the ground can also increase propulsive efficiency. Finally, the ground can act to suppress three-dimensional modes, thereby increasing thrust and propulsive efficiency. The planform considered here is non-biological, but the hydrodynamic benefits are likely to apply to more complex geometries, especially those where broad flexible propulsors are involved such as fish bodies and fins. Such fish could produce more thrust by swimming near the ground, and in some cases do so more efficiently. (paper)

  5. THE ROLE OF GROUND RENT IN ESTABLISHING THE AGRICULTURAL LAND PRICE

    Ramona DOBRE

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to demonstrate the role that ground rent has in establishing the agricultural land price. In order to be able to prove the connection between the ground rent and the agricultural land price, there are submitted to debate indicators that are part of ground rent such as the positioning of the land, the distance between the land and the access roads and water source, the intrinsic qualities of the land soil, the type of land and the manner of exploitation. The debate is intended to show how and in what manner the indicators part of ground rent may influence the price of an agricultural land. The final purpose of this study is to prove that a justified land price may contribute to encourage the agricultural land transactions and therefore to develop the land market. To fulfil the purpose of this paper it is necessary to understand what land ground means, why it is important the land price and how can the agricultural land price influence the agricultural land market and the development of the agriculture overall. The main methods utilized are collecting, analyze and interpreting data and information from the specialized literature. The conclusions formulated at the end of the study allow seeing the influence of ground rent on agricultural land price, the influence of the agricultural land price on agricultural land market and the influence of agricultural land market on the development of the agriculture.

  6. GROUND WATER REMEDIATION POWERED WITH RENEWABLE ENERGY

    Technical challenge: Resource conservation has become a critical concept in the remediation of contaminated ground water supplies. Ground water remedies which include surface discharge of treated ground water are often viewed as wasteful and non-sustainable....

  7. Research of Pre-Service Elementary Mathematics Teachers’ Beliefs in Proof, Proving Processes and Proof Evaluation Processes

    Candaş Uygan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to research pre-service elementary mathematics teachers’ beliefs on meaning and features of mathematical proof, their proving processes and their reasoning process while evaluating validities of proof examples. This study is a qualitative research. Participants of the study are three pre-service elementary mathematics teachers who continue to study in a state university from Central Anatolia Region. Participants’ beliefs on proof were researched with semi-structured interview whilst proving processes and evaluation processes of proof examples were researched with clinical interviews. Interviews were recorded with video camera and data were analyzed according to qualitative methods. When beliefs on proof were analyzed, it was indicated that participants see mathematical proofs as problem solving process and exploration of source of mathematical knowledge, and believe that proofs have to be deductive, apprehensible and have to include generalizable results. Also according to opinions of all three participants, they believe that their proving abilities are insufficient. Analyze results related to proving processes indicated that pre-service teachers considered conclusions of theorems as if they are conditions of theorems and also used proving strategies uncomprehendingly in proving process. Finally, analyze results related to proof evaluation process indicated that participants assessed computer based experimental verifications as valid mathematical proofs and had mistakes when they evaluated warrants used in verifications that break axiomatical structure of proofs.Key Words:    Beliefs in the context of proof, proving, proof evaluation, teacher education

  8. First ATRF Chili Contest Proves It’s Not Always about the Meat | Poster

    Wafting cumin through the building, 15 slow cookers full of chili lined an L-shaped conference room at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), as voters strolled past “No electioneering” signs and the tasting began Feb. 29. Chili No. 13 came out of the gate with a spicy authority. “My tongue’s still tingling,” said one taster. “Just looking at it, you can tell how spicy it is,” said another judge. Thick with ground beef, with a smoky, peppery aroma, it was layered with black beans and corn, and it had a back-of-the-throat burn no other contestant’s offering could match. A nearby box of tissues served as a must-have for anyone sampling the sinus-clearing concoction.

  9. An introduction to ground-water hydraulics

    This book deals with ground-water hydraulics, which introduces summary on hydrologic design bases, advantage on use of ground-water, ground water with the origin of water, outflow of ground-water, property of water of aquifer like storage of aquifer importance of structure materials of aquifer, flow of ground-water such as Darcy's law and Jacob's law, environmental condition of aquifer, ground-water stage change, output per well, well design, quality of ground water and bedrock ground water in domestic.

  10. Optical Ground Segment Performance Summary

    Breidenthal, J.; Xie, H.; Clare, L.

    2016-05-01

    The performance of candidate optical communication systems for deep space that would use a single optical ground station in conjunction with various space terminals is reported here. We considered three potential diameters of ground receive terminals (4, 8, and 12 m) and three potential ground transmit powers (1, 5, and 10 kW). Combinations of ground receive terminals, ground transmit terminals, and spacecraft terminals were assessed for data rate and volume (both uplink and downlink), and for uplink irradiance needed to enable downlink pointing, in the context of a set of 12 design reference missions. Raw physical link performance was assessed assuming clear weather conditions with conservative desert daytime turbulence, using communication link parameters that were optimized according to previously reported methods using the Strategic Optical Link Tool (SOLT). Also, realistic bad weather conditions were considered, assuming a random process that could at any time make transitions between two states: a cloud-free state and a cloudy state that completely interrupts data transmission. We compared the link performance achievable under our assumptions to the anticipated requirements associated with the design reference missions to determine the degree of satisfaction possible with various optical segments. Nine potential operating concepts for an optical communication system were described, and two were evaluated in detail for the Mars 2022 mission opportunity: raw data delivery and automatic repeat request for complete data delivery.

  11. A Mechanically Proved and an Incremental Development of the Session Initiation Protocol INVITE Transaction

    Rajaa Filali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP is an application layer signaling protocol used to create, manage, and terminate sessions in an IP based network. SIP is considered as a transactional protocol. There are two main SIP transactions, the INVITE transaction and the non-INVITE transaction. The SIP INVITE transaction specification is described in an informal way in Request for Comments (RFC 3261 and modified in RFC 6026. In this paper we focus on the INVITE transaction of SIP, over reliable and unreliable transport mediums, which is used to initiate a session. In order to ensure the correctness of SIP, the INVITE transaction is modeled and verified using event-B method and its Rodin platform. The Event-B refinement concept allows an incremental development by defining the studied system at different levels of abstraction, and Rodin discharges almost all proof obligations at each level. This interaction between modeling and proving reduces the complexity and helps in assuring that the INVITE transaction SIP specification is correct, unambiguous, and easy to understand.

  12. Solitary necrotic nodule of the liver: MR findings in 33 pathologically proved lesions

    Purpose: To determine characteristic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of solitary necrotic nodule of the liver. Materials and methods: MR images features of thirty-two patients (17 men, 15 women; mean age, 43 years; range, 24–76 years) with pathologically proved solitary necrotic nodule of the liver were retrospectively analyzed for number, size, signal intensity features and enhancement patterns. Results: A total of 33 lesions were identified. The mean diameter was 2.3 cm (range 1.0–4.5 cm). Thirty lesions (90.9%) were 1.0–3.0 cm in diameter and only 3 lesions (9.1%) were larger than 3.0 cm. On T1-weighted images, solitary necrotic nodule of the liver appeared hypointense in 31 lesions (93.9%) and isointense in 2 lesions (6.1%). On T2-weighted images, 12 (36.4%) lesions were hyperintense, 15 (45.4%) were isointense or invisible and 6 (18.2%) were hypointense. After injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine, all lesions were hypointense and none of them showed enhancement. Conclusion: Solitary necrotic nodule of the liver is usually small with the size not exceed 3.0 cm in diameter. Absence of enhancement on all dynamic phase after gadopentetate dimeglumine administration may be most characteristic feature of solitary necrotic nodule of the liver on MR images, which may help discriminate this entity from metastatic liver tumors and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

  13. Compensation for incoherent ground motion

    The power spectrum density and coherence function for ground motions are studied for the construction of the next generation electron-positron linear collider. It should provide a center of mass energy between 500 GeV-1 TeV with luminosity as high as 1033 to 1034 cm-2 sec-1. Since the linear collider has a relatively slow repetition rate, large number of particles and small sizes of the beam should be generated and preserved in the machine to obtain the required high luminosity. One of the most critical parameters is the extremely small vertical beam size at the interaction point, thus a proper alignment system for the focusing and accelerating elements of the machine is necessary to achieve the luminosity. We describe recent observed incoherent ground motions and an alignment system to compensate the distortion by the ground motions. (authors)

  14. Army ground robotics research program

    Bornstein, Jonathan A.

    2002-07-01

    The U.S. Army has committed to a paradigm shift in the way future ground military operations will be conducted. It envisions highly mobile, lethal, and survivable forces that seamlessly combine manned and unmanned elements. To support this vision, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, together with an alliance of government, industrial and academic organizations, has embarked upon a concerted research program focusing upon development of the technologies required for autonomous ground mobility by unmanned systems. This paper will discuss technical activities of the past year and research directions for the future.

  15. LINE-ABOVE-GROUND ATTENUATOR

    Wilds, R.B.; Ames, J.R.

    1957-09-24

    The line-above-ground attenuator provides a continuously variable microwave attenuator for a coaxial line that is capable of high attenuation and low insertion loss. The device consists of a short section of the line-above- ground plane type transmission lime, a pair of identical rectangular slabs of lossy material like polytron, whose longitudinal axes are parallel to and indentically spaced away from either side of the line, and a geared mechanism to adjust amd maintain this spaced relationship. This device permits optimum fineness and accuracy of attenuator control which heretofore has been difficult to achieve.

  16. Proving test on thermal-hydraulic performance of BWR fuel assemblies

    Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has conducted a proving test for thermal-hydraulic performance of BWR fuel (high-burnup 8 x 8, 9 x 9) assemblies entrusted by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (NUPEC-TH-B Project). The high-burnup 8 x 8 fuel (average fuel assembly discharge burnup: about 39.5 GWd/t), has been utilized from 1991. And the 9 x 9 fuel (average fuel assembly discharge burnup: about 45 GWd/t), has started to be used since 1999. There are two types (A-type and B-type) of fuel design in 9 x 9 fuel assembly. Using an electrically heated test assembly which simulated a BWR fuel bundle on full scale, flow induced vibration, pressure drop, critical power under steady state condition and post-boiling transition (post-BT) tests were carried out in an out-of pile test facility that can simulate the high pressure and high temperature conditions of BWRs. This paper completed the results of 9 x 9 fuel combined with the previously reported results of high-burnup 8 x 8 fuel. As a result of NUPEC-TH-B Project, the validity of the current BWR thermal-hydraulic design method was confirmed and the reliability of BWR thermo-hydraulic fuel performance was demonstrated. Based on the test data, a new correlation of the estimation of fuel rod vibration amplitude, new post-BT heat transfer and rewet correlations for the estimation of fuel rod surface temperature were developed. (author)

  17. 18F-FDG PET/CT surgically proved finding in patient with NSCLC

    Full text: Introduction: The 18F-FDG PET / CT has an important role in the staging and evaluation of the treatment response of non-small cell lung cancer. Despite the high sensitivity and specificity of the method cases are known of increased metabolic activity in benign lesions from fungal and bacterial infections, sarcoidosis, radiation pneumonitis, and the like. Materials and Methods: We present a case of a woman 55, diagnosed with peripheral squamous moderately differentiated carcinoma of the right lung. The surgery was done 18 months ago - upper right lobectomy. Nine months before the PET / CT she underwent two craniotomies and metastasectomies regarding brain metastases left occipital and right frontal, diagnosed during previous PET / CT and MRI. Results: On the re-staging PET / CT metabolically active areas are visualized in the middle and lower right lung lobe, with sizes up to 16/11 mm and metabolic activity SUV max 5.7. On the native computerized tomography these findings are presented as an irregular shape and not very high density, except those in the lower part, which have larger density and sharper edges. Dissemination in the lower portion of the right lung was observed, while other findings are inconclusive. Atypical resections were conducted of two of the three lesions. The histological verification proves focal fibrosis and anthracosis. The tracking PET / CT did not identify metabolically active lung lesions. Conclusion: The increased metabolic activity is not always of malignant origin. Despite the high sensitivity PET / CT does not have enough specificity. This requires that, even in cases where there is histologically proven secondary changes, the newly observed lesions are traced dynamically before surgery, in order to avoid the potential operational trauma

  18. 14 CFR 417.109 - Ground safety.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground safety. 417.109 Section 417.109... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Launch Safety Responsibilities § 417.109 Ground safety. (a) Ground safety... 417.115(c), and subpart E of this part provide launch operator ground safety requirements....

  19. Ground Fault--A Health Hazard

    Jacobs, Clinton O.

    1977-01-01

    A ground fault is especially hazardous because the resistance through which the current is flowing to ground may be sufficient to cause electrocution. The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (G.F.C.I.) protects 15 and 25 ampere 120 volt circuits from ground fault condition. The design and examples of G.F.C.I. functions are described in this article.…

  20. COMPILATION OF GROUND WATER MODELS

    The full report presents an overview of currently available computer-based simulation models for ground-water flow, solute and heat transport, and hydrogeochemistry in both porous media and fractured rock. Separate sections address multiphase flow and related chemical species tra...

  1. Ship Collision and Grounding Analysis

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    2010-01-01

    It is the purpose of the paper to present a review of prediction and analysis tools for collision and grounding analyses and to outline a probabilistic procedure whereby these tools can be used by the maritime industry to develop performance based rules to reduce the risk associated with human, e...

  2. Evaluation of multimodal ground cues

    Nordahl, Rolf; Lecuyer, Anatole; Serafin, Stefania; Turchet, Luca; Papetti, Stefano; Fontana, Federico; Visell, Yon

    This chapter presents an array of results on the perception of ground surfaces via multiple sensory modalities,with special attention to non visual perceptual cues, notably those arising from audition and haptics, as well as interactions between them. It also reviews approaches to combining...

  3. The Envisat-1 ground segment

    Harris, Ray; Ashton, Martin

    1995-03-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) Earth Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1 and ERS-2) missions will be followed by the Polar Orbit Earth Mission (POEM) program. The first of the POEM missions will be Envisat-1. ESA has completed the design phase of the ground segment. This paper presents the main elements of that design. The main part of this paper is an overview of the Payload Data Segment (PDS) which is the core of the Envisat-1 ground segment, followed by two further sections which describe in more detail the facilities to be offered by the PDS for archiving and for user servcies. A further section describes some future issues for ground segment development. Logica was the prime contractor of a team of 18 companies which undertook the ESA financed architectural design study of the Envisat-1 ground segment. The outputs of the study included detailed specifications of the components that will acquire, process, archive and disseminate the payload data, together with the functional designs of the flight operations and user data segments.

  4. Grounded coplanar waveguide defected ground structure enabled mulitlayered passive circuits

    Schlieter, Daniel Benjamin

    Passive circuits are essential to microwave and millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequency design, especially as new commercial applications emerge for complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. However, it is challenging to design distributed passive circuits for CMOS due to the substrate loss and thin dielectric layers of the back-end-of-line (BEOL). Furthermore, distributed passive circuits need to be adapted for compactness and integration while overcoming these challenges and maintaining high performance. Grounded coplanar waveguide defected ground structures meet this need for compact and integrable passive circuits by utilizing the top and bottom ground planes of the transmission line to implement circuit elements. Defected ground structures (DGS) are distributed elements realized by etching specific patterns into the ground planes of transmission lines. These structures can be used in conjunction with the center conductor of planar transmission lines to reduce circuit size and/or improve performance. By implementing DGS in grounded coplanar waveguide (GCPW) multiple resonances and higher impedances can be achieved. The resonant-based GCPW DGS are more compact than their microstrip and CPW counterparts and fit well into the vertical technology of back-end-of-line CMOS. This research demonstrates up to 80% size reduction at 5.8GHz by realizing spiral-shaped DGS in GCPW and applying the resulting GCPW DGS unit cell to a dual-behavior band-pass filter. The filter has been scaled to 60GHz and realized in a 130nm CMOS process by using floating metal strips to reduce the impact of the lossy silicon substrate. The impedance-based GCPW DGS, called EG-GCPW, have up to a 20:1 impedance ratio on Rogers RT/DuroidRTM 5880 and an impedance ratio of 15:1 on a benzocyclobutene post-CMOS process. These high impedance ratios increased the power division ratio of an unequal Wilkinson power divider to 7:1 and reduced the size of a stepped impedance low

  5. GSTAMIDS ground-penetrating radar: hardware description

    Sower, Gary D.; Eberly, John; Christy, Ed

    2001-10-01

    The Ground Standoff Mine Detection System (GSTAMIDS) is now in the Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMD) Block 0 phase for USA CECOM. The Mine Detection Subsystem (MDS) presently utilizes three different sensor technologies to detect buried anti-tank (AT) land mines; Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Pulsed Magnetic Induction (PMI), and passive infrared (IR). The GSTAMIDS hardware and software architectures are designed so that other technologies can readily be incorporated when and if they prove viable. Each sensor suite is designed to detect the buried mines and to discriminate against various clutter and background objects. Sensor data fusion of the outputs of the individual sensor suites then enhances the detection probability while reducing the false alarm rate from clutter objects. The metal detector is an essential tool for buried mine detection, as metal land mines still account for a large percentage of land mines. Technologies such as nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR or QR) are presently being developed to detect or confirm the presence of explosive material in buried land mines, particularly the so-called plastic mines; unfortunately, the radio frequency signals required cannot penetrate into a metal land mine. The limitation of the metal detector is not in detection of the metal mines, but in the additional detection of metal clutter. A metal detector has been developed using singular value decomposition (SVD) extraction techniques to discriminate the mines from the clutter, thereby greatly reducing false alarm rates. This mine detector is designed to characterize the impulse response function of the metal objects, based on a parametric three-pole model of the response, and to use pattern recognition to determine the match of the responses to known mines. In addition to discrimination against clutter, the system can also generally tell one mine type from another. This paper describes the PMI sensor suite hardware and its physical incorporation

  6. Prospective Retinal and Optic Nerve Vitrectomy Evaluation (PROVE study: findings at 3 months

    Reddy RK

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rahul K Reddy,1 Maziar Lalezary,1 Stephen J Kim,1 Jeffrey A Kammer,1 Rachel W Kuchtey,1 Edward F Cherney,1 Franco M Recchia,2 Karen M Joos,1 Anita Agarwal,1 Janice C Law11Department of Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA; 2Tennessee Retina, PC, Nashville, TN, USABackground: The purpose of this paper is to report the 3-month findings of the Prospective Retinal and Optic Nerve Vitrectomy Evaluation (PROVE study.Methods: Eighty eyes of 40 participants undergoing vitrectomy were enrolled. Participants underwent baseline evaluation of the study (surgical and fellow (control eye that included: intraocular pressure, central corneal thickness, gonioscopy, cup-to-disc ratio measurement, color fundus and optic disc photography, automated perimetry, and optical coherence tomography of the macula and optic nerve. Evaluation was repeated at 3 months. Main outcome measures were changes in macula and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness and intraocular pressure.Results: All participants completed follow-up. Mean cup-to-disc ratio of study and fellow eyes at baseline was 0.43 ± 0.2 and 0.46 ± 0.2, respectively, and 13% of participants had undiagnosed narrow angles. There was no significant change in intraocular pressure, cup-to-disc ratio, or pattern standard deviation in study eyes compared with baseline or fellow eyes at 3 months. Vision improved in all study eyes at 3 months compared with baseline (P = 0.013, but remained significantly worse than fellow eyes (P < 0.001. Central subfield and temporal peripapillary RNFL thickness were significantly greater in eyes with epiretinal membrane (P < 0.05, and resolution after surgery correlated with visual improvement (P < 0.05.Conclusion: The 3-month results do not indicate any increased risk for open-angle glaucoma but suggest that a relatively high percentage of eyes may be at risk of angle closure glaucoma. Temporal RNFL thickness and central subfield were increased

  7. Classic Grounded Theory to Analyse Secondary Data: Reality and Reflections

    Lorraine Andrews

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on the experiences of two researchers and discusses how they conducted a secondary data analysis using classic grounded theory. The aim of the primary study was to explore first-time parents’ postnatal educational needs. A subset of the data from the primary study (eight transcripts from interviews with fathers was used for the secondary data analysis. The objectives of the secondary data analysis were to identify the challenges of using classic grounded theory with secondary data and to explore whether the re-analysis of primary data using a different methodology would yield a different outcome. Through the process of re-analysis a tentative theory emerged on ‘developing competency as a father’. Challenges encountered during this re-analysis included the small dataset, the pre-framed data, and limited ability for theoretical sampling. This re-analysis proved to be a very useful learning tool for author 1(LA, who was a novice with classic grounded theory.

  8. Empirically grounding grounded cognition: the case of color.

    Amsel, Ben D; Urbach, Thomas P; Kutas, Marta

    2014-10-01

    Grounded cognition theories hold that the neural states involved in experiencing objects play a direct functional role in representing and accessing object knowledge from memory. However, extant data marshaled to support this view are also consistent with an opposing view that perceptuo-motor activations occur only following access to knowledge from amodal memory systems. We provide novel discriminating evidence for the functional involvement of visuo-perceptual states specifically in accessing knowledge about an object's color. We recorded event-related brain potentials (ERPs) while manipulating the visual contrast of monochromatic words ("lime") in a semantic decision task: responses were made for valid colors ("green") and locations ("kitchen") and withheld for invalid colors and locations. Low contrast delayed perceptual processing for both color and location. Critically, low contrast slowed access to color knowledge only. This finding reveals that the visual system plays a functional role in accessing object knowledge and uniquely supports grounded views of cognition. PMID:24844740

  9. The Leading Behavior of The Ground-State Energy of Heavy Ions According to Brown and Ravenhall

    Liu, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    In this article we prove the absence of relativistic effects in leading order for the ground-state energy Brown-Ravenhall operator. We obtain this asymptotic result for negative ions and for systems with the number of electrons proportional to the nuclear charge. In the case of neutral atoms the analogous result was obtained earlier by Cassanas and Siedentop [4].

  10. Research on ground heat exchanger of Ground Source Heat Pump technique

    LIU Dong-sheng; SUN You-hong; GAO Ke; WU Xiao-hang

    2004-01-01

    Ground Source Heat Pump technique and its operating principle are described in this paper. Ground heat exchanger is the key technique of ground source heat pump and its pattems are discussed. Software is helpful to design ground heat exchanger. A project of Chinese Ground Source Heat Pump is introduced and its market is more and more extensive.

  11. Safety indicators used to prove the role of natural barrier for Saligny near surface disposal system

    Full text: The siting process for a near surface repository suitable for the radioactive waste resulted from Cernavoda NPP operation and decommissioning (low level radioactive waste with small amounts of long lived radionuclides) started in 1992 and it included the collection of data from specific field and laboratory works for each site selection stage as well as different safety performance evaluation. According to the IAEA standards (Safety Guide No.111-G-3.1, 1994), the purpose of the siting process is not to get the best solution but to find out 'an acceptable solution, with sufficient safety reserves'. Since 1996, detailed field and investigation works were performed in Saligny preferred site including an experimental area to test the improvement method proposed for the foundation ground of repository, as well as detailed performance assessments using specific computer codes. The paper presents the results of recent performance assessments for the natural barrier of disposal system. The calculations were done using HYDRUS 2D, FEHM and AMBER computer codes. The endpoint of the Safety Report for Siting a Near Surface Repository at Saligny Site [CITON and SCN, Safety Report for Siting a Near Surface Repository at Saligny Site, 2007, pages 8.2.1-1 to 8.2.1-22 and 8-63 to 8-70] was the assessment of safety indicators. Individual annual effective dose for exposed peoples (both workers and general public) was the main safety indicator. In the same document, the radionuclide concentration in the disposal system compartments has been evaluated, as supplementary safety indicator of repository barriers (especially to confirm the natural barrier performance). The results confirmed the performance of natural barrier: the maximum extension of H-3 and Co-60 contaminant plume after repository closure remains more above underground water level. In the aquifer, iodine concentration reaches a value of 10-15 mol/l, at the same magnitude order with the admitted limit from CFR 141

  12. EMC中的两种接地技术%Case analysis of EMC grounding technology

    郭亚红

    2011-01-01

    电磁兼容接地设计有单点接地和多点接地2种基本方法,低频电路中要求用单点接地,高频电路中用多点接地,用多点接地设备如果不能通过EFT/B测试,可以尝试单点接地方法。实验证明,对某些高频电路完全可以用单点接地方法满足EMC要求。%The EMC grounding design consists of single-point grounding and multi-point grounding. Low-frequency circuits require single-point grounding, while multi-point grounding is usually used for equipments of high-frequency circuits. However, when the equipment can not pass the EFT/B test, single-point grounding can be used instead. Experiments prove that some high-frequency circuits can use single-point grounding to meet the EMC requirements.

  13. The Majumdar-Ghosh chain. Twofold ground state and elementary excitations

    Caspers, W.J.; Emmett, K.M.; Magnus, W.

    1984-01-01

    Recently it was proved that the Majumdar-Ghosh chain with the Hamiltonian H=4 Sigma j=12NSj.Sj+1+2 Sigma j=12N Sj.Sj+2, Si+2N identical to Si, Si=1/2, has at least two ground states, in which the spins are arranged in nearest-neighbour singlet pairs. In this work it is shown that these two states ar

  14. Wigner Frequency Point Slice Analysis of Superposition Data for Phased-Array Ground Penetrating Radar

    ZOU Lian; CHEN Shu-zhen; YANG Shen; WEI Dan; XIAO Box-xun

    2004-01-01

    According to the frequency property of Phased-array ground penetrating radar (PGPR), this paper gives a frequency point slice method based on Wigner time-frequency analysis. This method solves the problem of analysis for the PGPR's superposition data and makes detecting outcome simpler and detecting target more recognizable. At last, the analytical results of road test data of the Three Gorges prove the analytical method efficient.

  15. E-squared nine do-it-yourself energy experiments that prove your thoughts create your reality

    Grout, Pam

    2013-01-01

    E-Squared is a lab manual with simple experiments to prove once and for all that there really is a good, loving, totally hip force in the universe. Rather than take it on faith, you are invited to conduct ten 48-hour experiments to prove each of the principles in this book. Yes, you read that right. It says prove. The experiments, each of which can be conducted with absolutely no money and very little time expenditure, demonstrate that spiritual principles are as dependable as gravity, as consistent as Newton's 2nd law of motion. For years, you've been hoping and praying that spiritual principles are true. Now, you can know.

  16. In-Ground Radiation Detection

    Vertically oriented radiation detectors may not provide sufficient screening in rail or aviation applications. Railcars can be heavily shielded on the sides, reducing the sensitivity of vertically mounted monitors. For aviation, the distance required for wingspan clearance reduces a vertical detector's coverage of the fuselage. To surmount these, and other, challenging operational and sensitivity issues, we have investigated the use of in-ground radiation detectors. (PIET-43741-TM-605)

  17. Radon determination in ground water

    Segovia A, N.; Bulbulian G, S

    1991-08-15

    Studies on natural radioactivity in ground water were started in Mexico in San Luis Potosi state followed by samplings from deep wells and springs in the states of Mexico and Michoacan. The samples were analyzed for solubilized and {sup 226} Ra- supported {sup 222} Rn. Some of them were also studied for {sup 234} U/ {sup 238} U activity ratio. In this paper we discuss the activities obtained and their relationship with the geologic characteristics of the studied zones. (Author)

  18. Inverter Ground Fault Overvoltage Testing

    Hoke, Andy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nelson, Austin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chakraborty, Sudipta [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chebahtah, Justin [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States); Wang, Trudie [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States); McCarty, Michael [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States)

    2015-08-12

    This report describes testing conducted at NREL to determine the duration and magnitude of transient overvoltages created by several commercial PV inverters during ground fault conditions. For this work, a test plan developed by the Forum on Inverter Grid Integration Issues (FIGII) has been implemented in a custom test setup at NREL. Load rejection overvoltage test results were reported previously in a separate technical report.

  19. Block ground interaction of rockfalls

    Volkwein, Axel; Gerber, Werner; Kummer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    During a rockfall the interaction of the falling block with the ground is one of the most important factors that define the evolution of a rockfall trajectory. It steers the rebound, the rotational movement, possibly brake effects, friction losses and damping effects. Therefore, if most reliable rockfall /trajectory simulation software is sought a good understanding of the block ground interaction is necessary. Today's rockfall codes enable the simulation of a fully 3D modelled block within a full 3D surface . However, the details during the contact, i.e. the contact duration, the penetration depth or the dimension of the marks in the ground are usually not part of the simulation. Recent field tests with rocks between 20 and 80 kg have been conducted on a grassy slope in 2014 [1]. A special rockfall sensor [2] within the blocks measured the rotational velocity and the acting accelerations during the tests. External video records and a so-called LocalPositioningSystem deliver information on the travel velocity. With these data not only the flight phases of the trajectories but also the contacts with the ground can be analysed. During the single jumps of a block the flight time, jump length, the velocity, and the rotation are known. During the single impacts their duration and the acting accelerations are visible. Further, the changes of rotational and translational velocity influence the next jump of the block. The change of the rotational velocity over the whole trajectory nicely visualizes the different phases of a rockfall regarding general acceleration and deceleration in respect to the inclination and the topography of the field. References: [1] Volkwein A, Krummenacher B, Gerber W, Lardon J, Gees F, Brügger L, Ott T (2015) Repeated controlled rockfall trajectory testing. [Abstract] Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17: EGU2015-9779. [2] Volkwein A, Klette J (2014) Semi-Automatic Determination of Rockfall Trajectories. Sensors 14: 18187-18210.

  20. Packing, coding, and ground states

    Cohn, Henry

    2016-01-01

    These are the lecture notes from my 2014 PCMI graduate summer school lectures. In these lectures, we'll study simple models of materials from several different perspectives: geometry (packing problems), information theory (error-correcting codes), and physics (ground states of interacting particle systems). These perspectives each shed light on some of the same problems and phenomena, while highlighting different techniques and connections. One noteworthy phenomenon is the exceptional symmetr...

  1. The physical symbol grounding problem

    VOGT, Paul

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to solve the symbol grounding problem within the framework of embodied cognitive science. It will be argued that symbolic structures can be used within the paradigm of embodied cognitive science by adopting an alternative definition of a symbol. In this alternative definition, the symbol may be viewed as a structural coupling between an agent's sensorimotor activations and its environment. A robotic experiment is presented in which mobile robots develop a symbo...

  2. Mesh networked unattended ground sensors

    Colling, Kent; Calcutt, Wade; Winston, Mark; Jones, Barry

    2006-05-01

    McQ has developed a family of low cost unattended ground sensors that utilize self-configured, mesh network communications for wireless sensing. Intended for use in an urban environment, the area monitored by the sensor system poses a communication challenge. A discussion into the sensor's communication performance and how it affects sensor installation and the operation of the system once deployed is presented.

  3. Urban ambiances as common ground?

    Jean-Paul Thibaud

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to point out various arguments which question ambiance as a common ground of everyday urban experience. Such a project involves four major points. First, we have to move beyond the exclusive practical aspects of everyday life and bring the sensory to the forefront. Under such conditions, sensory cultures emerge where feeling and acting come together. Second, we must put common experience into perspectiveby initiating a dual dynamics of socialising the sensory and sens...

  4. Radon in ground water supplies

    In September 1986, the System Water Quality Department of the American Water Works Service Co. began conducting a radon survey that was designed to determine the levels of radon in American ground water supplies, and to assess the radon removal efficiency of existing treatment processes such as filtration through granular activated carbon (GAC) and various forms of aeration. The survey found that companies in the northeastern part of the country experienced the highest levels of radon in ground water supplies. The highest concentrations were in individual wells in New Hampshire, Maryland, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and California. The analytical results from the occurrence phase of the survey seemed to correlate well with the known geology of the aquifer materials from which samples of ground water were drawn. The highest levels were associated with formations of uranium-bearing granitic rocks. GAC can effectively reduce radon concentrations in drinking water supplies to very low levels. However, the amount of contact time within the carbon bed required to do so would be prohibitive to many water utilities from an operational and economic standpoint. Further, disposal of the spent GAC as a low-level radioactive waste may be required. Aeration is very effective in the removal of radon from drinking water. Packed tower aerators achieved > 95% reduction in radon concentrations and conventional cascading tray aerators achieved > 75% reduction in radon concentrations. 7 refs., 6 tabs

  5. XMM Future Operational Ground Segment

    Finn, T.; Kirsch, M.; Schmidt, F.; Pfeil, N.; Vasconcellos, A.; Martin, J.

    2014-07-01

    XMM-Newton has been operating for 14 years which have been characterised by an extraordinary scientific return leading to it being considered as one of the most important scientific missions operated by ESA. XMM-Newton has outlived its original operating lifetime and this has led to a new array of technical challenges which new software and operating strategies have greatly mitigated and have enabled XMM-Newton to continue to perform optimally. XMM-Newton relies on reaction wheels and thrusters to manoeuvre consuming on -board fuel and limiting XMM-Newtons operating life. As a result a new operating concept for the reaction wheels has been devised and reduces the fuel consumption by approximately 50% potentially allowing XMM-Newton to operate until 2028. This extension leads to a new set of challenges; firstly, a change in the orbital inclination causes XMM-Newtons ground station Kourou to develop a gap in coverage around perigee for a period of 5 years from mid-2014 and secondly, XMM-Newtons second prime ground station, Perth, is to be decommissioned at the end of 2015 due to regulation governing civil spectrum usage. This paper illustrates how these issues are resoled from a ground segment perspective and when implemented will ensure XMM-Newtons continuance into the next decade.

  6. The effect of herbal formula PROVE 1 and Stevia levels in diets on diet utilization of growing pigs

    Kooprasert, S.; Siriwathananukul, Y.; Malithod, S.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to study the effect of 0.2% antibiotic (ascomix-s®, one kilogram of which contains lincomycin hydrochloride 44 g and sulfamethazine 110 g) or 0.25% herbal formulaPROVE 1, combined with five levels of Stevia supplementation in the diets on digestibility of pigs. Two factors; 1) type of drug (0.2% antibiotic and 0.25% herbal formula PROVE 1) and 2) five Stevia levels (0,0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8%) were investigated and 10 dietary treatments were used in this stu...

  7. Airport Ground Resource Planning Tool Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This effort undertakes the creation of an Airport Ground Resource Planning (AGRP) tool. Little or no automation is currently available to support airport ground...

  8. 20 CFR 408.435 - How do you prove that you are residing outside the United States?

    2010-04-01

    ... institution after the date you arrived in the country in which you will be residing. ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do you prove that you are residing... SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements Residence § 408.435 How do...

  9. Grounded for life: creative symbol-grounding for lexical invention

    Veale, Tony; Al-Najjar, Khalid

    2016-04-01

    One of the challenges of linguistic creativity is to use words in a way that is novel and striking and even whimsical, to convey meanings that remain stubbornly grounded in the very same world of familiar experiences as serves to anchor the most literal and unimaginative language. The challenge remains unmet by systems that merely shuttle or arrange words to achieve novel arrangements without concern as to how those arrangements are to spur the processes of meaning construction in a listener. In this paper we explore a problem of lexical invention that cannot be solved without a model - explicit or implicit - of the perceptual grounding of language: the invention of apt new names for colours. To solve this problem here we shall call upon the notion of a linguistic readymade, a phrase that is wrenched from its original context of use to be given new meaning and new resonance in new settings. To ensure that our linguistic readymades - which owe a great deal to Marcel Duchamp's notion of found art - are anchored in a consensus model of perception, we introduce the notion of a lexicalised colour stereotype.

  10. Advances in ground motion studies in China

    许力生; 俞言祥; 陈运泰

    2003-01-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the works in the processing of strong ground motion data, the factors affecting strong ground motion, the modeling of strong ground motion and the calculating of broad-band response spectrum which have been done recent years by engineering seismologists and seismologists of China. In addition, we think back to the international cooperation in strong ground motion of the recent years and make some expectations for the future.

  11. Centrifugal stretching along the ground state band of 168Hf

    The lifetimes of the Jπ=4+, 6+, 8+, and 10+ levels along the ground state band in 168Hf were measured by means of the recoil distance Doppler shift (RDDS) method using the New Yale Plunger Device (NYPD) and the SPEEDY detection array at Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory of Yale University. Excited states in 168Hf were populated using the 124Sn(48Ti,4n) fusion evaporation reaction. The new lifetime values are sufficiently precise to clearly prove the increase of quadrupole deformation as a function of angular momentum in the deformed nucleus 168Hf. The data agree with the predictions from the geometrical confined β-soft (CBS) rotor model that involves centrifugal stretching in a soft potential

  12. Modeling and control for hydraulic transmission of unmanned ground vehicle

    王岩; 张泽; 秦绪情

    2014-01-01

    Variable pump driving variable motor (VPDVM) is the future development trend of the hydraulic transmission of an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV). VPDVM is a dual-input single-output nonlinear system with coupling, which is difficult to control. High pressure automatic variables bang-bang (HABB) was proposed to achieve the desired motor speed. First, the VPDVM nonlinear mathematic model was introduced, then linearized by feedback linearization theory, and the zero-dynamic stability was proved. The HABB control algorithm was proposed for VPDVM, in which the variable motor was controlled by high pressure automatic variables (HA) and the variable pump was controlled by bang-bang. Finally, simulation of VPDVM controlled by HABB was developed. Simulation results demonstrate the HABB can implement the desired motor speed rapidly and has strong robustness against the variations of desired motor speed, load and pump speed.

  13. 7 CFR 65.175 - Ground pork.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground pork. 65.175 Section 65.175 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.175 Ground pork. Ground pork means...

  14. 14 CFR 141.81 - Ground training.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground training. 141.81 Section 141.81... OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Operating Rules § 141.81 Ground training. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each instructor who is assigned to a ground training course...

  15. 7 CFR 65.160 - Ground chicken.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground chicken. 65.160 Section 65.160 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.160 Ground chicken. Ground chicken...

  16. Monopole Antenna with Modify Ground Plane

    kamal raj singh rajoriya; Singhal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents on modified the ground plane of monopole antenna with varying the shape and length. Basically the length of ground plane of monopole antenna is equal and greater than λ/4. Here analyzed a different ground plane of monopole antenna that is provided an efficient bandwidth with sufficient return loss.

  17. Monopole Antenna with Modify Ground Plane

    kamal raj singh rajoriya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents on modified the ground plane of monopole antenna with varying the shape and length. Basically the length of ground plane of monopole antenna is equal and greater than λ/4. Here analyzed a different ground plane of monopole antenna that is provided an efficient bandwidth with sufficient return loss.

  18. Global trends on local grounds

    Steensen, Jette Johanne

    2006-01-01

    Collection of papers produced by tutors involved in a master´s degree course for teacher in Ethiopia offers an important challenge to the dominant neo-liberal agenda that has taken over educational reform throughtout the world. The project was based on the practice of critical practitioner inquiry...... and built upon similar efforts in Namibia in the 1990s. Steensen´s contribution stresses that any educational system will have to lie firmly on local grounds, that international trends must be analysed strategically as well as critically and that such analysis, for example through Critical Practitioner...... Inquiries, might create room for local actors and counter-hegemonic efforts"...

  19. Estimation of strong ground motion

    Fault model has been developed to estimate a strong ground motion in consideration of characteristics of seismic source and propagation path of seismic waves. There are two different approaches in the model. The first one is a theoretical approach, while the second approach is a semi-empirical approach. Though the latter is more practical than the former to be applied to the estimation of input motions, it needs at least the small-event records, the value of the seismic moment of the small event and the fault model of the large event

  20. Leaders break ground for INFINITY

    2008-01-01

    Community leaders from Mississippi and Louisiana break ground for the new INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center facility during a Nov. 20 ceremony. Groundbreaking participants included (l to r): Gottfried Construction representative John Smith, Mississippi Highway Commissioner Wayne Brown, INFINITY board member and Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise, Stennis Director Gene Goldman, Studio South representative David Hardy, Leo Seal Jr. family representative Virginia Wagner, Hancock Bank President George Schloegel, Mississippi Rep. J.P. Compretta, Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians representative Charlie Benn and Louisiana Sen. A.G. Crowe.

  1. Evaluation of equipment modifications and dosage rates of ground ULV applications of naled against Aedes taeniorhynchus in a Florida citrus grove.

    Curtis, G A; Mason, J

    1988-09-01

    Efficiency of ground-applied naled (Dibrom 14), based on caged mosquito bioassays in a moderately vegetated coastal southeastern Florida citrus grove, proved to be significantly associated with downwind distance. However, association analysis between wind speed, temperature or relative humidity revealed no correlation between these meteorological factors and mosquito mortality. Tests conducted with 3 of the commonly used ULV machines demonstrated no significant differences in efficiency. Equipment modifications to simulate aerial application by elevating the spray release point proved ineffective. Increasing the dosage of naled to 3 times the labeled rate for ground treatment resulted in greater than 95% mortality. PMID:3251479

  2. Research on ground water pollution by leacheate of waste dump of open pit coal mine

    LIU Zhi-bin; YAN Hong-kun; WANG Zhao-jun

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of investigation and research on the pollution source and pollution pathway of Yujiagou area, by the ground water quality analysis and the leaching and soaking experiments of the gangue, reliable data were obtained. The experiment results prove that these inorganic salt elements are easily dissolved by the water. The main pollu-tion factors in the ground water are consisted with the main pollution factor in the leading water of the gangue. By synthetically analyzing, a conclusion is shown that the salts in the leacheate of the waste dump of open pit coal mine are the primary pollution source for groundwater of Yujiagou area. An assessment is made about the degree of pollution of the ground water in the study area.

  3. Common Ground Between Three Cultures

    Gloria Dunnivan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Triwizard program with Israel brought together students from three different communities: an Israeli Arab school, an Israeli Jewish school, and an American public school with few Jews and even fewer Muslims. The two Israeli groups met in Israel to find common ground and overcome their differences through dialogue and understanding. They communicated with the American school via technology such as video-conferencing, Skype, and emails. The program culminated with a visit to the U.S. The goal of the program was to embark upon a process that would bring about intercultural awareness and acceptance at the subjective level, guiding all involved to develop empathy and an insider's view of the other's culture. It was an attempt to have a group of Israeli high school students and a group of Arab Israeli students who had a fearful, distrustful perception of each other find common ground and become friends. TriWizard was designed to have participants begin a dialogue about issues, beliefs, and emotions based on the premise that cross-cultural training strategies that are effective in changing knowledge are those that engage the emotions, and actively develop empathy and an insider's views of another culture focused on what they have in common. Participants learned that they could become friends despite their cultural differences.

  4. Grounding word learning in space.

    Larissa K Samuelson

    Full Text Available Humans and objects, and thus social interactions about objects, exist within space. Words direct listeners' attention to specific regions of space. Thus, a strong correspondence exists between where one looks, one's bodily orientation, and what one sees. This leads to further correspondence with what one remembers. Here, we present data suggesting that children use associations between space and objects and space and words to link words and objects--space binds labels to their referents. We tested this claim in four experiments, showing that the spatial consistency of where objects are presented affects children's word learning. Next, we demonstrate that a process model that grounds word learning in the known neural dynamics of spatial attention, spatial memory, and associative learning can capture the suite of results reported here. This model also predicts that space is special, a prediction supported in a fifth experiment that shows children do not use color as a cue to bind words and objects. In a final experiment, we ask whether spatial consistency affects word learning in naturalistic word learning contexts. Children of parents who spontaneously keep objects in a consistent spatial location during naming interactions learn words more effectively. Together, the model and data show that space is a powerful tool that can effectively ground word learning in social contexts.

  5. The grounding of temporal metaphors.

    Lai, Vicky T; Desai, Rutvik H

    2016-03-01

    Grounded cognition suggests that the processing of conceptual knowledge cued by language relies on the sensory-motor regions. Does temporal language similarly engage brain areas involved in time perception? Participants read sentences that describe the temporal extent of events with motion verbs (The hours crawled until the release of the news) and their static controls. Comparison conditions were fictive motion (The trail crawled until the end of the hills) and literal motion (The caterpillar crawled towards the top of the tree), along with their static controls. Several time sensitive locations, identified using a meta-analysis, showed activation specific to temporal metaphors, including in the left insula, right claustrum, and bilateral posterior superior temporal sulci. Fictive and literal motion contrasts did not show this difference. Fictive motion contrast showed activation in a conceptual motion sensitive area of the left posterior inferior temporal sulcus (ITS). These data suggest that language of time is at least partially grounded in experiential time. In addition, motion semantics has different consequences for events and objects: temporal events become animate, while static entities become motional. PMID:26854961

  6. Root absorption of 222Rn and its transfer into above-ground plant organs

    Experimental data are given on the content of genetically related pairs of radionuclides (226Ra and 222Rn; 224Ra and 220Rn) in soils and the above-ground phytomass of plants growing on plots with differing genesis of the higher concentrations of natural radionuclides in soils. Methods for determining gaseous radionuclides in the above-ground phytomass are described. Different transport routes of 222Rn and 220Rn into above-ground plant organs are considered. The noted absence of balance between 222Rn and 226Ra in plants as well as higher 222Rn/226Ra ratios in the above-ground phytomass as compared to that of the root-containing soil layer (25- to 185-fold) appears to be accounted for by the root pathway of 222Rn uptake and transport of this radionuclide to above-ground plants organs. The existence of the root pathway for 222Rn uptake is proved by direct observations of daily radionuclide movement with bleeding sap in experiments on pumpkins. For the short-lived Rn isotopes, 220Rn and 218Rn, the root pathway of uptake and transport to the above-ground phytomass is less probable, and this causes a notable redistribution of gaseous radionuclides during their movement along the soil-plant route

  7. Sustainability of ground-water resources

    Alley, William M.; Reilly, Thomas E.; Franke, O. Lehn

    1999-01-01

    The pumpage of fresh ground water in the United States in 1995 was estimated to be approximately 77 billion gallons per day (Solley and others, 1998), which is about 8 percent of the estimated 1 trillion gallons per day of natural recharge to the Nation's ground-water systems (Nace, 1960). From an overall national perspective, the ground-water resource appears ample. Locally, however, the availability of ground water varies widely. Moreover, only a part of the ground water stored in the subsurface can be recovered by wells in an economic manner and without adverse consequences.

  8. Ground water contamination in the United States

    This book demonstrates an exhaustive research effort into published reports and legal documents of which 344 are cited. From the literature, the authors selected 84 tables and 41 figures and maps, adding to the value of the collected body of information provided within the text. These summarize and graphically illustrate the 10 major ground water regions, population served by source and supply, US ground water use; ground water overdrafts; sources of ground water contamination; characteristics of domestic waste water; nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in ground water by state; pesticides found in ground water; general state land use profiles; states with significant coal mining waste water discharges, cattle feeding operations, and underground storage tank release incidents; costs of analysis; and state ground water quality standards. Radioactive waste and spent fuel generated as of 1983 are reported from the US Dept. of Energy's 1984 Inventory, Projections, and Characteristics, as are data collected by OTA and the League of Women Voters. The authors summarize reports issued by US Government Accounting Office, EPA, and others on other sources of ground water contamination, such as accidental leaks and spills, mining, atmospheric contaminants and acid rain. The authors provide the geographical extent of ground water contamination in a list that ranks major ground water pollution problems for each state as provided in EPA's State Ground-Water Program Summaries. Among those problems classified are oil and gas brine pits, underground storage tanks, injection wells, abandoned hazardous waste sites, and regulated hazardous waste sites

  9. The treatment of ground water containing sulphuric acid by microbiological sulphate reduction in the Lausitz lignite district; Die Behandlung von schwefelsaurem Grundwasser durch mikrobiologische Sulfatreduktion im Lausitzer Braunkohlenrevier

    Gast, Martin [LUG Engineering GmbH, Cottbus (Germany); Schoepke, Ralph [Brandenburgische Technische Univ. Cottbus (Germany). Lehrstuhl Wassertechnik und Siedlungsbau; Benthaus, Friedrich-Carl [Lausitzer und Mitteldeutsche Bergbau-Verwaltungsgesellschaft mbh (LMBV), Senftenberg (Germany); Walko, Manja; Haubold-Rosar, Michael [FIB e.V., Finsterwalde (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    To create maintenance-free waters in the landscaping of old mining sites it is necessary to reduce the iron and sulphate loads in the inflow of the lakes. In addition to purely chemical processes biotechnological approaches are also adopted by the LMBV. In a pilot project in the Lausitzer lignite district an innovative process for reduction of the acid, iron and sulphate loads in the ground water inflow of a lake at an old open-cast mine was tested. For this purpose ground water-neutral nutrient substrates such as glycerine as microbially utilisable carbon were filtered into the ground water strata by injection lances. It was proved that by activating the sulphate-reducing bacteria in the dump the sulphate and iron concentrations in the ground water are reduced and subsequently precipitated as iron monosulphide. The depletion rates of about 90% of the iron up to 40% of the sulphate prove the success of the measure. (orig.)

  10. Modeling and synthesis of strong ground motion

    S T G Raghu Kanth

    2008-11-01

    Success of earthquake resistant design practices critically depends on how accurately the future ground motion can be determined at a desired site. But very limited recorded data are available about ground motion in India for engineers to rely upon. To identify the needs of engineers, under such circumstances, in estimating ground motion time histories, this article presents a detailed review of literature on modeling and synthesis of strong ground motion data. In particular, modeling of seismic sources and earth medium, analytical and empirical Green’s functions approaches for ground motion simulation, stochastic models for strong motion and ground motion relations are covered. These models can be used to generate realistic near-field and far-field ground motion in regions lacking strong motion data. Numerical examples are shown for illustration by taking Kutch earthquake-2001 as a case study.

  11. Consistent interactive segmentation of pulmonary ground glass nodules identified in CT studies

    Zhang, Li; Fang, Ming; Naidich, David P.; Novak, Carol L.

    2004-05-01

    Ground glass nodules (GGNs) have proved especially problematic in lung cancer diagnosis, as despite frequently being malignant they characteristically have extremely slow rates of growth. This problem is further magnified by the small size of many of these lesions now being routinely detected following the introduction of multislice CT scanners capable of acquiring contiguous high resolution 1 to 1.25 mm sections throughout the thorax in a single breathhold period. Although segmentation of solid nodules can be used clinically to determine volume doubling times quantitatively, reliable methods for segmentation of pure ground glass nodules have yet to be introduced. Our purpose is to evaluate a newly developed computer-based segmentation method for rapid and reproducible measurements of pure ground glass nodules. 23 pure or mixed ground glass nodules were identified in a total of 8 patients by a radiologist and subsequently segmented by our computer-based method using Markov random field and shape analysis. The computer-based segmentation was initialized by a click point. Methodological consistency was assessed using the overlap ratio between 3 segmentations initialized by 3 different click points for each nodule. The 95% confidence interval on the mean of the overlap ratios proved to be [0.984, 0.998]. The computer-based method failed on two nodules that were difficult to segment even manually either due to especially low contrast or markedly irregular margins. While achieving consistent manual segmentation of ground glass nodules has proven problematic most often due to indistinct boundaries and interobserver variability, our proposed method introduces a powerful new tool for obtaining reproducible quantitative measurements of these lesions. It is our intention to further document the value of this approach with a still larger set of ground glass nodules.

  12. Ground-target detection in a virtual battlefield

    Gozard, Patrick; Cathala, Thierry

    2007-04-01

    To perform multi-sensors simulations, the French DGA/DET (Directorate for Technical Evaluation of the French Ministry of Defense) uses CHORALE (simulated Optronic Acoustic Radar battlefield). CHORALE enables the user to create virtual and realistic multi spectral 3D scenes, and generates the physical signal received by one or several sensors, typically an IR sensor or an acoustic sensor. This article presents how the expertise is made to evaluate smart ammunition to detect ground target with infrared sensor and shape detector in a virtual battlefield with the environment CHORALE and the workshop AMOCO. The scene includes background with trees, houses, roads, fields, targets, and the ammunition. Each tool is explained to understand the physics phenomena in the scene to take into account atmospheric transmission, radiative parameters of objects and counter-measure devices. Then numeric models are described as the 6 DOF ballistics models, sensor model according precise positions inside the ammunition as well as the different steps of calculation between industrial model and technical model to obtain the global simulation. Finally, this paper explains some results of the evaluation compared with the true behavior after tests on proving ground. Then future evolutions are presented to perform similar evaluation with other kind of intelligent ammunition in a real-time model.

  13. Grace and compassion at "ground zero," New York City.

    Rogers, James R; Soyka, Karen M

    2004-01-01

    Responding to the request to write about our work at "ground zero" the site of the former World Trade Center in New York City following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack has proved to be a challenging task. Challenging in that we have found it difficult to discuss and honor our experiences with mere words alone. Thus, this work has been "in progress" for a long period of time. Part of the challenge is reflected for us in the title of the article by the choice of the word "grace." That is, writing about grace at ground zero does not fit comfortably with our scientist-practitioner training. In searching for words to describe our experiences, however, we tried out a number of alternatives to "grace" including luck, chance, coincidence, and serendipity. None of these alternatives quite captured our experiences and our sense that certain events may best be conceptualized as unsolicited "gifts" that facilitated our work at the WTC site. So while the term "grace" may seem out of place in the scientific and professional literature, it fits well as a descriptor of some of our experiences as we continue our struggle to understand PMID:15384654

  14. The simplified version of the Spielman and Srivastava algorithm for proving the Bourgain-Tzafriri restricted invertiblity theorem

    Casazza, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    By giving up the best constants, we will see that the original argument of Spielman and Srivastava for proving the Bourgain-Tzafriri Restricted Invertibility Theorem \\cite{SS} still works - and is much simplier than the final version. We do not intend on publishing this since it is their argument with just a trivial modification, but we want to make it available to the mathematics community since several people have requested it already.

  15. Seismic test facilities at the ENEA Casaccia Research Center; Prove sismiche con le tavole vibranti al centro ricerche Enea Casaccia

    De Canio, G. [ENEA, Divisione Servizi Tecnologici, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    The main experimental facilities for seismic tests at the ENEA C.R. Casaccia laboratories consist of two high performance shake table for three axial seismic tests of structures up to 10 ton mass and 3g acceleration applied at the Center of Gravity at 1m from the base table. The activities are principally devoted to the dynamic characterization and vibration tests for mechanical and aero spatial structures, and the experimental analysis of innovative systems for the seismic isolation and retrofitting of civil, industrial, and historical buildings; together with the seismic tests of sub-structures and scaled mock-ups, in order to evaluate the isolation/dissipation performance of the anti-seismic devices, and the failure modes of the structural parts of the building. [Italian] Le principali attrezzature per le prove sismiche presso i laboratori del C.R. Casaccia consistono di due tavole vibranti triassali per prove su strutture fino a 10t di peso con una accelerazione di 3g applicata al centro di gravita' posto ad 1 m di altezza dal piano della tavola. Le principali attivita' riguardano: (a) test di caratterizzazione dinamica e prove di vibrazioni per strutture meccaniche ed aerospaziali; (b) l'analisi sperimentale di sistemi innovativi per l'isolamento sismico ed il consolidamento di strutture civili, industriali e storico monumentali, e le prove sismiche di elementi strutturali e di modelli in scala per la valutazione della capacita' di dissipazione dei dispositivi antisismici e le modalita' di formazione delle fratture.

  16. Networked unattented ground sensors assesment

    Bouguereau, Julien; Gattefin, Christian; Dupuy, Gilles

    2003-09-01

    Within the framework of the NATO AC 323 / RTO TG 25 group, relating to advanced concepts of acoustic and seismic technology for military applications, Technical Establishment of Bourges welcomed and organized a joint campaign of experiment intending to demonstrate the interest of a networked unattented ground sensors for vehicles detection and tracking in an area defense context. Having reminded the principle of vehicles tracking, this paper describes the progress of the test campaign and details particularly sensors and participants deployment, the solution of interoperability chosen by the group and the instrumentation used to acquire, network, process and publish in real-time data available during the test: meteorological data, trajectography data and targets detection reports data. Finally, some results of the campaign are presented.

  17. A lightweight ground penetrating radar

    Koppenjan, S.K.; Allen, C.M.; Gardner, D.; Wong, H.R.

    1998-12-31

    The detection of buried objects, particularly unexploded ordnance (UXO), has gained significant interest in the US in the late 1990s. The desire to remediate the thousands of sites worldwide has become an increasing humanitarian concern. The application of radar to this problem has received renewed attention. Bechtel Nevada, Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) has developed several frequency modulated, continuous wave (FM-CW) ground penetrating radar (GPR) units for the US Department of Energy since 1984. To meet these new technical requirements for high resolution data and UXO detection, STL is moving forward with advances to GPR technology, signal processing, and imaging with the development of an innovative system. The goal is to design and fabricate a lightweight, battery operated unit that does not require surface contact and can be operated by a novice user.

  18. The effect of herbal formula PROVE 1 and Stevia levels in diets on diet utilization of growing pigs

    Kooprasert, S.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to study the effect of 0.2% antibiotic (ascomix-s®, one kilogram of which contains lincomycin hydrochloride 44 g and sulfamethazine 110 g or 0.25% herbal formulaPROVE 1, combined with five levels of Stevia supplementation in the diets on digestibility of pigs. Two factors; 1 type of drug (0.2% antibiotic and 0.25% herbal formula PROVE 1 and 2 five Stevia levels (0,0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8% were investigated and 10 dietary treatments were used in this study. Ten related growing crossbred (Large White x Landrace barrow pigs (30±1.5 kg body weight were raised in individualmetabolism cages for three collecting periods (30, 40 and 50 kg body weight, each pig was fed one experimental diet throughout the collecting period.The results showed that pigs fed diet with either 0.2% antibiotic or 0.25% herbal formula PROVE 1 had similar digestibility of diet, crude protein (CP, fiber, ash and nitrogen free extract (NFE (89.01 vs 87.83,94.96 vs 94.23, 60.73 vs 59.03, 61.22 vs 60.44 and 93.28 vs 92.03%, respectively. Negligible differences were observed between 0 and 0.4% Stevia supplementation in diet, but levels showed better digestibility than the other levels of Stevia supplementation, and the diet with 0.4% Stevia supplementation had the highestdigestibility of diet, CP, fiber, ash and NFE (91.04, 96.43, 69.48, 70.47 and 94.07%, respectively. The diet with antibiotic combined with 0.4% Stevia had digestibility of diet, CP, fat and fiber better than the otherlevels of Stevia supplementation, especially digestibility of ash, which was significantly higher than that of diet with 0.2% Stevia, but not significantly different from the other levels of Stevia supplementation. A partof herbal formula PROVE1 combined with 0% Stevia had the highest digestibility of ash (72.90%, significantly higher than the other levels of Stevia supplementation, except the diet with herbal formula PROVE 1combined with 0.4% Stevia supplementation

  19. Lower positive charge region (LPCR) and its influence on initiation of Thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs) and cloud-to-ground (CG-) and intracloud (IC-) lightning occurrences

    We discuss role of the LPCR model in the initiation of intracloud and cloud-to-ground lightning as well as in accelerated electrons in positive field within the cloud. Our analysis is based on the thunderstorm data from the Aragats Mountain in Armenia, 3200 m a.s.l. The electrical mill and lightning detectors are monitoring the near surface electrical field, distance and type of lightning occurrences, particle detectors register fluxes of neutral and charged particles associated with thunderstorms. The relations of particle fluxes to electrical structure of thunderclouds and – to lightning occurrences of different types were established and discussed. Our analysis supports the transient character of emerging LPCR and confirms blocking of CG- lightning occurrences by the mature LPCR. High particle fluxes, associated with thunderstorms, so called Thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs) prove the existence of the LCPR and its transient character.

  20. Suomi NPP Ground System Performance

    Grant, K. D.; Bergeron, C.

    2013-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS will replace the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA. The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and geophysical observations of the Earth. The first satellite in the JPSS constellation, known as the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite, was launched on 28 October 2011, and is currently undergoing product calibration and validation activities. As products reach a beta level of maturity, they are made available to the community through NOAA's Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS). CGS's data processing capability processes the satellite data from the Joint Polar Satellite System satellites to provide environmental data products (including Sensor Data Records (SDRs) and Environmental Data Records (EDRs)) to NOAA and Department of Defense (DoD) processing centers operated by the United States government. CGS is currently processing and delivering SDRs and EDRs for Suomi NPP and will continue through the lifetime of the Joint Polar Satellite System programs. Following the launch and sensor activation phase of the Suomi NPP mission, full volume data traffic is now flowing from the satellite through CGS's C3, data processing, and data delivery systems. Ground system performance is critical for this operational system. As part of early system checkout, Raytheon measured all aspects of data acquisition, routing, processing, and delivery to ensure operational performance requirements are met, and will continue to be met throughout the mission. Raytheon developed a tool to measure, categorize, and

  1. Test and Evaluation of Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    Yang Sun; Guangming Xiong; Weilong Song; Jianwei Gong; Huiyan Chen

    2014-01-01

    A preestablished test and evaluation system will benefit the development of autonomous ground vehicles. This paper proposes a design method for a scientific and comprehensive test and evaluation system for autonomous ground vehicles competitions. It can better guide and regulate the development of China’s autonomous ground vehicles. The test and evaluation system includes the test contents, the test environment, the test methods, and the evaluation methods. Using a hierarchical design approac...

  2. CONSERVATION PRICING AND GROUND WATER SUBSTITUTION

    Schuck, Eric C.; Green, Gareth P.

    2001-01-01

    The United States Bureau of Reclamation has been exploring the use of water price as a tool for promoting water conservation. Raising water rates is an attractive means of reducing diversions from surface water systems supplied by the USBR. Rising water rates may promote ground water substitution. When irrigators have access to both surface and ground water, changes in the relative cost of each water source can encourage movement from one source to another. Ground water substitution will occu...

  3. Ground Bounce Noise Reduction in Vlsi Circuits

    Vipin Kumar Sharma; Umesh Dutta

    2015-01-01

    : Scaling of devices in CMOS technology leads to increase in parameter like Ground bounce noise, Leakage current, average power dissipation and short channel effect. FinFET are the promising substitute to replace CMOS. Ground bounce noise is produced when power gating circuit goes from SLEEP to ACTIVE mode transition. FinFET based designs are compared with MOSFET based designs on basis of different parameter like Ground bounce noise, leakage current and average power dissipation. ...

  4. Site-specific ground response analysis

    GovindaRaju, L; RAMANA, GV; HanumanthaRao, C; Sitharam, TG

    2004-01-01

    The local soil conditions have a profound influence on ground response during earthquakes. The recent destructive earthquakes have again demonstrated that the topography, nature of the bedrock and nature and geometry of the depositional soils are the primary factors thatinfluence local modifications to the underlying motion. We highlight the engineering importance of site-specific ground response analysis and difficulties faced in conducting a complete ground response analysis. Steps to be fo...

  5. Discrimination of roast and ground coffee aroma

    Fisk Ian; Kettle Alec; Hofmeister Sonja; Virdie Amarjeet; Kenny Javier

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Four analytical approaches were used to evaluate the aroma profile at key stages in roast and ground coffee brew preparation (concentration within the roast and ground coffee and respective coffee brew; concentration in the headspace of the roast and ground coffee and respective brew). Each method was evaluated by the analysis of 15 diverse key aroma compounds that were predefined by odour port analysis. Results Different methods offered complimentary results for the discr...

  6. 'God' particle proves elusive

    Radford, T

    2001-01-01

    For more than a decade, scientists at CERN have been hoping that a key theoretical particle called the Higgs boson, would turn up in a subatomic collision. Some of them are now though beginning to wonder if it has ever existed.

  7. Monetary Policy Proving Effective

    2010-01-01

    Hu Xiaolian,Vice Governor of the People’s Bank of China,the country’s central bank, published an article concerning China’s managed floating exchange rate regime and the effectiveness of the monetary policy on the bank’s website on July 26.She pointed out monetary policy,as an important instrument of China’s macroeconomic control,has faced many challenges in recent years.A more flexible exchange rate regime will help improve the effectiveness of the policy.Edited excerpts follow

  8. Monetary Policy Proving Effective

    2010-01-01

    @@ Hu Xiaolian,Vice Governor of the People's Bank of China,the country's central bank,published an article concerning China's managed floating exchange rate regime and the effectiveness of the monetary policy on the bank's website on July 26.She pointed out monetary policy,as an important instrument of China's macroeconomic control,has faced many challenges in recent years.A more flexible exchange rate regime will help improve the effectiveness of the policy.

  9. Emissions control for ground power gas turbines

    Rudney, R. A.; Priem, R. J.; Juhasz, A. J.; Anderson, D. N.; Mroz, T. S.; Mularz, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    The similarities and differences of emissions reduction technology for aircraft and ground power gas turbines is described. The capability of this technology to reduce ground power emissions to meet existing and proposed emissions standards is presented and discussed. Those areas where the developing aircraft gas turbine technology may have direct application to ground power and those areas where the needed technology may be unique to the ground power mission are pointed out. Emissions reduction technology varying from simple combustor modifications to the use of advanced combustor concepts, such as catalysis, is described and discussed.

  10. Recent ground motion studies at Fermilab

    Shiltsev, V.; Volk, J.; /Fermilab; Singatulin, S.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-04-01

    Understanding slow and fast ground motion is important for the successful operation and design for present and future colliders. Since 2000 there have been several studies of ground motion at Fermilab. Several different types of HLS (hydro static level sensors) have been used to study slow ground motion (less than 1 hertz) seismometers have been used for fast (greater than 1 hertz) motions. Data have been taken at the surface and at locations 100 meters below the surface. Data of recent slow ground motion measurements with HLSs, many years of alignment data and results of the ATL-analysis are presented and discussed.

  11. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Anomaly Detection Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop the capability to identify anomalous conditions (indications to potential impending system failure) in ground system operations before...

  12. Urban ambiances as common ground?

    Jean-Paul Thibaud

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to point out various arguments which question ambiance as a common ground of everyday urban experience. Such a project involves four major points. First, we have to move beyond the exclusive practical aspects of everyday life and bring the sensory to the forefront. Under such conditions, sensory cultures emerge where feeling and acting come together. Second, we must put common experience into perspectiveby initiating a dual dynamics of socialising the sensory and sensitising social life. Ambiances involve a complex web comprised of an ‘existential’ dimension (empathy with the ambient world, a ‘contextual’ dimension (degree of presence in the situation, and an ‘interactional’ dimension (forms of sociability expressed in the tonality. Third, we have to initiate a political ecology of ambiances in order to better understand how ambiances deal with fundamental design and planning issues. Far from being neutral, the notion of ambiance appears to be bound up with the socio-aesthetic strategies underpinning changes to the sensory urban environment of the future. Fourth, we have to question what in situ experience is all about. Three major research pointers enable to address this issue: the embodiment of situated experiences, the porous nature of sensory spaces, and the sensory efficiency of the build environment. Ambiances sensitize urban design as well as social lifeforms.

  13. Alternatives for Ground Water Cleanup

    Hudak, P. F.

    Aquifer remediation is one of our most difficult environmental challenges; technological limitations and problems arising from the physical and chemical complexities of contaminated subsurface environments thwart our best efforts. A 19-member committee of leaders in environmental engineering, hydrogeology, epidemiology, environmental economics, and environmental policy has written an ambitious book that broadly addresses the groundwater remediation problem. Topics include site characterization, capabilities and limitations of pump-and-treat and alternative technologies, alternative goals for ground water cleanup, and policy implications.One of the book's strengths is its information base, which includes various public and private groups, data from 80 pump-and-treat sites, and an extensive literature review. The text is clearly written and well organized. Specific conclusions are stated at the end of each major chapter, and sound policy recommendations are offered at the end of the final chapter. An appendix summarizes pump-andtreat systems reviewed during the study. Several case studies, diagrams, and photographs effectively illustrate concepts and ideas conveyed in the text.

  14. 2011 Ground Testing Highlights Article

    Ross, James C.; Buchholz, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Two tests supporting development of the launch abort system for the Orion MultiPurpose Crew Vehicle were run in the NASA Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnel last year. The first test used a fully metric model to examine the stability and controllability of the Launch Abort Vehicle during potential abort scenarios for Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 2.5. The aerodynamic effects of the Abort Motor and Attitude Control Motor plumes were simulated using high-pressure air flowing through independent paths. The aerodynamic effects of the proximity to the launch vehicle during the early moments of an abort were simulated with a remotely actuated Service Module that allowed the position relative to the Crew Module to be varied appropriately. The second test simulated the acoustic environment around the Launch Abort Vehicle caused by the plumes from the 400,000-pound thrust, solid-fueled Abort Motor. To obtain the proper acoustic characteristics of the hot rocket plumes for the flight vehicle, heated Helium was used. A custom Helium supply system was developed for the test consisting of 2 jumbo high-pressure Helium trailers, a twelve-tube accumulator, and a 13MW gas-fired heater borrowed from the Propulsion Simulation Laboratory at NASA Glenn Research Center. The test provided fluctuating surface pressure measurements at over 200 points on the vehicle surface that have now been used to define the ground-testing requirements for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle.

  15. In Situ Measurement of the Undisturbed Ground Temperature for Ground Source Heat Pump System

    ZHOU Ya-su

    2008-01-01

    The undisturbed ground are important for design of the ground heat exchangers in ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems. In this paper, the undisturbed ground temperatures measured in two different methods are presented. The investigation was carried out in two cases. The temperature measured with the direct method is assumed to give the correct undisturbed ground temperature profile. The temperature measured with indirect method overestimates the undisturbed ground temperature by 2.1℃ and 1.7℃. This difference is mainly caused by the circulation pump and ambient air to the fluid. Therefore, the results that are decreased about 2℃ as compared with the indirect measured are recommended to estimate the undisturbed ground temperature in situ measuring. A smaller pump or deeper borehole or mild weather would result in a more correct temperature. Because the undisturbed ground temperature is affected by many factors. Whether or not these conclusions are correct to other areas, this would need further investigation.

  16. A Mixed Prediction Model of Ground Subsidence for Civil Infrastructures on Soft Ground

    Kiyoshi Kobayashi; Kiyoyuki Kaito

    2012-01-01

    The estimation of ground subsidence processes is an important subject for the asset management of civil infrastructures on soft ground, such as airport facilities. In the planning and design stage, there exist many uncertainties in geotechnical conditions, and it is impossible to estimate the ground subsidence process by deterministic methods. In this paper, the sets of sample paths designating ground subsidence processes are generated by use of a one-dimensional consolidation model incorpora...

  17. Evaluation of the Grounding Circuit Measurements for Stator Ground-Fault Location of Synchronous Generators

    Blánquez Delgado, Francisco; Rebollo López, Emilio; Platero Gaona, Carlos Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Locating stator-winding ground faults accurately is a very difficult task. In this paper the grounding circuit measurements are evaluated in order to obtain information about the stator ground-fault location in synchronous generators. In power generators grounded through a high impedance, the relation between the neutral voltage and the phase voltage provide a first estimation of the fault location. The location error by using this ratio depends on the fault resistance and the value of the ca...

  18. Implementation of 1D Ground Response Analysis in Probabilistic Assessments of Ground Shaking Potential

    Stewart, Jonathan P.; Goulet, Christine A.; Bazzurro, Paolo; Claassen, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    Results of 1D ground response analyses are typically not incorporated into probabilistic seismic hazard analyses (PSHA) in a statistically robust way. Often ground response is incorporated into PSHA using deterministic amplification factors. This simplistic method generates results that are intrinsically arbitrary and often unconservative. The main problem in probabilistically linking PSHA and ground response lies in quantifying the dispersion that is appropriate for use with ground respon...

  19. INTRODUCTION TO ARTIFICIAL GROUND-WATER RECHARGE

    Artificial ground-water recharge has been practiced for scores of years throughout the world. The purpose of artificial recharge is to increase the rate at which water infiltrates the land surface in order to supplement the quantity of ground water in storage. A variety of rechar...

  20. River as a part of ground battlefield

    Vračar, Miodrag S.; Pokrajac, Ivan; Okiljević, Predrag

    2013-05-01

    The rivers are in some circumstances part of the ground battlefield. Microseisms induced at the riverbed or ground at the river surrounding might be consequence of military activities (military ground transports, explosions, troop's activities, etc). Vibrations of those fluid-solid structures are modeled in terms of solid displacement and change of fluid pressure. This time varying fluid pressure in river, which originates from ground microseisms, is possible to detect with hydrophones. Therefore, hydroacoustic measurements in rivers enables detecting, identification and localization various types of military noisy activities at the ground as and those, which origin is in the river water (hydrodynamics of water flow, wind, waves, river vessels, etc). In this paper are presented river ambient noise measurements of the three great rivers: the Danube, the Sava and the Tisa, which flows in north part of Serbia in purpose to establish limits in detection of the ground vibrations in relatively wide frequency range from zero to 20 kHz. To confirm statement that the river is a part of ground battlefield, and that hydroacoustic noise is possible to use in detecting and analyzing ground microseisms induced by civil or military activities, some previous collected data of hydroacoustic noise measurement in the rivers are used. The data of the river ambient noise include noise induced by civil engineering activities, that ordinary take place in large cities, noise that produced ships and ambient noise of the river when human activities are significantly reduced. The poly spectral method was used in analysis such events.

  1. Procedures for ground-water investigations

    1992-12-01

    This manual was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to document the procedures used to carry out and control the technical aspects of ground-water investigations at the PNL. Ground-water monitoring procedures are developed and used in accordance with the PNL Quality Assurance Program.

  2. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  3. Grounded Theory Methodology: Positivism, Hermeneutics, and Pragmatism

    Age, Lars-Johan

    2011-01-01

    Glaserian grounded theory methodology, which has been widely adopted as a scientific methodology in recent decades, has been variously characterised as "hermeneutic" and "positivist." This commentary therefore takes a different approach to characterising grounded theory by undertaking a comprehensive analysis of: (a) the philosophical paradigms of…

  4. Ambulatory Measurement of Ground Reaction Forces

    Veltink, Peter H.; Liedtke, Christian; Droog, Ed

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of ground reaction forces is important in the biomechanical analysis of gait and other motor activities. It is the purpose of this study to show the feasibility of ambulatory measurement of ground reaction forces using two six degrees of freedom sensors mounted under the shoe. One se

  5. Grounded Theory as a General Research Methodology

    Judith A. Holton, Ph.D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Since its inception over forty years ago, grounded theory has achieved canonical status in the research world (Locke, 2001, p.1. Qualitative researchers, in particular, have embraced grounded theory although often without sufficient scholarship in the methodology (Partington, 2000, p.93; 2002, p.136. The embrace renders many researchers unable to perceive grounded theory as a general methodology and an alternative to the dominant qualitative and quantitative research paradigms. The result is methodological confusion and an often unconscious remodelling of the original methodology (Glaser, 2003. Given the various interpretations and approaches that have been popularised under the rubric of grounded theory, this paper addresses the important distinction between grounded theory as a general methodology and its popularisation as a qualitative research method. The paper begins with a brief overview of grounded theory’s origins and its philosophical foundations then continues by addressing the basic distinction between abstract conceptualisation as employed in classic grounded theory and the conceptual description approach as adopted by many qualitative researchers. The paper continues with a brief overview of the criteria for judging the quality of classic grounded theory and concludes by detailing its methodological principles.

  6. 14 CFR 415.117 - Ground safety.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground safety. 415.117 Section 415.117... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE Safety Review and Approval for Launch of an Expendable Launch Vehicle From a Non-Federal Launch Site § 415.117 Ground safety. (a) General. An applicant's safety...

  7. MTX facility and machine grounding plan

    A key issue in the design of fusion research experiments and their related facilities is the control of ground currents. Because of the large magnetic field, high voltages and high currents present in most of these installations, it is essential to avoid ground loops, and to control ground currents during both normal operations and fault conditions. The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) was installed in an existing building. The building was modified to add a new vault with shield walls to house the experiment. Experimental experience with other tokamaks has indicated the necessity of correctly isolating and grounding ''utility'' structures such as tray, conduit, pipe, and supports for diagnostics and the machine. This paper describes the grounding policy that was developed for MTX. The vault area was divided into zones, and each of the four walls was treated as a separate grounding area. Cable runs and magnet buss bars were run into the machine radially. The paper also describes the steps taken to isolate diagnostic signals and power for pumps and instruments. The paper outlines some of the field calculations used to predict problem areas, and to reveal voltage isolation levels that were required. The paper includes the active ground fault detection system used to insure the integrity of the ground system

  8. Procedures for ground-water investigations

    This manual was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to document the procedures used to carry out and control the technical aspects of ground-water investigations at the PNL. Ground-water monitoring procedures are developed and used in accordance with the PNL Quality Assurance Program

  9. ECRB ALCOVE AND NICHE GROUND SUPPORT ANALYSIS

    The purpose of the analysis is to provide design bases for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) alcove and niche ground support drawings. The objective is to evaluate the ESF Alcove Ground Support Analysis (Ref 5.1) to determine if the calculations technically bound the ECRB alcoves and to address specific differences in the conditions and constraints

  10. Pollutant infiltration and ground water management

    Following a short overview of hazard potentials for ground water in Germany, this book, which was compiled by the technical committee of DVWK on ground water use, discusses the natural scientific bases of pollutant movement to and in ground water. It points out whether and to what extent soil/ground water systems can be protected from harmful influences, and indicates relative strategies. Two zones are distinguished: the unsaturated zone, where local defence and remedial measures are frequently possible, and the saturated zone. From the protective function of geological systems, which is always pollutant-specific, criteria are derived for judging the systems generally, or at least regarding entire classes of pollutants. Finally, the impact of the infiltration of pollutants into ground water on its use as drinking water is pointed out and an estimate of the cost of remedial measures is given. (orig.)

  11. Building Grounded Theory in Entrepreneurship Research

    Mäkelä, Markus; Turcan, Romeo V.

    2007-01-01

    our approach to grounded theory, we acknowledge the existence of other approaches and try to locate our approach in relation to them. As an important part of this discussion, we take a stand on how to usefully define ‘grounded theory’ and ‘case study research’. Second, we seek to firmly link our......In this chapter we describe the process of building of theory from data (Glaser and Strauss 1967; Strauss and Corbin 1998). We discuss current grounded theory in relation to research in entrepreneurship and point out directions and potential improvements for further research in this field. The...... chapter has two goals. First, we wish to provide an explicit paradigmatic positioning of the grounded theory methodology, discussing the most relevant views of ontology and epistemology that can be used as alternative starting points for conducting grounded theory research. While the chapter introduces...

  12. Evaluating transmission towers potentials during ground faults

    2008-01-01

    During ground faults on transmission lines, a number of towers near the fault are likely to acquire high potentials to ground. These tower voltages, if excessive, may present a hazard to humans and animals. This paper presents analytical methods in order to determine the transmission towers potentials during ground faults, for long and short lines. The author developed a global systematic approach to calculate these voltages, which are dependent of a number of factors. Some of the most important factors are: magnitudes of fault currents, fault location with respect to the line terminals, conductor arrangement on the tower and the location of the faulted phase, the ground resistance of the faulted tower, soil resistivity, number, material and size of ground wires. The effects of these factors on the faulted tower voltages have been also examined for different types of power lines.

  13. Discrimination of roast and ground coffee aroma

    Fisk Ian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Four analytical approaches were used to evaluate the aroma profile at key stages in roast and ground coffee brew preparation (concentration within the roast and ground coffee and respective coffee brew; concentration in the headspace of the roast and ground coffee and respective brew. Each method was evaluated by the analysis of 15 diverse key aroma compounds that were predefined by odour port analysis. Results Different methods offered complimentary results for the discrimination of products; the concentration in the coffee brew was found to be the least discriminatory and concentration in the headspace above the roast and ground coffee was shown to be most discriminatory. Conclusions All approaches should be taken into consideration when classifying roast and ground coffee especially for alignment to sensory perception and consumer insight data as all offer markedly different discrimination abilities due to the variation in volatility, hydrophobicity, air-water partition coefficient and other physicochemical parameters of the key aroma compounds present.

  14. Ground-water protection, low-level waste, and below regulatory concern: What`s the connection?

    Gruhlke, J.M.; Galpin, F.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Radiation Programs

    1991-12-31

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has a responsibility to protect ground water and drinking water under a wide variety of statutes. Each statute establishes different but specific requirements for EPA and applies to diverse environmental contaminants. Radionuclides are but one of the many contaminants subject to this regulatory matrix. Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and below regulatory concern (BRC) are but two of many activities falling into this regulatory structure. The nation`s ground water serves as a major source of drinking water, supports sensitive ecosystems, and supplies the needs of agriculture and industry. Ground water can prove enormously expensive to clean up. EPA policy for protecting ground water has evolved considerably over the last ten years. The overall goal is to prevent adverse effects to human health, both now and in the future, and to protect the integrity of the nation`s ground-water resources. The Agency uses the Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) under the Safe Drinking Water Act as reference points for protection in both prevention and remediation activities. What`s the connection? Both low-level waste management and disposal activities and the implementation of below regulatory concern related to low-level waste disposal have the potential for contaminating ground water. EPA is proposing to use the MCLs as reference points for low-level waste disposal and BRC disposal in order to define limits to the environmental contamination of ground water that is, or may be, used for drinking water.

  15. Modernization of the Cassini Ground System

    Razo, Gus; Fujii, Tammy J.

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini Spacecraft and its ground system have been operational for over 16 years. Modernization presents several challenges due to the personnel, processes, and tools already invested and embedded into the current ground system structure. Every mission's ground system has its own unique complexities and challenges, involving various organizational units. As any mission from its inception to its execution, schedules are always tight. This forces GDS engineers to implement a working ground system that is not necessarily fully optimized. Ground system challenges increase as technology evolves and cyber threats become more sophisticated. Cassini's main challenges were due to its ground system existing before many security requirements were levied on the multi-mission tools and networks. This caused a domino effect on Cassini GDS tools that relied on outdated technological features. In the aerospace industry reliable and established technology is preferred over innovative yet less proven technology. Loss of data for a spacecraft mission can be catastrophic; therefore, there is a reluctance to make changes and updates to the ground system. Nevertheless, all missions and associated teams face the need to modernize their processes and tools. Systems development methods from well-known system analysis and design principles can be applied to many missions' ground systems. Modernization should always be considered, but should be done in such a way that it does not affect flexibility nor interfere with established practices. Cassini has accomplished a secure and efficient ground data system through periodic updates. The obstacles faced while performing the modernization of the Cassini ground system will be outlined, as well as the advantages and challenges that were encountered.

  16. Hanford site ground water protection management plan

    Ground water protection at the Hanford Site consists of preventative and remedial measures that are implemented in compliance with a variety of environmental regulations at local, state, and federal levels. These measures seek to ensure that the resource can sustain a broad range of beneficial uses. To effectively coordinate and ensure compliance with applicable regulations, the U.S. Department of Energy has issued DOE Order 5400.1 (DOE 1988a). This order requires all U.S. Department of Energy facilities to prepare separate ground water protection program descriptions and plans. This document describes the Ground Water Protection Management Plan (GPMP) for the Hanford Site located in the state of Washington. DOE Order 5400.1 specifies that the GPMP covers the following general topical areas: (1) documentation of the ground water regime; (2) design and implementation of a ground water monitoring program to support resource management and comply with applicable laws and regulations; (3) a management program for ground water protection and remediation; (4) a summary and identification of areas that may be contaminated with hazardous waste; (5) strategies for controlling hazardous waste sources; (6) a remedial action program; and (7) decontamination, decommissioning, and related remedial action requirements. Many of the above elements are currently covered by existing programs at the Hanford Site; thus, one of the primary purposes of this document is to provide a framework for coordination of existing ground water protection activities. The GPMP provides the ground water protection policy and strategies for ground water protection/management at the Hanford Site, as well as an implementation plan to improve coordination of site ground water activities

  17. Optical turbulence forecast: toward a new era of ground-based astronomy

    Masciadri, E

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of the optical turbulence (OT) for astronomical applications obtained with non-hydrostatic atmospherical models at meso-scale presents, with respect to measurements, some advantages. The future of the ground-based astronomy relies upon the potentialities and feasibility of the ELTs. Our ability in knowing, controlling and 'managing' the effects of the turbulence on such a new generation telescopes and facilities are determinant to assure their competitiveness with respect to the space astronomy. In the past several studies have been carried out proving the feasibility of the simulation of realistic Cn2 profiles above astronomical sites. The European Community (FP6 Program) decided recently to fund a Project aiming, from one side, to prove the feasibility of the OT forecasts and the ability of meso-scale models in discriminating astronomical sites from optical turbulence point of view and, from the other side, to boost the development of this discipline at the borderline between the astrophysics...

  18. Examining Rotational Ground Motion Induced by Tornados

    Kessler, Elijah; Dunn, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Ring lasers are well known for their ability to detect rotation and to serve as replacements for mechanical gyroscopes. The sensitivity of large ring lasers to various forms of ground motion is less familiar. Since ring lasers preferentially measure rotational ground motion and a standard seismograph is designed to measure translational and vertical ground motion, each device responds to different aspects of ground movement. Therefore, the two instruments will be used to explore responses to microseisms, earthquake generated shear waves, and in particular tornado generated ground movement. On April 27, 2014 an EF4 tornado devastated Vilonia, AR a small town ~ 21 km from the Hendrix College ring laser. The proximity of the tornado's path to the ring laser interferometer and to a seismograph located in Vilonia provided the opportunity to examine the response of these instruments to tornadic generated ground motion. Our measurements suggest tornadic weather systems can produce both rotational and lateral ground motion. This contention is supported by an after the fact damage survey which found that the tornado flattened a forest in which trees were uprooted and laid down in a pair of converging arcs with the centerline pointed in the direction of the tornado's path.

  19. Regional ground-water evapotranspiration and ground-water budgets, Great Basin, Nevada

    Nichols, William D.

    2000-01-01

    PART A: Ground-water evapotranspiration data from five sites in Nevada and seven sites in Owens Valley, California, were used to develop equations for estimating ground-water evapotranspiration as a function of phreatophyte plant cover or as a function of the depth to ground water. Equations are given for estimating mean daily seasonal and annual ground-water evapotranspiration. The equations that estimate ground-water evapotranspiration as a function of plant cover can be used to estimate regional-scale ground-water evapotranspiration using vegetation indices derived from satellite data for areas where the depth to ground water is poorly known. Equations that estimate ground-water evapotranspiration as a function of the depth to ground water can be used where the depth to ground water is known, but for which information on plant cover is lacking. PART B: Previous ground-water studies estimated groundwater evapotranspiration by phreatophytes and bare soil in Nevada on the basis of results of field studies published in 1912 and 1932. More recent studies of evapotranspiration by rangeland phreatophytes, using micrometeorological methods as discussed in Chapter A of this report, provide new data on which to base estimates of ground-water evapotranspiration. An approach correlating ground-water evapotranspiration with plant cover is used in conjunction with a modified soil-adjusted vegetation index derived from Landsat data to develop a method for estimating the magnitude and distribution of ground-water evapotranspiration at a regional scale. Large areas of phreatophytes near Duckwater and Lockes in Railroad Valley are believed to subsist on ground water discharged from nearby regional springs. Ground-water evapotranspiration by the Duckwater phreatophytes of about 11,500 acre-feet estimated by the method described in this report compares well with measured discharge of about 13,500 acre-feet from the springs near Duckwater. Measured discharge from springs near Lockes

  20. Ground Water in the Anchorage Area, Alaska--Meeting the Challenges of Ground-Water Sustainability

    Moran, Edward H.; Galloway, Devin L.

    2006-01-01

    Ground water is an important component of Anchorage's water supply. During the 1970s and early 80s when ground water extracted from aquifers near Ship Creek was the principal source of supply, area-wide declines in ground-water levels resulted in near record low streamflows in Ship Creek. Since the importation of Eklutna Lake water in the late 1980s, ground-water use has been reduced and ground water has contributed 14-30 percent of the annual supply. As Anchorage grows, given the current constraints on the Eklutna Lake water availability, the increasing demand for water could place an increasing reliance on local ground-water resources. The sustainability of Anchorage's ground-water resources challenges stakeholders to develop a comprehensive water-resources management strategy.

  1. The ground state of the D=11 supermembrane and matrix models on compact regions

    Boulton, L; Restuccia, A

    2015-01-01

    We establish a general framework for the analysis of boundary value problems at zero energy of matrix models on compact regions. This allows us to prove existence and uniqueness of ground state wavefunctions for the mass operator of the D=11 regularized supermembrane theory (and therefore the N=16 supersymmetric matrix model) on a ball of finite radius. Our results rely on the structure of the associated Dirichlet form and a factorization in terms of the supersymmetric charges. They also rely on the polynomial structure of the potential and various other supersymmetric properties of the system.

  2. General scaling limitations of ground-plane and isolated-object cloaks

    Hashemi, Hila; Johnson, Steven G. [Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Oskooi, A. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University (Japan); Joannopoulos, J. D. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    We prove that, for arbitrary three-dimensional transformation-based invisibility cloaking of an object above a ground plane or of isolated objects, there are practical constraints that increase with the object size. In particular, we show that the cloak thickness must scale proportionally to the thickness of the object being cloaked, assuming bounded refractive indices, and that absorption discrepancies and other imperfections must scale inversely with the object thickness. For isolated objects, we also show that bounded refractive indices imply a lower bound on the effective cross section.

  3. Ground state cooling is not possible given initial system-thermal bath factorization

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Segal, Dvira; Brumer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we prove that a fundamental constraint on the cooling dynamic implies that it is impossible to cool, via a unitary system-bath quantum evolution, a system that is embedded in a thermal environment down to its ground state, if the initial state is a factorized product of system and bath states. The latter is a crucial but artificial assumption often included in many descriptions of system-bath dynamics. The analogous conclusion holds for 'cooling' to any pure state of the system.

  4. Ground-Water Protection and Monitoring Program

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the ground-water protection and monitoring program strategy for the Hanford Site in 1994. Two of the key elements of this strategy are to (1) protect the unconfined aquifer from further contamination, and (2) conduct a monitoring program to provide early warning when contamination of ground water does occur. The monitoring program at Hanford is designed to document the distribution and movement of existing ground-water contamination and provides a historical baseline for evaluating current and future risk from exposure to the contamination and for deciding on remedial action options

  5. Ground cover estimated from aerial photographs

    Gerbermann, A. H.; Cuellar, J. A.; Wiegand, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    Estimates of per cent ground cover made by ground observers were compared with independent estimates made on the basis of low-altitude (640-1219 m) aerial photographs of the same fields. Standard statistical simple correlation and linear regression analyses revealed a high correlation between the two estimation methods. In crops such as grain, sorghum, corn, and forage sorghum, in which the broadest part of the leaf canopy is near the top of the plant, there was a tendency to overestimate the per cent ground cover from aerial photographs.

  6. Ground Bounce Noise Reduction in Vlsi Circuits

    Vipin Kumar Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available : Scaling of devices in CMOS technology leads to increase in parameter like Ground bounce noise, Leakage current, average power dissipation and short channel effect. FinFET are the promising substitute to replace CMOS. Ground bounce noise is produced when power gating circuit goes from SLEEP to ACTIVE mode transition. FinFET based designs are compared with MOSFET based designs on basis of different parameter like Ground bounce noise, leakage current and average power dissipation. HSPICE is the software tool used for simulation and circuit design.

  7. Grounded theory as feminist research methodology.

    Keddy, B; Sims, S L; Stern, P N

    1996-03-01

    Feminist research is evolving, and with it new methods of doing science. In this feminist post-positivist era, grounded theory, while less inclusive and descriptive than ethnography, allows for complex analysis of complex questions. While Glaser & Strauss (the originators of this methodology) have written about grounded theory in an esoteric way, others have written extensively about this method in a much clearer and less rigid fashion. In this paper we discuss how grounded theory could be used in a creative and constantly evolving manner for feminist research. PMID:8655818

  8. Fresnel zones for ground-based antennas

    Andersen, J. Bach

    1964-01-01

    The ordinary Fresnel zone concept is modified to include the influence of finite ground conductivity. This is important for ground-based antennas because the influence on the radiation pattern of irregularities near the antenna is determined by the amplitude and phase of the groundwave. A new...... definition of Fresnel zones which takes into account the phase shift of groundwave propagation is given and it is shown that these new zones are zones of greatest influence, at least when discontinuities of the electrical parameters of the ground are considered. Numerical results for the first Fresnel zone...

  9. Surveillance of ground vehicles for airport security

    Blasch, Erik; Wang, Zhonghai; Shen, Dan; Ling, Haibin; Chen, Genshe

    2014-06-01

    Future surveillance systems will work in complex and cluttered environments which require systems engineering solutions for such applications such as airport ground surface management. In this paper, we highlight the use of a L1 video tracker for monitoring activities at an airport. We present methods of information fusion, entity detection, and activity analysis using airport videos for runway detection and airport terminal events. For coordinated airport security, automated ground surveillance enhances efficient and safe maneuvers for aircraft, unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) operating within airport environments.

  10. Ground Water Management: Need for Sustainable Approach

    Menon, Sudha Venu

    2007-01-01

    Groundwater constitutes about 89% of the total fresh water resources in the planet. But in recent years, due to over exploitation of ground water and erratic nature of monsoon, there has been depletion of ground water across the world. Depletion of ground water has reached to the extent that it is virtually impossible to get the water table back. Even though there is a possibility of recharge of water from the other areas, the process is very slow and may take one year to replenish one meter....

  11. Ground-Water Protection and Monitoring Program

    Dresel, P.E.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the ground-water protection and monitoring program strategy for the Hanford Site in 1994. Two of the key elements of this strategy are to (1) protect the unconfined aquifer from further contamination, and (2) conduct a monitoring program to provide early warning when contamination of ground water does occur. The monitoring program at Hanford is designed to document the distribution and movement of existing ground-water contamination and provides a historical baseline for evaluating current and future risk from exposure to the contamination and for deciding on remedial action options.

  12. Ground-state projection multigrid for propagators in four-dimensional SU (2) gauge fields

    The ground-state projection multigrid method is studied for computations of slowly decaying bosonic propagators in four-dimensional SU (2) lattice gauge theory. The defining eigenvalue equation for the restriction operator C is solved exactly. With the Galerkin choice A=C* for the interpolation operator, the critical exponent z is not reduced in nontrivial gauge fields. Nevertheless, a considerable speedup is obtained compared to conventional relaxation, and the conjugate gradient algorithm is outperformed. Simulations with an 'optimal' interpolation kernel A eliminate critical slowing down for any value of the gauge coupling. This proves that ground-state projection is a good choice of C (i.e., of the blockspin). (orig.)

  13. Molecular imaging of hemoglobin using ground state recovery pump-probe optical coherence tomography

    Applegate, Brian E.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2007-02-01

    We have undertaken an effort to further develop ground state recovery Pump-Probe Optical Coherence Tomograpy (gsrPPOCT) to specifically target and measure 3-D images of hemoglobin concentration with the goals of mapping tissue vasculature, total hemoglobin, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation. As a first step toward those goals we have measured the gsrPPOCT signal from the hemoglobin in the filament arteries of a zebra danio fish. We have further processed the resulting signal to extract a qualitative map of the hemoglobin concentration. We have also demonstrated the potential to use ground state recovery times to differentiate between two chromophores which may prove to be an effective tool for differentiating between oxy and deoxy hemoglobin.

  14. Study on group air to ground attack-defends hierarchical dynamic decision-making

    2007-01-01

    As to oppositional,multi-objective and hierarchical characteristic of air formation to ground attack-defends campaign,and using dynamic space state model of military campaign,this article establishes a principal and subordinate hierarchical interactive decision-making way,the Nash-Stackelberg-Nash model,to solve the problems in military operation,and find out the associated best strategy in hierarchical dynamic decision-making.The simulating result indicate that when applying the model to air formation to ground attack-defends decision-making system,it can solve the problems of two hierarchies'dynamic oppositional decision-making favorably,and reach preferable effect in battle.It proves that the model can provide an effective way for analyzing a battle.

  15. 2D XXZ model ground state properties using an analytic Lanczos expansion

    A formalism was developed for calculating arbitrary expectation values for any extensive lattice Hamiltonian system using a new analytic Lanczos expansion, or plaquette expansion, and a recently proved exact theorem for ground state energies. The ground state energy, staggered magnetisation and the excited state gap of the 2D anisotropic antiferromagnetic Heisenberg Model are then calculated using this expansion for a range of anisotropy parameters and compared to other moment based techniques, such as the t-expansion, and spin-wave theory and series expansion methods. It was found that far from the isotropic point all moment methods give essentially very similar results, but near the isotopic point the plaquette expansion is generally better than the others. 20 refs., 6 tabs

  16. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for LA

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). The scope of the work includes determination of input parameter values and loads, selection of appropriate process and methods for the calculation, application of selected methods, such as empirical or analytical, to the calculation, development and execution of numerical models, and evaluation of results. Results from this calculation are limited to use for design of the emplacement drifts and the final ground support system installed in these drifts. The design of non-emplacement openings and their ground support systems is covered in the ''Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA'' (BSC 2004c)

  17. American Woodcock Singing-ground Survey

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The American Woodcock Singing-Ground Survey, conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, exploits the conspicuous courtship display of the male woodcock. The...

  18. Support for researchers on shaky ground

    Lazarus, Max

    2010-08-01

    I was appalled to read in Physics World (July p9) of the prosecution of seven Italian scientists and technicians for manslaughter on the grounds that they did not predict the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake, which killed 308 people.

  19. 16th Edition Breaks New Ground

    Zhao Fei

    2010-01-01

    @@ Breaking new ground,Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics,successfully closed its doors on October 22nd,2010at the Shanghai New International Exhibition Centre,attracting a record breaking,more than 57,000 buyers.

  20. Multilocus study of Turkish ground squirrels

    Tiryaki, D.; Demirtas, S.; Tez, C.; Gür, H.; Jaarola, M.; Říčanová, Š.; Gündüz, I.; Bryja, Josef

    Lisbon : -, 2014. s. 119. [Rodens et Spatium /14./. 28.07.2014-02.08.2014, Lisbon] Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : ground squirrels * phylogeography Subject RIV: EG - Zoology http://rslisbon2014.wix.com/conference

  1. Enhanced Ground Control for ISS Robotics Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will investigate and adapt aides which will increase the efficiency of ISS robotics ground control operations with the intent of creating more...

  2. Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis

    This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment

  3. Fuzzy Decision of Ground Improvement Method

    2001-01-01

    With the rapid development of expressway in China, the ground improvement is becoming more and more important. The decision of the ground improvement method often depends on the experience of an engineer. This paper sets up a module of multi-level fuzzy decision of the ground improvement method in the expressway construction which is mainly to set up multi-level structure module, to get value of the affected factors at rule level and index level, to set up the character index matrix of project level and to have a total evaluation on the projects. Combined with the project of ground improvement on the Second Cincture Road in Wuhan, a case study is carried out with satisfactory results.

  4. Electrical Ground Support Equipment Fabrication, Specification for

    Denson, Erik C.

    2014-01-01

    This document specifies parts, materials, and processes used in the fabrication, maintenance, repair, and procurement of electrical and electronic control and monitoring equipment associated with ground support equipment (GSE) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC).

  5. School Grounds Design: A Holistic Approach.

    Mancini, Henry

    1993-01-01

    Examines the major aspects of school grounds design and development. Focuses on a consultative case study involving the staff and the students in the Programs for Aboriginal and Islander Students at Salisbury. Contains details of the landscape design. (DDR)

  6. Ground Software Maintenance Facility (GSMF) system manual

    Derrig, D.; Griffith, G.

    1986-01-01

    The Ground Software Maintenance Facility (GSMF) is designed to support development and maintenance of spacelab ground support software. THE GSMF consists of a Perkin Elmer 3250 (Host computer) and a MITRA 125s (ATE computer), with appropriate interface devices and software to simulate the Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE). This document is presented in three sections: (1) GSMF Overview; (2) Software Structure; and (3) Fault Isolation Capability. The overview contains information on hardware and software organization along with their corresponding block diagrams. The Software Structure section describes the modes of software structure including source files, link information, and database files. The Fault Isolation section describes the capabilities of the Ground Computer Interface Device, Perkin Elmer host, and MITRA ATE.

  7. Open System of Agile Ground Stations Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is an opportunity to build the HETE-2/TESS network of ground stations into an innovative and powerful Open System of Agile Stations, by developing a low-cost...

  8. Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis

    Saito, G.H.

    1994-10-01

    This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

  9. Eficiência bionutricional de animais Nelore e seus mestiços com Simental e Aberdeen Angus, em duas dietas Bio-nutritional efficiency of Nellore and Nellore crosses with Angus and Simmental under two diets

    Kepler Euclides Filho

    2001-02-01

    different genetic potentials for growth, such as Nellore (N, ½ Angus - ½ Nellore (AN and ½ Simmental - ½ Nellore (SN.This study is part of an ample project, which has as principal goal, to evaluate the efficiency of production of systems composed by animals with different mature sizes (Projeto cruzamento Embrapa 1. Using a bivariate analysis involving the variables average daily gain and dry matter intake, it was determined the first discriminant canonical function which was used for estimating performance indexes that were denominated bio-nutritional efficiency. The data were obtained from 72 animals under two diets, one composed by Tanzânia hay plus 600 g of ground soybean (diet A, provided ad libitum, and other where this hay was combined with a concentrate ration (diet B. The bio-nutritional efficiency was significantly affected by the interaction between genetic group (GG and diet (D. Thus, the least square means were compared by four different contrasts. These contrasts were, on diet B: C1 Nellore versus average of crossbreds and, C2 ½ Angus - ½ Nellore versus ½ Simmental - ½ Nellore. And on diet A: C3 Nellore versus crossbreds and, C4 ½ Angus - ½ Nellore versus ½ Simmental - ½ Nellore. The analyses of these contrasts revealed that, independently on diet, Nellore animals had a worst performance than the average observed for the F1s. The average of bio-nutritional efficiencies were equal to 429.74 and 490.46 for Nellore and crossbred animals, respectively, on diet B and, in the same sequence, 299.70 and 376.10 on diet A. Relatively to the F1 animals, their performances were dependent on diet. On diet A, the ½ Angus - ½ Nellore and ½ Simmental - ½ Nellore presented the same bio-nutritional efficiency (376.10 while on diet B, the ½ Angus - ½ Nellore were superiors (529.84 versus 451.09.

  10. Duration of nuclear explosion ground motion

    This paper evaluates the duration of strong ground shaking that results from nuclear explosions and identifies some of the problems associated with its determination. Knowledge of the duration of horizontal ground shaking is important out to epicentral distances of about 44 km and 135 km, the approximate distances at which the ground shaking level falls to 0.01 g for nuclear explosions having yields of about 100 kt and 1,000 kt, respectively. Evaluation of the strong ground motions recorded from the event STRAIT (M/sub L/ = 5.6) on a linear array of five, broad-band velocity seismographs deployed in the distance range 3.2 to 19.5 km provides information about the characteristics of the duration of ground shaking. The STRAIT data show that: (1) the definition that is used for defining duration is very important; (2) the duration of ground acceleration, as defined in terms of 90% of the integral of the squared time history, increased from about 4 to 26 sec over the approximately 20-km distance range; and (3) the duration of ground velocity and displacement were slightly greater because of the effect of the alluvium layer on the propagating surface waves. Data from other events augment the STRAIT data and show that: (1) duration of shaking is increased by frequency-dependent site effects and (2) duration of shaking, as defined by the integral of the squared time history, does not increase as rapidly with increase in yield as is indicated by other definitions of duration that are stated in terms of an amplitude threshold (e.g., bracketed duration, response envelopes). The available data suggest that the duration of ground acceleration, based on the integral definition, varies from about 4 to 40 sec for a 100-kt range explosion and from about 4 to 105 sec for a megaton range explosion in the epicentral distance range of 0 to 44 km and 0 to 135 km, respectively

  11. Ground states for nonuniform periodic Ising chains

    Martínez-Garcilazo, J. P.; Ramírez, C.

    2014-01-01

    We give a generalization of Morita's works on ground states of Ising chains, for chains with a periodic structure with different spins, and distant neighbor interactions. The main assumption is translational invariance. The length of the irreducible blocks is a multiple of the period of the chain. In the case of parity invariance, it restricts the length in general only in the diatomic case. There are degenerated states and under certain circumstances there could be nonregular ground states. ...

  12. Macroscopic superpositions as quantum ground states

    Dakić, Borivoje; Radonjić, Milan

    2016-01-01

    We study the question of whether a macroscopic superposition can naturally exist as a ground state of some gapped many-body Hamiltonian. We derive an upper bound on the energy gap of an arbitrary physical Hamiltonian provided that its ground state is a superposition of two macroscopic "semi-classical" states. For a large class of such macroscopic superposition states we show that the gap vanishes in the macroscopic limit. Our main result shows an interesting quantitative relation between the ...

  13. Ground states of integrable quantum liquids

    J.M.P. Carmelo; Peres, N. M. R.

    1994-01-01

    Based on a recently introduced operator algebra for the description of a class of integrable quantum liquids we define the ground states for all canonical ensembles of these systems. We consider the particular case of the Hubbard chain in a magnetic field and chemical potential. The ground states of all canonical ensembles of the model can be generated by acting onto the electron vacuum (densities $n1$), suitable pseudoparticle creation operators. We also evaluate the energy gaps of the non-l...

  14. Absorbed Energy in Ship Collisions and Grounding

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1998-01-01

    ship collisions and grounding. The developed expressions reflect the structural arrangement, the material properties and different damage patterns.The present method is validated against a large number of existing experimental results and detailed numerical simulation results. Applications to full......-sale ship grounding accidents, the bottom raking damage to tankers and the bottom damage distribution for high-speed vessels are also presented. The propesed method may be considered as an improvement of the classical Minorsky method....

  15. Ground segment preparation for NPSAT1

    Koerschner, Luke E.

    2007-01-01

    Most satellites rely on a ground control station to command their payloads and through which they download data from their payloads. The Naval Postgraduate School?s satellite (NPSAT1) is no exception. The spacecraft?s payloads, which include the Coherent Electromagnetic Radio Tomography (CERTO), Langmuir probe, Configurable Fault Tolerant Processor (CFTP), as well as the Visible Wavelength Imager (VISIM), all generate data that require collection on the ground through a radio frequency downli...

  16. Ground Assisted Onboard Planning Autonomy with VAMOS

    Wörle, Maria Theresia; Lenzen, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The typical ground based mission planning system for a low earth satellite mission has one major drawback: The reaction time to onboard detected events includes at least the two upcoming ground station contacts. To address this disadvantage, DLR/GSOC implements the software experiment VAMOS as part of the FireBIRD mission, in which mission planning autonomy will be transferred to the spacecraft up to some extent. This paper presents the outcome of the VAMOS design phas...

  17. Grounding Locations Assessment of Practical Power System

    Kousay Abdul Sattar; Ahmed M.A. Haidar; Nadheer A. Shalash

    2012-01-01

    Grounding Points (GPs) are installed in electrical power system to drive protective devices and accomplish the person nel safety. The general grounding problem is to find the optimal locations of these points so that the security and reli ability of power system can be improved. This paper presents a practical approach to find the optimal location of GPs based on the ratios of zero sequence reactance with positive sequence reactance (X0/X1), zero sequence resistance with positive sequence rea...

  18. Source, propagation and site effects: impact on mapping strong ground motion in Bucharest area

    Achievements in the framework of the NATO SfP project 972266 focused on the impact of Vrancea earthquakes on the security of Bucharest urban area are presented. The problem of Bucharest city security to Vrancea earthquakes is discussed in terms of numerical modelling of seismic motion and intermediate term earthquake prediction. A hybrid numerical scheme developed by Faeh et al. (1990; 1993) for frequencies up to 1 Hz is applied for the realistic modelling of the seismic ground motion in Bucharest. The method combines the modal summation for the 1D bedrock model and the finite differences for the 2D local structure model. All the factors controlling the ground motion at the site are considered: source, propagation and site effects, respectively. The input data includes the recent records provided by the digital accelerometer network developed within the Romanian-German CRC461 cooperation programme and CALIXTO'99, VRANCEA'99, VRANCEA2001 experiments. The numerical simulation proves to be a powerful tool in mapping the strong ground motion for realistic structures, reproducing acceptably from engineering point of view the observations. A new model of the Vrancea earthquake scaling is obtained and implications for the determination of the seismic motion parameters are analyzed. The role of the focal mechanism and attenuation properties upon the amplitude and spectral content of the ground motion are outlined. CN algorithm is applied for predicting Vrancea earthquakes. Finally, implications for the disaster management strategy are discussed. (authors)

  19. Ground water protection management program plan

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a ground water protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office was prepared this Ground Water Protection Management Program Plan (ground water protection plan) whose scope and detail reflect the program's significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter III, for special program planning. This ground water protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor ground water resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA Project ground water protection management program. In addition, the plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA Project sites

  20. Preliminary results of ground-motion characteristics

    Francesca Bozzoni

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The preliminary results are presented herein for the engineering applications of the characteristics of the ground motion induced by the May 20, 2012, Emilia earthquake. Shake maps are computed to provide estimates of the spatial distribution of the induced ground motion. The signals recorded at the Mirandola (MRN station, the closest to the epicenter, have been processed to obtain acceleration, velocity and displacement response spectra. Ground-motion parameters from the MRN recordings are compared with the corresponding estimates from recent ground-motion prediction equations, and with the spectra prescribed by the current Italian Building Code for different return periods. The records from the MRN station are used to plot the particle orbit (hodogram described by the waveform. The availability of results from geotechnical field tests that were performed at a few sites in the Municipality of Mirandola prior to this earthquake of May 2012 has allowed preliminary assessment of the ground response. The amplification effects at Mirandola are estimated using fully stochastic site-response analyses. The seismic input comprises seven actual records that are compatible with the Italian code-based spectrum that refers to a 475-year return period. The computed acceleration response spectrum and the associated dispersion are compared to the spectra calculated from the recordings of the MRN station. Good agreement is obtained for periods up to 1 s, especially for the peak ground acceleration. For the other periods, the spectral acceleration of the MRN recordings exceeds that of the computed spectra.

  1. Ground assessment methods for nuclear power plant

    It is needless to say that nuclear power plant must be constructed on the most stable and safe ground. Reliable assessment method is required for the purpose. The Ground Integrity Sub-committee of the Committee of Civil Engineering of Nuclear Power Plant started five working groups, the purpose of which is to systematize the assessment procedures including geological survey, ground examination and construction design. The works of working groups are to establishing assessment method of activities of faults, standardizing the rock classification method, standardizing assessment and indication method of ground properties, standardizing test methods and establishing the application standard for design and construction. Flow diagrams for the procedures of geological survey, for the investigation on fault activities and ground properties of area where nuclear reactor and important outdoor equipments are scheduled to construct, were established. And further, flow diagrams for applying investigated results to design and construction of plant, and for determining procedure of liquidification nature of ground etc. were also established. These systematized and standardized methods of investigation are expected to yield reliable data for assessment of construction site of nuclear power plant and lead to the safety of construction and operation in the future. In addition, the execution of these systematized and detailed preliminary investigation for determining the construction site of nuclear power plant will make much contribution for obtaining nation-wide understanding and faith for the project. (Ishimitsu, A.)

  2. 环境犯罪证明方法研究%Research of Methods to Prove Environmental Crime

    李劲

    2012-01-01

    环境犯罪行为迥异于一般的犯罪行为,尤其是对于污染型环境犯罪行为,确定犯罪行为与损害结果之间的因果关系相当困难。对此,国外产生了推定因果关系存在的各种理论与学说。我国现行法律规定的犯罪证明方法在环境犯罪的认定上存在着缺陷,针对我国环境犯罪案发率高但因果关系证明难度大这一现实矛盾,有必要借鉴国外相关立法,对环境犯罪适用的因果关系确定推定方法,以彰显刑法对环境资源、人身权及财产权的保护功能,实现人类社会的可持续发展。%The behaviors of environmental crime are different from the behaviors of usual crime.It's difficult to define the cause- and-effect relationship between criminal behaviors and damage effects,especially for the crime of polluting the environment.For this reason,foreign countries raised various theories to presume the existence of cause-and-effect relationships.Nowadays,the methods to prove criminal behaviors in our country's law have some defects in the identification of environmental criminals.For the realistic contradiction between high occurring rate and difficulty to prove the cause-and-effect relationship,it is necessary to draw lessons from the laws of foreign countries to apply methods of presumption the cause-and-effect relationships in environmental crime,in or- der to show the functions of protecting environmental resources, personal right and property right,and to realize the continuous de- velopment of human society.

  3. Electromagnetic properties of the three-nucleon ground state

    The electromagnetic form factors of the three-nucleon ground state are calculated on the base of an exact solution of the Faddeev equations. In a Hilbert space of nucleons and a possible Δ-isobar the effects of a non-perturbative description of the Δ-isobar on the magnetic form factors are studied. Pure nucleonic current operators with two- and three-particle character can be described in the extended Hilbert space by simpler one-body operators. Additionally nonrelativistic meson-exchange corrections due to π and ρ exchange are calculated consistently with the requirements of current conservation. Further relativistic corrections are estimated on selected examples. The calculations yield a total magnetic contribution of the Δ-isobar which is smaller than hitherto assumed, a static approximation of the Δ propagation is proved as inadmissible and must be rejected. Together with the meson-exchange corrections a well agreement with the experimental data at low momentum transfers results. Especially the magnetic moments and magnetization radii can be explained. For higher momentum transfers the results show the importance of further corrections. The regard of selected relativistic corrections leads to a good description of the experimental magnetic form factors. Also by this way the position of the minimum and the height of the second maximum in the 3He charge form factor can be explained. The comparison with the latest experimental results reveals furthermore unresolved problems in the description of the 3H charge form factor. (orig.)

  4. Investigating Subsidence Resulting from Ground Water Withdrawal in the Cedar Valley, Utah Region Using InSAR

    Katzenstein, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ground water withdrawal has long been known as a potential source of land subsidence, particularly in arid regions where natural ground water recharge is low relative to the volumes of water produced. Throughout the last decade, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has proved to be a valuable tool to quantify aquifer system response to ground water withdrawal in arid portions of the western United States. The vast spatial coverage (~10,000 square miles minimum) and precise vertical resolution (subsidence features in the vicinity of the observed ground fissuring with cumulative magnitudes as high as 11 cm and 17 cm for the Enoch graben and Quichapa Lake areas respectively. Additional subsidence was detected in other areas within Cedar Valley that correspond well with the locations of active municipal ground water wells. Additionally, several subsidence features not associated with the fissures of interest were observed. One in particular located between the small communities of Enterprise and Beryl, Utah exhibits over 50 cm of subsidence during the period of this study. This agricultural area is typified by pivot irrigation with ground water produced from the local alluvial aquifer. True subsidence magnitudes may be much higher as a large portion of the area in the vicinity of the pivot irrigation is decorrelated in the InSAR result. The magnitudes and locations of all subsidence features observed are presented and discussed.

  5. Regularities of ground states of quantum field models

    Arai, Asao; Hirokawa, Masao; Hiroshima, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    Regularities and higher order regularities of ground states of quantum field models are investigated through the fact that asymptotic annihilation operators vanish ground states. Moreover a sufficient condition for the absence of a ground state is given.

  6. Regularities of ground states of quantum field models

    Arai, Asao; Hirokawa, Masao; Hiroshima, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    Regularities and higher order regularities of ground states of quantum field models are investigated through the fact that asymptotic annihilation operators vanish ground states. Moreover a sufficient condition for the absence of a ground state is given.

  7. Below-ground herbivory limits induction of extrafloral nectar by above-ground herbivores

    Huang, Wei; Siemann, Evan; Carrillo, Juli; Ding, Jianqing

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Many plants produce extrafloral nectar (EFN), and increase production following above-ground herbivory, presumably to attract natural enemies of the herbivores. Below-ground herbivores, alone or in combination with those above ground, may also alter EFN production depending on the specificity of this defence response and the interactions among herbivores mediated through plant defences. To date, however, a lack of manipulative experiments investigating EFN production induc...

  8. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF VERTICAL GROUND HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMPS

    Jalaluddin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: This paper presents the numerical simulation of several types of vertical ground heat exchangers. The ground heat exchangers (GHEs) such as U-tube, double-tube and multi-tube were simulated using the commercial CFD software FLUENT. Water flows through the heat exchangers and exchanges the heat to the ground. The inlet and outlet water temperatures, flow rate, and heat exchange rate are presented. The heat exchange rates in discontinuous short-time period of operation ...

  9. Thermal ablation in colorectal liver metastases: Lack of evidence or lack of capability to prove the evidence?

    Sartori, Sergio; Tombesi, Paola; Di Vece, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Many studies suggest that combined multimodality treatments including ablative therapies may achieve better outcomes than systemic chemotherapy alone in patients with colorectal liver metastases. Nevertheless, ablative therapies are not yet considered as effective options because their efficacy has never been proved by randomized controlled trials (RCT). However, there are in literature no trials that failed in demonstrating the effectiveness of ablative treatments: what are lacking, are the trials. All the attempts to organize phase III studies on this topic failed as a result of non accrual. Just one prospective RCT comparing radiofrequency ablation combined with systemic chemotherapy vs chemotherapy alone has been published. It was designed as a phase III study, but it was closed early because of slow accrual, and was downscaled to phase II study, with the consequent limits in drawing definite conclusions on the benefit of combined treatment. However, the combination treatment met the primary end point of the study and obtained a significantly higher 3-year progression-free survival than systemic chemotherapy alone. It is very unlikely that ultimate efficacy of ablation treatments will ever be tested again, and the best available evidence points toward a benefit for the combination strategy using ablative treatments and chemotherapy. PMID:27053843

  10. Kidney biopsy proved diagnosis of renal disorders in a tertiary care hospital: sharing a 4 years experience

    Objective: To evaluate outcome of renal biopsies in patients at a nephrology unit of a tertiary care centre at Rawalpindi over a period of 4 years. Study Design: Retrospective and cross sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Nephrology, Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from 2008-2012 Methodology: The study was based upon the data of patients with different renal pathologies who underwent kidney biopsy for establishment of diagnosis. All the patients who underwent successful kidney biopsy from 2008-2012 in our hospital were included in the study. Results: A total of 235 patients underwent successful kidney biopsy (with conclusive pathological findings). Out of these, 170 (72%) were males and 65 (28%) were females and the age ranged from 06 years to 55 years, with mean age of 28.6 years among males and 31.5 years among females. Out of these 100 (42.6%) patients had mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis, 65 (27.6%) had membranous nephropathy, 37 (15.7%) patients had focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis, 11 (4.7%) patients had IgA glomerulopathy, 7 (3%) had minimal change nephropathy whereas 15 (6.4%) patients had other causes of glomerulonephritis (including systemic illnesses, pyelonephritis, acute tubular necrosis and interstitial nephritis). Conclusion: The most common biopsy proved diagnosis in the patients with different renal disorders was mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis and the least common was minimal change nephropathy. (author)

  11. Acid phosphatase test proves superior to standard phenotypic identification procedure for Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from water

    Ryzinska-Paier, G.; Sommer, R.; Haider, J.M.; Knetsch, S.; Frick, C.; Kirschner, A.K.T.; Farnleitner, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is used as an indicator for persistent faecal pollution as well as to monitor the efficacy of water treatment processes. For these purposes, differentiation between C. perfringens and other Clostridia is essential and is routinely carried out by phenotypic standard tests as proposed in the ISO/CD 6461-2:2002 (ISO_LGMN: lactose fermentation, gelatine liquidation, motility and nitrate reduction). Because the ISO_LGMN procedure is time consuming and labour intensive, the acid phosphatase test was investigated as a possible and much more rapid alternative method for confirmation. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare confirmation results obtained by these two phenotypic methods using genotypically identified strains, what to our knowledge has not been accomplished before. For this purpose, a species specific PCR method was selected based on the results received for type strains and genotypically characterised environmental strains. For the comparative investigation type strains as well as presumptive C. perfringens isolates from water and faeces samples were used. The acid phosphatase test revealed higher percentage (92%) of correctly identified environmental strains (n = 127) than the ISO_LGMN procedure (83%) and proved to be a sensitive and reliable confirmation method. PMID:21872622

  12. Grounding-Induced Sectional Forces and Residual Strength of Grounded Ship Hulls

    Paik, Jeom Kee; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the sectional forces induced by ship grounding and also to assess the residual strength of groundedship hulls. An analytical approach is used to estimate the grounding-induced sectional forces of ships. The extent and location of structural damage due to...... grounding is defined based on the ABS Safe Hull guide. The residual strength of damaged hulls is calculated by using a simple analytical formula. The method is applied to residual strength assessment of a damaged double hull tanker of 38,400 dwt due to grounding....

  13. Residual current compensation for single-phase grounding fault in coal mine power network

    Jia Chenxi; Wang Chonglin; Du Guifu

    2014-01-01

    The way of neutral point to earth via full compensation arc suppression coil can solve the problem of residual current compensation in coal mine power network effectively. Based on the analysis on the grounding current detection results of Xieqiao coal mine, the conclusion that harmonic component of grounding current is dominated by higher harmonics with complex harmonic sources in coal mine power network system was obtained. The influences of harmonic source type and fault point position on har-monic voltage and harmonic current were analyzed theoretically. The influences of earthed fault feeder detection result and the estimation errors of parameters to earth on residual current compensation were analyzed. A new thought of residual current prediction and the selections of model method and control method were proposed on this basis. The simulation results prove that harmonic amplitudes of zero sequence voltage and zero sequence current are determined by harmonic source type as well as fault point position in coal mine power network, and also prove that zero sequence voltage detection can avoid the unstable problem of coal mine power network system caused by undercompensation of capacitive current. Finally, the experimental device of full compensation arc suppression coil is introduced.

  14. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M and O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used

  15. Ground water - Canonsburg, Pennsylvania UMTRA site

    At the Canonsburg site, shallow ground-water is present in an unconfined unit composed of variable fill material and in a semi-confined unit composed of fractured gray shale. The unconfined unit is recharged from the south and has a ground-water mound near the center of the site. Discharge is to Chartiers Creek to the east, north, and west. In the semi-confined unit, ground-water appears to flow in the direction of the dip of the underlying red shale, southwest to northwest. Communication between the semi-confined unit and Cartiers Creek is evident but most of the water in the unit probably flows beneath the creek. Ground-water analyses show elevated concentrations of uranium at various on-site areas in the unconfined unit, at one area in the semi-confined area, and not at all in the Chartiers Creek. Also, some on-site ground-water samples show elevated levels of arsenic, selenium, lead, nickel, and copper. Modeling of the hydrogeochemistry of the Canonsburg site and adjacent areas, present and post-remedial action include the following: Calibration of the hydrodynamic flow model for the steady-state unconfined unit against measured static water levels; Calculation of post-remedial action, steady-state water table elevations; Calculation of post-remedial action rates and concentrations of contaminant migration

  16. TNX Burying Ground: Environmental information document

    The TNX Burying Ground, located within the TNX Area of the Savannah River Plant (SRP), was originally built to dispose of debris from an experimental evaporator explosion at TNX in 1953. This evaporator contained approximately 590 kg of uranyl nitrate. From 1980 to 1984, much of the waste material buried at TNX was excavated and sent to the SRP Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds for reburial. An estimated 27 kg of uranyl nitrate remains buried at TNX. The TNX Burying Ground consists of three sites known to contain waste and one site suspected of containing waste material. All four sites are located within the TNX security fenceline. Groundwater at the TNX Burying Ground was not evaluated because there are no groundwater monitoring wells installed in the immediate vicinity of this waste site. The closure options considered for the TNX Burying Ground are waste removal and closure, no waste removal and closure, and no action. The predominant pathways for human exposure to chemical and/or radioactive constituents are through surface, subsurface, and atmospheric transport. Modeling calculations were made to determine the risks to human population via these general pathways for the three postulated closure options. An ecological assessment was conducted to predict the environmental impacts on aquatic and terrestrial biota. The relative costs for each of the closure options were estimated

  17. TNX Burying Ground: Environmental information document

    Dunaway, J.K.W.; Johnson, W.F.; Kingley, L.E.; Simmons, R.V.; Bledsoe, H.W.

    1987-03-01

    The TNX Burying Ground, located within the TNX Area of the Savannah River Plant (SRP), was originally built to dispose of debris from an experimental evaporator explosion at TNX in 1953. This evaporator contained approximately 590 kg of uranyl nitrate. From 1980 to 1984, much of the waste material buried at TNX was excavated and sent to the SRP Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds for reburial. An estimated 27 kg of uranyl nitrate remains buried at TNX. The TNX Burying Ground consists of three sites known to contain waste and one site suspected of containing waste material. All four sites are located within the TNX security fenceline. Groundwater at the TNX Burying Ground was not evaluated because there are no groundwater monitoring wells installed in the immediate vicinity of this waste site. The closure options considered for the TNX Burying Ground are waste removal and closure, no waste removal and closure, and no action. The predominant pathways for human exposure to chemical and/or radioactive constituents are through surface, subsurface, and atmospheric transport. Modeling calculations were made to determine the risks to human population via these general pathways for the three postulated closure options. An ecological assessment was conducted to predict the environmental impacts on aquatic and terrestrial biota. The relative costs for each of the closure options were estimated.

  18. Potential Flow Analysis of Dynamic Ground Effect

    Feifel, W. M.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of some flight test data suggests the presence of a 'dynamic ground effect'. The lift of an aircraft approaching the ground depends on the rate of descent and is lower than the aircraft steady state lift at a same height above the ground. Such a lift deficiency under dynamic conditions could have a serious impact on the overall aircraft layout. For example, the increased pitch angle needed to compensate for the temporary loss in lift would reduce the tail strike margin or require an increase in landing gear length. Under HSR2 an effort is under way to clarify the dynamic ground effect issue using a multi-pronged approach. A dynamic ground effect test has been run in the NASA Langley 14x22 ft wind tunnel. Northup-Grumman is conducting time accurate CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) Euler analyses on the National Aerodynamic Simulator facility. Boeing has been using linear potential flow methodology which are thought to provide much needed insight in, physics of this very complex problem. The present report summarizes the results of these potential flow studies.

  19. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Mice Models to Study Blastocystis spp. Adhesion, Colonization and Pathology: Closer to Proving Koch's Postulates

    Ajjampur, Sitara S. R.; Png, Chin Wen; Chia, Wan Ni; Zhang, Yongliang; Tan, Kevin S. W.

    2016-01-01

    Blastocystis spp. are widely prevalent extra cellular, non-motile anerobic protists that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract. Although Blastocystis spp. have been associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, irritable bowel syndrome and urticaria, their clinical significance has remained controversial. We established an ex vivo mouse explant model to characterize adhesion in the context of tissue architecture and presence of the mucin layer. Using confocal microscopy with tissue whole mounts and two axenic isolates of Blastocystis spp., subtype 7 with notable differences in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), isolate B (ST7-B) and isolate H (more adhesive, ST7-H), we showed that adhesion is both isolate dependent and tissue trophic. The more adhesive isolate, ST7-H was found to bind preferentially to the colon tissue than caecum and terminal ileum. Both isolates were also found to have mucinolytic effects. We then adapted a DSS colitis mouse model as a susceptible model to study colonization and acute infection by intra-caecal inoculation of trophic Blastocystis spp.cells. We found that the more adhesive isolate ST7-H was also a better colonizer with more mice shedding parasites and for a longer duration than ST7-B. Adhesion and colonization was also associated with increased virulence as ST7-H infected mice showed greater tissue damage than ST7-B. Both the ex vivo and in vivo models used in this study showed that Blastocystis spp. remain luminal and predominantly associated with mucin. This was further confirmed using colonic loop experiments. We were also successfully able to re-infect a second batch of mice with ST7-H isolates obtained from fecal cultures and demonstrated similar histopathological findings and tissue damage thereby coming closer to proving Koch’s postulates for this parasite. PMID:27508942

  20. Caratterizzazione microstrutturale e prove di resilienza su giunti Friction Stir Welding e Linear Friction Welding di compositi a matrice metallica

    M. Merlin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In questo studio sono stati caratterizzati giunti Friction Stir Welding e Linear Friction Welding su compositi a matrice in lega di alluminio e rinforzo particellare ceramico. Il processo FSW è stato applicato a due compositi ottenuti con processo fusorio, quindi estrusi e trattati termicamente T6: AA6061/20%vol.Al2O3p e AA7005/10%vol.Al2O3p. I giunti LFW sono stati invece realizzati su un composito con matrice in lega di alluminio e rinforzo particellare in carburo di silicio, ottenuto mediante metallurgia delle polveri, quindi forgiato e trattato termicamente T4: AA2124/25%vol.SiCp. Sono stati esaminati gli effetti della saldatura sullecaratteristiche microstrutturali dei giunti, avvalendosi di tecniche di microscopia ottica con analisi di immagine e di microscopia elettronica in scansione (SEM con microsonda a dispersione di energia (EDS. Sono state quindi condotte prove di resilienza con pendolo strumentato Charpy. Lo studio dei meccanismi di danneggiamento è stato effettuato mediante analisi al SEM delle superfici di frattura. Entrambi i processi di saldatura hanno portato a giunti sostanzialmente esenti da difetti. La microstruttura dei cordoni è risultata dipendente sia dalle caratteristiche microstrutturali iniziali dei compositi considerati, sia dalla tipologia di processo di saldatura. Nel caso dei compositi AA6061/20%Al2O3p e AA7005/10%Al2O3p saldati FSW si è osservato un sostanziale incremento di resilienza, rispetto al materiale base, in conseguenza dell’affinamento dei grani della matrice, della riduzione della dimensione media delle particelle di rinforzo e della loro spigolosità, indotte dal processo di saldatura. Il composito AA2124/25%SiCp saldato LFW ha presentato valori di resilienza confrontabili con quelli del materiale base, in conseguenza, soprattutto, dei limitati effetti della saldatura su dimensione e distribuzione delle particelle di rinforzo.

  1. Operation and maintenance of the TFTR grounding system

    The authors discuss how the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) grounding system utilizes a single-point ground which is connected to the building perimeter ground. Wired to this single-point ground, via individual 500 MCM insulated cables, are: the vacuum vessel, four toroidal field coil cases/inner support structure quadrants, umbrella structure halves, substructure ring girder sections, radial beams and columns and diagnostic systems. A special Ground System Monitor (GSM) system was designed and installed which actively monitors each of the individual machine grounds. The GSM insures that grounds remain intact thus avoiding secondary grounds on any components which would form a ground loop. Upon an accidental connection of a secondary ground to any one component of TFTR, the GSM sounds a horn within the TFTR test cell, the test cell basement, and the data acquisition rooms which notifies personnel that a ground loop is present

  2. Mean daily concentrations of ground-level ozone; Daily course of ground-level ozone concentrations at the selected stations (1992 - 1999); Mean monthly ground-level ozone concentrations at the selected stations (1992 - 1999)

    Concentrations of the ground level ozone in Central Europe have more than doubled in the last 100 years. The cause lies in increase of ozone precursor (oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide) emission. The result of implementation of the Convention of the UN European Economic Commission on the transboundary remote distance pollution measures was that the growth of concentrations stopped, as also proved by the measurements of the Stara Lesna station. Ozone concentrations increase with the increasing altitude above sea level and they are characterised by the distinct daily and annual courses. The maximum of the daily course occurs in afternoon hours with the exception of the high-mountain positions (for instance the Chopok Mt.), where in turn, the less distinct minimum is observed. (author)

  3. Qualidade da carne do músculo longissimus dorsi de novilhos superjovens Aberdeen Angus de biótipo pequeno e médio abatidos com o mesmo estágio de acabamento na carcaça - doi: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v33i2.10746 Meat quality of the longissimus dorsi muscle of Aberdeen Angus steers of small and medium frame score, slaughtered at the same carcass finishing stage - doi: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v33i2.10746

    Dari Celestino Alves Filho

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar a influência do biótipo pequeno e médio de novilhos Aberdeen Angus superjovens na composição da carne do longissimus dorsi (LD. Foram utilizadas secções do LD de oito novilhos com biótipo pequeno e dez com biótipo médio, confinados por 158 dias, apresentando ao abate idade e peso vivo médio de 456 dias e 429 kg. A alimentação foi constituída de silagem de sorgo e concentrado na relação 60:40 nos primeiros 63 dias e após 50:50 até o abate. O biótipo foi calculado por meio da fórmula: B = -11,548 + (0,4878 x h - (0,0289 x ID + (0,0000146 x (ID² + (0,0000759 x h x ID; h = altura em polegadas e ID=idade em dias. A carne do LD apresentou gordura intramuscular média (10,11 pontos; p = 0,7034, coloração vermelha (4,33 pontos; p = 0,3724, textura com tendência a muito fina (4,61 pontos; p = 0,3075 e força ao cisalhamento de 2,72 kgf cm-² (p = 0,4009. A carne apresentou 72,27% (p = 0,4355 de umidade, 19,34% (p = 0,4150 de proteína bruta, 3,96% (p = 0,9071 de lipídios, 4,43% (p = 0,9842 de minerais e 0,25 mg 100g-1 de carne (p = 0,2375 de colesterol. Os biótipos não influenciaram na concentração dos ácidos graxos palmítico (p = 0,0790, esteárico (p = 0,2455, oleico (p = 0,3046, linoleico (p = 0,9456, ocorrendo alteração na participação do ácido graxo mirístico (ŷ = 1,85 + 0,12B; p = 0,043. O estudo do biótipo na composição da carne é importante para a identificação de melhores características nutracêuticas.The objective of this work was to assess the influence of small and medium frame scores in the meat composition of the longissimus dorsi (LD muscle of Abredeen Angus steers. We used LD sections from eight small-framed steers and ten medium-framed steers, confined for 158 days, with mean slaughter age of 457 days and 429 kg live weight. The feed was composed of sorghum silage and concentrate in a 60:40 ratio for the first 63 days, and 50:50 thereafter until

  4. Shallow ground disposal of radioactive wastes

    This guidebook outlines the factors to be considered in site selection, design, operation, shut-down and surveillance as well as the regulatory requirements of repositories for safe disposal of radioactive waste in shallow ground. No attempt is made to summarize the existing voluminous literature on the many facets of radioactive waste disposal. In the context of this guidebook, shallow ground disposal refers to the emplacement of radioactive waste, with or without engineered barriers, above or below the ground surface, where the final protective covering is of the order of a few metres thick. Deep geological disposal and other underground disposal methods, management of mill tailings and disposal into the sea have been or will be considered in other IAEA publications. These guidelines have been made sufficiently general to cover a broad variety of climatic, hydrogeological and biological conditions. They may need to be interpreted or modified to reflect local conditions and national regulations

  5. Soil and ground-water remediation techniques

    Urban areas typically contain numerous sites underlain by soils or ground waters which are contaminated to levels that exceed clean-up guidelines and are hazardous to public health. Contamination most commonly results from the disposal, careless use and spillage of chemicals, or the historic importation of contaminated fill onto properties undergoing redevelopment. Contaminants of concern in soil and ground water include: inorganic chemicals such as heavy metals; radioactive metals; salt and inorganic pesticides, and a range of organic chemicals included within petroleum fuels, coal tar products, PCB oils, chlorinated solvents, and pesticides. Dealing with contaminated sites is a major problem affecting all urban areas and a wide range of different remedial technologies are available. This chapter reviews the more commonly used methods for ground-water and soil remediation, paying particular regard to efficiency and applicability of specific treatments to different site conditions. (author). 43 refs., 1 tab., 27 figs

  6. Ground-water applications of remote sensing

    Moore, Gerald K.

    1982-01-01

    Remote sensing can be used as a tool to inventory springs and seeps and to interpret lithology, structure, and ground-water occurrence and quality. Thermograms are the best images for inventory of seeps and springs. The steps in aquifer mapping are image analysis and interpretation and ground-water interpretation. A ground-water interpretation is derived from a conceptual geologic model by inferring aquifer characteristics and water salinity. The image selection process is very important for obtaining maximum geologic and hydrologic information from remotely sensed data. Remote sensing can contribute an image base map or geologic and hydrologic parameters, derived from the image, to the multiple data sets in a hydrologic information system. Various merging and integration techniques may then be used to obtain information from these data sets.

  7. Grounding and human health - a review

    Whilst grounding is often undertaken in industry as a matter of good practice in situations where the risk of excess charge exists, little thought is usually given to the biological effects that such measures may have, or possible benefits that may arise from the more widespread application of electrostatic and other 'electromagnetic hygiene' measures in hospitals and the general built environment. Research, which is still in its infancy, indicates that grounding the human body using suitable methodologies, particularly in low electromagnetic field environments, can significantly enhance biological functioning. It is proposed that there are often a number of electrostatic and 'electromagnetic hygiene' factors that need to be addressed before the beneficial effects of grounding the human body can be fully realised in many everyday environments.

  8. SEMANTIC GROUNDING STRATEGIES FOR TAGBASED RECOMMENDER SYSTEMS

    Frederico Durao

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Recommender systems usually operate on similarities between recommended items or users. Tag basedrecommender systems utilize similarities on tags. The tags are however mostly free user entered phrases.Therefore, similarities computed without their semantic groundings might lead to less relevantrecommendations. In this paper, we study a semantic grounding used for tag similarity calculus. We show acomprehensive analysis of semantic grounding given by 20 ontologies from different domains. The studybesides other things reveals that currently available OWL ontologies are very narrow and the percentageof the similarity expansions is rather small. WordNet scores slightly better as it is broader but not much asit does not support several semantic relationships. Furthermore, the study reveals that even with suchnumber of expansions, the recommendations change considerably

  9. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  10. Semantic Grounding Strategies for Tagbased Recommender Systems

    Durao, Frederico

    2011-01-01

    Recommender systems usually operate on similarities between recommended items or users. Tag based recommender systems utilize similarities on tags. The tags are however mostly free user entered phrases. Therefore, similarities computed without their semantic groundings might lead to less relevant recommendations. In this paper, we study a semantic grounding used for tag similarity calculus. We show a comprehensive analysis of semantic grounding given by 20 ontologies from different domains. The study besides other things reveals that currently available OWL ontologies are very narrow and the percentage of the similarity expansions is rather small. WordNet scores slightly better as it is broader but not much as it does not support several semantic relationships. Furthermore, the study reveals that even with such number of expansions, the recommendations change considerably.

  11. Mimicking Time Evolution within a Quantum Ground State: Ground-State Quantum Computation, Cloning, and Teleportation

    Mizel, Ari

    2003-01-01

    Ground-state quantum computers mimic quantum mechanical time evolution within the amplitudes of a time-independent quantum state. We explore the principles that constrain this mimicking. A no-cloning argument is found to impose strong restrictions. It is shown, however, that there is flexibility that can be exploited using quantum teleportation methods to improve ground-state quantum computer design.

  12. Software for calculations of surge processes in ground conductors and grounded objects

    Kuklin D.V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Software for calculations related to propagation of electromagnetic waves in high-voltage objects (transmission towers and their grounding, substation grounding has been described in the paper. Using the software the oblique thin wire simulation method proposed by Guiffaut et al. (2012 has been verified for conductive medium

  13. Superfund TIO videos: Set C. Ground water: Introduction to ground water. Part 4. Audio-Visual

    The videotape describes the occurrence and movement of ground water, the hydrologic cycle, the role of ground water in the hydrologic cycle, and the interaction of all elements of the hydrologic cycle. The different types of streams, rocks, and aquifers are presented

  14. Monitoring ground anchor using non-destructive ground anchor integrity test (NDT-GRANIT)

    Monitoring at ground anchor commonly uses a pull out test method, therefor we developing a non-destructive ground anchor integrity testing (NDT-GRANIT). NDT-GRANIT using the principle of seismic waves that have been modified into form of sweep signal, the signal will be demodulated, filtered, and Fourier transformation (inverse discrete Fourier transform) so the data can be interpreted reflected wave from the ground anchor. The method was applied to determine whether the ground anchor still gripped in the subsurface by looking the attenuation of the wave generated sources. From the result we can see that ground anchor does not grip. To validate the results of the comparison method of measurement used pile integrity test

  15. Ground motion measurements at the SSC

    The results of measurements of seismic vibrations in the Exploratory Shaft (at the tunnel depth) and in the ASST building (on the surface) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site are presented. Spectral and correlation analysis of the data obtained in the frequency band 0.05--1500 Hz is performed. It is found that amplitudes of ambient ground motion are lower than collider requirements, but cultural vibrations are unacceptably large and will cause fast growth of transverse emittance of the SSC beams. The issues of uncorrelated slow ground motion governed by the ''ATL law'' are also discussed on the example of the SSC collider. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  16. Permanent ground anchors: Nicholson design criteria

    Nicholson, P. J.; Uranowski, D. D.; Wycliffe-Jones, P. T.

    1982-09-01

    The methods used by Nicholson Construction Company in the design of permanent ground anchors specifically as related to retaining walls are discussed. Basic soil parameters, design concepts, drilling and grouting methods for ground anchors are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on anchors founded in soil rather than rock formations. Also, soil properties necessary for the proper design of anchored retaining walls are detailed. The second chapter of the report is devoted to a general discussion of retaining wall and anchor design. In addition, a design example of an anchored retaining wall is presented in a step by step manner.

  17. Victimising of school bullying : a grounded theory

    Thornberg, Robert; Halldin, Karolina; Bolmsjö, Nathalie; Petersson, Annelie

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how individuals;who had been victims of school bullying;perceived their bullying experiences and how these had affected them;and to generate a grounded theory of being a victim of bullying at school. Twenty-one individuals;who all had prior experiences of being bullied in school for more than one year;were interviewed. Qualitative analysis of data was performed by methods from grounded theory. The research identified a basic process of victimising in s...

  18. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k0=0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the

  19. Field measurement of relative ground displacement

    Protection of existing structures is a major requirement during underground nuclear blasts detonated as part of the Plowshare Program. Instrumental arrays to record ground motion are routinely established prior to blasts. These provide data on particle motions during the event but do not provide direct information concerning ground strains and relative displacements which may effect bridges, buildings, irrigation channels and other structures with large plan dimension. An experimental technique which was hastily developed and deployed to measure relative displacements during the Rio Blanco event of May 17, 1973 is described. The work was performed in anticipation of the Project Wagon Wheel in an area of Wyoming with many concrete lined irrigation channels

  20. Ground state number fluctuations of trapped particles

    Tran, Muoi N.

    This thesis encompasses a number of problems related to the number fluctuations from the ground state of ideal particles in different statistical ensembles. In the microcanonical ensemble most of these problems may be solved using number theory. Given an energy E, the well-known problem of finding the number of ways of distributing N bosons over the excited levels of a one-dimensional harmonic spectrum, for instance, is equivalent to the number of restricted partitions of E. As a result, the number fluctuation from the ground state in the microcanonical ensemble for this system may be found analytically. When the particles are fermions instead of bosons, however, it is difficult to calculate the exact ground state number fluctuation because the fermionic ground state consists of many levels. By breaking up the energy spectrum into particle and hole sectors, and mapping the problem onto the classic number partitioning theory, we formulate a method of calculating the particle number fluctuation from the ground state in the microcanonical ensemble for fermions. The same quantity is calculated for particles interacting via an inverse-square pairwise interaction in one dimension. In the canonical ensemble, an analytical formula for the ground state number fluctuation is obtained by using the mapping of this system onto a system of noninteracting particles obeying the Haldane-Wu exclusion statistics. In the microcanonical ensemble, however, the result can be obtained only for a limited set of values of the interacting strength parameter. Usually, for a discrete set of a mean-field single-particle quantum spectrum and in the microcanonical ensemble, there are many combinations of exciting particles from the ground state. The spectrum given by the logarithms of the prime number sequence, however, is a counterexample to this rule. Here, as a consequence of the fundamental theorem of arithmetic, there is a one-to-one correspondence between the microstate and the macrostate

  1. The use of hydrological and geoelectrical data to fix the boundary conditions of a ground water flow model: a case study

    M. Giudici

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess whether the hydrometric level of an artificial lake in a quarry near Milan (Italy could be assigned as a Dirichlet boundary condition for the phreatic aquifer in a fine scale groundwater flow model, hydrological measurements of piezometric head and rainfall rate time series have been analysed by spectral and statistical methods. The piezometric head close to the quarry lake proved to be well correlated with seasonal variations in the rainfall. Furthermore, geoelectrical tomography detected no semi-permeable layer between the phreatic aquifer and the lake, so the contact between surface and ground water is good. Finally, a time-varying prescribed head condition can be applied for ground water flow modelling. Keywords: ground water flow, boundary conditions, surface and ground water interactions, geoelectrical tomography, statistical analysis.

  2. Generalized isotropic Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick models: ground state entanglement and quantum entropies

    Carrasco, José A.; Finkel, Federico; González-López, Artemio; Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Tempesta, Piergiulio

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a new class of generalized isotropic Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick models with \\text{su}(m+1) spin and long-range non-constant interactions, whose non-degenerate ground state is a Dicke state of \\text{su}(m+1) type. We evaluate in closed form the reduced density matrix of a block of L spins when the whole system is in its ground state, and study the corresponding von Neumann and Rényi entanglement entropies in the thermodynamic limit. We show that both of these entropies scale as alog L when L tends to infinity, where the coefficient a is equal to (m  -  k)/2 in the ground state phase with k vanishing \\text{su}(m+1) magnon densities. In particular, our results show that none of these generalized Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick models are critical, since when L\\to ∞ their Rényi entropy R q becomes independent of the parameter q. We have also computed the Tsallis entanglement entropy of the ground state of these generalized \\text{su}(m+1) Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick models, finding that it can be made extensive by an appropriate choice of its parameter only when m-k≥slant 3 . Finally, in the \\text{su}(3) case we construct in detail the phase diagram of the ground state in parameter space, showing that it is determined in a simple way by the weights of the fundamental representation of \\text{su}(3) . This is also true in the \\text{su}(m+1) case; for instance, we prove that the region for which all the magnon densities are non-vanishing is an (m  +  1)-simplex in {{{R}}m} whose vertices are the weights of the fundamental representation of \\text{su}(m+1) .

  3. CTP-based tissue outcome. Promising tool to prove the beneficial effect of mechanical recanalization in acute ischemic stroke

    Drewer-Gutland, F.; Niederstadt, T.U.; Heindel, W. [University Hospital Muenster (Germany). Inst. for Clinical Radiology; Kemmling, A. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Ligges, S. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Biostatistics and Clinical Research; Ritter, M.; Dziewas, R.; Ringelstein, E.B. [University Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Hesselmann, V. [Asklepios-Clinic North, Hamburg (Germany). Radiology/Neuroradiology

    2015-06-15

    To prove the tissue-protecting effect of mechanical recanalization, we assessed the CT perfusion-based tissue outcome (''TO'') and correlated this imaging parameter with the 3-month clinical outcome (''CO''). 159 patients with large intracranial artery occlusions revealing mechanical recanalization were investigated by CCT, CT angiography (CTA) and CT perfusion (CTP) upon admission. For the final infarct volume, native CCT was repeated after 24h. The ''TO'' (''percentage mismatch loss'' = %ML) was defined as the difference between initial penumbral tissue on CTP and final infarct volume on follow-up CCT. We monitored the three-month modified Rankin Scale (mRS), age, bleeding occurrence, time to recanalization, TICI score and collateralization grade, infarct growth and final infarct volume. Spearman's correlation and nominal regression analysis were used to evaluate the impact of these parameters on mRS Significant correlations were found for %ML and mRS (c=0.48, p<0.001), for final infarct volume and mRS (c=0.52, p<0.001), for TICI score and mRS (c=-0.35, p<0.001), for initial infarct core and mRS (c=0.14, p=0.039) as well as for age and mRS (c=0.37, p<0.001). According to the regression analysis, %ML predicted the classification of mRS correctly in 38.5% of cases. The subclasses mRS 1 and 6 could be predicted by %ML with 86.4% and 60.9% reliability, respectively. No correlations were found for time to recanalization and mRS, for collateralization grade and mRS, and for post-interventional bleeding and mRS. Better than the TICI score, CT-based TO predicts the clinical success of mechanical recanalization, showing that not recanalization, but reperfusion should be regarded as a surrogate parameter for stroke therapy.

  4. Proposal for extension of ORSA to include phasing in to prove successive encounters of an asteroid between Earth and Mars

    Jolitz, Benjamin

    Ben Jolitz 2/6/10 Proposal for extension of ORSA to include phasing in to prove successive encounters of an asteroid between Earth and Mars Phasing is the act of changing the phase angle between two sinusoidal functions. In the case of orbits, which are ellipses drawn by sinusoidal functions, phasing is the act of matching one orbit to another. Finding the phasing parameters of a captured asteroid, a non-Keplarian object, in a resonant bi-elliptic orbit and simulation thereof is rather difficult without specialized and esoteric applications. However, open source in the last ten years has made incredible advance-ments, and some projects originally designed for orbital reconstruction have been released to the public on an AS IS basis; one such project is ORSA -Orbital Reconstruction, Simulation, Analysis. ORSA, however, does not have methods for evaluating the relative changes to a phase angle of a bi-elliptic orbit in a recursive manner for successive encounters. For years, space shuttles and other celestial transport vessels have been faced with the difficulty of docking with the International Space Station, a task which involves matching the craft to the unique elliptical orbit of the ISS such that the shuttle will meet the ISS with the appropriate orbital parameters. However, calculation of such requires consideration of only the Earth and it's effect on rather small, man-made objects. In electrical engineering, the concept of a phase lock loop is used to match the frequency and phase of a controlled oscillator with a given set of input signals. In our test case, we wish compute the successive bi-elliptic half orbits of a captured asteroid that traverses between Earth and Mars using gravitational interactions with the intent of computing the relative phase angle between the desired half orbit and current orbit such that a timed encounter with Earth or Mars is possible. The goal of this proposal is to extend ORSA to maintain relative phase angle between bi

  5. CTP-based tissue outcome. Promising tool to prove the beneficial effect of mechanical recanalization in acute ischemic stroke

    To prove the tissue-protecting effect of mechanical recanalization, we assessed the CT perfusion-based tissue outcome (''TO'') and correlated this imaging parameter with the 3-month clinical outcome (''CO''). 159 patients with large intracranial artery occlusions revealing mechanical recanalization were investigated by CCT, CT angiography (CTA) and CT perfusion (CTP) upon admission. For the final infarct volume, native CCT was repeated after 24h. The ''TO'' (''percentage mismatch loss'' = %ML) was defined as the difference between initial penumbral tissue on CTP and final infarct volume on follow-up CCT. We monitored the three-month modified Rankin Scale (mRS), age, bleeding occurrence, time to recanalization, TICI score and collateralization grade, infarct growth and final infarct volume. Spearman's correlation and nominal regression analysis were used to evaluate the impact of these parameters on mRS Significant correlations were found for %ML and mRS (c=0.48, p<0.001), for final infarct volume and mRS (c=0.52, p<0.001), for TICI score and mRS (c=-0.35, p<0.001), for initial infarct core and mRS (c=0.14, p=0.039) as well as for age and mRS (c=0.37, p<0.001). According to the regression analysis, %ML predicted the classification of mRS correctly in 38.5% of cases. The subclasses mRS 1 and 6 could be predicted by %ML with 86.4% and 60.9% reliability, respectively. No correlations were found for time to recanalization and mRS, for collateralization grade and mRS, and for post-interventional bleeding and mRS. Better than the TICI score, CT-based TO predicts the clinical success of mechanical recanalization, showing that not recanalization, but reperfusion should be regarded as a surrogate parameter for stroke therapy.

  6. PV Systems Reliability Final Technical Report: Ground Fault Detection

    Lavrova, Olga [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flicker, Jack David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We have examined ground faults in PhotoVoltaic (PV) arrays and the efficacy of fuse, current detection (RCD), current sense monitoring/relays (CSM), isolation/insulation (Riso) monitoring, and Ground Fault Detection and Isolation (GFID) using simulations based on a Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis SPICE ground fault circuit model, experimental ground faults installed on real arrays, and theoretical equations.

  7. Fault current analysis in JT-60 grounding system

    The determination of a ground fault current is described in the case where a ground fault occurs in JT-60 device. Specifically, a case in which six coils caused a simultaneous ground fault is investigated. It is found that when faults in vertical and toroidal magnetic field coils occur simultaneously, the resultant ground fault current is very large

  8. PROCEDURE FOR LOCALLY RAISING THE GROUND ARTIFICIALLY

    Schuiling, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Abstract of corresponding document: WO 8909251 (A1) The present invention relates to a procedure for locally raising the ground artificially, wherein an equivalent quantity of the calcite (CaCO3) present in the porous underground limestone formations is converted into gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) by inje

  9. Clostridium difficile in Retail Ground Meat, Canada

    Rodriguez-Palacios, Alexander; Staempfli, Henry R.; Duffield, Todd; Weese, J. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was isolated from 12 (20%) of 60 retail ground meat samples purchased over a 10-month period in 2005 in Canada. Eleven isolates were toxigenic, and 8 (67%) were classified as toxinotype III. The human health implications of this finding are unclear, but with the virulence of toxinotype III strains further studies are required.

  10. Ground water work breakdown structure dictionary

    This report contains the activities that are necessary to assess in ground water remediation as specified in the UMTRA Project. These activities include the following: site characterization; remedial action compliance and design documentation; environment, health, and safety program; technology assessment; property access and acquisition activities; site remedial actions; long term surveillance and licensing; and technical and management support

  11. Attacking Africa's Poverty : Experience from the Ground

    Fox, Louise M.; Liebenthal, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    By all measures, poverty in Africa as a whole has increased and deepened. But in fact, Africa contains a number of undocumented success stories of poverty reduction. This book presents case studies of thirteen of these success stories, giving grounds for some real hope, and providing useful learning for all policymakers, governments, businesses, service providers, non-governmental organiza...

  12. PREPARING YOUR ROLE ARTISTIC GYMNASTICS MALE GROUND

    CRISTIAN LERIC, Honored Master of Sports

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A requirement of modern high performance gymnastics is origina- lity and originality in composition exercises movements and con- nections to equipment and especially the ground. It is known that the formation of an artistic kept proper begins very early hours in the gym and continue throughout the career athlete per- fecting his time.

  13. Probability of Grounding and Collision Events

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    To quantify the risks involved in ship traffic, rational criteria for collision and grounding accidents are developed. This implies that probabilities as well as inherent consequences can be analysed and assessed. The presnt paper outlines a method for evaluation of the probability of ship...

  14. Probability of Grounding and Collision Events

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    To quantify the risks involved in ship traffic, rational criteria for collision and grounding accidents have to be developed. This implies that probabilities as well as inherent consequences have to be analyzed and assessed.The present notes outline a method for evaluation of the probability of...

  15. Outdoor synthetic aperture acoustic ground target measurements

    Bishop, Steven; Ngaya, Therese-Ann; Vignola, Joe; Judge, John; Marble, Jay; Gugino, Peter; Soumekh, Mehrdad; Rosen, Erik

    2010-04-01

    A novel outdoor synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) system consists of a microphone and loudspeaker traveling along a 6.3-meter rail system. This is an extension from a prior indoor laboratory measurement system in which selected targets were insonified while suspended in air. Here, the loudspeaker and microphone are aimed perpendicular to their direction of travel along the rail. The area next to the rail is insonified and the microphone records the reflected acoustic signal, while the travel of the transceiver along the rail creates a synthetic aperture allowing imaging of the scene. Ground surfaces consisted of weathered asphalt and short grass. Several surface-laid objects were arranged on the ground for SAA imaging. These included rocks, concrete masonry blocks, grout covered foam blocks; foliage obscured objects and several spherical canonical targets such as a bowling ball, and plastic and metal spheres. The measured data are processed and ground targets are further analyzed for characteristics and features amenable for discrimination. This paper includes a description of the measurement system, target descriptions, synthetic aperture processing approach and preliminary findings with respect to ground surface and target characteristics.

  16. Developing Computational Thinking through Grounded Embodied Cognition

    Fadjo, Cameron Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to examine the use of grounded embodied pedagogy, construction of Imaginary Worlds (Study 1), and context of instructional materials (Study 2) for developing learners' Computational Thinking (CT) Skills and Concept knowledge during the construction of digital artifacts using Scratch, a block-based programming…

  17. Depth to ground water of Nevada

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a raster-based, depth to ground-water data set for the State of Nevada. The source of this data set is a statewide water-table contour data set constructed...

  18. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Ground Test Development

    Del Corso, Jospeh A.; Hughes, Stephen; Cheatwood, Neil; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology readiness levels have been incrementally matured by NASA over the last thirteen years, with most recent support from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). Recently STMD GCDP has authorized funding and support through fiscal year 2015 (FY15) for continued HIAD ground developments which support a Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) study. The Mars study will assess the viability of various EDL architectures to enable a Mars human architecture pathfinder mission planned for mid-2020. At its conclusion in November 2014, NASA's first HIAD ground development effort had demonstrated success with fabricating a 50 W/cm2 modular thermal protection system, a 400 C capable inflatable structure, a 10-meter scale aeroshell manufacturing capability, together with calibrated thermal and structural models. Despite the unquestionable success of the first HIAD ground development effort, it was recognized that additional investment was needed in order to realize the full potential of the HIAD technology capability to enable future flight opportunities. The second HIAD ground development effort will focus on extending performance capability in key technology areas that include thermal protection system, lifting-body structures, inflation systems, flight control, stage transitions, and 15-meter aeroshell scalability. This paper presents an overview of the accomplishments under the baseline HIAD development effort and current plans for a follow-on development effort focused on extending those critical technologies needed to enable a Mars Pathfinder mission.

  19. Buried in the Warm, Warm Ground

    Ellis-Tipton, John

    2006-01-01

    Buntingsdale Infant School in Shropshire has installed an environmentally friendly heating system. The school's heating system is called a Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP). Buntingsdale, a three-classroom infant school in a wooden demountable building, is one of the first schools in Britain to use this system. The system is fully automatic: it is…

  20. Collision and Grounding, Committee V.3

    Paik, J.K.; Amdahl, J.; Barltrop, N.;

    2003-01-01

    Concern for structural arrangements on ships and floating structures with regard to their integrity and adequacy in the events of collisions and grounding, taking into account the probabilistic and physical nature of such accidents. Consideration shall be given to the effectiveness of structural ...