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Sample records for aberdeen maryland reactor

  1. Environmental geophysics at Beach Point, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    McGinnis, L.D.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Miller, S.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reclamation Engineering and Geosciences Section; Mandell, W.A. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Wrobel, J. [Dept. of Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Geophysical studies at Beach Point Peninsula, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies permit construction of the most reasonable scenario linking dense, nonaqueous-phase liquid contaminants introduced at the surface with their pathway through the surficial aquifer. Subsurface geology and contaminant presence were identified by drilling, outcrop mapping, and groundwater sampling and analyses. Suspected sources of near-surface contaminants were defined by magnetic and conductivity measurements. Negative conductivity anomalies may be associated with unlined trenches. Positive magnetic and conductivity anomalies outline suspected tanks and pipes. The anomalies of greatest concern are those spatially associated with a concrete slab that formerly supported a mobile clothing impregnating plant. Resistivity and conductivity profiling and depth soundings were used to identify an electrical anomaly extending through the surficial aquifer to the basal pleistocene unconformity, which was mapped by using seismic reflection methods. The anomaly may be representative of a contaminant plume connected to surficial sources. Major activities in the area included liquid rocket fuel tests, rocket fuel fire suppression tests, pyrotechnic material and smoke generator tests, and the use of solvents at a mobile clothing impregnating plant.

  2. Environmental geophysics at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Daudt, C.R.; McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    Geophysical data collected at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, were used in the characterization of the natural hydrogeologic framework of the J-Field area and in the identification of buried disturbances (trenches and other evidences of contamination). Seismic refraction and reflection data and electrical resistivity data have aided in the characterization of the leaky confining unit at the base of the surficial aquifer (designated Unit B of the Tertiary Talbot Formation). Excellent reflectors have been observed for both upper and lower surfaces of Unit B that correspond to stratigraphic units observed in boreholes and on gamma logs. Elevation maps of both surfaces and an isopach map of Unit B, created from reflection data at the toxic burning pits site, show a thickening of Unit B to the east. Abnormally low seismic compressional-wave velocities suggest that Unit B consists of gassy sediments whose gases are not being flushed by upward or downward moving groundwater. The presence of gases suggests that Unit B serves as an efficient aquitard that should not be penetrated by drilling or other activities. Electromagnetic, total-intensity magnetic, and ground-penetrating radar surveys have aided in delineating the limits of two buried trenches, the VX burning pit and the liquid smoke disposal pit, both located at the toxic burning pits site. The techniques have also aided in determining the extent of several other disturbed areas where soils and materials were pushed out of disposal pits during trenching activities. Surveys conducted from the Prototype Building west to the Gunpowder River did not reveal any buried trenches.

  3. High resolution seismic reflection profiling at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland

    The effectiveness of shallow high resolution seismic reflection (i.e., resolution potential) to image geologic interfaces between about 70 and 750 ft at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland (APG), appears to vary locally with the geometric complexity of the unconsolidated sediments that overlay crystalline bedrock. The bedrock surface (which represents the primary geologic target of this study) was imaged at each of three test areas on walkaway noise tests and CDP (common depth point) stacked data. Proven high resolution techniques were used to design and acquire data on this survey. Feasibility of the technique and minimum acquisition requirements were determined through evaluation and correlation of walkaway noise tests, CDP survey lines, and a downhole velocity check shot survey. Data processing and analysis revealed several critical attributes of shallow seismic data from APG that need careful consideration and compensation on reflection data sets. This survey determined: (1) the feasibility of the technique, (2) the resolution potential (both horizontal and vertical) of the technique, (3) the optimum source for this site, (4) the optimum acquisition geometries, (5) general processing flow, and (6) a basic idea of the acoustic variability across this site. Source testing involved an accelerated weight drop, land air gun, downhole black powder charge, sledge hammer/plate, and high frequency vibrator. Shallow seismic reflection profiles provided for a more detailed picture of the geometric complexity and variability of the distinct clay sequences (aquatards), previously inferred from drilling to be present, based on sparse drill holes and basewide conceptual models. The seismic data also reveal a clear explanation for the difficulties previously noted in correlating individual, borehole-identified sand or clay units over even short distances

  4. Health assessment for Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Aberdeen, Maryland, Region 3. CERCLIS Nos. MD3210021355 and MD10020036. Preliminary report

    1989-01-19

    The Aberdeen Proving Grounds site is located in Aberdeen (Harford County) Maryland. Preliminary on-site groundwater and surface water sampling results have identified various metals, phosphorus, and volatile organic compounds. They include: 1,2-dichloroethylene, chloroform, 1,2-dichloroethane, trichloroethylene, benzene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, 1,4-dithiane and 1,2-dichloroethylene. In addition, it has been reported that among the substances disposed of on-site are significant quantities of toxic metals, cyanide compounds, phosphorus, phosgene, napalm, and mustard gas. The site is considered to be of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the likelihood of human exposure to hazardous substances. Potential environmental pathways include those related to contaminated groundwater, surface water, on-site soils, and volatilization of contaminants in ambient air.

  5. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2000-02-25

    The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment.

  6. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment

    The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment

  7. Ecological survey of M-Field, Edgewood Area Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Downs, J.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Fitzner, R.E.; Rogers, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    An ecological survey was conducted on M-Field, at the Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. M-Field is used routinely to test army smokes and obscurants, including brass flakes, carbon fibers, and fog oils. The field has been used for testing purposes for the past 40 years, but little documented history is available. Under current environmental regulations, the test field must be assessed periodically to document the presence or potential use of the area by threatened and endangered species. The M-Field area is approximately 370 acres and is part of the US Army`s Edgewood Area at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland. The grass-covered field is primarily lowlands with elevations from about 1.0 to 8 m above sea level, and several buildings and structures are present on the field. The ecological assessment of M-Field was conducted in three stages, beginning with a preliminary site visit in May to assess sampling requirements. Two field site visits were made June 3--7, and August 12--15, 1991, to identify the biota existing on the site. Data were gathered on vegetation, small mammals, invertebrates, birds, large mammals, amphibians, and reptiles.

  8. Ecological survey of M-Field, Edgewood Area Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Downs, J.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Fitzner, R.E.; Rogers, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    An ecological survey was conducted on M-Field, at the Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. M-Field is used routinely to test army smokes and obscurants, including brass flakes, carbon fibers, and fog oils. The field has been used for testing purposes for the past 40 years, but little documented history is available. Under current environmental regulations, the test field must be assessed periodically to document the presence or potential use of the area by threatened and endangered species. The M-Field area is approximately 370 acres and is part of the US Army's Edgewood Area at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland. The grass-covered field is primarily lowlands with elevations from about 1.0 to 8 m above sea level, and several buildings and structures are present on the field. The ecological assessment of M-Field was conducted in three stages, beginning with a preliminary site visit in May to assess sampling requirements. Two field site visits were made June 3--7, and August 12--15, 1991, to identify the biota existing on the site. Data were gathered on vegetation, small mammals, invertebrates, birds, large mammals, amphibians, and reptiles.

  9. Work plan for conducting an ecological risk assessment at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [and others

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Management Division of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland, and activities at the Edgewood Area since World War II have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. The J-Field site was used to destroy chemical agents and munitions by open burning and open detonation. This work plan presents the approach proposed to conduct an ecological risk assessment (ERA) as part of the RI/FS program at J-Field. This work plan identifies the locations and types of field studies proposed for each area of concern (AOC), the laboratory studies proposed to evaluate toxicity of media, and the methodology to be used in estimating doses to ecological receptors and discusses the approach that will be used to estimate and evaluate ecological risks at J-Field. Eight AOCs have been identified at J-Field, and the proposed ERA is designed to evaluate the potential for adverse impacts to ecological receptors from contaminated media at each AOC, as well as over the entire J-Field site. The proposed ERA approach consists of three major phases, incorporating field and laboratory studies as well as modeling. Phase 1 includes biotic surveys of the aquatic and terrestrial habitats, biological tissue sampling and analysis, and media toxicity testing at each AOC and appropriate reference locations. Phase 2 includes definitive toxicity testing of media from areas of known or suspected contamination or of media for which the Phase 1 results indicate toxicity or adverse ecological effects. In Phase 3, the uptake models initially developed in Phase 2 will be finalized, and contaminant dose to each receptor from all complete pathways will be estimated.

  10. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results

    Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

    2000-03-14

    This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

  11. Contamination source review for Building E3180, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Zellmer, S.D.; Smits, M.P.; Rueda, J.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report was prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to document the results of a contamination source review of Building E3180 at the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) in Maryland. The report may be used to assist the US Army in planning for the future use or disposition of this building. The review included a historical records search, physical inspection, photographic documentation, geophysical investigation, collection of air samples, and review of available records regarding underground storage tanks associated with Building E3180. The field investigations were performed by ANL during 1994. Building,E3180 (current APG designation) is located near the eastern end of Kings Creek Road, north of Kings Creek, and about 0.5 miles east of the airstrip within APG`s Edgewood Area. The building was constructed in 1944 as a facsimile of a Japanese pillbox and used for the development of flame weapons systems until 1957 (EAI Corporation 1989). The building was not used from 1957 until 1965, when it was converted and used as a flame and incendiary laboratory. During the 1970s, the building was converted to a machine (metal) shop and used for that purpose until 1988.

  12. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results

    This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field

  13. Contamination source review for Building E3162, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Miller, G.A.; Draugelis, A.K.; Rueda, J.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report was prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to document the results of a contamination source review for Building E3162 at the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) in Maryland. The report may be used to assist the US Army in planning for the future use or disposition of this building. The review included a historical records search, physical inspection, photographic documentation, geophysical investigation, and collection of air samples. The field investigations were performed by ANL during 1994 and 1995. Building E3162 (APG designation) is part of the Medical Research Laboratories Building E3160 Complex. This research laboratory complex is located west of Kings Creek, east of the airfield and Ricketts Point Road, and south of Kings Creek Road in the Edgewood Area of APG. The original structures in the E3160 Complex were constructed during World War 2. The complex was originally used as a medical research laboratory. Much of the research involved wound assessment involving chemical warfare agents. Building E3162 was used as a holding and study area for animals involved in non-agent burns. The building was constructed in 1952, placed on inactive status in 1983, and remains unoccupied. Analytical results from these air samples revealed no distinguishable difference in hydrocarbon and chlorinated solvent levels between the two background samples and the sample taken inside Building E3162.

  14. Environmental geophysics at the Southern Bush River Peninsula, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Davies, B.E.; Miller, S.F.; McGinnis, L.D. [and others

    1995-05-01

    Geophysical studies have been conducted at five sites in the southern Bush River Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The goals of the studies were to identify areas containing buried metallic objects and to provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework of the site. These studies indicate that, during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low sea level resulted in a complex pattern of channel-fill deposits. Paleochannels of various sizes and orientations have been mapped throughout the study area by means of ground-penetrating radar and EM-31 techniques. The EM-31 paleochannel signatures are represented onshore either by conductivity highs or lows, depending on the depths and facies of the fill sequences. A companion study shows the features as conductivity highs where they extend offshore. This erosional and depositional system is environmentally significant because of the role it plays in the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the site. Magnetic and electromagnetic anomalies outline surficial and buried debris throughout the areas surveyed. On the basis of geophysical measurements, large-scale (i.e., tens of feet) landfilling has not been found in the southern Bush River Peninsula, though smaller-scale dumping of metallic debris and/or munitions cannot be ruled out.

  15. Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a freshwater tidal wetland, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Smith, Barrett L.; Johnson, Mark A.; Fleck, William B.

    1997-01-01

    Ground-water contaminant plumes that are flowing toward or currently discharging to wetland areas present unique remediation problems because of the hydrologic connections between ground water and surface water and the sensitive habitats in wetlands. Because wetlands typically have a large diversity of microorganisms and redox conditions that could enhance biodegradation, they are ideal environments for natural attenuation of organic contaminants, which is a treatment method that would leave the ecosystem largely undisturbed and be cost effective. During 1992-97, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated the natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOC's) in a contaminant plume that discharges from a sand aquifer to a freshwater tidal wetland along the West Branch Canal Creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Characterization of the hydrogeology and geochemistry along flowpaths in the wetland area and determination of the occurrence and rates of biodegradation and sorption show that natural attenuation could be a feasible remediation method for the contaminant plume that extends along the West Branch Canal Creek.

  16. Potential health impacts from range fires at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

    Willians, G.P.; Hermes, A.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Hartmann, H.M.; Tomasko, D.

    1998-03-01

    This study uses atmospheric dispersion computer models to evaluate the potential for human health impacts from exposure to contaminants that could be dispersed by fires on the testing ranges at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. It was designed as a screening study and does not estimate actual human health risks. Considered are five contaminants possibly present in the soil and vegetation from past human activities at APG--lead, arsenic, trichloroethylene (TCE), depleted uranium (DU), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT); and two chemical warfare agents that could be released from unexploded ordnance rounds heated in a range fire--mustard and phosgene. For comparison, dispersion of two naturally occurring compounds that could be released by burning of uncontaminated vegetation--vinyl acetate and 2-furaldehyde--is also examined. Data from previous studies on soil contamination at APG are used in conjunction with conservative estimates about plant uptake of contaminants, atmospheric conditions, and size and frequency of range fires at APG to estimate dispersion and possible human exposure. The results are compared with US Environmental Protection Agency action levels. The comparisons indicate that for all of the anthropogenic contaminants except arsenic and mustard, exposure levels would be at least an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding action levels. Because of the compoundingly conservative nature of the assumptions made, they conclude that the potential for significant human health risks from range fires is low. The authors recommend that future efforts be directed at fire management and control, rather than at conducting additional studies to more accurately estimate actual human health risk from range fires.

  17. Potential health impacts from range fires at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    This study uses atmospheric dispersion computer models to evaluate the potential for human health impacts from exposure to contaminants that could be dispersed by fires on the testing ranges at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. It was designed as a screening study and does not estimate actual human health risks. Considered are five contaminants possibly present in the soil and vegetation from past human activities at APG--lead, arsenic, trichloroethylene (TCE), depleted uranium (DU), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT); and two chemical warfare agents that could be released from unexploded ordnance rounds heated in a range fire--mustard and phosgene. For comparison, dispersion of two naturally occurring compounds that could be released by burning of uncontaminated vegetation--vinyl acetate and 2-furaldehyde--is also examined. Data from previous studies on soil contamination at APG are used in conjunction with conservative estimates about plant uptake of contaminants, atmospheric conditions, and size and frequency of range fires at APG to estimate dispersion and possible human exposure. The results are compared with US Environmental Protection Agency action levels. The comparisons indicate that for all of the anthropogenic contaminants except arsenic and mustard, exposure levels would be at least an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding action levels. Because of the compoundingly conservative nature of the assumptions made, they conclude that the potential for significant human health risks from range fires is low. The authors recommend that future efforts be directed at fire management and control, rather than at conducting additional studies to more accurately estimate actual human health risk from range fires

  18. Disposition of fuel elements from the Aberdeen and Sandia pulse reactor (SPR-II) assemblies

    Mckerley, Bill [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bustamante, Jacqueline M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Drypolcher, Anthony F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hickey, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    to consolidate the locations of special nuclear material (SNM) to reduce the cost of securing many SNM facilities. The removal of SPR-II from SNL was a significant accomplishment in SNL's de-inventory efforts and played a key role in reducing the number of locations requiring the expensive security measures required for category 1 and 2 SNM facilities. A similar pulse reactor was fabricated at the Y-12 National Security Complex beginning in the late 1960's. This Aberdeen Pulse Reactor (APR) was operated at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) located at the Aberdeen Test Center (ATC) in Maryland. When the APRF was shut down in 2003, a portion of the DOE-owned Special Nuclear Material (SNM) was shipped to an interim facility for storage. Subsequently, the DOE determined that the material from both the SPR-II and the APR would be processed in the H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because of the SRS receipt requirements some of the material was sent to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size-reduction prior to shipment to the SRS for final disposition.

  19. Initial building investigations at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: Objectives and methodology

    Brubaker, K.L.; Dougherty, J.M.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1994-12-01

    As part of an environmental-contamination source-definition program at Aberdeen Proving Ground, detailed internal and external inspections of 23 potentially contaminated buildings are being conducted to describe and characterize the state of each building as it currently exists and to identify areas potentially contaminated with toxic or other hazardous substances. In addition, a detailed geophysical investigation is being conducted in the vicinity of each target building to locate and identify subsurface structures, associated with former building operations, that are potential sources of contamination. This report describes the objectives of the initial building inspections, including the geophysical investigations, and discusses the methodology that has been developed to achieve these objectives.

  20. Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Field Sampling Plan

    Benioff, P.; Biang, R.; Dolak, D.; Dunn, C.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wang, Y.; Yuen, C.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Management Division (EMD) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland (Figure 1. 1). Since World War II activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). Considerable archival information about J-Field exists as a result of efforts by APG staff to characterize the hazards associated with the site. Contamination of J-Field was first detected during an environmental survey of the Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 by the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) (predecessor to the US Army Environmental Center [AEC]). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA -environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field. Contamination at J-Field was also detected during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science in 1983. The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved the installation and sampling of nine wells and the collection and analysis of surficial and deep composite soil samples. In 1986, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit (MD3-21-002-1355) requiring a basewide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field was issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 1987, the US Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phased hydrogeologic assessment in data were collected to model, groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed, a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today.

  1. Evaluation of depleted uranium in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds, Arizona. Final report

    This report represents an evaluation of depleted uranium (DU) introduced into the environment at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds (APG), Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) Arizona. This was a cooperative project between the Environmental Sciences and Statistical Analyses Groups at LANL and with the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology at Colorado State University. The project represents a unique approach to assessing the environmental impact of DU in two dissimilar ecosystems. Ecological exposure models were created for each ecosystem and sensitivity/uncertainty analyses were conducted to identify exposure pathways which were most influential in the fate and transport of DU in the environment. Research included field sampling, field exposure experiment, and laboratory experiments. The first section addresses DU at the APG site. Chapter topics include bioenergetics-based food web model; field exposure experiments; bioconcentration by phytoplankton and the toxicity of U to zooplankton; physical processes governing the desorption of uranium from sediment to water; transfer of uranium from sediment to benthic invertebrates; spead of adsorpion by benthic invertebrates; uptake of uranium by fish. The final section of the report addresses DU at the YPG site. Chapters include the following information: Du transport processes and pathway model; field studies of performance of exposure model; uptake and elimination rates for kangaroo rates; chemical toxicity in kangaroo rat kidneys

  2. Evaluation of depleted uranium in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds, Arizona. Final report

    Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.H.; Myers, O.B.; Bestgen, H.T.; Jenkins, D.G. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

    1995-01-01

    This report represents an evaluation of depleted uranium (DU) introduced into the environment at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds (APG), Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) Arizona. This was a cooperative project between the Environmental Sciences and Statistical Analyses Groups at LANL and with the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology at Colorado State University. The project represents a unique approach to assessing the environmental impact of DU in two dissimilar ecosystems. Ecological exposure models were created for each ecosystem and sensitivity/uncertainty analyses were conducted to identify exposure pathways which were most influential in the fate and transport of DU in the environment. Research included field sampling, field exposure experiment, and laboratory experiments. The first section addresses DU at the APG site. Chapter topics include bioenergetics-based food web model; field exposure experiments; bioconcentration by phytoplankton and the toxicity of U to zooplankton; physical processes governing the desorption of uranium from sediment to water; transfer of uranium from sediment to benthic invertebrates; spead of adsorpion by benthic invertebrates; uptake of uranium by fish. The final section of the report addresses DU at the YPG site. Chapters include the following information: Du transport processes and pathway model; field studies of performance of exposure model; uptake and elimination rates for kangaroo rates; chemical toxicity in kangaroo rat kidneys.

  3. Focused feasibility study for surface soil at the main pits and pushout area, J-field toxic burning pits area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Patton, T.; Benioff, P.; Biang, C.; Butler, J. [and others

    1996-06-01

    The Environmental Management Division of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). J-Field is located within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland. Since World War II, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning/open detonation. Portions of J-Field continue to be used for the detonation and disposal of unexploded ordnance (UXO) by open burning/open detonation under authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  4. Inorganic and organic ground-water chemistry in the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Lorah, M.M.; Vroblesky, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Groundwater chemical data were collected from November 1986 through April 1987 in the first phase of a 5-year study to assess the possibility of groundwater contamination in the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Water samples were collected from 87 observation wells screened in Coastal Plain sediments; 59 samples were collected from the Canal Creek aquifer, 18 from the overlying surficial aquifer, and 10 from the lower confined aquifer. Dissolved solids, chloride, iron, manganese, fluoride, mercury, and chromium are present in concentrations that exceed the Federal maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Elevated chloride and dissolved-solids concentrations appear to be related from contaminant plumes but also could result from brackish-water intrusion. Excessive concentrations of iron and manganese were the most extensive water quality problems found among the inorganic constituents and are derived from natural dissolution of minerals and oxide coatings in the aquifer sediments. Volatile organic compounds are present in the Canal Creek and surficial aquifers, but samples from the lower confined aquifer do not show any evidence of contamination by inorganic or organic chemicals. The volatile organic contaminants detected in the groundwater and their maximum concentrations (in micrograms/L) include 1,1,2,2- tetrachloroethane (9,000); carbon tetrachloride (480); chloroform (460); 1,1,2-trichloroethane (80); 1,2-dichloroethane (990); 1,1-dichloroethane (3.1); tetrachloroethylene (100); trichloroethylene (1,800); 1,2-trans- dichloroethylene (1,200); 1,1-dichloroethylene (4.4); vinyl chloride (140); benzene (70); and chlorobenzene (39). On the basis of information on past activities in the study area, some sources of the volatile organic compounds include: (1) decontaminants and degreasers; (2) clothing-impregnating operations; (3) the manufacture of impregnite material; (4) the manufacture of tear gas; and (5) fuels used in garages and at

  5. Water-quality and water-level data for a freshwater tidal wetland, West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, October 1998-September 1999

    Spencer, Tracey A.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Mount, Mastin M.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents water-quality data for ground-water and surface-water samples and water-level data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from October 1998 through September 1999 at West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The report also provides a description of the sampling and analytical methods that were used to collect and analyze the samples, and includes an evaluation of the quality-assurance data. The ground-water sampling network includes 88 wells or piezometers, including four 2-inch wells, two 4-inch wells, thirty 0.75-inch piezo-meters, and fifty-two 0.25-inch piezometers. Water levels were measured in 105 wells or piezometers. Surface-water samples were collected at five sites. Samples were collected from wells and 0.75-inch piezometers for measurement of field parameters, and analysis of inorganic and organic constituents during three sampling rounds: March, May through June, and July through August of 1999. Inorganic constituents and organic constituents were analyzed in samples collected from 0.25-inch piezometers during three sampling rounds in February through March, May, and September of 1999. Water levels were measured in October and November of 1998, and in February and May of 1999. Surface-water samples were collected between February and August of 1999 for analysis of organic constituents.

  6. Microbial Consortia Development and Microcosm and Column Experiments for Enhanced Bioremediation of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds, West Branch Canal Creek Wetland Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Majcher, Emily H.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated solvents, including 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform, are reaching land surface in localized areas of focused ground-water discharge (seeps) in a wetland and tidal creek in the West Branch Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, the U.S. Geological Survey is developing enhanced bioremediation methods that simulate the natural anaerobic degradation that occurs without intervention in non-seep areas of the wetland. A combination of natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation could provide a remedy for the discharging ground-water plumes that would minimize disturbance to the sensitive wetland ecosystem. Biostimulation (addition of organic substrate or nutrients) and bioaugmentation (addition of microbial consortium), applied either by direct injection at depth in the wetland sediments or by construction of a permeable reactive mat at the seep surface, were tested as possible methods to enhance anaerobic degradation in the seep areas. For the first phase of developing enhanced bioremediation methods for the contaminant mixtures in the seeps, laboratory studies were conducted to develop a microbial consortium to degrade 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and its chlorinated daughter products under anaerobic conditions, and to test biostimulation and bioaugmentation of wetland sediment and reactive mat matrices in microcosms. The individual components required for the direct injection and reactive mat methods were then combined in column experiments to test them under groundwater- flow rates and contaminant concentrations observed in the field. Results showed that both direct injection and the reactive mat are promising remediation methods, although the success of direct injection likely would depend on adequately distributing and maintaining organic substrate throughout the wetland sediment in the seep

  7. Assessment of soil, surface-water, and ground-water contamination at selected sites at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Water resources investigations

    Phelan, D.J.; Olsen, L.D.; Cashel, M.L.; Tegeler, J.L.; Marchand, E.H.

    1998-08-01

    J-Field is located at the southernmost tip of the Gunpowder Neck Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay, in Harford County, Maryland. J-Field has been used by the U. S. Army since World War I as a testing ground for munitions, including chemical- warfare agents. From shortly after World War II into the 1970`s, chemical- warfare agents, high-explosive munitions, and industrial chemicals were tested and disposed of at J-Field by open-pit burning and by high-explosive demolition. Only emergency disposal operations have been conducted at J-Field since the early 1980`s. Soil, surface-water, and ground-water contamination has resulted from the migration of unburned chemicals and fuels from the disposal areas. Discharge of contaminants from ground water and runoff has resulted in surface- water contamination in the marshes and ponds in J-Field. This investigation was conducted from 1989 to 1994 as part of a remedial investigation of J-Field in response to Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) requirements. The nature and extent of contamination was assessed at five sites: the toxic-materials disposal area, the white-phosphorus disposal area, the riot-control-agent disposal area, the Robins Point demolition area, and the prototype building area. The toxic-materials disposal area was the most contaminated of the five sites investigated. Most of the soil- and surface- water contamination was detected in the marsh area to the east of the disposal pits. High concentrations of lead, antimony, cadmium, copper, and mercury were detected in soils at the edge of this marsh. Lead concentrations as high as 51 micrograms per liter (micrograms/L) and concentrations of other trace metals were highest in surface water at the edge of the marsh.

  8. Characterization of Preferential Ground-Water Seepage From a Chlorinated Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer to West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, 2002-04

    Majcher, Emily H.; Phelan, Daniel J.; Lorah, Michelle M.; McGinty, Angela L.

    2007-01-01

    Wetlands act as natural transition zones between ground water and surface water, characterized by the complex interdependency of hydrology, chemical and physical properties, and biotic effects. Although field and laboratory demonstrations have shown efficient natural attenuation processes in the non-seep wetland areas and stream bottom sediments of West Branch Canal Creek, chlorinated volatile organic compounds are present in a freshwater tidal creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volatile organic compound concentrations in surface water indicate that in some areas of the wetland, preferential flow paths or seeps allow transport of organic compounds from the contaminated sand aquifer to the overlying surface water without undergoing natural attenuation. From 2002 through 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division of the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, characterized preferential ground-water seepage as part of an ongoing investigation of contaminant distribution and natural attenuation processes in wetlands at this site. Seep areas were discrete and spatially consistent during thermal infrared surveys in 2002, 2003, and 2004 throughout West Branch Canal Creek wetlands. In these seep areas, temperature measurements in shallow pore water and sediment more closely resembled those in ground water than those in nearby surface water. Generally, pore water in seep areas contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds had lower methane and greater volatile organic compound concentrations than pore water in non-seep wetland sediments. The volatile organic compounds detected in shallow pore water in seeps were spatially similar to the dominant volatile organic compounds in the underlying Canal Creek aquifer, with both parent and anaerobic daughter compounds detected. Seep locations characterized as focused seeps contained the highest concentrations of chlorinated parent compounds

  9. Design and analysis of a natural-gradient ground-water tracer test in a freshwater tidal wetland, West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Tenbus, Frederick J.

    2005-01-01

    A natural-gradient ground-water tracer test was designed and conducted in a tidal freshwater wetland at West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The objectives of the test were to characterize solute transport at the site, obtain data to more accurately determine the ground-water velocity in the upper wetland sediments, and to compare a conservative, ionic tracer (bromide) to a volatile tracer (sulfur hexafluoride) to ascertain whether volatilization could be an important process in attenuating volatile organic compounds in the ground water. The tracer test was conducted within the upper peat unit of a layer of wetland sediments that also includes a lower clayey unit; the combined layer overlies an aquifer. The area selected for the test was thought to have an above-average rate of ground-water discharge based on ground-water head distributions and near-surface detections of volatile organic compounds measured in previous studies. Because ground-water velocities in the wetland sediments were expected to be slow compared to the underlying aquifer, the test was designed to be conducted on a small scale. Ninety-seven ?-inch-diameter inverted-screen stainless-steel piezometers were installed in a cylindrical array within approximately 25 cubic feet (2.3 cubic meters) of wetland sediments, in an area with a vertically upward hydraulic gradient. Fluorescein dye was used to qualitatively evaluate the hydrologic integrity of the tracer array before the start of the tracer test, including verifying the absence of hydraulic short-circuiting due to nonnatural vertical conduits potentially created during piezometer installation. Bromide and sulfur hexafluoride tracers (0.139 liter of solution containing 100,000 milligrams per liter of bromide ion and 23.3 milligrams per liter of sulfur hexafluoride) were co-injected and monitored to generate a dataset that could be used to evaluate solute transport in three dimensions. Piezometers were sampled 2 to 15 times

  10. Environmental geophysics: Buildings E5485, E5487, and E5489 decommissioning - the open-quotes Ghost Townclose quotes complex, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Buildings E5485, E5487, and E5489, referred to informally as the open-quotes Ghost Townclose quotes complex, are potentially contaminated sites in the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, EM-31, EM-61, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted to assist a sampling and monitoring program prior to decommissioning and dismantling of the buildings. The buildings are located on a marginal wetland bordering the west branch of Canal Creek. The dominant geophysical signature in the open-quotes Ghost Town close quotes complex is a pattern of northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast anomalies that appear to be associated with a trench/pipe/sewer system, documented by the presence of a manhole. Combinations of anomalies suggest that line sources include nonmetallic and ferromagnetic materials in trenches. On the basis of anomaly associations, the sewer lines probably rest in a trench, back-filled with conductive, amphibolitic, crushed rock. Where the sewer lines connect manholes or junctions with other lines, ferromagnetic materials are present. Isolated, unidentified magnetic anomalies litter the area around Building E5487, particularly to the north. Three small magnetic sources are located east of Building E5487

  11. Anaerobic degradation of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and association with microbial communities in a freshwater tidal wetland, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland : laboratory experiments and comparisons to field data

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Voytek, Mary A.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Jones, Elizabeth J., (Phillips)

    2003-01-01

    Defining biodegradation rates and processes is a critical part of assessing the feasibility of monitored natural attenuation as a remediation method for ground water containing organic contaminants. During 1998?2001, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a microbial study at a freshwater tidal wetland along the West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, as part of an investigation of natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the wetland sediments. Geochemical analyses and molecular biology techniques were used to investigate factors controlling anaerobic degradation of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TeCA), and to characterize the microbial communities that potentially are important in its degradation. Rapid TeCA and daughter product degradation observed in laboratory experiments and estimated with field data confirm that natural attenuation is a feasible remediation method at this site. The diverse microbial community that seems to be involved in TeCA degradation in the wetland sediments varies with changing spatial and seasonal conditions, allowing continued effective natural attenuation throughout the year. Rates of TeCA degradation in anaerobic microcosm experiments conducted with wetland sediment collected from two different sites (WB23 and WB30) and during three different seasons (March?April 1999, July?August 1999, and October?November 2000) showed little spatial variability but high seasonal variability. Initial first-order degradation rate constants for TeCA ranged from 0.10?0.01 to 0.16?0.05 per day (half-lives of 4.3 to 6.9 days) for March?April 1999 and October?November 2000 microcosms incubated at 19 degrees Celsius, whereas lower rate constants of 0 ? 0.03 and 0.06 ? 0.03 per day were obtained in July?August 1999 microcosms incubated at 19 degrees Celsius. Microbial community profiles showed that low microbial biomass and microbial diversity in the summer, possibly due to competition for nutrients by the

  12. Kinetic parameters of the University of Maryland reactor by the interval distribution method

    The Rossi alpha of the University of Maryland Reactor was measured at criticality and at shutdown by the Babala interval-distribution method. At criticality, α/sub c/ = 145.8 +- 2.9 s-1. At shutdown, α/sub s/ = 1025.8 +- 4.1 s-1. The shutdown reactivity was found to be rho/sub s/β = -6.04 +- 0.14 dollars. An inverse kinetics analysis of a rod-drop experiment gave rho/sub s//β = -6.23 +- 0.13 dollars, which is considered with the interval-distribution result

  13. Computer modeling of the dynamic processes in the Maryland University Training Reactor - (MUTR)

    The simulator described in this paper models the behaviour of the Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR). The reactor is a 250 kW, TRIGA reactor. The computer model is based on a system of five primary equations and eight auxiliary equations. The primary equations consist of the prompt jump approximation, a heat balance equation for the fuel and the moderator, and iodine and xenon buildup equations. For the comparison with the computer program, data from the reactor was acquired by using a personal computer (pc) which contained a Strawberry Tree data acquisition Card, connected to the reactor. The systems monitored by the pc were: two neutron detectors, fuel temperature, water temperature, three control rod positions and the period meter. The time differenced equations were programmed in the basic language. It has been shown by this paper, that the MUTR power rise from low power critical to high power, can be modelled by a relatively simple computer program. The program yields accurate agreement considering the simplicity of the program. The steady state error between the reactor and computer power is 4.4%. The difference in steady state temperatures, 112 deg. C and 117 deg. C, of the reactor and computer program, respectively, also yields a 4.5% error. Further fine tuning of the coefficients will yield higher accuracies

  14. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Maryland (Docket No. 50-166)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Maryland (UMD) for a renewal of operating license R-70 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Maryland and is located at a site in College Park, Prince Georges County, Maryland. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can continue to be operated by UMD without endangering the health and safety of the public

  15. The Aberdeen Impedance Imaging System.

    Kulkarni, V; Hutchison, J M; Mallard, J R

    1989-01-01

    The Aberdeen Impedance Imaging System is designed to reconstruct 2 dimensional images of the average distribution of the amplitude and phase of the complex impedance within a 3 dimensional region. The system uses the four electrode technique in a 16 electrode split-array. The system hardware consists of task-orientated electronic modules for: driving a constant current, multiplexing the current drive, demultiplexing peripheral voltages, differential amplification, phase sensitive detection and low-pass filtration, digitisation with a 14 bit analog to digital converter (ADC), and -control logic for the ADC and multiplexors. A BBC microprocessor (Master series), initiates a controlled sequence for the collection of a number of data sets which are averaged and stored on disk. Image reconstruction is by a process of convolution-backprojection similar to the fan-beam reconstruction of computerised tomography and is also known as Equipotential Backprojection. In imaging impedance changes associated with fracture healing the changes may be large enough to allow retrieval of both the amplitude and phase of the complex impedance. Sequential imaging of these changes would necessitate monitoring electronic and electrode drift by imaging an equivalent region of the contralateral limb. Differential images could be retrieved when the image of the normal limb is the image template. Better characterisation of tissues would necessitate a cleaner retrieval of the quadrature signal. PMID:2742979

  16. Clean-ups at Aberdeen Proving Ground

    The Department of Defense has utilized radiative material in numerous applications over several decades. Aberdeen Proving Ground has been an integral player in the Army's Research, Development, and Testing of items incorporating radionuclides, as well as developing new and innovative applications. As new information becomes available and society progresses, we find that the best management practices used decades, or even sometimes years earlier are inadequate to meet the current demands. Aberdeen Proving Ground is committed to remediating historic disposal sites, and utilizing the best available technology in current operations to prevent future adverse impact. Two projects which are currently ongoing at Aberdeen Proving Ground illustrates these points. The first, the remediation of contaminated metal storage areas, depicts how available technology has provided a means for recycling material whereby preventing the continued stock piling, and allowing for the decommissioning of the areas. The second, the 26Th Street Disposal Site Removal Action, shows how historic methods of disposition were inadequate to meet today's needs

  17. Transactions of the twenty-third water reactor safety information meeting to be held at Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23--25, 1995

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 23rd Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23--25, 1995. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory, Research, US NRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the nuclear industry, and from foreign governments and industry are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting and are given in the order of their presentation in each session

  18. Transactions of the twenty-third water reactor safety information meeting to be held at Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23--25, 1995

    Monteleone, S. [comp.

    1995-09-01

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 23rd Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23--25, 1995. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory, Research, US NRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the nuclear industry, and from foreign governments and industry are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting and are given in the order of their presentation in each session.

  19. Unexploded ordnance issues at Aberdeen Proving Ground: Background information

    Rosenblatt, D.H.

    1996-11-01

    This document summarizes currently available information about the presence and significance of unexploded ordnance (UXO) in the two main areas of Aberdeen Proving Ground: Aberdeen Area and Edgewood Area. Known UXO in the land ranges of the Aberdeen Area consists entirely of conventional munitions. The Edgewood Area contains, in addition to conventional munitions, a significant quantity of chemical-munition UXO, which is reflected in the presence of chemical agent decomposition products in Edgewood Area ground-water samples. It may be concluded from current information that the UXO at Aberdeen Proving Ground has not adversely affected the environment through release of toxic substances to the public domain, especially not by water pathways, and is not likely to do so in the near future. Nevertheless, modest but periodic monitoring of groundwater and nearby surface waters would be a prudent policy.

  20. Census Snapshot: Maryland

    Romero, Adam P; Baumle, Amanda; Badgett, M. V. Lee; Gates, Gary J.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, this report provides demographic and economic information about same-sex couples and same-sex couples raising children in Maryland. We compare same-sex “unmarried partners,” which the Census Bureau defines as an unmarried couple who “shares living quarters and has a close personal relationship,” to different-sex married couples in Maryland. In many ways, the over 15,600 same-sex couples living in Maryland are similar to married couples. Accordi...

  1. Genetic characterization of Aberdeen Angus cattle using molecular markers

    Vasconcellos Luciana Pimentel de Mello Klocker

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberdeen Angus beef cattle from the Brazilian herd were studied genetically using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP of the kappa-casein - HinfI (CSN3 - HinfI, beta-lactoglobulin - HaeIII (LGB - HaeIII and growth hormone AluI (GH- AluI genes, as well as four microsatellites (TEXAN15, CSFM50, BM1224 and BM7160. The RFLP genotypes were determined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by digestion with restriction endonucleases and electrophoresis in agarose gels. With the exception of the microsatellite BM7160, which was analyzed in an automatic sequencer, the PCR products were genotyped by silver staining. The allele and genotype frequencies, heterozygosities and gene diversity were estimated. The values for these parameters of variability were comparable to other cattle breeds. The genetic relationship of the Aberdeen Angus to other breeds (Caracu, Canchim, Charolais, Guzerath, Gyr, Nelore, Santa Gertrudis and Simmental was investigated using Nei's genetic distance. Cluster analysis placed the Aberdeen Angus in an isolated group in the Bos taurus breeds branch. This fact is in agreement with the geographic origin of this breed.

  2. Maryland Reading First.

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    In years past, Maryland has provided little guidance toward adoption and implementation of Scientifically Based Reading Research (SBRR) programs. Only recently, with the implementation of the Comprehensive School Reform Demonstration program and the Reading Excellence Act (REA) program, have schools or local education agencies been required to…

  3. Geophysical study of the Building 103 Dump, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.

    1992-12-01

    The Building 103 Dump is one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, resistivity, ground-penetrating radar, and seismic refraction, were conducted. These surveys indicate that much of the area is free of debris. However, prominent magnetic and resistivity anomalies occur along well-defined lineaments, suggestive of a dendritic stream pattern. Prior to the onset of dumping, the site was described as a ``sand pit,`` which suggests that headward erosion of Canal Creek tributaries cut into the surficial aquifer. Contaminants dumped into the landfill would have direct access to the surficial aquifer and thus to Canal Creek. Seismic refraction profiling indicates 6--12 ft of fill material now rests on the former land surface. Only the northern third of the former landfill was geophysically surveyed.

  4. An air quality survey and emissions inventory at Aberdeen Harbour

    Marr, I. L.; Rosser, D. P.; Meneses, C. A.

    A network of 10 stations, with passive sampling for VOCs (including benzene), NO 2, and SO 2, over 2-week periods, grab sampling for CO, and 48-h pumped sampling for PM 10, was set up to make an air quality survey for 12 months around Aberdeen Harbour. Benzene, CO, SO 2 and PM 10 were always well below the AQS target values. However, NO 2 frequently showed a pronounced gradient across the harbour reaching its highest concentrations at the city end, indicating that the road traffic was the principal source of the pollution. This was backed up by the predominance of aromatics in the VOCs in the city centre, derived from petrol engined vehicles, compared to the predominance of alkanes and alkenes around the docks, derived from diesel engined heavy trucks and possibly ships. Black carbon on the PM 10 filters also showed a gradient with highest levels in the city centre. It is proposed that for such surveys in future, NO 2 and black carbon would be the two most informative parameters. This emissions inventory has shown first, that trucks contribute very little to the total, and second, that the ro-ro ferries are the major contributors as they burn light fuel oil while the oil platform supply vessels burn low-sulphur marine gas oil with around 0.1% S. When the whole picture of the emissions from the city is considered, the emissions from the harbour constitute only a small part.

  5. Geophysics: Building E5190 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1992-07-01

    Building E5190 is one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek area of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May 1992. A noninvasive geophysical survey, including the complementary technologies of magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, was conducted around the perimeter as a guide to developing a sampling and monitoring program prior to decommissioning and dismantling the building. The magnetics surveys indicated that multistation, positive magnetic sources are randomly distributed north and west of the building. Two linear trends were noted: one that may outline buried utility lines and another that is produced by a steel-covered trench. The resistivity profiling indicated three conductive zones: one due to increased moisture in a ditch, one associated with buried utility lines, and a third zone associated with the steel-covered trench. Ground-penetrating radar imaging detected two significant anomalies, which were correlated with small-amplitude magnetic anomalies. The objectives of the study -- to detect and locate objects and to characterize a located object were achieved.

  6. Geophysics: Building E5476 decommissiong, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    Building E5476 was one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The large number of magnetic sources surrounding the building are believed to be contained in construction fill. The smaller anomalies, for the most part, were not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. Large magnetic anomalies near the southwest comer of the building are due to aboveground standpipes and steel-reinforced concrete. Two high-resistivity areas, one projecting northeast from the building and another south of the original structure, may indicate the presence of organic pore fluids in the subsurface. A conductive lineament protruding from the south wall that is enclosed by the southem, high-resistivity feature is not associated with an equivalent magnetic anomaly. Magnetic and electrical anomalies south of the old landfill boundary are probably not associated with the building. The boundary is marked by a band of magnetic anomalies and a conductive zone trending northwest to southeast. The cause of high resistivities in a semicircular area in the southwest comer, within the landfill area, is unexplained

  7. Depleted uranium risk assessment at Aberdeen Proving Ground

    The Environmental Science Group at Los Alamos and the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) are assessing the risk of depleted uranium (DU) testing at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG). Conceptual and mathematical models of DU transfer through the APG ecosystem have been developed in order to show the mechanisms by which DU migrates or remains unavailable to different flora and fauna and to humans. The models incorporate actual rates of DU transfer between different ecosystem components as much as possible. Availability of data on DU transport through different pathways is scarce and constrains some of the transfer rates that can be used. Estimates of transfer rates were derived from literature sources and used in the mass-transfer models when actual transfer rates were unavailable. Objectives for this risk assessment are (1) to assess if DU transports away from impact areas; (2) to estimate how much, if any, DU migrates into Chesapeake Bay; (3) to determine if there are appreciable risks to the ecosystems due to DU testing; (4) to estimate the risk to human health as a result of DU testing

  8. Maryland ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species in Maryland. Vector polygons in this data...

  9. Maryland ESI: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and rare coastal invertebrate species in Maryland. Vector polygons in this data set...

  10. Maryland ESI: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and rare plants in Maryland. Vector polygons in this data set...

  11. Easements - Maryland Environmental Trust Easements

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Maryland Environmental Trust (MET) is a statewide local land trust governed by a citizen Board of Trustees. Since its creation by the General Assembly in 1967,...

  12. Shivers Junior/Senior High School: Aberdeen School District in Mississippi. Case Study in Sustainable Design.

    Zimmerman, David

    Design information, floor plan, photos, and energy use data are presented of a combined 45,000 square foot junior/senior high school in Mississippi's Aberdeen School District, built in 1956, and retrofitted over time to improve its usability. Exterior and interior photos are presented showing classrooms, the cafeteria, and gymnasium. Data are…

  13. New and improved methods for monitoring air quality and the terrestrial environment: Applications at Aberdeen Proving Ground-Edgewood area. Annual report, 1 April--14 November 1997

    Bromenshenk, J.J.; Smith, G.C.

    1998-03-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) have been shown to be multi-media monitors of chemical exposures and resultant effects. This five-year project has developed an automated system to assess in real-time colony behavioral responses to stressors, both anthropogenic and natural, including inclement weather. Field trials at the Aberdeen Proving Ground-Edgewood included the Old O Field and J field landfills, the Canal Creek and Bush River areas, and a Churchville, MD reference site. Preliminary results show varying concentrations of bioavailable inorganic elements and chlorinated hydrocarbons in bee colonies from all Maryland sites. Industrial solvents in the air inside beehives exhibited the greatest between site differences, with the highest levels occurring in hives near landfills at Old O Field, J Field, and at some sites in the Bush River and Canal Creek areas. Compared to 1996, the 1997 levels of solvents in Old O Field hives decreased by an order of magnitude, and colony performance significantly improved, probably as a consequence of capping the landfill. Recent chemical monitoring accomplishments include development of a new apparatus to quantitatively calibrate TD/GC/MS analysis, a QA/QC assessment of factors that limit the precision of these analyses, and confirmation of transport of aqueous contaminants into the hive. Real-time effects monitoring advances include development of an extensive array of software tools for automated data display, inspection, and numerical analysis and the ability to deliver data from remote locations in real time through Internet or Intranet connections.

  14. Renewable Energy Alternatives in Maryland.

    Welsh, Greg E.; McClellan, Deborah A. S.

    This handbook discusses the renewable energy resources suitable for use in Maryland. It follows a question and answer format with sections about the following alternative renewable energy sources; solar, wind, wood, water, bio-gas/methane, and geothermal. Each section includes a list of recommended readings, appropriate agencies or organizations,…

  15. Boots on the Ground: Maryland

    2013-10-24

    In this podcast, we talk to CDC public health advisor Artensie Flowers to see how her work with the Maryland State Health Department increases local health preparedness and response.  Created: 10/24/2013 by Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (PHPR).   Date Released: 10/24/2013.

  16. Analysis of cosmic-ray-muon induced spallation neutrons in Aberdeen Tunnel experiment in Hong Kong

    Cui, Kexi; 崔科晰

    2014-01-01

    The muon-induced radioactive isotopes, especially neutrons, are dangerous background component for rare-event detection in underground experiments, like neutrino-less double-beta decay and dark matter search. Understanding these cosmogenic backgrounds is crucial for these experiments. An underground experiment aiming at measuring the cosmic-ray muons' flux and their neutron production yield in liquid scintillator through spallation process is being carried out in the Aberdeen Tunnel laborator...

  17. Improvising innovation in UK urban district heating: The convergence of social and environmental agendas in Aberdeen

    Research on district heating has focused on technical-economic appraisal of its contribution to energy and carbon saving in urban centres. There is however lack of analysis of political and social processes which govern its actual take up. This paper examines these processes through a case study of Aberdeen, Scotland. Interviews and documentary analysis are used to examine the 2002 development of Aberdeen Heat and Power (AHP), an independent energy services company (ESCo). Technical-economic feasibility was a necessary component of appraisal, but not sufficient to govern decision-making. In the UK centralised energy market, DH investment is unattractive to commercial investors, and local authorities lack capacity and expertise in energy provision. In Aberdeen, the politics of fuel poverty converged with climate politics, creating an a-typical willingness to innovate through improvisation. The welfare priority resulted in creation of a non-profit locally-owned ESCo, using cost- rather than market-based heat tariffs. AHP has developed three combined heat and power energy centres and heat networks, supplying 34 MWh/pa of heat. Carbon savings are estimated to be 45% in comparison with electric heating, and heating costs are reduced by a similar amount. The conclusion outlines potential policy improvements. - Highlights: • UK policy proposes district heating for urban low carbon heat. • Technical and economic feasibility are insufficient to drive take-up. • In Aberdeen convergence of social and environmental goals gave impetus to improvisation. • The resulting non-profit ESCo has three CHP and district heat networks, supplying 34 MWh of heat pa. • Carbon and cost savings are 45% in comparison with electric heating

  18. 78 FR 9593 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Amendments to Maryland's...

    2013-02-11

    ..., Air pollution control, Carbon monoxide, Incorporation by reference, Intergovernmental relations, Lead... to Maryland's Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... reference of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) by the State of Maryland. EPA is...

  19. Reactors

    Purpose: To provide a spray cooling structure wherein the steam phase in a bwr reactor vessel can sufficiently be cooled and the upper cap and flanges in the vessel can be cooled rapidly which kept from direct contaction with cold water. Constitution: An apertured shielding is provided in parallel spaced apart from the inner wall surface at the upper portion of a reactor vessel equipped with a spray nozzle, and the lower end of the shielding and the inner wall of the vessel are closed to each other so as to store the cooling water. Upon spray cooling, cooling water jetting out from the nozzle cools the vapor phase in the vessel and then hits against the shielding. Then the cooling water mostly falls as it is, while partially enters through the apertures to the back of the shielding plate, abuts against stoppers and falls down. The stoppers are formed in an inverted L shape so that the spray water may not in direct contaction with the inner wall of the vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. 77 FR 1430 - Maryland Regulatory Program

    2012-01-10

    ... INFORMATION: On January 28, 2011, (76 FR 5103) we published a proposed rule to Maryland's program... regulation, Regulation .08 under COMAR 26.20.24, Special Performance Standards. On March 20, 2011, (76 FR..., Frostburg, Maryland 21532, Telephone: (301) 689- 1442, Email: elarrimore@mde.state.md.us . Instructions:...

  1. Molecular Signature of the Ebola Virus Associated with the Fishermen Community Outbreak in Aberdeen, Sierra Leone, in February 2015

    Gruber, Cesare E. M.; Carletti, Fabrizio; Meschi, Silvia; Castilletti, Concetta; Vairo, Francesco; Biava, Mirella; Minosse, Claudia; Strada, Gino; Portella, Gina; Miccio, Rossella; Minardi, Valeria; Rolla, Luca; Kamara, Abdul; Chillemi, Giovanni; Desideri, Alessandro; Di Caro, Antonino; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Ebola virus from a health worker linked to a cluster of cases occurring in the fishing community of Aberdeen, Sierra Leone (February 2015), which were characterized by unusually severe presentation. The sequence, clustering in the SL subclade 3.2.4, harbors mutations potentially relevant for pathogenesis. PMID:26404609

  2. Maryland ESI: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains polygons that represent the following sensitive human-use management areas in Maryland: wildlife refuges, national parks, wildlife management...

  3. Maryland ESI: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Maryland....

  4. Maryland ESI: REPTILES (Reptile and Amphibian Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for sea turtles, estuarine turtles, and rare reptiles and amphibians in Maryland. Vector polygons in this...

  5. 76 FR 5103 - Maryland Regulatory Program

    2011-01-28

    ... Register (47 FR 7214-7217). You can also find later actions concerning the Maryland program and program..., Frostburg, MD 21532, Telephone: (301) 689-1442; E-mail: jcarey@mde.state.md.us . FOR FURTHER...

  6. An apparatus for studying spallation neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory

    Blyth, S C; Chen, X C; Chu, M C; Hahn, R L; Ho, T H; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Lau, Y P; Lee, K P; Leung, J K C; Leung, K Y; Lin, G L; Lin, Y C; Luk, K B; Luk, W H; Ngai, H Y; Ngan, S Y; Pun, C S J; Shih, K; Tam, Y H; Tsang, R H M; Wang, C H; Wong, C M; Wong, H L; Wong, H H C; Wong, K K; Yeh, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design, construction and performance of an apparatus installed in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory in Hong Kong for studying spallation neutrons induced by cosmic-ray muons under a vertical rock overburden of 611 meter water equivalent (m.w.e.). The apparatus comprises of six horizontal layers of plastic-scintillator hodoscopes for determining the direction and position of the incident cosmic-ray muons. Sandwiched between the hodoscope planes is a neutron detector filled with 650 kg of liquid scintillator doped with about 0.06% of Gadolinium by weight for improving the e?ciency of detecting the spallation neutrons. Performance of the apparatus is also presented.

  7. Feasibility of using plants to assist in the remediation of heavy metal contamination at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Final report

    Jastrow, J.D.

    1995-11-03

    Most remedial technologies currently being used at hazardous waste sites (e.g., containment, excavation, soil washing, or incineration) are expensive. Further, in some locations technologies involving excavation could increase off-site releases of hazardous materials by destabilizing the site. Thus, interest in the development of in situ bioremediation technologies has grown substantially over the last decade. The idea of phytoremediation (i.e., using plants to clean up toxic wastes) is generating increasing attention from scientists, industry, and government agencies. The attractiveness of phytoremediation stems from its potential (1) to be less expensive than technologies involving the human engineering costs of soil manipulation, and (2) to initiate simultaneously both the clean up of hazardous materials and site restoration. The purpose of this project was to investigate the potential for using plants to remediate J-Field soils contaminated with heavy metals. Phragmites australis, one of the dominant species in the Toxic Burning Pits (TBP) area and other contaminated sites within J-Field, appears to be both tolerant of heavy metal contaminated soil conditions and capable of producing large amounts of biomass. Consequently, this project has concentrated on characterizing heavy metal accumulation by Phragmites australis growing in the TBP area relative to soil concentrations and availabilities. This type of information is necessary to determine the feasibility of using this species to assist in the remediation of metal contaminated soils at J-Field.

  8. The Maryland Youth Suicide Prevention School Program.

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    The Maryland State Department of Education developed this framework for a suicide prevention program. The program framework addresses the following goals: (1) increase awareness among school personnel and community awareness among school personnel and community leaders of the incidence of teenage suicide; (2) train school personnel in individual…

  9. 78 FR 2707 - Maryland Disaster # MD-00026

    2013-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster MD-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  10. Maryland Water-Use Data, 1998

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — MDWU98 is a point coverage that represents the locations of wells for the State of Maryland that are permitted to withdraw 10,000 gallons or more per day by the...

  11. Interim progress report -- geophysics: Decommissioning of Buildings E5974 and E5978, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    Buildings E5974 and E5978, located near the mouth of Canal Creek, were among 10 potentially contaminated sites in the Westwood and Canal Creek areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including the complementary technologies of magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeters of the buildings to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The magnetic anomalies and the electrically conductive areas around these buildings have a spatial relationship similar to that observed in low-lying sites in the Canal Creek area; they are probably associated with construction fill. Electrically conductive terrain is dominant on the eastern side of the site, and resistive terrain predominates on the west. The smaller magnetic anomalies are not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. The high resistivities in the northwest quadrant are believed to be caused by a natural sand lens. The causes of three magnetic anomalies in the high-resistivity area are unidentified, but they are probably anthropogenic

  12. Geophysics: Building E5190 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground. Interim progress report

    Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1992-07-01

    Building E5190 is one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek area of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May 1992. A noninvasive geophysical survey, including the complementary technologies of magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, was conducted around the perimeter as a guide to developing a sampling and monitoring program prior to decommissioning and dismantling the building. The magnetics surveys indicated that multistation, positive magnetic sources are randomly distributed north and west of the building. Two linear trends were noted: one that may outline buried utility lines and another that is produced by a steel-covered trench. The resistivity profiling indicated three conductive zones: one due to increased moisture in a ditch, one associated with buried utility lines, and a third zone associated with the steel-covered trench. Ground-penetrating radar imaging detected two significant anomalies, which were correlated with small-amplitude magnetic anomalies. The objectives of the study -- to detect and locate objects and to characterize a located object were achieved.

  13. Ecological risk assessment of depleted uranium in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground

    A preliminary ecological risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the effects of depleted uranium (DU) in the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) ecosystem and its potential for human health effects. An ecological risk assessment of DU should include the processes of hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Ecological risk assessments also should explicitly examine risks incurred by nonhuman as well as human populations, because risk assessments based only on human health do not always protect other species. To begin to assess the potential ecological risk of DU release to the environment we modeled DU transport through the principal components of the aquatic ecosystem at APG. We focused on the APG aquatic system because of the close proximity of the Chesapeake Bay and concerns about potential impacts on this ecosystem. Our objective in using a model to estimate environmental fate of DU is to ultimately reduce the uncertainty about predicted ecological risks due to DU from APG. The model functions to summarize information on the structure and functional properties of the APG aquatic system, to provide an exposure assessment by estimating the fate of DU in the environment, and to evaluate the sources of uncertainty about DU transport

  14. Maryland Reaches for the Goals: A Report on Maryland's Progress toward National Education Goals 1995.

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    This document reports on Maryland's progress as of 1995 toward the eight National Education Goals. The document lists the National Education Goals; describes state progress made toward each goal; describes programs that address each goal; and presents statistics on enrollment, public school funding, teacher salaries, attendance, special programs,…

  15. Intelligence, Social Class of Origin, Childhood Behavior Disturbance and Education as Predictors of Status Attainment in Midlife in Men: The Aberdeen Children of the 1950s Study

    von Stumm, Sophie; Macintyre, Sally; Batty, David G.; Clark, Heather; Deary, Ian J.

    2010-01-01

    In a birth cohort of 6281 men from Aberdeen, Scotland, social class of origin, childhood intelligence, childhood behavior disturbance and education were examined as predictors of status attainment in midlife (46 to 51 years). Social class of origin, intelligence and behavior disturbance were conceptualized as correlated predictors, whose effects…

  16. Particle confinement and fueling effects on the Maryland spheromak

    The spheromak plasma confinement concept provides the opportunity to study the evolution of a nearly force-free magnetic field configuration. The plasma currents and magnetic fields are produced self-consistently, making this type of device attractive as a possible fusion reactor. At present, spheromaks are observed to have poorer particle and magnetic confinement than expected from simple theory. The purpose of this study is to examine the role of plasma density in the decay of spheromaks produced in the Maryland Spheromak experiment. Density measurements are made with an interferometer and Langmuir probe, and results are correlated with those of other plasma diagnostics to understand the sources of plasma, the spheromak formation effects on the density, and the magnitude of particle loss during the spheromak decay. A power and particle balance computer model is constructed and applied to the spheromaks studied in order to assess the impact of high density and particle loss rate on the spheromak decay. The observations and model indicate that the decay of the spheromaks is at present dominated by impurity radiation loss. The model also predicts that high density and short particle confinement time play a critical role in the spheromak power balance when the impurity levels are reduced

  17. Occurrence of Trypanosoma cruzi in Maryland

    Herman, C.M.; Bruce, J.I., Jr.

    1962-01-01

    During 1954-1960, 2005 mammals of 18 species collected at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Maryland, were examined for trypanosomes. T. cruzi was found in 10 raccoons between October 31 and November 30. Infection occurred in 2 percent of all raccoons sampled, and in 11.3 percent of the 80 raccoons sampled in November. Examination was by direct smears, stained smears and cultures of heart blood. Although, in previous studies, at least two experimentally infected raccoons exhibited extended parasitemia (14 and 8 weeks), no such continuing parasitemia was observed in the natural infections. No trypanosomes were found in any of the other mammals examined.

  18. Maryland controlled fusion research program. Volume I

    This renewal proposal describes the University of Maryland research program on Magnetic Fusion Energy for a three-year period beginning January 1, 1986. This program consists of five tasks: (I) Plasma Theory; (II) Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostics for Mirror Machines; (III) Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostics on TFTR; (IV) Atomic Physics; and (V) Magnetic Field Measurement by Ion Beams. The four separate tasks of continuing research (Tasks I to IV) and the new experimental task (Task V) are described in detail. The task descriptions contain estimated budgets for CY 86, 87, and 88

  19. Maryland Child Care Choices Study: Changes in Child Care Arrangements of Young Children in Maryland. Publication #2014-57

    Krafft, Caroline; Davis, Elizabeth E.; Tout, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this series is to summarize key findings and implications from the Maryland Child Care Choices study, a longitudinal survey of parents who were applying for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in 2011. Families in the Maryland Child Care Choices study had at least one child age six or younger and lived in one of the…

  20. Características da carcaça de bovinos Canchim e Aberdeen Angus e de seus cruzamentos recíprocos terminados em confinamento Carcass traits of Canchim, Aberdeen Angus and reciprocal crosses finished in confinement

    Daniel Perotto; José Luiz Moletta; Antonio Carlos Cubas

    1999-01-01

    Foram analisadas quatorze características quantitativas das carcaças de 137 machos bovinos inteiros pertencentes aos grupos Canchim (Ca), Aberdeen Angus (Ab), 3/4Ca+1/4Ab, 3/4Ab+1/4Ca, 5/8Ca+3/8Ab e 5/8Ab+3/8Ca, nascidos na Estação Experimental Fazenda Modelo, em Ponta Grossa-PR, no período de 1988 a 1993. As médias para a idade e para o peso ao início do confinamento, duração do confinamento, idade e peso ao abate foram, respectivamente, 737 dias, 356kg, 97 dias, 834 dias e 468kg. Durante o ...

  1. Tradução e adaptação cultural do Questionário Aberdeen para Veias Varicosas Translation and cultural adaptation of Aberdeen Varicose Veins Questionnaire

    Flávia de Jesus Leal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Atualmente há um crescente interesse por instrumentos de avaliação em saúde produzidos e validados em todo o mundo. Apesar disso, ainda não temos no Brasil instrumentos que avaliem o impacto da doença venosa crônica na vida de seu portador. Para utilização dessas medidas torna-se necessária a realização da tradução e da adaptação cultural ao idioma em questão. OBJETIVO: Traduzir e adaptar culturalmente para a população brasileira o Aberdeen Varicose Veins Questionnaire (AVVQ- Brasil. MÉTODOS: O processo consistiu de duas traduções e duas retrotraduções realizadas por tradutores independentes, da avaliação das versões seguida da elaboração de versão consensual e de pré-teste comentado. RESULTADOS: Os pacientes do pré-teste eram do sexo feminino, com média de idade de 49,9 anos, média de tempo de resposta 7,73 minutos, que variou entre 4,55 minutos (tempo mínimo a 10,13 minutos (tempo máximo. Escolaridade: 20% analfabetismo funcional, 1º grau completo e 2º grau completo; 30% 1º grau incompleto; e 10% 3º grau completo. Gravidade clínica 40% C3 e C6S, 10% C2 e C5, havendo cinco termos incompreendidos na aplicação. CONCLUSÕES: A versão na língua portuguesa do Aberdeen Varicose Veins Questionnaire está traduzida e adaptada para uso na população brasileira, podendo ser utilizada após posterior análise de suas propriedades clinimétricas.BACKGROUND: Currently there is a growing interest in health assessment tools produced and validated throughout the world. Nevertheless, it is still inadequate the number of instruments that assess the impact of chronic venous disease in the life of its bearer. To use these measures it is necessary to accomplish the translation and cultural adaptation to the language in question. OBJECTIVE: Translate to Portuguese and culturally adapted for the Brazilian population the Aberdeen Varicose Veins Questionnaire (AVVQ-Brazil. METHODS: The process consisted of two

  2. Stratégie bas carbone écossaise : l’exemple de la ville d’Aberdeen

    Guyet, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    A l’instar de l’Ecosse, le modèle énergétique de la ville d’Aberdeen se caractérise par un paradoxe : comment transformer une économie reposant essentiellement sur le gaz et le pétrole en un modèle de développement bas carbone ? Sans renier la manne financière que représente encore à court terme les énergies fossiles, l’Ecosse poursuit également une stratégie de déploiement d’énergie bas carbone dans le secteur de l’électricité et de la chaleur. Elle a même défini des objectifs...

  3. Institute for Molecular Physics at the University of Maryland

    Sengers, Jan V

    2013-01-01

    The Institute for Physical Science and Technology at the University of Maryland was founded in 1976 from a merger of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics (IFDAM) and the Institute for Molecular Physics (IMP), which were established at the College Park Campus after World War II to enhance the expertise of the University of Maryland in some areas of science and technology of interest to the US Department of Defense. Here I try to reconstruct the history of the Institute for Molecular Physics at the University of Maryland.

  4. Alcohol Sales Dropped After Maryland Raised Liquor Tax

    ... 158297.html Alcohol Sales Dropped After Maryland Raised Liquor Tax Study finding suggests the tactic could help ... 6 percent to 9 percent in 2011, and liquor sales subsequently fell 5 percent, the study found. ...

  5. Reconnaissance survey of nonpoint source pesticides in Maryland surface waters

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — As part of the Chesapeake Bay Agreement, the "Maryland Toxics Reduction Strategy for the Chesapeake Bay and its Tributaries" committed the State to identify the...

  6. Maryland ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for river otters in Maryland. Vector polygons in this data set represent the terrestrial mammal...

  7. Maryland ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for seals, whales, porpoise, and dolphin in Maryland. Vector polygons in this data set represent marine...

  8. Ocean City, Maryland Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ocean City, Maryland Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  9. Maryland Ground-Water Observation Well Network, 2001

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — MDNET is a point coverage that represents the locations and names of a network of observation wells for the State of Maryland. Additional information on water...

  10. Institute for Molecular Physics at the University of Maryland

    Sengers, Jan V.

    2013-01-01

    The Institute for Physical Science and Technology at the University of Maryland was founded in 1976 from a merger of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics (IFDAM) and the Institute for Molecular Physics (IMP), which were established at the College Park Campus after World War II to enhance the expertise of the University of Maryland in some areas of science and technology of interest to the US Department of Defense. Here I try to reconstruct the history of the Institute for ...

  11. The IAIMS initiative at the University of Maryland at Baltimore.

    Wilson, M. P.; Ball, M J; Zimmerman, J L; Douglas, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    With support from the National Library of Medicine, the University of Maryland at Baltimore is creating an Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) that will serve as a prototype for academic health centers. A campus-wide undertaking, the IAIMS initiative at Maryland is characterized by its functional comprehensiveness and its planning model. The resulting strategic plan is serving as a guide in the ongoing model development within an interdisciplinary Hypertension Center.

  12. Childhood IQ and life course socioeconomic position in relation to alcohol induced hangovers in adulthood: the Aberdeen children of the 1950s study

    Batty, G D; Deary, I J; MacIntyre, S

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between scores on IQ tests in childhood and alcohol induced hangovers in middle aged men and women. Design, Setting, and Participants: A cohort of 12 150 people born in Aberdeen (Scotland) who took part in a school based survey in 1962 when IQ test scores were extracted from educational records. Between 2000 and 2003, 7184 (64%) responded to questionnaire inquiries regarding drinking behaviour. Main outcome measures: Self reported hangovers attr...

  13. Lumbar Disc Screening Using Back Pain Questionnaires: Oswestry Low Back Pain Score, Aberdeen Low Back Pain Scale, and Acute Low Back Pain Screening Questionnaire

    Kim, Do Yeon; Oh, Chang Hyun; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Park, Hyung Chun; Park, Chong Oon

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usefulness of back pain questionnaires for lumbar disc screening among Korean young males. Methods We carried out a survey for lumbar disc screening through back pain questionnaires among the volunteers with or without back pain. Three types of back pain questionnaire (Oswestry Low Back Pain Score, Aberdeen Low Back Pain Scale, and Acute Low Back Pain Screeing Questionnaire) were randomly assigned to the examinees. The authors reviewed lumbar imaging studies (simple ...

  14. Heterose sobre os pesos de bovinos Canchim e Aberdeen Angus e de seus cruzamentos recíprocos Heterosis upon weights in Canchim and Aberdeen Angus calves and in their reciprocal crosses

    DANIEL PEROTTO

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho foi conduzido para estimar a heterose sobre os pesos ao nascimento (PNT, à desmama (P210 e ao ano (P365 e sobre os ganhos de pesos médios diários do nascimento à desmama (G210 e da desmama ao ano (G365 nas quatro primeiras gerações do sistema de cruzamentos alternados entre as raças Canchim (C e Aberdeen Angus (A. Os dados de 1.147 bezerros nascidos de 1981 a 1998 foram analisados pelo método dos mínimos quadrados, ajustando-se um modelo linear que incluiu os efeitos linear e quadrático da idade da mãe do bezerro e os efeitos fixos de sexo, grupo genético, mês e ano de nascimento do bezerro. Estimativas de heterose e de outras diferenças genéticas foram estimadas por contrastes entre médias e testadas pelo teste t. O contraste "CA" foi positivo e significativo (PThe study was conducted to estimate heterosis upon birth weight (PNT, weaning weight (P210, yearling weight (P365 and daily weight gain from birth to weaning (G210 and from weaning to one year of age (G365 in the first, second, third and fourth generations of a rotational crossbreeding system between Canchim (C and Aberdeen Angus (A. Data from 1,147 calves born from 1981 to 1998 were analyzed by least squares procedures fitting a linear model that included the linear and the quadratic effects of age of the dam of the calf plus the fixed effects of sex, genetic group, month and year of birth of calf. Estimates of heterosis and of other genetic differences were obtained by linear contrasts of appropriate means and tested by the t test. The contrast CA was positive and significant (P<0.001 for all five traits. The contrast F1CAF1AC was negative and highly significant (P<0.001 for P210 and for G210 and significant (P<0.05 for P365. The F1 generation exhibited heterosis of 4.8% for P210 and of 4.9% for G210. Maternal heterosis was 3.7%, 5.8%, 6.3% and 20.4%, respectively, for P210, G210, P365 and G365. The heterosis estimated for the mean of the third and fourth

  15. Nuclear Reactors

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  16. AM, administrative software ease complex Maryland job

    A gas distribution looping project, in three segments that traversed a complete range of installation and alignment issues, recently was completed by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. (BG and E) in northern Maryland. The major projects unit in the company's gas system engineering and design section was responsible for total oversight of the three projects. This included design, engineering, permitting, right-of-way acquisition, construction, testing and restoration, as well as liaison with other company divisions. A specially selected subcontractor team was organized to provide the latest technology. A project management system, comprised mainly of personal computer applications, was implemented to provide: engineering and design coordination; accurate interface among easement, real estate acquisition data, plats, surveys, permitting and design documents; accurate right-of-way identification; data storage and accessibility of all real estate information for use in design and budgeting; an interface of environmental conditions with topography and design; a computer database that is compatible with existing computer libraries and industry-available software, for producing drawings. Controls for projects costs, budget and schedule were provided by the project management system. This was accomplished by interaction of four data systems: real estate, accounting/budget, geographical information system (GIS), global positioning system (GPS). Construction progress was monitored with a scheduling application that ultimately provided justification for contractor progress payments. The amount of pipe laid in any given time span, as documented by field inspector reports, was entered into the scheduling application. The scheduling software calculated the percent completed and provided information for monitoring progress

  17. 76 FR 27622 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption of Control...

    2011-05-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption of Control Techniques Guidelines for...

  18. An audit to review the characteristics and management of placenta praevia at Aberdeen Maternity Hospital, 2009-2011.

    Pande, B; Shetty, A

    2014-07-01

    Placenta praevia (PP) is an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity. We reviewed the characteristics and management of PP at the Aberdeen Maternity Hospital (AMH) to evaluate performance. In the years 2009-2011, a total of 60 cases with confirmed PP underwent caesarean section (CS) at the AMH. Two-fifths of cases had previous CS and two-thirds were posterior praevias. Four-fifths were major praevias. Diagnosis was mostly by trans-abdominal scanning (TAS). A little less than two-thirds underwent hospital admission (half of them for antepartum haemorrhage). Most received steroid and ferrous sulphate as appropriate. The majority were delivered at greater than 36 weeks' gestation. There was good support in theatre by senior obstetricians and anaesthetists. Cell salvage was used in theatre. Overall, the outcomes were good. Improvements could be made on documentation of counselling preoperatively and practice of trans-vaginal scans (TVS) to confirm low lying placentae even at the 20-week scan for better diagnosis, as per the RCOG guidelines. PMID:24702527

  19. Veterinary college, University of Maryland at Baltimore create new public health degree program

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    The Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine (VMRCVM) and the University of Maryland at Baltimore (UMB) have established a collaborative new program that will enable veterinary students and working veterinarians to earn a Master in Public Health (MPH) degree from the University of Maryland at Baltimore and expand research opportunities.

  20. Características da carcaça de bovinos Canchim e Aberdeen Angus e de seus cruzamentos recíprocos terminados em confinamento Carcass traits of Canchim, Aberdeen Angus and reciprocal crosses finished in confinement

    Daniel Perotto

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisadas quatorze características quantitativas das carcaças de 137 machos bovinos inteiros pertencentes aos grupos Canchim (Ca, Aberdeen Angus (Ab, 3/4Ca+1/4Ab, 3/4Ab+1/4Ca, 5/8Ca+3/8Ab e 5/8Ab+3/8Ca, nascidos na Estação Experimental Fazenda Modelo, em Ponta Grossa-PR, no período de 1988 a 1993. As médias para a idade e para o peso ao início do confinamento, duração do confinamento, idade e peso ao abate foram, respectivamente, 737 dias, 356kg, 97 dias, 834 dias e 468kg. Durante o confinamento, os garrotes receberam silagem de milho à vontade mais uma ração concentrada (79% de NDT, 17,8% de PB fornecida à base de 1% do peso vivo do animal por dia. Os grupos Ca e Ab diferiram entre si para todas as características, exceto para percentagem de costilhar (PEC. O Ca foi superior ao Ab para peso de carcaça quente (PCQ, rendimento de carcaça quente (RCQ, área de olho de lombo (AOL, conformação, percentagem de músculos (PEM, peso da porção comestível da carcaça (PPC e peso de carcaça quente por dia de vida ao abate (PCQ/DDV. O Ab superou o Ca quanto à espessura de gordura de cobertura (ECG e à percentagem de gordura (PEG. Houve heterose para PCQ, RCQ, AOL, PPC e PCQ/DDV. As duas gerações avançadas de cruzamentos alternados Ca x Ab apresentaram desempenho superior à média das raças paternas para PCQ, RCQ, AOL, PPC e PCQ/DDV. O desempenho de um esquema alternado de cruzamentos entre Ca e Ab seria melhor que o de qualquer dessas duas criada isoladamente.Fourteen quantitative carcass traits of 137 Canchim; 5/8 Charolais + 3/8 Zebu, (Ca, Aberdeen Angus (Ab, 3/4Ca+1/4Ab, 3/4Ab+1/4Ca, 5/8Ca+3/8Ab and 5/8Ab+3/8Ca, born at Est. Exp. Fazenda Modelo, in Ponta Grossa-PR, Brazil, from 1988 to 1993, were analyzed. Averages for age at beginning of confinement, initial weight, length of confinement period, final age and final weight were, respectively, 737 days, 356kg, 97 days, 834 days and 468kg. During the confinement period

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF THE ACCOUNTING PROFESSION IN MARYLAND (ABSTRACT

    Jerome DeRidder

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Double entry bookkeeping began in fifteenth century Italy. It developed into a fully integrated accounting system in England during the Industrial Revolution. The English system was transferred to America in the early 1880’s by accountants who were sent to America to represent investors in England.The first professional accounting society began in New York in 1886 as the American Association of Public Accountants. It established the requirement for the first Certified Public Accounting Examination (CPA in 1896 .Maryland established the accounting profession with the certification requirement in 1901. Max Tecichman was the first person to pass the CPA exam in Maryland.Max Tecichman is considered the founder of the accounting profession in Maryland. He founded the Association of Public Accountants and was its first president. Since then, the profession in Maryland has expanded rapidly in response to the needs of business. By 1998 it had over 10,000 members to serve the needs of commerce and society within the state and encompassed areas such as tax, ethics, education and public service.

  2. Maryland and the Southern Regional Education Board, December 2014

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This report details Maryland's participation in Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) programs and services from December 2013 through November 2014. Appropriations from member states support SREB's core operations and general services. SREB leverages the long-standing commitment of member states to attract external funding for an array of…

  3. 78 FR 3496 - Maryland Disaster Number MD-00025

    2013-01-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster Number MD-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  4. 77 FR 74908 - Maryland Disaster Number MD-00025

    2012-12-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Maryland Disaster Number MD-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  5. Long-term fate of depleted uranium at Aberdeen and Yuma Proving Grounds: Human health and ecological risk assessments

    Ebinger, M.H.; Beckman, R.J.; Myers, O.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.; Bestgen, H.T. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term consequences of depleted uranium (DU) in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) and Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) for the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) of the US Army. Specifically, we examined the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to humans and ecosystems caused by exposure to DU at both installations. We developed contaminant transport models of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at APG and terrestrial ecosystems at YPG to assess potential adverse effects from DU exposure. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the initial models showed the portions of the models that most influenced predicted DU concentrations, and the results of the sensitivity analyses were fundamental tools in designing field sampling campaigns at both installations. Results of uranium (U) isotope analyses of field samples provided data to evaluate the source of U in the environment and the toxicological and radiological doses to different ecosystem components and to humans. Probabilistic doses were estimated from the field data, and DU was identified in several components of the food chain at APG and YPG. Dose estimates from APG data indicated that U or DU uptake was insufficient to cause adverse toxicological or radiological effects. Dose estimates from YPG data indicated that U or DU uptake is insufficient to cause radiological effects in ecosystem components or in humans, but toxicological effects in small mammals (e.g., kangaroo rats and pocket mice) may occur from U or DU ingestion. The results of this study were used to modify environmental radiation monitoring plans at APG and YPG to ensure collection of adequate data for ongoing ecological and human health risk assessments.

  6. Long-term fate of depleted uranium at Aberdeen and Yuma Proving Grounds: Human health and ecological risk assessments

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term consequences of depleted uranium (DU) in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) and Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) for the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) of the US Army. Specifically, we examined the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to humans and ecosystems caused by exposure to DU at both installations. We developed contaminant transport models of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at APG and terrestrial ecosystems at YPG to assess potential adverse effects from DU exposure. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the initial models showed the portions of the models that most influenced predicted DU concentrations, and the results of the sensitivity analyses were fundamental tools in designing field sampling campaigns at both installations. Results of uranium (U) isotope analyses of field samples provided data to evaluate the source of U in the environment and the toxicological and radiological doses to different ecosystem components and to humans. Probabilistic doses were estimated from the field data, and DU was identified in several components of the food chain at APG and YPG. Dose estimates from APG data indicated that U or DU uptake was insufficient to cause adverse toxicological or radiological effects. Dose estimates from YPG data indicated that U or DU uptake is insufficient to cause radiological effects in ecosystem components or in humans, but toxicological effects in small mammals (e.g., kangaroo rats and pocket mice) may occur from U or DU ingestion. The results of this study were used to modify environmental radiation monitoring plans at APG and YPG to ensure collection of adequate data for ongoing ecological and human health risk assessments

  7. Salinity. Grade 5 Science Language Usage. Maryland School Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP): Resource Library. Public Release Task.

    Maryland State Dept. of Education. Baltimore. Div. of Planning, Results and Information Management.

    One component of the Maryland School Performance Assessment; Program (MSPAP) is the state's performance-based assessments, criterion-referenced tests that require students to apply what they know and can do to solve problems and display other higher-order thinking skills. This document helps parents, teachers, students, and other citizens…

  8. N Reactor

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The last of Hanfordqaodmasdkwaspemas7ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdflss nine plutonium production reactors to be built was the N Reactor.This reactor was called a dual purpose...

  9. De brest à Aberdeen, la croisière 48 du Glomar Challenger From Brest to Aberdee, Glomar Challenger Sails on Leg 48

    L'équipe Scientifique Embarquée

    2006-01-01

    La croisière 48 du Glomar Challenger s'est déroulée en 1976 entre Brest et Aberdeen sur la marge septentrionale du Golfe de Gascogne et le Banc de Rockall. Les sept sites forés ont permis de comparer la structure et l'histoire géologique de deux marges de types différents, formées par rifting, l'une dans une mer épicontinentale, l'autre dans un craton. L'histoire de la subsidence a pu être établie. De nombreux hiatus ont été mis en évidence dans les séries déposées en mer profonde, dont certa...

  10. Special Year held at the University of Maryland

    1988-01-01

    The papers in this volume reflect the richness and diversity of the subject of dynamics. Some are lectures given at the three conferences (Ergodic Theory and Topological Dynamics, Symbolic Dynamics and Coding Theory and Smooth Dynamics, Dynamics and Applied Dynamics) held in Maryland between October 1986 and March 1987; some are work which was in progress during the Special Year, and some are work which was done because of questions and problems raised at the conferences. In addition, a paper of John Milnor and William Thurston, versions of which had been available as notes but not yet published, is included.

  11. Ensuring quality Website redesign: the University of Maryland's experience*

    Fuller, Diane M.; Hinegardner, Patricia G.

    2001-01-01

    The Web Redesign Committee at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) of the University of Maryland was formed to evaluate its site and oversee the site's redesign. The committee's goal was to design a site that would be functional, be usable, and provide the library with a more current image. Based on a literature review and discussions with colleagues, a usability study was conducted to gain a better understanding of how the Website was used. Volunteers from across the campu...

  12. 77 FR 39938 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Regional Haze State...

    2012-07-06

    ... approving into the Maryland SIP. \\1\\ EPA promulgated the RHR to address regional haze on July 1, 1999 (64 FR... which the SIP relies,'' which is ``defined as 2002 for regional haze purposes.'' See 64 FR 35742, July 1..., 2012 (77 FR 11839), EPA published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR) for the State of Maryland....

  13. The National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative: Strategy in Action: Building the Cybersecurity Workforce in Maryland

    Business-Higher Education Forum, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Business-Higher Education Forum (BHEF) has achieved particular success in operationalizing the National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative (HEWI) in Maryland around cybersecurity. Leveraging its membership of corporate CEOs, university presidents, and government agency leaders, BHEF partnered with the University System of Maryland to…

  14. 75 FR 6337 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control of Carbon...

    2010-02-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control of... submitted by the State of Maryland for the purpose of replacing the existing requirements for the control...

  15. 75 FR 59180 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control Technique...

    2010-09-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control... and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control Technique Guidelines for Paper... adopting the requirements of EPA's Control Technique Guidelines (CTG) for paper, film, and foil...

  16. Pattern of Mortality in a Sample of Maryland Residents with Severe Mental Illness

    Daumit, Gail L.; Anthony, Christopher B.; Ford, Daniel E.; Fahey, Maureen; Skinner, Elizabeth Ann; Lehman, Anthony F.; Hwang, Wenke; Steinwachs, Donald M.

    2010-01-01

    In a cohort of Maryland Medicaid recipients with severe mental illness followed from 1993-2001, we compared mortality to the Maryland general population including race and gender subgroups. Persons with severe mental illness died at a mean age of 51.8 years, with a standardized mortality ratio of 3.7 (95%CI, 3.6-3.7).

  17. 75 FR 74712 - Planet Energy (Maryland) Corp.; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    2010-12-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Planet Energy (Maryland) Corp.; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding, of Planet Energy (Maryland) Corp.'s application...

  18. Changing Lives: The Baltimore City Community College Life Sciences Partnership with the University of Maryland, Baltimore

    Carroll, Vanessa G.; Harris-Bondima, Michelle; Norris, Kathleen Kennedy; Williams, Carolane

    2010-01-01

    Baltimore City Community College (BCCC) leveraged heightened student interest and enrollment in the sciences and allied health with Maryland's world-leading biotechnology industry to build a community college life sciences learning and research center right on the University of Maryland, Baltimore's downtown BioPark campus. The BCCC Life Sciences…

  19. Railroad Lines, Maryland Transit Adminstration's Light Rail, Metro and MARC rail routes., Published in 2013, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Maryland Transit Administration.

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Railroad Lines dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2013. It is described as 'Maryland...

  20. Bus Stops, Maryland Transit Administration Local and Commuter Bus Stops, Published in 2013, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Maryland Transit Administration.

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Bus Stops dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2013. It is described as 'Maryland Transit...

  1. Looking For New Ways to Make Progress: School Restructuring in Maryland, 2008-09 Follow-Up Report

    Neuman-Sheldon, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    This report describes Maryland's latest approaches to dealing with restructuring schools and other schools in NCLB improvement. Information for this report was obtained between September 2008 and January 2009 from interviews with Maryland State Department of Education officials and with administrators in three Maryland districts: Anne Arundel…

  2. Prevalence and differentiation of diseases in Maryland backyard flocks.

    Madsen, Jennifer M; Zimmermann, Nickolas G; Timmons, Jennifer; Tablante, Nathaniel L

    2013-09-01

    Several epidemiologic surveillance studies have implicated backyard flocks as a reservoir for poultry diseases; however, much debate still exists over the risk these small flocks pose. To evaluate this concern, the prevalence of Newcastle disease (ND), infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT), Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), and Salmonella was determined in 39 Maryland backyard flocks. Serum, tracheal, and cloacal swabs were randomly collected from 262 birds throughout nine counties in Maryland. Through PCR and ELISA analysis, disease prevalence and seroprevalence were determined in flocks, respectively, for the following: ND (0%, 23%); ILT (26%, 77%); MG (3%, 13%); and Salmonella (0%, not done). Vaccine status could not be accurately confirmed. Premise positives were further differentiated and identified by partial nucleotide sequencing. Screening of the 10 ILT premise positives showed that most were live attenuated vaccines: eight matched a tissue culture origin vaccine, one matched a chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccine, and one was CEO related. The single MG-positive flock, also positive for the CEO-related sequence, was identified as the infectious S6 strain. The prevalence rates for these economically important poultry diseases ranged from none to relatively low, with the vast majority of sampled flocks presenting no clinical signs. PMID:24283123

  3. The Maryland nuclear science baccalaureate degree program: The university perspective

    Nuclear utilities' efforts in response to industry-wide pressures to provide operations staff with degree opportunities have encountered formidable barriers. This paper describes, from the university's perspective, the development and operation of the University of Maryland University College (UMUC) special baccalaureate program in nuclear science. This program has successfully overcome these problems to provide degree education on-site, on-line, and on time. Program delivery began in 1984 with one utility and a single site. It is currently delivered at eight sites under contract to six utilities with a total active student count of over 500. The first graduates are expected in 1989. The program is an accredited university program and enjoys licensure approval from the six states within which it operates. In addition to meeting US Nuclear Regulatory Commission proposed guidelines for degreed operators, the program increasingly appears as part of utility management development programs for all plant personnel and a factor in employee retention. The owner utilities, the University of Maryland, and the growing user's group are committed to the academic integrity, technical capability, and responsiveness of the program. The full support of this partnership speaks well for the long-term service of the Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Science program to the nuclear power industry

  4. Regional levels of indoor radon in Virginia and Maryland

    Mose, Douglas G.; Mushrush, George W.

    1988-12-01

    The levels of Rn-222 in homes located in Fairfax County, Virginia, and Montgomery County, Maryland, are currently being measured during four consecutive three-month seasonal intervals using alpha-track detectors. Significant variations occur between parts of northern Virginia and southern Maryland because the area is part of three very different geologic provinces. Results from the winter period in these three provinces show that the indoor radon levels were about twice as high as anticipated. Approximately 45 percent of the homes had winter indoor radon levels above 4 pCi/l, the EPA’s recommended action level, and in the spring period, more than 30 percent of the homes still had indoor levels above 4 pCi/l. Indoor radon variations due to seasonal control were about as significant as geological control. Worst-case combinations developed over some rock units in the winter, producing areas in which about 70 percent of the homes exceeded 4 pCi/l.

  5. Safety-Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Docket No. 50-170

    Supplement 1 to the Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The reactor facility is located in Montgomery County, Maryland. This supplement reports on the status of the licensee's emergency plan that had not been reviewed at the time the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0882) was published

  6. Reactor Physics

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  7. Reactor Physics

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  8. Reactor Physics

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  9. Proceedings of the advisory committee on reactor safeguards workshop on future reactors

    This report contains the information presented at the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Workshop on Future Reactors held at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission headquarters in Rockville, Maryland, on June 4-5, 2001. Included are the subject matter summaries, followed by the presentation material and selected participants discussions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to identify the regulatory challenges associated with future reactor designs. A list of such challenges was developed from the workshop notes, the various presentations, the panel discussions and the question and answer sessions. This list is included in the Introduction section of this document. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final workshop agenda

  10. Reactor operation

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  11. Reactor safeguards

    Russell, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  12. De brest à Aberdeen, la croisière 48 du Glomar Challenger From Brest to Aberdee, Glomar Challenger Sails on Leg 48

    L'équipe Scientifique Embarquée

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available La croisière 48 du Glomar Challenger s'est déroulée en 1976 entre Brest et Aberdeen sur la marge septentrionale du Golfe de Gascogne et le Banc de Rockall. Les sept sites forés ont permis de comparer la structure et l'histoire géologique de deux marges de types différents, formées par rifting, l'une dans une mer épicontinentale, l'autre dans un craton. L'histoire de la subsidence a pu être établie. De nombreux hiatus ont été mis en évidence dans les séries déposées en mer profonde, dont certains sont contemporains d'événements connus sur le plateau continental. Des marnes noires riches en matière organique d'origine détritique ont été trouvées dans le golfe de Gascogne. Elles ont pu se déposer aussi bien en mer profonde que sur le plateau continental. Des mesures de paléomagnétisme, de flux de chaleur et des diagraphies ont été effectuées avec succès. Leg 48 by the Glomar Challenger took place in 1976, between Brest and Aberdeen, on the northern margin of the Bay of Biscay and the Rockall Bank. The seven drilling sites enabled a comparison ta be made of the structure and geological history of two different types of margins, both formed by rifting, one in an epicontinental sea and the other in a craton. The history of subsidence was determined. A great many gaps were revealed in the series deposited in deep water, including some that are contemporary with events known on the continental shelf. Blackshales rich in organic motter of detrital origin were found in the Bay of Biscay. They may have been deposited either in deep water or on the continental shelf. Successful paleomagnetism and heat flow measurements were made, along with well logging.

  13. Research Reactors

    Martens, Frederick H. [Argonne National Laboratory; Jacobson, Norman H.

    1968-09-01

    This booklet discusses research reactors - reactors designed to provide a source of neutrons and/or gamma radiation for research, or to aid in the investigation of the effects of radiation on any type of material.

  14. Power balance and characterization of impurities in the Maryland Spheromak

    Cote, C.

    1993-12-31

    The Maryland Spheromak is a medium size magnetically confined plasma of toroidal shape. Low T{sub e} and higher n{sub e} than expected contribute to produce a radiation dominated short-lived spheromak configuration. A pyroelectric radiation detector and a VUV spectrometer have been used for space and time-resolved measurements of radiated power and impurity line emission. Results from the bolometry and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics have been combined to give the absolute concentrations of the major impurity species together with the electron temperature. The large amount of oxygen and nitrogen ions in the plasma very early in the discharge is seen to be directly responsible for the abnormally high electron density. The dominant power loss mechanisms are found to be radiation (from impurity line emission) and electron convection to the end walls during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration, and radiation only during the decay phase.

  15. Three-cavity circuit studies of the Maryland gyroklystron

    Striffler, C.D.; Tantawi, S.; Main, W.; Hogan, B.; Latham, P.E.; Lawson, W.; Koc, U.V.; Matthews, H.W.; Nusinovich, G.S.; Granatstein, V.L.

    1992-12-31

    At the University of Maryland we have examined an X-Band TE{sub 01} mode three-cavity gyroklystron circuit that includes a tunable buncher cavity. The system parameters are: 425 kV, 100--200 A, pulse length {approximately} 1 {mu}s, operating frequency 9.85 GHz, and a beam alpha, {upsilon}{perpendicular}/{upsilon}{sub z}, in the range 0.7--1.0. This circuit produced a maximum power of 27 MW at 32% efficiency and a gain of 36 dB. We will summarize the major results of the three-cavity systems, including recent output cavity configurations that were to affect the post-cavity interaction.

  16. Injector for the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER)

    The electron beam injector constructed by FM technologies for the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) program is described. The program will use an electron beam to model space-charge-dominated ion beams in a recirculating linac for heavy ion inertial fusion, as well as for high-current muon colliders. The injector consists of a 10 keV, 100 mA electron gun with 50-100 nsec pulse width and a repetition rate of 120 Hz. The e-gun system includes a 6-mask, rotatable aperture plate, a Rogowski current monitor, an ion pump, and a gate valve. The injector beamline consists of a solenoid, a five-quadrupole matching section, two diagnostic chambers, and a fast current monitor. An independent diagnostic chamber also built for UMER will be used to measure horizontal and vertical emittance, current, energy, energy spread, and the evolution of the beam envelope and profile along the injector beamline

  17. Power balance and characterization of impurities in the Maryland Spheromak

    The Maryland Spheromak is a medium size magnetically confined plasma of toroidal shape. Low Te and higher ne than expected contribute to produce a radiation dominated short-lived spheromak configuration. A pyroelectric radiation detector and a VUV spectrometer have been used for space and time-resolved measurements of radiated power and impurity line emission. Results from the bolometry and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics have been combined to give the absolute concentrations of the major impurity species together with the electron temperature. The large amount of oxygen and nitrogen ions in the plasma very early in the discharge is seen to be directly responsible for the abnormally high electron density. The dominant power loss mechanisms are found to be radiation (from impurity line emission) and electron convection to the end walls during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration, and radiation only during the decay phase

  18. Maryland State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Handbook Series Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Maryland. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  19. Commissioning of the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER)

    Bernal, Santiago; Feldman, Donald; Feldman, Renee; Godlove, Terry; Haber, Irving; Harris, John R; Holloway, Mike; Kishek, Rami A; Neumann, Jonathan G; Papadopoulos, Christos; Quinn, Bryan; Reiser, Martin; Stratakis, Diktys; Thangaraj, Jayakar C T; Tian, Kai; Walter, Mark; Wilson, Mark C

    2005-01-01

    The University of Maryland electron ring (UMER) is a low-energy, high current recirculator for beam physics research. The ring is completed for multi-turn operation of beams over a broad range of intensities and initial conditions. UMER is addressing issues in beam physics with relevance to many applications that rely on intense beams of high quality. Examples are advanced accelerators, FEL's, spallation neutron sources and future heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion. We review the motivation, ring layout and operating conditions of UMER. Further, we present a summary of beam physics areas that UMER is currently investigating and others that are part of the commissioning plan: from transverse beam dynamics (matching, halo formation, strongly asymmetric beams, space-charge waves, etc), longitudinal dynamics (bunch capture/shaping, evolution of energy spread, longitudinal space-charge waves, etc.) to future upgrades and planned research (acceleration and resonance traversal, modeling of galactic dynamics, etc....

  20. Dermocystidium sp. Infection in Blue Ridge Sculpin Captured in Maryland.

    Blazer, Vicki S; Hitt, Nathaniel P; Snyder, Craig D; Snook, Erin L; Adams, Cynthia R

    2016-09-01

    Raised pale cysts were observed on Blue Ridge Sculpin Cottus caeruleomentum during stream fish community surveys in Catoctin Mountain Park, Maryland. When examined histologically, preserved sculpin exhibited multiple cysts containing spherical endospores with a refractile central body characteristic of Dermocystidium spp. Cysts were not observed on the gills or internally. The portion of the watershed in which affected sculpin were observed contained lower than expected numbers of sculpin, raising concerns about the population effects of this infection. A nearby stream lacked sculpin even though they are common in this region, further suggesting the possibility of regional effects. This is the first report of a Dermocystidium infecting any fish species in the eastern United States. Received October 16, 2015; accepted February 14, 2016. PMID:27455037

  1. Maryland state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and State levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Maryland. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  2. Injector for the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER)

    Kehne, D.; Godlove, T.; Haldemann, P.; Bernal, S.; Guharay, S.; Kishek, R.; Li, Y.; O'Shea, P.; Reiser, M.; Yun, V.; Zou, Y.; Haber, I.

    2001-05-01

    The electron beam injector constructed by FM technologies for the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) program is described. The program will use an electron beam to model space-charge-dominated ion beams in a recirculating linac for heavy ion inertial fusion, as well as for high-current muon colliders. The injector consists of a 10 keV, 100 mA electron gun with 50-100 nsec pulse width and a repetition rate of 120 Hz. The e-gun system includes a 6-mask, rotatable aperture plate, a Rogowski current monitor, an ion pump, and a gate valve. The injector beamline consists of a solenoid, a five-quadrupole matching section, two diagnostic chambers, and a fast current monitor. An independent diagnostic chamber also built for UMER will be used to measure horizontal and vertical emittance, current, energy, energy spread, and the evolution of the beam envelope and profile along the injector beamline.

  3. Maryland State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    None

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Handbook Series Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Maryland. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  4. Qualidade do sêmen de touros das raças Aberdeen Angus e Brangus-Ibagé em frente à degeneração testicular experimental induzida por dexametasona Bulls semen quality of Aberdeen Angus and Brangus-Ibagé breeds after experimental testicular degeneration induced by dexamethasone

    Marilise Mesquita Horn

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Foi administrada dexametasona para indução de degeneração testicular experimental em touros de uma raça taurina pura (Aberdeen Angus e de sua sintética derivada (Brangus-Ibagé. O objetivo deste estudo foi o de averiguar a diferença de sensibilidade na função gametogênica em frente à degeneração experimental. Para tal, foram avaliados os aspectos físicos e morfológicos do sêmen. Os dados obtidos foram analisados considerando o dia de coleta e genótipo. Os resultados revelaram que os dois grupos raciais comportaram-se semelhantemente ao longo das coletas. A despeito do número de animais empregados, o uso da degeneração testicular experimental possibilitou evidenciar que não há diferença entre as duas raças quanto à intensidade da degeneração e tempo necessário para o restabelecimento do quadro espermático normal.Testicular degeneration was induced by dexamethasone injection in bulls from a European breed Aberdeen Angus and a derived synthetic crossbreed (Brangus-Ibagé. Aiming to investigate differential sensibility on gametogenic function in these genotypes, physical and morphological semen characteristics were evaluated. The data analysed considered the day of the semen samples and the breed. Our results reveal that both breeds behave similarly during the experimental period. Even considering the number of bulls used in this experiment, the employed methodology gives no evidence of any difference between breeds, intensity of degeneration or time required to the reestablishment of normal sperm frequencies after experimental induction of testicular degeneration.

  5. Research reactors

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  6. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  7. Research reactors

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world's research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted

  8. Reactor container

    Object: To provide a jet and missile protective wall of a configuration being inflated toward the center of a reactor container on the inside of a body of the reactor container disposed within a biological shield wall to thereby increase safety of the reactor container. Structure: A jet and missile protective wall comprised of curved surfaces internally formed with a plurality of arch inflations filled with concrete between inner and outer iron plates and shape steel beam is provided between a reactor container surrounded by a biological shield wall and a thermal shield wall surrounding the reactor pressure vessel, and an adiabatic heat insulating material is filled in space therebetween. (Yoshino, Y.)

  9. Coastal Topography—Assateague Island, Maryland and Virginia, Post-Hurricane Joaquin, 26 November 2015

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) mosaic was produced for Assateague Island, Maryland and Virginia, post-Hurricane Joaquin, from remotely sensed, geographically...

  10. Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Maryland and the District of Columbia

    Blom, E.A.T.; Cullom, J.; Farrell, J.H.; Joyce, E.D.; Klimkiewicz, M.K.; Malcolm, J.G.; Rasberry, D.A.; Ringler, R.F.; Solem, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    This was the result of a 5-year cooperative study with the Maryland Ornithological Society and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Each of Maryland's 1,256 5-km (25 sq km) blocks was surveyed for breeding birds using the standard categories of Possible, Probable, and Confirmed breeding. Special features include: (1) coverage of all blocks instead of a random sample; (2) one-third of the state (including the most rapidly changing counties) was covered in quarterblocks (2.5 km on each side) to facilitate detecting future changes; (3) quantitative sampling (miniroutes) was completed in more than half the blocks; (4) a 2 percent statewide random sample of blocks was searched for about 30 hours each by Patuxent professionals to evaluate efficiency of coverage by the volunteers; (5) besides species maps for 1983-87, the atlas also includes distribution maps from the 1950s; (6) life history data are based largely on unpublished Maryland information.

  11. 77 FR 64787 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Reasonably Available...

    2012-10-23

    ... methods, calculations methods, work practice standards and exemptions which make Maryland Department of... from Specific Processes for adoption of various test methods, calculations methods, work practice... test methods, calculations methods, work practice standards and exemptions in accordance with CTGs...

  12. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Maryland based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Maryland census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  13. Coastal Topography—Assateague Island, Maryland and Virginia, Post-Hurricane Joaquin, 26 November 2015

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Binary point-cloud data were produced for Assateague Island, Maryland and Virginia, post-Hurricane Joaquin, from remotely sensed, geographically referenced...

  14. Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine hosted Temple Grandin

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    Dr. Temple Grandin, an associate professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University, recently spoke on agricultural animal welfare issues at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine.

  15. Water quality of Lower Deer Creek, Harford County, MD, home of the federally endangered Maryland darter

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Maryland darter (Etheostoma sellare) is one of the rarest fish in the world, existing in one riffle of Deer Creek, Harford County. There have been several...

  16. EAARL Coastal Topography--Maryland and Delaware, post-Nor'Ida, 2009

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the eastern Maryland and Delaware coastline, post-Nor'Ida (November 2009 nor'easter), was produced from remotely...

  17. EAARL Coastal Topography--Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland and Virginia, 2010

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland and Virginia was produced from remotely sensed, geographically...

  18. 2006 Maryland Department of Natural Resources Lidar: Caroline, Kent and Queen Anne Counties

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Maryland Department of Natural Resources requested the collection of LIDAR data over Kent, Queen Anne and Caroline Counties, MD. In response, EarthData acquired the...

  19. 78 FR 27160 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; District of Columbia, Maryland and...

    2013-05-09

    ... rule published on March 20, 2013 (78 FR 17161) is reopened through June 10, 2013. All comments received... Implementation Plans (SIPs). At the request of the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE), EPA is...

  20. 77 FR 26474 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Approval of 2011 Consent...

    2012-05-04

    ... Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE). These revisions approve specific provisions of a 2011 Consent Decree between MDE and GenOn to reduce particulate matter (PM), sulfur oxides (SO X ), and...

  1. University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report

    Dorland, William [University of Maryland

    2014-11-18

    The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center. The University of Maryland (UMD) and UCLA were the host universities. This final technical report describes the physics results from the UMD CMPD.

  2. Preliminary assessment of risk from toxic materials that might be mobilized in the decommissioning of Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032

    Rosenblatt, D.H.; Brubaker, K.L.

    1991-12-01

    Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032 is scheduled for decommissioning, that is, for demolition. Because the building was formerly used for small-scale operations with incendiary and toxic chemical agents, it presents unusual concerns for occupational and public health safety during the demolition. For this reason, an anticipatory risk assessment was conducted, taking into consideration the building`s history, properties of potential residual contaminants (particularly chemical and incendiary agents), and assumptions relating to meteorological conditions and envisioned modes of demolition. Safe maximum levels in concrete floors for the worst case were estimated to be: white phosphorus, 3200 mg/kg; mustard, 94 mg/kg; nerve agent GA (tabun), 6 mg/kg; cyanide, 500 mg/kg; and sulfide, 1400 mg/kg. These values will serve as planning guidance for the activities to follow. It is emphasized that the estimates must be reviewed, and perhaps revised, after sampling and analysis are completed, the demolition methodology is chosen, and dust emissions are measured under operating conditions.

  3. Preliminary assessment of risk from toxic materials that might be mobilized in the decommissioning of Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032

    Rosenblatt, D.H.; Brubaker, K.L.

    1991-12-01

    Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032 is scheduled for decommissioning, that is, for demolition. Because the building was formerly used for small-scale operations with incendiary and toxic chemical agents, it presents unusual concerns for occupational and public health safety during the demolition. For this reason, an anticipatory risk assessment was conducted, taking into consideration the building's history, properties of potential residual contaminants (particularly chemical and incendiary agents), and assumptions relating to meteorological conditions and envisioned modes of demolition. Safe maximum levels in concrete floors for the worst case were estimated to be: white phosphorus, 3200 mg/kg; mustard, 94 mg/kg; nerve agent GA (tabun), 6 mg/kg; cyanide, 500 mg/kg; and sulfide, 1400 mg/kg. These values will serve as planning guidance for the activities to follow. It is emphasized that the estimates must be reviewed, and perhaps revised, after sampling and analysis are completed, the demolition methodology is chosen, and dust emissions are measured under operating conditions.

  4. The Effect of Hurricanes on Annual Precipitation in Maryland and the Connection to Global Climate Change

    Liu, Jackie; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation is a vital aspect of our lives droughts, floods and other related disasters that involve precipitation can cause costly damage in the economic system and general society. Purpose of this project is to determine what, if any effect do hurricanes have on annual precipitation in Maryland Research will be conducted on Marylands terrain, climatology, annual precipitation, and precipitation contributed from hurricanes Possible connections to climate change

  5. The Use of Recommended Communication Techniques by Maryland Family Physicians and Pediatricians

    Weatherspoon, Darien J.; Horowitz, Alice M.; Kleinman, Dushanka V.; WANG, MIN QI

    2015-01-01

    Background Health literacy experts and the American Medical Association have developed recommended communication techniques for healthcare providers given that effective communication has been shown to greatly improve health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the number and types of communication techniques routinely used by Maryland physicians. Methods In 2010, a 30-item survey was mailed to a random sample of 1,472 Maryland family physicians and pediatricians, with 294 sur...

  6. Nurse Practitioners' Use of Communication Techniques: Results of a Maryland Oral Health Literacy Survey

    Koo, Laura W.; Horowitz, Alice M.; Radice, Sarah D.; Wang, Min Q.; Kleinman, Dushanka V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We examined nurse practitioners’ use and opinions of recommended communication techniques for the promotion of oral health as part of a Maryland state-wide oral health literacy assessment. Use of recommended health-literate and patient-centered communication techniques have demonstrated improved health outcomes. Methods A 27-item self-report survey, containing 17 communication technique items, across 5 domains, was mailed to 1,410 licensed nurse practitioners (NPs) in Maryland in 2...

  7. Effects of Concrete Channels on Stream Biogeochemistry, Maryland Coastal Plain

    Prestegaard, K. L.; Gilbert, L.; Phemister, K.

    2005-05-01

    In the 1950's and 60's, extensive networks of cement-lined channels were built in suburban watersheds near Washington, D.C. to convey storm water to downstream locations. These cement-lined stream channels limit interactions between surface and groundwater and they provide sources of alkalinity in Maryland Coastal Plain watersheds that normally have low alkalinity. This project was designed to 1) compare base flow water chemistry in headwater reaches of urban and non-urban streams, and 2) to evaluate downstream changes in water chemistry in channelized urban streams in comparison with non-urban reference streams. During a drought year, headwater streams in both urban and non-urban sites had significant concentrations of Fe(II) that were discharged from groundwater sources and rapidly oxidized by iron-oxidizing bacteria. During a wet year, the concentrations of Fe(II) were higher in headwater urban streams than in the non-urban streams. This suggests that impervious surfaces in headwater urban watersheds prevent the recharge of oxygen-rich waters during storm events, which maintains iron-rich groundwater discharge to the stream. Downstream changes in water chemistry are prominent in cement-lined urban channels because they are associated with distinctive microbial communities. The headwater zones of channelized streams are dominated by iron-ozidizing bacteria, that are replaced downstream by manganese-oxidizing zones, and replaced further downstream by biofilms dominated by photosynthesizing cyanobacteria. The reaches dominated by cyanobacteria exhibit diurnal changes in pH due to uptake of CO2 for photosynthesis. Diurnal changes range from 7.5 to 8.8 in the summer months to 7.0 to 7.5 in the cooler months, indicating both the impact of photosynthesis and the additional source of alkalinity provided by concrete. The dissolved oxygen, pH, and other characteristics of tributaries dominated by cyanobacteria are similar to the water chemistry characteristics observed in

  8. Reactor building

    The whole reactor building is accommodated in a shaft and is sealed level with the earth's surface by a building ceiling, which provides protection against penetration due to external effects. The building ceiling is supported on walls of the reactor building, which line the shaft and transfer the vertical components of forces to the foundations. The thickness of the walls is designed to withstand horizontal pressure waves in the floor. The building ceiling has an opening above the reactor, which must be closed by cover plates. Operating equipment for the reactor can be situated above the building ceiling. (orig./HP)

  9. Heterogeneous reactors

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author)

  10. Current Status of Gyroklystron Research at the University of Maryland

    Gouveia, E. S.; Lawson, W.; Hogan, B.; Bharathan, K.; Granatstein, V. L.

    2003-12-01

    At the University of Maryland, we have been developing high-power coaxial gyroklystrons. Our present work is focused on the development of a 17.136 GHz four-cavity frequency-doubling gyroklystron amplifier. This device will then be used to drive a high gradient linear accelerator structure recently developed by the Haimson Corporation. Our work has been afflicted by many technical challenges, most arising from thermal imperfections in the custom-made high current emitter of our electron gun. In our latest experimental run, instabilities were detected in the input cavity of our amplifier tube. These instabilities appear when the beam pitch ratio (α) is approximately 1, thus impeding our search of domains with higher α values (note that the circuit was designed to operate at α=1.4). In order to remedy this problem, we have radically redesigned the input cavity, changing both its geometry and Q factor. The new input cavity has been fabricated and cold-tested. It will soon undergo hot-test in the next run of experimental studies of the circuit, which will commence after an upgrade of our vacuum system. Here we present the current status of this research.

  11. Current Status of Gyroklystron Research at the University of Maryland

    At the University of Maryland, we have been developing high-power coaxial gyroklystrons. Our present work is focused on the development of a 17.136 GHz four-cavity frequency-doubling gyroklystron amplifier. This device will then be used to drive a high gradient linear accelerator structure recently developed by the Haimson Corporation. Our work has been afflicted by many technical challenges, most arising from thermal imperfections in the custom-made high current emitter of our electron gun. In our latest experimental run, instabilities were detected in the input cavity of our amplifier tube. These instabilities appear when the beam pitch ratio (α) is approximately 1, thus impeding our search of domains with higher α values (note that the circuit was designed to operate at α=1.4). In order to remedy this problem, we have radically redesigned the input cavity, changing both its geometry and Q factor. The new input cavity has been fabricated and cold-tested. It will soon undergo hot-test in the next run of experimental studies of the circuit, which will commence after an upgrade of our vacuum system. Here we present the current status of this research

  12. Radioactive hazard of potable water in Virginia and Maryland

    Only a few studies have examined instances of prolonged exposure to radionuclide concentrations found in natural settings. Radium in domestic water in Florida counties has been correlated with a higher than normal incidence of leukemia. A similar study in Iowa towns reported on a correlation between radium and increases in lung, bladder and breast cancer. Radium and radon in domestic water has been correlated with the development of lung cancer in a study of several Texas counties. A correlation has been found between radon in home water supplies in Maine and the incidence of lung cancer. Starting in the winter of 1986-87, the Center of Basic and Applied Science conducted a study of indoor radon and soil radon. Most of the study homes are in Fairfax County in northern Virginia, and the immediately adjacent Montgomery County in southern Maryland. Approximately 650 homeowners agreed to participate in the radon-in-water study. The study group now includes approximately 1,400 people, over 1,000 of whom have consumed their present water supply for 5 or more years, and over 700 of whom have consumed this water for 10 or more years

  13. The Maryland nuclear science baccalaureate degree program: The utility perspective

    In the early 1980s, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation (WPSC) made a firm commitment to pursue development and subsequent delivery of an appropriate, academically accredited program leading to a baccalaureate degree in nuclear science for its nuclear operations personnel. Recognizing the formidable tasks to be accomplished, WPSC worked closely with the University of Maryland University College (UMUC) in curriculum definition, specific courseware development for delivery by computer-aided instruction, individual student evaluation, and overall program implementation. Instruction began on our nuclear plant site in the fall of 1984. The university anticipates conferring the first degrees from this program at WPSC in the fall of 1989. There are several notable results that WPSC achieved from this degree program. First and most importantly, an increase in the level of education of our employees. It should be stated that this program has been well received by WPSC operator personnel. These employees, now armed with plant experience, a formal degree in nuclear science, and professional education in management are real candidates for advancement in our nuclear organization

  14. Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, Maryland (Fact Sheet)

    2014-02-01

    With this new home - which achieved the highest rating possible under the National Green Building Standard - Nexus EnergyHomes demonstrated that green and affordable can go hand in hand. The mixed-humid climate builder, along with the U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Partnership for Home Innovation, embraced the challenge to create a new duplex home in downtown Frederick, Maryland, that successfully combines affordability with state-of-the-art efficiency and indoor environmental quality. To limit costs, the builder designed a simple rectangular shape and kept interesting architectural features such as porches outside the building's structure. This strategy avoided the common pitfall of creating potential air leakage where architectural features are connected to the structure before the building is sealed against air infiltration. To speed construction and limit costs, the company chose factory-assembled components such as structural insulated panel walls and floor and roof trusses. Factory-built elements were key in achieving continuous insulation around the entire structure. Open-cell spray foam at the rim joist and attic roofline completed the insulation package, and kept the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning system in conditioned space.

  15. Interações entre monensina sódica, óleo de soja e fontes de nitrogênio no desempenho de novilhos Aberdeen Angus em confinamento

    Lana Rogério de Paula; Fox Danny G.

    2001-01-01

    Quarenta novilhos Aberdeen Angus foram usados para avaliar o efeito da monensina, óleo de soja e fontes de nitrogênio (farelo de soja ou uréia) sobre o desempenho de novilhos em dietas com 90% de concentrado. A monensina diminuiu o consumo de matéria seca em dietas contendo farelo de soja e o peso corporal aos 56 e 112 dias. O óleo diminuiu o ganho de peso nos períodos de 57-112 dias e 1-112 dias, enquanto a monensina diminuiu o ganho de peso nestes períodos nas dietas contendo farelo de soja...

  16. Plasma reactor

    Molina Mansilla, Ricardo; Erra Serrabasa, Pilar; Bertrán Serra, Enric

    2008-01-01

    [EN] A plasma reactor that can operate in a wide pressure range, from vacuum and low pressures to atmospheric pressure and higher pressures. The plasma reactor is also able to regulate other important settings and can be used for processing a wide range of different samples, such as relatively large samples or samples with rough surfaces.

  17. Reactor physics

    Progress in research on reactor physics in 1997 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. Activities in the following four domains are discussed: core physics, ex-core neutron transport, experiments in Materials Testing Reactors, international benchmarks

  18. Heterosis para el peso y la ganancia de peso desde el nacimiento hasta los 18 meses en el cruce de bovinos aberdeen angus por cebú.

    Arango Ulloa Astrid Johanna

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available En la presente investigación se tuvieron en cuenta 2032 observaciones para el análisis de peso al nacimiento, ganancia predestete y peso al destete y 603 para ganancia de peso posdestete y peso a los 18 meses, de machos y hembras nacidas entre 1994 y 1996 en la "Hacienda Cuba", localizada en el municipio de Montelíbano, departamento de Córboba. Para determinar la influencia de los diferentes factores genéticos y no genéticos sobre las variables estudiadas, se utilizó el programa de mínimos cuadrados de Harvey (1988. En los modelos para el peso al nacimiento, ganancia diaria predestete, peso al destete, ganancia diaria posdestete y peso a los 18 meses fueron considerados los siguientes factores: año de nacimiento, época de nacimiento, grupo genético de la cría, (Aberdeen Angus x Cebú y Cebú Comercial,sexo de la cría, mes de destete, época de destete, año de destete, mes de pesaje a los 18 meses. Según el modelo estudiado se tuvieron en cuenta como variables al destete, el peso al nacimiento y el peso ajustado al destete. La mayor parte de los factores no genéticos tuvieron efecto significativo (P<0,05, no siendo significativa la época de destete para el modelo de peso a los 18 meses.

  19. The effects of breed and level of nutrition on whole-body and muscle protein metabolism in pure-bred Aberdeen angus and Charolais beef steers.

    Lobley, G E; Sinclair, K D; Grant, C M; Miller, L; Mantle, D; Calder, A G; Warkup, C C; Maltin, C A

    2000-09-01

    Eighteen pure-bred steers (live weight 350 kg) from each of two breeds, Aberdeen Angus (AA) and Charolais (CH), were split into three equal groups (six animals each) and offered three planes of nutrition during a 20-week period. The same ration formulation was offered to all animals with amounts adjusted at 3-week intervals to give predicted average weight gains of either 1.0 kg/d (M/M group) or 1.4 kg/d (H/H group). The remaining group (M/H) were offered the same amount of ration as the M/M group until 10 weeks before slaughter when the ration was increased to H. Data on animal performance, carcass characteristics and fibre-type composition in skeletal muscle are presented elsewhere (Maltin et al. 2000; Sinclair et al. 2000). On three occasions (17, 10 and 2 weeks before slaughter) the animals were transferred to metabolism stalls for 1 week, during which total urine collection for quantification of Ntau-methylhistidine (Ntau-MeH) elimination was performed for 4 d. On the last day, animals were infused for 11 h with [2H5]phenylalanine with frequent blood sampling (to allow determination of whole-body phenylalanine flux) followed by biopsies from m. longissimus lumborum and m. vastus lateralis to determine the fractional synthesis rate of mixed muscle protein. For both breeds, the absolute amount of Ntau-MeH eliminated increased with animal age or weight (P meat eating quality (Sinclair et al. 2000). PMID:10967606

  20. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan

  1. The Maryland Amphibian and Reptile Atlas: A Volunteer-Based Distributional Survey

    Heather R. Cunningham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Declines of amphibian and reptile populations are well documented. Yet a lack of understanding of their distribution may hinder conservation planning for these species. The Maryland Amphibian and Reptile Atlas project (MARA was launched in 2010. This five-year, citizen science project will document the distribution of the 93 amphibian and reptile species in Maryland. During the 2010 and 2011 field seasons, 488 registered MARA volunteers collected 13,919 occurrence records that document 85 of Maryland's amphibian and reptile species, including 19 frog, 20 salamander, five lizard, 25 snake, and 16 turtle species. Thirteen of these species are of conservation concern in Maryland. The MARA will establish a baseline by which future changes in the distribution of populations of native herpetofauna can be assessed as well as provide information for immediate management actions for rare and threatened species. As a citizen science project it has the added benefit of educating citizens about native amphibian and reptile diversity and its ecological benefits—an important step in creating an informed society that actively participates in the long-term conservation of Maryland's nature heritage.

  2. Compact Reactor

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date

  3. Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine and partners to offer seminar series for career-development

    Jackson, Christy

    2008-01-01

    The Center for Public and Corporate Veterinary Medicine on the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine's Maryland campus has partnered with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to enhance their career-development oriented graduate seminar series this semester.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Anderson, H.L.

    1960-09-20

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fissionable material dispersed in graphite blocks, helium filling the voids of the blocks and the spaces therebetween, and means other than the helium in thermal conductive contact with the graphite for removing heat.

  5. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  6. Nuclear reactors

    This draft chart contains graphical symbols from which the type of (nuclear) reactor can be seen. They will serve as illustrations for graphical sketches. Important features of the individual reactor types are marked out graphically. The user can combine these symbols to characterize a specific reactor type. The basic graphical symbol is a square with a point in the centre. Functional groups can be depicted for closer specification. If two functional groups are not clearly separated, this is symbolized by a dotted line or a channel. Supply and discharge lines for coolant, moderator and fuel are specified in accordance with DIN 2481 and can be further specified by additional symbols if necessary. The examples in the paper show several different reactor types. (orig./AK)

  7. Multifunctional reactors

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multifunctional reactors are single pieces of equipment in which, besides the reaction, other functions are carried out simultaneously. The other functions can be a heat, mass or momentum transfer operation and even another reaction. Multifunctional reactors are not new, but they have received much emphasis in research in the last decade. A survey is given of modern developments and the first successful applications on a large scale. It is explained why their application in many instances is ...

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  9. Nuclear reactor

    In order to reduce neutron embrittlement of the pressue vessel of an LWR, blanked off elements are fitted at the edge of the reactor core, with the same dimensions as the fuel elements. They are parallel to each other, and to the edge of the reactor taking the place of fuel rods, and are plates of neutron-absorbing material (stainless steel, boron steel, borated Al). (HP)

  10. Breeder reactors

    The reasons for the development of fast reactors are briefly reviewed (a propitious neutron balance oriented towards a maximum uranium burnup) and its special requirements (cooling, fissile material density and reprocessing) discussed. The three stages in the French program of fast reactor development are outlined with Rapsodie at Cadarache, Phenix at Marcoule, and Super Phenix at Creys-Malville. The more specific features of the program of research and development are emphasized: kinetics and the core, the fuel and the components

  11. Initial operation of the University of Maryland x-band coaxial gyroklystron experiment

    Lawson, W.; Ballew, N.; Calame, J.P. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    In this paper the authors detail the result from the initial operation of the University of Maryland`s coaxial gyroklystron experiment, which is being evaluated as a potential driver for future colliders. The interaction is designed to occur between 500 kV, 500--700 A beam and a series of coaxial TE{sup 011} microwave cavities. Output powers in excess of 100 MW at 8.568 GHz are expected with an efficiency of about 40%. The authors present results of the electron gun performance, the stability of the tube, and the amplification properties of the microwave circuit.

  12. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Maryland Wind Energy Area

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

    2013-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of the delineation proposed by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) for the Maryland (MD) WEA and two alternative delineations. The objectives of the NREL evaluation were to assess MEA's proposed delineation of the MD WEA, perform independent analysis, and recommend how the MD WEA should be delineated.

  13. Receptor modeling of airborne pollutants in the State of Maryland

    Han, Ming

    distant coal-fired power plants outside of the state of Maryland, was found to be the predominant component of atmospheric aerosol at the two rural sites: it accounted for 72% of the total particulate mass (TPM) observed at DCL and 58% at Lewes, and was a major component, i.e., 38% of the TPM, at Beltsville-College Park, the suburban sites. Soil was the strongest particle source at Beltsville-College Park sites, due to human activities, the second strongest source at DCL and the third strongest source at Lewes.

  14. Preliminary assessment of potential well yields and the potential for artificial recharge of the Elm and Middle James aquifers in the Aberdeen area, South Dakota

    Emmons, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    A complex hydrologic system exists in the glacial drift overlying the bedrock in the Aberdeen, South Dakota, area. The hydrologic system has been subdivided into three aquifers: the Elm, Middle James, and Deep James. These sand-and-gravel outwash aquifers generally are separated from each other by till or other fine-grained sediments. The Elm aquifer is the uppermost and largest of the aquifers and underlies about 204 sq mi of the study area. The maximum altitude of the top of the Elm aquifer is 1,400 ft and the minimum altitude of the bottom is 1,225 ft. The Middle James aquifer underlies about 172 sq mi of the study area. The maximum altitude of the top of the Middle James aquifer is 1,250 ft and the minimum altitude of the bottom is 1 ,150 ft. The lower-most Deep James aquifer was not evaluated. The quality of the water from the Elm and Middle James aquifer varies considerably throughout the study area. The predominant chemical constituents in the water from the aquifers are sodium and sulfate ions; however, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, or chloride may dominate locally. The calculated theoretical total well yield from the Elm and Middle James aquifers ranges from a minimum of 64 cu ft/sec, which may be conservative, to a maximum of 640 cu ft/sec. Based on available data, yields of 100 to 150 cu ft/sec probably can be obtained from properly sited and constructed wells. The feasibility of artificially recharging an aquifer, using the technique of water spreading, depends on the geologic and hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer and of the sediments overlying the aquifer through which the recharge water must percolate. The sites suitable for artificial recharge in the study area were defined as those areas where the average aquifer thickness was > 20 ft and the average thickness of the fine-grained sediments overlying the aquifer was artificial recharge. Infiltration rates in the study area are estimated to range from 1.3 to 4.3 ft/day. Using an infiltration

  15. Proteomic profiling of bovine M. longissimus lumborum from Crossbred Aberdeen Angus and Belgian Blue sired steers varying in genetic merit for carcass weight.

    Keady, Sarah M; Kenny, David A; Ohlendieck, Kay; Doyle, Sean; Keane, M G; Waters, Sinéad M

    2013-02-01

    Bovine skeletal muscle is a tissue of significant value to the beef industry and global economy. Proteomic analyses offer the opportunity to detect molecular mechanisms regulating muscle growth and intramuscular fat accumulation. The current study aimed to investigate differences in protein abundance in skeletal muscle tissue of cattle from two breeds of contrasting maturity (early vs. late maturing), adiposity, and muscle growth potential, namely, Belgian Blue (BB) × Holstein Friesian and Aberdeen Angus (AA) × Holstein Friesian. Twenty AA (n = 10) and BB (n = 10) sired steers, the progeny of sires of either high or low genetic merit, expressed as expected progeny difference for carcass weight (EPDcwt), and bred through AI, were evaluated as 4 genetic groups, BB-High, BB-Low, AA-High, and AA-Low (n = 5 per treatment). Chemical composition analysis of M. longissimus lumborum showed greater protein and moisture and decreased lipid concentrations for BB-sired compared with AA-sired steers. To investigate the effects of both sire breed and EPDcwt on M. longissimus lumborum, proteomic analysis was performed using 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry. Proteins were identified from their peptide sequences, using the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and Swiss-prot databases. Metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis (glycogen phosphorylase, phosphoglycerate mutase) and the citric acid cycle (aconitase 2, oxoglutarate dehydrogenase) were increased in AA- vs. BB-sired steers. Expression of proteins involved in cell structure, such as myosin light chain isoforms and troponins I and T, were also altered due to sire breed. Furthermore, heat shock protein β-1 and peroxiredoxin 6, involved in cell defense, had increased abundance in muscle of AA-sired relative to BB-sired steers. Protein abundance of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, enolase-3, and pyruvate kinase was greater in AA-sired animals of High compared with Low

  16. Research reactors - an overview

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Reactor utilization

    In 1962, the RA reactor was operated almost three times more than in 1961, producing total of 25 555 MWh. Diagram containing comparative data about reactor operation for 1960, 1961, and 1962, percent of fuel used and U-235 burnup shows increase in reactor operation. Number of samples irradiated was 659, number of experiments done was 16. mean powered level was 5.93 MW. Fuel was added into the core twice during the reporting year. In fact the core was increased from 56 to 68 fuel channels and later to 84 fuel channels. Fuel was added to the core when the reactivity worth decreased to the minimum operation level due to burnup. In addition to this 5 central fuel channels were exchanged with fresh fuel in february for the purpose of irradiation in the VISA-2 channel

  18. Reactor Neutrinos

    Lasserre, T; Lasserre, Thierry; Sobel, Henry W.

    2005-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments, that toe the cutting edge of neutrino research. Short baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and are still searching for important phenomena such as the neutrino magnetic moment. They could open the door to the measurement of coherent neutrino scattering in a near future. Middle and long baseline oscillation experiments at Chooz and KamLAND have played a relevant role in neutrino oscillation physics in the last years. It is now widely accepted that a new middle baseline disappearance reactor neutrino experiment with multiple detectors could provide a clean measurement of the last undetermined neutrino mixing angle theta13. We conclude by opening on possible use of neutrinos for Society: NonProliferation of Nuclear materials and Geophysics.

  19. 76 FR 64015 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption of Control...

    2011-10-17

    ... Maryland to EPA on June 22, 2011. On August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51314), EPA published a notice of proposed... action'' subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR... as specified in Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999); Is not an...

  20. 76 FR 64020 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption of Control...

    2011-10-17

    ... August 19, 2011 (76 FR 51922), EPA published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR) for Maryland. The NPR... Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an information collection burden under... Federalism implications as specified in Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999); Is not...

  1. Detection of Assemblage A, Giardia duodenalis and Eimeria spp. in Alpacas on Two Maryland Farms

    Sixty one fecal samples were collected from adult alpacas and crias (ages 10 wk to 10 yr) on two farms in central Maryland. The farms raised both suri (silky-haired) and huacaya (crimpy-haired) breeds. Females and crias were housed together on pasture, whereas older/breeding males were maintained o...

  2. 75 FR 59179 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption of Control...

    2010-09-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption... in the public docket and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic comment, EPA... the Internet and will be publicly available only in hard copy form. Publicly available...

  3. 76 FR 4578 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption of Control...

    2011-01-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption... is placed in the public docket and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic... placed on the Internet and will be publicly available only in hard copy form. Publicly available...

  4. 77 FR 55171 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Deferral for CO2

    2012-09-07

    ... permitting authorities and sources (75 FR 31514). EPA accomplished this by tailoring the applicability... amended by the `Prevention of Significant Deterioration and Title V Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule' (75 FR 31514).'' EPA approved this revision into the Maryland SIP on August 2, 2012 (77 FR 45949). B....

  5. 78 FR 5290 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Reasonably Available...

    2013-01-25

    ..., calculations methods, work practice standards and exemptions which make Maryland Department of the Environment... pertain to the adoption of various test methods, calculations methods, work practice standards and... to the adoption of various test methods, calculations methods, work practice standards and...

  6. The Perceived Roles, Responsibilities and Situational Leadership Qualities of NCATE Coordinators in Maryland and New Jersey

    Brown-Hobbs, Stacey L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the perceived roles, responsibilities, and situational leadership qualities of Maryland and New Jersey National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) coordinators. Currently there is no research which examines the roles and responsibilities expected of NCATE coordinators and how the work of accreditation…

  7. Soil Investigations. Grade 3 Science. Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP): Resource Library. Public Release Task.

    Maryland State Dept. of Education. Baltimore. Div. of Planning, Results and Information Management.

    One component of the Maryland School Performance Program (MSPAP) is the state's performance-based assessments, criterion-referenced tests that require students to apply what they know and can do to solve problems and display other higher-order thinking skills. This document helps parents, teachers, students, and other citizens understand the tasks…

  8. Local solutions for federal problems: immigrant incorporation in Montgomery County, Maryland

    R. Daamen; J. Doomernik

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the role of local jurisdictions in regulating United States immigration, focusing on local policy responses to unauthorized migration in Montgomery County, Maryland. Important theoretical questions involve the conditions under which local policy responses, and their burea

  9. Assessing the potential for forest effects due to soil acidification in Maryland

    Calculations with the PROFILE model indicates that present acid deposition will lead to soil solution BC/Al molar ratios in the forest soils of Maryland far below the limits used for calculation of critical loads in Europe. Weathering rates and molar soil solution BC/Al ratios were calculated using measured mineralogy and texture. It has been assumed that the laboratory experiments on tree seedling response to soil solution Al concentration is applicable to field conditions as applied in the PROFILE model and that the observed connection between growth and needle loss for Sweden is also valid for North America. The assumptions were utilized to estimate the potential for forest damage due to soil acidification in Maryland. The results for Maryland was used to speculate over the possibilities for adverse effects due to soil acidity in Northeastern United States. A preliminary comparison with Maryland and European results suggests that the threat of soil acidification to forest health in the Northeastern United States may have been underestimated. 39 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Maryland and District of Columbia State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    The District of Columbia and Maryland State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in the District of Columbia and Maryland. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in the District of Columbia and Maryland. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in the District of Columbia and Maryland

  11. Assessment of Teams and Teamwork in the University of Maryland Libraries

    Baughman, M. Sue

    2008-01-01

    Teams play an important role in the University of Maryland (UM) Libraries. Since 1998, teams and collaborative teamwork have become the way librarians address the myriad of issues affecting the needs of UM's faculty, students, and staff. There has been much change in the UM Libraries over the past nine years, and the development is ongoing.…

  12. Youth Suicide Prevention School Program for the Public Schools of Maryland.

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Compensatory, Urban, and Supplementary Programs.

    This document describes a program developed by Maryland's Youth Suicide Prevention School Program Committee in response to state legislation, and is intended to: (1) assist in increasing the awareness among school personnel and community leaders of the incidence of teenage suicide; (2) train school personnel in individual and schoolwide strategies…

  13. Settle for Segregation or Strive for Diversity? A Defining Moment for Maryland's Public Schools

    Ayscue, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    Maryland, as one of 17 states that had de jure segregation, has an intense history of school segregation. Following the 1954 Brown decision, school districts across the state employed various methods to desegregate their schools, including mandatory busing in Prince George's County, magnet schools in Montgomery County, and a freedom of choice plan…

  14. Trends in Funding Higher Education in Maryland, FY 1976-FY 1985. Postsecondary Education Research Reports.

    Breslin, Janice

    Trends in Maryland's support of higher education during fiscal years 1976 to 1985 are reported, along with comparisons to other states. Attention is also directed to shifts in the distribution of state appropriations among the various segments of higher education and key trends in expenditure patterns at the four-year public institutions. It is…

  15. Student Financial Aid in Maryland: Programs, Trends, and Analysis. Postsecondary Education Research Reports.

    Breslin, Janice

    Trends in financial aid to students in Maryland colleges and universities are reported. Attention is directed to the distribution of different types of aid to undergraduate and graduate students, and financial aid awarded by type of institution. Characteristics of recipients of Guaranteed Student Loans, General State Scholarships, and Senatorial…

  16. 75 FR 59084 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control Technique...

    2010-09-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control... reasonably available considering technological and economic feasibility'' (44 FR 53761, September 17, 1979... and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an...

  17. Low-level radioactive waste transportation plan for the State of Maryland

    The purpose of this document is to prepare a recommended transportation plan that will outline specific procedures for monitoring and regulating low-level radioactive waste transport in Maryland and which is consistent with federal law and party-state requirements under the Appalachian Compact

  18. Economic Development and Maryland Community Colleges: An Identification and Comparison of Stakeholders' Perception

    Lee, Carolyn S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory survey research was to replicate a study designed to examine the perception of community college administrators and local stakeholders regarding the economic development strategies, but applied to Maryland community colleges. A Web-based survey was directed to community college leaders (32) and local leaders (100).…

  19. Eyre Steps Down As Dean Of Virginia-Maryland Regional College Of Veterinary Medicine

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2003-01-01

    Peter Eyre, dean of the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine (VMRCVM) since 1985, has announced his immediate resignation from the deanship for personal health reasons. Virginia Tech Provost Dr. Mark McNamee has appointed Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies Dr. Gerhardt Schurig interim dean.

  20. The Advanced Education in General Dentistry Program at the University of Maryland at Baltimore.

    Barnes, Douglas M.; Blank, Lawrence W.

    1991-01-01

    The University of Maryland at Baltimore's 12-month graduate program in general dentistry focuses on comprehensive care and treatment planning in a simulated group practice environment. To achieve its goal of self-support, the program solicits training grants from international corporations, generates income from clinical facilities, encourages…

  1. Local Foods in Maryland Schools and Implications for Extension: Findings from Schools and Farmers

    Oberholtzer, Lydia; Hanson, James C.; Brust, Gerald; Dimitri, Carolyn; Richman, Nessa

    2012-01-01

    This article describes results from a study examining the supply chain for local foods in Maryland school meals, the barriers and opportunities for increasing local foods in schools, and the development of Extension efforts to meet the needs identified. Interviews and surveys were administered with stakeholders, including farmers and food service…

  2. An Examination of Maryland Community College Trustees' Intentions to Promote Succession Planning

    Snowden, Daphne Renee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Maryland community college trustees' intentions to promote succession planning. This study focused on community college trustees' understandings of their roles and responsibilities related to sustainability of institutions, their knowledge of the leadership crisis, and their intentions to promote…

  3. Decreases in a Population of Red-Shouldered Hawks Nesting in Central Maryland

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This outlines the results of a 32 year nesting study of the Red-shouldered Hawk in central Maryland that adds 31 years of observations to an earlier long-term...

  4. 76 FR 25334 - Cross-Media Electronic Reporting: Authorized Program Revision Approval, State of Maryland

    2011-05-04

    ... published in the Federal Register (70 FR 59848) and codified as part 3 of title 40 of the CFR. CROMERR... Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) submitted an application for its Net Discharge Monitoring... title 40 CFR. EPA reviewed MDE's request to revise its EPA-authorized program and, based on this...

  5. CASE STUDIES OF RADON REDUCTION RESEARCH IN MARYLAND, NEW JERSEY, AND VIRGINIA SCHOOLS

    The report gives results of radon mitigation research conducted in 1991 and 1992 in school buildings in Maryland, New Jersey, and Virginia. One school in each state was selected. In two schools, the objective was to evaluate the potential for modifying the school ventilation sy...

  6. Tumor prevalence in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the South River, Anne Arundel County, Maryland

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The South River is a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay flowing near Annapolis, Maryland. In March 2005, brown bullheads were collected in a fyke net set about 1.25 km...

  7. Crystalliferous Bacillus cereus group bacteria from a Maryland hardwood forest are dominated by psychrotolerant strains

    Crystal forming Bacillus spp. were isolated from soil samples collected at different elevations within a mixed hardwood forest in central Maryland, and their phylogenetic relationships determined by multilocus sequence analysis. The vast majority of isolates obtained were associated with two phylog...

  8. Groundwater Site Identification Indexes for Washington D.C., Baltimore City, and the Counties of Maryland

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data sets represent 23 geographic 5-minute indexes for the counties of Maryland, one 2 1/2-minute index for Washington D.C., and 1-mile square index for...

  9. Phytochemical composition and antioxidant capacity of modified-lipoxygenase soybeans grown in maryland

    Maryland-grown soybean lines modified for low lipoxygenase (LOX) content and a traditional non-modified cultivar were analyzed for fatty acid composition, total phenolic content (TPC), isoflavone composition, relative DPPH• scavenging capacity (RDSC), and hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity (HOSC)....

  10. 15 CFR 265.5 - Laws of Maryland and Colorado applicable.

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laws of Maryland and Colorado applicable. 265.5 Section 265.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade... States. The applicability of State laws shall not, however, affect or abrogate any other Federal law...

  11. CTE: Educating Tomorrow's Workforce Today. Maryland Classroom. Vol. 13, No.2

    Mulqueen, Nan, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Maryland redesigned its CTE (career and technical education) program a dozen years ago to prepare students for the 21st Century's global economy and its rapidly changing workforce needs. With 350 business and industry representatives, the state created a program whose emphasis is problem-solving and critical thinking, rather than narrow,…

  12. Nuclear reactors

    A nuclear reactor has a large prompt negative temperature coefficient of reactivity. A reactor core assembly of a plurality of fluid-tight fuel elements is located within a water-filled tank. Each fuel element contains a solid homogeneous mixture of 50-79 w/o zirconium hydride, 20-50 w/o uranium and 0.5-1.5 W erbium. The uranium is not more than 20 percent enriched, and the ratio of hydrogen atoms to zirconium atoms is between 1.5:1 and 7:1. The core has a long lifetime, E.G., at least about 1200 days

  13. Nuclear reactors

    In a liquid cooled nuclear reactor, the combination is described for a single-walled vessel containing liquid coolant in which the reactor core is submerged, and a containment structure, primarily of material for shielding against radioactivity, surrounding at least the liquid-containing part of the vessel with clearance therebetween and having that surface thereof which faces the vessel make compatible with the liquid, thereby providing a leak jacket for the vessel. The structure is preferably a metal-lined concrete vault, and cooling means are provided for protecting the concrete against reaching a temperature at which damage would occur. (U.S.)

  14. Efeitos genéticos aditivos diretos e maternos e heterozigóticos sobre os desempenhos pré e pós-desmama em uma população multirracial Aberdeen Angus × Nelore Direct, maternal additive genetic and heterozygotic effects for pre- and post-weaning traits in a multi-breed Aberdeen Angus-Nelore population

    Carlos Júnior Kippert

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar os efeitos aditivos direto e materno e os efeitos não-aditivos e heterozigóticos sobre os desempenhos pré e pós-desmama e desenvolver equações para predizer o desempenho de genótipos de uma população multirracial Aberdeen Angus (Angus × Nelore. Nas análises, foram utilizados dois modelos. O modelo 1 foi adotado para as características pré-desmama peso à desmama ajustado para 205 dias (P205 e ganho de peso médio diário do nascimento à desmama (GMDND, considerando fixos os efeitos de grupo de contemporâneos (GC e de grupo genético (GG, além das co-variáveis idade do bezerro à desmama (IBD e idade da vaca ao parto (IVP. Para as características pós-desmama peso ao sobreano ajustado para 550 dias de idade (P550 e ganho médio de peso da desmama ao sobreano (GMDDS, utilizou-se o mesmo modelo, apenas substituindo a co-variável IBD pela idade do bezerro ao sobreano (IBS. O modelo 2 (M2, de regressão múltipla, foi utilizado depois que os dados foram ajustados para GC, IVP e IBD (P205 ou IBS (P550 e contemplou os efeitos genéticos aditivos diretos e maternos de raça e os efeitos de heterozigoses direta e materna. Os resultados das análises comprovaram diferenças entre os cruzamentos, uma vez que os animais com elevada heterozigose materna apresentaram melhor desempenho para P205 e GMDND, tendência semelhante à observada para a heterozigose direta. A influência do efeito direto sobre as características P550 e GMDDS foi maior que a do efeito materno. Os efeitos aditivos diretos da raça Angus determinaram maior desempenho. Não houve diferença significativa entre os valores estimados pelo modelo 1 e os preditos pelo modelo 2 para P205, P550 e GMDDS.The objective of this study was to estimate direct and maternal additive genetic, non-additive and heterozygotic effects for pre and post-weaning traits and to develop equations to predict growth performance in a multi-breed Aberdeen Angus (Angus

  15. Nuclear reactor

    In an improved reactor core for a high conversion BWR reactor, Pu-breeding type BWR type reactor, Pu-breeding type BWR type rector, FEBR type reactor, etc., two types of fuel assemblies are loaded such that fuel assemblies using a channel box of a smaller irradiation deformation ratio are loaded in a high conversion region, while other fuel assemblies are loaded in a burner region. This enables to suppress the irradiation deformation within an allowable limit in the high conversion region where the fast neutron flux is high and the load weight from the inside of the channel box due to the pressure loss is large. At the same time, the irradiation deformation can be restricted within an allowable limit without deteriorating the neutron economy in the burner region in which fast neutron flux is low and the load weight from the inside of the channel box is small since a channel box with smaller neutron absorption cross section or reduced wall thickness is charged. As a result, it is possible to prevent structural deformations such as swelling of the channel box, bending of the entire assemblies, bending of fuel rods, etc. (K.M.)

  16. Transactions of the nineteenth water reactor safety information meeting

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 19th Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, October 28--30, 1991. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, USNRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the nuclear industry, and from the governments and industry in Europe and Japan are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting, and are given in the order of their presentation in each session. The individual summaries have been cataloged separately

  17. Transactions of the nineteenth water reactor safety information meeting

    Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

    1991-10-01

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 19th Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, October 28--30, 1991. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, USNRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the nuclear industry, and from the governments and industry in Europe and Japan are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting, and are given in the order of their presentation in each session. The individual summaries have been cataloged separately.

  18. Reactor container

    A reactor container has a suppression chamber partitioned by concrete side walls, a reactor pedestal and a diaphragm floor. A plurality of partitioning walls are disposed in circumferential direction each at an interval inside the suppression chamber, so that independent chambers in a state being divided into plurality are formed inside the suppression chamber. The partition walls are formed from the bottom portion of the suppression chamber up to the diaphragm floor to isolate pool water in a divided state. Operation platforms are formed above the suppression chamber and connected to an access port. Upon conducting maintenance, inspection or repairing, a pump is disposed in the independent chamber to transfer pool water therein to one or a plurality of other independent chambers to make it vacant. (I.N.)

  19. Reactor building

    The present invention concerns a structure of ABWR-type reactor buildings, which can increase the capacity of a spent fuel storage area at a low cost and improved earthquake proofness. In the reactor building, the floor of a spent fuel pool is made flat, and a depth of the pool water satisfying requirement for shielding is ensured. In addition, a depth of pool water is also maintained for a equipment provisionally storing pool for storing spent fuels, and a capacity for a spent fuel storage area is increased by utilizing surplus space of the equipment provisionally storing pool. Since the flattened floor of the spent fuel pool is flushed with the floor of the equipment provisionally storing pool, transfer of horizontal loads applied to the building upon occurrence of earthquakes is made smooth, to improve earthquake proofness of the building. (T.M.)

  20. Nuclear reactors

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor cooled by a freezable liquid has a vessel for containing said liquid and comprising a structure shaped as a container, and cooling means in the region of the surface of said structure for effecting freezing of said liquid coolant at and for a finite distance from said surface for providing a layer of frozen coolant on and supported by said surface for containing said liquid coolant. In a specific example, where the reactor is sodium-cooled, the said structure is a metal-lined concrete vault, cooling is effected by closed cooling loops containing NaK, the loops extending over the lined surface of the concrete vault with outward and reverse pipe runs of each loop separated by thermal insulation, and air is flowed through cooling pipes embedded in the concrete behind the metal lining. 7 claims, 3 figures

  1. Safety-evaluation report related to the license renewal and power increase for the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (Docket No. 50-184)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) for an increase in power from 10 MWt to 20 MWt and for a renewal of the Operating License TR-5 to continue to operate the test reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Gaithersburg, Maryland, on the site of the National Bureau of Standards, which is a bureau of the Department of Commerce. The staff concludes that the NBS reactor can operate at the 20 MWt power level without endangering the health and safety of the public

  2. EAARL Coastal Topography and Imagery--Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland and Virginia, Post-Nor'Ida, 2009

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland and Virginia, post-Nor'Ida (November 2009 nor'easter), was...

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    Anderson, J.B.

    1960-01-01

    A reactor is described which comprises a tank, a plurality of coaxial steel sleeves in the tank, a mass of water in the tank, and wire grids in abutting relationship within a plurality of elongated parallel channels within the steel sleeves, the wire being provided with a plurality of bends in the same plane forming adjacent parallel sections between bends, and the sections of adjacent grids being normally disposed relative to each other.

  4. Nuclear reactor

    The liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactor has got fuel subassemblies which are bundled and enclosed by a common can. In order to reduce bending of the sides of the can because of the load caused by the coolant pressure the can has got a dodecagon-shaped crosssection. The surfaces of the can may be of equal width. One out of two surfaces may also be convex towards the center. (RW)

  5. Nuclear reactor

    A detector having high sensitivity to fast neutrons and having low sensitivity to thermal neutrons is disposed for reducing influences of neutron detector signals on detection values of neutron fluxes when the upper end of control rod pass in the vicinity of the neutron flux detector. Namely, the change of the neutron fluxes is greater in the thermal neutron energy region while it is smaller in the fast neutron energy region. This is because the neutron absorbing cross section of B-10 used as neutron absorbers of control rods is greater in the thermal neutron region and it is smaller in the fast neutron region. As a result, increase of the neutron detection signals along with the local neutron flux change can be reduced, and detection signals corresponding to the reactor power can be obtained. Even when gang withdrawal of operating a plurality of control rods at the same time is performed, the reactor operation cycle can be measured accurately, thereby enabling to shorten the reactor startup time. (N.H.)

  6. Proceedings of the twenty-fourth water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; Reactor vessel lower head integrity; Evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Fourth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 21--23, 1996. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, Norway, Russia and United Kingdom. This volume is divided into the following sections: reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; reactor vessel lower head integrity; and evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  7. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    In a BWR type nuclear reactor, the number of first fuel assemblies (uranium) loaded in a reactor core is smaller than that of second fuel assemblies (mixed oxide), the average burnup degree upon take-out of the first fuel assemblies is reduced to less than that of the second fuel assemblies, and the number of the kinds of the fuel rods constituting the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than that of the fuel rods constituting the second fuel assemblies. As a result, the variety of the plutonium enrichment degree is reduced to make the distribution of the axial enrichment degree uniform, thereby enabling to simplify the distribution of the enrichment degree. Then the number of molding fabrication steps for MOX fuel assemblies can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost for molding and fabrication. (N.H.)

  8. Likely Sexual Transmission of Zika Virus from a Man with No Symptoms of Infection - Maryland, 2016.

    Brooks, Richard B; Carlos, Maria Paz; Myers, Robert A; White, Mary Grace; Bobo-Lenoci, Tanya; Aplan, Debra; Blythe, David; Feldman, Katherine A

    2016-01-01

    In June 2016, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) was notified of a nonpregnant woman who sought treatment for a subjective fever and an itchy rash, which was described as maculopapular by her provider. Laboratory testing at the Maryland DHMH Laboratories Administration confirmed Zika virus infection. Case investigation revealed that the woman had not traveled to a region with ongoing transmission of Zika virus, but did have sexual contact with a male partner who had recently traveled to the Dominican Republic. The male partner reported exposure to mosquitoes while traveling, but no symptoms consistent with Zika virus infection either before or after returning to the United States. The woman reported no other sex partners during the 14 days before onset of her symptoms and no receipt of blood products or organ transplants. PMID:27585037

  9. Maryland Controlled Fusion Research Program. Progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1995

    In the past three years, members of the Maryland Plasma Theory Group have made significant contributions to the national fusion theory program, and, in many cases, these theoretical developments helped to interpret experimental results and to design new experimental programs. In this report, they summarize the technical progress in four major areas of tokamak research: (a) L/H transition and edge turbulence and transport; (b) active control of micro-turbulence and transport; (c) major disruptions; and (d) the sawtooth crash

  10. Revitalization of an Historically Black College: A Maryland Eastern Shore Case

    Person, Carl S.

    1998-01-01

    This study comprises a multi-faceted case study of the growth and development of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES), with an emphasis on the leadership of Chancellor William T. Hytche during his tenure from 1975 to 1995. The study takes into account the complex, dynamic, and interrelated internal and external forces that led to the survival and subsequent development of UMES. An attempt was made to describe the relationship of Chancellor Hytche's leadership behavior and the r...

  11. Pinewood Nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, Associated with Red Pine, Pinus resinosa, in Western Maryland

    Harman, Amy L.; Krusberg, Lorin R.; Nickle, William R.

    1986-01-01

    Red pines Pinus resinosa in Garrett and Allegany counties, Maryland, were examined during 1982-84 to determine distribution of the pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, within and among trees. Approximately 25-year-old (younger) and 47-year-old (older) trees were subdivided into the following categories: 1) trees with mostly green needles; 2) trees with mostly reddish-brown needles; 3) trees lacking needles but with bark intact; 4) trees lacking both needles and bark; and 5) trees wi...

  12. Just and Reasonable Treatment: Racial Treatment in the Terms of Pauper Apprenticeship in Antebellum Maryland

    Howard Bodenhorn

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the economics of pauper apprenticeship in antebellum Maryland and several results emerge. Contrary to some earlier interpretations, the system did not arbitrarily indent poor children. Court officials negotiated contracts that reflected an apprentice's productivity; officials did not offer one-size-fits-all contracts to minimize the costs of indenting indigent children. Black and white children received comparable compensation during the term of the indenture, but blac...

  13. Maryland Controlled Fusion Research Program: Progress report, November 1, 1987-July 1, 1988

    In recent years, members of the Maryland Theory Group have made significant contributions to the national fusion theory programs, and, in many cases, these theoretical developments helped to interpret experimental results and to design new experimental programs. In the following, we summarize the technical progress in five major areas: sawteeth in tokamaks; density limit disruptions in tokamaks; anomalous transport in tokamaks; compact torus and RFP studies; stability theory of tokamaks and other configurations; cyclotron radiation from current driven tokamaks; and atomic physics

  14. Piping plover breeding biology, foraging ecology and behavior on Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland

    John P. Loegering

    1992-01-01

    We studied piping plovers (Charadrius melodus Ord) on Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland, during the 1988-1990 breeding seasons. The estimated breeding population declined from 25 pairs in 1988 to 14 pairs in 1990. Nest predation by red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) was high. Predator exclosures constructed arou nd individual nests did not increase nest survival. Chick survival was higher in bay beach and island interior brood-rearing habitats than on the ocean beach. Our ...

  15. Types of Nuclear Reactors

    The presentation is based on the following areas: Types of Nuclear Reactors, coolant, moderator, neutron spectrum, fuel type, pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR) reactor pressurized heavy water (PHWR), gas-cooled reactor, RBMK , Nuclear Electricity Generation,Challenges in Nuclear Technology Deployment,EPR, APR1400, A P 1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER-1000, A PWR, VVER 1200, Boiling Water Reactor, A BWR, A BWR -II, ESBUR, Ke ren, AREVA, Heavy Water Reactor, Candu 6, Acr-1000, HWR, Bw, Iris, CAREM NuCcale, Smart, KLT-HOS, Westinghouse small modular Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactors, PBMR.

  16. Maryland Power Plant Siting Project: an application of the ORNL-Land Use Screening Procedure

    Dobson, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Since 1974 the Resource Analysis Group in the Regional and Urban Studies Section of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been engaged in developing a procedure for regional and local siting analysis known as the ORNL Land Use Screening Procedure (LUSP). This document is the final report of the Maryland Power Plant Siting Project (MPPSP) in which the ORNL LUSP was used to identify candidate areas for power plant sites in northern Maryland. Numerous candidate areas are identified on the basis of four different siting objectives: the minimization of adverse ecologic impact, the minimization of adverse socioeconomic impact, the minimization of construction and operating costs, and a composite of all siting objectives. Siting criteria have been defined for each of these objectives through group processing techniques administered to four different groups of siting specialists. The siting priorities and opinions of each group have been expressed quantitatively and applied to a geographic information system containing 52 variables for each 91.8-acre cell in the northern eight counties of Maryland.

  17. Maryland air toxics regulation applicable to a natural gas compressor station

    Columbia Gas Transmission Corporation submitted an air permit application to the Maryland Department of the Environment to construct a natural gas compressor station near Rutledge, Maryland. The station consists of three natural gas-fueled internal combustion reciprocating engines, each rated at 3200 horsepower. Maximum potential pollutant emissions associated with the station operation did not trigger Prevention of Significant Deterioration review or nonattainment area New Source review. However, a minor source air permit cannot be issued without addressing Maryland's toxic air regulations. Columbia initiated a detailed investigation of toxic air pollutants, including a stack test of an identical engine. Based on this information, the proposed station was subject to the toxic air regulation for acetaldehyde, acrolein, benzene, crotonaldehyde, and formaldehyde. Compliance with the toxic air regulation for crotonaldehyde was demonstrated by having an emission rate less than the threshold emission rate, specified in the regulation. The ambient air quality impact of the other four pollutants was determined using the Industrial Source Complex dispersion model and resulted in predicted concentrations below the pollutant-specific acceptable ambient level. A carcinogenic impact analysis was performed for acetaldehyde, benzene, and formaldehyde to demonstrate compliance with the accepted risk of one in one hundred thousand

  18. Effects of Maryland's law banning "Saturday night special" handguns on homicides.

    Webster, Daniel W; Vernick, Jon S; Hepburn, Lisa M

    2002-03-01

    Small, inexpensive, often poorly made handguns known as "Saturday night specials" are disproportionately involved in crime. Maryland banned the sale of Saturday night specials effective January 1, 1990. During the 2 years between the law's passage in 1988 and its effective date, legal handgun sales in Maryland were 34% higher than expected (p = 0.09). Interrupted time-series analysis of age-adjusted homicide rates for 1975-1998 with statistical controls for trends in two neighboring states, social and economic variables, and temporal patterns in Maryland's homicide rates was used to assess the effect of the law. Estimates of the Saturday night special ban effects depended on the assumption made about the timing of the law's effects. Models that assumed a delayed or gradual effect of the Saturday night special ban produced estimates indicating that firearm homicide rates were 6.8-11.5% lower than would have been expected without the Saturday night special ban (p < or =0.05). The model that assumed an immediate, constant change in response to the law showed no law effect, unless an outlier was excluded from the analysis. Excluding this outlier, the model estimated a 15% increase in firearm homicides associated with the Saturday night special ban. None of the models revealed significant law effects on nonfirearm homicides. PMID:11867351

  19. Serosurvey for selected pathogens in free-ranging American black bears (Ursus americanus) in Maryland, USA.

    Bronson, Ellen; Spiker, Harry; Driscoll, Cindy P

    2014-10-01

    American black bears (Ursus americanus) in Maryland, USA, live in forested areas in close proximity to humans and their domestic pets. From 1999 to 2011, we collected 84 serum samples from 63 black bears (18 males; 45 females) in five Maryland counties and tested them for exposure to infectious, including zoonotic, pathogens. A large portion of the bears had antibody to canine distemper virus and Toxoplasma gondii, many at high titers. Prevalences of antibodies to zoonotic agents such as rabies virus and to infectious agents of carnivores including canine adenovirus and canine parvovirus were lower. Bears also had antibodies to vector-borne pathogens common to bears and humans such as West Nile virus, Borrelia burgdorferi, Rickettsia rickettsii, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Antibodies were detected to Leptospira interrogans serovars Pomona, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Canicola, Grippotyphosa, and Bratislava. We did not detect antibodies to Brucella canis or Ehrlichia canis. Although this population of Maryland black bears demonstrated exposure to multiple pathogens of concern for humans and domesticated animals, the low levels of clinical disease in this and other free-ranging black bear populations indicate the black bear is likely a spillover host for the majority of pathogens studied. Nevertheless, bear populations living at the human-domestic-wildlife interface with increasing human and domestic animal exposure should continue to be monitored because this population likely serves as a useful sentinel of ecosystem health. PMID:25075540

  20. A case study: The economic cost of net metering in Maryland: Who bears the economic burden?

    The Maryland legislature approved net-metering legislation for residential consumer generators with photovoltaic systems during 1997. Before the legislation passed, the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) examined its potential economic impact on both the affected utilities and consumer ratepayers--with and without net-metered PV systems. The MEA discovered that the impact on the affected utility is minimal when the net-metered PV capacity is limited to a small percentage of utility peak load. The analysis also determined that the cost burden on other customers under a net-metered scenario is likewise limited. For Maryland's largest investor-owned utility, the maximum amount of any cross-subsidy (or cost) on a per customer basis is 46 cents annually. Furthermore, their analysis showed that when distribution system savings and environmental externalities are incorporated, net-metered customers may actually subsidize other utility customers. The MEA analysis also determined that about 50% of the value of the energy produced is lost if net metering is not available to those customers with grid tied PV systems. Over the long term, most if not all of any potential cost is borne by other residential customers, not utility shareholders. Finally, the additional cost burden to the utility under net metering--compensating the consumer at the retail rate versus the avoided cost rate--is less than expected when one considers the administrative costs associated with a dual-metered billing approach

  1. Nuclear reactor

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assemblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters in the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters in the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance

  2. Nuclear research reactors

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.)

  3. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  4. Nuclear reactor

    Cover gas spaces for primary coolant vessel, such as a reactor container, a pump vessel and an intermediate heat exchanger vessel are in communication with each other by an inverted U-shaped pressure conduit. A transmitter and a receiver are disposed to the pressure conduit at appropriate positions. If vibration frequencies (pressure vibration) from low frequency to high frequency are generated continuously from the transmitter to the inside of the communication pipe, a resonance phenomenon (air-column resonance oscillation) is caused by the inherent frequency or the like of the communication pipe. The frequency of the air-column resonance oscillation is changed by the inner diameter and the clogged state of the pipelines. Accordingly, by detecting the change of the air-column oscillation characteristics by the receiver, the clogged state of the flow channels in the pipelines can be detected even during the reactor operation. With such procedures, steams of coolants flowing entrained by the cover gases can be prevented from condensation and coagulation at a low temperature portion of the pipelines, otherwise it would lead clogging in the pipelines. (I.N.)

  5. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  6. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  7. Eficiência produtiva em vacas primíparas das raças Aberdeen Angus e Charolês Productive efficiency of Angus and Charolais primiparous cows

    Edson Luis de Azambuja Ribeiro

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi conduzido com o objetivo de avaliar o desempenho produtivo de vacas de corte. Foram utilizadas 30 vacas da raça Aberdeen Angus e 32 da raça Charolês primíparas, prenhes no início do experimento, com bezerros puros ou mestiços Nelore. As vacas foram submetidas a diferentes tratamentos alimentares durante o inverno e a primavera: T1 - pastagem natural, T2 - pastagem cultivada por 60 dias (24 horas/dia, do início de setembro ao início de novembro, T3 - acesso à pastagem cultivada por duas horas diárias, por um período de 60 dias (de início de julho ao início de setembro, T4 - acesso à pastagem cultivada por duas horas diárias, por um período de 60 dias (de início de julho ao início de setembro, e mais 60 dias (24 horas/dia de pastagem cultivada do início de setembro ao início de novembro. As medidas de eficiência produtiva foram: EPPARTO = (P205/PVP*100; EPDESMAME = (P205/PVD*100; EPMBPARTO = (P205/PVP0,75; EPMBDESMAME = (P205/PVD0,75; e EPNDT = NDTTOTAL/P205, em que P205 é o peso ao desmame dos bezerros; PVP e PVD, os pesos das vacas ao parto e ao desmame, respectivamente; e NDTTOTAL, a exigência em energia para manutenção e produção de leite das vacas. As vacas Aberdeen Angus, com bezerros machos e aquelas com bezerros mestiços, foram mais eficientes. Vacas que utilizaram a pastagem cultivada por um período de tempo maior (T4 tiveram melhor desempenho do que aquelas que permaneceram apenas em pastagem natural(T1; as vacas dos outros tratamentos tiveram desempenhos intermediários.The objective of this work was to evaluate the productive efficiency of beef cows. Thirty Angus and 32 Charolais primiparous cows, pregnant at the beginning of the experiment with straightbred or crossbred calves, were evaluated. The cows were submitted to different feeding management during winter and spring: T1 -- Native pasture, T2 -- Cultivated pasture for 60 days (24 hours/day, from early September to early November, T3

  8. Reactor container

    Purpose: To prevent shocks exerted on a vent head due to pool-swell caused within a pressure suppression chamber (disposed in a torus configuration around the dry well) upon loss of coolant accident in BWR type reactors. Constitution: The following relationship is established between the volume V (m3) of a dry well and the ruptured opening area A (m2) at the boundary expected upon loss of coolant accident: V >= 30340 (m) x A Then, the volume of the dry well is made larger than the ruptured open area, that is, the steam flow rate of leaking coolants upon loss of coolant accident to decrease the pressure rise in the dry well at the initial state where loss of coolant accident is resulted. Accordingly, the pressure of non-compressive gases jetted out from the lower end of the downcomer to the pool water is decreased to suppress the pool-swell. (Ikeda, J.)

  9. Survey of research reactors

    A survey of reasearch reactors based on the IAEA Nuclear Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) was done. This database includes information on 273 operating research reactors ranging in power from zero to several hundred MW. From these 273 operating research reactors 205 reactors have a power level below 5 MW, the remaining 68 reactors range from 5 MW up to several 100 MW thermal power. The major reactor types with common design are: Siemens Unterrichtsreaktors, 1.2 Argonaut reactors, Slowpoke reactors, the miniature neutron source reactors, TRIGA reactors, material testing reactors and high flux reactors. Technical data such as: power, fuel material, fuel type, enrichment, maximum neutron flux density and experimental facilities for each reactor type as well as a description of their utilization in physics and chemistry, medicine and biology, academic research and teaching, training purposes (students and physicists, operating personnel), industrial application (neutron radiography, silicon neutron transmutation doping facilities) are provided. The geographically distribution of these reactors is also shown. As conclusions the author discussed the advantages (low capital cost, low operating cost, low burn up, simple to operate, safe, less restrictive containment and sitting requirements, versatility) and disadvantages (lower sensitivity for NAA, limited radioisotope production, limited use of neutron beams, limited access to the core, licensing) of low power research reactors. 24 figs., refs. 15, Tab. 1 (nevyjel)

  10. Department of reactor technology

    The activities of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risoe during 1979 are described. The work is presented in five chapters: Reactor Engineering, Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Heat Transfer and Hydraulics, The DR 1 Reactor, and Non-Nuclear Activities. A list of the staff and of publications is included. (author)

  11. RB reactor noise analysis

    Statistical fluctuations of reactivity represent reactor noise. Analysis of reactor noise enables determining a series of reactor kinetic parameters. Fluctuations of power was measured by ionization chamber placed next to the tank of the RB reactor. The signal was digitized by an analog-digital converter. After calculation of the mean power, 3000 data obtained by sampling were analysed

  12. The Impact of Climate Change on Air Quality and Respiratory Disease: Maryland/DC Metropolitan Area

    Kaushiva, A.; Strong, S. B.; Babin, S. M.; Paxton, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    Ground level ozone, or tropospheric ozone, forms smog and becomes directly harmful to humans by exacerbating respiratory conditions, primarily asthma (Knowlton et al. 2004). As climate change progresses, increased ozone concentrations emerge as a major public health concern (Gardiner et al. 2011). Increasing ground level ozone concentrations have been directly correlated with rising temperatures (Patz et al. 2005). The projected increase in ozone concentration caused by climate induced temperature change is 1-2 ppb in 2020 and 2-7 ppb in 2050, with associated temperature increases of 1-2 degrees Fahrenheit and 2-5.5 degrees Fahrenheit, respectively (UCS, 2011). Those with existing respiratory conditions, children and the elderly, and those who spend a significant amount of time outdoors are the most sensitive to ground level ozone pollution (Schlink et al. 2006). In Maryland, there would be approximately 68,894 occurrences of acute respiratory symptoms associated with a 2 ppb climate penalty in 2020, and the total costs for health impacts associated with this would be approximately $133,398,027 (UCS, 2011). In their 2011 "State of the Air" report, the American Lung Association rated the Washington/Baltimore/Northern Virginia region as one of the 25 most ozone polluted regions nationwide (ALA, 2011). We examine asthma hospital admissions data for the Maryland/DC metropolitan region between 2005 and 2010 and identify possible correlations with the reported ozone measurements provided by the EPA (CASTNET). We examine trends between the archived temperatures from NCEP reanalysis data, the EPA ozone data, and reported asthma cases. We utilize these trends to investigate the future impact of changes in ozone concentration based on the IPCC AR4 and SRES emissions scenarios and attempt to quantify the financial burden of its implications. Visualizations from this data can serve as important educational and planning tools for decision makers in the Maryland, DC, and

  13. Interaction between urbanization and climate variability amplifies watershed nitrate export in Maryland

    Kaushal, S.S.; Groffman, P.M.; Band, L.E.; Shields, C.A.; Morgan, R.P.; Palmer, Margaret A.; Belt, K.T.; Swan, C.M.; Findlay, S.E.G.; Fisher, G.T.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated regional effects of urbanization and land use change on nitrate concentrations in approximately 1,000 small streams in Maryland during record drought and wet years in 2001-2003. We also investigated changes in nitrate-N export during the same time period in 8 intensively monitored small watersheds across an urbanization gradient in Baltimore, Maryland. Nitrate-N concentrations in Maryland were greatest in agricultural streams, urban streams, and forest streams respectively. During the period of record drought and wet years, nitrate-N exports in Baltimore showed substantial variation in 6 suburban/urban streams (2.9-15.3 kg/ha/y), 1 agricultural stream (3.4-38.9 kg/ha/y), and 1 forest stream (0.03-0.2 kg/ ha/y). Interannual variability was similar for small Baltimore streams and nearby well-monitored tributaries and coincided with record hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay. Discharge-weighted mean annual nitrate concentrations showed a variable tendency to decrease/increase with changes in annual runoff, although total N export generally increased with annual runoff. N retention in small Baltimore watersheds during the 2002 drought was 85%, 99%, and 94% for suburban, forest, and agricultural watersheds, respectively, and declined to 35%, 91%, and 41% during the wet year of 2003. Our results suggest that urban land use change can increase the vulnerability of ecosystem nitrogen retention functions to climatic variability. Further work is necessary to characterize patterns of nitrate-N export and retention in small urbanizing watersheds under varying climatic conditions to improve future forecasting and watershed scale restoration efforts aimed at improving nitrate-N retention. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  14. Final Environmental Statement related to license renewal and power increase for the National Bureau of Standards Reactor: Docket No. 50-184

    This Final Environmental Statement contains an assessment of the environmental impact associated with renewal of Operating License No. TR-5 for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) reactor for a period of 20 years at a power level of 20 MW. This reactor is located on the 576-acre NBS site near Gaithersburg in Montgomery County, Maryland, about 20 mi northwest of the center of Washington, DC. The reactor is a high-flux heavy-water-moderated, cooled and reflected test reactor, which first went critical on December 7, 1967. Though the reactor was originally designed for 20-MW operation, it has been operating for 14 years at a maximum authorized power level to 10 MW. Program demand is now great enough to warrant operation at a power level of 20 MW. No additional major changes to the physical plant are required to operate at 20 MW

  15. Inverted Magnetron-Injection Electron Gun for the Relativistic Gyroklystron at the University of Maryland

    Read, M. E.; Ives, R. L.; Miram, G.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Lawson, W.; Hogan, B.; Granatstein, V. L.

    2002-12-01

    As is known, coaxial circuits can provide a better mode selectivity than cylindrical ones. They also allow for eliminating so-called `cross-talk' between gyroklystron cavities operating in high-order modes. Therefore, in present 100-MW scale relativistic gyroklystrons, which are under development at the University of Maryland, coaxial structures are used. Presently, inner conductors of these structures are supported by radial metallic pins that intercept the electron beam. The use of inverted electron guns allows for avoiding this interception. In the present paper a preliminary design of such an electron gun is described.

  16. Initial operation of the University of Maryland x-band coaxial gyroklystron experiment

    In this paper the authors detail the result from the initial operation of the University of Maryland's coaxial gyroklystron experiment, which is being evaluated as a potential driver for future colliders. The interaction is designed to occur between 500 kV, 500--700 A beam and a series of coaxial TE011 microwave cavities. Output powers in excess of 100 MW at 8.568 GHz are expected with an efficiency of about 40%. The authors present results of the electron gun performance, the stability of the tube, and the amplification properties of the microwave circuit

  17. Water volume and sediment accumulation in Lake Linganore, Frederick County, Maryland, 2009

    Sekellick, Andrew J.; Banks, S.L.

    2010-01-01

    To assist in understanding sediment and phosphorus loadings and the management of water resources, a bathymetric survey was conducted at Lake Linganore in Frederick County, Maryland in June 2009 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Frederick and Frederick County, Maryland. Position data and water-depth data were collected using a survey grade echo sounder and a differentially corrected global positioning system. Data were compiled and edited using geographic information system software. A three-dimensional triangulated irregular network model of the lake bottom was created to calculate the volume of stored water in the reservoir. Large-scale topographic maps of the valley prior to inundation in 1972 were provided by the City of Frederick and digitized. The two surfaces were compared and a sediment volume was calculated. Cartographic representations of both water depth and sediment accumulation were produced along with an area/capacity table. An accuracy assessment was completed on the resulting bathymetric model. Vertical accuracy at the 95-percent confidence level for the collected data, the bathymetric surface model, and the bathymetric contour map was calculated to be 0.95 feet, 1.53 feet, and 3.63 feet, respectively. The water storage volume of Lake Linganore was calculated to be 1,860 acre-feet at full pool elevation. Water volume in the reservoir has decreased by 350 acre-feet (about 16 percent) in the 37 years since the dam was constructed. The total calculated volume of sediment deposited in the lake since 1972 is 313 acre-feet. This represents an average rate of sediment accumulation of 8.5 acre-feet per year since Linganore Creek was impounded. A sectional analysis of sediment distribution indicates that the most upstream third of Lake Linganore contains the largest volume of sediment whereas the section closest to the dam contains the largest amount of water. In comparison to other Maryland Piedmont reservoirs, Lake Linganore

  18. Nutrient Trading, the Flush Tax, and Maryland's Nitrogen Emissions to the Chesapeake Bay

    Hanson, James C.; McConnell, Kenneth E.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate nutrient trading for point and non-point sources for the Bay Restoration Fund in Maryland. We demonstrate how to use the proceeds from the tax revenue to mimic trading high-cost upgrades of sewage treatment plants for low-cost winter cover crops. Under an optimistic assumption about costs for non-point sources, we calculate that abatement could be increased by more than 50%, while in a pessimistic scenario, abatement could be increased by 2%. We also explore the role of uncerta...

  19. Project-based Modules from two STEM Learning Teams in Howard County, Maryland

    Griffiths, L. N.; Bradley, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, two Maryland school districts-Howard County Public School System and Prince George's County Public Schools-and the Goddard Space Flight Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) partnered with the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (NCTAF) to develop NASA 21st Century Learning Studios. In 2010, NCTAF expanded the program to include Learning Studios at two additional Maryland school districts (Anne Arundel County Public Schools and Baltimore County Public Schools), partnering with the United States Naval Academy and the University of Maryland. Overall, the focus of these Learning Studios is to combine the expertise of scientists with that of educators through Learning Teams to improve teaching and learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, while delivering project-based modules to be implemented in other school districts. The focus of this paper is to summarize the experience and outcomes from two Learning Teams from the Howard County Public School System. STEM Learning Teams were established at Centennial High School and Hammond High School in Maryland. Each Team worked together for two years to create interdisciplinary units of study for their students with a focus on Earth Science. To maximize student interest, teachers worked with NASA scientists five times a year to develop four learning modules using practical examples and incorporating real scientific observations. A weathering and erosion module challenges students to collect appropriate field observations and determine erosion and deposition rates in a nearby lake. A plate tectonics module requires students to use measures of plate motion from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to estimate rates of convergence in southern Asia. A third module for lessons in climate change requires students to find open source climate data, determine changes in the atmosphere and estimate anthropogenic impacts. A follow

  20. Estimating Wal-Mart's Impacts in Maryland: A Test of Identification Strategies and Endogeneity Tests

    Michael J. Hicks

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I estimate the impact of Wal-Mart on labor markets in Maryland. My goal is to compare estimation techniques that incorporate corrections for endogeneity of Wal-Mart's entrance and those that test for and fail to reject exogeneity in Wal-Mart's entrance decision. The instrumental variable approaches I test include those offered by Basker and Neumark et al., and a new test introduced in this paper. I also explain why differences in choice of sample time and location may lead to d...

  1. Seasat synthetic aperture radar ( SAR) response to lowland vegetation types in eastern Maryland and Virginia.

    Krohn, M.D.; Milton, N.M.; Segal, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    Examination of Seasat SAR images of eastern Maryland and Virginia reveals botanical distinctions between vegetated lowland areas and adjacent upland areas. Radar returns from the lowland areas can be either brighter or darker than returns from the upland forests. Scattering models and scatterometer measurements predict an increase of 6 dB in backscatter from vegetation over standing water. This agrees with the 30-digital number (DN) increase observed in the digital Seasat data. The density, morphology, and relative geometry of the lowland vegetation with respect to standing water can all affect the strength of the return L band signal.-from Authors

  2. 2013 Advanced Placement Exam Participation and Performance for Students in Montgomery County Public Schools and Public School Students in the State of Maryland and the Nation. Memorandum

    Sanderson, Geoffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    This memorandum provides data on the participation and performance of Advanced Placement (AP) exams taken by students in the Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) in the 2012-2013 school year as compared with those by public school students in Maryland and the nation. Generally, the number of AP exams taken by MCPS students in 2013…

  3. Interações entre monensina sódica, óleo de soja e fontes de nitrogênio no desempenho de novilhos Aberdeen Angus em confinamento

    Lana Rogério de Paula

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Quarenta novilhos Aberdeen Angus foram usados para avaliar o efeito da monensina, óleo de soja e fontes de nitrogênio (farelo de soja ou uréia sobre o desempenho de novilhos em dietas com 90% de concentrado. A monensina diminuiu o consumo de matéria seca em dietas contendo farelo de soja e o peso corporal aos 56 e 112 dias. O óleo diminuiu o ganho de peso nos períodos de 57-112 dias e 1-112 dias, enquanto a monensina diminuiu o ganho de peso nestes períodos nas dietas contendo farelo de soja como fonte de nitrogênio. O óleo de soja piorou a eficiência alimentar em todos os períodos e o farelo de soja, comparado com dietas com uréia, nos períodos de 57-112 dias e 1-112 dias. A monensina melhorou a eficiência alimentar em 7,4% para as dietas contendo farelo de soja, na ausência de óleo de soja, mas não alterou a eficiência alimentar para as dietas contendo uréia. Por outro lado, a monensina piorou a eficiência alimentar em 13% para as dietas contendo farelo de soja e óleo de soja.

  4. Research Nuclear Reactors

    Published in English and in French, this large report first proposes an overview of the use and history of research nuclear reactors. It discusses their definition, and presents the various types of research reactors which can be either related to nuclear power (critical mock-ups, material test reactors, safety test reactors, training reactors, prototypes), or to research (basic research, industry, health), or to specific particle physics phenomena (neutron diffraction, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography, semiconductor doping). It reports the history of the French research reactors by distinguishing the first atomic pile (ZOE), and the activities and achievements during the fifties, the sixties and the seventies. It also addresses the development of instrumentation for research reactors (neutron, thermal, mechanical and fission gas release measurements). The other parts of the report concern the validation of neutronics calculations for different reactors (the EOLE water critical mock-up, the MASURCA air critical mock-up dedicated to fast neutron reactor study, the MINERVE water critical mock-up, the CALIBAN pulsed research reactor), the testing of materials under irradiation (OSIRIS reactor, laboratories associated with research reactors, the Jules Horowitz reactor and its experimental programs and related devices, irradiation of materials with ion beams), the investigation of accident situations (on the CABRI, Phebus, Silene and Jules Horowitz reactors). The last part proposes a worldwide overview of research reactors

  5. Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25-27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  6. Reactor Physics Training

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  7. Introduction of Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    This book introduces development, status, supply and demand and resource of nuclear reactor. It deals with basic knowledge of nuclear reactor, which are reactor system, heat recovery in reactor core, structural feature in reactor, materials of structure in reactor, shielding of gamma ray, shielding of reactor, safety and environmental problem of nuclear power plant, nuclear fuel and economical efficiency of nuclear energy.

  8. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 6, Decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, TMI-2

    This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 6, discusses decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, and the Three Mile Island-2 reactor accident. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately

  9. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 6, Decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, TMI-2

    Weiss, A. J. [comp.

    1988-02-01

    This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 6, discusses decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, and the Three Mile Island-2 reactor accident. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately.

  10. Impacts of cowbird parasitism on wood thrushes and other neotropical migrants in suburban Maryland forests

    Dowell, B.A.; Fallon, J.E.; Robbins, C.S.; Dawson, D.K.; Fallon, F.W.

    2000-01-01

    During 1988-1993, we monitored nests of neotropical migrant birds in seven suburban Maryland forests to compare parasitism and predation rates in forests of different areas. Of 1,122 nests monitored, 672 were of Wood Thrush, the most commonly found nesting species. Study sites were forests that ranged in size from 21 ha to more than 1,300 ha in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain regions of Maryland within 50 km of Washington, D.C. Parasitism rates of Wood Thrush nests varied greatly among sites, ranging from 0% (29 nests in 1990-1992) in a site in extensive forest to 68% (31 nests 1992-1993) in a 21-ha, selectively logged old-growth forest. A sudden increase in parasitism from 9% (102 nests 1990-1991) to 35% (125 nests 1992-1993) in a 23-ha old-growth forest was noteworthy. The surrounding environment at this site is changing from rural to residential. Wood Thrush parasitism rates dropped as the breeding season progressed, but peaks of parasitism coincided with peaks of nesting activity. Parasitism rates for Hooded Warblers (88% of 17 nests-all sites) were most alarming. High predation rates were a much greater factor in low productivity for Wood Thrushes than parasitism.

  11. Have Maryland local health departments effectively put in place the information technology relevant to emergency preparedness?

    Nguh, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Ever since the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the federal government has increased funding for emergency preparedness. However, the literature continues to document several areas of weaknesses in public health emergency management by local health departments (LHD). This lack of preparedness affects the entire public. The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not Maryland LHDs have effectively put in place the information technology (IT) that is relevant for emergency preparedness. Base Firm-wide IT Infrastructure Services and the Feeny/Willcocks Framework for Core IS Capabilities are the two conceptual frameworks used in this study. This qualitative study used the survey method and the data were analyzed through content analysis. The results revealed that utilization, practice, and performance of IT by Maryland LHDs are not efficient or effective. Recommendations included the development of "best practices," increased funding for IT infrastructure and the establishment of strategic management framework for IT initiatives. Implications for positive social change include the development of recommendations to enhance emergency preparedness practice, and advancement of knowledge so as to facilitate the functions, and duties of health departments in emergency preparedness operations. PMID:24187746

  12. Environmental concerns of roxarsone in broiler poultry feed and litter in Maryland, USA.

    Fisher, Daniel J; Yonkos, Lance T; Staver, Kenneth W

    2015-02-17

    Roxarsone has been used extensively in the broiler chicken industry. We reviewed the environmental concerns of this usage. To summarize, arsenic added to poultry feed as roxarsone ends up in poultry litter. Fresh litter contains predominately roxarsone, whereas aged litter contains predominately inorganic arsenic. Soil arsenic concentrations from long-term poultry litter applications can exceed Maryland arsenic soil background remediation standards. Due to continued soil accumulation, arsenic-amended litter use as fertilizer is thought to be unsustainable. Surface-applied roxarsone-amended litter does not influence deep aquifer arsenic concentrations but is transported as inorganic arsenic to receiving waters and very shallow groundwater after precipitation. Arsenic in some receiving waters and sediments from agriculturally dominated watersheds have levels above established criteria. Arsenic in fish and shellfish is mostly organic. Phosphorus-based nutrient management will tend to limit PL application rates in areas that have over-applied phosphorus relative to crop needs, resulting in decreased rates of arsenic application and accumulation. Despite most arsenic in surface soils being tightly bound, as surface soils become more enriched in arsenic, the potential for downward movement increases but is limited in most soils due to the high capacity for binding of arsenic to clay minerals and oxides of iron and aluminum in subsoil horizons. In 2012, Maryland passed a law banning the use of arsenic additives except nitarsone in poultry feed. In 2013, the USFDA withdrew approval of roxarsone, carbarsone, and arsanilic but is reviewing nitarsone. PMID:25608233

  13. A comparison of techniques to sample salamander assemblages along highland streams of Maryland.

    Strain, G F; Raesly, R L; Hilderbrand, R H

    2009-09-01

    Amphibians may be useful indicators of biological condition in small streams so determining which sampling technique maximizes encounters at the least cost and at the optimal time of year is important. Area constrained surveys (ACS), used by the Maryland Biological Stream Survey, were tested against cover board surveys, drift fences with pitfall and funnel traps, quadrat leaf litter searches, and leaf litter bags. Sixteen, 100 m-long sites were established in headwater streams in the Savage River State Forest in Garrett County, Maryland. Each technique was randomly assigned to a 25 m stream section within each overall sampling site, and sites were sampled once each month from May to October (2005) with additional sampling in March and April (2006). Area constrained surveys yielded means of 2.7 taxa and 14.9 total individuals per sampling visit, which was significantly higher than the yield of all other methods in all months except October and March, when yields were low for all techniques. Area constrained surveys were also significantly more cost-effective per taxon and per individual compared to all other methods. September produced the most taxa and individuals, October and March produced the least, and yields for April through August were similar to September. We employed removal sampling at four sites in April 2006, but abundance could not be estimated because a significant linear decrease in the accumulated catch versus catch per unit effort did not occur for three of the sites. PMID:18636337

  14. Spectroscopic measurements of the concentration of atmospheric formaldehyde in Beltsville, Maryland

    Batts, Johnny

    Formaldehyde is a significant atmospheric pollutant and an intermediate product in the decomposition of many other pollutants. Experimental measurements from the first Mauna Loa Observatory Photochemistry Experiment (MOPEXI) reveal (CH2O) levels were a factor of 3 lower than those suggested by theoretical models. The present study has determined the CH2O levels at the Howard University Atmospheric Science Facility in Beltsville, Maryland. The Beltsville site is interesting and unique, being a rural in-land bordering on an industrial area to the north west, which includes a heavily used railroad line and a major thoroughfare. In our study, the CH2O levels at the Howard University Atmospheric Science Research Facility were at times similar to CH2O levels quoted in other experimental studies. The collection site at Beltsville, Maryland, is a challenging area for studying CH2O levels. We investigated the CH2O levels under different conditions, including variations in temperature, wind velocity and relative humidity. Transport of CH2O from the immediate surroundings appears to have considerable influence on CH2O levels at the site because of the presence of cattle farms, industry and the automobile and train traffic on the major highways and railroads that are significant contributors to the total formaldehyde concentration in Beltsville.

  15. Safeguarding research reactors

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  16. Research nuclear reactors

    Since the divergence of the first nuclear reactor in 1942, about 600 research or test reactors have been built throughout the world. Today 255 research reactors are operating in 57 countries and about 70% are over 25 years old. Whereas there are very few reactor types for power plants because of rationalization and standardisation, there is a great diversity of research reactors. We can divide them into 2 groups: heavy water cooled reactors and light water moderated reactors. Heavy water cooled reactors are dedicated to the production of high flux of thermal neutrons which are extracted from the core by means of neutronic channels. Light water moderated reactors involved pool reactors and slightly pressurized closed reactors, they are polyvalent but their main purposes are material testing, technological irradiations, radionuclide production and neutron radiography. At the moment 8 research reactors are being built in Canada, Germany, Iran, Japan, Kazakhstan, Morocco, Russia and Slovakia and 8 others are planned in 7 countries (France, Indonesia, Nigeria, Russia, Slovakia, Thailand and Tunisia. Different research reactors are described: Phebus, Masurca, Phenix and Petten HFR. The general principles of nuclear safety applied to test reactors are presented. (A.C.)

  17. Nuclear reactor building

    Purpose: To prevent seismic vibrations of external buildings from transmitting to the side walls of a reactor container in a tank type FBR reactor building. Constitution: The reactor building is structured such that the base mat for a reactor container chamber and a reactor container is separated from the base mat for the walls of building, and gas-tight material such as silicon rubber is filled in the gap therebetween. With such a constitution, even if the crane-supporting wall vibrates violently upon occurrence of earthqualkes, the seismic vibrations do not transmit toward the reactor container chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  18. Reactor Physics Programme

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies

  19. A Survey of Cognitive Style in Maryland Ninth-Graders: I. Achievement Motivation, Productivity. Report No. 60.

    Antwisle, Doris R.; Greenberger, Ellen

    In a survey of ninth graders in and around Baltimore, Maryland, in the spring of 1968, several cognitive style variables were measured. The sample of students was divided by sex, IQ level, and residential locus. This report discusses achievement motivation and productivity (the number of words written in achievement motivation stories). The…

  20. Predation and Parasitism Rates on Sentinel and Naturally Occurring Egg Masses of the Squash Bug (Hemiptera: Coreidae) in Maryland

    Seasonal changes in egg predation and parasitism rates on sentinel and naturally occurring (wild) egg masses of the squash bug, Anasa tristis (DeGeer), were evaluated in squash fields in Maryland from June through September in 2013 and 2014. Rates of egg predation and parasitism were significantly ...

  1. Understanding and Informing Policy Implementation: A Case Study of the Domestic Violence Provisions of the Maryland Gun Violence Act

    Frattaroli, Shannon; Teret, Stephen P.

    2006-01-01

    The Maryland Gun Violence Act, enacted into law in 1996, explicitly authorized courts to order batterers to surrender their firearms through civil protective orders. It also vested law enforcement with the explicit authority to remove guns when responding to a domestic violence complaint. In order to assess how these laws were implemented, we…

  2. Choreographing Partnerships within an Organizational Structure of Accountability: Maryland State Department of Education's Shift from Compliance Monitor to Breakthrough Partner

    Strickling, Laura Rutter; Doneker, Karen Lee

    2014-01-01

    Drawing upon data from twenty-five interviews, this paper examines how the Maryland State Department of Education's Cross-functional Team navigates its changing role from compliance monitor to breakthrough partner in terms of discourse, time, and flexibility, as it carries out the work of the Breakthrough Center. It also examines how the role of…

  3. Response of SO2 and particulate air pollution to local and regional emission controls: A case study in Maryland

    He, Hao; Vinnikov, Konstantin Y.; Li, Can; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Jongeward, Andrew R.; Li, Zhanqing; Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Hains, Jennifer C.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper addresses the questions of what effect local regulations can have on pollutants with different lifetimes and how surface observations and remotely sensed data can be used to determine the impacts. We investigated the decadal trends of tropospheric sulfur dioxide (SO2) and aerosol pollution over Maryland and its surrounding states, using surface, aircraft, and satellite measurements. Aircraft measurements indicated fewer isolated SO2 plumes observed in summers, a ˜40% decrease of column SO2, and a ˜20% decrease of atmospheric optical depth (AOD) over Maryland after the implementation of local regulations on sulfur emissions from power plants (˜90% reduction from 2010). Surface observations of SO2 and particulate matter (PM) concentrations in Maryland show similar trends. OMI SO2 and MODIS AOD observations were used to investigate the column contents of air pollutants over the eastern U.S.; these indicate decreasing trends in column SO2 (˜60% decrease) and AOD (˜20% decrease). The decrease of upwind SO2 emissions also reduced aerosol loadings over the downwind Atlantic Ocean near the coast by ˜20%, while indiscernible changes of the SO2 column were observed. A step change of SO2 emissions in Maryland starting in 2009-2010 had an immediate and profound benefit in terms of local surface SO2 concentrations but a modest impact on aerosol pollution, indicating that short-lived pollutants are effectively controlled locally, while long-lived pollutants require regional measures.

  4. 76 FR 67671 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Connecticut, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland...

    2011-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Connecticut, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland... meeting is to receive a briefing from experts on Human Trafficking. Those who are unable to attend...

  5. Increased Mortality Rates Associated with Staphylococcus aureus and Influenza Co-infection, Maryland and Iowa, USA1

    Perencevich, Eli N.; Storm, Jeremy; Diekema, Daniel J.; Herwaldt, Loreen; Johnson, J. Kristie; Winokur, Patricia L.; Schweizer, Marin L.

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed data for 195 respiratory infection patients who had positive Staphyloccocus aureus cultures and who were hospitalized in 2 hospitals in Iowa and Maryland, USA, during 2003–2009. Odds for death for patients who also had influenza-positive test results were >4 times higher than for those who had negative influenza test results. PMID:27315549

  6. Adopting MOOCs on Campus: A Collaborative Effort to Test MOOCs on Campuses of the University System of Maryland

    Griffiths, Rebecca; Mulhern, Christine; Spies, Richard; Chingos, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    To address the paucity of data on the use of MOOCs in "traditional" postsecondary institutions, Ithaka S+R and the University System of Maryland studied the feasibility of repurposing MOOCs for use in hybrid, credit-bearing courses. In this paper we will describe the design of a large-scale study undertaken to examine the use of MOOCs in…

  7. The Utility of Modeling in Evaluation Planning: The Case of the Coordination of Domestic Violence Services in Maryland.

    Adler, Marina A.

    2002-01-01

    Modified evaluation planning tools, such as document models, logic models, and program theory models in planning for the evaluation of the coordination of domestic violence services in metropolitan Baltimore, Maryland. Data from a variety of sources (targeted agencies) show that activities of agencies in the coordinated community response are…

  8. A Comparison of Teaching Management Information Systems in Two State-Funded Universities: Anhui, China and Towson, Maryland.

    Rosecky, Richard B.; Li, Yongfang

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the differences in teaching management information systems to business, accounting, and economics students at Towson University in Maryland and economics and accounting students at Anhui University in China; also sought a teaching paradigm for visiting college-level teachers in China. Found differences in student behavior regarding…

  9. Restructuring under the No Child Left Behind Act in Maryland. 2007-08 Follow-Up Report

    Neuman-Sheldon, Brenda

    2008-01-01

    This report, the Center on Education Policy's (CEP's) third annual review of Maryland's efforts to restructure schools under the No Child Left Behind Act, finds that (1) although between school years 2006-07 and 2007-08 the number of schools in the restructuring implementation phase declined slightly, there was a drastic increase in the number of…

  10. Ship propulsion reactors technology

    This paper takes the state of the art on ship propulsion reactors technology. The french research programs with the corresponding technological stakes, the reactors specifications and advantages are detailed. (A.L.B.)

  11. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  12. Process heat reactors

    The consumption of heat, for industrial and domestic needs, takes up half of the national energy supply; direct utilization of the heat produced by nuclear reactors could therefore contribute to reduce the deficit in the energetic results. The restraints proper to heat consumption (dispersal and variety of consumers, irregular demand) involve the development of the heat transport system structures and adequate nuclear reactors. With this in view, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique and Technicatome are developing the CAS reactor series, pressurized water reactors (PWR), (CAS 3G reactor with a power of 420 MW.th.), and the Thermos reactor (100 MW.th.), directly conceived to produce heat at 1200C and whose technology derives from the experimental pool reactors type. In order to prove the value of the Thermos design, an experimental reactor should soon be constructed in the Saclay nuclear research centre

  13. Reactor System Design

    SMART NPP(Nuclear Power Plant) has been developed for duel purpose, electricity generation and energy supply for seawater desalination. The objective of this project IS to design the reactor system of SMART pilot plant(SMART-P) which will be built and operated for the integrated technology verification of SMART. SMART-P is an integral reactor in which primary components of reactor coolant system are enclosed in single pressure vessel without connecting pipes. The major components installed within a vessel includes a core, twelve steam generator cassettes, a low-temperature self pressurizer, twelve control rod drives, and two main coolant pumps. SMART-P reactor system design was categorized to the reactor coe design, fluid system design, reactor mechanical design, major component design and MMIS design. Reactor safety -analysis and performance analysis were performed for developed SMART=P reactor system. Also, the preparation of safety analysis report, and the technical support for licensing acquisition are performed

  14. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 11, Reactor operation

    This volume includes the following chapters describing: Organisation of reactor operation (including operational safety, fuel management, and regulatory rules for RA reactor operation); Control and maintenance of reactor components (reactor core, nuclear fuel, heavy water and cover gas systems, mechanical structures, electric power supply system, reactor instrumentation); Quality assurance and Training of the reactor personnel

  15. The Chernobylsk reactor accident

    The construction, the safety philosophy, the major reactor physical parameters of RBMK-1000 type reactor units and the detailed description of the Chernobylsk-4 reactor accident, its causes and conclusions, the efforts to reduce the consequences on the reactor site and in the surroundings are discussed based on different types of Soviet documents including the report presented to the IAEA by the Soviet Atomic Energy Agency in August 1986. (V.N.)

  16. Zero energy reactor 'RB'

    In 1958 the zero energy reactor RB was built with the purpose of enabling critical experiments with various reactor systems to be carried out. The first core assembly built in this reactor consists of heavy water as moderator and natural uranium metal as fuel. In order to be able to obtain very accurate results when measuring the main characteristics of the assembly the reactor was built as a completely bare system. (author)

  17. Extreme precipitation events and increased risk of campylobacteriosis in Maryland, U.S.A.

    Soneja, Sutyajeet; Jiang, Chengsheng; Romeo Upperman, Crystal; Murtugudde, Raghu; S Mitchell, Clifford; Blythe, David; Sapkota, Amy R; Sapkota, Amir

    2016-08-01

    Consumption of contaminated poultry, raw milk and water are significant risk factors for Campylobacter infection. Previous studies also have investigated the association between weather (temperature and precipitation) and increased risk of campylobacteriosis, but limited information exists regarding the impacts of extreme heat and precipitation events on campylobacteriosis risk, and how such risk may differentially impact coastal communities. We obtained Campylobacter case data 2002-2012; n=4804) from the Maryland Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet). We identified extreme heat and extreme precipitation events during this time (2002-2012) using location and calendar day specific thresholds (95th percentile for extreme heat and 90th percentile for extreme precipitation) that were computed based on a 30-year baseline (1960-1989). We linked these datasets using GIS and used negative binomial generalized estimating equations adjusted for demographic confounders to calculate the association between exposure to extreme events and risk of campylobacteriosis in Maryland. We observed that a one-day increase in exposure to extreme precipitation events was associated with a 3% increase in risk of campylobacteriosis in coastal areas of Maryland (Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR): 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01, 1.05), but such an association was not observed in noncoastal areas. Furthermore, the risk associated with extreme precipitation events was considerably higher during La Niña periods (IRR: 1.09, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.13), while there was no evidence of elevated risk during El Niño or ENSO Neutral periods. Exposure to extreme heat events was not associated with an increased risk of campylobacteriosis, except during La Niña periods (IRR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.08). Extreme precipitation events could result in flooding within coastal areas that may bring water contaminated with bacterial pathogens (originating from sources such as septic systems

  18. An evaluation of cassava, sweet potato and field corn as potential carbohydrate sources for bioethanol production in Alabama and Maryland

    Ziska, Lewis H.; Tomecek, Martha; Sicher, Richard [United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Crop Systems and Global Change Lab, 10300 Baltimore Avenue, Building 1, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Runion, G. Brett; Prior, Stephen A.; Torbet, H. Allen [United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Soil Dynamics Laboratory, 411 South Donahue Drive, Auburn, AL 36832 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    The recent emphasis on corn production to meet the increasing demand for bioethanol has resulted in trepidation regarding the sustainability of the global food supply. To assess the potential of alternative crops as sources of bioethanol production, we grew sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and cassava (Manihot esculentum) at locations near Auburn, Alabama and Beltsville, Maryland in order to measure root carbohydrate (starch, sucrose, glucose) and root biomass. Averaged for both locations, sweet potato yielded the highest concentration of root carbohydrate (ca 80%), primarily in the form of starch (ca 50%) and sucrose (ca 30%); whereas cassava had root carbohydrate concentrations of (ca 55%), almost entirely as starch. For sweet potato, overall carbohydrate production was 9.4 and 12.7 Mg ha{sup -1} for the Alabama and Maryland sites, respectively. For cassava, carbohydrate production in Maryland was poor, yielding only 2.9 Mg ha{sup -1}. However, in Alabama, carbohydrate production from cassava averaged {proportional_to}10 Mg ha{sup -1}. Relative to carbohydrate production from corn in each location, sweet potato and cassava yielded approximately 1.5 x and 1.6 x as much carbohydrate as corn in Alabama; 2.3 x and 0.5 x for the Maryland site. If economical harvesting and processing techniques could be developed, these data suggest that sweet potato in Maryland, and sweet potato and cassava in Alabama, have greater potential as ethanol sources than existing corn systems, and as such, could be used to replace or offset corn as a source of biofuels. (author)

  19. High solids fermentation reactor

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  20. Fossil nuclear reactors

    Maurette, M.

    1976-01-01

    The discussion of fossil nuclear reactors (the Oklo phenomenon) covers the earth science background, neutron-induced isotopes and reactor operating conditions, radiation-damage studies, and reactor modeling. In conclusion possible future studies are suggested and the significance of the data obtained in past studies is summarized. (JSR)

  1. Fusion reactor studies

    A review is given of fusion reactor systems studies, the objectives of these studies are outlined and some recent conceptual reactor designs are described. The need for further studies in greater depth is indicated so that progress towards a commercial fusion reactor may be consolidated. (U.K.)

  2. Reactor power measuring device

    The present invention provides a self-powered long detector having a sensitivity over the entire length of a reactor core as an entire control rod withdrawal range of a BWR type reactor, and a reactor power measuring device using a gamma ray thermometer which scarcely causes sensitivity degradation. That is, a hollow protection pipe is disposed passing through the reactor core from the outside of a reactor pressure vessel. The self-powered long detectors and the gamma ray thermometers are inserted and installed in the protection pipe. An average reactor power in an axial direction of the reactor relative to a certain position in the horizontal cross section of the reactor core is determined based on the power of the self-powered long detector over the entire length of the reactor core. Since the response of the self-powered detector relative to a local power change is rapid, the output is used as an input signal to a safety protection device of the reactor core. Further, a gamma ray thermometer secured in the reactor and having scarce sensitivity degradation is used instead of an incore travelling neutron monitor used for relative calibration of an existent neutron monitor secured in the reactor. (I.S.)

  3. Transactions of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting

    Monteleone, S. [comp.

    1993-10-01

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 21st Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 25--27, 1993. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, US NRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the nuclear industry, and from foreign governments and industry are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting and are given in the order of their presentation in each session.

  4. Transactions of the twenty-fifth water reactor safety information meeting

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 25th Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, October 20--22, 1997. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, US NRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the nuclear industry, and from foreign governments and industry are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion of information exchanged during the course of the meeting, and are given in order of their presentation in each session

  5. Transactions of the twenty-fifth water reactor safety information meeting

    Monteleone, S. [comp.

    1997-09-01

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 25th Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, October 20--22, 1997. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, US NRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the nuclear industry, and from foreign governments and industry are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion of information exchanged during the course of the meeting, and are given in order of their presentation in each session.

  6. Transactions of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 21st Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 25--27, 1993. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, US NRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the nuclear industry, and from foreign governments and industry are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting and are given in the order of their presentation in each session

  7. Experimental design of the University of Maryland's high power, x-band gyroklystron

    In this paper the authors discuss a high peak-power, 1-2 μs, 10 GHz gyroklystron experiment that is nearing the operational stage at the University of Maryland. The device is expected to achieve power levels in excess of 30 MW via the interaction between a 500 kV, 160 A small-orbit beam and a TE010 gyroklystron circuit. Additional characteristics include an efficiency in excess of 40%, a gain in excess of 50 dB, and low phase noise. The authors present the detailed theoretical design of a four-cavity, stagger-tuned microwave circuit. A parametric characterization of the design is carried out with the aid of a partially self-consistent numerical code. Also presented are the results of a start oscillation calculation for the exact cold cavity field profiles of all relevant modes

  8. Sustainability of Water Resources in the Fractured-Rock Area of Maryland

    Bolton, David W.; Gerhart, James M.; Kasraei, Saeid

    2009-01-01

    The fractured-rock area of Maryland encompasses the region of the State west of the Fall Line, which is approximated by the Interstate 95 corridor. It includes the Piedmont, Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Appalachian Plateau Physiographic Provinces (fig. 1). Surface water and ground water are important and interconnected water sources in this area. Streamflow characteristics vary in response to different land use, geology, topography, soil, and other factors. Ground-water flow is quite localized, tending to be controlled by local watersheds. Water in this region moves down through the soil and decomposed rock (saprolite) and along joints, faults, and fractures in the underlying rock (fig. 2). Water availability depends upon the size of fractures as well as the interconnections between fractures.

  9. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide

    2007-01-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  10. Recommended regulatory program plan for low-level radioactive waste management in Maryland

    The National Program for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management was instituted by the US Department of Energy to assist the states in carrying out this new federal policy. Based on the premise that the safe disposal of low-level waste is technologically feasible and that states have the necessary degree of authority to set management policy, the National Program is helping them to develop a responsive, comprehensive regulatory program. The State of Maryland is actively engaged with the National Program in its efforts to form a comprehensive management program. The purpose of this plan is to review existing statutory and regulatory program responsibilities and provide a recommended management scheme for low-level radioactive waste

  11. Content-Based Persian Language Instruction at the University of Maryland: A Field-Report

    Ali Reza Abasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Content-based language instruction (CBI has been increasingly gaining prominence in foreign language education. There is, however, a paucity of reports on less commonly taught language programs in the USA that have adopted this approach. This paper reports on the introduction of CBI in a Persian language program at the University of Maryland. The paper begins with an overview of the most common CBI models in higher education settings. Next, a description of a particular CBI model developed in response to the program needs is presented, followed by a description of an offered course based on this model and a discussion of the views of the students, content faculty, and the language instructor. In conclusion, key considerations and the lessons learned in the process of implementing CBI are discussed.

  12. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    2009-08-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  13. Study of polonium and lead in shellfish (Mytilus Edulis) from NORM discharge area of Aberdeen Bay and Ythan Estuary of Scotland and radiological impact to the local people and environment

    Introduction The problem of NORM in the oil and gas industry is a result of deposits of radioactive (Ra,BaSO4) scale within pipelines and processing equipment. The build-up of the scale has a significant impact on the activities of the operating company involved and is therefore a costly problem. The pipes and other equipment must therefore be cleaned on a regular basis or disposed of and replaced. Once the LSA scale has been removed from oil processing equipment the main route of disposal is into the sea. This scale contains mainly radium, lead and its daughter products, which have a long half-lives and high radiotoxicity. The volume of NORM waste produced by the petroleum industry is quite impressive. There are 230 oil and gas producing platforms in UK waters together with around 40 onshore oil and gas producing wells. All are involved in NORM production and discharging the NORM contaminated waste to the North Sea. Discharge of radioactive scale waste from offshore platforms into the surface waters of sea has been a matter of concern due to possible environmental effects of radioelements contained in such waters. Subject to certain conditions this is allowed under the UK Radioactive Substances Act 1993 which controls the release of radioactive materials into the environment. In the case for North sea oil and gas field waste, waste from the cleaning of contaminated plant and equipment is either discharged to sea off shore, discharged to sea from a pipeline in Aberdeen or stored at the Dounraey nuclear facility. Although allowed since 1981 no one has ascertained if these conditions are ensuring full protection of fish consumers. Furthermore, the disposal of large amounts of contaminated wastes resulting from the various stages of oil processing can pose an environmental problem due to its content of long lived radionuclides (226Ra t1/2 = 1600 y and 210Pb t1/2 = 22 years). In order that an accurate estimate of the contribution of polonium from NORM discharges can be

  14. Light water reactor safety

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  15. Nuclear reactor repairing device

    Purpose: To enable free repairing of an arbitrary position in an LMFBR reactor. Constitution: A laser light emitted from a laser oscillator installed out of a nuclear reactor is guided into a portion to be repaired in the reactor by using a reflecting mirror, thereby welding or cutting it. The guidance of the laser out of the reactor into the reactor is performed by an extension tube depending into a through hole of a rotary plug, and the guidance of the laser light into a portion to be repaired is performed by the transmitting and condensing action of the reflecting mirror. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Fundamentals of reactor chemistry

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around the nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also the subject material of chemistry. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry in the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI was considered, and the fundamental part of reactor chemistry was reviewed in this report. Since the students of the Nuclear Engineering School are not chemists, the knowledge necessary in and around the nuclear reactors was emphasized in order to familiarize the students with the reactor chemistry. The teaching experience of the fundamentals of reactor chemistry is also given. (author)

  17. Nuclear reactor physics

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  18. Improving Maryland's Offshore Wind Energy Resource Estimate Using Doppler Wind Lidar Technology to Assess Microtmeteorology Controls

    St. Pé, Alexandra; Wesloh, Daniel; Antoszewski, Graham; Daham, Farrah; Goudarzi, Navid; Rabenhorst, Scott; Delgado, Ruben

    2016-06-01

    There is enormous potential to harness the kinetic energy of offshore wind and produce power. However significant uncertainties are introduced in the offshore wind resource assessment process, due in part to limited observational networks and a poor understanding of the marine atmosphere's complexity. Given the cubic relationship between a turbine's power output and wind speed, a relatively small error in the wind speed estimate translates to a significant error in expected power production. The University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) collected in-situ measurements offshore, within Maryland's Wind Energy Area (WEA) from July-August 2013. This research demonstrates the ability of Doppler wind lidar technology to reduce uncertainty in estimating an offshore wind resource, compared to traditional resource assessment techniques, by providing a more accurate representation of the wind profile and associated hub-height wind speed variability. The second objective of this research is to elucidate the impact of offshore micrometeorology controls (stability, wind shear, turbulence) on a turbine's ability to produce power. Compared to lidar measurements, power law extrapolation estimates and operational National Weather Service models underestimated hub-height wind speeds in the WEA. In addition, lidar observations suggest the frequent development of a low-level wind maximum (LLWM), with high turbinelayer wind shear and low turbulence intensity within a turbine's rotor layer (40m-160m). Results elucidate the advantages of using Doppler wind lidar technology to improve offshore wind resource estimates and its ability to monitor under-sampled offshore meteorological controls impact on a potential turbine's ability to produce power.

  19. Generation III+ Reactor Portfolio

    While the power generation needs of utilities are unique and diverse, they are all faced with the double challenge of meeting growing electricity needs while curbing CO2 emissions. To answer these diverse needs and help tackle this challenge, AREVA has developed several reactor models which are briefly described in this document: The EPRTM Reactor: designed on the basis of the Konvoi (Germany) and N4 (France) reactors, the EPRTM reactor is an evolutionary model designed to achieve best-in-class safety and operational performance levels. The ATMEA1TM reactor: jointly designed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and AREVA through ATMEA, their common company. This reactor design benefits from the competencies and expertise of the two mother companies, which have commissioned close to 130 reactor units. The KERENATM reactor: Designed on the basis of the most recent German BWR reactors (Gundremmingen) the KERENATM reactor relies on proven technology while also including innovative, yet thoroughly tested, features. The optimal combination of active and passive safety systems for a boiling water reactor achieves a very low probability of severe accident

  20. The Maple reactor project

    MDS Nordion supplies the majority of the world's reactor-produced medical isotopes. These isotopes are currently produced in the NRU reactor at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). Medical isotopes and related technology are relied upon around the world to prevent, diagnose and treat disease. The NRU reactor, which has played a key role in supplying medical isotopes to date, has been in operation for over 40 years. Replacing this aging reactor has been a priority for MDS Nordion to assure the global nuclear medicine community that Canada will continue to be a dependable supplier of medical isotopes. MDS Nordion contracted AECL to construct two MAPLE reactors dedicated to the production of medical isotopes. The MDS Nordion Medical Isotope Reactor (MMIR) project started in September 1996. This paper describes the MAPLE reactors that AECL has built at its CRL site, and will operate for MDS Nordion. (author)

  1. High temperature reactors

    With the advent of high temperature reactors, nuclear energy, in addition to producing electricity, has shown enormous potential for the production of alternate transport energy carrier such as hydrogen. High efficiency hydrogen production processes need process heat at temperatures around 1173-1223 K. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), is currently developing concepts of high temperature reactors capable of supplying process heat around 1273 K. These reactors would provide energy to facilitate combined production of hydrogen, electricity, and drinking water. Compact high temperature reactor is being developed as a technology demonstrator for associated technologies. Design has been also initiated for a 600 MWth innovative high temperature reactor. High temperature reactor development programme has opened new avenues for research in areas like advanced nuclear fuels, high temperature and corrosion resistant materials and protective coatings, heavy liquid metal coolant technologies, etc. The paper highlights design of these reactors and their material related requirements

  2. Spinning fluids reactor

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  3. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting; Volume 2, Severe accident research, Thermal hydraulics

    Weiss, A.J. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Reactor Safety: Introduction

    The programme of the Reactor Safety Division focuses on the development of expertise on materials behaviour under irradiation for fission and fusion oriented applications. Furthermore, as nuclear energy needs international public acceptance with respect to safety and efficient management of natural resources and wants to reduce the burden of nuclear waste, the Reactor Safety Division enhanced its efforts to develop the MYRRHA project. MYRRHA, an accelerator driven sub-critical system, might have the potential to cope in Europe with the above mentioned constraints on acceptability and might serve as a technological platform for GEN IV reactor development, in particular the Liquid Metal Fast Reactor.The Reactor Safety Division gathers three research entities that are internationally recognised: the Reactor Materials Research department, the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA department and the Instrumentation department.The objectives of Reactor Materials Research are: to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials and nuclear fuels used in present and future nuclear power industry; to perform research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material and fuel behaviour under or after irradiation; to contribute to the interpretation and modelling of the materials and fuels behaviour in order to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the Reactor Materials Research department concentrate on four distinct disciplines: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel embrittlement Stress corrosion cracking in reactor coolant environment, including Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking; Nuclear Fuel characterisation and development of new fuel types for commercial and test reactors. Development of materials for Fusion and advanced nuclear fission reactors. The safe operation of present nuclear power plants relies primarily on the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel

  5. 2005 US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program Topo/Bathy Lidar: Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina and Virginia

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data contained in these files are hydrographic and topographic data collected by the SHOALS-1000T system along the Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York,...

  6. Geodatabase of the available top and bottom surface datasets that represent the Mississippian aquifer, Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase includes spatial datasets that represent the Mississippian aquifer in the States of Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri,...

  7. Research reactors in Argentina

    Argentine Nuclear Development started in early fifties. In 1957, it was decided to built the first a research reactor. RA-1 reactor (120 kw, today licensed to work at 40 kW) started operation in January 1958. Originally RA-1 was an Argonaut (American design) reactor. In early sixties, the RA-1 core was changed. Fuel rods (20% enrichment) was introduced instead the old Argonaut core design. For that reason, a critical facility named RA-0 was built. After that, the RA-3 project started, to build a multipurpose 5 MW nuclear reactor MTR pool type, to produce radioisotopes and research. For that reason and to define the characteristics of the RA-3 core, another critical facility was built, RA-2. Initially RA-3 was a 90 % enriched fuel reactor, and started operation in 1967. When Atucha I NPP project started, a German design Power Reactor, a small homogeneous reactor was donated by the German Government to Argentina (1969). This was RA-4 reactor (20% enrichment, 1W). In 1982, RA-6 pool reactor achieved criticality. This is a 500 kW reactor with 90% enriched MTR fuel elements. In 1990, RA-3 started to operate fueled by 20% enriched fuel. In 1997, the RA-8 (multipurpose critical facility located at Pilcaniyeu) started to operate. RA-3 reactor is the most important CNEA reactor for Argentine Research Reactors development. It is the first in a succession of Argentine MTR reactors built by CNEA (and INVAP SE ) in Argentina and other countries: RA-6 (500 kW, Bariloche-Argentina), RP-10 (10MW, Peru), NUR (500 kW, Algeria), MPR (22 MW, Egypt). The experience of Argentinian industry permits to compete with foreign developed countries as supplier of research reactors. Today, CNEA has six research reactors whose activities have a range from education and promotion of nuclear activity, to radioisotope production. For more than forty years, Argentine Research Reactors are working. The experience of Argentine is important, and argentine firms are able to compete in the design and

  8. Thai research reactor

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  9. Nuclear Reactor Physics

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2001-02-01

    An authoritative textbook and up-to-date professional's guide to basic and advanced principles and practices Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering, and as the first comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics to appear in a quarter century, this book fills a large gap in the professional literature. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a textbook for students new to the subject, for others who need a basic understanding of how nuclear reactors work, as well as for those who are, or wish to become, specialists in nuclear reactor physics and reactor physics computations. It is also a valuable resource for engineers responsible for the operation of nuclear reactors. Dr. Weston Stacey begins with clear presentations of the basic physical principles, nuclear data, and computational methodology needed to understand both the static and dynamic behaviors of nuclear reactors. This is followed by in-depth discussions of advanced concepts, including extensive treatment of neutron transport computational methods. As an aid to comprehension and quick mastery of computational skills, he provides numerous examples illustrating step-by-step procedures for performing the calculations described and chapter-end problems. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a useful textbook and working reference. It is an excellent self-teaching guide for research scientists, engineers, and technicians involved in industrial, research, and military applications of nuclear reactors, as well as government regulators who wish to increase their understanding of nuclear reactors.

  10. Mapping of the Frazee Mine, the Western Maryland Coal Combustion By-Products/Acid Mine Drainage Initiative, Part 2 of 3

    Maryland coal production over the years before 1977 reveals that Maryland coal basins have void space from mining a quarter billion tons of coal. The exposure of sulfur-bearing minerals in these mine voids to oxygen and water generates AMD, which is toxic to aquatic flora and fauna. It is estimated that about 450 miles of waterways in western Maryland are impacted by AMD. The majority of these waterways ultimately drain to the east, and affect the overall water quality of the Chesapeake Bay. Typically, AMD is treated by dosing discharges with limestone, which only provides a temporary solution as AMD continues to form at its source in underground mines. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Power Plant Research Program (PPRP) and the Maryland Department of the Environment Bureau of Mines (MDE) have undertaken the Western Maryland CCB/AMD Initiative (the Initiative), which is a joint effort with private industry to develop permanent solutions to abate AMD at its source. The Initiative's goal is to demonstrate the beneficial application of alkaline CCBs to abate AMD from underground coal mines. The Initiative is based on the concept that alkaline CCBs generated by clean coal technologies, such as fluidized bed combustion (FBC) and flue gas desulfurization (FGD), can be injected into underground mines to prevent the formation of AMD by sealing mines from exposure to oxygen and water. This goal will be met by performing the following: Determining optimum grout formulations for mine injection; Optimizing engineering techniques for mine reclamation to achieve economic viability; Implementing appropriately-sized demonstration projects, progressing to full-scale applications at Maryland's largest abandoned mines; and Developing industry partnerships for implementation of the Initiative's findings to abate AMD in western Maryland

  11. Reactor containment and reactor safety in the United States

    The reactor safety systems of two reactors are studied aiming at the reactor containment integrity. The first is a BWR type reactor and is called Peachbottom 2, and the second is a PWR type reactor, and is called surry. (E.G.)

  12. TRIGA reactor main systems

    This module describes the main systems of low power (<2 MW) and higher power (≥2 MW) TRIGA reactors. The most significant difference between the two is that forced reactor cooling and an emergency core cooling system are generally required for the higher power TRIGA reactors. However, those TRIGA reactors that are designed to be operated above 3 MW also use a TRIGA fuel that is specifically designed for those higher power outputs (3 to 14 MW). Typical values are given for the respective systems although each TRIGA facility will have unique characteristics that may only be determined by the experienced facility operators. Due to the inherent wide scope of these research reactor facilities construction and missions, this training module covers those systems found at most operating TRIGA reactor facilities but may also discuss non-standard equipment that was found to be operationally useful although not necessarily required. (author)

  13. Evaluation of research reactors

    The present status of research reactors with highly enriched (93%) uranium fuel at JAERI, JRR-2 and JMTR is described. JRR-2 is a heterogeneous type of reactor, using heavy water as moderator and coolant. It uses both MTR type and cylindrical type of fuel elements. The maximum thermal power and the thermal neutron flux are 10 MW and 2x1014 n/cm2 see respectively. The reactor has been used for various experiments such as solid state physics, material irradiation, reactor fuel irradiation and radioisotope production. The JMTR is a multi-purpose tank type material testing reactor, and light water moderator and coolant, operated at 50 MW. The evaluation of lower enriched fuel and its consequences for both reactors is considered more especially

  14. Multipurpose research reactors

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. The nuclear soliton reactor

    The basic reactor physics of a completely novel nuclear fission reactor design - the soliton-reactor - is presented on the basis of a simple model. In such a reactor, the neutrons in the critical region convert either fertile material in the adjacent layers into fissile material or reduce the poisoning of fissile material in such a manner that successively new critical regions emerge. The result is an autocatalytically driven burn-up wave which propagates throughout the reactor. Thereby, the relevant characteristic spatial distributions (neutron flux, specific power density and the associated particle densities) are solitons - wave phenomena resulting from non-linear partial differential equations which do not change their shape during propagation. A qualitativley new kind of harnessing nuclear fission energy may become possible with fuel residence times comparable with the useful lifetime of the reactor system. In the long run, fast breeder systems which exploit the natural uranium and thorium resources, without any reprocessing capacity are imaginable. (orig.)

  16. Fast Spectrum Reactors

    Todd, Donald; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Fast Spectrum Reactors presents a detailed overview of world-wide technology contributing to the development of fast spectrum reactors. With a unique focus on the capabilities of fast spectrum reactors to address nuclear waste transmutation issues, in addition to the well-known capabilities of breeding new fuel, this volume describes how fast spectrum reactors contribute to the wide application of nuclear power systems to serve the global nuclear renaissance while minimizing nuclear proliferation concerns. Readers will find an introduction to the sustainable development of nuclear energy and the role of fast reactors, in addition to an economic analysis of nuclear reactors. A section devoted to neutronics offers the current trends in nuclear design, such as performance parameters and the optimization of advanced power systems. The latest findings on fuel management, partitioning and transmutation include the physics, efficiency and strategies of transmutation, homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling, in addit...

  17. Fusion reactor research

    This work covers four separate areas: (1) development of technology for processing liquid lithium from blankets, (2) investigation of hydrogen isotope permeation in candidate structural metals and alloys for near-term fusion reactors, (3) analytical studies encompassing fusion reactor thermal hydraulics, tritium facility design, and fusion reactor safety, and (4) studies involving dosimetry and damage analysis. Recent accomplishments in each of these areas are summarized

  18. The Integral Fast Reactor

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  19. The replacement research reactor

    As a consequences of the government decision in September 1997. ANSTO established a replacement research reactor project to manage the procurement of the replacement reactor through the necessary approval, tendering and contract management stages This paper provides an update of the status of the project including the completion of the Environmental Impact Statement. Prequalification and Public Works Committee processes. The aims of the project, management organisation, reactor type and expected capabilities are also described

  20. PFBR reactor protection

    Design philosophy adopted for Prototype Fast breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a classical one and has the following features: triplicated sensors for measuring important safety parameters; two independent reactor protection Logic Systems based on solid state devices; reactivity control achieved by control rods; gas equipped modules at the core blanket interface providing negative reactivity. Design verification of these features showed that safety of the reactor can be achieved by a traditional approach since the inherent features of LMFBR make this easy

  1. Reactor BR2

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  2. TRIGA reactor characteristics

    This module describes the general design, characteristics and parameters of TRIGA reactors and fuels. It is recommended that most of this information should be incorporated into any reactor operator training program and, in many cases, the facility Safety Analysis Report. It is oriented to teach the basics of the physics and mechanical design of the TRIGA fuel as well as its unique operational characteristics and the differences between TRIGA fuels and others more traditional reactor fuels. (nevyjel)

  3. Reactor Safety Analysis

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of four main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents, the development of an expert system for the aid to diagnosis; the development and application of a probabilistic reactor dynamics method. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  4. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1984 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, reactor physics experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  5. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    Research and development activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1981 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  6. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1979 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committees on Reactor Physics and on Decomissioning of Nuclear Facilities. (author)

  7. New reactor concepts

    The document gives a summary of new nuclear reactor concepts from a technological point of view. Belgium supports the development of the European Pressurized-Water Reactor, which is an evolutionary concept based on the European experience in Pressurized-Water Reactors. A reorientation of the Belgian choice for this evolutionary concept may be required in case that a decision is taken to burn plutonium, when the need for flexible nuclear power plants arises or when new reactor concepts can demonstrate proved benefits in terms of safety and cost

  8. Reactor construction steels

    The basic functions of light water reactor components are shown on the example of a pressurized water reactor and the requirements resulting therefrom for steel, the basic structural material, are derived. A detailed analysis of three main groups of reactor steels is presented and the applications are indicated of low-alloyed steels, high-alloyed austenitic steels, and steels with a high content of Ni and of alloying additions for steam generator pipes. An outline is given of prospective fast breeder reactor steels. (J.K.)

  9. Commercialization of fast reactors

    Comparative analysis has been performed of capital and fuel cycle costs for fast BN-type and pressurized light water VVER-type reactors. As a result of materials demand and components costs comparison of NPPs with VVER-1000 and BN-600 reactors, respectively, conclusion was made, that under equal conditions of the comparison, NPP with fast reactor had surpassed the specific capital cost of NPP with VVER by about 30 - 40 %. Ways were determined for further decrease of this difference, as well as for the fuel cycle cost reduction, because at present it is higher than that of VVER-type reactors. (author)

  10. Mirror fusion reactors

    Conceptual design studies were made of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror-confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid and a small pilot-plant hybrid based on standard mirror confinement. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000-MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single-cell pilot plant

  11. Natural convection type reactor

    In a natural convection type nuclear reactor, a reactor core is disposed such that the top of the reactor core is always situated in a flooded position even if pipelines connected to the pressure vessel are ruptured and the level at the inside of the reactor vessel is reduced due to flashing. Further, a lower dry well situated below the pressure vessel is disposed such that it is in communication with a through hole to a pressure suppression chamber situated therearound and the reactor core is situated at the level lower than that of the through hole. If pipelines connected to the pressure vessel are ruptured to cause loss of water, although the water level is lowered after the end of the flashing, the reactor core is always flooded till the operation of a pressure accummulation water injection system to prevent the top of the reactor core even from temporary exposure. Further, injected water is discharged to the outside of the pressure vessel, transferred to the lower dry well, and flows through the through hole to the pressure control chamber and cools the surface of the reactor pressure vessel from the outside. Accordingly, the reactor core is cooled to surely and efficiently remove the after-heat. (N.H.)

  12. INVAP's Research Reactor Designs

    INVAP, an Argentine company founded more than three decades ago, is today recognized as one of the leaders within the research reactor industry. INVAP has participated in several projects covering a wide range of facilities, designed in accordance with the requirements of our different clients. For complying with these requirements, INVAP developed special skills and capabilities to deal with different fuel assemblies, different core cooling systems, and different reactor layouts. This paper summarizes the general features and utilization of several INVAP research reactor designs, from subcritical and critical assemblies to high-power reactors IAEA safety

  13. Reactor power control device

    The present invention provides a control device which can conduct scram and avoid lowering of the power of a nuclear power plant upon occurrence of earthquakes. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises, in addition to an existent power control device, (1) an earthquake detector for detecting occurrence and annihilation of earthquakes and (2) a reactor control device for outputting control rod operation signals and reactor core flow rate control signals depending on the earthquake detection signals from the detector, and reactor and plant information. With such a constitution, although the reactor is vibrated by earthquakes, the detector detects slight oscillations of the reactor by initial fine vibration waves as premonitory symptoms of serious earthquakes. The earthquake occurrence signals are outputted to the reactor control device. The reactor control device, receiving the signals, changes the position of control rods by way of control rod driving mechanisms to make the axial power distribution in the reactor core to a top peak type. As a result, even if the void amount in the reactor core is reduced by the subsequent actual earthquakes, since the void amount is moved, effects on the increase of neutron fluxes by the actual earthquakes is small. (I.S.)

  14. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  15. Fusion Reactor Materials

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  16. Gender differences in street economy and social network correlates of arrest among heroin injectors in Baltimore, Maryland

    Curry, Aaron D.; Latkin, Carl A.

    2003-01-01

    In a sample of 761 heroin injectors in Baltimore, Maryland, correlates of arrest for drug-related and non-drug-related criminal offenses, by gender, were examined. This investigation examined gender differences in involvement in the drug economy and correlates of arrest. Correlates included roles in the street drug economy, social network attributes, and economic and demographic variables. Gender differences were found. Selling drugs was strongly associated with drug-related arrests for males...

  17. Comparison of the academic success rate of GED and traditional high school graduates in Maryland community colleges

    Logan, Lynda Byrd

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if there is any significant difference in the rate of academic success of traditional high school graduates and GED holders in a Maryland Community College. Similar studies have measured academic success using variables, such as persistence and graduation rates, which are better suited to studying academic success in four year colleges. Because graduation rates in community colleges are low, it might be more accurate to assume that co...

  18. Maryland Community College Academic Deans and Department Chair Perceptions of Higher-Order Skill Proficiencies for Associate Degree Completers

    Ball, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Maryland Community College Academic Deans and Department Chair Perceptions of Higher-Order Skill Proficiencies for Associate Degree Completers By James D. Ball Committee Chair: Dr. James L. Hoerner Community College Administration (Abstract) The SCANS report issued in 1990 brought national attention to concerns about lagging competencies of US workers and their lack of preparedness for the high-performance workplace. Since the SCANS report, several national and state...

  19. A Predominant Role for Norwalk-like Viruses as Agents of Epidemic Gastroenteritis in Maryland Nursing Homes for the Elderly

    Green, Kim Y.; Belliot, Gaël; Taylor, Jean Lin; Valdesuso, José; Lew, Judy F.; Kapikian, Albert Z.; Lin, Feng-Ying C.

    2002-01-01

    Stool specimens from 156 Maryland nursing home residents, who became ill during 20 outbreaks of gastroenteritis from November 1987 through February 1988, were analyzed. All tested negative for astroviruses, enteroviruses, Group A rotaviruses, Sapporo-like caliciviruses, and enteric bacteria (i.e., Salmonella, Clostridium, and Shigella species). Eighty-two (52%) were positive for Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs), members of the family Caliciviridae. Six distinct genetic clusters within genogroups I...

  20. Data-based planning for educational interventions through hypertension control programs for urban and rural populations in Maryland.

    Levine, D. M.; Morisky, D. E.; Bone, L R; Lewis, C.; Ward, W B; Green, L W

    1982-01-01

    As part of a statewide effort to coordinate existing resources for high blood pressure (HBP) control, a public health HPB control program was planned and implemented in two high-risk communities in Maryland. The selection of the two communities was based on epidemiologic data. The planning of the educational intervention program in these communities (urban and rural) was guided by organizational theory and health education principles. The framework for development, implementation, and evaluat...

  1. Economic impacts of the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine on the Commonwealth of Virginia

    Kshirsagar, Shukla

    1994-01-01

    This thesis estimates the economic impacts of the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine on the Commonwealth of Virginia. Two types of economic impacts were measured. First, the short term impacts were assessed, using the input-output model for the Commonwealth of Virginia. Operating expenditures of the college were entered into the model as a change in final demand and the multiplier effects of these expenditures were measured. Second, long run benefits o...

  2. Hazard Ranking Methodology for Assessing Health Impacts of Unconventional Natural Gas Development and Production: The Maryland Case Study.

    Boyle, Meleah D; Payne-Sturges, Devon C; Sangaramoorthy, Thurka; Wilson, Sacoby; Nachman, Keeve E; Babik, Kelsey; Jenkins, Christian C; Trowell, Joshua; Milton, Donald K; Sapkota, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The recent growth of unconventional natural gas development and production (UNGDP) has outpaced research on the potential health impacts associated with the process. The Maryland Marcellus Shale Public Health Study was conducted to inform the Maryland Marcellus Shale Safe Drilling Initiative Advisory Commission, State legislators and the Governor about potential public health impacts associated with UNGDP so they could make an informed decision that considers the health and well-being of Marylanders. In this paper, we describe an impact assessment and hazard ranking methodology we used to assess the potential public health impacts for eight hazards associated with the UNGDP process. The hazard ranking included seven metrics: 1) presence of vulnerable populations (e.g. children under the age of 5, individuals over the age of 65, surface owners), 2) duration of exposure, 3) frequency of exposure, 4) likelihood of health effects, 5) magnitude/severity of health effects, 6) geographic extent, and 7) effectiveness of setbacks. Overall public health concern was determined by a color-coded ranking system (low, moderately high, and high) that was generated based on the overall sum of the scores for each hazard. We provide three illustrative examples of applying our methodology for air quality and health care infrastructure which were ranked as high concern and for water quality which was ranked moderately high concern. The hazard ranking was a valuable tool that allowed us to systematically evaluate each of the hazards and provide recommendations to minimize the hazards. PMID:26726918

  3. Hazard Ranking Methodology for Assessing Health Impacts of Unconventional Natural Gas Development and Production: The Maryland Case Study

    Sangaramoorthy, Thurka; Wilson, Sacoby; Nachman, Keeve E.; Babik, Kelsey; Jenkins, Christian C.; Trowell, Joshua; Milton, Donald K.; Sapkota, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The recent growth of unconventional natural gas development and production (UNGDP) has outpaced research on the potential health impacts associated with the process. The Maryland Marcellus Shale Public Health Study was conducted to inform the Maryland Marcellus Shale Safe Drilling Initiative Advisory Commission, State legislators and the Governor about potential public health impacts associated with UNGDP so they could make an informed decision that considers the health and well-being of Marylanders. In this paper, we describe an impact assessment and hazard ranking methodology we used to assess the potential public health impacts for eight hazards associated with the UNGDP process. The hazard ranking included seven metrics: 1) presence of vulnerable populations (e.g. children under the age of 5, individuals over the age of 65, surface owners), 2) duration of exposure, 3) frequency of exposure, 4) likelihood of health effects, 5) magnitude/severity of health effects, 6) geographic extent, and 7) effectiveness of setbacks. Overall public health concern was determined by a color-coded ranking system (low, moderately high, and high) that was generated based on the overall sum of the scores for each hazard. We provide three illustrative examples of applying our methodology for air quality and health care infrastructure which were ranked as high concern and for water quality which was ranked moderately high concern. The hazard ranking was a valuable tool that allowed us to systematically evaluate each of the hazards and provide recommendations to minimize the hazards. PMID:26726918

  4. Social Movements Against Racist Police Brutality and Department of Justice Intervention in Prince George's County, Maryland.

    Hutto, Jonathan W; Green, Rodney D

    2016-04-01

    Racist police brutality has been systemic in Prince George's County, Maryland. The victims include African Americans, the mentally challenged, and immigrant populations, creating a complex and uneven public health impact. Three threads characterize the social movements and intervention since 1970. First, a significant demographic shift occurred as African Americans became the majority population in the late 1980s when the first Black county executive was elected in 1994. Despite the change in political leadership, police brutality remained rampant. Lower-income households located close to the District of Columbia and "inside the beltway" experienced the most police brutality. In 2001, The Washington Post revealed that between 1990 and 2000, Prince George's police shot and killed more citizens per officer than any of the 50 largest city and county law enforcement agencies in the country, 84 % of whom were black. Of the 147 persons shot during the 1990s, 12 were mentally and/or emotionally disturbed; 6 of these shootings were fatal. Second, resistance to police brutality emerged in a variety of political formations throughout the period, especially in the late 1990s. Sustained community pressure prompted the Department of Justice (DOJ) to open a civil rights investigation of the police department in November 2000. To avoid a potential federal lawsuit, the county leadership negotiated a memorandum of agreement (MOA) with the DOJ to enact policy reforms, part of which called for supplementing the departmental mobile crisis team, comprised of mental health care professionals, to respond to all cases involving mentally challenged citizens. Third, the incomplete process of change subsequent to the ending of DOJ oversight suggests a continued challenge to social movements opposing police brutality. This study focuses on the effectiveness of the MOA along with the activism of the People's Coalition for Police Accountability (PCPA) in reforming a culture of police brutality

  5. The research reactors their contribution to the reactors physics

    The 19 october 2000, the french society of nuclear energy organized a day on the research reactors. This associated report of the technical session, reactors physics, is presented in two parts. The first part deals with the annual meeting and groups general papers on the pressurized water reactors, the fast neutrons reactors and the fusion reactors industry. The second part presents more technical papers about the research programs, critical models, irradiation reactors (OSIRIS and Jules Horowitz) and computing tools. (A.L.B.)

  6. One piece reactor removal

    Japan Research Reactor No.3 (JRR-3) was the first reactor consisting of 'Japanese-made' components alone except for fuel and heavy water. After reaching its initial critical state in September 1962, JRR-3 had been in operation for 21 years until March 1983. It was decided that the reactor be removed en-bloc in view of the work schedule, cost and management of the reactor following the removal. In the special method developed jointly by the Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute and Shimizu Construction Co., Ltd., the reactor main unit was cut off from the building by continuous core boring, with its major components bound in the block with biological shield material (heavy concrete), and then conveyed and stored in a large waste store building constructed near the reactor building. Major work processes described in this report include the cutting off, lifting, horizontal conveyance and lowering of the reactor main unit. The removal of the JRR-3 reactor main unit was successfully carried out safely and quickly by the en-block removal method with radiation exposure dose of the workers being kept at a minimum. Thus the high performance of the en-bloc removal method was demonstrated and, in addition, valuable knowhow and other data were obtained from the work. (Nogami, K.)

  7. Reactor Materials Research

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  8. The fusion reactor

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  9. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  10. Reactor Materials Research

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  11. Gas-cooled reactors

    The present study is the second part of a general survey of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs). In this part, the course of development, overall performance and present development status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTCRs) and advances of HTGR systems are reviewed. (author)

  12. Light water reactor program

    Franks, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Light Water Reactor Program is outlined. The scope of the program consists of: design certification of evolutionary plants; design, development, and design certification of simplified passive plants; first-of-a-kind engineering to achieve commercial standardization; plant lifetime improvement; and advanced reactor severe accident program. These program activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy are discussed.

  13. Reactor Safety Analysis

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of two main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  14. Light water type reactor

    The nuclear reactor of the present invention prevents disruption of a reactor core even in a case of occurrence of entire AC power loss event, and even if a reactor core disruption should occur, it prevents a rupture of the reactor container due to excess heating. That is, a high pressure water injection system and a low pressure water injection system operated by a diesel engine are disposed in the reactor building in addition to an emergency core cooling system. With such a constitution, even if an entire AC power loss event should occur, water can surely be injected to the reactor thereby enabling to prevent the rupture of the reactor core. Even if it should be ruptured, water can be sprayed to the reactor container by the low pressure water injection system. Further, if each of water injection pumps of the high pressure water injection system and the low pressure water injection system can be driven also by motors in addition to the diesel engine, the pump operation can be conducted more certainly and integrally. (I.S.)

  15. Summary of PERF air program review - August 22-23, 2007, Annapolis, Maryland.

    Veil, J. A.; Schmalzer, D. K.; Leath, P. P.

    2007-10-24

    For many years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported and sponsored various types of environmental research related to the oil and gas industry through its Office of Fossil Energy and its National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). In November 2005, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) organized and coordinated a review of DOE's water research program in conjunction with the fall 2005 meeting of the Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (PERF). PERF is a nonprofit organization created in 1986 to provide a stimulus and forum for collecting, exchanging, and analyzing research information related to the development of technology for the petroleum industry and also to provide a mechanism for establishing joint research projects in that field. Additional information on PERF can be accessed at http://www.perf.org. The water program review was so successful that both DOE and PERF agreed that a second program review would be useful -- this time on air research and issues. Argonne coordinated the air program review, which was held in Annapolis, Maryland, on August 22 and 23, 2007. This report summarizes the presentations and related discussions that were part of the air program review. The full agenda for the program review is included as Appendix A.

  16. Downstream effects of reservoir releases to the Potomac River from Luke, Maryland, to Washington, DC

    Trombley, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    A digital computer flow-routing model was developed for the Potomac River in order to determine the downstream effects of flow releases from the Bloomington and Savage River Reservoirs. Both reservoirs are located above Luke, Maryland approximately 230 miles upstream from Washington, D. C. The downstream effects of reservoir releases were determined by using the unit-response method of flow routing implemented by a diffusion analogy. Results are in the form of unit response coefficients which are used to route flows downstream from Luke. A 24-hour sustained reservoir release input at Luke will result in 35 percent of the flow arriving at Washington, D.C., during the 4th day after the beginning of the release, followed by 61 percent and 4 percent arriving on the 5th and 6th days, respectively. For a 7-day sustained reservoir release, 47 percent of the flow will arrive during the 1st week, and 53 percent will arrive the 2d week. Two methods were used to estimate the amount of water that goes into channel storage between Luke and Washington, D.C., during sustained reservoir releases. Analysis of the flow-routing results indicates channel storage is equivalent to the volume of water releases over a 3.7-day period. Using channel geometry relationships, that volume is equal to 3.2 days ' release. (USGS)

  17. Design and progress of the 100 MW fundamental frequency gyroklystron at the University of Maryland

    Cheng, J.; Lawson, W.; Calame, J.P.; Hogan, B.; Latham, P.E.; Castle, M.; Granatstein, V.L.; Reiser, M.; Metz, H. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Inst. for Plasma Research

    1995-12-31

    Design results for the fundamental frequency, 8.568 GHz, coaxial gyroklystron at the University of Maryland will be presented. In order to accommodate the vast power traveling through the microwave circuit, the cross section of the system has been increased by over a factor of two from the previous 30 MW system; this increase results in an even more highly overmoded system. A coaxial microwave circuit has been chosen to alleviate the problems associated with highly overmoded waveguides. Computer simulations have resulted in the design of a circular TE{sub 01} output cavity which not only is stable to spurious oscillations but also achieves RF efficiencies near 40%. The output cavity`s low design Q of 122 and effective length of 2.6 cm lowers the cavity`s susceptibility to parasitic modes. Cold test results of the actual input and output cavities will be performed and compared with code predictions. The present status in the modifications of the modulator, beam transport and diagnostic systems to accommodate the goal of 100 MW peak power production will also be presented.

  18. GRAD-MAP: A Joint Physics and Astronomy Diversity Initiative at the University of Maryland

    Wilkins, Ashlee N.; Jameson, Katherine; Taylor, Corbin James; Anderson, Neil; Megson, Peter; Roberg-Clark, Gareth; Sheppard, Kyle; Uher, Tim; Hammer, Donna; Vogel, Stuart N.

    2016-01-01

    Graduate Resources for Advancing Diversity with Maryland's Astronomy and Physics (GRAD-MAP), builds connections between UMD and mid-Atlantic HBCUs, Minority-Serving Institutions, and community colleges, and uses seminars, forums, and workshops to foster a diverse community of undergraduates prepared to succeed in graduate school, and is now in its third year. GRAD-MAP launched with a three-pronged approach: 1) Collaborative Seminars, 2) A Winter Workshop, and 3) A Spring Symposium. This program allows GRAD-MAP to do more than just increase the numbers of minority students participating in astronomy and physics research (or, worse, simply shuffle around students who already are or would be); it is committed to identifying students who are otherwise underserved or overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline, not only to get them on the path to be successful undergraduate researchers and eventual graduate applicants, but also to make the climate of academic physics and astronomy more inclusive to them and all other underrepresented minority students. Our poster describes the key elements of our program, and highlights successes and lessons learned; GRAD-MAP can serve as a model for other universities committed to diversity and inclusion.

  19. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Twenty-two. Maryland

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of Maryland governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  20. Electron beam characteristics in the hollow beam diode and cusped magnetic field of the Maryland ERA

    The University of Maryland electron ring accelerator (ERA) concept calls for the formation of an electron ring current by transmission of a hollow relativistic electron beam through a static, azimuthally symmetric, cusped magnetic field. Electron motion is approximately paraxial in the diode and pre-cusp drift region and is axis-encircling in the post-cusp region. Experiments show the electron flow in the diode to be approximately pressureless. The radial thickness of the drifting Brillouin hollow beam is derived from a radial force balance equation. Time-resolved measurements of the beam current and energy are made by measuring the extrapolated range of the beam in aluminum targets. These measurements are analyzed with a model of the diode as a terminating impedance driven by a transmission line. Beam motion in the cusped field region is analyzed. Beam dynamics in the post-cusp region are studied by examining the interaction of a hollow rotating beam with its self-induced potentials in a cylindrical box with conducting walls and ends. The energy of the self-induced electric and magnetic potentials is much less than the kinetic energy of the beam electrons for cases approximating experimental conditions

  1. Effects of urbanization and stormwater control measures on streamflows in the vicinity of Clarksburg, Maryland, USA

    Rhea, Lee; Jarnagin, Taylor; Hogan, Dianna; Loperfido, J. V.; Shuster, William

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the efficacy of revised watershed management methods is important to mitigating the impacts of urbanization on streamflow. We evaluated the influence of land use change, primarily as urbanization, and stormwater control measures on the relationship between precipitation and stream discharge over an 8-year period for five catchments near Clarksburg, Montgomery County, Maryland, USA. A unit-hydrograph model based on a temporal transfer function was employed to account for and standardize temporal variation in rainfall pattern, and properly apportion rainfall to streamflow at different time lags. From these lagged relationships, we quantified a correction to the precipitation time series to achieve a hydrograph that showed good agreement between precipitation and discharge records. Positive corrections appeared to include precipitation events that were of limited areal extent and therefore not captured by our rain gages. Negative corrections were analysed for potential causal relationships. We used mixed-model statistical techniques to isolate different sources of variance as drivers that mediate the rainfall–runoff dynamic before and after management. Seasonal periodicity mediated rainfall–runoff relationships, and land uses (i.e. agriculture, natural lands, wetlands and stormwater control measures) were statistically significant predictors of precipitation apportionment to stream discharge. Our approach is one way to evaluate actual effectiveness of management efforts in the face of complicating circumstances and could be paired with cost data to understand economic efficiency or life cycle aspects of watershed management. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Commissioning of the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER): Advances toward multiturn operation

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) is a low-energy, high current recirculator for beam physics research [M. Reiser et al., in Proceedings of the 1999 Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, NY (IEEE, New York, 1999), p. 234]. Ring construction is completed for multiturn operation of beams over a broad range of intensities and initial conditions. UMER is an extremely versatile experimental platform with a beam current of up to 100 mA and a pulse length as long as 100 ns. UMER is addressing issues in beam physics relevant to many applications that require intense beams of high quality, such as advanced concept accelerators, free electron lasers, spallation neutron sources, and future heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion. The primary focus of this paper is to present experimental results in the areas of beam steering and multiturn operation of the ring. Unique beam steering algorithms now include measurement of the beam response matrix at each quadrupole and matrix inversion by singular value decomposition. With these advanced steering methods, transport of an intense beam over four turns (144 full lattice periods) of the ring has been achieved

  3. Beam Control and Steering in the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER)

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) is a low energy, high current recirculator for beam physics research. Ring construction has been completed for multi-turn operation of beams over a broad range of intensities and initial conditions. The electron beam current is adjustable up to 100 mA and pulse length as long as 100 ns. UMER is addressing issues in beam physics relevant to many applications that require intense beams of high quality, such as advanced concept accelerators, free electron lasers, spallalion neutron sources, and future heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion. The primary focus of this presentation is experimental results in the area of beam steering and control within the injection line and ring. Unique beam steering algorithms now include measurement of the beam response matrix at each quadrupole and matrix inversion by singular value decomposition (SVD). With these advanced steering methods, transport of an intense beam over 50 turns (3600 full lattice periods) of the ring has been achieved

  4. Beam Control and Steering in the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER)

    Walter, M.; Bai, G.; Bernal, S.; Feldman, D.; Godlove, T.; Haber, I.; Holloway, M.; Kishek, R.; O'Shea, P.; Papadopoulos, C.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; Stratakis, D.; Sutter, D.; Thangaraj, J.; Wilson, M.; Wu, C.

    2006-11-01

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) is a low energy, high current recirculator for beam physics research. Ring construction has been completed for multi-turn operation of beams over a broad range of intensities and initial conditions. The electron beam current is adjustable up to 100 mA and pulse length as long as 100 ns. UMER is addressing issues in beam physics relevant to many applications that require intense beams of high quality, such as advanced concept accelerators, free electron lasers, spallalion neutron sources, and future heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion. The primary focus of this presentation is experimental results in the area of beam steering and control within the injection line and ring. Unique beam steering algorithms now include measurement of the beam response matrix at each quadrupole and matrix inversion by singular value decomposition (SVD). With these advanced steering methods, transport of an intense beam over 50 turns (3600 full lattice periods) of the ring has been achieved.

  5. Radially resolved measurements of plasma rotation and flow-velocity shear in the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment

    In diagnosing the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) [R. F. Ellis et al., Phys. of Plasmas 8, 2057 (2001)], earlier spectroscopic measurements of averaged plasma rotation velocities have been upgraded to include radial distributions, using a five-channel fiber-optic collection system. Detailed information from each view is now possible with an 8-times increase in spectral resolution, by using a 2 m spectrograph and a 2400 lines/mm grating. Inversion of the integrated chordal radiation into a radial dependence of local emissions is performed by two methods: (a) an iterative simulation beginning with assumed emissions in five axially concentric cylindrical zones followed by summation along the five viewing chords, and (b) inversion of a combination of dual Abel-type matrices. The radial profiles of the absolute velocities derived cover a range from 20 to 70 km/s for both C+ and C++ impurity ions. Previous apparent differences in velocities between ions from a single chordal observation are now explained by the measured radial dependence of velocities and relative emissions. An important result is the first direct and quantitative measurement on MCX of a radial shear in rotational flow velocity as large as 9x105 s-1, 9 times a threshold of 1x105 s-1 for magnetohydrodynamic stability. Stark-broadened hydrogen Balmer-series spectral lines provide both a value for electron density of Ne=(8.5±1.5)1014 cm-3 and supporting data for radial particle distributions

  6. Female reproductive dynamics in a Maryland population of ringneck snakes (Diadophis punctatus)

    Clark, D.R., Jr.; Bunck, C.M.; Hall, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    Adult female ringneck snakes (Diadophis punctatus) collected from a Maryland population during five successive summers laid a total of 50 clutches in which all eggs hatched successfully under laboratory conditions. Mean hatchling mass was not significantly related to female mass or clutch size when each was evaluated in separate analyses, but was significantly related to these factors when they were evaluated in a joint analysis. Mean hatchling masses of 0.6-1 g appear most adaptive; when females are large enough to produce 1-g eggs, the tendency is to produce a larger number of relatively smaller eggs. The relationship of clutch mass to female mass was unaffected by clutch size. Reproductive effort, measured as relative clutch mass (RCM, clutch mass/female mass), increased with age, as indicated by snout-vent length (SVL); also, the relationship of clutch mass to female mass indicated that clutches equaled a larger percentage as female mass increased. Clutch size averaged 3.55 eggs and ranged from 2 to 6. Clutches were laid from 17 June through 21 July (35 d), median 2 July. Clutches hatched during the 20-d interval 8-27 August (median August 18). Larger clutches were laid earlier in the season on average than smaller clutches. Incubation periods for clutches averaged 47 (range 42-51) d. Clutches laid later in the season averaged shorter incubation periods than clutches laid earlier.

  7. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, Maryland

    None

    2014-02-01

    With this new home—which achieved the highest rating possible under the National Green Building Standard—Nexus EnergyHomes demonstrated that green and affordable can go hand in hand. The mixed-humid climate builder, along with the U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Partnership for Home Innovation, embraced the challenge to create a new duplex home in downtown Frederick, Maryland, that successfully combines affordability with state-of-the-art efficiency and indoor environmental quality. To limit costs, the builder designed a simple rectangular shape and kept interesting architectural features such as porches outside the building’s structure. This strategy avoided the common pitfall of creating potential air leakage where architectural features are connected to the structure before the building is sealed against air infiltration. To speed construction and limit costs, the company chose factory-assembled components such as structural insulated panel walls and floor and roof trusses. Factory-built elements were key in achieving continuous insulation around the entire structure. Open-cell spray foam at the rim joist and attic roofline completed the insulation package, and kept the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning system in conditioned space.

  8. Geologic and anthropogenic factors influencing karst development in the Frederick region of Maryland

    Brezinski, D.K.

    2007-01-01

    Karst features pervade the outcrop belts of Triassic, Ordovician, and Cambrian rocks in the Frederick Valley region of Maryland's western Piedmont. Detailed stratigraphic analysis and geologic and karst mapping demonstrate that individual stratigraphic units have differing susceptibilities of karst feature creation. Although the Triassic Leesburg Member of the Bull Run Formation and Rocky Springs Station Member of the Cambrian Frederick Formation have many surface depressions within their outcrop belts, the Lime Kiln Member of the Frederick Formation and the Ceresville, Fountain Rock, and Woodsboro members of the Ordovician Grove Formation have the greatest potential for development of catastrophic collapse sinkholes. Although these four members have the highest relative susceptibility, human activity can increase the potential for sinkhole activation in all units. Rerouting of surface drainage patterns, unlined drainage, and storm-water management areas and removal of significant overburden deposits significantly increase sinkhole development, but mainly, these units are inherently more susceptible to begin with. Copyright ?? 2007. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  9. Naval propulsion reactors

    This article deals with the design and exploitation of naval propulsion reactors, mainly of PWR-type. The other existing or conceivable types of reactors are also presented: 1 - specificities of nuclear propulsion (integration in the ship, marine environment, maneuverability, instantaneous availability, conditions of exploitation-isolation, nuclear safety, safety authority); 2 - PWR-type reactor (stable operation, mastered technology, general design, radiation protection); 3 - other reactor types; 4 - compact or integrated loops architecture; 5 - radiation protection; 6 - reactor core; 7 - reactivity control (core lifetime, control means and mechanisms); 8 - core cooling (natural circulation, forced circulation, primary flow-rate program); 9 - primary loop; 10 - pressurizer; 11 - steam generators and water-steam secondary loop; 12 - auxiliary and safety loops; 13 - control instrumentation; 14 - operation; 15 - nuclear wastes and dismantling. (J.S.)

  10. Iris reactor conceptual design

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral, light water cooled, low-to-medium power (100-350 MWe) reactor which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, improved economics and fuel cycle sustainability. It relies on the proven technology of light water reactors and features innovative engineering, but it does not require new technology development. This paper discusses the current reference IRIS design, which features a 1000 MWt thermal core with proven 5%-enriched uranium oxide fuel and five-year long straight burn fuel cycle, integral reactor vessel housing helical tube steam generators and immersed spool pumps. Other major contributors to the high level of safety and economic attractiveness are the safety by design and optimized maintenance approaches, which allow elimination of some classes of accidents, lower capital cost, long operating cycle, and high capacity factors. (author)

  11. Research reactor DHRUVA

    DHRUVA, a 100 MWt research reactor located at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, attained first criticality during August, 1985. The reactor is fuelled with natural uranium and is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water. Maximum thermal neutron flux obtained in the reactor is 1.8 X 1014 n/cm2/sec. Some of the salient design features of the reactor are discussed in this paper. Some important features of the reactor coolant system, regulation and protection systems and experimental facilities are presented. A short account of the engineered safety features is provided. Some of the problems that were faced during commissioning and the initial phase of power operation are also dealt upon

  12. Reactor core monitoring method

    Mori, Michitsugu [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Kanemoto, Shigeru; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Ebata, Shigeo

    1998-05-06

    The present invention provides a method of monitoring the state of coolant flow in a reactor of a BWR power plant. Namely, a plurality of local power region monitors (LPRM) are disposed to the inside of the reactor core for monitoring a power distribution. Signals of at least two optional LPRM detectors situated at positions different in axial or radial positions of the reactor core are obtained. General fluctuation components which nuclear hydrothermally fluctuate in overall reactor core are removed from the components of the signals. Then, correlational functions between these signals are determined. The state of coolant flow in the reactor is monitored based on the correlational function. When the axial flowing rate and radial flow interference are monitored, the accuracy upon monitoring axial and radial local behaviors of coolants can be improved by thus previously removing the general fluctuation components from signals of LPRM detectors and extracting local void information near to LPRM detectors at high accuracy. (I.S.)

  13. Physics of nuclear reactors

    This manual covers all the aspects of the science of neutron transport in nuclear reactors and can be used with great advantage by students, engineers or even reactor experts. It is composed of 18 chapters: 1) basis of nuclear physics, 2) the interactions of neutrons with matter, 3) the interactions of electromagnetic radiations and charged-particles with matter, 4) neutron slowing-down, 5) resonant absorption, 6) Doppler effect, 7) neutron thermalization, 8) Boltzmann equation, 9) calculation methods in neutron transport theory, 10) neutron scattering, 11) reactor reactivity, 12) theory of the critical homogenous pile, 13) the neutron reflector, 14) the heterogeneous reactor, 15) the equations of the fuel cycle, 16) neutron counter-reactions, 17) reactor kinetics, and 18) calculation methods in neutron scattering

  14. Mirror reactor surface study

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  15. FBR type reactor

    A circular neutron reflector is disposed vertically movably so as to surround the outer circumference of a reactor core barrel. A reflector driving device comprises a driving device main body attracted to the outer wall surface of the reactor barrel by electromagnetic attraction force and an inertia body disposed above the driving device main body vertically movably. A reflector is connected below the reactor driving device. At the initial stage, a spontaneous large current is supplied to upper electromagnetic repulsion coils of the reflector driving device, impact electromagnetic repulsion force is caused between the inertia body and the reflector driving device, so that the driving device main body moves downwardly by a predetermined distance and stopped. The reflector driving device can be lowered in a step-like manner to an appropriate position suitable to restart the reactor during stoppage of the reactor core by conducting spontaneous supply of current repeatedly to the upper electromagnetic repulsion coils. (I.N.)

  16. TRIGA research reactors

    TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General-Atomic) has become the most used research reactor in the world with 65 units operating in 24 countries. The original patent for TRIGA reactors was registered in 1958. The success of this reactor is due to its inherent level of safety that results from a prompt negative temperature coefficient. Most of the neutron moderation occurs in the nuclear fuel (UZrH) because of the presence of hydrogen atoms, so in case of an increase of fuel temperature, the neutron spectrum becomes harder and neutrons are less likely to fission uranium nuclei and as a consequence the power released decreases. This inherent level of safety has made this reactor fit for training tool in university laboratories. Some recent versions of TRIGA reactors have been designed for medicine and industrial isotope production, for neutron therapy of cancers and for providing a neutron source. (A.C.)

  17. Status of French reactors

    Ballagny, A. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Saclay (France)

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  18. Nuclear reactor design

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  19. Compact torsatron reactors

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R0 = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R0 ≅ 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  20. Multi-purpose reactor

    The Multi-Purpose-Reactor (MPR), is a pool-type reactor with an open water surface and variable core arrangement. Its main feature is plant safety and reliability. Its power is 22MWth, cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium. It has platetype fuel elements (MTR type, approx. 20%. enriched uranium) clad in aluminium. Its cobalt (Co60) production capacity is 50000 Ci/yr, 200Ci/gr. The distribution of the reactor core and associated control and safety systems is essentially based on the following design criteria: - upwards cooling flow, to waive the need for cooling flow inversion in case the reactor is cooled by natural convection if confronted with a loss of pumping power, and in order to establish a superior heat transfer potential (a higher coolant saturation temperature); - easy access to the reactor core from top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power, in order to facilitate actual implementation of experiments. Consequently, mechanisms associated to control and safety rods s,re located underneath the reactor tank; - free access of reactor personnel to top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power. This aids in the training of personnel and the actual carrying out of experiments, hence: - a vast water column was placed over the core to act as radiation shielding; - the core's external area is cooled by a downwards flow which leads to a decay tank beyond the pool (for N16 to decay); - a small downwards flow was directed to stream downwards from above the reactor core in order to drag along any possibly active element; and - a stagnant hot layer system was placed at top of pool level so as to minimize the upwards coolant flow rising towards pool level

  1. The CAREM reactor and present currents in reactor design

    INVAP has been working on the CAREM project since 1983. It concerns a very low power reactor for electrical energy generation. The design of the reactor and the basic criteria used were described in 1984. Since then, a series of designs have been presented for reactors which are similar to CAREM regarding the solutions presented to reduce the chance of major nuclear accidents. These designs have been grouped under different names: Advanced Reactors, Second Generation Reactors, Inherently Safe Reactors, or even, Revolutionary Reactors. Every reactor fabrication firm has, at least, one project which can be placed in this category. Presently, there are two main currents of Reactor Design; Evolutionary and Revolutionary. The present work discusses characteristics of these two types of reactors, some revolutionary designs and common criteria to both types. After, these criteria are compared with CAREM reactor design. (Author)

  2. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1977 are described. Works of the Division are development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, fusion reactor engineering, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology, and Committee on Reactor Physics. (Author)

  3. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1983 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  4. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    Research activities conducted in Reactor Engineering Division in fiscal 1975 are summarized in this report. Works in the division are closely related to the development of multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering research of thermonuclear fusion reactor. Many achievements are described concerning nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (auth.)

  5. Reactor performance calculations for water reactors

    The principles of nuclear, thermal and hydraulic performance calculations for water cooled reactors are discussed. The principles are illustrated by describing their implementation in the UKAEA PATRIARCH scheme of computer codes. This material was originally delivered as a course of lectures at the Technical University of Helsinki in Summer of 1969.

  6. Fourth Generation Reactor Concepts

    Concerns over energy resources availability, climate changes and energy supply security suggest an important role for nuclear energy in future energy supplies. So far nuclear energy evolved through three generations and is still evolving into new generation that is now being extensively studied. Nuclear Power Plants are producing 16% of the world's electricity. Today the world is moving towards hydrogen economy. Nuclear technologies can provide energy to dissociate water into oxygen and hydrogen and to production of synthetic fuel from coal gasification. The introduction of breeder reactors would turn nuclear energy from depletable energy supply into an unlimited supply. From the early beginnings of nuclear energy in the 1940s to the present, three generations of nuclear power reactors have been developed: First generation reactors: introduced during the period 1950-1970. Second generation: includes commercial power reactors built during 1970-1990 (PWR, BWR, Candu, Russian RBMK and VVER). Third generation: started being deployed in the 1990s and is composed of Advanced LWR (ALWR), Advanced BWR (ABWR) and Passive AP600 to be deployed in 2010-2030. Future advances of the nuclear technology designs can broaden opportunities for use of nuclear energy. The fourth generation reactors are expected to be deployed by 2030 in time to replace ageing reactors built in the 1970s and 1980s. The new reactors are to be designed with a view of the following objectives: economic competitiveness, enhanced safety, minimal radioactive waste production, proliferation resistance. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) was established in January 2000 to investigate innovative nuclear energy system concepts. GIF members include Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Euratom, France Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States with the IAEA and OECD's NEA as permanent observers. China and Russia are expected to join the GIF initiative. The following six systems

  7. Safety of research reactors

    The number of research reactors that have been constructed worldwide for civilian applications is about 651. Of the reactors constructed, 284 are currently in operation, 258 are shut down and 109 have been decommissioned. More than half of all operating research reactors worldwide are over thirty years old. During this long period of time national priorities have changed. Facility ageing, if not properly managed, has a natural degrading effect. Many research reactors face concerns with the obsolescence of equipment, lack of experimental programmes, lack of funding for operation and maintenance and loss of expertise through ageing and retirement of the staff. Other reactors of the same vintage maintain effective ageing management programmes, conduct active research programmes, develop and retain high calibre personnel and make important contributions to society. Many countries that operate research reactors neither operate nor plan to operate power reactors. In most of these countries there is a tendency not to create a formal regulatory body. A safety committee, not always independent of the operating organization, may be responsible for regulatory oversight. Even in countries with nuclear power plants, a regulatory regime differing from the one used for the power plants may exist. Concern is therefore focused on one tail of a continuous spectrum of operational performance. The IAEA has been sending missions to review the safety of research reactors in Member States since 1972. Some of the reviews have been conducted pursuant to the IAEA' functions and responsibilities regarding research reactors that are operated within the framework of Project and Supply Agreements between Member States and the IAEA. Other reviews have been conducted upon request. All these reviews are conducted following procedures for Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) missions. The prime objective of these missions has been to conduct a comprehensive operational safety

  8. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1992 (April 1, 1992-March 31, 1993). The major Department's programs promoted in the year are the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor, the design activities of advanced reactor system and development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the engineering applications including TRU incineration. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on the nuclear data and group constants, the developments of theoretical methods and codes, the reactor physics experiments and their analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project were also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  9. Reactor engineering department annual report

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1989 (April 1, 1989 - March 31, 1990). One of major Department's programs is the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor and the design activities of advanced reactor system. Development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the nuclear engineering including is also TRU incineration promoted. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on nuclear data and group constants, theoretical methods and code development, on reactor physics experiments and analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics, technology assessment of nuclear energy and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  10. Slurry reactor design studies

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Akgerman, A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Smith, J.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  11. FBR type reactor

    The present invention provides an FBR type reactor in which the combustion of reactor core fuels is controlled by reflectors, and the position of a reflector driving device can be controlled even during shut down of the reactor. Namely, the reflector driving device is attracted to the outer wall surface of a reactor core barrel by electromagnetic attraction force. An inertia body is disposed vertically movably to the upper portion of the reflector driving device. Magnetic repulsive coils generate instantaneous magnetic repulsive force between the inertia body and the reflector driving device. With such a constitution, the reflector driving device can be driven by using magnetic repulsion of the electromagnetic repulsive coils and inertia of the inertia body. As a result, not only the reflectors can be elevated at an ultraslow speed during normal reactor operation, but also fine position adjustment for the reflector driving device, as well as fine position adjustment of the reflectors required upon restart of the reactor can be conducted by lowering the reflector driving device during shut down of the reactor. (I.S.)

  12. Reactor water sampling device

    The present invention concerns a reactor water sampling device for sampling reactor water in an in-core monitor (neutron measuring tube) housing in a BWR type reactor. The upper end portion of a drain pipe of the reactor water sampling device is attached detachably to an in-core monitor flange. A push-up rod is inserted in the drain pipe vertically movably. A sampling vessel and a vacuum pump are connected to the lower end of the drain pipe. A vacuum pump is operated to depressurize the inside of the device and move the push-up rod upwardly. Reactor water in the in-core monitor housing flows between the drain pipe and the push-up rod and flows into the sampling vessel. With such a constitution, reactor water in the in-core monitor housing can be sampled rapidly with neither opening the lid of the reactor pressure vessel nor being in contact with air. Accordingly, operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (I.N.)

  13. Test reactor technology

    The Reactor Development Program created a need for engineering testing of fuels and materials. The Engineering Test Reactors were developed around the world in response to this demand. The design of the test reactors proved to be different from that of power reactors, carrying the fuel elements closer to the threshold of failure, requiring more responsive instrumentation, more rapid control element action, and inherent self-limiting behavior under accident conditions. The design of the experimental facilities to exploit these reactors evolved a new, specialized, branch of engineering, requiring a very high-lvel scientific and engineering team, established a meticulous concern with reliability, the provision for recovery from their own failures, and detailed attention to possible interactions with the test reactors. This paper presents this technology commencing with the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) through the Fast Flux Test Facility, some of the unique experimental facilities developed to exploit them, but discusses only cursorily the experiments performed, since sample preparation and sample analyses were, and to some extent still are, either classified or proprietary. The Nuclear Engineering literature is filled with this information

  14. Advanced reactor licensing issues

    In July 1986 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a Policy Statement on the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants. As part of this policy advanced reactor designers were encouraged to interact with NRC early in the design process to obtain feedback regarding licensing requirements for advanced reactors. Accordingly, the staff has been interacting with the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors on the review of three advanced reactor conceptual designs: one modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) and two Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). As a result of these interactions certain safety issues associated with these advanced reactor designs have been identified as key to the licensability of the designs as proposed by DOE. The major issues in this regard are: (1) selection and treatment of accident scenarios; (2) selection of siting source term; (3) performance and reliability of reactor shutdown and decay heat removal systems; (4) need for conventional containment; (5) need for conventional emergency evacuation; (6) role of the operator; (7) treatment of balance of plant; and (8) modular approach. This paper provides a status of the NRC review effort, describes the above issues in more detail and provides the current status and approach to the development of licensing guidance on each

  15. Nuclear reactor power monitor

    The device of the present invention monitors phenomena occurred in a nuclear reactor more accurately than usual case. that is, the device monitors a reactor power by signals sent from a great number of neutron monitors disposed in the reactor. The device has a means for estimating a phenomenon occurred in the reactor based on the relationship of a difference of signals between each of the great number of neutron monitors to the positions of the neutron monitors disposed in the reactor. The estimation of the phenomena is conducted by, for example, conversion of signals sent from the neutron monitors to a code train. Then, a phenomenon is estimated rapidly by matching the code train described above with a code train contained in a data base. Further. signals sent from the neutron monitors are processed statistically to estimate long term and periodical phenomena. As a result, phenomena occurred in the reactor are monitored more accurately than usual case, thereby enabling to improve reactor safety and operationability. (I.S.)

  16. Reactor Sharing Program

    Support utilization of the RINSC reactor for student and faculty instructions and research. The Department of Energy award has provided financial assistance during the period 9/29/1995 to 5/31/2001 to support the utilization of the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) reactor for student and faculty instruction and research by non-reactor owning educational institutions within approximately 300 miles of Narragansett, Rhode Island. Through the reactor sharing program, the RINSC (including the reactor and analytical laboratories) provided reactor services and laboratory space that were not available to the other universities and colleges in the region. As an example of services provided to the users: Counting equipment, laboratory space, pneumatic and in-pool irradiations, demonstrations of sample counting and analysis, reactor tours and lectures. Funding from the Reactor Sharing Program has provided the RINSC to expand student tours and demonstration programs that emphasized our long history of providing these types of services to the universities and colleges in the area. The funding have also helped defray the cost of the technical assistance that the staff has routinely provided to schools, individuals and researchers who have called on the RINSC for resolution of problems relating to nuclear science. The reactor has been featured in a Public Broadcasting System documentary on Pollution in the Arctic and how a University of Rhode Island Professor used Neutron Activation Analysis conducted at the RINSC to discover the sources of the ''Arctic Haze''. The RINSC was also featured by local television on Earth Day for its role in environmental monitoring

  17. Determination of research reactor safety parameters by reactor calculations

    Main research reactor safety parameters such as power density peaking factors, shutdown margin and temperature reactivity coefficients are treated. Reactor physics explanation of the parameters is given together with their application in safety evaluation performed as part of research reactor operation. Reactor calculations are presented as a method for their determination assuming use of widely available computer codes. (author)

  18. Reactor de plasma

    Erra Serrabasa, Pilar; Molina Mansilla, Ricardo; Beltrán Serra, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Reactor de plasma. Se trata de un reactor de plasma que puede trabajar en un amplio rango de presión, desde el vacío y presiones reducidas hasta la presión atmosférica y presiones superiores. Adicionalmente el reactor de plasma tiene la capacidad de regular otros parámetros importantes y permite su uso para el tratamiento de muestras de tipología muy diversa, como por ejemplo las de tamaño relativamente grande o de superficie rugosa.

  19. Integral nuclear reactor

    The invention deals with an inprovement of the design of an integral pressurized water nuclear reactor. A typical embodyment of the invention includes a generally cylindrical pressure vessel that is assembled from three segments which are bolted together at transverse joints to form a pressure tight unit that encloses the steam generator and the reactor. The new construction permits primary to secondary coolant heat exchange and improved control rod drive mecanisms which can be exposed for full service access during reactor core refueling, maintenance and inspection

  20. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mitrovski, Svetlana M.

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  1. Licensed operating reactors

    The Operating Units Status Report --- Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff on NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non- power reactors in the US

  2. First Algerian research reactor

    In 1985, both the Algerian Commissariat of New Energies and the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission plus the firm INVAP S.E., started a series of mutual visits aimed at defining the mechanisms for cooperation in the nuclear field. Within this framework, a commercial contract was undersigned covering the supply of a low-power reactor (RUN), designed for basic and applied research in the fields of reactor physics and nuclear engineering. The reactor may also be used for performing experiences with neutron beams, for the irradiation of several materials and for the training of technicians, scientists and operators

  3. Course on reactor physics

    In Germany only few students graduate in nuclear technology, therefore the NPP operating companies are forced to develop their own education and training concepts. AREVA NP has started together with the Technical University of Dresden a one-week course ''reactor physics'' that includes the know-how of the nuclear power plant construction company. The Technical University of Dresden has the training reactor AKR-2 that is retrofitted by modern digital instrumentation and control technology that allows the practical training of reactor control.

  4. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts

  5. Nuclear reactor theory

    This textbook is composed of two parts. Part 1 'Elements of Nuclear Reactor Theory' is composed of only elements but the main resource for the lecture of nuclear reactor theory, and should be studied as common knowledge. Much space is therefore devoted to the history of nuclear energy production and to nuclear physics, and the material focuses on the principles of energy production in nuclear reactors. However, considering the heavy workload of students, these subjects are presented concisely, allowing students to read quickly through this textbook. (J.P.N.)

  6. PWR type reactor

    From a PWR with a primary circuit, consisting of a reactor pressure vessel, a steam generator and a reactor coolant pump, hot coolant is removed by means of an auxiliary system containing h.p. pumps for feeding water into the primary circuit and being connected with a pipe, originating at the upper part, which has got at least one isolating value. This is done by opening an outlet in a part of the auxiliary system that has got a lower pressure than the reactor vessel. Preferably a water jet pump is used for mixing with the water of the auxiliary system. (orig.)

  7. Fusion Reactor Materials

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components during and after irradiation. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; and the study of dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are discussed

  8. International tokamak reactor

    Since 1978, the US, the European Communities, Japan, and the Soviet Union have collaborated on the definition, conceptual design, data base assessment, and analysis of critical technical issues for a tokamak engineering test reactor, called the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). During 1985-1986, this activity has been expanded in scope to include evaluation of concept innovations that could significantly improve the tokamak as a commercial reactor. The purposes of this paper are to summarize the present INTOR design concept and to summarize the work on concept innovations

  9. Joyo experimental reactor tour

    JAEA cooperation in remote monitoring focuses on the Joyo Experimental Reactor at the O'arai Research and Development Center. Joyo performs irradiation of test fuels to support development of the fast reactor cycle in Japan, both in international cooperation and in support of the Monju fast reactor, which is now undergoing reconstruction. The tour included an introduction at the model, a visit to the control room, entry into the containment vessel, and viewing of remote monitoring equipment in the Fresh Fuel Storage and at one of the Spent Fuel Ponds. (author)

  10. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  11. nuclear reactor design calculations

    In this work , the sensitivity of different reactor calculation methods, and the effect of different assumptions and/or approximation are evaluated . A new concept named error map is developed to determine the relative importance of different factors affecting the accuracy of calculations. To achieve this goal a generalized, multigroup, multi dimension code UAR-DEPLETION is developed to calculate the spatial distribution of neutron flux, effective multiplication factor and the spatial composition of a reactor core for a period of time and for specified reactor operating conditions. The code also investigates the fuel management strategies and policies for the entire fuel cycle to meet the constraints of material and operating limitations

  12. Nuclear reactor internal structures

    The upper internal structures of the reactor are connected to the closing head so as to be readily removed with the latter and a skirt connected to the lower portion of said upper structures so as to surround the latter, extends under the control rods when they are removed from the reactor core. Through such an arrangement the skirt protects the control rods and supports the vessel closing-head and the core upper structures, whenever the head is severed from the vessel and put beside the latter in order to discharge the reactor

  13. Reactor monitoring system

    The present invention concerns a device for monitoring the inside of an FBR type reactor which can not be monitored by a usual optical camera. An ultrasonic camera having an excellent propagating property in a liquid metal sodium is scanned, and reflected waves of the ultrasonic waves are received as signals. The signals are processed by using a virtual realistic feeling (VR) technique such as a head mounting type image display (HMD) and a three dimensional pointing device. With such procedures, the inside of the FBR type reactor can be observed with such a realistic feeling that the inside of the FBR type reactor were seen directly. (I.S.)

  14. Research reactor support

    Research reactors (RRs) have been used in a wide range of applications including nuclear power development, basic physics research, education and training, medical isotope production, geology, industry and other fields. However, many research reactors are fuelled with High Enriched Uranium (HEU), are underutilized and aging, and have significant quantities of spent fuel. HEU inventories (fresh and spent) pose security risks Unavailability of a high-density-reprocessable fuel hinders conversion and limits back-end options and represents a survival dilemma for many RRs. Improvement of interim spent fuel storage is required at some RRs. Many RRs are under-utilized and/or inadequately funded and need to find users for their services, or permanently shut down and eventually decommission. Reluctance to decommission affect both cost and safety (loss of experienced staff ) and many shut down but not decommissioned RR with fresh and/or spent fuel at the sites invoke serious concern. The IAEA's research reactor support helps to ensure that research reactors can be operated efficiently with fuels and targets of lower proliferation and security concern and that operators have appropriate technology and options to manage RR fuel cycle issues, especially on long term interim storage of spent research reactor fuel. Availability of a high-density-reprocessable fuel would expand and improve back end options. The International Atomic Energy Agency provides assistance to Member States to convert research reactors from High Enriched Uranium fuel and targets (for medical isotope production) to qualified Low Enriched Uranium fuel and targets while maintaining reactor performance levels. The assistance includes provision of handbooks and training in the performance of core conversion studies, advice for the procurement of LEU fuel, and expert services for LEU fuel acceptance. The IAEA further provides technical and administrative support for countries considering repatriation of its

  15. Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Severe accident research, thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs, high-burnup fuel behavior

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24-26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting

  16. Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Severe accident research, thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs, high-burnup fuel behavior

    Monteleone, S. [comp.

    1995-04-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24-26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting.

  17. Study of power reactor dynamics by stochastic reactor oscillator method

    Stochastic reactor oscillator and cross correlation method were used for determining reactor dynamics characteristics. Experimental equipment, fast reactor oscillator (BOR-1) was activated by random pulses from the GBS-16 generator. Tape recorder AMPEX-SF-300 and data acquisition tool registered reactor response to perturbations having different frequencies. Reactor response and activation signals were cross correlated by digital computer for different positions of stochastic oscillator and ionization chamber

  18. Evaluating Student Success and Progress in the Maryland Sea Grant REU Program

    Moser, F. C.; Allen, M. R.; Clark, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Maryland Sea Grant's Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) 12-week summer program is in its 24th year. This estuarine science-focused program has evolved, based in part on our use of assessment tools to measure the program's effectiveness. Our goal is to understand the REU program's effectiveness in such areas as improving student understanding of scientific research, scientific ethics and marine science careers. Initially, our assessment approach was limited to short surveys that used qualitative answers from students about their experience. However, in the last decade we have developed a more comprehensive approach to measure program effectiveness. Currently, we use paired pre- and post-survey questions to estimate student growth during the program. These matching questions evaluate the student's change in knowledge and perception of science research over the course of the summer program. Additionally, we administer several surveys during the 12 weeks of the program to measure immediate responses of students to program activities and to gauge the students' evolving attitudes to customize each year's program. Our 2011 cohort showed consistent improvement in numerous areas, including understanding the nature of science (pre: 4.35, post: 4.64 on a 5 point scale), what graduate school is like (3.71, 4.42), the job of a researcher (4.07, 4.50), and career options in science (3.86, 4.42). Student confidence also increased in numerous skills required for good scientists. To analyze the long-term impact of our program, we survey our alumni to assess graduate degrees earned and career choices. A large percentage (72%) of our tracked alumni have continued on to graduate school, with subsequent careers spanning the academic (51%), public (24%) and private (25%) sectors. These assessments demonstrate that our program is successful in meeting our key objectives of strengthening the training of undergraduates in the sciences and retaining them in marine science

  19. Monitoring seasonal bat activity on a coastal barrier island in Maryland, USA.

    Johnson, Joshua B; Gates, J Edward; Zegre, Nicolas P

    2011-02-01

    Research on effects of wind turbines on bats has increased dramatically in recent years because of significant numbers of bats killed by rotating wind turbine blades. Whereas most research has focused on the Midwest and inland portions of eastern North America, bat activity and migration on the Atlantic Coast has largely been unexamined. We used three long-term acoustic monitoring stations to determine seasonal bat activity patterns on the Assateague Island National Seashore, a barrier island off the coast of Maryland, from 2005 to 2006. We recorded five species, including eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus), tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus), and silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans). Seasonal bat activity (number of bat passes recorded) followed a cosine function and gradually increased beginning in April, peaked in August, and declined gradually until cessation in December. Based on autoregressive models, inter-night bat activity was autocorrelated for lags of seven nights or fewer but varied among acoustic monitoring stations. Higher nightly temperatures and lower wind speeds positively affected bat activity. When autoregressive model predictions were fitted to the observed nightly bat pass totals, model residuals>2 standard deviations from the mean existed only during migration periods, indicating that periodic increases in bat activity could not be accounted for by seasonal trends and weather variables alone. Rather, the additional bat passes were attributable to migrating bats. We conclude that bats, specifically eastern red, hoary, and silver-haired bats, use this barrier island during migration and that this phenomenon may have implications for the development of near and offshore wind energy. PMID:20364316

  20. Home range behavior among box turtles (Terrapene c. carolina) of a bottomland forest in Maryland

    Stickel, L.F.

    1989-01-01

    Eastern box turtles (Terrapene c. carolina) in a Maryland bottomland forest were studied over a period of years (1944-1981). Home ranges of 51 males averaged 146 + SD 48 m long and 105 + SD 38 m wide; ranges of 52 females averaged 144 + SD 52 m long and 100 + SD 38 m wide. An approximation of average home range size, based on an ellipse, is 1.20 ha for males and 1.13 ha for females. Sizes of home ranges of individuals did not differ significantly between 1945 and the full term of their captures (0 =14 yr) (AOV; P > 0.05). Mean distance between capture sites, which provides an index to range size, was not significantly different among the years of 1945, 1955, 1965, and 1975 (AOV; P > 0.05). Geographic centers of ranges of 77 males in the bottomlands showed no significant (AOV; P > 0.05) change for 46, and change over relatively short distances (0 =57 + SD 23 m) for the others. Among 70 females, there was no significant change for 46 and change over short distances (0=61 + SD 24 m) for the others. Changes in location were more frequent between 1965 and 1975, a period of pronounced population decline, than between previous decades (significant only for females, x2 P < 0.025). Hibernation sites ordinarily (21 of 23 Individuals) were within the normal bottom]and range; hibernation sites of different years were near each other (all of 4 individuals). In contrast, nesting sites were far distant, extending the home range by 400-700 m, but those of different years were near each other (6 individuals). Mating partners occupied broadly overlapping or contiguous ranges (35 records). Interactions between males (18 records) were identical to courtship behavior, and are believed not to represent territorial aggression.

  1. Is the three-foot bicycle passing law working in Baltimore, Maryland?

    Love, David C; Breaud, Autumn; Burns, Sean; Margulies, Jared; Romano, Max; Lawrence, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Maryland (MD) recently became one of fourteen states in the United States to enact a traffic law requiring motor vehicles to pass bicyclists at a distance of greater than three feet. To our knowledge, motorist compliance with the law has never been assessed. This study measured the distance between overtaking motor vehicles and cyclists [e.g. vehicle passing distance (VPD)], to develop baseline metrics for tracking implementation of the three-foot passing law in Baltimore, MD and to assess risk factors for dangerous passes. During September and October 2011, cyclists (n=5) measured VPD using a previously published video technique (Parkin and Meyers, 2010). Cyclists logged a total of 10.8h of video footage and 586 vehicle passes on 34 bicycle commuting trips. The average trip lasted 19.5±4.9 min and cyclists were passed on average 17.2±11.8 times per trip. VPDs of three feet or less were common when cycling in standard lanes (17%; 78 of 451 passes) and lanes with a shared lane marking (e.g. sharrows) (23%; 11 of 47 passes). No passes of three feet or less occurred in bicycle lanes (0 of 88 passes). A multiple linear regression model was created, which explained 26% of the variability in VPD. Significant model variables were lane width, bicycle infrastructure, cyclist identity, and street identity. Interventions, such as driver education, signage, enforcement, and bicycle infrastructure changes are needed to influence driving behavior in Baltimore to increase motorist compliance with the three-foot law. PMID:22664711

  2. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    An improved nuclear power reactor fuel element is described which consists of fuel rods, rod guide tubes and an end plate. The system allows direct access to an end of each fuel rod for inspection purposes. (U.K.)

  3. Reactor power control device

    The present invention concerns a method of controlling reactor power to shift it into a partial power operation upon occurrence of recycling pump tripping or loss of generator load. Operation state of a reactor is classified into a plurality of operation states based on values of the reactor core flow rate and the reactor power. Different insertion patterns for selected control rods are determined on every classified operation states. Then, an insertion pattern corresponding to the operation state upon occurrence of recycling pump tripping or loss of power generator load is carried out to shift into partial power operation. The operation is shifted to a load operation solely in the station while avoiding risks such as TPM scram. Then neutron fluxes are suppressed upon transient to increase margin of fuel integrity. Selected control rod pattern of the optimum reactivity is set to each of operation regions, thereby enabling to conduct flexible countermeasure so as to attain optimum operationability. (N.H.)

  4. Reactor pressure boundary materials

    With a long-term operation of nuclear power plants, the component materials are degraded under severe reactor conditions such as neutron irradiation, high temperature, high pressure and corrosive environment. It is necessary to establish the reliable and practical technologies for improving and developing the component materials and for evaluating the mechanical properties. Especially, it is very important to investigate the technologies for reactor pressure boundary materials such as reactor vessel and pipings in accordance with their critical roles. Therefore, this study was focused on developing and advancing the microstructural/micro-mechanical evaluation technologies, and on evaluating the neutron irradiation characteristics and radiation effects analysis technology of the reactor pressure boundary materials, and also on establishing a basis of nuclear material property database

  5. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Gubel, P

    2001-04-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given.

  6. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Gubel, P

    2002-04-01

    The BR2 materials testing reactor is one of SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. In 2001, the reactor was operated for a total of 123 days at a mean power of 59 MW in order to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the internal and external programmes using mainly the CALLISTO PWR loop. The mean consumption of fresh fuel elements was 5.26 per 1000 MWd. Main achievements in 2001 included the development of a three-dimensional full-scale model of the BR2 reactor for simulation and prediction of irradiation conditions for various experiments; the construction of the FUTURE-MT device designed for the irradiation of fuel plates under representative conditions of geometry, neutron spectrum, heat flux and thermal-hydraulic conditions and the development of in-pile instrumentation and a data acquisition system.

  7. Reactor parameter simulation system

    A reactor parameter simulation system (RPSS) has been built with the capability of analyzing any reactor signals, decomposing those signals into their deterministic and stochastic components, then reconstructing new, simulated signals that possess the same statistical and correlation structure as the original plant variables. Important uses of the RPSS are for integration with reactor simulation software to provide tools for plant control strategy development, and for safety-study investigations of scenarios that can arise involving signal faults generated from degraded sensors. A third use of the RPSS is for frequency-domain filtering of reactor process variables contaminated with serially correlated noise, which is important for our ongoing development of expert systems for sensor-operability surveillance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  9. New reactor type proposed

    2003-01-01

    "Russian scientists at the Research Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering in Moscow are hoping to develop a new reactor that will use lead and bismuth as fuel instead of uranium and plutonium" (1/2 page).

  10. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    A fuel assembly construction for liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described in which the sub-assemblies carry a smaller proportion of parasitic material than do conventional sub-assemblies. (U.K.)

  11. Ageing of research reactors

    Historically, many of the research institutions were centred on a research reactor facility as main technological asset and major source of neutrons for research. Important achievements were made in time in these research institutions for development of nuclear materials technology and nuclear safety for nuclear energy. At present, ageing of nuclear research facilities among these research reactors and ageing of staff are considerable factors of reduction of competence in research centres. The safe way of mitigation of this trend deals with ageing management by so called, for power reactors, Plant Life Management and new investments in staff as investments in research, or in future resources of competence. A programmatic approach of ageing of research reactors in correlation with their actual and future utilisation, will be used as a basis for safety evaluation and future spending. (author)

  12. Experience with Kamini reactor

    Kamini is a 233U fuelled, 30 kW(th) research reactor. It is one of the best neutron source facility with a core average flux of 1012 n/cm2/s in IGCAR used for neutron radiography of active and nonradioactive objects, activation analysis and radiation physics research. The core consists of nine plate type fuel elements with a total fuel inventory of 590 g of 233U. Two safety control plates made of cadmium are used for start up and shutdown of the reactor. Three beam tubes, two-thimble irradiation site outside reflector and one irradiation site nearer to the core constitute the testing facilities of Kamini. Kamini attained first criticality on 29th October 96 and nominal power of 30 kW in September 1997. This paper covers the design features of the reactor, irradiation facilities and their utilities and operating experience of the reactor. (author)

  13. Dossier: research reactors

    Research reactors are used at the CEA (the French atomic energy commission) since many years. Their number has been reduced but they remain unique tools that CEA valorize continuously. The results of the programs involving such reactors are of prime importance for the operation of Electricite de France (EdF) park of existing power plants but also for the design of future nuclear power plants and future research reactors. This dossier presents three examples of research reactors in use at the CEA: Osiris and Orphee (CEA-Saclay), devoted to nuclear energy and fundamental research, respectively, and the critical mockups Eole, Minerve and Masurca (CEA-Cadarache) devoted to nuclear data libraries and neutronic calculation. (J.S.)

  14. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  15. Future Reactor Experiments

    He, Miao

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ opens a gateway for the next generation experiments to measure the neutrino mass hierarchy and the leptonic CP-violating phase. Future reactor experiments will focus on mass hierarchy determination and the precision measurement of mixing parameters. Mass hierarchy can be determined from the disappearance of reactor electron antineutrinos based on the interference effect of two separated oscillation modes. Relative and absolute measurement techniques have been explored. A proposed experiment JUNO, with a 20 kton liquid scintillator detector of $3%/$$\\sqrt{E(MeV)}$ energy resolution, $\\sim$ 53 km far from reactors of $\\sim$ 36 GW total thermal power, can reach to a sensitivity of $\\Delta\\chi^{2}>16$ considering the spread of reactor cores and uncertainties of the detector response. Three of mixing parameters are expected to be measured to better than 1% precision. There are multiple detector options for JUNO under investigation. The technical challenges...

  16. Reactor hot spot analysis

    Vilim, R.B.

    1985-08-01

    The principle methods for performing reactor hot spot analysis are reviewed and examined for potential use in the Applied Physics Division. The semistatistical horizontal method is recommended for future work and is now available as an option in the SE2-ANL core thermal hydraulic code. The semistatistical horizontal method is applied to a small LMR to illustrate the calculation of cladding midwall and fuel centerline hot spot temperatures. The example includes a listing of uncertainties, estimates for their magnitudes, computation of hot spot subfactor values and calculation of two sigma temperatures. A review of the uncertainties that affect liquid metal fast reactors is also presented. It was found that hot spot subfactor magnitudes are strongly dependent on the reactor design and therefore reactor specific details must be carefully studied. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  17. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given

  18. Research Reactor Benchmarks

    A criticality benchmark experiment performed at the Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II research reactor is described. This experiment and its evaluation are given as examples of benchmark experiments at research reactors. For this reason the differences and possible problems compared to other benchmark experiments are particularly emphasized. General guidelines for performing criticality benchmarks in research reactors are given. The criticality benchmark experiment was performed in a normal operating reactor core using commercially available fresh 20% enriched fuel elements containing 12 wt% uranium in uranium-zirconium hydride fuel material. Experimental conditions to minimize experimental errors and to enhance computer modeling accuracy are described. Uncertainties in multiplication factor due to fuel composition and geometry data are analyzed by sensitivity analysis. The simplifications in the benchmark model compared to the actual geometry are evaluated. Sample benchmark calculations with the MCNP and KENO Monte Carlo codes are given

  19. Nuclear reactor (1960)

    The first French plutonium-making reactors G1, G2 and G3 built at Marcoule research center are linked to a power plant. The G1 electrical output does not offset the energy needed for operating this reactor. On the contrary, reactors G2 and G3 will each generate a net power of 25 to 30 MW, which will go into the EDF grid. This power is relatively small, but the information obtained from operation is great and will be helpful for starting up the power reactor EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3. The paper describes how, previous to any starting-up operation, the tests performed, especially those concerned with the power plant and the pressure vessel, have helped to bring the commissioning date closer. (author)

  20. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    Hayes, A C

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these and their associated uncertainties are crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to-date have been determined by either conversion of measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that makeup the spectra using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to beta-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  1. Pulsed fusion reactors

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  2. Reactor fueling of BWR type reactors

    Purpose: To enable the pattern exchange for control rods during burning in Control Cell Core type BWR reactors. Constitution: A plurality of control cells are divided into a plurality of groups such that the control cells is aparted from each other by way of at least two fuel assemblies other than the control cells with respect to the vertical and lateral directions of the reactor core cross section, as well as they are in adjacent with control cells of other groups with respect to the orthogonal direction. This enables to perform the pattern exchange for the control rods during burning in the control cell core with ease, and the control blade and the story effect harmful to the mechanical soundness of fuels can thus be suppressed. (Moriyama, K.)

  3. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    Research activities in fiscal 1974 in Reactor Engineering Division of eight laboratories and computing center are described. Works in the division are closely related with the development of a multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering of thermonuclear fusion reactors. They cover nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and aspects of the computing center. (auth.)

  4. Special lecture on nuclear reactor

    This book gives a special lecture on nuclear reactor, which is divided into two parts. The first part has explanation on nuclear design of nuclear reactor and analysis of core with theories of integral transports, diffusion Nodal, transports Nodal and Monte Carlo skill parallel computer and nuclear calculation and speciality of transmutation reactor. The second part deals with speciality of nuclear reactor and control with nonlinear stabilization of nuclear reactor, nonlinear control of nuclear reactor, neural network and control of nuclear reactor, control theory of observer and analysis method of Adomian.

  5. The replacement research reactor

    The contract for the design, construction and commissioning of the Replacement Research Reactor was signed in July 2000. This was followed by the completion of the detailed design and an application for a construction licence was made in May 2001. This paper will describe the main elements of the design and their relation to the proposed applications of the reactor. The future stages in the project leading to full operation are also described

  6. OECD Halden reactor project

    This report summarizes the activities of the OECD Halden Reactor Project for the year 1976. The main items reported on are: a) the process supervision and control which have focused on core monitoring and control, and operator-process communication; b) the fuel performance and safety behavior which have provided data and analytical descriptions of the thermal, mechanical and chemical behavior of fuel under various operating conditions; c) the reactor operations and d) the administration and finance

  7. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  8. Small reactor return

    Current state of the development of present-day small reactors in different countries is performed. Various designs of low and middle power reactors, among which are CAREM (25 MW, PWR), KLT-40 (40 MW, PWR), MRX (30 MW, PWR), IRIS (50 MW, PWR), SMART (1000 MW, PWR), Modular SBWR (50 MW, BWR), PBMR (120 MW, HTGR), GT-HMR (285 MW, HTGR), are discussed

  9. Reactor lattice transport calculations

    The present lecture is a continuation of the lecture on Introduction to the Neutron Transport Phenomena. It comprises three aspects of lattice calculations. First the idea of a reactor lattice is introduced. Then the main definitions used in reactor lattice analysis are given, and finally two basic methods applied for solution of the transport equations are defined. Several remarks on secondary results from lattice transport calculations are added. (author)

  10. Thermal or epithermal reactor

    In a thermal or epithermal heavy-water reactor of the pressure tube design the reactivity is to be increased by different means: replacement of the moderator by additional rods with heavy metal in the core or in the reflector; separation of the moderator (heavy water) from the coolant (light water) by means of shroud tubes. In light-water reactor types neutron losses are to be influenced by using the heavy elements in different configurations. (orig./PW)

  11. Future reactor experiments

    The non-zero neutrino mixing angle θ13 has been discovered and precisely measured by the current generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments. It opens the gate of measuring the leptonic CP-violating phase and enables the neutrino mass ordering. The JUNO and RENO-50 proposals aim at resolving the neutrino mass ordering using reactors. The experiment design, physics sensitivity, technical challenges as well as the progresses of those two proposed experiments are reviewed in this paper

  12. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    The description is given of a water cooled nuclear reactor comprising a core, cooling water that rises through the core, vertical guide tubes located inside the core and control rods vertically mobile in the guide tubes. In this reactor the cooling water is divided into a first part introduced at the bottom end of the core and rising through it and a second part introduced at the top end of the guide tubes so as to drop in them

  13. Jet-Stirred Reactors

    Herbinet, Olivier; Guillaume, Dayma

    2013-01-01

    The jet-stirred reactor is a type of ideal continuously stirred-tank reactor which is well suited for gas phase kinetic studies. It is mainly used to study the oxidation and the pyrolysis of hydrocarbon and oxygenated fuels. These studies consist in recording the evolution of the conversion of the reactants and of the mole fractions of reaction products as a function of different parameters such as reaction temperature, residence time, pressure and composition of the inlet gas. Gas chromatogr...

  14. Generation IV reactors: economics

    The operating nuclear reactors were built over a short period: no more than 10 years and today their average age rounds 18 years. EDF (French electricity company) plans to renew its reactor park over a far longer period : 30 years from 2020 to 2050. According to EDF this objective implies 3 constraints: 1) a service life of 50 to 60 years for a significant part of the present operating reactors, 2) to be ready to built a generation 3+ unit in 2020 which infers the third constraint: 3) to launch the construction of an EPR (European pressurized reactor) prototype as soon as possible in order to have it operating in 2010. In this scheme, generation 4 reactor will benefit the feedback experience of generation 3 and will take over in 2030. Economic analysis is an important tool that has been used by the generation 4 international forum to select the likely future reactor systems. This analysis is based on 4 independent criteria: the basic construction cost, the construction time, the operation and maintenance costs and the fuel cycle cost. This analysis leads to the evaluation of the global cost of electricity generation and of the total investment required for each of the reactor system. The former defines the economic competitiveness in a de-regulated energy market while the latter is linked to the financial risk taken by the investor. It appears, within the limits of the assumptions and models used, that generation 4 reactors will be characterized by a better competitiveness and an equivalent financial risk when compared with the previous generation. (A.C.)

  15. Future reactor experiments

    Wen, Liangjian

    2015-07-01

    The non-zero neutrino mixing angle θ13 has been discovered and precisely measured by the current generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments. It opens the gate of measuring the leptonic CP-violating phase and enables the neutrino mass ordering. The JUNO and RENO-50 proposals aim at resolving the neutrino mass ordering using reactors. The experiment design, physics sensitivity, technical challenges as well as the progresses of those two proposed experiments are reviewed in this paper.

  16. Department of Reactor Technology

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included.......The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included....

  17. AVR reactor physics

    A process for reactivity control was developed and used for fuelling the AVR reactor core, which is largely based on experimentally determined values. By adding fuel elements with different quantities of heavy metals paired with various experimental requirements, great demands were made of reactivity control. Although only a small range of control was available, this was sufficient to operate the reactor and to shut it down safely in the required power and temperature range. (orig.)

  18. Moon base reactor system

    Chavez, H.; Flores, J.; Nguyen, M.; Carsen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of our reactor design is to supply a lunar-based research facility with 20 MW(e). The fundamental layout of this lunar-based system includes the reactor, power conversion devices, and a radiator. The additional aim of this reactor is a longevity of 12 to 15 years. The reactor is a liquid metal fast breeder that has a breeding ratio very close to 1.0. The geometry of the core is cylindrical. The metallic fuel rods are of beryllium oxide enriched with varying degrees of uranium, with a beryllium core reflector. The liquid metal coolant chosen was natural lithium. After the liquid metal coolant leaves the reactor, it goes directly into the power conversion devices. The power conversion devices are Stirling engines. The heated coolant acts as a hot reservoir to the device. It then enters the radiator to be cooled and reenters the Stirling engine acting as a cold reservoir. The engines' operating fluid is helium, a highly conductive gas. These Stirling engines are hermetically sealed. Although natural lithium produces a lower breeding ratio, it does have a larger temperature range than sodium. It is also corrosive to steel. This is why the container material must be carefully chosen. One option is to use an expensive alloy of cerbium and zirconium. The radiator must be made of a highly conductive material whose melting point temperature is not exceeded in the reactor and whose structural strength can withstand meteor showers.

  19. BWR type nuclear reactor

    Purpose: To simplify the structure of an emergency core cooling system while suppressing the flow out of coolants upon rapture accidents in a coolant recycling device of BWR type reactors. Constitution: Recirculation pumps are located at a position higher than the reactor core in a pressure vessel, and the lower plenum is bisected vertically by a partition plate. Further, a gas-liquid separator is surrounded with a wall and the water level at the outer side of the wall is made higher than the water level in the inside of the wall. In this structure, coolants are introduced from the upper chamber in the lower plenum into the reactor core, and the steams generated in the reactor core are separated in the gas-liquid separator, whereby the separated liquid is introduced as coolants by way of the inner chamber into the lower chamber of the lower plenum and further sent by way of the outer chamber into the reactor core. Consequently, idle rotation of the recycling pumps due to the flow-in of saturated water is prevented and loss of coolants in the reactor core can also be prevented upon raptures in the pipeway and the driving section of the pump connected to the pressure vessel and in the bottom of the pressure vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. Emergency reactor scram system

    The present invention provides an emergency reactor scram system capable of shut down a reactor safely upon occurrence of pump trip by improving a passive scram performance for an FBR-type reactor. Namely, a driving motor and an electric generator are connected to a main pump of a primary system. An AC/DC convertor is connected to the electric generator. A shielding plug is disposed to the upper end opening of a reactor container, a control rod drive mechanism is erected on the shielding plug, and an extension pipe is attached to scram magnets of the control rod drive mechanism. The extension pipe is connected to a control rod. The rotation of the shaft of the pump is used as a direct rotator to provide an integrated-type electric generator. The electric generator is electrically connected with the power source of a scram magnet of the emergency scram system. Accordingly, the control rod of the emergency scram system is automatically and rapidly inserted to the reactor core using the power source of the electric generator upon trip of the main pump thereby enabling to scram the reactor safely. (I.S.)