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Sample records for abducens nerve palsy

  1. Isolated abducens nerve palsy with hyperhomocysteinemia: Association and outcomes

    Virender Sachdeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic abducens nerve palsy usually presents as isolated cranial nerve palsy in the middle aged and elderly patients with known risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, carotid artery disease, etc., In this report, we describe four patients with isolated abducens nerve palsy who presented with an acute onset diplopia whose detailed history and examination were suggestive of an ischemic etiology. Detailed systemic and laboratory evaluation revealed hyperhomocysteinemia as the only potential risk factor. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of association of hyperhomocysteinemia and isolated abducens nerve palsy.

  2. Multiple myeloma presenting with unilateral abducens and trigeminal nerve palsies.

    Thiruvengadam, Sushrut S; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Petrous apex masses can manifest with neurologic symptoms due to their involvement of various structures, including cranial nerves (CN) V and VI. The differential diagnosis of petrous masses is broad and includes a variety of both non-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions. We report a rare case of multiple myeloma confined to the right petrous apex, presenting with ipsilateral abducens and trigeminal nerve palsies. A 63-year-old woman presented with a 6-8 week history of facial numbness and a 2 week history of diplopia, with examination showing right-sided facial hypoesthesia in the CN V1-V3 region and right-sided lateral rectus palsy. MRI of the brain showed a solitary 2.0 cm lesion confined to the right petrous apex involving the right cavernous internal carotid artery and Meckel's cave. A transnasal biopsy showed a proliferation of plasmacytoid cells, which showed diffuse immunoreactivity with antibodies to CD138 and kappa, consistent with a plasma cell dyscrasia. A bone scan subsequently revealed multiple lytic bone lesions involving the skull, left humerus, bilateral femurs and possibly the L4 vertebral body. Bone marrow biopsy and serum laboratory results confirmed the diagnosis of kappa-type multiple myeloma. Although rare, multiple myeloma may initially present with petrous involvement and associated cranial nerve deficits. PMID:26602603

  3. ABDUCENS NERVE PALSY AND THROMBOSIS OF THE CEREBRAL VEINS AND SINUSES - A DIAGNOSTIC PITFALL

    Alexandra J. Tzoukeva; Ara G. Kaprelyan; Valeria Kaleva; Chavdar Bachvarov; Radoslav Georgiev; Elina Peteva

    2012-01-01

    Thrombosis of the cerebral veins and sinuses is an infrequent cerebrovascular disorder. Because the highly variable symptoms, recent neuroimaging plays a key role in the diagnosis. Abducens nerve palsy as a focal neurological deficit is a rare clinical manifestation in these patients. We present two cases with sudden onset of diplopia and headache. Case 1: A 3-year old girl with B cell lymphoblastic leukemia developed bilateral abducens deficit and bilateral optic disc edema after treatment i...

  4. Abducens nerve palsy as a postoperative complication of minimally invasive thoracic spine surgery: a case report

    Sandon, Luiz Henrique Dias; Choi, Gun; Park, EunSoo; Lee, Hyung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background Thoracic disc surgeries make up only a small number of all spine surgeries performed, but they can have a considerable number of postoperative complications. Numerous approaches have been developed and studied in an attempt to reduce the morbidity associated with the procedure; however, we still encounter cases that develop serious and unexpected outcomes. Case Presentation This case report presents a patient with abducens nerve palsy after minimally invasive surgery for thoracic d...

  5. Paralytic squint due to abducens nerve palsy : a rare consequence of dengue fever

    Shivanthan Mitrakrishnan C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue fever is an endemic illness in the tropics with early and post infectious complications affecting multiple systems. Though neurological sequelae including mononeuropathy, encephalopathy, transverse myelitis, polyradiculopathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome , optic neuropathy and oculomotor neuropathy have been reported in medical literature, the abducens nerve despite its notoriety in cranial neuropathies in a multitude of condition due to its long intracranial course had not been to date reported to manifest with lateral rectus paralysis following dengue. Case presentation A previously well 29 year old male with serologically confirmed dengue hemorrhagic fever developed symptomatic right lateral rectus palsy during the critical phase of the illness, which persisted into convalescence and post convalescence with proven deficit on Hess screen. Alternate etiologies were excluded by imaging, serology and electrophysiology. Conclusions The authors detail the first reported case of abducens nerve palsy complicating dengue fever in a previously healthy male from Sri Lanka. In a tropical country with endemic dengue infections, dengue related abducens neuropathy may be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of acquired lateral rectus palsy after dengue fever.

  6. ABDUCENS NERVE PALSY AND THROMBOSIS OF THE CEREBRAL VEINS AND SINUSES - A DIAGNOSTIC PITFALL

    Alexandra J. Tzoukeva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis of the cerebral veins and sinuses is an infrequent cerebrovascular disorder. Because the highly variable symptoms, recent neuroimaging plays a key role in the diagnosis. Abducens nerve palsy as a focal neurological deficit is a rare clinical manifestation in these patients. We present two cases with sudden onset of diplopia and headache. Case 1: A 3-year old girl with B cell lymphoblastic leukemia developed bilateral abducens deficit and bilateral optic disc edema after treatment including L-asparaginase. Thrombosis of the right jugular vein, sagittal and right sigmoid sinuses was visualized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance venography (MRV. Symptoms gradually resolved after treatment with enoxiparine and MRV demonstrated recanalization.Case 2: A 75-year old female with medical history of arterial hypertension presented with headache and sudden left abduction deficit. Computerized tomography (CT scan was normal. MRI and MRV revealed aging brain and disruption of venous flow at the left internal jugular vein, suspecting thrombosis. Extracranial colour duplex sonography and CT angiography proved haemodinamic equivalent of left internal jugular vein thrombosis due to sclerotic pathology of aortic arch.Our first case illustrates the role of improved neuroimaging techniques as the best method for diagnosis of cerebral veins and sinuses thrombosis, presenting with abducens nerve palsy. With second case the potential neuroimaging pitfalls concerning the accurate diagnosis of these cerebrovascular disorders with neuro-ophthalmologic manifestation are discussed.

  7. Bilateral Abducens Nerve Palsy due to Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension as an Initial Manifestation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Katsuyama, Eri; Sada, Ken-Ei; Tatebe, Noriko; Watanabe, Haruki; Katsuyama, Takayuki; Narazaki, Mariko; Sugiyama, Koichi; Watanabe, Katsue S; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Tomoko; Wada, Jun; Makino, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a syndrome of increased intracranial pressure and presents as an intractable headache, vomiting, and ophthalmologic manifestations. We herein report the case of a young girl who presented with bilateral abducens nerve palsy due to IIH as the onset of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The patient was successfully treated with corticosteroid therapy. Our case lacked the typical symptoms of IIH, such as headache or nausea; therefore, it is necessary to carefully determine the cause of bilateral abducens nerve palsies. The development of IIH in SLE patients is a rare occurrence, but this manifestation should not be overlooked. PMID:27086818

  8. A Rare Neurological Involvement in Sjogrens Syndrome: Abducens Nerve Palsy

    Yunus Ugan

    2014-01-01

    Sjogren%u2019s syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of exocrine organs. Although neurological involvement occurs in approximately one quarter of patients, involvement of cranial nerves is a relatively rare occurrence. Here a rare case of cranial neuropathy related to SS is reported.

  9. A Rare Neurological Involvement in Sjogrens Syndrome: Abducens Nerve Palsy

    Yunus Ugan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren%u2019s syndrome (SS is an autoimmune disorder characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of exocrine organs. Although neurological involvement occurs in approximately one quarter of patients, involvement of cranial nerves is a relatively rare occurrence. Here a rare case of cranial neuropathy related to SS is reported.

  10. The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy - Sankara Nethralaya Abducens Palsy Study (SNAPS: Report 1

    Akshay Gopinathan Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to assess the etiology of sixth nerve palsy and on the basis of our data, to formulate a diagnostic algorithm for the management in sixth nerve palsy. Design: Retrospective chart review. Results: Of the 104 neurologically isolated cases, 9 cases were attributable to trauma, and 95 (86.36% cases were classified as nontraumatic, neurologically isolated cases. Of the 95 nontraumatic, isolated cases of sixth nerve palsy, 52 cases were associated with vasculopathic risk factors, namely diabetes and hypertension and were classified as vasculopathic sixth nerve palsy (54.7%, and those with a history of sixth nerve palsy from birth (6 cases were classified as congenital sixth nerve palsy (6.3%. Of the rest, neuroimaging alone yielded a cause in 18 of the 37 cases (48.64%. Of the other 19 cases where neuroimaging did not yield a cause, 6 cases were attributed to preceding history of infection (3 upper respiratory tract infection and 3 viral illnesses, 2 cases of sixth nerve palsy were found to be a false localizing sign in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 11 cases, the cause was undetermined. In these idiopathic cases of isolated sixth nerve palsy, neuroimaging yielded no positive findings. Conclusions: In the absence of risk factors, a suggestive history, or positive laboratory and clinical findings, neuroimaging can serve as a useful diagnostic tool in identifying the exact cause of sixth nerve palsy. Furthermore, we recommend an algorithm to assess the need for neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy.

  11. Conjugate Gaze Palsies

    ... Nerve) Palsy Sixth Cranial Nerve (Abducens Nerve) Palsy Trigeminal Neuralgia Bell Palsy Hemifacial Spasm Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia Hypoglossal Nerve ... Nerve) Palsy Sixth Cranial Nerve (Abducens Nerve) Palsy Trigeminal Neuralgia Bell Palsy Hemifacial Spasm Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia Hypoglossal Nerve ...

  12. Microsurgical anatomy of the abducens nerve.

    Joo, Wonil; Yoshioka, Fumitaka; Funaki, Takeshi; Rhoton, Albert L

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate and review the detailed microsurgical anatomy of the abducens nerve and surrounding structures along its entire course and to provide its topographic measurements. Ten cadaveric heads were examined using ×3 to ×40 magnification after the arteries and veins were injected with colored silicone. Both sides of each cadaveric head were dissected using different skull base approaches to demonstrate the entire course of the abducens nerve from the pontomedullary sulcus to the lateral rectus muscle. The anatomy of the petroclival area and the cavernous sinus through which the abducens nerve passes are complex due to the high density of critically important neural and vascular structures. The abducens nerve has angulations and fixation points along its course that put the nerve at risk in many clinical situations. From a surgical viewpoint, the petrous tubercle of the petrous apex is an intraoperative landmark to avoid damage to the abducens nerve. The abducens nerve is quite different from the other nerves. No other cranial nerve has a long intradural path with angulations and fixations such as the abducens nerve in petroclival venous confluence. A precise knowledge of the relationship between the abducens nerve and surrounding structures has allowed neurosurgeon to approach the clivus, petroclival area, cavernous sinus, and superior orbital fissure without surgical complications. PMID:22334502

  13. An Infant with Benign Isolated Abducens Palsy After Vaccination

    Celebi Kocaoglu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Benign isolated abducens palsy is a self-improving clinical entity characterized by esotropia and diplopia led by the deficiency of abduction, and accompanied by no other neurological findings. The entity may occur after experiencing minor fever episodes, viral infection. The pathophysiological mechanism of cellular injury remains unclear. Hypotheses involve damage arising from autoimmune mediation or direct viral invasion causing demyelination, localized arteritis or genetic predisposition, which could increase susceptibility to such nerve palsies. Diagnosed with benign isolated abducens palsy, a 19-month-old girl infant admitted to our outpatient clinic with an acute onset of esotropia in the right eye developing two weeks after the vaccination of diphtheria, acellular pertussis, tetanus, inactivated polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTPa-IP-Hib was presented in this report.

  14. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Aug. 02, 2012 Microvascular cranial nerve palsy ( ...

  15. Detailed magnetic resonance imaging of abducens nerve by 3D-CISS

    Although abducens nerve palsy is a relatively common disease, the abducens nerve has been almost impossible to identify, because it is one of the finest cranial nerves and runs three-dimensionally in the prepontine cistern. Three-dimensional constructive interference in steady state (3D-CISS) is helpful in visualizing fine structural elements in the central nervous system because of its higher spatial resolution and fewer artifacts from cerebrospinal fluid. In this study, we successfully visualized the abducens nerve using 3D-CISS. The procedures were as follows: first, Dorello's canal and the ponto-medullary sulcus were identified as visible landmarks, and then the abducens nerve was followed to the root exit zone; second, the gray scale of the original image was inverted to clearly visualize the cisternal course of the nerve and the neighboring small vessels; and, finally, the entire cisternal course of the nerve was visualized in the same images in both oblique axial and oblique sagittal planes by a multi-planar reconstruction method. This reliable technique can be performed for the diagnosis of abducens nerve palsy. (author)

  16. A case misdiagnosed as bilateral abducens palsy

    A 66-year-old male was admitted to our neurosurgical floor because of double vision and gait disturbance. Neurological examinations revealed bilateral 6th nerve palsy with both eyes pointing toward the midline. Initially, using a tentative diagnosis of intracranial mass lesions, especially localized at the base of the skull, computerized tomography of the head, cerebral angiography, orbital venography, and metrizamide CT cisternography were performed; the findings were normal. An orbital CT scan showed an enlargement of the bilateral medial rectus muscles, and the thyroid functions of T3 and T4 and the T3 uptake were all elevated, which was compatible with the diagnosis of Graves' disease. The limitations of both eyeballs were considered to be due not to the 6th nerve palsy, but to the hypertrophy of the bilateral medial rectus muscles. We neurosurgeons should recall Graves' disease as well as intracranial lesions, cerebrovascular disease, and post-traumatic sequelae when examining a patient who presents limitations of external ocular movement. (author)

  17. 电针改善单纯外展神经麻痹性眼球运动障碍的临床分析%Clinical analysis of abducens nerve palsy treated by electroacupuncture

    马朝廷; 杨迎新; 马秋艳; 张丹丹; 赵彦萍; 李喜文

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To observe the clinical curative effect of electroacupuncture connecting Qiuhou ( EX-HN7) and Hegu( LI-4) for eyeball movement disorder caused by acquired simplex abducens nerve palsy. METHODS:Randomly we divided 48 cases(48 eyes) into treatment group(26 cases with 26 eyes) and control group (22 cases with 22 eyes), diagnosed with abducens nerve palsy from March 2012 to March 2015 at ophthalmology department of Beijing hospital of traditional Chinese medicine affiliated to Capital Medical University.Patients in treatment group were treated by electroacupuncture connecting Qiuhou ( EX-HN7) and Hegu ( LI-4), with body acupuncture and acupoints around eye. Control group took methylcobalamin (0.5mg,3 times per day) orally and subcutaneously injection of compound anisodine hydrobromide by the superficial temporal vein (2mL, once a day ) as the treatment. During the treatment, affected eyes of all the patients were covered. The course of treatments was 1mo.The improvement of eye movements was observed. RESULTS:The date of the two groups was comparable at baseline.After 1mo treatments, the eye movement of treatment group was significantly improved from 13.06±2.31mm pre-treatment to 19.35±3.21mm post-treatment, than that of the control group. The difference was statistically significant (t=-5.43, P<0.01).The effective rate of the treatment group was 88.5%, higher than that of the control group (63.6%).The difference was statistically significant (χ2=4.16, P=0.04). CONCLUSION: The electroacupuncture connecting Qiuhou(EX-HN7) and Hegu (LI-4)has certain effects on the treatment of eyeball movement disorder caused by simplex abduction paralysis.It is worth further clinical research.%AIM: To observe the clinical curative effect of electroacupuncture connecting Qiuhou ( EX -HN7 ) and Hegu(LI -4 ) for eyeball

  18. Recurrent isolated abducens nerve paresis associated with persistent trigeminal artery variant.

    Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Mamada, Naomi; Shiigai, Masanari; Shimizu, Kotone; Koganezawa, Tadachika; Tamaoka, Akira

    2012-01-01

    We report a 74-year-old woman who presented with recurrent isolated abducens nerve paresis. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the right abducens nerve was sandwiched between the right internal carotid artery and a persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) variant, which might have led to neurovascular compression of the abducens nerve, resulting in abducens nerve damage. Normal variants of PTA, which are cerebellar arteries originating from a precavernous portion of the internal carotid artery, must be carefully observed as such variants can potentially cause a neurovascular compression of the abducens nerve. PMID:22892506

  19. Motor palsies of cranial nerves (excluding VII) after vaccination: Reports to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System

    Woo, Emily Jane; Winiecki, Scott K.; Ou, Alan C

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed cranial nerve palsies, other than VII, that have been reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We examined patterns for differences in vaccine types, seriousness, age, and clinical characteristics. We identified 68 reports of cranial nerve palsies, most commonly involving the oculomotor (III), trochlear (IV), and abducens (VI) nerves. Isolated cranial nerve palsies, as well as palsies occurring as part of a broader clinical entity, were reported. Forty re...

  20. 影响颈内动脉海绵窦瘘患者发生展神经麻痹的相关因素分析%Risk Factor Analysis of Abducens Nerve Palsy Caused by Carotid Cavernous Fistula

    黄小山; 李志平

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨颈内动脉海绵窦瘘患者发生展神经麻痹的相关影响因素。方法回顾性分析神经外科收治的127例颈内动脉海绵窦瘘患者的临床资料。结果127例患者中展神经麻痹67例,展神经非麻痹患者60例。单因素分析显示:治疗前症状持续时长、瘘口血流量大、颈内盗血、合并颅底骨折或颅高压、经岩上、下引流,是颈内动脉海绵窦瘘患者发生展神经麻痹影响因素,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。多因素Logistic 回归分析显示:治疗前症状持续时长(OR=8.449,P<0.05)、瘘口血流量大(OR=6.862,P<0.05)、合并颅底骨折或颅高压(OR=19.375,P<0.05)、经岩上、下引流(OR=3.838,P<0.05)是导致颈内动脉海绵窦瘘患者发生展神经麻痹的独立危险因素。67例展神经麻痹患者中失访3例,展神经完全恢复59例,未完全恢复5例。恢复时间(82.14±12.23)d,85.84%的患者在6个月内恢复。结论治疗前症状持续时长、瘘口血流量大、合并颅底骨折或颅高压、经岩上、下引流是颈内动脉海绵窦瘘患者发生展神经麻痹重要影响因素。多数患者可在6个月内恢复。%Objective To explore the risk factors of abducens nerve palsy caused by carotid cavernous fistula(CCF).Methods The clinical data of 127 patients with CCF in the Department of Neurosurgery form January 2004 to August 2013 were analyzed retrospectively.The factors include gender, age, etiology, duration of symptoms before treatment, accompanying by skull fracture or cerebral edema, fistula side, blood flow of fistula, number of fistula, with or without steal phenomena and venous drainage, were analyzed with univariate analysis and multi-variate binary Logistic regression analysis.Observe the patient’ s prognosis.Results Totally 127 patients, the number of paralysis patients was 67 and non-paralytic patients was 60.The

  1. The cisternal segment of the abducens nerve in man: three-dimensional MR imaging

    Alkan, Alpay E-mail: aalkan@inonu.edu.tr; Sigirci, Ahmet; Ozveren, M. Faik; Kutlu, Ramazan; Altinok, Tayfun; Onal, Cagatay; Sarac, Kaya

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to identify the abducens nerve in its cisternal segment by using three-dimensional turbo spin echo T2-weighted image (3DT2-TSE). The abducens nerve may arise from the medullopontine sulcus by one singular or two separated rootlets. Material and methods: We studied 285 patients (150 males, 135 females, age range: 9-72 years, mean age: 33.3{+-}14.4) referred to MR imaging of the inner ear, internal auditory canal and brainstem. All 3D T2-TSE studies were performed with a 1.5 T MR system. Imaging parameters used for 3DT2-TSE sequence were TR:4000, TE:150, and 0.70 mm slice thickness. A field of view of 160 mm and 256x256 matrix were used. The double rootlets of the abducens nerve and contralateral abducens nerves and their relationships with anatomical structures were searched in the subarachnoid space. Results: We identified 540 of 570 abducens nerves (94.7%) in its complete cisternal course with certainty. Seventy-two cases (25.2%) in the present study had double rootlets of the abducens nerve. In 59 of these cases (34 on the right side and 25 on the left) presented with unilateral double rootlets of the abducens. Thirteen cases presented with bilateral double rootlets of the abducens (4.5%). Conclusion: An abducens nerve arising by two separate rootlets is not a rare variation. The detection of this anatomical variation by preoperative MR imaging is important to avoid partial damage of the nerve during surgical procedures. The 3DT2-TSE as a noninvasive technique makes it possible to obtain extremely high-quality images of microstructures as cranial nerves and surrounding vessels in the cerebellopontine cistern. Therefore, preoperative MR imaging should be performed to detect anatomical variations of abducens nerve and to reduce the chance of operative injuries.

  2. Multiple dental anomalies accompany unilateral disturbances in abducens and facial nerves: A case report

    Elham Talatahari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the oral rehabilitation of an 8-year-old girl with extensively affected primary and permanent dentition. This report is unique in which distinct dental anomalies including enamel hypoplasia, irregular dentin formation, taurodontism, hpodontia and dens in dente accompany unilateral disturbance of abducens and facial nerves which control the lateral eye movement, and facial expression, respectively. Keywords: enamel hypoplasia; irregular dentin formation; taurodontism; hypodontia; dens in dente; abducens and facial nerves;

  3. Abducens Palsy Due to Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in a Patient with Heart Failure

    Cem Özgönül; Osman Melih Ceylan; Fatih Mehmet Mutlu

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis has a wide spectrum of presentation. The clinical manifestation depends on the location of the thrombus, its rate of progression, and the extent of venous collateralization. In this case report, we present the findings of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis presenting with abducens palsy and papilloedema in a patient with heart failure, an unusual etiology for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 179-181)

  4. Cranial nerve palsies

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  5. Cranial nerve palsies in childhood

    Lyons, C J; Godoy, F; ALQahtani, E

    2015-01-01

    We review ocular motor cranial nerve palsies in childhood and highlight many of the features that differentiate these from their occurrence in adulthood. The clinical characteristics of cranial nerve palsies in childhood are affected by the child's impressive ability to repair and regenerate after injury. Thus, aberrant regeneration is very common after congenital III palsy; Duane syndrome, the result of early repair after congenital VI palsy, is invariably associated with retraction of the g...

  6. Risk factors analysis and follow-up of abducens nerve palsy caused by carotid cavernous fistula%颈内动脉海绵窦瘘致外展神经麻痹的影响因素分析及临床随访总结

    崔旭波; 汪求精; 高玉元; 郑涛; 柳亚启; 张炘; 段传志; 李铁林

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the risk factors of abducens nerve palsy caused by carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) and follow up their prognosis.Methods One hundred and thirty-nine patients with CCF,admitted to our hospital from January 2000 to August 2012,were chosen in our study and divided into paralysis group and non-paralytic group.The relevant factors,including gender,age,etiology,duration of symptoms before treatment,accompaying by skull fracture or cerebral edema,fistula side,blood flow of fistula,number of fistula,with or without steal phenomena and venous drainage,were retrospectively analyzed with univariate analysis and multivariate binary Logistic regression analysis.And prognosis of patients with abducens nerve palsy (non-paralytic group) were followed up through the outpatient,telephone,Internet and other means.Results In 139 patients,the number of paralysis patients was 67 and non-paralytic patients was 72.The duration of symptoms before treatment (P=0.001,R=4.073,95%CI:1.745-9.510),accompaying by skull fracture or cerebral edema (P=0.009,R=2.829,95%CI:1.294-6.185),blood flow of fistula (P=0.015,R=3.336,95%CI:1.261-8.823) and the inferior or superior petrosal sinus drainage (P=0.001,R=6.791,95%CI:2.129-21.660) were the four independent risk factors.In all,67 paralysis patients were followed; abducens nerve completely restored in 53 and seven did not fully recover.Recovery time lasted for 12-310 d with an average of 88.9 d; 45 patients got recovery within six months,accounting for 84.9%.Conclusion Abducens nerve palsy can be caused by many factors in CCF patients,and the inferior or superior petrosal sinus drainage is the primary risk factors; after CCF being cured,most patients with abducens nerve palsy can fully restore within six months with an average of three months.%目的 探讨颈内动脉海绵窦瘘致外展神经麻痹的影响因素,并对其预后进行临床随访总结. 方法 回顾性收集南方医科大学

  7. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy caused by cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula: Case report

    Cavernous dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF), which usually presents with conjunctival injection, proptosis, loss of visual acuity, and ophthalmoplegia, is a rare cause of ophthalmoplegia. Thus, it may be overlooked when the typical symptoms are lacking. There have been some cavernous DAVF case reports presenting with isolated oculomotor, abducens and trochlear nerve palsy. We report a patient presenting with isolated oculomotor palsy, caused by cavernous DAVF, which was treated by transvenous coil embolization. This case suggests that cavernous DAVF should be considered in the differential diagnosis of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy and for which case - selective angiography and embolization may be helpful in reaching a diagnosis and providing a guide for optimal treatment

  8. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy caused by cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula: Case report

    Ihn, Yon Kwon; Jung, Won Sang [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bum Soo [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Cavernous dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF), which usually presents with conjunctival injection, proptosis, loss of visual acuity, and ophthalmoplegia, is a rare cause of ophthalmoplegia. Thus, it may be overlooked when the typical symptoms are lacking. There have been some cavernous DAVF case reports presenting with isolated oculomotor, abducens and trochlear nerve palsy. We report a patient presenting with isolated oculomotor palsy, caused by cavernous DAVF, which was treated by transvenous coil embolization. This case suggests that cavernous DAVF should be considered in the differential diagnosis of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy and for which case - selective angiography and embolization may be helpful in reaching a diagnosis and providing a guide for optimal treatment.

  9. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement By Michael Rubin, MDCM NOTE: This is the ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  10. Cranial nerve palsies in childhood.

    Lyons, C J; Godoy, F; ALQahtani, E

    2015-02-01

    We review ocular motor cranial nerve palsies in childhood and highlight many of the features that differentiate these from their occurrence in adulthood. The clinical characteristics of cranial nerve palsies in childhood are affected by the child's impressive ability to repair and regenerate after injury. Thus, aberrant regeneration is very common after congenital III palsy; Duane syndrome, the result of early repair after congenital VI palsy, is invariably associated with retraction of the globe in adduction related to the innervation of the lateral rectus by the III nerve causing co-contraction in adduction. Clinical features that may be of concern in adulthood may not be relevant in childhood; whereas the presence of mydriasis in III palsy suggests a compressive aetiology in adults, this is not the case in children. However, the frequency of associated CNS abnormalities in III palsy and the risk of tumour in VI palsy can be indications for early neuroimaging depending on presenting features elicited through a careful history and clinical examination. The latter should include the neighbouring cranial nerves. We discuss the impact of our evolving knowledge of congenital cranial dysinnervation syndromes on this field. PMID:25572578

  11. Intrinsic properties guide proximal abducens and oculomotor nerve outgrowth in avian embryos.

    Lance-Jones, Cynthia; Shah, Veeral; Noden, Drew M; Sours, Emily

    2012-02-01

    Proper movement of the vertebrate eye requires the formation of precisely patterned axonal connections linking cranial somatic motoneurons, located at defined positions in the ventral midbrain and hindbrain, with extraocular muscles. The aim of this research was to assess the relative contributions of intrinsic, population-specific properties and extrinsic, outgrowth site-specific cues during the early stages of abducens and oculomotor nerve development in avian embryos. This was accomplished by surgically transposing midbrain and caudal hindbrain segments, which had been pre-labeled by electroporation with an EGFP construct. Graft-derived EGFP+ oculomotor axons entering a hindbrain microenvironment often mimicked an abducens initial pathway and coursed cranially. Similarly, some EGFP+ abducens axons entering a midbrain microenvironment mimicked an oculomotor initial pathway and coursed ventrally. Many but not all of these axons subsequently projected to extraocular muscles that they would not normally innervate. Strikingly, EGFP+ axons also took initial paths atypical for their new location. Upon exiting from a hindbrain position, most EGFP+ oculomotor axons actually coursed ventrally and joined host branchiomotor nerves, whose neurons share molecular features with oculomotor neurons. Similarly, upon exiting from a midbrain position, some EGFP+ abducens axons turned caudally, elongated parallel to the brainstem, and contacted the lateral rectus muscle, their originally correct target. These data reveal an interplay between intrinsic properties that are unique to oculomotor and abducens populations and shared ability to recognize and respond to extrinsic directional cues. The former play a prominent role in initial pathway choices, whereas the latter appear more instructive during subsequent directional choices. PMID:21739615

  12. Isolated trochlear nerve palsy with midbrain hemorrhage

    Raghavendra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain hemorrhage causing isolated fourth nerve palsy is extremely rare. Idiopathic, traumatic and congenital abnormalities are the most common causes of fourth nerve palsy. We report acute isolated fourth nerve palsy in an 18-year-old lady due to a midbrain hemorrhage probably due to a midbrain cavernoma. The case highlights the need for neuroimaging in selected cases of isolated trochlear nerve palsy.

  13. Intrinsic Properties Guide Proximal Abducens and Oculomotor Nerve Outgrowth in Avian Embryos

    Lance-Jones, Cynthia; Shah, Veeral; Noden, Drew M; Sours, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Proper movement of the vertebrate eye requires the formation of precisely patterned axonal connections linking cranial somatic motoneurons, located at defined positions in the ventral midbrain and hindbrain, with extraocular muscles. The aim of this research was to assess the relative contributions of intrinsic, population-specific properties and extrinsic, outgrowth site-specific cues during the early stages of abducens and oculomotor nerve development in avian embryos. This was accomplished...

  14. An unusual variant of the abducens nerve duplication with two nerve trunks merging within the orbit: a case report with comments on developmental background.

    Wysiadecki, Grzegorz; Polguj, Michał; Topol, Mirosław

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the first case of abducens nerve duplication along its entire intracranial course, ending within the orbit. A distinct abducens nerve duplication reaching the common tendinous ring (annulus of Zinn), as well as another split within the intraconal segment of the nerve have been revealed. Additionally, two groups (superior and inferior) of abducens nerve sub-branches to the lateral rectus muscle were visualised using Sihler's stain. The analysed anatomical variation has never been reported before and it seems to be in the middle of the spectrum between the cases of duplication occurring only within the intracranial segments of the abducens nerve found in the literature and those continuing throughout the whole course of the nerve. Abducens nerve duplication may be treated as a relic of early stages of ontogenesis. Such a variant might result from alternative developmental pathways in which axons of the abducens nerve, specific for a given segment of the lateral rectus muscle, run separately at some stage, instead of forming a single stem. PMID:26501961

  15. Isolated cranial nerve palsies in multiple sclerosis

    Zadro, Ivana; Barun, Barbara; Habek, Mario; Brinar, Vesna V.

    1997-01-01

    During a 10 year period 24 patients with definite multiple sclerosis with isolated cranial nerve palsies were studied (third and fourth nerve: one patient each, sixth nerve: 12 patients, seventh nerve: three patients, eighth nerve: seven patients), in whom cranial nerve palsies were the presenting sign in 14 and the only clinical sign of an exacerbation in 10 patients. MRI was carried out in 20 patients and substantiated corresponding brainstem lesions in seven patients (...

  16. Multiple nerve palsies in beta thalassaemia major.

    Lamabadusuriya, S. P.

    1989-01-01

    A patient with beta thalassaemia major is described who developed a lower motor neurone facial nerve palsy on the left side, together with a phrenic nerve palsy on the same side, during the course of the illness. This complication has not been reported before in haemoglobinopathies.

  17. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy: hypoglossal nerve and vocal cord palsies

    Cranial nerve palsies are an unexpected complication of radiotherapy for head and neck tumours. We present a case of this radiation-induced cranial palsy. An 18-year-old female with nasopharyngeal carcinoma developed a right hypoglossal nerve palsy 42 months after cancericidal doses of radiotherapy. In addition, she developed a bilateral vocal cord palsy 62 months after the therapy. Follow-up over four years has demonstrated no evidence of tumour recurrence and no sign of neurological improvement. (author)

  18. Case misdiagnosed as bilateral abducens palsy. Importance of orbital CT scan in Graves' ophthalmopathy

    Takeda, Naoya; Kuwamura, Keiichi; Shirataki, Kunio; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-02-01

    A 66-year-old male was admitted to our neurosurgical floor because of double vision and gait disturbance. Neurological examinations revealed bilateral 6th nerve palsy with both eyes pointing toward the midline. Initially, using a tentative diagnosis of intracranial mass lesions, especially localized at the base of the skull, computerized tomography of the head, cerebral angiography, orbital venography, and metrizamide CT cisternography were performed; the findings were normal. An orbital CT scan showed an enlargement of the bilateral medial rectus muscles, and the thyroid functions of T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/ and the T/sub 3/ uptake were all elevated, which was compatible with the diagnosis of Graves' disease. The limitations of both eyeballs were considered to be due not to the 6th nerve palsy, but to the hypertrophy of the bilateral medial rectus muscles. We neurosurgeons should recall Graves' disease as well as intracranial lesions, cerebrovascular disease, and post-traumatic sequelae when examining a patient who presents limitations of external ocular movement.

  19. Surgical management of third nerve palsy

    Singh, Anupam; Bahuguna, Chirag; Nagpal, Ritu; Kumar, Barun

    2016-01-01

    Third nerve paralysis has been known to be associated with a wide spectrum of presentation and other associated factors such as the presence of ptosis, pupillary involvement, amblyopia, aberrant regeneration, poor bell's phenomenon, superior oblique (SO) overaction, and lateral rectus (LR) contracture. Correction of strabismus due to third nerve palsy can be complex as four out of the six extraocular muscles are involved and therefore should be approached differently. Third nerve palsy can be congenital or acquired. The common causes of isolated third nerve palsy in children are congenital (43%), trauma (20%), inflammation (13%), aneurysm (7%), and ophthalmoplegic migraine. Whereas, in adult population, common etiologies are vasculopathic disorders (diabetes mellitus, hypertension), aneurysm, and trauma. Treatment can be both nonsurgical and surgical. As nonsurgical modalities are not of much help, surgery remains the main-stay of treatment. Surgical strategies are different for complete and partial third nerve palsy. Surgery for complete third nerve palsy may involve supra-maximal recession - resection of the recti. This may be combined with SO transposition and augmented by surgery on the other eye. For partial third nerve, palsy surgery is determined according to nature and extent of involvement of extraocular muscles. PMID:27433033

  20. Peripheral nerve involvement in Bell's palsy

    J. A. Bueri

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available A group of patients with Bell's palsy were studied in order to disclose the presence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. 20 patients, 8 male and 12 female, with recent Bell's palsy as their unique disease were examined, in all cases other causes of polyneuropathy were ruled out. Patients were investigated with CSF examination, facial nerve latencies in the affected and in the sound sides, and maximal motor nerve conduction velocities, as well as motor terminal latencies from the right median and peroneal nerves. CSF laboratory examination was normal in all cases. Facial nerve latencies were abnormal in all patients in the affected side, and they differed significantly from those of control group in the clinically sound side. Half of the patients showed abnormal values in the maximal motor nerve conduction velocities and motor terminal latencies of the right median and peroneal nerves. These results agree with previous reports which have pointed out that other cranial nerves may be affected in Bell's palsy. However, we have found a higher frequency of peripheral nerve involvement in this entity. These findings, support the hypothesis that in some patients Bell's palsy is the component of a more widespread disease, affecting other cranial and peripheral nerves.

  1. Inflammatory peripheral facial nerve palsy. An overview

    In inflammatory peripheral facial nerve palsy pathologically intense, linear and smooth enhancement of the distal intrameatal nerve segment can always be observed on T1-w- SE- MR sequences. The other nerve segments often present with a pathological enhancement as well. On T2-w- SE sequences, a thickening of the distal intrameatal nerve segment can be observed. The pathological enhancement persists over weeks and months; even in patients with complete clinical recovery, a persistent enhancement of the distal intrameatal nerve segment can be demonstrated. No correlation can be established between the intensity of the enhancement, the clinical condition and the electrophysiological data on electroneurography. The persistent enhancement of the different nerve segments is due to a longlasting breakdown of the blood-peripheral nerve-barrier related to the process of degeneration and regeneration of the facial nerve in inflammatory palsy. (orig.)

  2. Paralytic squint in dengue fever- a report of three cases: Further reports of a rare, once before reported phenomenon of abducens palsy in dengue

    Mitrakrishnan Shivanthan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With dengue becoming endemic, more complications are being recognized including a variety of neurological complications such as mononeuropathies. Abducens palsy causing paralytic squint has been reported only once previously in medical literature. Demyelinating infective and immune-mediated mechanisms are believed to be the pathogenesis behind mononeuropathies. Neither an effective vaccine against dengue nor proven treatment for dengue neuropathy is currently available. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism and develop effective treatment for dengue neuropathy.

  3. Paralytic squint in dengue fever- a report of three cases: Further reports of a rare, once before reported phenomenon of abducens palsy in dengue

    Mitrakrishnan Shivanthan

    2013-01-01

    With dengue becoming endemic, more complications are being recognized including a variety of neurological complications such as mononeuropathies. Abducens palsy causing paralytic squint has been reported only once previously in medical literature. Demyelinating infective and immune-mediated mechanisms are believed to be the pathogenesis behind mononeuropathies. Neither an effective vaccine against dengue nor proven treatment for dengue neuropathy is currently available. Further studies are ne...

  4. Peroneal nerve palsy caused by intraneural ganglion

    A case of peroneal nerve palsy caused by an intraneural ganglion is presented. The cystic mass was located posterolateral to the lateral femoral condyle and extended along the common peroneal nerve distal to the origin of the peroneus longus muscle. The nerve was compressed in the narrow fibro-osseous tunnel against the fibula neck and the tight origin of the peroneus longus muscle. The nerve was decompressed by complete tumor excision and transection of the origin of the peroneus longus muscle. Full recovery of nerve function was obtained in 6 months. (orig.)

  5. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity. PMID:26319412

  6. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy

    Twenty-five patients with 35 cranial nerve palsies were seen at the Fondation Curie during follow-up after radical radiotherapy for head and neck tumors. The twelfth nerve was involved in 19 cases, the tenth in nine, and the eleventh in five; the fifth and second nerves were involved once each and in the same patient. The twelfth nerve was involved alone in 16 patients and the tenth nerve alone in three, with multiple nerves involved in the remaining six patients. The palsy was noted from 12 to 145 months after diagnosis of the tumor. The latency period could be correlated with dose so that the least square fit equation representing NSD vs delay is NSD = 2598--Delay (in months) x 4.6, with a correlation coefficient of -0.58. The distinction between tumor recurrence and radiation-induced nerve palsy is critical. It can often be inferred from the latency period but must be confirmed by observation over a period of time

  7. Facial nerve palsy after mandibular fracture.

    Weinberg, M J; Merx, P; Antonyshyn, O; Farb, R

    1995-05-01

    A 19-year-old man sustained a right parasymphyseal fracture and bilateral condylar neck fractures in a motor vehicle accident. The parasymphyseal fracture was treated by open reduction and internal fixation, and the subcondylar fractures were treated with closed reduction and maxillomandibular fixation. Three days postoperatively, a near-complete left facial nerve palsy developed. Facial nerve recovery was not full. The literature is reviewed, and possible mechanisms of this rare and devastating complication are discussed. PMID:7639495

  8. Prolactinoma presenting with intermittent third nerve palsy.

    Wykes, W N

    1986-01-01

    A patient presented with a painful third nerve palsy. This resolved spontaneously, but recurred several months later. At his second presentation carotid angiography gave normal results, but a high resolution CT scan showed a tumour in the right parasellar region. The serum prolactin was raised at over 22,000 millimicrons/, showing this to be a prolactinoma.

  9. Isolated unilateral idiopathic transient hypoglossal nerve palsy

    Ahmed, Syed Viqar; Akram, Muhammad Saqub

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old Caucasian man presented with sudden onset of difficulty in moving his tongue to the left with preceding left-sided headache with no neck pain. Earlier, he had self-limiting chest infection without rashes or tonsillar enlargement. His medical and surgical history was unremarkable with no recent trauma. Oral examination revealed difficulty in protruding his tongue to the left with muscle bulk loss and fasciculation on the same side, suggesting left hypoglossal nerve palsy. Examination of the rest of the cranial nerves and nervous system was normal. The patient's oropharyngeal and laryngeal examination was unremarkable with no cervical lymphadenopathy. He had normal laboratory investigations and cerebrospinal fluid examination. Extensive imaging of the head, neck and chest failed to reveal any pathology. Further review by an otorhinologist and rheumatologist ruled out any other underlying pathology. He made a good recovery without treatment. English literature search revealed very few cases of idiopathic, transient, unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy. PMID:24969070

  10. Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus With Oculomotor Nerve Palsy

    Viroj WIWANITKIT

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Editor, I read the recent publication on a case of herpes zoster ophthalmicus with oculomotor nerve palsy by Yildiz et al with a great interest(4. As Yildiz et al noted, this is a rare neurological complication of herpes zoster(4. Haargaard et al proposed that “Central nervous system involvement after varicella zoster virus infection is an uncommon, but potentially life-threatening, complication. (2” This complication is usually acute(1 and the early antiviral treatment is not proved useful on the prevention(3. There is still no present recommended effective mean for prevention and treatment of this condition. Further research to assess the pathogenesis and natural history of oculomotor nerve palsy in herpes zoster ophthalmicus is recommended.

  11. NEONATAL NERVE PALSIES: A CONTEMPORARY OBSTETRIC PERSPECTIVE

    Daren J. Roberts

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:Birth trauma and its often incorrect inference of iatrogenic causation has led to unfortunate implications for the affected child, the parents, the obstetrician and the midwife due to unwarranted medico-legal attention in our current litigious society.A more discerning evaluation of neonatal nerve palsies following labour and delivery has led to a better understanding of their aetiology with potentially more appropriate outcomes for all parties involved.

  12. Dynamic aspects of trochlear nerve palsy

    Straumann, D.; Bockisch, C J; Weber, K P.

    2008-01-01

    Trochlear nerve palsy leads to kinematic aberrations of both the paretic and the unaffected eye. During dynamic head roll, the rotation axis of the covered paretic or unaffected eye deviates inward, while the rotation axis of the viewing paretic or unaffected eye aligns with the line of sight; this convergence of rotation axes increases with gaze moving in the direction of the unaffected eye. During downward saccades, the trajectories of both eyes curve towards the unaffected side; these curv...

  13. Non-traumatic peroneal nerve palsy: MRI findings

    Aim: To present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of non-traumatic peroneal nerve palsy and to evaluate the usefulness of MRI in patients with non-traumatic peroneal nerve palsy. Materials and methods: In a retrospective study, 11 consecutive patients presenting with peroneal nerve palsy were included. MR images of the lower leg and electrophysiological examinations were also reviewed. The cause of peroneal nerve palsy was determined on the basis of MRI findings and was evaluated using electrophysiological data. Nine patients with causative lesions detected on MRI, underwent surgery. Results: Clinical examination and electromyography (EMG) disclosed 11 peroneal lesions. MRI and EMG revealed three types of signal intensity change, i.e. deep peroneal nerve palsy type, common peroneal nerve palsy type, and superficial peroneal nerve palsy type. The MRI and EMG findings were in agreement in seven (65%) of the 11 study patients. In nine patients the causative lesions were identified using MRI, including ganglion cyst (n = 6), osteochondroma (n = 1), synovial cyst (n = 1), and aneurysm (n = 1). Conclusion: Ganglion cyst is the most common cause of non-traumatic peroneal nerve palsy. MRI offers a noninvasive method for obtaining useful information to assess, localize, and monitor peripheral peroneal nerve palsy

  14. Non-traumatic peroneal nerve palsy: MRI findings

    Kim, J.Y. [Departments of Radiology St Vincent' s Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, Paldal-gu, Suwon city, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Ihn, Y.K. [Departments of Radiology St Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Paldal-gu, Suwon city, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: Ihn@catholic.ac.kr; Kim, J.S. [Department of Rehabilitation medicine, St Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Paldal-gu, Suwon city, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chun, K.A. [Department of Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Geumo-dong, Uijeongbu city, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Sung, M.S. [Department of Radiology, Holy Family Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Sosa-dong, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon city, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Cho, K.H. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam Univ. Medical Center, Nam-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Aim: To present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of non-traumatic peroneal nerve palsy and to evaluate the usefulness of MRI in patients with non-traumatic peroneal nerve palsy. Materials and methods: In a retrospective study, 11 consecutive patients presenting with peroneal nerve palsy were included. MR images of the lower leg and electrophysiological examinations were also reviewed. The cause of peroneal nerve palsy was determined on the basis of MRI findings and was evaluated using electrophysiological data. Nine patients with causative lesions detected on MRI, underwent surgery. Results: Clinical examination and electromyography (EMG) disclosed 11 peroneal lesions. MRI and EMG revealed three types of signal intensity change, i.e. deep peroneal nerve palsy type, common peroneal nerve palsy type, and superficial peroneal nerve palsy type. The MRI and EMG findings were in agreement in seven (65%) of the 11 study patients. In nine patients the causative lesions were identified using MRI, including ganglion cyst (n = 6), osteochondroma (n = 1), synovial cyst (n = 1), and aneurysm (n = 1). Conclusion: Ganglion cyst is the most common cause of non-traumatic peroneal nerve palsy. MRI offers a noninvasive method for obtaining useful information to assess, localize, and monitor peripheral peroneal nerve palsy.

  15. Skull Base Allergic Fungal Sinusitis with Abducens Palsy in the Third Trimester

    Rassekh, Christopher H.; Kinsella, John B.; Calhoun, Karen H.; Maggio, William W.; Chaljub, Gregory; Gourley, William K.

    1996-01-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) usually follows a slow course, but bone erosion including that of the skull base can be seen. Patients may present with intracranial extension mimicking a cranial base neoplasm. We describe a 21-year-old pregnant female initially seen at 27 weeks gestation with a complete right sixth nerve paralysis. MR imaging showed an apparent nasopharyngeal neoplasm invading both temporal lobes. Further evaluation revealed typical findings of fungal sinusitis on both CT and...

  16. Ocular motor nerve palsy: A clinical and etiological study

    Mwanza Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To clinically describe cases of ocular motor nerve palsy and to determine the possible causes. Materials and Methods: Thirty-one consecutive patients with ocular motor nerve palsies were investigated. All underwent complete ophthalmological, as well as neurological, otorhinolaryngological and general examination. Computerised tomography (CT-scan of the brain and complementary laboratory tests were obtained from each participant. Results: Paralysis of the sixth (38.4% and the third (35.3% cranial nerve were the most common. The Lees screen test was found to be very sensitive, confirming the diagnosis of ocular motor nerve palsy, even in cases with minimal manifestations. Complete ptosis and full mydriasis were mostly seen in isolated cases of the third cranial nerve palsy. The majority of eyes (63.2% with third cranial nerve palsy had pupil sparing. Overall, an etiological diagnosis was made in 93.5% of cases. The common causes were vascular conditions (25.8%, otorhinolaryngologic diseases (19.7% and trauma (12.9%. CT scan failed to reveal any abnormality in 54.8% of cases. Conclusion: Patients with ocular motor nerve palsy should be carefully examined in close collaboration with other specialists, especially where sophisticated, complementary investigations are impossible.

  17. Intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma leads to sciatic nerve palsy

    Ichikawa Jiro; Matsumoto Seiichi; Shimoji Takashi; Tanizawa Taisuke; Gokita Tabu; Hayakawa Keiko; Aoki Kaoru; Ina Saori; Kanda Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Soft tissue metastases, in particular intraneural metastasis, from any carcinomas seldom occur. To our knowledge, no case of sciatic nerve palsy due to intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma is reported in the literature. Case presentation A case is reported of a 82-year old woman with sciatic nerve palsy with intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma. Although she had undergone partial gastrectomy with T2b, N0, M0 two years ago and primary site was cured, she devel...

  18. Intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma leads to sciatic nerve palsy

    Soft tissue metastases, in particular intraneural metastasis, from any carcinomas seldom occur. To our knowledge, no case of sciatic nerve palsy due to intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma is reported in the literature. A case is reported of a 82-year old woman with sciatic nerve palsy with intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma. Although she had undergone partial gastrectomy with T2b, N0, M0 two years ago and primary site was cured, she developed sciatic nerve palsy from the carcinoma metastasis directly to the nerve. Operative resection and Histological examination revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, the same as her primary site adenocarcinoma. Sciatica is usually caused by a herniated disc or spinal canal stenosis. Sciatic nerve palsy may be caused by nondiscogenic etiologies that may be either intrapelvic or extrapelvic. It is important to image the entire course of the nerve to distinguish these etiologies quickly. The longer the nerve compression the less likely a palsy will recover. Surgery is a good intervention that simultaneously obtains a tissue diagnosis and decompresses the nerve

  19. Intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma leads to sciatic nerve palsy

    Ichikawa Jiro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soft tissue metastases, in particular intraneural metastasis, from any carcinomas seldom occur. To our knowledge, no case of sciatic nerve palsy due to intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma is reported in the literature. Case presentation A case is reported of a 82-year old woman with sciatic nerve palsy with intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma. Although she had undergone partial gastrectomy with T2b, N0, M0 two years ago and primary site was cured, she developed sciatic nerve palsy from the carcinoma metastasis directly to the nerve. Operative resection and Histological examination revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, the same as her primary site adenocarcinoma. Conclusions Sciatica is usually caused by a herniated disc or spinal canal stenosis. Sciatic nerve palsy may be caused by nondiscogenic etiologies that may be either intrapelvic or extrapelvic. It is important to image the entire course of the nerve to distinguish these etiologies quickly. The longer the nerve compression the less likely a palsy will recover. Surgery is a good intervention that simultaneously obtains a tissue diagnosis and decompresses the nerve.

  20. Legionnaires' Disease with Facial Nerve Palsy

    Basani, Shailesh R.; Ahmed, Salwa Mohamed; Habte-Gabr, Eyassu

    2011-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is primarily a pneumonic process caused by Legionella pneumophilia, a gram-negative aerobic bacillus but also has multiple system involvement. The most common manifestation is encephalopathy suggesting a generalized brain dysfunction but focal neurological manifestations have been reported. We report a patient with Legionella pneumonia associated with cerebellar dysfunction and unilateral facial nerve weakness. 51-year-old previously healthy male presented with shortness of breath, cough, slurred speech, and unsteadiness on feet associated with malaise, fevers and myalgias. Patient's family reported facial asymmetry for 2 days. Patient had no significant medical history and was not on any medication. He denied smoking, alcohol or illicit drug use. Chest X-ray showed bilateral lower lobe infiltrates. Urinary antigen assay for Legionella pneumophilia serogroup 1 was positive. Patient was started on intravenous moxifloxacin. On day 5 the patient was discharged home and continued oral moxifloxacin for two weeks. After the two weeks, his respiratory symptoms, gait ataxia and dysarthria resolved. We report the first case of Legionnaires' disease with cerebellar dysfunction and seventh nerve palsy. Legionnaires' disease should be considered in patients with any neurological symptoms in the setting of pneumonia. Failure to recognize and treat the infection may lead to poor outcomes. PMID:21461048

  1. Sciatic nerve palsy associated with total hip arthroplasty.

    Dhillon, M S; Nagi, O N

    1992-01-01

    Six cases of clinically evident sciatic or peroneal nerve palsy occurred in a consecutive series of 380 total hip arthroplasties (THA). An additional eight cases of peroneal nerve palsy due to pressure from Thomas splint or tight bandages were seen. Factors apparently causing nerve palsy were significant lateralization and lengthening in four cases and dislocation of the hip in one case. The cases with neuroapraxia of the peroneal nerve were seen from the third to the fifth day of Thomas splint immobilization. EMG studies were conducted in all six group 1 patients; at the end of one year the results were good in two cases, fair in three cases, and poor in one case. The results suggest that limb lengthening should be limited to 4 cm to minimize this complication. It was also seen that patients with peroneal nerve palsy due to local compression do well, though some are bothered by mild residual dysesthesia over the dorsum of the foot. In contrast, patients with sciatic nerve palsy do not have such a good outlook. PMID:1345646

  2. Correlates of degree of nerve involvement in early Bell's palsy

    Hsieh Ru-Lan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to evaluate the still unknown factors correlating with the degree of nerve involvement in early Bell's palsy. Methods This retrospective chart review study of newly diagnosed cases of Bell's palsy was conducted over a three-year period. Information on age, sex, day of onset, comorbidities, corticosteroid use, and electroneurographic test results were collected. The electroneurographic quotient (amplitude of compound muscle action potential on the affected side divided by that on the healthy side and expressed in percent was used as an index of nerve involvement, with lower quotient indicating more severe disease. Results Data were collected on 563 patients. The mean electroneurographic quotient varied inversely with age (p vs. 40.3%; p = 0.002. There was no correlation between the degree of nerve involvement and sex, season of onset, hypertension, or diabetes. Conclusion The degree of nerve involvement in early Bell's palsy correlates positively with age and negatively with corticosteroid use.

  3. Pontine stroke presenting as isolated facial nerve palsy mimicking Bell's palsy: a case report

    Saluja Paramveer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated facial nerve palsy usually manifests as Bell's palsy. Lacunar infarct involving the lower pons is a rare cause of solitary infranuclear facial paralysis. The present unusual case is one in which the patient appeared to have Bell's palsy but turned out to have a pontine infarct. Case presentation A 47-year-old Asian Indian man with a medical history of hypertension presented to our institution with nausea, vomiting, generalized weakness, facial droop, and slurred speech of 14 hours' duration. His physical examination revealed that he was conscious, lethargic, and had mildly slurred speech. His blood pressure was 216/142 mmHg. His neurologic examination showed that he had loss of left-sided forehead creases, inability to close his left eye, left facial muscle weakness, rightward deviation of the angle of the mouth on smiling, and loss of the left nasolabial fold. Afferent corneal reflexes were present bilaterally. MRI of the head was initially read as negative for acute stroke. Bell's palsy appeared less likely because of the acuity of his presentation, encephalopathy-like imaging, and hypertension. The MRI was re-evaluated with a neurologist's assistance, which revealed a tiny 4 mm infarct involving the left dorsal aspect of the pons. The final diagnosis was isolated facial nerve palsy due to lacunar infarct of dorsal pons and hypertensive encephalopathy. Conclusion The facial nerve has a predominant motor component which supplies all muscles concerned with unilateral facial expression. Anatomic knowledge is crucial for clinical localization. Bell's palsy accounts for around 72% of facial palsies. Other causes such as tumors and pontine infarcts can also present as facial palsy. Isolated dorsal infarct presenting as isolated facial palsy is very rare. Our case emphasizes that isolated facial palsy should not always be attributed to Bell's palsy. It can be a presentation of a rare dorsal pontine infarct as observed

  4. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy in interventional neuroradiology

    Lv Xianli; Jiang Chuhan; Li Youxiang; Yang Xinjian [Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 6, Tiantan Xili, Chongwen, Beijing, 100050 (China); Wu Zhongxue, E-mail: ttyyzjb@sina.co [Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 6, Tiantan Xili, Chongwen, Beijing, 100050 (China)

    2010-06-15

    Background: Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy (IOP) can be annoying for a patient and can also be the only clue to a potentially devastating and life-threatening disease. In order to understand its clinical spectrum and management better we analyzed the files of 13 patients seen at our institution over a 3-year period. Methods: Thirteen consecutive patients with IOP between January 2005 and August 2008 presented to our hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography were employed as investigations tailored to the individual patient. A vascular disorder [i.e. arteriovenous fistula, aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery (Pcoma)] was found in 7 patients (63%), most commonly a dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula (DCCF) or a Pcoma aneurysm. Results: In 7 patients with a vascular abnormality (4 DCCFs; 3 Pcoma aneurysms), IOP was the presenting symptom. Pcoma aneurysms were coiled endovascularly and DCCFs were managed transvenously. Of the patients with more than 1 year (6 months to 2 years) of follow-up, all 7 endovascular patients recovered completely. Time to complete resolution of ONP was 6 months. Conclusion: Patients with IOP should be investigated with noninvasive techniques (MRI and MRA). If these are negative or to clarify abnormal findings of noninvasive techniques, selective angiography is needed for diagnosis and to guide treatment.

  5. Hemiplegic peripheral neuropathy accompanied with multiple cranial nerve palsy

    Hirohisa Okuma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old man experienced double vision around January, 2010, followed by weakness of his left upper and lower extremities. Articulation disorders and loss of hearing in his left ear developed, and he was admitted to our hospital on February 14, 2010. Physical examination was normal, and neurological examination showed clear consciousness with no impairment of cognitive function, but with articulation disorders. Olfactory sensation was reduced. Left ptosis and left gaze palsy, complete left facial palsy, perceptive deafness of the left ear, and muscle weakness of the left trapezius muscle were observed. Paresis in the left upper and lower extremities was graded 4/5 through manual muscle testing. Sensory system evaluation revealed complete left-side palsy, including the face. Deep tendon reflexes were slightly diminished equally on both sides; no pathologic reflex was seen. No abnormality of the brain parenchyma, cerebral nerves or cervicothoracolumbar region was found on brain magnetic resonance imaging. On electroencephalogram, alpha waves in the main frequency band of 8 to 9 Hz were recorded, indicating normal findings. Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT scan showed reduced blood flow in the right inner frontal lobe and both occipital lobes. Nerve biopsy (left sural nerve showed reduction of nerve density by 30%, with demyelination. The patient also showed manifestations of multiple cranial nerve disorder, i.e., of the trigeminal nerve, glossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, and hypoglossal nerve. Whole-body examination was negative. Finally, based on ischemic brain SPECT images, spinal fluid findings and nerve biopsy results, peripheral neuropathy accompanied with multiple cranial nerve palsy was diagnosed.

  6. Causes of Secondary Radial Nerve Palsy and Results of Treatment.

    Reichert, Pawel; Wnukiewicz, Witold; Witkowski, Jarosław; Bocheńska, Aneta; Mizia, Sylwia; Gosk, Jerzy; Zimmer, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to analyze the causes that lead to secondary damage of the radial nerve and to discuss the results of reconstructive treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study group consisted of 33 patients treated for radial nerve palsy after humeral fractures. Patients were diagnosed based on clinical examinations, ultrasonography, electromyography, or nerve conduction velocity. During each operation, the location and type of nerve damage were analyzed. During the reconstructive treatment, neurolysis, direct neurorrhaphy, or reconstruction with a sural nerve graft was used. The outcomes were evaluated using the Medical Research Council (MRC) scales and the quick DASH score. RESULTS Secondary radial nerve palsy occurs after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) by plate, as well as by closed reduction and internal fixation (CRIF) by nail. In the case of ORIF, it most often occurs when the lateral approach is used, as in the case of CRIF with an insertion interlocking screws. The results of the surgical treatment were statistically significant and depended on the time between nerve injury and revision (reconstruction) surgery, type of damage to the radial nerve, surgery treatment, and type of fixation. Treatment results were not statistically significant, depending on the type of fracture or location of the nerve injury. CONCLUSIONS The potential risk of radial nerve neurotmesis justifies an operative intervention to treat neurological complications after a humeral fracture. Adequate surgical treatment in many of these cases allows for functional recovery of the radial nerve. PMID:26895570

  7. MR diagnosis and diagnosis of peripheral oculomotor nerve palsy

    Objective: To analyze the causes for peripheral oculomotor nerve palsy and improve the accuracy of MRI diagnosis. Methods: The MR findings of 85 cases with peripheral oculomotor nerve palsy were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The causes of peripheral oculomotor nerve palsy were aneutysms found in 26 cases, carotid cavernous fistulas in 8 cases, one Rathke cyst of pituitary gland, inflammation in 21 cases (including 2 fungi, 1 tuberculosis, 1 herpes zoster virus and 17 auto-immunity) and malignancy imbibition in 14 cases. Diagnosis unknown still happened in 10 cases as patients left hospital because lamellar enhanced scanning was not performed. MRA showed as clearly as DSA, cyst inside pituitary gland grew rightwards cavernous sinus, with unclear enhancement. The symptom improved after operation. The orbit thin lamina -MRI binding 3D contrast enhanced MRI in inflammation showed the orbital apex fascia and cavemous sinus thickening, abnormal enhancement in contrast enhanced scanning, vessel increase and nerver enhancement. The oculomotor nerve roots thickened and enhanced as nodules in malignancy imbibition. Conclusion: The causes of peripheral oculomotor nerve palsy were complex, MRI is useful to make the diagnosis after selection of proper protocol. (authors)

  8. Acute sixth nerve palsy in a young man, beware of the 'red herring'.

    O'Neill, E C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Cranial nerve palsies has several etiologies including vascular insufficiency, neoplasm, trauma and inflammation. Isolated sixth nerve palsy is an extremely rare presenting feature of leukemia. AIM: We describe an unusual ocular presentation of a bilateral progressive sixth nerve palsy in a young male with a preceding head injury. CONCLUSION: Acquired sixth nerve palsies in young adults may be due to trauma but in the absence of a definitive history other systemic processes must be outruled. We describe a case of bilateral sixth nerve palsy in a patient with ALL with no obvious CNS involvement. Potential etiological mechanisms are discussed.

  9. Hansen's disease and HIV coinfection with facial nerve palsy.

    Yadav, Nidhi; Kar, Sumit; Madke, Bhushan; Gangane, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of HIV leprosy co infection in India in spite of having a large burden of both leprosy and HIV. Herein we are reporting a case of co-infection of Hansen's disease and HIV with facial nerve palsy. PMID:25883486

  10. Bilateral median nerve palsy in a cyclist.

    Braithwaite, I J

    1992-01-01

    Cyclists are prone to a number of sport-related musculoskeletal injuries, mainly of the lower limb. Nerve compression injuries are relatively rare, though in the hand ulnar nerve compression is well described. We describe a case of bilateral median nerve compression caused by cycling.

  11. Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia

    ... Nerve) Palsy Sixth Cranial Nerve (Abducens Nerve) Palsy Trigeminal Neuralgia Bell Palsy Hemifacial Spasm Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia Hypoglossal Nerve ... Nerve) Palsy Sixth Cranial Nerve (Abducens Nerve) Palsy Trigeminal Neuralgia Bell Palsy Hemifacial Spasm Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia Hypoglossal Nerve ...

  12. Risk factors for recurrent nerve palsy after thyroid surgery

    Godballe, Christian; Madsen, Anders Rørbæk; Sørensen, Christian Hjort; Schytte, Sten; Trolle, Waldemar; Helweg-Larsen, Jens Peter; Barfoed, Lisa; Kristiansen, Larry; Sørensen, Vibeke Zederkof; Samuelsen, Grethe; Pedersen, Henrik Baymler

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is a well-known and serious complication to thyroid surgery. The objective was to estimate the frequency of post-thyroidectomy RLN palsy and to identify possible risk factors. Based on the Danish national thyroid surgery database, 6,859 patients treated with...... thyroid surgery from 1 January 2001 to the 31 December 2008 at the Danish departments of ENT-HNS were analyzed. Unilateral RLN palsy was found in 2.1 % and bilateral in 0.1 %. In benign histology, RLN palsies were registered in 1.3 %. Malignant histology and accordingly neck dissection were the most...... predominant risk factors with a relative risk (RR) of 5.4 and 5.8, respectively. In benign cases previous performed thyroid surgery had a RR of 10.4. High volume departments with more than 150 thyroid procedures per year seem to perform significantly better. Malignant histology, neck dissection and previous...

  13. Median Nerve Palsy Secondary To A Ganglion Cyst: A Case Report

    SERARSLAN, Yurdal; Doğramacı, Yunus; Kalacı, Aydıner; Yanat, Ahmet Nedim; Emir, Anıl

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of ganglion cyst inside the carpal tunnel presenting as median nerve palsy. We consider that the median nerve palsy in this case was due to direct nerve compression within the carpal tunnel caused by a ganglion cyst.

  14. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies

    Byju, N.; James Jose; Saifudheen, K; V Abdul Gafoor; P Jithendranath

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a well-recognized entity, but its clinical presentation is varied and often mimics many neurological disorders, making it a diagnostic challenge. Cerebral venous thrombosis has a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms, which may evolve suddenly or over weeks. It mimics many neurological conditions such as meningitis, encephalopathy, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and stroke. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies, ...

  15. Spontaneous Radial Nerve Palsy Subsequent to Non-Traumatic Neuroma

    Adel Ebrahimpour; Shahram Nazerani; Reza Tavakoli Darestani; Salim Khani

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Spontaneous radial palsy is a not rare finding in hand clinics. The anatomy of the radial nerve renders it prone to pressure paralysis as often called “Saturday night palsy”. This problem is a transient nerve lesion and an acute one but the case presented here is very unusual in that it seems this entity can also occur as an acute on chronic situation with neuroma formation.Case Presentation: A 61 year-old man presented with the chief complaint of inability to extend the wrist a...

  16. Tardy ulnar nerve palsy after fracture non-union medial epicondyle of humerus – An unusual case

    Thiyam, Rajesh; Lalchandani, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Tardy ulnar nerve palsy is a chronic clinical condition characterised by delayed onset ulnar neuropathy. Typically tardy ulnar nerve palsy occurs as a consequence of non-union of lateral condyle in child resulting in cubitus valgus deformity which ultimately is the cause of ulnar nerve palsy. However very few literature are available for tardy ulnar nerve palsy as a result of old fracture of medial epicondyle without cubitus varus or valgus deformity. We report a rare case of tardy ulnar nerv...

  17. Biting palsy of the accessory nerve.

    Paljärvi, L; Partanen, J

    1980-01-01

    A young man was bitten by his girl friend at the anterior border of the left trapezius muscle. Weakness of the trapezius resulted and a longstanding ache in the shoulder developed. Clinically and neurophysiologically, an axonotmesis type crush injury of the accessory nerve was verified.

  18. Case of Cytomegalovirus Infection Causing Isolated Oculomotor Nerve Palsy

    Halil Sen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The third cranial nerve is called the oculomotor nerve. The pathology is revealed by limitation of eye movement inward-up-down, mydriasis, loss of light reflex and ptosis. Oculomotor nerve pathologies are frequently seen in neurology practice and are situations that may be very difficult for differential diagnosis. Differential diagnosis first involves disqualifying intracranial etiologies by imaging because these intracranial etiologies may be situations that can result in death and should be primarily evaluated. If intracranial events are ruled out, generally rarer etiologic reasons with generally difficult differentiation should be researched. Viral infections are among the rare etiological reasons causing 3rd cranial nerve involvement. Our case was a 71-year old female with etiological research due to 3rd cranial nerve palsy. The patient with diabetes-linked immune deficiency was found to have cranial nerve involvement developed secondary to cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. We report this case as 3rd cranial nerve involvement is rarely observed developing linked to CMV infection.

  19. Ulnar nerve palsy due to axillary crutch.

    Veerendrakumar M; Taly A; Nagaraja D.

    2001-01-01

    A young lady with residual polio, using axillary crutch since early childhood, presented with tingling, numbness and weakness in ulnar nerve distribution of five months duration. Ulnar motor conduction study revealed proximal conduction block near the axilla, at the point of pressure by the crutch while walking. Distal ulnar sensory conduction studies were normal but proximal ulnar sensory conduction studies showed absence of Erb′s point potential. These findings suggested the presence...

  20. Legionnaires' Disease with Facial Nerve Palsy

    Eyassu Habte-Gabr; Salwa Mohamed Ahmed; Shailesh R. Basani

    2011-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is primarily a pneumonic process caused by Legionella pneumophilia, a gram-negative aerobic bacillus but also has multiple system involvement. The most common manifestation is encephalopathy suggesting a generalized brain dysfunction but focal neurological manifestations have been reported. We report a patient with Legionella pneumonia associated with cerebellar dysfunction and unilateral facial nerve weakness. 51-year-old previously healthy male presented with shortness...

  1. Ulnar nerve palsy due to axillary crutch.

    Veerendrakumar M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A young lady with residual polio, using axillary crutch since early childhood, presented with tingling, numbness and weakness in ulnar nerve distribution of five months duration. Ulnar motor conduction study revealed proximal conduction block near the axilla, at the point of pressure by the crutch while walking. Distal ulnar sensory conduction studies were normal but proximal ulnar sensory conduction studies showed absence of Erb′s point potential. These findings suggested the presence of conduction block in sensory fibers as well. Proper use and change of axillary crutch resulted in clinical recovery and resolution of motor and sensory conduction block.

  2. [Spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery: description of a case with lower cranial nerve palsy].

    Macarini, Luca; Zeppa, Pio; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Scialpi, Michele; Raucci, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Spontaneous dissection of the extracranial internal carotid artery is a well recognized cause of headache and juvenile stroke; lower cranial nerve palsy as a complication of dissection is rare. We report the case of a female patient with bilateral dissecting aneurysm of the internal carotid artery, associated with unilateral cranial nerve XII palsy and oculosympathetic palsy. Neuroradiological findings, in particular those obtained by Magnetic Resonance imaging, allow the identification of the dissecting pathology and the correlation of the aneurysmal formation with nerve palsy. PMID:23096747

  3. MRI of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial palsy

    Saatci, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sahintuerk, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sennaroglu, L. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Boyvat, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Guersel, B. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Besim, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to define the enhancement pattern of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell`s palsy) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with routine doses of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Using 0.5 T imager, 24 patients were examined with a mean interval time of 13.7 days between the onset of symptoms and the MR examination. Contralateral asymptomatic facial nerves constituted the control group and five of the normal facial nerves (20.8%) showed enhancement confined to the geniculate ganglion. Hence, contrast enhancement limited to the geniculate ganglion in the abnormal facial nerve (3 of 24) was referred to a equivocal. Not encountered in any of the normal facial nerves, enhancement of other segments alone or associated with geniculate ganglion enhancement was considered to be abnormal and noted in 70.8% of the symptomatic facial nerves. The most frequently enhancing segments were the geniculate ganglion and the distal intracanalicular segment. (orig.)

  4. Multi cranial nerve palsies as the presenting features of prostate carcinoma

    Full text: Cranial nerve palsies have previously been reported in metastatic prostate carcinoma, usually occurring late in the course of the disease. We describe the case of a 55-year-old man whose diagnosis of prostate cancer was made following investigation of multiple cranial nerve palsies.

  5. Clinical observation on common peroneal nerve palsy treated with comprehensive therapy

    杨丽娟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the difference of the clinical efficacy on common peroneal nerve palsy between the comprehensive therapy of electroacupuncture,moxibustion and moving cupping method and western medication.Methods Ninety cases of common peroneal nerve palsy were randomized into a comprehensive therapy group and a western medication group,45 cases in each

  6. A 3-year review of cranial nerve palsies from the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic, Nigeria

    Chinyere Nnenne Pedro-Egbe

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: This is the first study in the literature on ocular cranial nerve palsies in Southern Nigeria. Third and sixth cranial nerve palsies were the most common cases to present to the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic. There was a statistically significant association to systemic disorders such as hypertension and DM and majority of cases with 6 th cranial nerve palsy.

  7. New Tendon Transfer for Correction of Drop-foot in Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy

    Vigasio, Adolfo; Marcoccio, Ignazio; Patelli, Alberto; Mattiuzzo, Valerio; Prestini, Greta

    2008-01-01

    Common peroneal nerve palsy has been reported to be the most frequent lower extremity palsy characterized by a supinated equinovarus foot deformity and foot drop. Dynamic tendon transposition represents the gold standard for surgical restoration of dorsiflexion of a permanently paralyzed foot. Between 1998 and 2005, we operated on a selected series of 16 patients with traumatic complete common peroneal nerve palsy. In all cases, we performed a double tendon transfer through the interosseous m...

  8. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Presenting With Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

    Soroor INALOO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Inaloo S, Katibeh P. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Presenting With Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter;8(1:69-71.ObjectiveThis case study is about an 11-year-old girl with bilateral facial weakness, abnormal taste sensation, and deep tendon reflexes of both knees and ankles were absent. However, the muscle power of the lower and upper extremities across all muscle groups was normal. After 2 days, she developed paresthesia and numbness in the lower extremities. Other neurologic examinations, such as fundoscopic evaluation of the retina were normal with the muscle power of both upper- and lower-extremities intact. A lumbar puncture revealed albumincytological dissociation. EMG and NCV were in favor of Guillain-Barre syndrome, for which IVIG was prescribed and the abnormal sensations in the lower limbs rapidly improved. Bilateral facial diplegia without weakness and paresthesia is a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome that mostly presents withacute onset, rapid progression with or without limb weakness, paresthesia, and decreased or absent DTR and albumin-cytological dissociation.References:Barbi F, Ariatti A, Funakoshi K, Meacci M, Odaka M, Galassi G. Parvovirus B19 infection antedating Guillain-Barre’ syndrome variant with prominent facial diplegia. J Neurol 2011 Aug; 258(8:1551-2. doi: 10.1007/s00415-011-5949-5. Epub 2011 Feb 15.Yardimci N, Avci AY, Kayhan E, Benli S. Bilateral facial nerve enhancement demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging in Guillain-Barré syndrome. Neurol Sci 2009 Oct; 30(5:431-3. doi:10.1007/s10072-009-0120-0.Lim TC, Yeo WS, Loke KY, Quek SC. Bilateral facial nerve palsy in Kawasaki disease. Ann Acad Med Singapore 2009; 38(8:737-8.Quintas E, Silva A, Sarmento A. Bilateral facial palsy in a young patient after meningococcal meningitis, associated to herpetic infection. Arq Neuro-Psiquiatr 2009; 67(3a: 712-14.Jain V, Deshmukh A, Gollomp S. Bilateral facial

  9. Ulnar nerve palsy after closed forearm fracture: a case report

    Levent Kucuk

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Closed double bone forearm fractures are among the most common fractures of childhood. These fractures often heal without problems with closed reduction and casting. The leading complications are known as malunion and compartment syndrome. The reports about nerve injuries related with these fractures are very limited. We present an eight years old boy who admitted to our hospital with ulnar nerve palsy symptomps three months after his initial trauma. His initial trauma was a simple fall which caused radius and ulna fractures. Radiological assessment showed proper union of the fractures. We performed surgical exploration to the ulnar nerve. We found a trapped and damaged nerve in the fracture region. Even though the rate of complications about nerve injuries are extremely rare in forearm fractures, neurologic examinations should be performed before and after the reduction maneuvers. Neurologic examination will be not only a guide for fracture management but also an important point for medicolegal problems. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(1.000: 30-32

  10. Nerve injury associated with orthognathic surgery. Part 1: UK practice and motor nerve injuries.

    Bowe, D C; Gruber, E A; McLeod, N M H

    2016-05-01

    The head and neck is anatomically complex, and several nerves are at risk during orthognathic operations. Some injuries to nerves are reported more commonly than others. To find out what consultant surgeons tell their patients about the prevalence of common nerve injuries before orthognathic operations, we did a postal survey of fellows of the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (BAOMS). We also reviewed published papers to find out the reported incidence of injuries to cranial motor nerves during orthognathic operations. Only injuries to the facial nerve were commonly reported, and we found only case reports about injuries to the oculomotor, abducens, and trochlear nerves. The risk of temporary facial nerve palsy reported was 0.30/100 nerves (95% CI 0.23 to 0.50) and permanent facial nerve palsy was 0.06/100 nerves (95% CI 0.02 to 0.15). PMID:26935213

  11. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies.

    Byju, N; Jose, James; Saifudheen, K; Gafoor, V Abdul; Jithendranath, P

    2012-10-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a well-recognized entity, but its clinical presentation is varied and often mimics many neurological disorders, making it a diagnostic challenge. Cerebral venous thrombosis has a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms, which may evolve suddenly or over weeks. It mimics many neurological conditions such as meningitis, encephalopathy, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and stroke. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies, are rarely reported. We describe a pregnant lady who presented with sensorineural deafness of the right ear and paralysis of the 9(th), 10(th), and 12(th) cranial nerves on the right side. She was diagnosed to have thrombosis of the right transverse sinus and sigmoid sinus with extension to the jugular vein and confluence of sinuses. She improved with anticoagulant treatment. PMID:23559730

  12. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies

    N Byju

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a well-recognized entity, but its clinical presentation is varied and often mimics many neurological disorders, making it a diagnostic challenge. Cerebral venous thrombosis has a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms, which may evolve suddenly or over weeks. It mimics many neurological conditions such as meningitis, encephalopathy, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and stroke. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies, are rarely reported. We describe a pregnant lady who presented with sensorineural deafness of the right ear and paralysis of the 9 th , 10 th , and 12 th cranial nerves on the right side. She was diagnosed to have thrombosis of the right transverse sinus and sigmoid sinus with extension to the jugular vein and confluence of sinuses. She improved with anticoagulant treatment.

  13. Primary oculomotor nerve palsy due to mild head injury. Report of two cases

    Two patients with primary oculomotor nerve palsy due to direct mild head injury are reported. They presented with internal ophthalmoplegia, dilated nonreactive pupils, and very mild disturbance in consciousness. Except for the persistent oculomotor nerve palsy, both the patients recovered fully within one week. Neither demonstrated a history that was suggestive of a cause for their oculomotor nerve palsy. Initial CT scans demonstrated localized subarachnoid hemorrhage around the brain stem. One of the patients had sustained a fracture of the anterior clinoid process. As the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the oculomotor nerve palsy we suspected mild injury to the pupillomotor fibers at the anterior petroclinoidal ligament and that of the pupillary fibers at the posterior petroclinoidal ligament. We speculate that these perforating fibers at the anterior petroclinoidal ligament acted as a fulcrum due to downward displacement of the brainstem at the time of impact. (author)

  14. An isolated right hypoglossal nerve palsy in association with infectious mononucleosis.

    Wright, G. D.; Lee, K D

    1980-01-01

    Following an upper respiratory tract infection, a teenage girl developed an isolated right XII nerve palsy; subsequently she was shown to have infectious mononucleosis. After 24 weeks her tongue had virtually recovered.

  15. Femoral and obturator nerves palsy caused by pelvic cement extrusion after hip arthroplasty

    Pawel Zwolak; Peer Eysel; Joern William-Patrick Michael

    2011-01-01

    Cement extrusion into the pelvis with subsequent palsy of the obturator and femoral nerves is a rare entity after hip replacement surgery. Cemented fixation of the acetabular cup has been considered as a safe and reliable standard procedure with very good long term results. We present a case of fifty year old female patient after hip arthroplasty procedure which suffered an obturator and femoral nerve palsy caused by extrusion of bone cement into the pelvis. Postoperative X-rays and CT-scan ...

  16. Nerve grafting and nerve suture in postoperative facial palsies: A report of 69 cases

    Karsten Kettel

    1954-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 1939, 260 patients with a peripheral facial palsy have been operated on by me according to Ballance and Duel, and in 61 cases nerve grafting, in 8 nerve suture was performed; 66 of the patients have been re-examined by me, 2 have been operated upon lately and one could not be traced. If a complete facial palsy arises in direct conjunction with surgery or accident the repair should, if possible, be undertaken without delay; if it occurs after an interval of freedom and the continuity of the nerve is unbroken the prognosis on the whole is good. The technique is discussed and the importance of the after-treatment is stressed. The results may be divided into two groups according to the conditions for and the proceeding of the repair, illustrated in tables 1 and 2. Among 52 cases, in which no degeneration of the musc'es had taken place and in which the operation was successfully performed a clinically satisfactory result was obtained in 47 patients. If these conditions are not fulfilled the prospect of a satisfactory result is a priori poor. It must be born in mind that not even the most successful operation will be able to restore function completely.

  17. Oculomotor nerve palsy evaluated by diffusion-tensor tractography

    Yamada, Kei; Kizu, Osamu; Ito, Hirotoshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Shiga, Kensuke; Akiyama, Katsuhisa; Nakagawa, Masanori [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Kyoto (Japan)

    2006-06-15

    The aim of the study was to test the feasibility of the tractography technique based on diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) for the assessment of small infarcts involving the brainstem. A patient who presented with an isolated left third cranial nerve palsy underwent magnetic resonance examination. Images were obtained by use of a whole-body, 1.5-T imager. Data were transferred to an off-line workstation for fiber tracking. The conventional diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) performed using a 5 mm slice thickness could only depict an equivocal hyperintensity lesion located at the left paramedian midbrain. An additional thin-slice DTI was performed immediately after the initial DWI using a 3 mm slice thickness and was able to delineate the lesion more clearly. Image postprocessing of thin-slice DTI data revealed that the lesion location involved the course of the third cranial nerve tract, corresponding with the patient's clinical symptoms. The tractography technique can be applied to assess fine neuronal structures of the brainstem, enabling direct clinicoradiological correlation of small infarcts involving this region. (orig.)

  18. Intercostal Nerve Neurotization for the Treatment of Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy Patients

    Terzis, Julia K.; Kostas, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    In severe obstetrical brachial plexus palsy with proximal nerve root involvement, there is an insufficient number of motor axons to reconstruct the entire plexus, and neurotization procedures are the only possibility to achieve useful upper extremity function. One of the most useful neurotization procedures is intercostal nerve transfer. In our practice, intercostal nerve transfer was used for direct neurotization of primary nerve targets or for neurotization of transferred muscles. The best ...

  19. Partial oculomotor nerve palsy in a 7-year-old child

    Israni, Anil; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Kumar, Atin; Gulati, Sheffali

    2016-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy can be due to varied causes that include diabetic neuropathy, myasthenia gravis, brainstem infarction, demyelinating conditions, and cerebral aneurysms. Among the aneurysmal causes of oculomotor nerve palsy, aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery has been observed to be the most common. Pupillary dysfunction is considered to be an important feature of aneurysmal oculomotor nerve paresis. A case of a 7-year-old boy with partial oculomotor nerve palsy with pupillary sparing is being reported here, the etiology of which is tortuous and ectatic distal internal carotid artery. This is a rare cause of oculomotor nerve paresis and to the best of our knowledge has not yet been reported in children. Ischemia rather than compression seems to be the most plausible cause in this case.

  20. Cross-face nerve transfer for established trigeminal branch II palsy.

    Koshima, Isao; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Mihara, Makoto; Uchida, Gentaro; Nakagawa, Masahiro

    2009-12-01

    Reconstruction for trigeminal nerve II palsy is challenging. Cross-face nerve transfer from the contralateral trigeminal nerve facilitates this reconstruction. However, the microanatomy and techniques required for nerve sutures cause problems for many surgeons. Following the recent development of supramicrosurgical techniques appropriate for the microanatomy of peripheral nerves, a new method of intraoral "cross-face nerve transfer" was successfully used for repairing trigeminal nerve II palsy. Two cases of trigeminal nerve II palsy were repaired with contralateral trigeminal nerve transfer without any nerve graft. Affected upper labial sensory recovery was 1.65 to 2.44 (Semmes-Weinstein values) and 15 to 30 mm (moving 2-point discriminations) at 1 to 1 1/2 years after surgery. The advantages of this method are excellent nerve regeneration and the lack of donor site morbidity. It is a brief and simple operation in comparison to free nerve grafts. The disadvantage is a need for a supramicrosurgical technique, using a needle less than 80 microm wide. PMID:19934846

  1. Sciatic Nerve Palsy following Total Hip Replacement via Direct Anterior Approach after Recommencement of Warfarin for Prophylaxis in Atrial Fibrillation

    Vipin Asopa; Shafic Al-Nammari; Tony Spriggins; Tony Menz; Adrian Bauze

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of sciatic nerve palsy following posterior and anterolateral approaches to the hip has been well documented and is about 1-2%. To our knowledge, however, there are no reports of sciatic nerve palsy occurring secondary to the anterior approach to the hip for arthroplasty. We describe a case of sciatic nerve palsy secondary to haematoma formation following total hip replacement through the anterior approach. The recommencement of warfarin for prophylaxis against atrial fibrillati...

  2. A 3-Year Review of Cranial Nerve Palsies from the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic, Nigeria

    Chinyere Nnenne Pedro-Egbe; Bassey Fiebai; Elizabeth Akon Awoyesuku

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To provide the types, frequency and clinical information on common cranial nerve palsies seen at the Eye Clinic at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: A chart review was performed of patients who presented with cranial nerve palsy at the Eye Clinic over a 3-year period (January 2009-December 2011). Data were collected on age, sex, type of cranial nerve palsy, a history of systemic disease such as diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension and cereb...

  3. MR findings of facial nerve on oblique sagittal MRI using TMJ surface coil: normal vs peripheral facial nerve palsy

    To evaluate the findings of normal facial nerve, as seen on oblique sagittal MRI using a TMJ (temporomandibular joint) surface coil, and then to evaluate abnormal findings of peripheral facial nerve palsy. We retrospectively reviewed the MR findings of 20 patients with peripheral facial palsy and 50 normal facial nerves of 36 patients without facial palsy. All underwent oblique sagittal MRI using a T MJ surface coil. We analyzed the course, signal intensity, thickness, location, and degree of enhancement of the facial nerve. According to the angle made by the proximal parotid segment on the axis of the mastoid segment, course was classified as anterior angulation (obtuse and acute, or buckling), straight and posterior angulation. Among 50 normal facial nerves, 24 (48%) were straight, and 23 (46%) demonstrated anterior angulation; 34 (68%) showed iso signal intensity on T1W1. In the group of patients, course on the affected side was either straight (40%) or showed anterior angulation (55%), and signal intensity in 80% of cases was isointense. These findings were similar to those in the normal group, but in patients with post-traumatic or post-operative facial palsy, buckling, of course, appeared. In 12 of 18 facial palsy cases (66.6%) in which contrast materials were administered, a normal facial nerve of the opposite facial canal showed mild enhancement on more than one segment, but on the affected side the facial nerve showed diffuse enhancement in all 14 patients with acute facial palsy. Eleven of these (79%) showed fair or marked enhancement on more than one segment, and in 12 (86%), mild enhancement of the proximal parotid segment was noted. Four of six chronic facial palsy cases (66.6%) showed atrophy of the facial nerve. When oblique sagittal MR images are obtained using a TMJ surface coil, enhancement of the proximal parotid segment of the facial nerve and fair or marked enhancement of at least one segment within the facial canal always suggests pathology of

  4. MULTIPLE MYELOMA PRESENTING AS THIRD CRANIAL NERVE PALSY: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Lohit Kumar; Chayanika; Pabitra Kumar; Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Compression of cranial nerves (CNs) by an intracranial plasmacytoma is considered to be an unusual presentation of multiple myeloma (MM). Here, we report a case of right 3 rd cranial nerve involvement as an initial presentation, which emphasizes the fact that third CN palsy can be the first presenting feature of Multiple Myeloma (MM).

  5. Lyme disease in a child presenting with bilateral facial nerve palsy: MRI findings and review of the literature

    Vanzieleghem, B.; Lemmerling, M.; Achten, E.; Vanlangenhove, P.; Kunnen, M. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital Gent (Belgium); Carton, D.; Matthys, E. [Dept. of Pediatrics, University Hospital Gent (Belgium)

    1998-11-01

    We report a 7-year-old boy with neuroborreliosis presenting with headache and bilateral facial nerve palsy. MRI demonstrated tentorial and bilateral facial and trigeminal nerve enhancement. (orig.) With 1 fig., 22 refs.

  6. Late-Onset Radial Nerve Palsy Associated with Conservatively Managed Humeral Fracture. A Case Report and Suggested Classification System

    Abdelgawad, Amr Atef; Wassef, Andrew; Ebraheim, Nabil A.

    2009-01-01

    Radial nerve palsy can occur with humerus fracture, either at the time of injury (primary) or during reduction (secondary). Late-onset radial nerve palsy (not immediately related to injury or reduction) has been very seldom reported in the English literature. We describe a case of late-onset radial nerve palsy, which developed 9 weeks after an attempted closed management of a midshaft humerus fracture. Exploration of the nerve was performed. The radial nerve was found to be stretched over the...

  7. Bilateral facial nerve palsy as the sole initial symptom of syphilis: a case report.

    Ting, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Wei; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Yang, Fu-Chi

    2015-09-01

    Bilateral facial nerve palsy is an exceedingly rare condition and presents a diagnostic challenge. Bilateral facial nerve palsy may result from cranial trauma, congenital abnormalities, inflammation, infiltration, or infection, but is rarely associated with syphilis. Here, we report a case of syphilis in which bilateral facial nerve palsy was the only initial symptom. A 22-year-old man presented at our emergency department with isolated bilateral facial nerve palsy. Results for initial serum and cerebrospinal fluid examinations were normal, including the rapid plasma reagin titer. One week later, the patient developed rashes on the torso, palms, and soles. At this time, a high serum rapid plasma reagin titer was detected, and the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination test was positive. Once the tests were confirmed, the patient admitted to a history of unprotected sexual behavior. Penicillin G treatment was effective, and a 3-month follow-up examination demonstrated a complete recovery. We recommend that syphilis be considered when diagnosing sexually experienced young men presenting with bilateral facial nerve palsy, even in the absence of skin manifestations. Failure to recognize facial signs of syphilis could result in inappropriate management, affecting the patient's clinical outcome. PMID:26166431

  8. Fibular nerve palsy after hip replacement: Not only surgeon responsibility. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) a rare cause of nerve liability.

    Logroscino, G; Del Tedesco, F; Cambise, C; Coraci, D; Donati, F; Santilli, V; Padua, L

    2016-06-01

    Mononeuropathy after surgery may occur and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a possible pathological condition related to paresis after hip surgery. We present a case of 66-year-old man presenting severe weakness at inferior limb muscles after hip prosthesis revision. Clinic and electrophysiology showed severe right fibular nerve damage and ultrasound found a marked enlargement of the same nerve, associated with focal enlargements in other nerves. A diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies was suspected and confirmed by genetic test. The patient gradually recovered returning to a normal daily active life. Ultrasound was crucial for diagnosis. The suspicion and diagnosis of latent neuropathy, which can occur after surgical intervention, may lead to a better understand of the risks of the surgery, specific for the patient, and avoid the wrong attribution to surgical malpractice. PMID:27084090

  9. Bilateral Cranial IX and X Nerve Palsies After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Yoo, Seung Don; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Seung Ah; Joo, Hye In; Yeo, Jin Ah; Chung, Sung Joon

    2016-01-01

    We report a 57-year-old man with bilateral cranial nerve IX and X palsies who presented with severe dysphagia. After a mild head injury, the patient complained of difficult swallowing. Physical examination revealed normal tongue motion and no uvular deviation. Cervical X-ray findings were negative, but a brain computed tomography revealed a skull fracture involving bilateral jugular foramen. Laryngoscopy indicated bilateral vocal cord palsy. In a videofluoroscopic swallowing study, food resid...

  10. Oculomotor nerve palsy associated with bortezomib in a patient with multiple myeloma: a case report

    Helmy Tarek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor used in the treatment of multiple myeloma. A newly recognized oculomotor nerve palsy related to bortezomib is described. Case presentation A 54-year-old Caucasian woman with immunoglobulin G kappa multiple myeloma on single-agent bortezomib given by intravenous push once weekly developed isolated unilateral partially reversible left sided oculomotor nerve palsy during the first cycle of treatment. All the essential diagnostic tests that were carried out excluded all other possible causes. There was a positive dechallenge-rechallenge test. Management was by withdrawal of bortezomib and empirical dexamethazone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of its kind in the literature. Conclusion This case illustrates the probable association between oculomotor nerve palsy and bortezomib, and generates a hypothesis of whether bortezomib can cross the blood-brain barrier or not.

  11. Central pontine myelinolysis presenting as isolated sixth nerve palsy in third trimester of pregnancy

    Tushar Divakar Gosavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old primigravida presented with isolated left sixth nerve palsy at 38 weeks gestation. Her MRI showed a lesion consistent with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM. Extensive investigations did not reveal any secondary cause for the CPM. She recovered spontaneously in 2 weeks with complete resolution of her MRI changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CPM occurring in third trimester in the absence of identifiable secondary causes and of CPM presenting as an isolated sixth nerve palsy. We discuss the reported causes of CPM in pregnancy, possible pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and the anatomic basis of the unique clinical presentation of sixth nerve palsy in our case.

  12. Central pontine myelinolysis presenting as isolated sixth nerve palsy in third trimester of pregnancy

    Gosavi, Tushar Divakar; See, Siew Ju

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old primigravida presented with isolated left sixth nerve palsy at 38 weeks gestation. Her MRI showed a lesion consistent with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). Extensive investigations did not reveal any secondary cause for the CPM. She recovered spontaneously in 2 weeks with complete resolution of her MRI changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CPM occurring in third trimester in the absence of identifiable secondary causes and of CPM presenting as an isolated sixth nerve palsy. We discuss the reported causes of CPM in pregnancy, possible pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and the anatomic basis of the unique clinical presentation of sixth nerve palsy in our case. PMID:25745319

  13. Central pontine myelinolysis presenting as isolated sixth nerve palsy in third trimester of pregnancy.

    Gosavi, Tushar Divakar; See, Siew Ju

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old primigravida presented with isolated left sixth nerve palsy at 38 weeks gestation. Her MRI showed a lesion consistent with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). Extensive investigations did not reveal any secondary cause for the CPM. She recovered spontaneously in 2 weeks with complete resolution of her MRI changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CPM occurring in third trimester in the absence of identifiable secondary causes and of CPM presenting as an isolated sixth nerve palsy. We discuss the reported causes of CPM in pregnancy, possible pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and the anatomic basis of the unique clinical presentation of sixth nerve palsy in our case. PMID:25745319

  14. Oculomotor Nerve Palsy as a Rare Presentation and First Sign of Multiple Myeloma.

    Panda, Bijnya Birajita; Parija, Sucheta; Mallick, Jyotiranjan; Pujahari, Susanta

    2016-05-01

    Acquired oculomotor nerve palsy has varied aetiologies like vascular (diabetes, heart disease, atherosclerosis and posterior communicating artery aneurysm), space occupying lesions or tumours, inflammation, infection, trauma, demyelinating disease like Multiple sclerosis, autoimmune disorders such as Myasthenia gravis, postoperatively as a complication of neurosurgery, cavernous sinus thrombosis etc. Cranial Nerve palsies as one of the first symptoms of multiple myeloma have been reported sparsely in literature. We report a case of a 60-year-old woman who developed sudden onset right-sided pupil sparing oculomotor nerve palsy along with a tender swelling at right sternoclavicular joint. Cranial and orbital magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid examination demonstrated no abnormalities. Immunological investigations and histopathological analysis of sternoclavicular joint swelling confirmed the diagnosis of IgG type multiple myeloma. After confirmation of diagnosis we started her with appropriate chemotherapy, after which the palsy resolved within one month. The cause of the palsy was probably due to nerve ischemia due to hyper viscosity of the serum. PMID:27437257

  15. Cause of long thoracic nerve palsy: a possible dynamic fascial sling cause.

    Hester, P; Caborn, D N; Nyland, J

    2000-01-01

    Long thoracic nerve palsy can result from sudden or repetitive external biomechanical forces. This investigation describes a possible dynamic cause from internal forces. Six fresh cadaveric shoulders (3 female, 3 male, 4 left, 2 right) with full range of motion were systematically dissected to evaluate the anatomic course of the long thoracic nerve. In all specimens a tight fascial band of tissue arose from the inferior aspect of the brachial plexus, extended just superior to the middle scalene muscle insertion on the first rib, and presented a digitation that extended to the proximal aspect of the serratus anterior muscle. With progressive manual abduction and external rotation, the long thoracic nerve was found to "bow-string" across the fascial band. Medial and upward migration of the superior most aspect of the scapula was found to further compress the long thoracic nerve. Previous investigations have reported that nerves tolerate a 10% increase in their resting length before a stretch-induced neuropraxia develops. Previous studies postulated that long thoracic nerve palsy resulted from the tethering effect of the scalenus medius muscle as it actively or passively compressed the nerve; however, similar neuromuscular relationships occur in many other anatomic sites without ill effect. We propose that the cause of long thoracic nerve palsy may be this "bow-stringing" phenomenon of the nerve across this tight fascial band. This condition may be further exacerbated with medial and upward migration of the superior aspect of the scapula as is commonly seen with scapulothoracic dyskinesia and fatigue of the scapular stabilizers. Rehabilitation for long thoracic nerve palsy may therefore benefit from special attention to scapulothoracic muscle stabilization. PMID:10717860

  16. Oculomotor Nerve Palsy following Cardiac Tamponade with Churg-Strauss Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Suganuma, Kazuki; Hashimoto, Takao; Sato, Hiromasa; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Sakurai, Shunpei

    2011-09-01

    A 57-year-old man with a history of more than 10 years of bronchial asthma and chronic sinusitis complained of double vision which developed 18 days after cardiac tamponade with eosinophil-rich fluid (eosinophils 30%). He had oculomotor nerve palsy, and a blood test revealed eosinophilia (12,700/mm(3)) and elevation of both C-reactive protein and rheumatoid factor. He was diagnosed as having Churg-Strauss syndrome. His symptoms were relieved by corticosteroid therapy. Our case and previous cases in the literature revealed that oculomotor nerve palsy in Churg-Strauss syndrome is associated with pupil involvement and may be relieved by corticosteroid treatment. PMID:22125528

  17. Unilateral common peroneal nerve palsy following renal transplantation: A case report of tacrolimus neurotoxicity

    A Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic complications are not uncommon in renal transplant recipients. Acute femoral neuropathy, lumbosacral plexopathy, and sciatic neuropathy have been reported after kidney transplantation probably due to perioperative nerve compression and ischemia. To the best of our knowledge, common peroneal nerve (CPN palsy has not been described in the early postoperative period following renal transplantation. Also, mononeuropathy due to tacrolimus (TAC therapy has not been described so far. We report a case of isolated CPN palsy presenting as unilateral foot drop following renal transplantation and that improved only after replacing TAC with cyclosporine.

  18. Primary central nervous system lymphoma presenting as isolated oculomotor nerve palsy

    Terence Tan, MBBS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors report an unusual case of primary central nervous system lymphoma presenting with isolated pupil-involved oculomotor nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated leptomeningeal involvement of the midbrain and interpeduncular cistern, a single hypothalamic lesion, and intraventricular involvement. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was confirmed by stereotactic intraventricular biopsy. Combination chemotherapy with methotrexate, vincristine, procarbazine and rituximab was instituted with resolution of oculomotor nerve palsy and complete disease remission. An interdisciplinary approach involving neurosurgeons, neuroradiologists, neuropathologists and neurologists is crucial in the management of primary central nervous system lymphoma.

  19. Cranial nerve palsy in Wegener's granulomatosis--lessons from clinical cases

    Nowack, Rainer; Wachtler, Paul; Kunz, Jürgen;

    2009-01-01

    The problem of diagnosing vasculitic neuropathy is discussed based on case reports of two patients with Wegener's granulomatosis. One patient developed de novo 6(th) nerve palsy as an isolated relapse manifestation and the second patient a sequence of multiple cranial nerve palsies. Brain imaging...... overall clinical presentations. Cranial neuropathy may be the first obvious vasculitic manifestation preceding other organ disease, and since single reliable tests for its diagnosis are lacking, a multidisciplinary approach is advocated here to detect vasculitic manifestations in other organs....

  20. Delayed-onset bilateral abducens paresis after head trauma

    Pravin Salunke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral sixth nerve paresis following closed head injury, though rare, is a known entity. However, delayed-onset post-traumatic bilateral abducens paresis is extremely rare. We present two cases. The first patient had onset of bilateral abducens paresis 2 weeks after closed head injury and the second patient after 3 days. The cause in the former was detected to be chronic subdural hematoma and in the latter is speculated to be edema/ischemia due to injury to soft tissue structures housing these nerves. The delayed onset of bilateral abducens paresis following head injury may vary according to the cause. There may be another mechanism of injury apart from direct trauma. Though rare, it needs to be evaluated and may have a treatable cause like elevated intracranial pressure.

  1. Oberlin partial ulnar nerve transfer for restoration in obstetric brachial plexus palsy of a newborn: case report

    Kawamura Kenji

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 8 month old male infant with Erb's birth palsy was treated with two peripheral nerve transfers. Except for rapid motor reinnervations, elbow flexion was obtained by an Oberlin's partial ulnar nerve transfer, while shoulder abduction was restored by an accessory-to-suprascapular nerve transfer. The initial contraction of the biceps muscle occurred two months after surgery. Forty months after surgery, elbow flexion reached M5 without functional loss of the ulnar nerve. This case demonstrates an excellent result of an Oberlin's nerve transfer for restoration of flexion of the elbow joint in Erb's birth palsy. However, at this time partial ulnar nerve transfer for Erb's birth palsy is an optional procedure; a larger number of cases will need to be studied for it to be widely accepted as a standard procedure for Erb's palsy at birth.

  2. Distal Ulna Fracture With Delayed Ulnar Nerve Palsy in a Baseball Player.

    Pasque, Charles B; Pearson, Clark; Margo, Bradley; Ethel, Robert

    2016-02-01

    We present a case report of a college baseball player who sustained a blunt-trauma, distal-third ulna fracture from a thrown ball with delayed presentation of ulnar nerve palsy. Even after his ulna fracture had healed, the nerve injury made it difficult for the athlete to control a baseball while throwing, resulting in a delayed return to full baseball activity for 3 to 4 months. He had almost complete nerve recovery by 6 months after his injury and complete nerve recovery by 1 year after his injury. PMID:26866319

  3. POST VIRAL UNILATERAL ISOLATED HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE PALSY WITH CERVICAL LYMPHADENITIS: A CASE REPORT

    Sudhir M Naik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/objectives: Unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy is not an uncommon finding in neurological diseases. It is a rare condition in childhood where the mononeuropathies of the facial nerve are the commonest reported. Setting: Department of Head and Neck oncosurgery, Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology , Bangalore. Case report: A 12 yr old boy was referred to our outpatient clinic with history of deviation of the tongue to the right and small enlarged lymph nodes in the right neck since 3 years.The deviation was seen after an episode of viral infection with rashes. Contrast enhanced CT and MRI scans were negative for any organic pathology. Excision biopsy revealed reactive lymphadenitis in the lymph nodes. Conclusion: Isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy represents a formidable challenge and indepth patient history accompanied with good knowledge of hypoglossal nerve anatomy and a rational selection of diagnostic tests is necessary for making the diagnosis.

  4. Post-traumatic acute bilateral facial nerve palsy - a management dilemma

    Kumar Rakesh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute bilateral facial nerve paralysis is a rare clinical entity, and its management remains very controversial (operative or conservative. Here we are presenting a case of acute onset bilateral facial nerve palsy following head injury with bilateral temporal bone fracture with clinico-radiographic contrary. Patient was managed conservatively with complete recovery. By this article, authors want to stress on combining clinical examination and radiological findings for decision making of this rare entity and tried to evaluate the management.

  5. Rare Presentation of Rhino-Orbital-Cerebral Zygomycosis: Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

    Alireza Mohebbi; Hesam Jahandideh; Ali Amini Harandi

    2011-01-01

    Rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis afflicts primarily diabetics and immunocompromised individual, but can also occur in normal hosts rarely. We here presented an interesting case of facial nerve palsy and multiple cold abscesses of neck due to rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis in an otherwise healthy man. Although some reports of facial nerve paralysis in conjunction with rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis exist, no case of bilateral complete facial paralysis has been reported in the literat...

  6. Trochlear nerve palsy associated with claude bernard-horner syndrome after brainstem stroke.

    Bazan, Rodrigo; Braga, Gabriel Pereira; Gomes, Daniela Laranja; Yamashita, Seizo; Betting, Luiz Eduardo; Resende, Luiz Antonio de Lima

    2011-09-01

    The association of unilateral trochlear nerve palsy with Claude Bernard-Horner syndrome represents a rare clinical condition. We present the case of a patient with this unusual presentation. The investigation performed implicated cerebrovascular disease as the underlying cause of the condition in this patient. PMID:22114581

  7. Trochlear Nerve Palsy Associated with Claude Bernard-Horner Syndrome after Brainstem Stroke

    Bazan, Rodrigo; Braga, Gabriel Pereira; Gomes, Daniela Laranja; Yamashita, Seizo; Betting, Luiz Eduardo; Resende, Luiz Antonio de Lima

    2011-01-01

    The association of unilateral trochlear nerve palsy with Claude Bernard-Horner syndrome represents a rare clinical condition. We present the case of a patient with this unusual presentation. The investigation performed implicated cerebrovascular disease as the underlying cause of the condition in this patient. PMID:22114581

  8. Orthodromic Transfer of the Temporalis Muscle in Incomplete Facial Nerve Palsy

    Jae Ho Aum

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Temporalis muscle transfer produces prompt surgical results with a one-stage operation in facial palsy patients. The orthodromic method is surgically simple, and the vector of muscle action is similar to the temporalis muscle action direction. This article describes transferring temporalis muscle insertion to reconstruct incomplete facial nerve palsy patients.Methods Between August 2009 and November 2011, 6 unilateral incomplete facial nerve palsy patients underwent surgery for orthodromic temporalis muscle transfer. A preauricular incision was performed to expose the mandibular coronoid process. Using a saw, the coronoid process was transected. Three strips of the fascia lata were anchored to the muscle of the nasolabial fold through subcutaneous tunneling. The tension of the strips was adjusted by observing the shape of the nasolabial fold. When optimal tension was achieved, the temporalis muscle was sutured to the strips. The surgical results were assessed by comparing pre- and postoperative photographs. Three independent observers evaluated the photographs.Results The symmetry of the mouth corner was improved in the resting state, and movement of the oral commissure was enhanced in facial animation after surgery.Conclusions The orthodromic transfer of temporalis muscle technique can produce prompt results by applying the natural temporalis muscle vector. This technique preserves residual facial nerve function in incomplete facial nerve palsy patients and produces satisfying cosmetic outcomes without malar muscle bulging, which often occurs in the turn-over technique.

  9. Case Study of Oriental Medicine Treatment with Acupotomy Therapy of the Peroneal Nerve Palsy through Ultrasound Case Report

    Kim Sungha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to estimate clinical effects of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy therapy of Peroneal nerve Palsy. Methods: From 10th June, 2010 to 19th June, 2010, 1 female patient diagnosed as Peroneal nerve Palsy(clinical diagnosed was treated with general oriental medicine therapy (acupuncture, pharmacopuncture,moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication and acupotomy. Results: The patient's left foot drop was remarkably improved. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that oriental medical treatment with acuputomy therapy has notable effect in improving symptoms of peroneal nerve palsy. as though we had not wide experience in this treatment, more research is needed.

  10. An unusual cause of trochlear nerve palsy and brainstem compression

    Jasmit Singh; Hrushikesh Kharosekar; Vernon Velho; Praveen Survashe

    2016-01-01

    Schwannoma originates from the Schwann cells at the Obersteiner-Redlich zone, which marks the junction of central and peripheral myelin of the cranial nerves. Most frequently affected are the vestibular, trigeminal, and facial nerves followed by the lower cranial nerves. Trochlear schwannoma in the absence of neurofibromatosis is a rare entity. The purpose of this report is to serve as a reminder to consider trochlear nerve schwannoma in the list of differential diagnosis of such tumors as th...

  11. Deep Peroneal Nerve Palsy Caused by an Extraneural Ganglion Cyst: A Rare Case

    Dimitrios Nikolopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower extremities peripheral neuropathies caused by ganglion cysts are rare. The most frequent location of occurrence is the common peroneal nerve and its branches, at the level of the fibular neck. We report the case of a 57-year-old patient admitted with foot drop, due to an extraneural ganglion of the upper tibiofibular syndesmosis, compressing the deep branch of the peroneal nerve. Although there have been many previous reports of intraneural ganglion involvement with the lower limb nerves, to our knowledge, this is the second reported occurrence of an extraneural ganglion distinctly localized to the upper tibiofibular syndesmosis and palsying deep peroneal nerve. The diagnosis was made preoperatively using MRI. The common peroneal nerve and its branches were recognized and traced to its bifurcation during the operation, and the ganglion cyst was removed. Two months after surgery, the patient was pain-free and asymptomatic except for cutaneous anesthesia in the distribution of the deep peroneal nerve.

  12. Deep peroneal nerve palsy caused by an extraneural ganglion cyst: a rare case.

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Safos, George; Sergides, Neoptolemos; Safos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremities peripheral neuropathies caused by ganglion cysts are rare. The most frequent location of occurrence is the common peroneal nerve and its branches, at the level of the fibular neck. We report the case of a 57-year-old patient admitted with foot drop, due to an extraneural ganglion of the upper tibiofibular syndesmosis, compressing the deep branch of the peroneal nerve. Although there have been many previous reports of intraneural ganglion involvement with the lower limb nerves, to our knowledge, this is the second reported occurrence of an extraneural ganglion distinctly localized to the upper tibiofibular syndesmosis and palsying deep peroneal nerve. The diagnosis was made preoperatively using MRI. The common peroneal nerve and its branches were recognized and traced to its bifurcation during the operation, and the ganglion cyst was removed. Two months after surgery, the patient was pain-free and asymptomatic except for cutaneous anesthesia in the distribution of the deep peroneal nerve. PMID:25632363

  13. Evaluation of Variation in the Course of the Facial Nerve, Nerve Adhesion to Tumors, and Postoperative Facial Palsy in Acoustic Neuroma

    Sameshima, Tetsuro; Morita, Akio; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Fukushima, Takanori; Friedman, Allan H.; Zenga, Francesco; Ducati, Alessandro; Mastronardi, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the variation in the course of the facial nerve (FN) in patients undergoing acoustic neuroma (AN) surgery, its adhesion to tumors, and the relationship between such adhesions and postoperative facial palsy.

  14. An uncommon cause of tardy ulnar nerve palsy due to upper extremity prolonged malposition in a comatose child: a case report

    Emamhadi, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoudi, Davood

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Ulnar nerve neuropathy is one of the most common peripheral nerve dysfunctions. Elbow is the most common area affected by ulnar nerve which is mainly because of fractures or dislocations of this area. Delayed ulnar nerve palsy (Tardy Ulnar Nerve Palsy) in children due to a malpositioning of upper extremity during hospitalization is an uncommon cause of ulnar nerve injury which we have already reported it. Methods: An eight-year-old conscious patient who had weakness, par...

  15. Peripheral Neuropathy and VIth Nerve Palsy Related to Randall Disease Successfully Treated by High-Dose Melphalan, Autologous Blood Stem Cell Transplantation, and VIth Nerve Decompression Surgery

    J.-L. Dupond; Manckoundia, P.; Pfitzenmeyer, P; C. Foguem

    2010-01-01

    Randall disease is an unusual cause of extraocular motor nerve (VI) palsy. A 35-year-old woman was hospitalized for sicca syndrome. The physical examination showed general weakness, weight loss, diplopia related to a left VIth nerve palsy, hypertrophy of the submandibular salivary glands, and peripheral neuropathy. The biological screening revealed renal insufficiency, serum monoclonal kappa light chain immunoglobulin, urinary monoclonal kappa light chain immunoglobulin, albuminuria, and Benc...

  16. Bilateral Cranial IX and X Nerve Palsies After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Yoo, Seung Don; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Seung Ah; Joo, Hye In; Yeo, Jin Ah

    2016-01-01

    We report a 57-year-old man with bilateral cranial nerve IX and X palsies who presented with severe dysphagia. After a mild head injury, the patient complained of difficult swallowing. Physical examination revealed normal tongue motion and no uvular deviation. Cervical X-ray findings were negative, but a brain computed tomography revealed a skull fracture involving bilateral jugular foramen. Laryngoscopy indicated bilateral vocal cord palsy. In a videofluoroscopic swallowing study, food residue remained in the vallecula and pyriform sinus, and there was reduced motion of the pharynx and larynx. Electromyography confirmed bilateral superior and recurrent laryngeal neuropathy. PMID:26949684

  17. Intermittent hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by a calcified persistent hypoglossal artery: an uncommon neurovascular compression syndrome.

    Meila, Dan; Wetter, Axel; Brassel, Friedhelm; Nacimiento, Wilhelm

    2012-12-15

    Neurovascular compression is assumed to cause symptoms like trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm and vestibular paroxysmia. We present a patient with recurrent episodes of transient dysarthria due to isolated right hypoglossal nerve (HN) palsy. We describe the first case of a calcified persistent hypoglossal artery (PHA) as the putative cause of a hypoglossal neurovascular compression syndrome. Our patient received a daily low-dose medication of carbamazepine resulting in complete relief of symptoms. In conclusion, PHA is not only an anatomic variation but also a possible cause of a neurovascular compression syndrome leading to intermittent HN palsy. PMID:23020989

  18. Clinical Features and Outcomes of Strabismus Treatment in Third Cranial Nerve Palsy during a 10-Year Period

    Abbas Bagheri

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Surgical management of strabismus in patients with third nerve palsy is difficult and challenging, however the majority of patients achieve ideal results with appropriate and stepwise surgical plans.

  19. An unusual cause of trochlear nerve palsy and brainstem compression

    Jasmit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma originates from the Schwann cells at the Obersteiner-Redlich zone, which marks the junction of central and peripheral myelin of the cranial nerves. Most frequently affected are the vestibular, trigeminal, and facial nerves followed by the lower cranial nerves. Trochlear schwannoma in the absence of neurofibromatosis is a rare entity. The purpose of this report is to serve as a reminder to consider trochlear nerve schwannoma in the list of differential diagnosis of such tumors as the outcome is far better than the intraaxial tumor in that location.

  20. Pituitary apoplexy presenting as isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis : two case reports.

    Cho, Won-Jin; Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, Tae-Sun; Seo, Bo-Ra

    2009-02-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome caused by an acute ischemic or hemorrhagic vascular accident involving a pituitary adenoma or an adjacent pituitary gland. Pituitary apoplexy may be associated with a variety of neurological and endocrinological signs and symptoms. However, isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis as the presenting sign of pituitary apoplexy is very rare. We describe two cases of pituitary apoplexy presenting as sudden-onset unilateral ptosis and diplopia. In one case, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass in the pituitary fossa with signs of hemorrhage, upward displacement of the optic chiasm, erosion of the sellar floor and invasion of the right cavernous sinus. In the other case, MRI showed a large area of insufficient enhancement in the anterior pituitary consistent with pituitary infarction or Sheehan's syndrome. We performed neurosurgical decompression via a transsphenoidal approach. Both patients showed an uneventful recovery. Both cases of isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis completely resolved during the early postoperative period. We suggest that pituitary apoplexy should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis and that prompt neurosurgical decompression should be considered for the preservation of third cranial nerve function. PMID:19274125

  1. Bony exostosis of the atlas with resultant cranial nerve palsy

    A case of tenth and twelfth nerve compression secondary to a bony exostosis of the first cervical vertebra is described. This uncommon phenomenon serves to outline the importance of imaging the course of a cranial nerve when no intracranial abnormality is demonstrable on CT or MRI. The radiologic features of spinal osteochondromas are reviewed. (orig.)

  2. Oberlin partial ulnar nerve transfer for restoration in obstetric brachial plexus palsy of a newborn: case report

    Kawamura Kenji; Kobata Yasunori; Yajima Hiroshi; Shigematsu Koji; Maegawa Naoki; Takakura Yoshinori

    2006-01-01

    Abstract An 8 month old male infant with Erb's birth palsy was treated with two peripheral nerve transfers. Except for rapid motor reinnervations, elbow flexion was obtained by an Oberlin's partial ulnar nerve transfer, while shoulder abduction was restored by an accessory-to-suprascapular nerve transfer. The initial contraction of the biceps muscle occurred two months after surgery. Forty months after surgery, elbow flexion reached M5 without functional loss of the ulnar nerve. This case dem...

  3. Combined Ipsilateral Oculomotor Nerve Palsy and Contralateral Downbeat Nystagmus in a Case of Cerebral Infarction

    Kosuke Matsuzono

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with acute cerebral infarction of the left paramedian thalamus, upper mesencephalon and cerebellum who exhibited ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and contralateral downbeat nystagmus. The site of the infarction was considered to be the paramedian thalamopeduncular and cerebellar regions, which are supplied by the superior cerebellar artery containing direct perforating branches or both the superior cerebellar artery and the superior mesencephalic and posterior thalamosubthalamic arteries. Contralateral and monocular downbeat nystagmus is very rare. Our case suggests that the present downbeat nystagmus was due to dysfunction of cerebellar-modulated crossed oculovestibular fibers of the superior cerebellar peduncle or bilateral downbeat nystagmus with one-sided oculomotor nerve palsy.

  4. Prosthetic ambulation in a paraplegic patient with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy.

    Shin, J C; Park, C; Kim, D Y; Choi, Y S; Kim, Y K; Seong, Y J

    2000-08-01

    Great importance and caution should be placed on prosthetic fitting for a paraplegic patient with an anesthetic residual limb if functional ambulation is to be achieved. The combination of paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy is a complex injury that makes the rehabilitation process difficult. This article describes a case of L2 paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy on the right side. Following the rehabilitation course, the patient independently walked using a walker at indoor level with a transfemoral prosthesis with ischial containment socket, polycentric knee assembly, endoskeletal shank and multiaxis foot assembly and a knee ankle foot orthosis on the sound side. The difficulties of fitting a functional prosthesis to an insensate limb and the rehabilitation stages leading to functional ambulation are reviewed. PMID:10992814

  5. Dural carotid cavernous sinus fistula presenting as isolated oculomotor nerve palsy: Case report

    Şehnaz Arıcı

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Indirect (dural carotid cavernous fistula is formed by the connection between meningeal branches of the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinüs, and low flow circulation with low pressure is occured. Proptosis, ophtalmoplegia, headache, scleral and conjuctival hyperemia expanding around the eyeball can be observed. A forty-eight year old female patient with a background of diabetes mellitus and hypertension was admitted with complaints of double vision. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy was found in neurological examination and an indirect carotid cavernous fistula was revealed by digital subtraction angiography. Our case with carotid cavernous fistula as a rare cause of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy is worth to be reported.

  6. C5 Nerve root palsies following cervical spine surgery: A review

    Nancy E Epstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical C5 nerve root palsies may occur in between 0% and 30% of routine anterior or posterior cervical spine operations. They are largely attributed to traction injuries/increased cord migration following anterior/posterior decompressions. Of interest, almost all studies cite spontaneous resolution of these deficits without surgery with 3-24 postoperative months. Methods: Different studies cite various frequencies for C5 root palsies following anterior or posterior cervical spine surgery. In their combined anterior/posterior series involving C4-C5 level  decompressions, Libelski et al. cited up to a 12% incidence of C5 palsies. In Gu et al. series, C5 root palsies occurred in 3.1% of double-door laminoplasty, 4.5% of open-door laminoplasty, and 11.3% of laminectomy. Miller et al. observed an intermediate 6.9% frequency of C5 palsies followed by posterior cervical decompressions and fusions (PCDF. Results: Gu et al. also identified multiple risk factors for developing C5 palsies following posterior surgery; male gender, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL, narrower foramina, laminectomy, and marked dorsal spinal cord drift. Miller et al. also identified an average $1918 increased cost for physical/occupational therapy for patients with C5 palsies. Conclusions: The incidence of C5 root deficits for anterior/posterior cervical surgery at C4-C5 was 12% in one series, and ranged up to 11.3% for laminectomies, while others cited 0-30%. Although identification of preoperative risk factors for C5 root deficits may help educate patients regarding these risks, there is no clear method for their avoidance at this time.

  7. Pituitary Apoplexy Presenting as Isolated Third Cranial Nerve Palsy with Ptosis : Two Case Reports

    Cho, Won-Jin; Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, Tae-Sun; Seo, Bo-Ra

    2009-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome caused by an acute ischemic or hemorrhagic vascular accident involving a pituitary adenoma or an adjacent pituitary gland. Pituitary apoplexy may be associated with a variety of neurological and endocrinological signs and symptoms. However, isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis as the presenting sign of pituitary apoplexy is very rare. We describe two cases of pituitary apoplexy presenting as sudden-onset unilateral ptosis and diplopia. In on...

  8. Diagnostic gait pattern of a patient with longstanding left femoral nerve palsy: a case report.

    Burke, Neil G

    2010-12-01

    The gait pattern of a 35-year-old man with longstanding, left femoral nerve palsy was assessed using 3-dimensional kinematic and kinetic analysis. Stability of his left knee in stance was achieved by manipulating the external moments of the limb so that the ground reaction force passes in front of the knee joint. This compensatory mechanism of locking the knee in extension is reliant on the posterior capsular structures. The patient was managed conservatively and continued to walk without aids.

  9. Central pontine myelinolysis presenting as isolated sixth nerve palsy in third trimester of pregnancy

    Tushar Divakar Gosavi; Siew Ju See

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old primigravida presented with isolated left sixth nerve palsy at 38 weeks gestation. Her MRI showed a lesion consistent with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). Extensive investigations did not reveal any secondary cause for the CPM. She recovered spontaneously in 2 weeks with complete resolution of her MRI changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CPM occurring in third trimester in the absence of identifiable secondary causes and of CPM presenting as an isolated six...

  10. Palsy of the rear limbs in Mycobacterium lepraemurium-infected mice results from bone damage and not from nerve involvement.

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Becerril-Villanueva, E; Wek-Rodríguez, K; Arce-Paredes, P; Reyes-Maldonado, E

    2005-06-01

    A small but relatively constant proportion (3-5%) of mice chronically infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) develops bilateral paralysis of the rear limbs. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not the bilateral leg palsy results from nerve involvement. Direct bacterial nerve infection or acute/delayed inflammation might possibly affect the nerves. Therefore, palsied animals were investigated for the presence of: (a) histopathological changes in the leg tissues including nerves, bones and annexes, and (b) serum antibodies to M. lepraemurium and M. leprae lipids, including phenolic glycolipid I from M. leprae. Histopathological study of the palsied legs revealed that the paralysis was not the result of direct involvement of the limb nerves, as neither bacilli nor inflammatory cells were observed in the nerve branches studied. Antibodies to brain lipids and cardiolipin were not detected in the serum of the palsied animals, thus ruling out an immune response to self-lipids as the basis for the paralysis. Although high levels of antibodies to MLM lipids were detected in the serum of palsied animals they were not related to limb paralysis, as the nerves of the palsied legs showed no evidence of inflammatory damage. In fact, nerves showed no evidence of damage. Paralysis resulted from severe damage of the leg bones. Within the bones the bone marrow became replaced by extended bacilli-laden granulomas that frequently eroded the bone wall, altering the normal architecture of the bone and its annexes, namely muscle, tendons and connective tissue. Although this study rules out definitively the infectious or inflammatory damage of nerves in murine leprosy, it opens a new avenue of research into the factors that participate in the involvement or the sparing of nerves in human and murine leprosy, respectively. PMID:15932504

  11. Radiation-induced lower cranial nerve palsy in patients with head and neck carcinoma

    Janssen, Stefan; Glanzmann, Christoph; Yousefi, Bita; Loewenich, Karl; HUBER, GERHARD; Schmid, Stephan; Studer, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (RICNP) is a severe long-term complication in patients with head and neck cancer following high-dose radiation therapy (RT). We present the case report of a patient with bilateral RICNP of the hypoglossal and vagus cranial nerves (XII/X) following postoperative RT in the era prior to the introduction of intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and an analysis of our IMRT patient cohort at risk including the case of a XII RICNP. A total of 201 patients whose glosso-...

  12. Transient Femoral Nerve Palsy Complicating “Blind” Transversus Abdominis Plane Block

    Dimitrios K. Manatakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of patients who reported quadriceps femoris weakness and hypoesthesia over the anterior thigh after an inguinal hernia repair under transversus abdominis plane (TAP block. Transient femoral nerve palsy is the result of local anesthetic incorrectly injected between transversus abdominis muscle and transversalis fascia and pooling around the femoral nerve. Although it is a minor and self-limiting complication, it requires overnight hospital stay and observation of the patients. Performing the block under ultrasound guidance and injecting the least volume of local anesthetic required are ways of minimizing its incidence.

  13. Superior Oblique Anterior Transposition with Horizontal Recti Recession-Resection for Total Third-Nerve Palsy

    Muhsin Eraslan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To report the results of lateral rectus muscle recession, medial rectus muscle resection, and superior oblique muscle transposition in the restoration and maintenance of ocular alignment in primary position for patients with total third-nerve palsy. Methods. The medical records of patients who underwent surgery between March 2007 and September 2011 for total third-nerve palsy were reviewed. All patients underwent a preoperative assessment, including a detailed ophthalmologic examination. Results. A total of 6 patients (age range, 14–45 years were included. The median preoperative horizontal deviation was 67.5 Prism Diopter (PD (interquartile range [IQR] 57.5–70 and vertical deviation was 13.5 PD (IQR 10–20. The median postoperative horizontal residual exodeviation was 8.0 PD (IQR 1–16, and the vertical deviation was 0 PD (IQR 0–4. The median correction of hypotropia following superior oblique transposition was 13.5 ± 2.9 PD (range, 10–16. All cases were vertically aligned within 5 PD. Four of the six cases were aligned within 10 PD of the horizontal deviation. Adduction and head posture were improved in all patients. All patients gained new area of binocular single vision in the primary position after the operation. Conclusion. Lateral rectus recession, medial rectus resection, and superior oblique transposition may be used to achieve satisfactory cosmetic and functional results in total third-nerve palsy.

  14. Facial nerve palsy: incidence of different ethiologies in a tertiary ambulatory

    Atolini Junior, Nédio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The ethiologic diferencial diagnostic for facial nerve paralisis is still a challenge and the literature has shown conflictive results concerning its epidemiology. Objective: To outline the incidence of the different ethiologies and the profile of peripheral facial nerve paralysis patients in the otolaryngology ambulatory of the Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas e Biologicas da PUC-SP - campus Sorocaba. Method: The records of 54 patients with facial nerve paralysis seen during the years of 2007 and 2008 were analysed retrospectively. Results: From the 54 patients analysed, 55,5% were male, median age of 40,6 years and had the right side of the face acomitted in 66,6%. Parestesia of the accomited side in 51,85% and increased tears in 66,6% of the patients were observed as associated symptoms. Bell´s palsy was the most frequent ethiology (53,7%, follwed by: traumatic (24%, Ramsay Hunt syndrome (9,2%, Cholesteatoma (5,5%, malignant otitis media (3,7% and acute otits media (3,7%. Three cases of Bell´s palsy during pregancy was also seen in this series. Conclusion: The data found are similiar of the most of the literature, showing that Bell´s palsy is still the most frequent, followed by traumatic causes and others. There is an equilibrium concerning to the gender, with a slight prevalence for males and for the right side of the face.

  15. Unilateral Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy after Use of the Laryngeal Mask Airway Supreme

    Kenichi Takahoko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA is an exceptionally rare complication. We present the first case of unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the LMA Supreme. Clinical Features. A healthy 67-year-old female was scheduled for a hallux valgus correction under general anesthesia combined with femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. A size 4 LMA Supreme was inserted successfully at the first attempt and the cuff was inflated with air at an intracuff pressure of 60 cmH2O using cuff pressure gauge. Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide (67%, and sevoflurane under spontaneous breathing. The surgery was uneventful and the duration of anesthesia was two hours. The LMA was removed as the patient woke and there were no immediate postoperative complications. The next morning, the patient complained of dysarthria and dysphasia. These symptoms were considered to be caused by the LMA compressing the nerve against the hyoid bone. Conservative treatment was chosen and the paralysis recovered completely after 5 months. Conclusion. Hypoglossal nerve injury may occur despite correct positioning of the LMA under the appropriate intracuff pressure. A follow-up period of at least 6 months should be taken into account for the recovery.

  16. Nerve Transfers for Adult Traumatic Brachial Plexus Palsy (Brachial Plexus Nerve Transfer)

    Rohde, Rachel S.; Wolfe, Scott W.

    2006-01-01

    Adult traumatic brachial plexus injuries can have devastating effects on upper extremity function. Although neurolysis, nerve repair, and nerve grafting have been used to treat injuries to the plexus, nerve transfer makes use of an undamaged nerve to supply motor input over a relatively short distance to reinnervate a denervated muscle. A review of several recent innovations in nerve transfer surgery for brachial plexus injuries is illustrated with surgical cases performed at this institution.

  17. Femoral and obturator nerves palsy caused by pelvic cement extrusion after hip arthroplasty.

    Pawel Zwolak

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cement extrusion into the pelvis with subsequent palsy of the obturator and femoral nerves is a rare entity after hip replacement surgery. Cemented fixation of the acetabular cup has been considered as a safe and reliable standard procedure with very good long term results. We present a case of fifty year old female patient after hip arthroplasty procedure which suffered an obturator and femoral nerve palsy caused by extrusion of bone cement into the pelvis. Postoperative X-rays and CT-scan of the pelvis demonstrated a huge mass consisted of bone cement in close proximity of femoral and obturator nerves. The surgery charts reported shallow and weak bony substance in postero-superior aspect of the acetabulum. This weak bony acetabular substance may have caused extrusion of bone cement during press-fitting of the polyethylene cup into the acetabulum, and the following damage of the both nerves produced by polymerization of bone cement. The bone cement fragment has been surgically removed 3 weeks after arthroplasty. The female patient underwent intensive postoperative physical therapy and electro stimulation which resulted in full recovery of the patient to daily routine and almost normal electromyography results.

  18. Remote therapeutic effect of early nerve transposition in treatment of obstetric al brachial plexus palsy

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To report a method and remote therape utic effect of early nerve transposition in treatment of obstetrical brachial pl exus palsy.   Methods: From May 1995 to August 1996, 12 patients who had no r ecovery of biceps 3 months after birth were treated with nerve transposition. Ei ght had neuroma at the upper trunk and 4 had rupture or avulsion of the upper tr unk. Mallet test was used to evaluate the results.   Results: The follow-up of 40-52 months showed that excellent and good recovery in functions was found in 75% of the patients and the excellen t rate of phrenic nerve and accessory nerve transposition was 83.3% and 6 6.7% respectively. A complete recovery in shoulder and elbow joint function wa s in 3 patients and Mallet Ⅳ was in 6 patients.   Conclusions: Satisfactory outcome can be obtained by using earl y nerve transposition in treating obstetrical brachial plexus.Paralysis, obstetric; Peripheral nerves; Nerve trans position

  19. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    ... may reduce the risk by controlling their blood sugar. Alternative Names Abducens paralysis; Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; Vith nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References Rucker JC. Cranial ...

  20. Clinical studies of photodynamic therapy for malignant brain tumors: facial nerve palsy after temporal fossa photoillumination

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.; Lilge, Lothar D.; Varma, Abhay; Bogaards, Arjen; Fullagar, Tim; Fenstermaker, Robert; Selker, Robert; Abrams, Judith

    2003-06-01

    In two randomized prospective studies of brain tumor PDT more than 180 patients have been accrued. At the Toronto site we recognized two patients who developed a lower motor neuron (LMN) facial paralysis in the week following the PDT treatment. In both cases a temporal lobectomy was undertaken and the residual tumor cavity was photo-illuminated. The surface illuminated included the temporal fossa floor, thus potentially exposing the facial nerve to the effect of PDT. The number of frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital tumors in this cohort was 39, 24, 12 and 4, respectively. Of the 24 temporal tumors 18 were randomized to Photofrin-PDT. Of these 18 a temporal lobectomy was carried out exposing the middle fossa floor as part of the tumor resection. In two of the 10 patients where the lobectomy was carried out and the fossa floor was exposed to light there occurred a postoperative facial palsy. Both patients recovered facial nerve function in 6 and 12 weeks, respectively. 46 J/cm2 were used in the former and 130 J/cm2 in the latter. We did not encounter a single post-operative LMN facial plasy in the 101 phase 2 patients treated with Photofrin-PDT. Among 688 supratentorial brain tumor operations in the last decade involving all pathologies and all locations no case of early post-operative LMN facial palsy was identified in the absence of PDT. One further patient who had a with post-PDT facial palsy was identified at the Denver site. Although it is possible that these patients had incidental Bell's palsy, we now recommend shielding the temporal fossa floor during PDT.

  1. Prognostic value of pretreatment and recovery duration of cranial nerve palsy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of cranial nerve (CN) palsy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. A retrospective analysis was performed on CN involvement using medical records of 178 consecutive patients with histologically diagnosed, non-disseminated NPC. In 178 NPC patients with CN palsy, the 5-year survival rates were as follows: overall survival (OS), 61.0%; disease-specific survival (DSS), 69.6%; local relapse-free survival (LRFS), 75.2%; distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), 73.4%; and disease-free survival (DFS), 55.3%. Significant differences were observed in the 5-year OS rates between patients with single and multiple CN palsy (69.8% vs. 54.3%; P = 0.033) and the OS rates between patients with different pretreatment durations (68.7% vs. 43.3%, P = 0.007). However, no significant differences were observed in OS, DSS, LRFS and DFS rates between patients with upper and lower CN palsy (P = 0.581, P = 0.792, P = 0.729 and P = 0.212, respectively). The results showed that recovery duration was an independent prognostic factor for OS (HR = 2.485; P < 0.001), DSS (HR = 2.065; P = 0.016), LRFS (HR = 3.051; P = 0.001) and DFS (HR = 2.440; P < 0.001). Recovery duration is an independent prognostic factor for NPC patients with CN palsy and is related to recurrence, which leads to poor survival. Recovery duration requires close surveillance and different treatment regimens

  2. Superior rectus transposition combined with medial rectus recession for Duane syndrome and sixth nerve palsy

    Mehendale, Reshma A.; Dagi, Linda R.; Wu, Carolyn; Ledoux, Danielle; Johnston, Suzanne; Hunter, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Vertical rectus transposition (VRT) is used to treat abduction limitation, but new vertical deviations and anterior segment ischemia are concerns. Johnston and Crouch described superior rectus transposition (SRT), a procedure in which only the superior rectus muscle is transposed temporally. We describe our results using augmented temporal SRT with adjustable medial rectus muscle recession (MRc) for treatment of Duane syndrome I (DS) and sixth nerve palsy. Methods Retrospective surgical case review of patients undergoing the SRT procedure. Pre- and post-operative orthoptic measurements were recorded. Minimum follow-up was 6 weeks. Main outcome measures included angle of esotropia in primary position and the angle of head turn. Secondary outcomes included duction limitation, stereopsis, and new vertical deviations. Results The review identified seventeen patients (10 with DS and 7 with sixth nerve palsy). SRT+MRc improved esotropia [from 44 PD to 10.1 PD (p< 0.0001)], reduced abduction limitation [from −4.3 to −2.7 (p<0.0001)] and improved compensatory head posture [from 28°to 4° (p<0.0001)]. Stereopsis was recovered in eight patients (p=0.03). Three patients required a reoperation; one for overcorrection and 2 for undercorrection. A new primary position vertical deviation was observed in 2/7 patients with complex sixth nerve palsy and 0/10 DS patients. No patient described torsional diplopia. Conclusions SRT allows for the option of simultaneous medial rectus recession in patients with severe abduction imitation who require transposition surgery. SRT+MRc improved esotropia, head position, abduction limitation, and stereopsis without inducing torsional diplopia. PMID:22332212

  3. Oculomotor Nerve Palsy following Cardiac Tamponade with Churg-Strauss Syndrome: A Case Report

    Suganuma, Kazuki; Hashimoto, Takao; Sato, Hiromasa; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Sakurai, Shunpei

    2011-01-01

    A 57-year-old man with a history of more than 10 years of bronchial asthma and chronic sinusitis complained of double vision which developed 18 days after cardiac tamponade with eosinophil-rich fluid (eosinophils 30%). He had oculomotor nerve palsy, and a blood test revealed eosinophilia (12,700/mm3) and elevation of both C-reactive protein and rheumatoid factor. He was diagnosed as having Churg-Strauss syndrome. His symptoms were relieved by corticosteroid therapy. Our case and previous case...

  4. Midbrain hematoma presenting with isolated bilateral palsy of the third cranial nerve in a Moroccan man: a case report

    El Ouali Ouarda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bilateral third nerve palsy secondary to a hemorrhagic stroke is exceptional. To the best of our knowledge, no similar case has been reported in the literature. Case presentation We describe the case of a 69-year-old Moroccan man who presented with isolated sudden bilateral third nerve palsy. Computed tomography (CT of the brain revealed a midbrain hematoma. The oculomotor function gradually and completely improved over eight months of follow-up. Conclusion Stroke should be included in the differential diagnosis of sudden isolated oculomotor paralysis even when it is bilateral because of the severity of the underlying disease and the importance of its therapeutic implications.

  5. Discrepancy between magnetic resonance imaging and cranial nerve neuropathies associated with the involvement of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma(DLBL)

    Yutaka, TSUTSUMI; Asako, N A K A T A; Souichi,SHIRA TORI; Hiroaki, Y A M ATO; Nobuyuki, EHIRA; Hiroe, K A N A MORI; Takahito, K A W A MURA; Taro, NISHIO; Nobutaka, OGURA

    2007-01-01

    An 83-year-old female developed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma(DLBL) of the left nasal cavity. Complete remission was achieved after two courses of Rituximab and CHOP(R-CHOP) . During the fourth course of R-CHOP, sensory disturbance and palsy of the left face developed. Left trigeminal nerve swelling was observed in magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) followed by double vision in the left eye, and MRI revealed swelling of both trigeminal nerves but not of the abducens nerve. Although the swelling ...

  6. Tardy posterior interosseous nerve palsy resulting from residual dislocation of the radial head in a Monteggia fracture: a case report

    Lee Kyung-Jae

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report an extremely rare case of tardy posterior interosseous nerve palsy that developed 40 years after unreduced anterior dislocation of the radial head in a Monteggia fracture. Case presentation A 46-year-old Asian woman was diagnosed with tardy posterior interosseous nerve palsy resulting from residual dislocation of the radial head in a Monteggia fracture. The patient remembered that she had sustained a fracture to the right elbow when she was 6 years old but could not remember the details of either the injury or its treatment. Intra-operatively, the posterior interosseous nerve was compressed at the radial head, wrapped around the medial side of the radial neck, and ran into the distorted supinator muscle, and was stretched. We therefore excised the radial head and performed neurolysis. The function of the right hand was normal at a follow-up examination 8 months after surgery. Conclusion We theorize that excessive repeated motion with loss of elasticity of surrounding tissues because of long-term dislocation of the radial head may cause delayed posterior interosseous nerve palsy. It is necessary to make an accurate diagnosis and render proper treatment when a Monteggia fracture occurs, making sure that the radial head does not remain dislocated, to avoid possible posterior interosseous nerve palsy due to excessive pronation and supination even several decades later.

  7. Management of Synkinesis and Asymmetry in Facial Nerve Palsy: A Review Article

    Abbasali pourmomeny

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The important sequelae of facial nerve palsy are synkinesis, asymmetry, hypertension and contracture; all of which have psychosocial effects on patients. Synkinesis due to mal regeneration causes involuntary movements during a voluntary movement. Previous studies have advocated treatment using physiotherapy modalities alone or with exercise therapy, but no consensus exists on the optimal approach. Thus, this review summarizes clinical controlled studies in the management of synkinesis and asymmetry in facial nerve palsy.   Materials and Methods: Case-controlled clinical studies of patients at the acute stage of injury were selected for this review article. Data were obtained from English-language databases from 1980 until mid-2013.   Results: Among 124 articles initially captured, six randomized controlled trials involving 269 patients were identified with appropriate inclusion criteria. The results of all these studies emphasized the benefit of exercise therapy. Four studies considered electromyogram (EMG biofeedback to be effective through neuromuscular re-education.   Conclusion:  Synkinesis and inconsistency of facial muscles could be treated with educational exercise therapy. EMG biofeedback is a suitable tool for this exercise therapy.

  8. Long-Lasting Cranial Nerve III Palsy as a Presenting Feature of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    Rossella Spataro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP in which an adduction deficit and ptosis in the left eye presented several years before the polyneuropathy. A 52-year-old man presented with a 14-year history of unremitting diplopia, adduction deficit, and ptosis in the left eye. At the age of 45 a mild bilateral foot drop and impaired sensation in the four limbs appeared, with these symptoms showing a progressive course. The diagnostic workup included EMG/ENG which demonstrated reduced conduction velocity with bilateral and symmetrical sensory and motor involvement. Cerebrospinal fluid studies revealed a cytoalbuminologic dissociation. A prolonged treatment with corticosteroids allowed a significant improvement of the limb weakness. Diplopia and ptosis remained unchanged. This unusual form of CIDP presented as a long-lasting isolated cranial nerve palsy. A diagnostic workup for CIDP should therefore be performed in those patients in which an isolated and unremitting cranial nerve palsy cannot be explained by common causes.

  9. The utility of anatomic diagnosis for identifying femoral nerve palsy following gynecologic surgery.

    Watanabe, Tatsunori; Sekine, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takayuki; Baba, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    We describe a case in which an anatomic diagnosis was useful for diagnosing and estimating the cause of femoral nerve palsy following gynecologic surgery. A 49-year-old female received general and epidural anesthesia for radical ovarian cancer surgery. Although injection pain was noted in the left medial shin with 1 % mepivacaine administered as a test dose, the catheter was left indwelling because it improved her symptoms. The surgery, which lasted 195 min, was performed in the lithotomy position, and a self-retained retractor was used to gain a good surgical field. Postoperatively, the patient complained of difficulty in stretching her knee joint and left lower limb paresthesia that did not improve after stopping continuous epidural administration. A spinal cord injury related to epidural anesthesia was suspected because the sites of sensory impairment and epidural injection pain were the same; however, the patient had greater weakness of the quadriceps muscle than the iliopsoas, and no other muscle weakness was observed. These findings and previous reports suggest that her femoral nerve palsy was caused by compression of the inguinal ligament from the self-retaining retractor and lithotomy position. Twenty months after surgery, her muscle strength had fully recovered. PMID:26661449

  10. MRI enhancement of the facial nerve with Gd-DTPA, 2; Investigation of enhanced nerve portions in patients with facial palsy

    Yanagida, Masahiro (Kansai Medical School, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    We performed enhanced MRI using Gd-DTPA in 84 patients with facial palsy. After assessing enhancement of the normal facial nerve, we examined enhancement in patients with Bell's palsy and Ramsay Hunt syndrome. In 95% of patients with Bell's palsy, enhancement was obtained in the distal IAC and labyrinthine portions. In 72%, enhancement was significant from the distal IAC portion through the vertical portion. In some of the patients who underwent enhanced MRI twice, increased signal intensity was observed in distal portions such as the vertical portion. In many cases of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, enhancement was seen extensively in the IAC portion through the vertical portion. In the subjects with internal auditory symptoms such as vertigo and tinnitus, enhancement of the IAC portion was seen not only in the facial nerve but also in the vestibular and the cochlear nerves. These results suggest that the vascular permeability of lesions in Bell's palsy may be increased from the distal IAC portion to the vertical portion. Judging from the present findings with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, symptoms related to the enhanced portions suggest that accompanying internal auditory symptoms occur due to inflammation of the IAC portions of cochlear and vestibular nerves. (author).

  11. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cranial nerve palsy: The importance of MRI for radiotherapy

    Purpose: To evaluate various prognostic factors and the impact of imaging modalities on tumor control in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) with cranial nerve (China) palsy. Material and Methods: Between September 1979 and December 2000, 330 NPC patients with CN palsy received radical radiotherapy (RT) by the conventional opposing technique at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou. Imaging methods used varied over that period, and included conventional tomography (Tm) for 47 patients, computerized tomography (CT) for 195 patients, and magnetic resonance image (MRI) for 88 patients. Upper CN (II-VI) palsy was found in 268 patients, lower CN (IX-XII) in 13, and 49 patients had both. The most commonly involved CN were V or VI or both (23%, 12%, and 16%, respectively). All patients had good performance status (World Health Organization <2). The median external RT dose was 70.2 Gy (range, 63-77.5 Gy). Brachytherapy was also given to 156 patients in addition to external RT, delivered by the remote after-loading, high-dose-rate technique. A total of 139 patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy, in 115 received as neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy and in 24 concomitant with RT. Recovery from CN palsy occurred in 171 patients during or after radiotherapy. Patients who died without a specific cause identified were regarded as having died with persistent disease. Results: The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year overall survival was 47.1%, 34.4%, and 22.2%. The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 50.4%, 37.8%, and 25.9%. The 5-year DSS for patients staged with MRI, CT, and Tm were 46.9%, 36.7%, and 21.9%, respectively (p = 0.016). The difference between MRI and CT was significant (p = 0.015). The 3-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 53%, respectively. The 5-year local control was 68.2% if excluding patients who died without a specific cause. Patients who had an MRI had a significantly better tumor control rate than those

  12. Tourniquet-Related Iatrogenic Femoral Nerve Palsy after Knee Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Juan Mingo-Robinet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Tourniquet-induced nerve injuries have been reported in the literature, but even if electromyography abnormalities in knee surgery are frequent, only two cases of permanent femoral nerve palsies have been reported, both after prolonged tourniquet time. We report a case of tourniquet-related permanent femoral nerve palsy after knee surgery. Case Report. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent surgical treatment of a patella fracture. Tourniquet was inflated to 310 mmHg for 45 minutes. After surgery, patient complained about paralysis of the quadriceps femoris with inability to extend the knee. Electromyography and nerve conduction study showed a severe axonal neuropathy of the left femoral nerve, without clinical remission after several months. Discussion. Even if complications are not rare, safe duration and pressure for tourniquet use remain a controversy. Nevertheless, subtle clinical lesions of the femoral nerve or even subclinical lesions only detectable by nerve conduction and EMG activity are frequent, so persistent neurologic dysfunction, even if rare, may be an underreported complication of tourniquet application. Elderly persons with muscle atrophy and flaccid, loose skin might be in risk for iatrogenic nerve injury secondary to tourniquet.

  13. Femoral nerve palsy caused by ileopectineal bursitis after total hip replacement: a case report

    Bähr Mathias

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Infectious ileopectineal bursitis is a rare complication after total hip replacement and is associated mainly with rheumatoid arthritis. The main complications are local swelling and pain, but communication of the inflamed bursa with the joint can occur, leading to subsequent cartilage damage and bone destruction. Case presentation We report a case of a 47-year-old Caucasian woman without rheumatoid arthritis who reported pain and palsy in her left leg almost one year after total hip replacement. She was diagnosed with an ileopectineal bursitis after total hip replacement, leading to femoral nerve palsy. The diagnosis was obtained by thorough clinical examination, the results of focused computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of non-infectious ileopectineal bursitis in a patient without rheumatoid arthritis as a complication of total hip replacement. This rare case underlines the importance of proper neurologic examination of persistent conditions after orthopedic intervention in otherwise healthy individuals. We believe this case should be useful for a broad spectrum of medical specialties, including orthopedics, neurology, radiology, and general practice.

  14. Paralisia nervosa na artroplastia total do quadril Nerve palsy in total hip replacement

    Carlos Roberto Schwartsmann

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A paralisia nervosa pós-prótese total do quadril é uma complicação incomum (0,17 a 1%. A presente revisão, após levantamento bibliográfico sobre o assunto, analisa 50 artigos relevantes sobre o tema. A revisão tem como objetivos analisar dados da fisiopatologia, prevalência, etiologia, fatores de risco, prognóstico e prevenção dessa complicação.Nerve palsy after total hip replacement is a rare complication (0.17% to 1%. This review of the literature on this topic reviews 50 relevant papers on the issue. The purpose of the review is to analyze pathophysiology, prevalence, etiology, risk factors, prognosis, and prevention of this complication.

  15. Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy with Multiple-Ligament Knee Injury and Distal Avulsion of the Biceps Femoris Tendon

    Takeshi Oshima; Junsuke Nakase; Hitoaki Numata; Yasushi Takata; Hiroyuki Tsuchiya

    2015-01-01

    A multiple-ligament knee injury that includes posterolateral corner (PLC) disruption often causes palsy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN), which occurs in 44% of cases with PLC injury and biceps femoris tendon rupture or avulsion of the fibular head. Approximately half of these cases do not show functional recovery. This case report aims to present a criteria-based approach to the operation and postoperative management of CPN palsy that resulted from a multiple-ligament knee injury in a 22-y...

  16. Èlectroneuromyographiс parameters as prognostic criteria in facial nerve palsy outcome

    N. G. Savitskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article we present the results of the retrospective clinico-electrophysiological analysis of 182 patients suffering from the idiopathic neuropathy of the facial nerve (Bell`s palsy. The comparison of the most common electromyographical (ENMG predictors of outcomes was made. It was demonstrated that the most sensitive method in the acutest period (less then 5 days is the level of excitability of the nerve, in the acute period (less then 14 days – estimation of M-answer amplitude loss, and from the 21st day – the presence of denervation in muscles. The most specific electromyographical approach to estimate the therapy efficiency is an analysis of the M-answer amplitude and latency. In conclusion, neurologists have the possibility to predict the outcome and to control the therapy efficiency in any period of the disease. The correlation dynamics ÈNMG sensitivity settings – NLN on different dates can be used to determine the volume of ÈNMG – the NLN study depending on the timing for the treatment of patients.

  17. A Case of Death Secondary to Phrenic Nerve Palsy after Huge Mediastinal Teratoma 
Resection in Newborn

    Yuanda CHENG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal teratomas, not common in clinical, are often some case reports, female more than male, most are benign. It can occur anywhere of body midline; sacrococcygeal teratoma is the most common and the second most frequent site of extragonadal teratomas is mediastinum. Benign is more commom and malignant is very rarely seen. Completely surgical resection is the main and effective treatment. This review reports a case of neonatal teratoma, which is complicated with a fatal phrenic nerve palsy after surgery.

  18. UNILATERAL EXTERNAL AUDITORY CANAL ATRESIA WITH CONGENITAL FACIAL NERVE PALSY : A CASE REPORT

    Venkata Ramana Rao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Congenital facial palsy is generally due to developmental an o m a ly or acquired cause. Unilateral congenital facial palsy due to developmental defect is most often associated with inner ear abnormalities. We report a rare case of unilateral congenital facial palsy with atresia of pinna and external auditory canal and normally developed middle ear and inner ear structures.

  19. UNILATERAL EXTERNAL AUDITORY CANAL ATRESIA WITH CONGENITAL FACIAL NERVE PALSY : A CASE REPORT

    Venkata Ramana Rao; Sharma,; Subba Rao; Pravin

    2015-01-01

    Congenital facial palsy is generally due to developmental an o m a ly or acquired cause. Unilateral congenital facial palsy due to developmental defect is most often associated with inner ear abnormalities. We report a rare case of unilateral congenital facial palsy with atresia of pinna and external auditory canal and normally developed middle ear and inner ear structures.

  20. Diagnostic Value of FDG-PET/CT in Laryngeal Nerve Palsy

    Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Thomassen, Anders; Hess, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    from January 2011 until March 2013. Scan results were compared to clinical workup including biopsy and pathology results. A scan was considered true positive if PET/CT was suggestive of malignancy along the pathway of the recurrent laryngeal nerves, and this finding was confirmed by biopsy and false...... positive if not confirmed by biopsy and/or follow-up. A true negative scan was one without abnormal FDG-uptake and a follow-up demonstrating non-malignancy, whereas a false negative scan was present if follow-up was consistent with malignancy in a patient in whom PET/CT failed to detect a malignancy...... suspicious lesion. Results The study comprised 48 patients, 23 females and 25 males with a mean age of 66 years (range 37-89). Nine of these had a history of radically treated cancer. Twenty-one (44 %) were diagnosed with cancer during follow-up, most frequently of the lung, breast and oesophagus. The palsy...

  1. Results of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer in 110 patients with complete palsy of the brachial plexus.

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Transfer of the spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve is a common procedure, performed to reestablish shoulder motion in patients with total brachial plexus palsy. However, the results of this procedure remain largely unknown. METHODS Over an 11-year period (2002-2012), 257 patients with total brachial plexus palsy were operated upon in the authors' department by a single surgeon and had the spinal accessory nerve transferred to the suprascapular nerve. Among these, 110 had adequate follow-up and were included in this study. Their average age was 26 years (SD 8.4 years), and the mean interval between their injury and surgery was 5.2 months (SD 2.4 months). Prior to 2005, the suprascapular and spinal accessory nerves were dissected through a classic supraclavicular L-shape incision (n = 29). Afterward (n = 81), the spinal accessory and suprascapular nerves were dissected via an oblique incision, extending from the point at which the plexus crossed the clavicle to the anterior border of the trapezius muscle. In 17 of these patients, because of clavicle fractures or dislocation, scapular fractures or retroclavicular scarring, the incision was extended by detaching the trapezius from the clavicle to expose the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular fossa. In all patients, the brachial plexus was explored and elbow flexion reconstructed by root grafting (n = 95), root grafting and phrenic nerve transfer (n = 6), phrenic nerve transfer (n = 1), or third, fourth, and fifth intercostal nerve transfer. Postoperatively, patients were followed for an average of 40 months (SD 13.7 months). RESULTS Failed recovery, meaning less than 30° abduction, was observed in 10 (9%) of the 110 patients. The failure rate was 25% between 2002 and 2004, but dropped to 5% after the staged/extended approach was introduced. The mean overall range of abduction recovery was 58.5° (SD 26°). Comparing before and after distal suprascapular nerve exploration (2005-2012), the

  2. Laryngeal and phrenic nerve involvement in a patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP).

    Cortese, A; Piccolo, G; Lozza, A; Schreiber, A; Callegari, I; Moglia, A; Alfonsi, E; Pareyson, D

    2016-07-01

    Lower cranial and phrenic nerve involvement is exceptional in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Here we report the occurrence of reversible laryngeal and phrenic nerve involvement in a patient with HNPP. The patient recalled several episodes of reversible weakness and numbness of his feet and hands since the age of 30 years. His medical history was uneventful, apart from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). At age 44, following severe weight loss, he presented with progressive dysphonia and hoarseness. EMG of cricoarytenoid and thyroarytenoid muscles and laryngeal fibroscopy confirmed vocal cord paralysis. These speech disturbances gradually regressed. Two years later, he reported rapidly worsening dyspnea. Electroneurography showed increased distal latency of the right phrenic nerve and diaphragm ultrasonography documented reduced right hemi-diaphragm excursion. Six months later and after optimization of CODP treatment, his respiratory function had improved and both phrenic nerve conduction and diaphragm excursion were completely restored. We hypothesize that chronic cough and nerve stretching in the context of CODP, together with severe weight loss, may have triggered the nerve paralysis in this patient. Our report highlights the need for optimal management of comorbidities such as CODP as well as careful control of weight in HNPP patients to avoid potentially harmful complications. PMID:27241821

  3. Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy following intranasal delivery of a genetically detoxified mutant of Escherichia coli heat labile toxin.

    David J M Lewis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An association was previously established between facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy and intranasal administration of an inactivated influenza virosome vaccine containing an enzymatically active Escherichia coli Heat Labile Toxin (LT adjuvant. The individual component(s responsible for paralysis were not identified, and the vaccine was withdrawn. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Subjects participating in two contemporaneous non-randomized Phase 1 clinical trials of nasal subunit vaccines against Human Immunodeficiency Virus and tuberculosis, both of which employed an enzymatically inactive non-toxic mutant LT adjuvant (LTK63, underwent active follow-up for adverse events using diary-cards and clinical examination. Two healthy subjects experienced transient peripheral facial nerve palsies 44 and 60 days after passive nasal instillation of LTK63, possibly a result of retrograde axonal transport after neuronal ganglioside binding or an inflammatory immune response, but without exaggerated immune responses to LTK63. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While the unique anatomical predisposition of the facial nerve to compression suggests nasal delivery of neuronal-binding LT-derived adjuvants is inadvisable, their continued investigation as topical or mucosal adjuvants and antigens appears warranted on the basis of longstanding safety via oral, percutaneous, and other mucosal routes.

  4. A Case Presentation of a Third-Nerve Palsy as a Characteristic of Miller Fisher Syndrome

    Trennda L. Rittenbach, OD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: A rare clinical variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome, known as Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS, is an immunemediated neuropathy classically characterized by a triad consisting of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia.1,2 Although MFS is thought to be a disease of immunological basis, other pathological entities may give rise to the syndrome as well. The diagnosis of MFS relies upon clinical signs, a combination of lab tests including antibody serum, cerebrospinal fluid, and electrophysiological findings. Understanding the clinical course of MFS and its ocular components can aid in the rehabilitation and co-management of these patients. Case Report: A 79-year-old white male presented with a four day onset of double vision and an inability to walk unassisted. An examination revealed a pupil-sparing third-nerve palsy with a left eye ptosis. Due to the patient being in moderate pain throughout his entire body and presenting with an acute onset of symptoms, the patient was sent to the emergency room in the same hospital building. The patient was immediately admitted for evaluation and testing which revealed the diagnosis of MFS. Conclusions: Although a complaint of diplopia can lead to an array of diagnoses, when accompanied by an acute inability to walk, MFS should be on the list of possible causes. Although mostly a self-limiting disease, there is the possibility of progressing to respiratory failure. Knowledge of the syndrome, its clinical course, and prognosis, along with an appropriate evaluation with current laboratory testing, will lead to the proper diagnosis, treatment, and management.

  5. Treatment of Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Spontaneous Dissection with Pseudoaneurysm and Unilateral Lower Cranial Nerves Palsy by Two Silk Flow Diverters

    Internal carotid artery (ICA) lesions in the parapharyngeal space (a dissection and a pseudoaneurysm) may present as isolated lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XI, and XII) palsy (Collet–Sicard syndrome). Some arteriopathies such as fibromuscular dysplasia and tortuosity make a vessel predisposed to dissection. Extreme vessel tortuosity makes the treatment by a stent graft impossible. Two Silk stents were used in a 46 year-old man with left lower cranial nerves (IX–XII) palsy for the treatment of left ICA spontaneous dissection with pseudoaneurysm. A follow-up angiogram 5 months later confirmed pseudoaneurysm thrombosis and patency of the left ICA. The patient recovered completely from the deficits

  6. Treatment of Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Spontaneous Dissection with Pseudoaneurysm and Unilateral Lower Cranial Nerves Palsy by Two Silk Flow Diverters

    Zelenak, Kamil, E-mail: zelenak@unm.sk [University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Slovakia); Zelenakova, Jana [University Hospital, Department of Neurology (Slovakia); DeRiggo, Julius [University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery (Slovakia); Kurca, Egon; Kantorova, Ema [University Hospital, Department of Neurology (Slovakia); Polacek, Hubert [University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Slovakia)

    2013-08-01

    Internal carotid artery (ICA) lesions in the parapharyngeal space (a dissection and a pseudoaneurysm) may present as isolated lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XI, and XII) palsy (Collet-Sicard syndrome). Some arteriopathies such as fibromuscular dysplasia and tortuosity make a vessel predisposed to dissection. Extreme vessel tortuosity makes the treatment by a stent graft impossible. Two Silk stents were used in a 46 year-old man with left lower cranial nerves (IX-XII) palsy for the treatment of left ICA spontaneous dissection with pseudoaneurysm. A follow-up angiogram 5 months later confirmed pseudoaneurysm thrombosis and patency of the left ICA. The patient recovered completely from the deficits.

  7. An unusual presentation of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the minor salivary glands with cranial nerve palsy: a case study

    Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor entity and comprises about 1% of all malignant tumor of the oral and maxillofacial region. It is slow growing but a highly invasive cancer with a high recurrence rate. Intracranial ACC is even more infrequent and could be primary or secondary occurring either by direct invasion, hematogenous spread, or perineural spread. We report the first case of the 5th and 6th nerve palsy due to cavernous sinus invasion by adenoid cystic carcinoma. A 49-year-old African American female presented to the emergency room complaining of severe right-sided headache, photophobia, dizziness and nausea, with diplopia. The patient had a 14 year history migraine headaches, hypertension, and mild intermittent asthma. Physical examination revealed right lateral rectus muscle palsy with esotropia. There was numbness in all three divisions of the right trigeminal nerve. Motor and sensory examination of extremities was normal. An MRI of the brain/brain stem was obtained which showed a large mass in the clivus extending to involve the nasopharynx, pterygoid plate, sphenoid and right cavernous sinuses. Biopsy showed an ACC tumor with a cribriform pattern of the minor salivary glands. The patient underwent total gross surgical resection and radiation therapy. This is a case of ACC of the minor salivary glands with intracranial invasion. The patient had long history of headaches which changed in character during the past year, and symptoms of acute 5th and 6th cranial nerve involvement. Our unique case demonstrates direct invasion of cavernous sinus and could explain the 5th and 6th cranial nerve involvement as histopathology revealed no perineural invasion

  8. An unusual presentation of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the minor salivary glands with cranial nerve palsy: a case study

    Morris Pierre A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (ACC is a rare tumor entity and comprises about 1% of all malignant tumor of the oral and maxillofacial region. It is slow growing but a highly invasive cancer with a high recurrence rate. Intracranial ACC is even more infrequent and could be primary or secondary occurring either by direct invasion, hematogenous spread, or perineural spread. We report the first case of the 5th and 6th nerve palsy due to cavernous sinus invasion by adenoid cystic carcinoma. Case presentation A 49-year-old African American female presented to the emergency room complaining of severe right-sided headache, photophobia, dizziness and nausea, with diplopia. The patient had a 14 year history migraine headaches, hypertension, and mild intermittent asthma. Physical examination revealed right lateral rectus muscle palsy with esotropia. There was numbness in all three divisions of the right trigeminal nerve. Motor and sensory examination of extremities was normal. An MRI of the brain/brain stem was obtained which showed a large mass in the clivus extending to involve the nasopharynx, pterygoid plate, sphenoid and right cavernous sinuses. Biopsy showed an ACC tumor with a cribriform pattern of the minor salivary glands. The patient underwent total gross surgical resection and radiation therapy. Conclusion This is a case of ACC of the minor salivary glands with intracranial invasion. The patient had long history of headaches which changed in character during the past year, and symptoms of acute 5th and 6th cranial nerve involvement. Our unique case demonstrates direct invasion of cavernous sinus and could explain the 5th and 6th cranial nerve involvement as histopathology revealed no perineural invasion.

  9. Trochlear nerve palsy occurred after percutaneous microsphere compression treatment for trigeminal neuralgia: a clinical analysis

    Objective: To discuss the possible causes of trochlear never palsy occurred after percutaneous microsphere compression therapy for trigeminal neuralgia in order to improve the operative procedure and reduce the incidence of complications. Methods: Sixteen patients (study group) who developed postoperative trochlear never palsy after microsphere compression therapy for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, encountered during the period from June 2001 to June 2010, were enrolled in this study. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. The shape of the microsphere which compressed the trigeminal ganglion was observed. Another fifty patients who received microsphere compression therapy and didn't develop postoperative trochlear never palsy, encountered during the period of Jan. 2010-June 2010, were randomly collected as the control group. Results: In all the 16 patients study group the microsphere took the form of the dumbell shape not the ideal 'pear' shape, while the dumbell shape appeared only in 3 patients in the control group. The difference in the frequency of dumbell shape between the two groups was statistically significant (P<0.05). All patients in study group completely recovered from trochlear never palsy after they received neural nourishment therapy. Conclusion: Postoperative trochlear never palsy is caused by inappropriate manipulation, which leads to the protrusion of the microsphere into posterior cranial fossa. In this way, the microsphere presses its wall against the trochlear never and results in never palsy. Proper and careful manipulation can reduce the occurrence of this complication. (authors)

  10. Delayed ulnar nerve palsy secondary to ulnar artery pseudoaneurysm distal to Guyon’s canal following penetrating trauma to the hand

    Dobson, PF; Purushothaman, B.; Michla, Y; England, S; Krishnan, MK; Tourret, L

    2013-01-01

    Compression of the ulnar nerve in Guyon’s canal is an uncommon phenomenon. Reports of ulnar nerve palsy secondary to ulnar artery pseudoaneurysm at this anatomical location are very rare and equivalent pathology just distal to this site is unheard of. Here we present such a case, which featured a delayed onset of symptoms. This followed penetrating trauma to the hand. Our methods for diagnosis, operative planning and surgical treatment are included.

  11. A combination of cranial and peripheral nerve palsies in infectious mononucleosis.

    Mohanaruban, K; Fisher, D J

    1986-01-01

    A 44 year old woman presented with bilateral brachial neuritis and an isolated Bell's palsy. Subsequently she was found to have infectious mononucleosis. The association of cranial and brachial neuropathy has not previously been reported. Without any specific drug therapy she recovered completely within 5 months.

  12. Facial nerve palsy: incidence of different ethiologies in a tertiary ambulatory

    Atolini Junior, Nédio; Jorge Junior, José Jarjura; Gignon, Vinícius de Faria; Kitice, Adriano Tomio; Prado, Letícia Suriano de Almeida; Santos, Vânia Gracia Wolff

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The ethiologic diferencial diagnostic for facial nerve paralisis is still a challenge and the literature has shown conflictive results concerning its epidemiology. Objective: To outline the incidence of the different ethiologies and the profile of peripheral facial nerve paralysis patients in the otolaryngology ambulatory of the Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas e Biologicas da PUC-SP - campus Sorocaba. Method: The records of 54 patients with facial nerve paralysis seen during the y...

  13. Deep Peroneal Nerve Palsy Caused by an Extraneural Ganglion Cyst: A Rare Case

    Dimitrios Nikolopoulos; George Safos; Neoptolemos Sergides; Petros Safos

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremities peripheral neuropathies caused by ganglion cysts are rare. The most frequent location of occurrence is the common peroneal nerve and its branches, at the level of the fibular neck. We report the case of a 57-year-old patient admitted with foot drop, due to an extraneural ganglion of the upper tibiofibular syndesmosis, compressing the deep branch of the peroneal nerve. Although there have been many previous reports of intraneural ganglion involvement with the lower limb nerve...

  14. Peripheral (Seventh Nerve Palsy and Multiple Sclerosis: A Diagnostic Dilemma - A Case Report

    Christian Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, only a few cases on the association between peripheral demyelinating diseases and multiple sclerosis (MS have been reported. We describe the case of a young man who was initially diagnosed with Bell's palsy, and only after performing a brain MRI was the diagnosis of MS made. We review the literature and discuss some pitfalls which may lead to missing the diagnosis of MS.

  15. Femoral nerve palsy caused by ileopectineal bursitis after total hip replacement: a case report

    Bähr Mathias; von Gottberg Philipp; Liman Jan; Kermer Pawel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Infectious ileopectineal bursitis is a rare complication after total hip replacement and is associated mainly with rheumatoid arthritis. The main complications are local swelling and pain, but communication of the inflamed bursa with the joint can occur, leading to subsequent cartilage damage and bone destruction. Case presentation We report a case of a 47-year-old Caucasian woman without rheumatoid arthritis who reported pain and palsy in her left leg almost one year af...

  16. A rare case of human immunodeficiency virus associated bilateral facial nerve palsy in North India

    Sanjay Gupta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV cases are on the increase in India and worldwide, so are its various complications. Neurological complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. They can occur at any stage of the disease and can affect any level of the central or peripheral nervous systems. In the literature, several cases of HIV-associated facial paralysis have been reported; however, bilateral facial palsy is rarely reported

  17. Apoplexy of a pituitary macroadenoma with reversible third, fourth and sixth cranial nerve palsies following administration of hypothalamic releasing hormones: MR features

    Pituitary apoplexy in patients with pituitary macroadenomas can occur either spontaneously or following various interventions. We present a case of a 71-year-old woman who developed third, fourth, and sixth cranial nerve palsies following administration of the four hypothalamic releasing hormones for routine preoperative testing of pituitary function. The MR examination showed interval tumor growth with impression of the floor of the third ventricle. There were also changes in signal intensity characteristics of the mass, suggestive of intratumoral bleeding. A transsphenoidal surgery with subtotal resection of the pituitary adenoma was performed. Microscopical examination revealed large areas of necrosis and blood surrounded by adenomatous tissue. Third, fourth, and sixth cranial nerve palsies completely resolved within 4 months. We conclude that MR imaging is useful in the demonstration of pituitary apoplexy following preoperative stimulation tests, but we suggest that these tests should be abandoned in patients with pituitary macroadenomas

  18. Hypoglossal nerve palsy following the robotic thyroidectomy for the papillary thyroid carcinoma: A case report

    Suk-Won Ahn

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Although the robotic surgery is a creative technique and has been known to be safe and effective, the risk of this surgery including traumatic nerve injury should be taken into account before surgery.

  19. Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to skull base metastasis from breast cancer

    We describe a 44-year-old woman who presented with an isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve paralysis caused by a skull base metastasis from breast cancer. The patient had a modified radical mastectomy followed by local radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Fourteen months later she presented with difficulty in speaking. Physical examination revealed an isolated left hypoglossal nerve paralysis. The MRI scan showed a mass lesion involving the left occipital condyle extending into hypoglossal canal. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  20. Functional and anatomical basis for brain plasticity in facial palsy rehabilitation using the masseteric nerve.

    Buendia, Javier; Loayza, Francis R; Luis, Elkin O; Celorrio, Marta; Pastor, Maria A; Hontanilla, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Several techniques have been described for smile restoration after facial nerve paralysis. When a nerve other than the contralateral facial nerve is used to restore the smile, some controversy appears because of the nonphysiological mechanism of smile recovering. Different authors have reported natural results with the masseter nerve. The physiological pathways which determine whether this is achieved continue to remain unclear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activation pattern measuring blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal during smiling and jaw clenching was recorded in a group of 24 healthy subjects (11 females). Effective connectivity of premotor regions was also compared in both tasks. The brain activation pattern was similar for smile and jaw-clenching tasks. Smile activations showed topographic overlap though more extended for smile than clenching. Gender comparisons during facial movements, according to kinematics and BOLD signal, did not reveal significant differences. Effective connectivity results of psychophysiological interaction (PPI) from the same seeds located in bilateral facial premotor regions showed significant task and gender differences (p < 0.001). The hypothesis of brain plasticity between the facial nerve and masseter nerve areas is supported by the broad cortical overlap in the representation of facial and masseter muscles. PMID:26683008

  1. The effect of fibrosis in the upper neck on radiation-related cranial nerve palsy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Objective: To analyse the effect of fibrosis in the upper neck on the development of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients after radiation treatment. Methods: Between Feb. 2000 and Feb. 2002, 317 consecutive patients with NPC who survival at least 5 years came to our radiotherapy center for follow-up, who were analyzed in this study. Patients who received re-irradiation were excluded. All patients received definitive external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with either Cobalt-60 or megavoltage linear accelerators. The median radiotherapy dose was 71 Gy (range 55-86 Gy) to the primary disease, 61 Gy (range 34-72 Gy) to the upper neck. High-dose-rate brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was used in 24 patients either as part of definitive treatment or as a boost for residual disease in the nasopharynx. Forty-five patients also received chemotherapy with various regimens. Results: The median follow-up was 11.4 years (range 5.1-38.0 years). A total of 81 patients (25.5%) developed radiation-induced posterior CN group (CN IX-XII) palsy with an average annual rate of 1.8%. The cumulative incidence of CNP was 5.7%, 17.4% and 37.3% at 5-, 10- and 20-year respectively. Fifty-four (17%) patients showed severe fibrosis (G3-4) in the upper neck. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that the total dose of radiation to the nasopharynx and upper neck fibrosis were independent risk factors for developing CNP after RT for NPC. Neck severe fibrosis was associated with approximately two-fold risk of developing CNP (RR=1.936, 95% CI: 1.521-2.466, P70 Gy to the nasopharynx were associated with increased risk of developing CNP. Other factors, including gender, age, N classifications, chemotherapy, unconventional fractionation radiation, total radiation dose to the upper neck, and brachytherapy did not influence the risk of CNP. Conclusions: Patients who had severe fibrosis in the upper neck may be at increased risk of radiation

  2. Femoral nerve palsy secondary to iliopsoas haemorrhage in patients with haemophilia: results from biceps femoral transfer

    Marcela Piña-Quintero

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia causes injuries of peripheral nerves secondary to compressions by hematoma. In general, these injuries recover spontaneously after the cause of the compression is solved. A case of a 16-year-old adolescent with injury of the left femoral nerve, causing loss of the extension of the knee is described herein. During the evolution there was no recovery. For this reason a tendinous transfer of the femoral biceps was practiced. This technique was described formerly for the correction of poliomyelitis. Excellent results were obtained with complete recovery of the extension and force 4+/5.

  3. A Comprehensive Guide on Restoring Grasp Using Tendon Transfer Procedures for Ulnar Nerve Palsy.

    Diaz-Garcia, Rafael J; Chung, Kevin C

    2016-08-01

    Ulnar nerve paralysis results in classic stigmata, including weakness of grasp and pinch, poorly coordinated flexion, and clawing of digits. Restoration of grasp is a key portion of the reconstructive efforts after loss of ulnar nerve function. Improving flexion at the metacarpophalangeal joint can be done by static and dynamic means, although only the latter can improve interphalangeal extension. Deformity and digital posture are more predictably corrected with surgical intervention. Loss of strength from intrinsic muscle paralysis cannot be fully restored with tendon transfer procedures. Preoperative patient education is paramount to success if realistic expectations are to be met. PMID:27387079

  4. Spinal accessory nerve schwannomas masquerading as a fourth ventricular lesion

    Shyam Sundar Krishnan; Sivaram Bojja; Madabhushi Chakravarthy Vasudevan

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign lesions that arise from the nerve sheath of cranial nerves. The most common schwannomas arise from the 8 th cranial nerve (the vestibulo-cochlear nerve) followed by trigeminal and facial nerves and then from glossopharyngeal, vagus, and spinal accessory nerves. Schwannomas involving the oculomotor, trochlear, abducens and hypoglossal nerves are very rare. We report a very unusual spinal accessory nerve schwannoma which occupied the fourth ventricle and extended inferior...

  5. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema. PMID:26947104

  6. Cranial nerve palsies in metastatic prostate cancer--results of base of skull radiotherapy

    We studied the rate of response to palliative external beam radiation therapy (20 Gy/5 or 30 Gy/10 fractions) to the base of skull in 32 prostate cancer patients with cranial nerve dysfunction. Sixteen patients (50%; 95% CI, 34-66%) had a useful response to therapy. The median survival post-therapy was 3 months

  7. Radiation-Induced Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Cross-Sectional Study of Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients After Definitive Radiotherapy

    Purpose: To address the characteristics and the causative factors of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with an extensive period of followed-up. Patients and Methods: A total of 317 consecutive and nonselected patients treated with definitive external-beam radiotherapy between November 1962 and February 1995 participated in this study. The median doses to the nasopharynx and upper neck were 71 Gy (range, 55-86 Gy) and 61 Gy (range, 34-72 Gy), respectively. Conventional fractionation was used in 287 patients (90.5%). Forty-five patients (14.2%) received chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was 11.4 years (range, 5.1-38.0 years). Ninety-eight patients (30.9%) developed CNP, with a median latent period of 7.6 years (range, 0.3-34 years). Patients had a higher rate of CNP (81 cases, 25.5%) in lower-group cranial nerves compared with upper group (44 cases, 13.9%) (χ2 = 34.444, p 2 = 4.661, p = 0.031). The cumulative incidences of CNP were 10.4%, 22.4%, 35.5%, and 44.5% at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that CNP at diagnosis, chemotherapy, total radiation dose to the nasopharynx, and upper neck fibrosis were independent risk factors for developing radiation-induced CNP. Conclusion: Radiation-induced fibrosis may play an important role in radiation-induced CNP. The incidence of CNP after definitive radiotherapy for NPC remains high after long-term follow-up and is dose and fractionation dependent.

  8. Facial Nerve Palsy: An Unusual Presenting Feature of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Ozcan Yildiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world and is the most common cause of cancer-related death in men and women; it is responsible for 1.3 million deaths annually worldwide. It can metastasize to any organ. The most common site of metastasis in the head and neck region is the brain; however, it can also metastasize to the oral cavity, gingiva, tongue, parotid gland and lymph nodes. This article reports a case of small cell lung cancer presenting with metastasis to the facial nerve.

  9. Report of a child with acute herpes zoster ophthalmicus induced partial third nerve palsy

    AR Suraida

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster is a reactivation of the varicella zoster virus (VZV, which may remain dormant in the dorsal root ganglion of the trigeminal nerve for decades after the patient's initial exposure. The ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve, i.e., the innervation to the ocular structures, is one of the most commonly involved dermatomes, giving rise to herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO. A 10-year-old indigenous Malaysian girl presented with a complaint of painful blurring of vision in the right eye for one week. It was followed a few days later by cutaneous vesicular eruptions over the right side of her face and nose and drooping of the right upper lid, associated with double vision. In children, the disease usually follows a mild course, resolving without residual damage. However, this child achieved a best corrected visual acuity of only 6/36 in the affected eye due to corneal scarring. The rashes healed by formation of disfiguring keloids over the right nasal area. This is another rarely reported complication of HZO in immunocompetent individuals.

  10. Report of a child with acute herpes zoster ophthalmicus induced partial third nerve palsy

    Suraida AR; Evelyn-Tai LM; Madhusudhan; LK Thavaratnam; Mohtar Ibrahim; Wan Hazabbah WH

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a reactivation of the varicella zoster virus (VZV), which may remain dormant in the dorsal root ganglion of the trigeminal nerve for decades after the patient's initial exposure. The ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve, i.e., the innervation to the ocular structures, is one of the most commonly involved dermatomes, giving rise to herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO). A 10-year-old indigenous Malaysian girl presented with a complaint of painful blurring of vision in the right eye for one week. It was followed a few days later by cutaneous vesicular eruptions over the right side of her face and nose and drooping of the right upper lid, associated with double vision. In children, the disease usually follows a mild course, resolving without residual damage. However, this child achieved a best corrected visual acuity of only 6/36 in the affected eye due to corneal scarring. The rashes healed by formation of disfiguring keloids over the right nasal area. This is another rarely reported complication of HZO in immunocompetent individuals.

  11. [A 74-year-old man with urinary incontinence, right leg weakness and multiple cranial nerve palsies].

    Mochizuki, H; Satoh, S; Saikawa, M; Mori, H; Shirai, T; Kondo, T; Mizuno, Y

    1995-02-01

    We report a 74-year-old man with a lung cancer, who developed right leg weakness, neurogenic bladder, and multiple cranial nerve palsies. The patient was well until December of 1992, when he was 74-year-old, when he noted transient double vision; in February of 1993, he noted numb sensation and weakness in his right leg. Later in the same month, he developed overflow incontinence of urine and weakness in his right face. He also noted deafness in his left ear (he had a marked loss of hearing in his right ear since childhood because of otitis media). His weakness in his right leg had progressed, and he was admitted to our service on March 19, 1993. On admission, he was afebrile and BP was 130/50 mmHg. General physical examination was unremarkable. On neurologic examination, he was alert and oriented to all spheres; no dementia was noted nor were detected aphasia, apraxia, and agnosia. His optic fundi were unremarkable; ocular movement appeared normal, however, he complained of diplopia in far vision. Sensation of the face was intact. He had right facial palsy of peripheral type; he was unable to close his right eye, and Bell's phenomenon was observed on attempted eye closure. On the left side, he had facial spasm. He had marked bilateral deafness. He had no dysarthria or dysphagia. The remaining of the cranial nerves were intact. Motor wise, he was unable to stand or walk alone; weakness did not appear to account for his difficulty in gait; manual muscle testing revealed 4/5 weakness in his tibialis anterior muscle, 1/5 in the peroneus longus, 0/5 in his extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus, all on the right side. Brachioradial and quadriceps femoris reflexes were increased to 3/4; plantar response was equivocal on the right side, and flexor on the left. Sensory examination revealed loss of touch and pain sensation in the L5 and S1 distributions in his right leg: vibration and position sensations were also diminished in his right foot. He had

  12. [The "necktie lasso": a new technique for the simultaneous treatment of Wartenberg's sign and claw deformities in the hand due to ulnar nerve palsy].

    Belmahi, A M; Gharib, N E; El Mazouz, S

    2004-08-01

    The "necktie lasso" is a new technique that allows the simultaneous active treatment, of both Wartenberg's sign and claw deformity of the fifth and the fourth digits in the hand with ulnar nerve palsy. The flexor sublimis of the fourth digit is taken by a palmar approach. It is then divided into two strips up to the proximal part of the palm; The radial strip is used as a classical "direct lasso" to treat the claw deformity of the fourth digit; The ulnar strip is wound around the base of the fifth digit by a palmar and dorsal approaches at the level of the proximal phalanx, like a necktie, being medial to its radial pedicle, dorsal and superficial to its extensor apparatus, then lateral to its ulnar pedicle; It is then recovered in the palm and sutured to itself. From September 1998 to April 2003, this technique has been used in eight patients aged between 21 and 35 years old and suffering from post traumatic low ulnar nerve palsy. It was always very effective in dealing with Wartenberg's sign: the active adduction of the fifth digit appearing at the start of flexion. The claw deformity of the fourth and fifth digits was equally actively corrected. No complications are reported in this series. With a mean follow-up of 3 years there was no recurrence of any of the deformities. PMID:15484679

  13. Case of Behçet's disease complicated by oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    Yamaoka, Toshifumi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a relapsing systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology involving systemic vasculitis. Vasculitis in BD results from the involvement of arteries, veins and blood vessels of all sizes, which leads to the three major manifestations of this condition: venous occlusion, arterial occlusion and aneurysm formation. Therefore, whole-body vascular involvement should always be considered in BD patients. Here, we describe the first appearance of an internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm, resulting in complete oculomotor nerve palsy in a BD patient. A 44-year-old Japanese man suffered from recurrent episodes of erythema nodosum that had presented on the lower extremities for the past 2 years. His condition was diagnosed as an incomplete type of BD based on relapsing oral and genital ulcers, skin eruptions, such as erythema nodosum and folliculitis, a positive pathergy test and systemic arthralgia. Ten years after his initial clinical presentation, he had manifestations of right-sided ptosis and cyclic dull pain in his right temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography revealed a right internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Although oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm in a BD patient has not been reported previously, our report highlights the fact that this abnormal manifestation should be considered in those with vasculo-BD. PMID:25573207

  14. The treatment of spastic cerebral palsy by side to side neurorrhaphy of peripheral nerves%周围神经侧侧缝合治疗痉挛性脑性瘫痪的初步观察

    修先伦; 王宁; 张少成; 祝玉玺; 王季; 王吉波

    2002-01-01

    Objective To discuss a new method and its mechanism for the treatment of spastic cerebral palsy. Methods 6 cases were treated.The injurious nerve trunk was kept abreast of neighbor donor nerve at suitable segement, the epineurium and fascicu of two neighboring area were incised to appear nerve fibers,then side to side anastomosed each other through the epineurium and fascicu. Result All cases were followed up for 4~ 15 months.The spastic limb and deformity of all cases have obvious relieve, 5 cases had no spasm without extra stimulation and have the main function recovered.Conclusion Side to side neurorrhaphy is a new method to treat spastic cerebral palsy.After operation, the spastic muscle could obtain normal never control,thereby,the cervical orientation area was changed.

  15. 颈总动脉交感神经网剥脱术治疗脑性瘫痪的探讨%Discussion of common carotid artery sympathetic nerve net exfoliation therapy treating cerebral palsy

    尹彪中; 李如求; 成顺成

    2002-01-01

    Objective To discuss mechanism of common carotid artery sympathetic nerve net exfoliation therapy treating sequela of cerebral palsy. Methods Examing and assessing before and after operation, curative effect analysis, Wals value assay and 1 year follow up to 124 patients. Result Score of patients in this group reached excellent 1 week after operation, reached good 1 year after operation, Wals value measure P≤ 0.05. Conclusion This operation had an effect on the promotion of mixed type; athetosis type cerebral palsy, upper limb function disorder and malfunction.

  16. Delayed diagnosed intermuscular lipoma causing a posterior interosseous nerve palsy in a patient with cervical spondylosis: the “priceless” value of the clinical examination in the technological era

    COLASANTI, R.; IACOANGELI, M.; DI RIENZO, A.; DOBRAN, M.; DI SOMMA, L.; NOCCHI, N.; SCERRATI, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy may present with various symptoms, and may resemble cervical spondylosis. Case report We report about a 59-year-old patient with cervical spondylosis which delayed the diagnosis of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy due to an intermuscular lipoma. Initial right hand paraesthesias and clumsiness, together with MR findings of right C5–C6 and C6–C7 foraminal stenosis, misled the diagnostic investigation. The progressive loss of extension of all right hand fingers brought to detect a painless mass compressing the PIN. Electrophysiological studies confirmed a right radial motor neuropathy at the level of the forearm. Results Surgical tumor removal and nerve decompression resulted in a gradual motor deficits recovery. Conclusions A thorough clinical examination is paramount, and electrophysiology may differentiate between cervical and peripheral nerve lesions. Ultrasonography and MR offer an effective evaluation of lipomas, which represent a rare cause of PIN palsy. Surgical decompression and lipoma removal generally determine excellent prognoses, with very few recurrences. PMID:27142825

  17. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: Can excision of upper trunk neuroma and nerve grafting improve function in babies with adequate elbow flexion at nine months of age?

    Argenta, Anne E; Brooker, Jack; MacIssac, Zoe; Natali, Megan; Greene, Stephanie; Stanger, Meg; Grunwaldt, Lorelei

    2016-05-01

    Accepted indications for exploration in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) vary by center. Most agree that full elbow flexion against gravity at nine months of age implies high chance of spontaneous recovery and thus excludes a baby from surgical intervention. However, there are certain movements of the shoulder and forearm that may not be used frequently by the infant, but are extremely important functionally as they grow. These movements are difficult to assess in a baby and may lead to some clinicians to recommend conservative treatment, when this cohort of infants may in fact benefit substantially from surgery. A retrospective review was conducted on all infants managed surgically at the Brachial Plexus Center of a major children's hospital from 2009 to 2014. Further analysis identified five patients who had near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion but who had weakness of shoulder abduction, flexion, external rotation, and/or forearm supination. In contrast to standard conservative management, this cohort underwent exploration, C5-6 neuroma excision, and sural nerve grafting. Data analysis was performed on this group to look for overall improvement in function. During an average follow-up period of 29 months, all patients made substantial gains in motor function of the shoulder and forearm, without loss of elbow flexion or extension, or worsening of overall outcome. In select infants with brachial plexus injuries but near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion, surgical intervention may be indicated to achieve the best functional outcome. PMID:26806089

  18. Intramuscular myxoid lipoma in the proximal forearm presenting as an olecranon mass with superficial radial nerve palsy: a case report

    Hildebrand Kevin A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extremity lipomas may occur in any location, including the proximal forearm. We describe a case of a patient with an intramuscular lipoma presenting as an unusual posterior elbow mass. Case presentation We discuss the case of a 57-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a tender, posterior elbow mass initially diagnosed as chronic olecranon bursitis. A minor sensory disturbance in the distribution of the superficial radial nerve was initially thought to be unrelated, but was likely caused by mass effect from the lipoma. No pre-operative advanced imaging was obtained because the diagnosis was felt to have already been made. At the time of surgery, a fatty mass originating in the volar forearm muscles was found to have breached the dorsal forearm fascia and displaced the olecranon bursa. Tissue diagnosis was made by histopathology as a myxoid lipoma with no aggressive features. Post-operative recovery was uneventful. Conclusion We present a case of an unusual elbow mass presenting with symptoms consistent with chronic olecranon bursitis, a relatively common condition. The only unexplained pre-operative finding was the non-specific finding of a transient superficial radial nerve deficit. We remind clinicians to be cautious when diagnosing soft tissue masses in the extremities when unexplained physical findings are present.

  19. ECG-Guided Surveillance Technique in Cryoballoon Ablation for Paroxysmal and Persistent Atrial Fibrillation: A Strategy to Prevent From Phrenic Nerve Palsy

    Meissner, Axel; Maagh, Petra; Christoph, Arndt; Oernek, Ahmet; Plehn, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Phrenic nerve palsy (PNP) is still a cause for concern in Cryoballoon ablation (CBA) procedures. New surveillance techniques, such as invasive registration of the compound motor action potential (CMAP), have been thought to prevent the occurrence of PNP. The present study investigates the impact of CMAP surveillance via an alternative and non-invasive ECG-conduction technique during CBA. Methods: PVI with CBA was performed in 166 patients suffering from AF. Diaphragmal contraction was monitored by abdominal hands-on observation in Observation Group I; Observation Group II was treated using additional ECG-conduction, as a means of modified CMAP surveillance method. During the ablation of the right superior and inferior pulmonary veins, the upper extremities lead I was newly adjusted between the inferior sternum and the right chest, thereby recording the maximum CMAP. The CMAP in the above-mentioned ECG leads was continuously observed in a semi-quantitative manner. Results: PNP was observed in 10 (6%) patients in total. In Observation Group I, 6 out of 61 (9.8%) demonstrated PNP. In Observation Group II a significant decrease of PNP could be demonstrated (p <0,001) and occurred in 4 out of 105 patients (3.8%). While three patients from Observation Group I left the EP lap with an ongoing PNP, none of the patients in Observation Group II had persistent PNP outside of the EP lab. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that additional ECG-conduction, used as modified CMAP surveillance, is an easy, effective and helpful additional safety measure to prevent PNP in CBA. PMID:27279788

  20. Cerebral Palsy

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  1. Evaluation of clinically relevant landmarks of the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve: A three-dimensional study with application to avoiding facial nerve palsy.

    Davies, Joel C; Ravichandiran, Mayoorendra; Agur, Anne M; Fattah, Adel

    2016-03-01

    Injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve (MMN) during surgery often results in poor functional and cosmetic outcomes. A line two finger breadths or 2 cm inferior to the border of the mandible is commonly used in planning neck incisions to avoid injury to the MMN. The purpose was to compare the two finger breadth/2 cm landmarks in predicting MMN course, and their accuracy/reliability. Thirty-one cadaveric specimens were scanned to obtain 3D surface topography (FARO® scanner). Four independent raters pinned the inferior border of the mandible and a two finger breadth line and 2cm line below. The location of each pin was digitized (Microscribe™). A preauricular flap was raised, and MMN branches were digitized and modelled (Geomagic®/Maya®) enabling quantification of the accuracy of these landmarks. The location of the two-finger breadth line was variable, spanning 25-51 mm below the inferior border of the mandible (ICC = 0.10). The most inferior MMN branch did not pass below the two-finger breadth line in any specimen, but a narrow clearance zone (≤5 mm) was found in two. In contrast, in 7/31 specimens, the most inferior MMN branch coursed below the 2 cm line and would be at risk of injury. It was concluded that an incision two finger breadths below the inferior border of the mandible could provide safer access than the 2 cm line. After an incision has been placed using the two finger-breadth landmark, caution must be exercised during dissection as branches of the MMN may lie only a few millimeters superior to the incision. PMID:26096443

  2. Bell's palsy

    ... This nerve is called the facial or seventh cranial nerve. Damage to this nerve causes weakness or paralysis ... United States. It involves damage to the seventh cranial (facial) nerve. This nerve controls the movement of the muscles ...

  3. Clinical Profile of Extraocular Muscle Palsy: A Retrospective Study

    Suman Adhikari, BOptom

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The sixth cranial nerve has been found to be the most commonly affected in previous studies of cranial nerve palsies. This study was carried out to determine the most common nerve involved in extraocular muscle (EOM palsies and the most common cause of EOM palsy in Nepal.Methods: The diagnosed cases of third, fourth, or sixth nerve palsy for 10 years (2000-2010 at the B.P. Koirala Lions Center for Ophthalmic Studies outpatient department were included in the study. A retrospective review of patients’ records was performed, and the causes of EOM palsy were grouped as: vascular, trauma, tumor,aneurysm, undetermined, and others. Recovery of the palsy was evaluated by reviewing the records of the patients who were followed up one month after the initial visit.Results: A total of 838 patients was included in the study. The average patient age was 37 years. The sixth nerve was most commonly affected (n=458, 54.65%, and the most common etiology was undetermined (n=408, 48.68%. Among the cases where the cause of palsy was known, the largest number of patients had trauma (n=188, 16.46%.Conclusion: It was concluded that in Nepal, the most commonly affected cranial nerve is the sixth nerve, in accordance with the other studies done in the past in different parts of the world. Most of the cases of cranial nerve palsy were found to have no specific cause and were not associated with diagnosed systemic disease.

  4. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy inspontaneous internal carotid artery dissection: case report Paralisia isolada do nervo oculomotor na dissecção de artéria carótida interna: relato de caso

    Cynthia Resende Campos

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Partial oculosympathetic palsy followed by ischemic manifestations in brain or retina are the main symptoms of extracranial internal carotid artery (ICA dissection. Unusually, cranial nerves may be affected. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy is found only rarely. CASE: We present a 50-year-old nondiabetic man who experienced acute onset of right occipital headache which spread to the right retro-orbital region. Five days later he noticed diplopia and right blurred vision sensation. Neurologic examination disclosed only impaired adduction and upward gaze of right eye, slight ipsilateral pupillary dilatation, without ptosis. Brain MRI was normal. Angiography showed right internal carotid artery dissection with forward occlusion to the base of the skull. Intravenous heparin followed by warfarin was prescribed. The headache and the oculomotor nerve deficit gradually resolved in the next three weeks. DISCUSSION: Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy is underrecognized as a clinical presentation of extracranial ICA dissection. If the angiographic evaluation is incomplete without careful study of extracranial arteries, misdiagnosis may lead to failure to initiate early treatment to prevent thromboembolic complications. For this reason we draw attention to the need for careful evaluation of cervical arteries in patients with oculomotor nerve palsy. Mechanical compression or stretching of the third nerve are possible mechanisms, but the direct impairment of the blood supply to the third nerve seems to be the most plausible explanation.A paralisia oculosimpática parcial (síndrome de Horner seguida por manifestações isquêmicas cerebrais ou retinianas são os principais sintomas da dissecção da artéria carótida interna (ACI extracraniana. O acometimento de nervos cranianos é incomum. Apenas raramente a paralisia isolada do nervo oculomotor pode ser encontrada. CASO: homem de 50 anos, sem diabetes, apresentou cefaléia occipital de início s

  5. Imaging the ocular motor nerves

    Ferreira, Teresa [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.A.Ferreira@lumc.nl; Verbist, Berit [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: B.M.Verbist@lumc.nl; Buchem, Mark van [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.A.van_Buchem@lumc.nl; Osch, Thijs van [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.J.P.van_Osch@lumc.nl; Webb, Andrew [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: A.Webb@lumc.nl

    2010-05-15

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0 T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  6. Clinical efficacy of mouse nerve growth factor and cattle encephalon glycoside and ignotin injection on cerebnal palsy%鼠神经生长因子与脑苷肌肽治疗脑性瘫痪的疗效

    孙兴礼

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨鼠神经生长因子与脑苷肌肽治疗脑性瘫痪的临床效果.方法 选取郸城县第二人民医院收治的脑性瘫痪患儿80例,随机分为观察组(鼠神经生长因子)与对照组(脑苷肌肽),每组40例.两组患儿均接受常规运动康复训练,观察两组患儿治疗前后发育商(DQ)及治疗期间不良反应发生情况.结果 两组患儿发育商治疗后均显著提高(P<0.05),观察组提高程度明显大于对照组(P<0.05),两组患儿接受治疗期间不良反应发生率比较差异未见统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 鼠神经生长因子治疗脑性瘫痪患儿效果显著,安全性较高.%Objective To investigate the clinical efficacy of mouse nerve growth factor and cattle encephalon glycoside and ignotin injection on cerebral palsy.Methods Eighty cases of cerebral palsy were selected and randomly divided into observation group (treated with mouse nerve growth factor) and control group (treated with cattle encephalon glycoside and ignotin injection),with 40 cases in each group.Both two groups received conventional rehabilitation training.Developmental quotient (DQ) before and after treatment,adverse reactions in the two groups were observed.Results DQ after treatment was significantly improved than before treatment in both two groups,and there was better improvement in observation group than that in control group (P < 0.05).The differences of adverse reactions during treatment in the two groups were not statistically significant (P > 0.05).Conclusions Mouse nerve growth factor has good efficacy and high safety in the treatment of cerebral palsy.

  7. Cerebral Palsy

    ... 1 • 2 • 3 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Cerebral Palsy: Keith's Story Physical Therapy I Have Cerebral Palsy. Can I Babysit? Body Image and Self-Esteem Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  8. Facial Nerve Neuroma Management

    Weber, Peter C; Osguthorpe, J. David

    1998-01-01

    Three facial nerve neuromas were identified in the academic year 1994-1995. Each case illustrates different management dilemmas. One patient with a grade III facial nerve palsy had a small geniculate ganglion neuroma with the dilemma of decompression versus resection clear nerve section margins. The second patient underwent facial neuroma resection with cable graft reconstruction, but the permanent sections were positive. The last patient had a massive neuroma in which grafting versus other f...

  9. Facial Palsy in Kawasaki Syndrome; Review and a Case Report

    MH. Moradi Nejad

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Facial nerve palsy, a very rare complication of Kawasaki syndrome, has been reported in only 25 patents. None of the 25 previous reported cases with this complication was treated with IVIG. We treated a 24-month-old boy with bilateral coronary artery aneurysms due to Kawasaki syndrome. In our patient, whom we treated with Aspirin and IVIG, duration of disease was 7-9 days. He developed marked unilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy on day 3 of illness. This treatment led to complete resolution of facial nerve palsy within 48 hours. Review of pervious cases demonstrates that children with Kawasaki–associated facial nerve palsy have more than twice the risk for coronary artery aneurysm (52% vs 25% as that of children without facial nerve palsy. Unexplained facial nerve palsy in young children with a prolonged febrile illness should provoke consideration of Kawasaki syndrome and Echocardiography to exclude coronary artery aneurysms. Although facial nerve palsy appears likely to be resolved in all patients surviving the acute phase of Kawasaki syndrome, treatment with IVIG appears to shorten considerably the time for full recovery and provides an important clue to the mechanism of neurological injury in this illness.

  10. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  11. Cerebral palsy.

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging. PMID:27188686

  12. Facial Palsy after Carotid Endarterectomy & Difficult Intubation during Subsequent CABG Surgery: An Impact of the Cranial Nerve Injury on Airway Management

    Won K. Chee

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerve injuries can occur during carotid endarterectomy from extensive dissection and prolonged retraction. The nerve injuries can impact both the airway reflex and the anatomical contour to cause a difficulty with subsequent airway management for the anesthesiologists. A careful examination of the airway after the carotid procedure is critical for recognizing the subtle signs of cranial nerve injuries.

  13. Bell's Palsy.

    Vakharia, Kavita; Vakharia, Kalpesh

    2016-02-01

    Bell's palsy is unilateral, acute onset facial paralysis that is a common condition. One in every 65 people experiences Bell's palsy in the course of their lifetime. The majority of patients afflicted with this idiopathic disorder recover facial function. Initial treatment involves oral corticosteroids, possible antiviral drugs, and protection of the eye from desiccation. A small subset of patients may be left with incomplete recovery, synkinesis, facial contracture, or hemifacial spasm. A combination of medical and surgical treatment options exist to treat the long-term sequelae of Bell's palsy. PMID:26611696

  14. Paralisia facial periférica bilateral na leucemia linfóide aguda: relato de caso Bilateral peripheric facial nerve palsy in acute linfoid leukemia: a case report

    Marcos L. Antunes

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A mímica facial é fundamental para a expressão e comunicação humana, que são possíveis apenas através da integridade do nervo facial. Sendo assim, a paralisia facial periférica (PFP pode deixar seqüelas estéticas, funcionais e psicológicas. A causa mais comum é a paralisia de Bell (50 a 80%, onde a maioria dos pacientes apresenta manifestação unilateral. O acometimento bilateral simultâneo é raro, sendo a leucemia a neoplasia que com maior freqüência pode resultar nesse tipo de manifestação. A seguir, relatamos o caso de um paciente de dezoito anos de idade apresentando leucemia linfóide aguda (LLA e PFP simultânea, ambas refratárias ao tratamento quimioterápico, culminando com o óbito cinco meses após o início da PFP. Realizou-se considerações importantes sobre a fisiopatologia da PFP na LLA, além de uma revisão da literatura.The facial mimic is very important to the human expression and communication, which depend on the integrity of the facial nerve. So, the peripheric facial palsy (PFP can leave esthetics, functional and psychological sequelae. The more common etiology is Bell's palsy (50 to 80% and most of the patients show a unilateral manifestation. The simultaneous bilateral PFP is rare, and the leukemia is the neoplasia that can often that kind of manifestation. We present a clinical case of an 18-year-old patient with acute lymphoid leukemia and simultaneous bilateral facial palsy, who did not recover after the chemotherapy treatment, and died five months after the initial manifestation of the facial palsy. Important considerations were accomplished about the physiopathology of PFP in acute lymphoid leukemia, besides literature review.

  15. Bell's Palsy

    ... Order Brochures News From NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Bell's Palsy Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS Disorders Get Web page suited for printing Email this to a friend ...

  16. Bell's Palsy as a Possible Complication of Hepatitis B Vaccination in A Child

    Alp, Handan; Tan, Hüseyin; Orbak, Zerrin

    2009-01-01

    Bell's Palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral temporary paralysis of facial muscles resulting from seventh cranial nerve dysfunction. Presented here is a two-year old female patient with right peripheral facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers’ attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's Palsy, as a rare complication of hepatitis B vaccination.

  17. Spinal accessory nerve schwannomas masquerading as a fourth ventricular lesion

    Shyam Sundar Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign lesions that arise from the nerve sheath of cranial nerves. The most common schwannomas arise from the 8 th cranial nerve (the vestibulo-cochlear nerve followed by trigeminal and facial nerves and then from glossopharyngeal, vagus, and spinal accessory nerves. Schwannomas involving the oculomotor, trochlear, abducens and hypoglossal nerves are very rare. We report a very unusual spinal accessory nerve schwannoma which occupied the fourth ventricle and extended inferiorly to the upper cervical canal. The radiological features have been detailed. The diagnostic dilemma was due to its midline posterior location mimicking a fourth ventricular lesion like medulloblastoma and ependymoma. Total excision is the ideal treatment for these tumors. A brief review of literature with tabulations of the variants has been listed.

  18. 外周神经电刺激引导下A型肉毒毒素注射在痉挛型脑性瘫痪中的应用%Injection of Botulinum Toxin Type A Guided by Peripheral Nerve Stimulation for Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    邵银进; 吴桂华; 曾康华

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of local injection of Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) on spastic cerebral palsy guided by peripheral nerve stimulation. Methods 30 children with spastic cerebral palsy received local multi-point injection of BTX-A guided by peripheral nerve stimulation. They were assessed with modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and Gross Motor Function Assessment Scale (GM-FM-88) before and 1 week, 3 months and 6 months after treatment. Results The scores of MAS decreased significantly 1 week, 3 months and 6 months after treatment (P0.05),3个月和6个月时显著增加(P<0.001)。结论外周神经电刺激引导下BTX-A局部多点注射治疗痉挛型脑瘫疗效显著。

  19. 胫神经缩窄术在治疗脑瘫下肢痉挛肢体中的应用%Neurotomy of the tibial nerve for treatment of spastic lower limbs in cerebral palsy.

    谢轩贵; 李鹏; 蔡德成; 张洪良; 周学斌; 蔡毅骁

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore indication and approaches of neurotomy of tibial nerve for the treatment of the talipes equinovarus and spastic paralysis in cerebral palsy. Methods A total of 27 cerebral palsy children with 53 spastic lower limbs were diagnosed with clear etiology, spastic muscles with supphed nerves were analyzed in detail, neurotomy of the tibial nerve was performed under microscope, during operation, motor nerve was located with electronic stimuli and monitored with induced electromyocardiogram. The surgical results were analyzed. Results 53 neurotomies of tibial nerve were done in 27 cases of cerebral palsy children with 53 spastic limbs. All patients were followed up from 6 to 15 months ( means 10. 3 months) ,and evaluated with dorsum flex of ankle joint, touching ground of feet, talipes equinovans, random movement improving evaluation and satisfactory grade of the parents. A total of 26 of 27 (96%) neurotomy of the tibial nerve were improved with dorsum flex of ankle at 15 ~ 50 degree,and 16 of 19(84% ) talipes aquinovarus improved chnically. Of 27 feet with surgery, 11 feet (40. 8% ) were in normal position and could touch ground completely, 13 feet (48. 1% ) had 10 degree with ground or could contact ground with external one third of the feet, 3 feet (11.1%) were abnormal. All patients were followed up from 6 to 15 months (means 10. 3 months). During follow-up, the random movement improving rate of spastic lower limbs is 81% (22/27), 7 patients (26%)improved dramatically.Conclusion Neurotomy of tibial nerve is an effective method to treat talipes equinovarus, and can improve the motor activity of spastic lower limbs in cerebral palsy children.%目的 探讨胫神经缩窄术在治疗脑瘫下肢痉挛肢体及矫正内翻马蹄足中的应用及手术效果.方法 2006年9月~2008年12月对27例脑瘫患儿53肢下肢痉挛肢体行胫神经缩窄术,单侧1例,双侧26例.术前详细检查、明确病因,对下肢挛缩肌肉及

  20. Lower motor neuron facial palsy in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    Girish Baburao Kulkarni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With advances in the neuro-imaging modalities, diverse manifestations of the cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT are being recognized. There are very few reports of isolated cranial nerve palsies in CVT. In this case report, we describe a patient of lower motor neuron facial palsy with CVT who was successfully treated with anticoagulation, highlighting the atypical manifestation of the disease.

  1. DIABETES MELLITUS AND BELL’S PALSY IN IRANIAN POPULATION

    A. R Karimi-Yazdi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available "nDuring last decades many researchers have focused on the conditions associated with Bell's palsy including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and viral infections. This study was performed to evaluate correlation of diabetes mellitus and Bell's palsy and some relevant features not discussed in the literature in an Iranian population. The presence of diabetes mellitus was evaluated in a total number of 275 subjects (75 patients with Bell's palsy and 200 control subjects. Diabetes mellitus was noted in 10 (13.3% patients with Bell's palsy among which 6 case were diagnosed as new cases of diabetes. Previous history of Bell's palsy was present in 10.67% of the subjects with Bell's palsy. Symptoms of other cranial nerves revealed higher figures in Bell's palsy patients with underlying diabetes. Such studies in developing countries may reveal some unknown features of the disease. This study confirms the correlation of diabetes mellitus and Bell's palsy for the first time in an Iranian population. The results also suggest that diabetic patients with Bell's palsy suffer from more cranial nerve symptoms. We offer screening tests of diabetes as a routine process in the management of Bell's palsy especially in developing countries.

  2. FACIAL PALSY AS FIRST PRESENTATION OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA: A CASE REPORT

    S. Inaloo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveFacial paralysis in children is very often idiopathic and isolated facial nerve palsy, resulting from leukemic infiltration is a rare occurrence. Here we present the case of a 14 year-old boy with acute lymphobastic leukemia, who first presented with isolated right side peripheral facial nerve paralysis and was initially diagnosed with Bell's palsy.ConclusionThe presence of Bell's palsy in young children requires a complete evaluation, keeping in mind the possibility of leptomeningeal disease.Key words: Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Facial nerve palsy, Children.

  3. A case of myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis presenting with multiple cranial nerve palsies and diabetes insipidus.

    Yasuda, Ken; Sainouchi, Makoto; Goto, Masahiro; Murase, Nagako; Ohtani, Ryo; Nakamura, Michikazu

    2016-05-31

    A 61-year-old woman developed hearing difficulties and became thirsty after experiencing cold symptoms. A neurological examination revealed a loss of odor sensation, facial palsy, dysphasia, and dysarthria. Vocal cord palsy was observed during pharyngoscopy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a thickened pituitary stalk and swelling of the pituitary gland, but no high signal intensity regions were seen in the posterior portion of the pituitary gland. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI demonstrated a thickened dura mater over the anterior cranial fossa. A biopsy specimen of the thickened dura mater showed fibrosis, granulomatous inflammation, and necrotic foci. Blood tests detected myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA). The patient's urine osmolarity was low even though she exhibited hypernatremia. We diagnosed her with hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with MPO-ANCA and diabetes insipidus. The patient received two courses of 5-day high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (1.0 g/day), and was subsequently administered oral prednisolone, which gradually relieved her symptoms. However, the patient's symptoms recurred despite the high-dose prednisolone treatment. It was difficult to control the patient's symptoms in this case with oral prednisolone monotherapy, but combined treatment with cyclosporine resulted in sustained remission. It is considered that patients with MPO-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis require combination therapy with prednisolone and immunosuppressive agents at an early stage. PMID:27098904

  4. Complete oculomotor palsy caused by persistent trigeminal artery.

    Bosco, Domenico; Consoli, Domenico; Lanza, Pier Luigi; Plastino, Massimiliano; Nicoletti, Francesco; Ceccotti, Claudio

    2010-10-01

    Primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most frequent embryonic communication between the carotid and vertebro-basilar system. PTA is a pathophysiology phenomenon which has been implicated as a rare cause of cranial nerve dysfunction. We report the case of a 40-year-old woman who developed a complete oculomotor nerve palsy caused by a persistent ecstatic trigeminal artery. Brain MRI and MRA studies documented a neurovascular conflict between the oculomotor nerve and a PTA. To the best of our knowledge there is no report about complete third cranial nerve palsy NC due to a PTA. A role of this rare vascular condition is discussed. PMID:20552240

  5. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  6. A Case of Death Secondary to Phrenic Nerve Palsy after Huge Mediastinal Teratoma Resection in Newborn%新生儿纵隔巨大畸胎瘤术后膈神经麻痹致死1例

    程远大; 艾燕; 高阳; 张春芳

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal teratomas, not common in clinical, are otfen some case reports, female more than male, most are benign. It can occur anywhere of body midline; sacrococcygeal teratoma is the most common and the second most frequent site of extragonadal teratomas is mediastinum. Benign is more commom and malignant is very rarely seen. Completely surgical resection is the main and effective treatment. hTis review reports a case of neonatal teratoma, which is complicated with a fatal phrenic nerve palsy atfer surgery.%新生儿畸胎瘤临床上不多见,多为病例报道,女性多于男性,大多数为良性,可发生于身体中线的任何部位,骶尾部为最好发部位,纵隔是性腺以外的第二大好发部位。临床上新生儿畸胎瘤多为良性,恶性少见,外科完整切除是其主要治疗方式。本文报道1例新生儿畸胎瘤,其术后发生致死性膈神经麻痹。

  7. Immediate Postoperative Bell's Palsy: Viral Etiology or Post-Traumatic Phenomena?

    Mohammad Ghasem Shams

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bell’s palsy is a sudden unilateral paralysis of the facial nerve. Postoperative Bell’s palsy following surgery is rare. It occurs in less than 1% of operations. The hypothesis: We premise that the main cause of immediate postoperative Bell's palsy is latent herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus type 1 and herpes zoster virus, which are reactivated from cranial nerve ganglia. Inflammation of the nerve initially results in a reversible neurapraxia, but ultimately Wallerian degeneration ensues. The palsy is often sudden in onset and evolves rapidly, with maximal facial weakness developing within two days. Associated symptoms of-ten seen in idiopathic Bell’s palsy are tearing problems, hyperacusis and altered taste.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Facial paralysis presenting postoperatively is distressing and poses a diagnostic chal-lenge. A complete interruption of the facial nerve at the sty-lomastoid foramen paralyzes all the muscles of facial expression. Taste sensation may be lost unilaterally and hye-racusis may be present. Idiopathic Bell’s palsy is due to inflammation of the facial nerve in the facial canal. Bell’s palsy may also occur from lesions that invade the temporal bone (carotid body, cholesteatoma, dermoid cyst, acoustic neu-romas. Although traumatic Bell’s palsy cannot be ruled out, it seems logic to postulate that the main cause of immediate postoperative Bell's palsy is latent herpes viruses.

  8. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  9. Silent intratemporal facial nerve schwannoma associated with Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media: A rare presentation

    Phaniendra, V.; Pratinidhi, Santosh K.; I V Renuka

    2007-01-01

    Facial palsy is a common manifestation of intratemporal facial nerve schwannoma. Review of English literature describes intratemporal facial nerve schwannoma presenting as vertigo, tinnitus (without facial palsy) which were diagnosed on CT scan or MRI of temporal bone. We are presenting two cases of asymptomatic facial nerve schwannoma without facial palsy presenting only as Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM), which were diagnosed incidentally during surgery.

  10. Isolated trochlear nerve paralysis due to brainstem ischemia: a case report

    Halit Yaşar; Hakan Tekeli; Tolga Biçer; Kemal Kara

    2013-01-01

    Trochlear neuropathy is the most common isolated cranial nerve palsy which affects the ocular movements. Patients complain of double vision especially during descending stairs or bending. Only 5 % of trochlear nerve palsy is isolated. The most common cause of trochlear nerve palsy is congenital causes. Trauma is the most common reason among acquired causes and ischemia-induced causes are extremely rare. In this article we present a 61-year-old female patient who has an isolated tr...