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Sample records for abdominal irradiation modulates

  1. Abdominal irradiation modulates 5-Fluorouracil pharmacokinetics

    Shueng Pei-Wei

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concurrent chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU is widely accepted for treatment of abdominal malignancy. Nonetheless, the interactions between radiation and 5-FU remain unclear. We evaluated the influence of abdominal irradiation on the pharmacokinetics of 5-FU in rats. Methods The radiation dose distributions of cholangiocarcinoma patients were determined for the low dose areas, which are generously deposited around the intrahepatic target volume. Then, corresponding single-fraction radiation was delivered to the whole abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats from a linear accelerator after computerized tomography-based planning. 5-FU at 100 mg/kg was intravenously infused 24 hours after radiation. A high-performance liquid chromatography system equipped with a UV detector was used to measure 5-FU in the blood. Ultrafiltration was used to measure protein-unbound 5-FU. Results Radiation at 2 Gy, simulating the daily human treatment dose, reduced the area under the plasma concentration vs. time curve (AUC of 5-FU by 31.7% compared to non-irradiated controls. This was accompanied by a reduction in mean residence time and incremental total plasma clearance values, and volume of distribution at steady state. Intriguingly, low dose radiation at 0.5 Gy, representing a dose deposited in the generous, off-target area in clinical practice, resulted in a similar pharmacokinetic profile, with a 21.4% reduction in the AUC. This effect was independent of protein binding capacity. Conclusions Abdominal irradiation appears to significantly modulate the systemic pharmacokinetics of 5-FU at both the dose level for target treatment and off-target areas. This unexpected and unwanted influence is worthy of further investigation and might need to be considered in clinical practice.

  2. Intensity modulated radiation-therapy for preoperative posterior abdominal wall irradiation of retroperitoneal liposarcomas

    Purpose: Preoperative external-beam radiation therapy (preop RT) in the management of Retroperitoneal Liposarcomas (RPLS) typically involves the delivery of radiation to the entire tumor mass: yet this may not be necessary. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new strategy of preop RT for RPLS in which the target volume is limited to the contact area between the tumoral mass and the posterior abdominal wall. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and Jan 2005, 18 patients with the diagnosis of RPLS have been treated following a pilot protocol of pre-op RT, 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2 Gy/day. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) has been limited to the posterior abdominal wall, region at higher risk for local relapse. A Three-Dimensional conformal (3D-CRT) and an Intensity Modulated (IMRT) plan were generated and compared; toxicity was reported following the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: All patients completed the planned treatment and the acute toxicity was tolerable: 2 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 Grade 2 anorexia while 2 patients developed Grade 2 nausea. IMRT allows a better sparing of the ipsilateral and the contralateral kidney. All tumors were successfully resected without major complications. At a median follow-up of 27 months 2 patients developed a local relapse and 1 lung metastasis. Conclusions: Our strategy of preop RT is feasible and well tolerated: the rate of resectability is not compromised by limiting the preop CTV to the posterior abdominal wall and a better critical-structures sparing is obtained with IMRT

  3. Late renal function following whole abdominal irradiation

    Sixty patients treated with whole abdominal radiotherapy who had remained disease-free since completion of treatment participated in a study to assess the late clinical and biochemical effects of bilateral renal irradiation. Minimum follow-up was 5 years with a maximum of 20 years and a median of 9 years. Fifty-two patients in the study group were treated for primary ovarian cancer. Seven had non-Hodgkins lymphoma arising in the gastrointestinal tract and one patient had a carcinoid tumour arising in small bowel. None of the patients received chemotherapy. Abdominal radiation was given using an open beam technique to a mean dose of 22.92 Gy (range 6.68-27.54 Gy) in 1.02 to 1.25 Gy fractions treated once daily. Posterior kidney shields were used in order to limit the renal dose to <20 Gy. Mean radiation dose to both kidneys (retrospectively calculated) was 19.28 Gy (range 6.68-22.99 Gy). Patients ranged in age from 32-81 years with a median of 61 years. No patient had clinical evidence of renal impairment. Nine patients were hypertensive prior to radiotherapy and a further five patients became hypertensive after treatment. Serum creatinine values ranged from 44-123 μmol/l, with a mean of 87 μmol/l. Creatinine clearance ranged from 0.61-2.38 ml/s (mean 1.28 ml/s). Tubular function tests revealed one borderline high 24-h protein excretion and normal 24-h phosphorous and uric acid. Using a multiple linear regression analysis with creatinine clearance as the endpoint, age was the only significant variable (P < 0.00001) and renal dose and interval from treatment were not independently significant. There was no evidence of late renal toxicity more than 5 years after whole abdominal radiotherapy delivered with this technique and dose/fractionation schedule, and using the clinical and biochemical endpoints assessed in this study

  4. Late renal function following whole abdominal irradiation.

    Irwin, C; Fyles, A; Wong, C S; Cheung, C M; Zhu, Y

    1996-03-01

    Sixty patients treated with whole abdominal radiotherapy who had remained disease-free since completion of treatment participated in a study to assess the late clinical and biochemical effects of bilateral renal irradiation. Minimum follow-up was 5 years with a maximum of 20 years and a median of 9 years. Fifty-two patients in the study group were treated for primary ovarian cancer. Seven had non-Hodgkins lymphoma arising in the gastrointestinal tract and one patient had a carcinoid tumour arising in small bowel. None of the patients received chemotherapy. Abdominal radiation was given using an open beam technique to a mean dose of 22.92 Gy (range 6.68-27.54 Gy) in 1.02 to 1.25 Gy fractions treated once daily. Posterior kidney shields were used in order to limit the renal dose to creatinine values ranged from 44-123 mumol/l, with a mean of 87 mumol/l. Creatinine clearance ranged from 0.61-2.38 ml/s (mean 1.28 ml/s). Tubular function tests revealed one borderline high 24-h protein excretion and normal 24-h phosphorous and uric acid. Using a multiple linear regression analysis with creatinine clearance as the endpoint, age was the only significant variable (P < 0.00001) and renal dose and interval from treatment were not independently significant. There was no evidence of late renal toxicity more than 5 years after whole abdominal radiotherapy delivered with this technique and dose/fractionation schedule, and using the clinical and biochemical endpoints assessed in this study. PMID:8693108

  5. Abdominal irradiation in the treatment of Wilms' tumor

    One hundred and fifty-two consecutive children who had Wilms' tumor were treated from 1960 to 1976. This series was analysed to determine the effect of systemic treatment on the incidence of abdominal relapse. Primary treatment included abdominal irradiation in 151 of these patients. Twenty-two patients (14%) had abdominal disease alone or in part at first relapse. For stages I-IV combined, a first abdominal relapse within the irradiated volume occurred in 3/21 patients (14%) who received no systemic treatment; 6/83 patients (7%) who received actinomycin D (AMD) and 1/35 patients (3%) who received AMD and vincristine (VCR). The mean radiation dose, 2400 rad given in 100-125 rad fractions, was essentially constant. Overall two in-field abdominal relapses occurred among 85 patients with stage I or II disease. The optimal radiation dose could not be determined in this retrospective review, but for stages I and II it was not greater than 2400 rad in 24 fractions

  6. Whole abdominal irradiation following chemotherapy in advanced ovarian carcinoma

    One hundred and sixteen patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma, who underwent primary cytoreductive surgery, received 6-11 courses of chemotherapy by cis-platin (50 mg/m2) and adriamycin (50 mg/m2) every 21 days. This was followed by second look laparotomy in 66 patients with no clinical evidence of disease. Consolidation abdominal irradiation was administered to 43 patients. Two techniques of irradiation were employed: between 1980-1983 whole abdominal irradiation was used and patients were to receive 3000 cGy in 4 weeks (Schedule I). Due to myelosuppression only 13 of 26 patients (50%) completed the planned dose of radiation. Between 1983-1985 the target volume was divided into upper and lower parts. First, the lower abdomen received 3000 cGy in 3 weeks, and then the upper abdomen received the same dose (Schedule II). Sixteen of seventeen patients (94%) thus treated, completed the planned dose of radiation. The actuarial survival for all 116 patients was 28% of 5 years. Irradiated patients with negative second look laparotomy had a survival probability of 100% at 24 months. Irradiated patients with microscopic disease at second look operation had an actuarial 5-year survival of 66%. Patients with minimal residual disease at second look laparotomy, receiving consolidation abdominal irradiation, had an actuarial survival of 5% only at 36 months. It is concluded that consolidation radiotherapy is effective in patients with negative or microscopic residual disease at second-look laparotomy. In regard to bone marrow tolerance, split field technique of irradiation is preferred

  7. Significance of bacterial flora in abdominal irradiation-induced inhibition of lung metastases

    We have previously reported that abdominal irradiation prior to i.v. injection of syngeneic tumor cells reduced metastases in lung. Our report described an investigation of the significance of intestinal organisms in the radiation effect. We found that eliminating intestinal organisms with antibiotics totally abolished the radiation effect. Monoassociation of germ-free mice revealed that the radiation effect was observable only for Enterobacter cloacae, never for Streptococcus faecium, Bifidobacterium adlesentis, or Escherichia coli. After abdominal irradiation of regular mice, E. cloacae multiplied in cecal contents, adhered to mucous membranes, invaded the cecal wall, and translocated to mesenteric lymph nodes. Intravenous administration of E. cloacae in place of abdominal irradiation inhibited metastases. E. cloacae-monoassociated mice developed fewer metastases than germ-free mice, and the reduction was further enhanced by abdominal irradiation. We concluded that abdominal irradiation caused the invasion of E. cloacae from the mucous membrane of the intestine and inhibited formation of lung metastases

  8. Effect of abdominal irradiation on growth in boys treated for a Wilms' tumor

    To study the effect of abdominal irradiation on spinal growth in childhood we have measured final height, sitting height, and leg length in 30 male survivors of a Wilms' tumor. Twenty-one patients received whole abdominal irradiation by either megavoltage therapy (MV: n = 11) or orthovoltage therapy (OV: n = 10); the remainder received flank irradiation. To examine the effect of the adolescent growth spurt on the irradiated spine we have followed prospectively seven patients who received whole abdominal irradiation and nine patients who received flank irradiation through puberty. Compared to a normal population there is a modest reduction in median final standing height SDS (H.SDS: -1.15) accompanied by a marked reduction in median final sitting height SDS (S.HT SDS: -2.41) with no apparent effect on median subischial leg length SDS (SILL.SDS: 0.04). This reduction in spinal growth is reflected by a strongly positive disproportion score (DPS; [SILL SDS-S.HT SDS] + 2.81). The incidence of scoliosis after abdominal irradiation has been low (10%). During puberty there is a significant fall in median sitting height SDS after both whole abdominal (median fall: -0.9, P = 0.02) and flank irradiation (median fall: -1.85, P = 0.01), and this is reflected in a significant increase in disproportion (DPS: whole abdominal; median rise +1.4, P = 0.02: flank, median rise +1.34, P = 0.01). After MV irradiation there is a significant correlation between the degree of disproportion and the age at treatment (P less than 0.0005). The younger the patient is at treatment the more severe is the restriction on spinal growth and the shorter and more disproportionate they become as an adult. The estimated eventual loss in potential height from abdominal irradiation at the age of one is 10 cm and at five years is 7 cm

  9. Total abdominal irradiation and parenteral nutrition: an experimental study in the dog

    The influence of parenteral nutrition on digestive tolerance was studied in 26 dogs receiving total abdominal irradiation (1100 rads were delivered in a single dose at mid-thickness of the abdomen). Enzymatic perturbations (lactase, maltase, alkaline phosphatase and enterokinase) were studied in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum and a correction of the 75% decrease of the intestinal enzymatic activities was observed after total abdominal irradiation in the dogs fed exclusively by parenteral routes while the dogs fed orally died in few days with severe digestive and metabolic disturbances

  10. Tentative therapy of acute abdominal irradiations of pigs

    The anatomical and physiological considerations that make pig an interesting experimental model for radiobiological investigations are first reviewed. The anatomo- and physico-pathological bases of therapy acute abdominal exposure are stated, especially the kinetics and limits of intestinal recovery at various doses. A therapeutic procedure is given and the experimental results on reanimation (parenteral alimentation), re-nutrition (continuous enteral infusion) and intestine grafts are presented

  11. Pathomorphology of the consequences of chronic irradiation from γ-neutron source implanted in abdominal cavity

    Comparison of the results of morphological investigations of the internal organs of dogs and sheep with γ-neutron radiation sources, implanted in the abdominal cavity, has shown that the correlation between a degree of severity and type of morphological changes in this case is similar to that of identical irradiation from an external source

  12. Research on the therapeutics of intense abdominal irradiations in pigs

    Tests of surgical treatments (graft of small intestine, and partial enterectomy before or after irradiation) and dietic treatments (continuous parenteral feeding) were carried out on 80 pigs irradiated over the posterior half of the body with doses of between 950 and 1750 rad at mid plane. The results relate to clinical symptoms, survivals, haematology, and histopathology; nutritional aspects were studied by means of evaluation of balances (nitrogen, lipids, and minerals) and absorption tests (58Co - Vit. B 12 and iodised lipids). Above 1200 rad recuperation of the digestive system did not in general make prolonged survival possible; in addition to intestinal lesions, renal and especially pancreatic atrophy appeared, whose consequences appeared to be determinative as regards the nutrition and hence the survival of the animals. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 CKA

  13. Strategies for modulating the inflammatory response after decompression from abdominal compartment syndrome

    Shah Shinil K; Jimenez Fernando; Letourneau Phillip A; Walker Peter A; Moore-Olufemi Stacey D; Stewart Randolph H; Laine Glen A; Cox Charles S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Management of the open abdomen is an increasingly common part of surgical practice. The purpose of this review is to examine the scientific background for the use of temporary abdominal closure (TAC) in the open abdomen as a way to modulate the local and systemic inflammatory response, with an emphasis on decompression after abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Methods A review of the relevant English language literature was conducted. Priority was placed on articles publ...

  14. Helical tomotherapy as a new treatment technique for whole abdominal irradiation

    Rochet, N.; Sterzing, F.; Jensen, A.; Herfarth, K.; Schubert, K.; Debus, J.; Harms, W. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Dinkel, J. [German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Eichbaum, M.; Schneeweiss, A.; Sohn, C. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To describe a new intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique using helical tomotherapy for whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Material and Methods: A patient with radically operated ovarian cancer FIGO stage IIIc was treated in a prospective clinical trial with WAI to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as an additional therapy after adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. The planning target volume (PTV) included the entire peritoneal cavity. PTV was adapted according to breathing motion as detected in a four-dimensional respiratory-triggered computed tomography (4D-CT). Inverse treatment planning was done with the Hi-Art tomotherapy planning station. Organs at risk (OARs) were kidneys, liver, bone marrow, spinal cord, thoracic and lumbosacral vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Daily control of positioning accuracy was performed with megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT). Results: Helical tomotherapy enabled a very homogeneous dose distribution with excellent sparing of OARs and coverage of the PTV (V90 of 93.1%, V95 of 86.9%, V105 of 1.9%, and V110 of 0.01%). Mean liver dose was 21.57 Gy and mean kidney doses were 9.75 Gy and 9.14 Gy, respectively. Treatment could be performed in 18.1 min daily and no severe side effects occurred. Conclusion: Helical tomotherapy is feasible and fast for WAI. Tomotherapy enabled excellent coverage of the PTV and effective sparing of liver, kidneys and bone marrow. (orig.)

  15. Helical tomotherapy as a new treatment technique for whole abdominal irradiation

    Purpose: To describe a new intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique using helical tomotherapy for whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Material and Methods: A patient with radically operated ovarian cancer FIGO stage IIIc was treated in a prospective clinical trial with WAI to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as an additional therapy after adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. The planning target volume (PTV) included the entire peritoneal cavity. PTV was adapted according to breathing motion as detected in a four-dimensional respiratory-triggered computed tomography (4D-CT). Inverse treatment planning was done with the Hi-Art tomotherapy planning station. Organs at risk (OARs) were kidneys, liver, bone marrow, spinal cord, thoracic and lumbosacral vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Daily control of positioning accuracy was performed with megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT). Results: Helical tomotherapy enabled a very homogeneous dose distribution with excellent sparing of OARs and coverage of the PTV (V90 of 93.1%, V95 of 86.9%, V105 of 1.9%, and V110 of 0.01%). Mean liver dose was 21.57 Gy and mean kidney doses were 9.75 Gy and 9.14 Gy, respectively. Treatment could be performed in 18.1 min daily and no severe side effects occurred. Conclusion: Helical tomotherapy is feasible and fast for WAI. Tomotherapy enabled excellent coverage of the PTV and effective sparing of liver, kidneys and bone marrow. (orig.)

  16. Protective effects of intestinal RNA on intestinal mucosal barrier in mice after abdominal γ-irradiation

    The work was aimed at exploring protective effects of intestinal RNA on intestinal mucosal barrier in mice after abdominal γ-irradiation. The BALB/c male mice were abdominally irradiated with 11.50 Gy 60Co γ-ray in 1-3h, and then they were injected intestinal RNA from normal on jejunum. On 1, 3 and 5d after irradiation, the mice were sacrificed after anesthesia for determining sIgA in small intestinal mucilage, endotoxin in blood and bacterial metathetic rate, and observing morphological changes of jejunal villus. The result showed that intestinal RNA can decrease MLN bacterial metathetic rate and the level of endotoxin in blood, and increase sIgA in small intestinal mucilage (p<0.01). In addition, it can improve intestinal mucosal morphology and reduce atrophy and collapse of jejunal villus. In conclusion, Intestinal RNA can improve intestinal mucosal barrier and inhibit intestinal bacterial translocation and absorption of intestinal endotoxin in irradiated mice. (authors)

  17. Radiobiological effect of abdominal X-ray hypo-fraction irradiation on Wistar rats liver

    Peng Qi; Yongheng An; Hongsheng Yu; Xinjia He

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of abdominal hypo-fraction irradiation on liver dam-age in rats so as to provide a reference for its clinical application. Methods: A total of 100 Wistar rats were equally randomized to five groups as control, 4 Gy, 6 Gy, 8 Gy and 12 Gy group, and the corresponding fractionated doses were offered. Liver functions were examined at the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th and 10th week after irradiation. Morphological changes were observed by HE staining. Expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax were examined by immunohistochemical technique. Results: In all irradiation groups, hepatocellular swell, degeneration, necrosis and even hepatic fibrosis could be seen. The differences of the liver coef-ficient, Glutamyl pyruvic transaminase (GPT), Glutamyl oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) were significant among the groups and different time points (F = 11.833–781.972, F = 20.857–264.692, P < 0.001). Expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax were signifi-cantly different between each group (F = 211.607, 116.577; P < 0. 001), and between each time point (F = 54.083, 68.749; P < 0. 001). Conclusion: Compare with conventional fraction, abdominal hypo-fraction irradiation may cause radiation damage to rat liver, being dose-and-time dependent. Up-regulation of activating apoptosis protein Bax and down-regulation of inhibiting apoptosis protein Bcl-2 may involve in the process.

  18. Effect of intestinal RNA on intestinal mucosal barrier and bacterial translocation in mice after abdominal γ-irradiation

    Objective: To study the effects of intestinal RNA on intestinal mucosal barrier and bacterial translocation in mice after abdominal γ-irradiation. Methods: Twenty-eight BALB/c male mice were abdominally irradiated with 11.50 Gy 60Co γ-rays, and then injected with intestinal RNA on jejunum within 3 hours after the irradiation. All the mice were sacrificed on the 5 d after irradiation. Changes of intestinal mucosal histomorphology were observed with light microscope and scanning electron microscope, and then crypt survival rate and bacterial metathetic rate were calculated. The experimental data were analyzed with SPSS 13.0. Results: Intestinal RNA significantly increased the crypt survival rate of jejunum in mice after irradiation (P<0.01 ). Intestinal villous atrophy and collapse, submucosal edema, and necrosis of crypts were observed in the irradiated control group. Intestinal mucosal morphosis was significantly improved in the RNA group compared with that in the irradiation control group. Intestinal RNA decreased the intestinal bacterial metathetic rate. Conclusion: Intestinal RNA can improve intestinal mucosal barrier and decrease intestinal bacterial metathetic rate in mice after irradiation. (authors)

  19. Irradiation exposure modulates central opioid functions

    Exposure to low doses of gamma irradiation results in the modification of both the antinociceptive properties of morphine and the severity of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-dependent rats. To better define the interactions between gamma irradiation and these opiate-mediated phenomena, dose-response studies were undertaken of the effect of irradiation on morphine-induced antinociception, and on the naloxone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome of morphine-dependent rats. In addition, electrophysiologic studies were conducted in rats after irradiation exposure and morphine treatment correlating with the behavioral studies. The observations obtained demonstrated that the antinociceptive effects of morphine as well as naloxone-precipitated withdrawal were modified in a dose-dependent manner by irradiation exposure. In addition, irradiation-induced changes in the evoked responses obtained from four different brain regions demonstrated transient alterations in both baseline and morphine-treated responses that may reflect the alterations observed in the behavioral paradigms. These results suggest that the effects of irradiation on opiate activities resulted from physiologic alterations of central endogenous opioid systems due to alterations manifested within peripheral targets

  20. Irradiation exposure modulates central opioid functions

    Dougherty, P.M.; Dafny, N.

    1987-11-01

    Exposure to low doses of gamma irradiation results in the modification of both the antinociceptive properties of morphine and the severity of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-dependent rats. To better define the interactions between gamma irradiation and these opiate-mediated phenomena, dose-response studies were undertaken of the effect of irradiation on morphine-induced antinociception, and on the naloxone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome of morphine-dependent rats. In addition, electrophysiologic studies were conducted in rats after irradiation exposure and morphine treatment correlating with the behavioral studies. The observations obtained demonstrated that the antinociceptive effects of morphine as well as naloxone-precipitated withdrawal were modified in a dose-dependent manner by irradiation exposure. In addition, irradiation-induced changes in the evoked responses obtained from four different brain regions demonstrated transient alterations in both baseline and morphine-treated responses that may reflect the alterations observed in the behavioral paradigms. These results suggest that the effects of irradiation on opiate activities resulted from physiologic alterations of central endogenous opioid systems due to alterations manifested within peripheral targets.

  1. Pathomorphologic aftereffects of chronic irradiation with γ-neutron source incorporated in the abdominal cavity (communication 2)

    The results were presented of radiometric and morphological studies of the viscera of dogs and sheep who lived 5 to 7 years with the Hertz-IR type γ-neutron standard radiation sources, implanted in the abdominal cavity. The most coarse dystrophic and sclerotic changes were found in the visceral sites adjacent to the radiation source or near it. It was suggested that spermatogenesis disorders resulting from chronic low-dose irradiation were due to not only the immediate action of ionizing radiation, but to total disorders of the trophicity of irradiated body as well

  2. Adjuvant whole abdominal intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for high risk stage FIGO III patients with ovarian cancer (OVAR-IMRT-01 – Pilot trial of a phase I/II study: study protocol

    Sohn Christof

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite aggressive surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy. More than 60% of patients will develop recurrent disease, principally intraperitoneal, and die within 5 years. The use of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI as consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy given its ability to sterilize small tumour volumes. Despite the clinically proven efficacy of whole abdominal irradiation, the use of radiotherapy in ovarian cancer has profoundly decreased mainly due to high treatment-related toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT could allow to spare kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. Methods/Design The OVAR-IMRT-01 study is a single center pilot trial of a phase I/II study. Patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III (R1 or R2 Discussion The primary endpoint of the study is the evaluation of the feasibility of intensity-modulated WAI and the evaluation of the study protocol. Secondary endpoint is evaluation of the toxicity of intensity modulated WAI before continuing with the phase I/II study. The aim is to explore the potential of IMRT as a new method for WAI to decrease the dose to kidneys, liver, bone marrow while covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose, and to implement whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy into the adjuvant multimodal treatment concept of advanced ovarian cancer FIGO stage III.

  3. Effects of fractionated abdominal irradiation on small intestinal motility. Studies in a novel in vitro animal model

    Disordered small intestinal motility occurs frequently during acute radiation enteritis. However, the characteristics and time course of the motor dysfunction are poorly defined. These parameters were assessed in a novel animal model of radiation enteritis. Ileal pressures were recorded in vitro with perfused microanometric catheter using an arterially perfused ileal loop in 22 ferrets following fractionated abdominal irradiation (9 doses 2.50 Gz thrice weekly for 3 weeks). Tissue damage was graded histologically. Studies were performed 3 to 29 days after irradiation. Tissue from 7 control animals was also studied. All treated animals developed diarrhoea. Histology showed changes consistent with mild to moderate radiation enteritis. Following irradiation, there was an initial increase in frequency followed by a non-significant reduction in the frequency, but not the amplitude of ileal pressure waves. The frequency of pressure waves showed an inverse relationship with time after radiation (r=-0.634, p<0.002). There was no relationship between motility and histology. We conclude that abdominal irradiation is associated with a time-dependent reduction in ileal motility which does not correlate with light microscopic changes. (orig.)

  4. Effects of fractionated abdominal irradiation on small intestinal motility. Studies in a novel in vitro animal model

    Fraser, R.; Frisby, C.; Horowitz, M. [Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia). Dept. of Medicine; Schirmer, M.; Yeoh, E. [Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Blackshaw, A. [Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia). Dept. of Gastrointestinal Medicine; Langman, J.; Rowland, R. [Division of Tissue Pathology, Inst. of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Disordered small intestinal motility occurs frequently during acute radiation enteritis. However, the characteristics and time course of the motor dysfunction are poorly defined. These parameters were assessed in a novel animal model of radiation enteritis. Ileal pressures were recorded in vitro with perfused microanometric catheter using an arterially perfused ileal loop in 22 ferrets following fractionated abdominal irradiation (9 doses 2.50 Gz thrice weekly for 3 weeks). Tissue damage was graded histologically. Studies were performed 3 to 29 days after irradiation. Tissue from 7 control animals was also studied. All treated animals developed diarrhoea. Histology showed changes consistent with mild to moderate radiation enteritis. Following irradiation, there was an initial increase in frequency followed by a non-significant reduction in the frequency, but not the amplitude of ileal pressure waves. The frequency of pressure waves showed an inverse relationship with time after radiation (r=-0.634, p<0.002). There was no relationship between motility and histology. We conclude that abdominal irradiation is associated with a time-dependent reduction in ileal motility which does not correlate with light microscopic changes. (orig.).

  5. Dosimetry computer module of the gamma irradiator of ININ

    This work present the technical specifications for the upgrade of the dosimetry module of the computer system of the gamma irradiator of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) whose result allows the integration and consultation of information in industrial dosimetry subject under an outline client-server. (Author)

  6. Fertility and Pregnancy Outcome After Abdominal Irradiation That Included or Excluded the Pelvis in Childhood Tumor Survivors

    Purpose: To evaluate fertility after abdominal and/or pelvic irradiation in long-term female survivors. Methods and Materials: Puberty and pregnancy outcome were analyzed in female survivors of childhood cancer (aged <18 years) treated with abdominal and/or pelvic radiotherapy (RT) at one of two French centers (Nancy and Lyon) between 1975 and 2004. Data were obtained from medical records and questionnaires sent to the women. Results: A total of 84 patients who had received abdominal and/or pelvic RT during childhood and were alive and aged more than 18 years at the time of the study made up the study population. Of the 57 female survivors treated with abdominal RT that excluded the pelvis, 52 (91%) progressed normally through puberty and 23 (40%) had at least one recorded pregnancy. Of the 27 patients treated with pelvic RT, only 10 (37%) progressed normally through puberty and 5 (19%) had at least one recorded pregnancy. Twenty-two women (seventeen of whom were treated with pelvic RT) had certain subfertility. A total of 50 births occurred in 28 women, with one baby dying at birth; one miscarriage also occurred. There was a high prevalence of prematurity and low birth weight but not of congenital malformations. Conclusions: Fertility can be preserved in patients who undergo abdominal RT that excludes the pelvis, taking into account the other treatments (e.g., chemotherapy with alkylating agents) are taken into account. When RT includes the pelvis, fertility is frequently impaired and women can have difficulty conceiving. Nevertheless, pregnancies can occur in some of these women. The most important factor that endangers a successful pregnancy after RT is the total dose received by the ovaries and uterus. This radiation dose has to be systematically recorded to improve our ability to follow up patients.

  7. Critical Appraisal of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Metastases to Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    Purpose: A planning study was performed comparing volumetric modulated arcs, RapidArc (RA), fixed beam IMRT (IM), and conformal radiotherapy (CRT) with multiple static fields or short conformal arcs in a series of patients treated with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solitary or oligo-metastases from different tumors to abdominal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were included in the study. Dose prescription was set to 45 Gy (mean dose to clinical target volume [CTV]) in six fractions of 7.5 Gy. Objectives for CTV and planning target volume (PTV) were as follows: Dosemin >95%, Dosemax 15Gy 36Gy 36Gy 15Gy 3) for liver. Dose-volume histograms were evaluated to assess plan quality. Results: Planning objectives on CTV and PTV were achieved by all techniques. Use of RA improved PTV coverage (V95% = 90.2% ± 5.2% for RA compared with 82.5% ± 9.6% and 84.5% ± 8.2% for CRT and IM, respectively). Most planning objectives for organs at risk were met by all techniques except for the duodenum, small bowel, and stomach, in which the CRT plans exceeded the dose/volume constraints in some patients. The MU/fraction values were as follows: 2186 ± 211 for RA, 2583 ± 699 for IM, and 1554 ± 153 for CRT. Effective treatment time resulted as follows: 3.7 ± 0.4 min for RA, 10.6 ± 1.2 min for IM, and 6.3 ± 0.5 min for CRT. Conclusions: Delivery of SBRT by RA showed improvements in conformal avoidance with respect to standard conformal irradiation. Delivery parameters confirmed logistical advantages of RA, particularly compared with IM.

  8. Ovarian failure following abdominal irradiation in childhood: the radiosensitivity of the human oocyte

    Ovarian function has been studied sequentially since 1975 in 19 patients treated in childhood for an intra-abdominal tumour with surgery and whole abdominal radiotherapy (total dose 30 Gy). Eleven patients received chemotherapeutic agents known to cause gonadal dysfunction. All but one patient have developed ovarian failure with persistently elevated gonadotrophin levels (FSH and LH > 32 IU/litre) and low serum oestradiol values (50 for the human oocyte does not exceed 4 Gy. (author)

  9. Adjuvant whole abdominal intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk stage FIGO III patients with ovarian cancer (OVAR-IMRT-01) – Pilot trial of a phase I/II study: study protocol

    The prognosis for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite aggressive surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy. More than 60% of patients will develop recurrent disease, principally intraperitoneal, and die within 5 years. The use of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) as consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy given its ability to sterilize small tumour volumes. Despite the clinically proven efficacy of whole abdominal irradiation, the use of radiotherapy in ovarian cancer has profoundly decreased mainly due to high treatment-related toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) could allow to spare kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. The OVAR-IMRT-01 study is a single center pilot trial of a phase I/II study. Patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III (R1 or R2< 1 cm) after surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy will be treated with whole abdomen irradiation as consolidation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions. A total of 8 patients will be included in this trial. For treatment planning bone marrow, kidneys, liver, spinal cord, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones are defined as organs at risk. The planning target volume includes the entire peritoneal cavity plus pelvic and para-aortic node regions. The primary endpoint of the study is the evaluation of the feasibility of intensity-modulated WAI and the evaluation of the study protocol. Secondary endpoint is evaluation of the toxicity of intensity modulated WAI before continuing with the phase I/II study. The aim is to explore the potential of IMRT as a new method for WAI to decrease the dose to kidneys, liver, bone marrow while covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose, and to implement whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy into the adjuvant multimodal

  10. Patterns of Brain Activation and Meal Reduction Induced by Abdominal Surgery in Mice and Modulation by Rikkunshito.

    Lixin Wang

    Full Text Available Abdominal surgery inhibits food intake and induces c-Fos expression in the hypothalamic and medullary nuclei in rats. Rikkunshito (RKT, a Kampo medicine improves anorexia. We assessed the alterations in meal microstructure and c-Fos expression in brain nuclei induced by abdominal surgery and the modulation by RKT in mice. RKT or vehicle was gavaged daily for 1 week. On day 8 mice had no access to food for 6-7 h and were treated twice with RKT or vehicle. Abdominal surgery (laparotomy-cecum palpation was performed 1-2 h before the dark phase. The food intake and meal structures were monitored using an automated monitoring system for mice. Brain sections were processed for c-Fos immunoreactivity (ir 2-h after abdominal surgery. Abdominal surgery significantly reduced bouts, meal frequency, size and duration, and time spent on meals, and increased inter-meal interval and satiety ratio resulting in 92-86% suppression of food intake at 2-24 h post-surgery compared with control group (no surgery. RKT significantly increased bouts, meal duration and the cumulative 12-h food intake by 11%. Abdominal surgery increased c-Fos in the prelimbic, cingulate and insular cortexes, and autonomic nuclei, such as the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, central amygdala, hypothalamic supraoptic (SON, paraventricular and arcuate nuclei, Edinger-Westphal nucleus (E-W, lateral periaqueduct gray (PAG, lateral parabrachial nucleus, locus coeruleus, ventrolateral medulla and nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS. RKT induced a small increase in c-Fos-ir neurons in the SON and E-W of control mice, and in mice with surgery there was an increase in the lateral PAG and a decrease in the NTS. These findings indicate that abdominal surgery inhibits food intake by increasing both satiation (meal duration and satiety (meal interval and activates brain circuits involved in pain, feeding behavior and stress that may underlie the alterations of meal pattern and food intake inhibition

  11. Ovarian failure following abdominal irradiation in childhood: the radiosensitivity of the human oocyte

    Wallace, W.H.B.; Shalet, S.M.; Hendry, J.H.; Morris-Jones, P.H.; Gattamaneni, H.R. (Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (UK))

    1989-11-01

    Ovarian function has been studied sequentially since 1975 in 19 patients treated in childhood for an intra-abdominal tumour with surgery and whole abdominal radiotherapy (total dose 30 Gy). Eleven patients received chemotherapeutic agents known to cause gonadal dysfunction. All but one patient have developed ovarian failure with persistently elevated gonadotrophin levels (FSH and LH > 32 IU/litre) and low serum oestradiol values (< 40 pmol/litre) before the age of 16 years. The majority (n=12) did not progress beyond breast stage I without sex steroid replacement therapy. As the number of oocytes within the ovary declines exponentially by atresia from approximately 2,000,000 at birth to approximately 2,000 at the menopause, the authors estimated that the LD{sub 50} for the human oocyte does not exceed 4 Gy. (author).

  12. Androgen deprivation modulates the inflammatory response induced by irradiation

    The aim of this study was to determine whether radiation (RT)-induced inflammatory responses and organ damage might be modulated by androgen deprivation therapies. The mRNA and tissue sections obtained from the lungs, intestines and livers of irradiated mice with or without androgen deprivation were analyzed by real-time PCR and histological analysis. Activation of NF-kappa B was examined by measuring nuclear protein levels in the intestine and lung 24 h after irradiation. We also examined the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), TGF-β1 and p-AKT to elucidate the related pathway responsible to irradiation (RT) -induced fibrosis. We found androgen deprivation by castration significantly augmented RT-induced inflammation, associated with the increase NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression. However, administration of flutamide had no obvious effect on the radiation-induced inflammation response in the lung and intestine. These different responses were probably due to the increase of RT-induced NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression by castration or lupron treatment. In addition, our data suggest that TGF-β1 and the induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway may contribute to RT-induced fibrosis. When irradiation was given to patients with total androgen deprivation, the augmenting effects on the RT-induced inflammation and fibrosis should take into consideration for complications associated with radiotherapy

  13. Androgen deprivation modulates the inflammatory response induced by irradiation

    Lin Paul-Yang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine whether radiation (RT-induced inflammatory responses and organ damage might be modulated by androgen deprivation therapies. Methods The mRNA and tissue sections obtained from the lungs, intestines and livers of irradiated mice with or without androgen deprivation were analyzed by real-time PCR and histological analysis. Activation of NF-kappa B was examined by measuring nuclear protein levels in the intestine and lung 24 h after irradiation. We also examined the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, TGF-β1 and p-AKT to elucidate the related pathway responsible to irradiation (RT -induced fibrosis. Results We found androgen deprivation by castration significantly augmented RT-induced inflammation, associated with the increase NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression. However, administration of flutamide had no obvious effect on the radiation-induced inflammation response in the lung and intestine. These different responses were probably due to the increase of RT-induced NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression by castration or lupron treatment. In addition, our data suggest that TGF-β1 and the induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway may contribute to RT-induced fibrosis. Conclusion When irradiation was given to patients with total androgen deprivation, the augmenting effects on the RT-induced inflammation and fibrosis should take into consideration for complications associated with radiotherapy.

  14. Effect of external abdominal irradiation on the dimensions and characteristics of the barriers to passive transport in the rat intestine

    Limited information is available on the effect of irradiation on the intestinal absorption of passively transported nutrients. In this study a previously validated in vitro technique was used to measure the uptake of fatty acids (FA), fatty alcohols and cholesterol into the jejunum, ileum and colon of control rats and animals exposed to cesium-137 source irradiation applied to the abdomen. The effective resistance of the intestinal unstirred water layer was measured with lauryl alcohol, and in control rats this resistance was lowest in the ileum, highest in the colon, and of intermediate value in the jejunum. Fourteen days after 600 rads, unstirred layer resistance was reduced by half in the colon when the bulk phase was stirred at 600 rpm, and in the jejunum, ileum and colon when the bulk phase was unstirred (0 rpm). The incremental change in the free energy of transfer (integral of delta Fw----l) was measured with a homologous series of saturated medium-chain length fatty acids; 14 days after 600 and 900 rads the value of integral of delta Fw----l in the jejunum rose significantly, and occurred when light and electron microscopic changes were minimal. Fourteen days after 300 rads, the uptake of FA 6:0-12:0 was reduced, but this decline in uptake appeared to be caused by a fall in the functional surface area of the membrane rather than a change in integral of delta Fw----l. The uptake of cholesterol into the jejunum, ileum and colon was unaffected by irradiation, suggesting that cholesterol and fatty acids may have different diffusion pathways through the membrane. Thus, external abdominal irradiation influences the dimensions and characteristics of the barriers to passive transport in the intestine of the rat, and thereby modifies the uptake of some but not all passively absorbed nutrients. These functional changes are not closely associated with morphological alterations

  15. Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results: Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  16. Tai Chi Chuan modulates heart rate variability during abdominal breathing in elderly adults.

    Wei, Gao-Xia; Li, You-Fa; Yue, Xiao-Lin; Ma, Xiao; Chang, Yu-Kai; Yi, Long-Yan; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2016-03-01

    Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) practice is currently intentionally applied in clinical populations, especially those with cardiovascular diseases because of its potential benefits on the autonomic nervous system. The long-term effect of TCC practice on heart rate variability (HRV) remains largely unknown. In this study, we recruited 23 TCC practitioners whose experience averaged approximately 21 years and 19 controls matched by age, sex and education to examine the effect of TCC practice on the autonomic nervous system during a resting state and during an abdominal breathing state. HRV was measured by traditional electrocardiogram (ECG) recording. The results showed that the low frequency, total power frequency, and normalized low frequency components and the low-frequency/high-frequency ratio were significantly higher, whereas the normalized high frequency was significantly lower in the TCC practitioners relative to controls during the abdominal breathing state. However, we did not detect any significant difference in the HRV measures during the resting state between the two groups. Additionally, TCC experience did not correlate with HRV components either in the abdominal state or the resting state in the TCC group. Considering all of these findings, we suggest that TCC improves vagal activity and the balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic activity during the relaxation state. This study also provides direct physiological evidence for the role of TCC practice in relaxation. PMID:26377754

  17. The nucleic acid precursors can enhance the intestinal crypt survival in mice after 980 cGy abdominal γ-irradiation

    The effect of a single post-irradiation intestinal lumen dilatation injection of one of mononucleotides, nucleosides or nucleic acid bases on intestinal crypt survival after 980 cGy abdominally γ-irradiated mice has been studied. The results showed that any one of these nucleic acid components can produce the same enhancing effect of crypt survival as that did by polymerized calf thymus DNA. This fact suggests that the radio restorative effect of exogenous nucleic acids on the intestinal crypt cells depends not upon the action exerted by their highly polymerized state, but rather by their various enzymatic degradation products

  18. Investigation of high flux test module for the international fusion materials irradiation facilities (IFMIF)

    This report describes investigation on structure of a high neutron flux test module (HFTM) for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facilities (IFMIF). The HFTM is aimed for neutron irradiation of a specimen in a high neutron flux domain of the test cell for irradiation ground of IFMIF. We investigated the overall structure of the HFTM that was able to include specimens in a rig and thermocouple arrangement, an interface of control signal and support structure. Moreover, pressure and the amount of the bend in the module vessel (a rectangular section pressure vessel) were calculated. The module vessel did a rectangular section from limitation of a high neutron flux domain. Also, we investigated damage of thermocouples under neutron irradiation, which was a temperature sensor of irradiation materials temperature control demanded high precision. Based on these results, drawings on the HTFM structure. (author)

  19. Volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams for isolated abdominal/pelvic lymph nodes: report of dosimetric and early clinical results in oligometastatic patients

    SBRT is a safe and efficient strategy to locally control multiple metastatic sites. While research in the physics domain for Flattening Filter Free Beams (FFF) beams is increasing, there are few clinical data of FFF beams in clinical practice. Here we reported dosimentric and early clinical data of SBRT and FFF delivery in isolated lymph node oligometastatic patients. Between October 2010 and March 2012, 34 patients were treated with SBRT for oligometastatic lymph node metastasis on a Varian TrueBeamTM treatment machine using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (RapidArc). We retrospectively evaluated a total of 25 patients for isolated lymph node metastases in abdomen and/or pelvis treated with SBRT and FFF (28 treatments). Acute toxicity was recorded. Local control evaluation was scored by means of CT scan and/or PET scan. All dosimetric results are in line with what published for the same type of stereotactic abdominal lymph node metastases treatments and fractionation, using RapidArc. All 25 FFF SBRT patients completed the treatment. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was minimal: one patient showed Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity. Three other patients presented Grade 2 toxicity. No Grade 3 or higher was recorded. All toxicities were recovered within one week. The preliminary clinical results at the median follow up of 195 days are: complete response in 12 cases, partial response in 11, stable disease in 5, with an overall response rate of 82%; no local progression was recorded. Data of dosimetrical findings and acute toxicity are excellent for patients treated with SBRT with VMAT using FFF beams. Preliminary clinical results showed a high rate of local control in irradiated lesion. Further data and longer follow up are needed to assess late toxicity and definitive clinical outcomes

  20. Volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams for isolated abdominal/pelvic lymph nodes: report of dosimetric and early clinical results in oligometastatic patients

    Alongi Filippo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SBRT is a safe and efficient strategy to locally control multiple metastatic sites. While research in the physics domain for Flattening Filter Free Beams (FFF beams is increasing, there are few clinical data of FFF beams in clinical practice. Here we reported dosimentric and early clinical data of SBRT and FFF delivery in isolated lymph node oligometastatic patients. Methods Between October 2010 and March 2012, 34 patients were treated with SBRT for oligometastatic lymph node metastasis on a Varian TrueBeamTM treatment machine using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (RapidArc. We retrospectively evaluated a total of 25 patients for isolated lymph node metastases in abdomen and/or pelvis treated with SBRT and FFF (28 treatments. Acute toxicity was recorded. Local control evaluation was scored by means of CT scan and/or PET scan. Results All dosimetric results are in line with what published for the same type of stereotactic abdominal lymph node metastases treatments and fractionation, using RapidArc. All 25 FFF SBRT patients completed the treatment. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was minimal: one patient showed Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity. Three other patients presented Grade 2 toxicity. No Grade 3 or higher was recorded. All toxicities were recovered within one week. The preliminary clinical results at the median follow up of 195 days are: complete response in 12 cases, partial response in 11, stable disease in 5, with an overall response rate of 82%; no local progression was recorded. Conclusions Data of dosimetrical findings and acute toxicity are excellent for patients treated with SBRT with VMAT using FFF beams. Preliminary clinical results showed a high rate of local control in irradiated lesion. Further data and longer follow up are needed to assess late toxicity and definitive clinical outcomes.

  1. Progress report on irradiation experiment on small size specimens in high temperature flux module

    This report describes the progress made in IFREC/DEMO Research and Development Program during the year 2010 at SCK/CEN. This task is part of demonstrating the possibility to irradiate small specimens in the HFTM modules that will be used in DEMO. Different small specimens of three candidate materials of DEMO fusion reactor will be irradiated with the objective of validating the specimen geometry and size to reliably characterize the mechanical properties of unirradiated and in future of irradiated materials.

  2. Estimating PV Module Performance over Large Geographical Regions: The Role of Irradiance, Air Temperature, Wind Speed and Solar Spectrum

    Thomas Huld; Ana M. Gracia Amillo

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of how photovoltaic (PV) module performance varies on continental scale. Mathematical models have been used to take into account shallow-angle reflectivity, spectral sensitivity, dependence of module efficiency on irradiance and module temperature as well as how the module temperature depends on irradiance, ambient temperature and wind speed. Spectrally resolved irradiance data retrieved from satellite images are combined with temperature and wind speed data from global com...

  3. Modulation of NF-KB in rescued irradiated cells

    Studies by different groups on the rescue effect, where unirradiated bystander cells mitigated the damages in the irradiated cells, since its discovery by the authors' group in 2011 were first reviewed. The properties of the rescue effect were then examined using a novel experimental set-up to physically separate the rescue signals from the bystander signals. The authors' results showed that the rescue effect was mediated through activation of the nuclear factor-KB (NF-KB) response pathway in the irradiated cells, and that the NF-KB activation inhibitor BAy-11-7082 did not affect the activation of this response pathway in the irradiated cells induced by direct irradiation. (authors)

  4. A preliminary investigation of cell growth after irradiation using a modulated x-ray intensity pattern

    In this study we have investigated a spatial distribution of cell growth after their irradiation using a modulated x-ray intensity pattern. An A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cell line was grown in a 6-well culture. Two of the wells were the unirradiated control wells, whilst another two wells were irradiated with a modulated x-ray intensity pattern and the third two wells were uniformly irradiated. A number of plates were incubated for various times after irradiation and stained with crystal violet. The spatial distribution of the stained cells within each well was determined by measurement of the crystal violet optical density at multiple positions in the plate using a microplate photospectrometer. The crystal violet optical density for a range of cell densities was measured for the unirradiated well and this correlated with cell viability as determined by the MTT cell viability assay. An exponential dose response curve was measured for A549 cells from the average crystal violet optical density in the uniformly irradiated well up to a dose of 30 Gy. By measuring the crystal violet optical density distribution within a well the spatial distribution of cell growth after irradiation with a modulated x-ray intensity pattern can be plotted. This method can be used for in vitro investigation into the changes in radiation response associated with treatment using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

  5. A preliminary investigation of cell growth after irradiation using a modulated x-ray intensity pattern

    Bromley, Regina; Davey, Ross; Oliver, Lyn; Harvie, Rozelle; Baldock, Clive

    2006-08-01

    In this study we have investigated a spatial distribution of cell growth after their irradiation using a modulated x-ray intensity pattern. An A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cell line was grown in a 6-well culture. Two of the wells were the unirradiated control wells, whilst another two wells were irradiated with a modulated x-ray intensity pattern and the third two wells were uniformly irradiated. A number of plates were incubated for various times after irradiation and stained with crystal violet. The spatial distribution of the stained cells within each well was determined by measurement of the crystal violet optical density at multiple positions in the plate using a microplate photospectrometer. The crystal violet optical density for a range of cell densities was measured for the unirradiated well and this correlated with cell viability as determined by the MTT cell viability assay. An exponential dose response curve was measured for A549 cells from the average crystal violet optical density in the uniformly irradiated well up to a dose of 30 Gy. By measuring the crystal violet optical density distribution within a well the spatial distribution of cell growth after irradiation with a modulated x-ray intensity pattern can be plotted. This method can be used for in vitro investigation into the changes in radiation response associated with treatment using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT).

  6. A preliminary investigation of cell growth after irradiation using a modulated x-ray intensity pattern

    Bromley, Regina [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Davey, Ross [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, Sydney University, NSW 2006 (Australia); Oliver, Lyn [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Harvie, Rozelle [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, Sydney University, NSW 2006 (Australia); Baldock, Clive [Bill Walsh Cancer Research Laboratories, Department of Medical Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia)

    2006-08-07

    In this study we have investigated a spatial distribution of cell growth after their irradiation using a modulated x-ray intensity pattern. An A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cell line was grown in a 6-well culture. Two of the wells were the unirradiated control wells, whilst another two wells were irradiated with a modulated x-ray intensity pattern and the third two wells were uniformly irradiated. A number of plates were incubated for various times after irradiation and stained with crystal violet. The spatial distribution of the stained cells within each well was determined by measurement of the crystal violet optical density at multiple positions in the plate using a microplate photospectrometer. The crystal violet optical density for a range of cell densities was measured for the unirradiated well and this correlated with cell viability as determined by the MTT cell viability assay. An exponential dose response curve was measured for A549 cells from the average crystal violet optical density in the uniformly irradiated well up to a dose of 30 Gy. By measuring the crystal violet optical density distribution within a well the spatial distribution of cell growth after irradiation with a modulated x-ray intensity pattern can be plotted. This method can be used for in vitro investigation into the changes in radiation response associated with treatment using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

  7. Neonatal irradiation: neurotoxicity and modulation of pharmacological response

    Neuronal loss may be responsible of many acute and chronic diseases. For this reason, is very important to understand the mechanisms that contribute to neuronal cell death in order to develop pharmacological strategies for the treatment of these disorders. Developing CNS is very sensitive to ionizing radiations. In particular, irradiation of immature cerebellum induce motor (impaired gait), morphological (disarrangement of cytoarchitecture) and biochemical (increase in noradrenaline levels) alterations, mainly related to cerebellar granule cell death induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated after radiation exposure. Cellular changes triggered by ROS include increased intracellular Ca2+ levels, activation of NMDA glutamatergic receptors and apoptosis. With an excitatory neurotransmitter as glutamate and a multifacetic ion as calcium, their regulation in synapses and cytoplasm, respectively, is very vulnerable. Moreover, the highly aerobic condition of neuronal metabolism determines that an oxidative injury lead to ROS accumulation. The neuro protection therapy attempts to interfere with these few processes by using antioxidants, metal chelators, calcium antagonists or glutamatergic antagonists. In the protocol used in our laboratory, neonatal rats were irradiated with 5 Gy gamma radiations in their cephalic ends, and pre or post-treated with selected putative neuro protective agents. After 30-90 days, motor, morphological and biochemical parameters were measured and compared with irradiated and sham-irradiated (control) animals. Drugs as GM1 ganglioside or amifostine were able to restore abnormal parameters. Cerebellar granule cell irradiated 'in vitro' were treated with neuro protective agents prior or after irradiation. Cell viability and several biochemical parameters were analysed after 48 hours. GM1 ganglioside and amifostine were effective in preventing cell death and increase in ROS induced by ionizing radiation exposure. (author)

  8. Pre-irradiation testing of actively cooled Be-Cu divertor modules

    Linke, J.; Duwe, R.; Kuehnlein, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A set of neutron irradiation tests is prepared on different plasma facing materials (PFM) candidates and miniaturized components for ITER. Beside beryllium the irradiation program which will be performed in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, includes different carbon fiber composites (CFQ) and tungsten alloys. The target values for the neutron irradiation will be 0.5 dpa at temperatures of 350{degrees}C and 700{degrees}C, resp.. The post irradiation examination (PIE) will cover a wide range of mechanical tests; in addition the degradation of thermal conductivity will be investigated. To determine the high heat flux (HHF) performance of actively cooled divertor modules, electron beam tests which simulate the expected heat loads during the operation of ITER, are scheduled in the hot cell electron beam facility JUDITH. These tests on a selection of different actively cooled beryllium-copper and CFC-copper divertor modules are performed before and after neutron irradiation; the pre-irradiation testing is an essential part of the program to quantify the zero-fluence high heat flux performance and to detect defects in the modules, in particular in the brazed joints.

  9. Preclinical Assessment of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Total Marrow Irradiation

    Purpose: A preclinical investigation was undertaken to explore a treatment technique for total marrow irradiation using RapidArc, a volumetric modulated arc technique. Materials and Methods: Computed tomography datasets of 5 patients were included. Plans with eight overlapping coaxial arcs were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. Dose prescription was 12 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction, normalized so that 100% isodose covered 85% of the planning target volume (PTV). The PTV consisted of the whole skeleton (including ribs and sternum), from the top of the skull to the medium distal third of the femurs. Planning objectives for organs at risk (OARs) were constrained to a median dose <6 to 7 Gy. OARs included brain, eyes, oral cavity, parotids, thyroid, lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, stomach, abdominal cavity, bladder, rectum, and genitals. Pretreatment quality assurance consisted of portal dosimetry comparisons, scoring the delivery to calculation agreement with the gamma agreement index. Results: The median total body volume in the study was 57 liters (range, 49-81 liters), for an average diameter of 47 cm (range, 46-53 cm) and a total length ranging from 95 to 112 cm. The median PTV volume was 6.8 liters (range, 5.8-10.8 liters). The mean dose to PTV was 109% (range, 107-112%). The global mean of median dose to all OARs was 4.9 Gy (range, 4.5-5.1 Gy over the 5 patients). The individual mean of median doses per organ ranged from 2.3 Gy (oral cavity) to 7.3 Gy (bowels cavity). Preclinical quality assurance resulted in a mean gamma agreement index of 94.3 ± 5.1%. The delivery time measured from quality assurance runs was 13 minutes. Conclusion: Sparing of normal tissues with adequate coverage of skeletal bones was shown to be feasible with RapidArc. Pretreatment quality assurance measurements confirmed the technical agreement between expected and actually delivered dose distributions, suggesting the possibility of incorporating this technique in the treatment options for

  10. Irradiation tests of an electromagnetic fibre-Pb calorimeter module at LURE/LAL

    We report on preliminary results of an irradiation test concerning the resistance to radiation of a scintillating fibre electromagnetic calorimeter module. In these tests we have measured the light output from the module before and after being irradiated in a high intensity 1.1 GeV electron beam. The beam was tuned to low intensity in order to perform the measurements in situ. We found that after a total dose of 3 Mrad deposited in the fibres at the peak of damage the signal showed a loss of 18% after 30 hours of recovery. A detailed description is given below. (author)

  11. Examination of the first irradiated LOFT fuel module

    The first Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) center fuel module was nondestructively examined in order to assess any changes after power range testing and three large-break loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs). The examination consisted of evaluation of LOCE measurement data; measurement of withdrawal forces during removal of the module from the reactor; poolside examination of the exposed fuel module surfaces, using an underwater periscope, 35-mm camera, and closed circuit television; and poolside measurements of the rod-to-rod spacing, using a Sulo probe. The performance of the equipment is assessed from the results of the examination. Color standards are required for underwater color photography, and fuel rod deflection must be considered in evaluting rod-to-rod spaces

  12. Abdominal Adhesions

    ... adhesions? Abdominal adhesions can cause intestinal obstruction and female infertility—the inability to become pregnant after a year of trying. Abdominal adhesions can lead to female infertility by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus, ...

  13. Abdominal Ultrasound

    ... It is used to help diagnose pain or distention and evaluate the kidneys, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, spleen ... variety of conditions, such as: abdominal pain or distention. abnormal liver function. enlarged abdominal organ. stones in ...

  14. Estimating PV Module Performance over Large Geographical Regions: The Role of Irradiance, Air Temperature, Wind Speed and Solar Spectrum

    Thomas Huld

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of how photovoltaic (PV module performance varies on continental scale. Mathematical models have been used to take into account shallow-angle reflectivity, spectral sensitivity, dependence of module efficiency on irradiance and module temperature as well as how the module temperature depends on irradiance, ambient temperature and wind speed. Spectrally resolved irradiance data retrieved from satellite images are combined with temperature and wind speed data from global computational weather forecast data to produce maps of PV performance for Eurasia and Africa. Results show that module reflectivity causes a fairly small drop of 2\\%–4\\% in PV performance. Spectral effects may modify the performance by up to \\(\\pm 6\\\\%, depending on location and module type. The strongest effect is seen in the dependence on irradiance and module temperature, which may range from \\(-\\20\\% to +5\\% at different locations.

  15. Berberine potentizes apoptosis induced by X-rays irradiation probably through modulation of gap junctions

    LIU Bing; WANG Qin; YUAN Dong-dong; HONG Xiao-ting; TAO Liang

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical combination of some traditional Chinese medical herbs, including berberine, with irradiation is demonstrated to improve efficacy of tumor radiotherapy, yet the mechanisms for such effect remain largely unknown. The present study investigated the effect of berberine on apoptosis induced by X-rays irradiation and the relation between this effect and gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC).Methods The role of gap junctions in the modulation of X-rays irradiation-induced apoptosis was explored by manipulation of connexin (Cx) expression, and gap junction function, using oleamide, a GJIC inhibitor, and berberine.Results In transfected HeLa cells, Cx32 expression increased apoptosis induced by X-rays irradiation, while inhibition of gap junction by oleamide reduced the irradiation responses, indicating the dependence of X-rays irradiation-induced apoptosis on GJIC. Berberine, at the concentrations without cytotoxicity, enhanced apoptosis induced by irradiation only in the presence of functional gap junctions.Conclusions These results suggest that berberine potentizes cell apoptosis induced by X-rays irradiation, probably through enhancement of gap junction activity.

  16. Acute toxicity profile of craniospinal irradiation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy in children with medulloblastoma: A prospective analysis

    To report on the acute toxicity in children with medulloblastoma undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with daily intrafractionally modulated junctions. Newly diagnosed patients, aged 3–21, with standard-risk (SR) or high-risk (HR) medulloblastoma were eligible. A dose of 23.4 or 36.0Gy in daily fractions of 1.8Gy was prescribed to the craniospinal axis, followed by a boost to the primary tumor bed (54 or 55.8Gy) and metastases (39.6–55.8Gy), when indicated. Weekly, an intravenous bolus of vincristine was combined for patients with SR medulloblastoma and patients participating in the COG-ACNS-0332 study. Common toxicity criteria (CTC, version 2.0) focusing on skin, alopecia, voice changes, conjunctivitis, anorexia, dysphagia, gastro-intestinal symptoms, headache, fatigue and hematological changes were scored weekly during radiotherapy. From 2010 to 2014, data from 15 consecutive patients (SR, n = 7; HR, n = 8) were collected. Within 72 h from onset of treatment, vomiting (66 %) and headache (46 %) occurred. During week 3 of treatment, a peak incidence in constipation (33 %) and abdominal pain/cramping (40 %) was observed, but only in the subgroup of patients (n = 9) receiving vincristine (constipation: 56 vs 0 %, P = .04; pain/cramping: 67 vs 0 %, P = .03). At week 6, 73 % of the patients developed faint erythema of the cranial skin with dry desquamation (40 %) or moist desquamation confined to the skin folds of the auricle (33 %). No reaction of the skin overlying the spinal target volume was observed. Headache at onset and gastro-intestinal toxicity, especially in patients receiving weekly vincristine, were the major complaints of patients with medulloblastoma undergoing craniospinal irradiation with IMRT

  17. Antithrombin can modulate coagulation, cytokine production, and expression of adhesion molecules in abdominal aortic aneurysm repair surgery.

    Nishiyama, Tomoki

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the effects of antithrombin on coagulation, fibrinolysis, and production of cytokines and adhesion molecules in abdominal aortic aneurysm repair surgery. Sixteen patients for Y-shaped graft replacement of abdominal aortic aneurysm were divided into an antithrombin group and a control group. In the antithrombin group, 3000 U antithrombin was infused over 30 min before heparin administration and 24 h later. White blood cell counts, platelet counts, prothrombin time ratio, and serum concentrations of antithrombin, polymorphonuclear leukocyte elastase, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and adhesion molecules, and variables of coagulation and fibrinolysis were measured before surgery, at the end of surgery, and 1 and 2 days after surgery. The antithrombin concentration decreased in the control group, whereas it increased in the antithrombin group with significant differences between the groups. Prothrombin time ratio, concentrations of d-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 increased only in the control group and polymorphonuclear leukocyte elastase, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 increased in both groups. They were significantly less in the antithrombin group except for intercellular adhesion molecule-1. In conclusion, antithrombin could decrease hypercoagulation and inflammatory activation during abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery, which may decrease adverse events. PMID:16551889

  18. Abdominal Assessment.

    Fritz, Deborah; Weilitz, Pamela Becker

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints by patients, and assessment of abdominal pain and associated symptoms can be challenging for home healthcare providers. Reasons for abdominal pain are related to inflammation, organ distention, and ischemia. The history and physical examination are important to narrow the source of acute or chronic problems, identify immediate interventions, and when necessary, facilitate emergency department care. PMID:26925941

  19. Pharmacological modulation of late radio-induced side effects; Modulation pharmacologique des effets tardifs de l'irradiation

    Bourgier, C.; Bourhis, J.; Deutsch, E. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Unite mixte de recherche ' radiotherapie moleculaire' , Inserm unite 1030, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, universite Paris Sud 11, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Monceau, V. [Unite mixte de recherche ' radiotherapie moleculaire' , Inserm unite 1030, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, universite Paris Sud 11, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Vozenin, M.C. [Unite mixte de recherche ' radiotherapie moleculaire' , Inserm unite 1030, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, universite Paris Sud 11, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Unite mixte de recherche ' cellules souches et radiations' , Inserm unite 967, 18, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); UMR 967, institut de radiobiologie cellulaire et moleculaire (iRCM), direction des sciences du vivant, CEA, 18, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); UMR 967, universite Paris-Diderot Paris 7, 18, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); UMR 967, universite Paris Sud 11, 18, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France)

    2011-08-15

    After normal tissue exposure to radiation therapy, late side effects can occur and may reduce patients' quality of life due to their progressive nature. Late toxicities occurrence is the main limiting factor of radiotherapy. Various biological disorders related to irradiation are involved in the development of late toxicities including fibrosis. The present review will focus on the recent physiopathological and molecular mechanisms described to be involved in the development of late radio-induced toxicities, that provide therapeutic perspective for pharmaco-modulation. (authors)

  20. Radiometric ratio characterization for low-to-mid CPV modules operating in variable irradiance conditions

    Vorndran, Shelby; Russo, Juan; Zhang, Deming; Gordon, Michael; Kostuk, Raymond

    2012-10-01

    In this work, a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) design methodology is proposed which aims to maximize system efficiency for a given irradiance condition. In this technique, the acceptance angle of the system is radiometrically matched to the angular spread of the site's average irradiance conditions using a simple geometric ratio. The optical efficiency of CPV systems from flat-plate to high-concentration is plotted at all irradiance conditions. Concentrator systems are measured outdoors in various irradiance conditions to test the methodology. This modeling technique is valuable at the design stage to determine the ideal level of concentration for a CPV module. It requires only two inputs: the acceptance angle profile of the system and the site's average direct and diffuse irradiance fractions. Acceptance angle can be determined by raytracing or testing a fabricated prototype in the lab with a solar simulator. The average irradiance conditions can be found in the Typical Metrological Year (TMY3) database. Additionally, the information gained from this technique can be used to determine tracking tolerance, quantify power loss during an isolated weather event, and do more sophisticated analysis such as I-V curve simulation.

  1. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for abdominal targets using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc: Feasibility and clinical preliminary results

    Purpose. To report early clinical experience in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc (RA) in patients with primary or metastatic tumours at abdominal sites. Material and methods. Thirty-seven consecutive patients were treated using RA. Of these, 16 had primary or metastatic liver tumours, nine had pancreatic cancer and 12 a nodal metastasis in the retro-peritoneum. Dose prescription varied from 45 to 75 Gy to the Clinical Target Volume in 3 to 6 fractions. The median follow-up was 12 months (6-22). Early local control and toxicity were investigated and reported. Results. Planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk were met in most cases. Delivery time ranged from 2.8 ± 0.3 to 9.2 ± 2.4 minutes and pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index from 95.3 ± 3.8 to 98.3 ± 1.7%. At the time of analysis, local control (freedom from progression) at six months, was assessable in 24 of 37 patients and was achieved in 19 patients with a crude rate of 79.2%. Seven patients experienced treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced a mild and transient G1 enteritis and two showed a transient G1 liver damage. Two had late toxicity: one developed chronic enteritis causing G1 diarrhoea and G1 abdominal pain and one suffered at three months a G3 gastric bleeding. No patients experienced G4 acute toxicity. Conclusions. SBRT for abdominal targets delivered by means of RA resulted to be feasible with good early clinical results in terms of local control rate and acute toxicity profile. RA allowed to achieve required target coverage as well as to keep within normal tissue dose/volume constraints

  2. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for abdominal targets using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc: Feasibility and clinical preliminary results

    Scorsetti, Marta; Bignardi, Mario; Alongi, Filippo; Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Castiglioni, Simona; Pentimalli, Sara; Tozzi, Angelo (IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano (Italy)), e-mail: pietro.mancosu@humanitas.it; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca (Oncology Inst. of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland))

    2011-05-15

    Purpose. To report early clinical experience in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc (RA) in patients with primary or metastatic tumours at abdominal sites. Material and methods. Thirty-seven consecutive patients were treated using RA. Of these, 16 had primary or metastatic liver tumours, nine had pancreatic cancer and 12 a nodal metastasis in the retro-peritoneum. Dose prescription varied from 45 to 75 Gy to the Clinical Target Volume in 3 to 6 fractions. The median follow-up was 12 months (6-22). Early local control and toxicity were investigated and reported. Results. Planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk were met in most cases. Delivery time ranged from 2.8 +- 0.3 to 9.2 +- 2.4 minutes and pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index from 95.3 +- 3.8 to 98.3 +- 1.7%. At the time of analysis, local control (freedom from progression) at six months, was assessable in 24 of 37 patients and was achieved in 19 patients with a crude rate of 79.2%. Seven patients experienced treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced a mild and transient G1 enteritis and two showed a transient G1 liver damage. Two had late toxicity: one developed chronic enteritis causing G1 diarrhoea and G1 abdominal pain and one suffered at three months a G3 gastric bleeding. No patients experienced G4 acute toxicity. Conclusions. SBRT for abdominal targets delivered by means of RA resulted to be feasible with good early clinical results in terms of local control rate and acute toxicity profile. RA allowed to achieve required target coverage as well as to keep within normal tissue dose/volume constraints

  3. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation with Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Is Feasible for Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    He, Zhenyu; Wu, Sangang; Zhou, Juan; Li, Fengyan; Sun, Jiayan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huanxin; Guan, Xunxing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Several accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) techniques are being investigated in patients with early-stage breast cancer. The present study evaluated the feasibility, early toxicity, initial efficacy, and cosmetic outcomes of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for Chinese female patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. Methods A total of 38 patients met the inclusion criteria and an accelerated partial breast in...

  4. The Different Volume Effects of Small-Bowel Toxicity During Pelvic Irradiation Between Gynecologic Patients With and Without Abdominal Surgery: A Prospective Study With Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of abdominal surgery on the volume effects of small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation in patients with gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: From May 2003 through November 2006, 80 gynecologic patients without (Group I) or with (Group II) prior abdominal surgery were analyzed. We used a computed tomography (CT) planning system to measure the small-bowel volume and dosimetry. We acquired the range of small-bowel volume in 10% (V10) to 100% (V100) of dose, at 10% intervals. The onset and grade of diarrhea during whole-pelvic irradiation were recorded as small-bowel toxicity up to 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions. Results: The volume effect of Grade 2-3 diarrhea existed from V10 to V100 in Group I patients and from V60 to V100 in Group II patients on univariate analyses. The V40 of Group I and the V100 of Group II achieved most statistical significance. The mean V40 was 281 ± 27 cm3 and 489 ± 34 cm3 (p 3 and 132 ± 19 cm3 (p = 0.003). Multivariate analyses revealed that V40 (p = 0.001) and V100 (p = 0.027) were independent factors for the development of Grade 2-3 diarrhea in Groups I and II, respectively. Conclusions: Gynecologic patients without and with abdominal surgery have different volume effects on small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation. Low-dose volume can be used as a predictive index of Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients without abdominal surgery. Full-dose volume is more important than low-dose volume for Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients with abdominal surgery

  5. Abdominal trauma

    The potential for multiple intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal organ injuries often makes accurate clinical evaluation of abdominal trauma patients difficult. Additionally, patients may be unresponsive, have unreliable abdominal physical examinations, or have concurrent serious head and cervical spine injuries which delay diagnosis of and attention to abdominal problems. In these situations radiologic abdominal imaging is often requested. To expedite patient evaluation, close cooperation between the emergency physician and the radiologist is essential. It is the clinical stability of the traumatized patient that dictates the extent of radiologic imaging. Life-threatening hypotension, positive peritoneal signs, or clear evidence of penetrating abdominal injury are indications for immediate surgery. Stable patients with signs suggesting intra-abdominal injury will benefit by further radiologic evaluation with appropriate imaging modalities. The selection of an appropriate modality in any one clinical situation depends upon many criteria including accessibility to diagnostic equipment, the sensitivity and specificity of each technique, and the expertise and preference of the attending radiologist. A suggested scheme for evaluating abdominal trauma patients is presented. Most aspects of this evaluation scheme will be discussed in depth

  6. Abdominal trauma

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  7. Abdominal sounds

    ... during sleep. They also occur normally for a short time after the use of certain medicines and after abdominal surgery. Decreased or absent bowel sounds often indicate constipation. Increased ( hyperactive ) bowel sounds ...

  8. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    Lu YF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yueh-Feng Lu,1 Yu-Chin Lin,2 Kuo-Hsin Chen,3,4 Pei-Wei Shueng,1 Hsin-Pei Yeh,1 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,5,6 1Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, 4Department of Electrical Engineering, Yuan-Ze University, Taoyuan, 5Department of Medicine, 6Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT; however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20 was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity

  9. Resonance energy transfer in nano-bio hybrid structures can be modulated by UV laser irradiation

    A method for targeted variation of the radiation properties of quantum dots (QDs) to control the efficiency of resonance energy transfer in nanocrystal assemblies and nano-bio hybrid materials has been developed. The method is based on strong ultraviolet (UV) laser irradiation of QDs and allows the extinction and luminescence spectra to be controlled and the luminescence quantum yield and decay kinetics to be varied. Water-soluble QDs have been synthesized and used for analyzing the effect of energy transfer from semiconductor nanocrystals on the photocycle of the photosensitive protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) in bR–QD complexes. The UV irradiation mode has been selected in a way permitting the modulation of QD optical parameters without modification of their structure or physico-chemical properties. It is concluded that the QD interaction with bR accelerates its photocycle, but this acceleration is determined by electrostatic interactions, rather than Förster resonance energy transfer from QDs to bR. The method of UV laser irradiation of fluorescent semiconductor QDs has proven to be an efficient technique for variation of nanocrystal optical properties without affecting their structure, as well as for fine modulation of the energy transfer processes in the nanocrystal assemblies and nano-bio hybrid materials. (letter)

  10. Salivary gland sparing and improved target irradiation by conformal and intensity modulated irradiation of head and neck cancer.

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Ship, Jonathan A; Dawson, Laura A; Kim, Hyungjin M; Bradford, Carol R; Terrell, Jeffrey E; Chepeha, Douglas B; Teknos, Theodore N; Hogikyan, Norman D; Anzai, Yoshimi; Marsh, Lon H; Ten Haken, Randall K; Wolf, Gregory T

    2003-07-01

    The goals of this study were to facilitate sparing of the major salivary glands while adequately treating tumor targets in patients requiring comprehensive bilateral neck irradiation (RT), and to assess the potential for improved xerostomia. Since 1994 techniques of target irradiation and locoregional tumor control with conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) have been developed. In patients treated with these modalities, the salivary flow rates before and periodically after RT have been measured selectively from each major salivary gland and the residual flows correlated with glands' dose volume histograms (DVHs). In addition, subjective xerostomia questionnaires have been developed and validated. The pattern of locoregional recurrence has been examined from computed tomography (CT) scans at the time of recurrence, transferring the recurrence volumes to the planning CT scans, and regenerating the dose distributions at the recurrence sites. Treatment plans for target coverage and dose homogeneity using static, multisegmental IMRT were found to be significantly better than standard RT plans. In addition, significant parotid gland sparing was achieved in the conformal plans. The relationships among dose, irradiated volume, and the residual saliva flow rates from the parotid glands were characterized by dose and volume thresholds. A mean radiation dose of 26 Gy was found to be the threshold for preserved stimulated saliva flow. Xerostomia questionnaire scores suggested that xerostomia was significantly reduced in patients irradiated with bilateral neck, parotid-sparing RT, compared to patients with similar tumors treated with standard RT. Examination of locoregional tumor recurrence patterns revealed that the large majority of recurrences occurred inside targets, in areas that had been judged to be at high risk and that had received RT doses according to the perceived risk. Tangible gains in salivary gland sparing and target coverage are being

  11. Modulator Effect of Turmeric on Oxidative Damage in Whole Body Gamma Irradiated rats

    Because of its penetrating power and its ability to travel great distances, gamma rays are considered the primary hazard to the population during most radiological emergencies. So, there is a need to develop medical countermeasures to protect the first responders and remediation workers from biomedical effect of ionizing radiation. Turmeric has been reported to have many beneficial health effects, including a strong anti-oxidant effect, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties. In the present study, turmeric was investigated as a therapeutic agent against hazards induced by ionizing radiation on kidney, liver, urinary and serum calcium levels and blood counts. A daily dose of 0.5 g/kg body weight was used in whole body gamma irradiated female rats with 3 Gy. Radiation effects were followed up for four weeks post irradiation. The results revealed that the administration of turmeric post-irradiation resulted in a significant inhibition in the frequency of radiation induced oxidative damage. It could be concluded that definite turmeric dose exerts a vital modulator role against gamma irradiation hazard

  12. Direct observation of keyhole behaviour during pulse modulated high-power Nd:YAG laser irradiation

    Fujinaga, Shigeki; Takenaka, Hiroo; Narikiyo, Toru; Katayama, Seiji; Matsunawa, Akira

    2000-03-01

    When a high-power laser beam is irradiated on the surface of material, it is well known that a cavity, called a keyhole, is generated in the molten material. To examine the effect of laser beam pulse shape on the keyhole behaviour, we observed it directly with an in situ microfocused x-ray transmission imaging system. As a result, it was found that the keyhole began to be generated after about 0.6-0.7 ms and became deepest after about 1.5 ms from the laser irradiation initiation and collapsed about 1 ms after laser power declination when a pulse modulated laser beam of 1.1 ms rise time and 4.6 kW peak power was used. It was also understood that the generation and the collapse of the keyhole was repeated, synchronizing with laser beam irradiation of 100 Hz. The transition of the keyhole depth and the cross sectional area had good agreement with the transition of the irradiated beam shape. Moreover, it was observed that the porosity was frequently generated at the beam shape in which the laser power was decreased rapidly from a high peak power.

  13. Predicting the clonogenic survival of A549 cells after modulated x-ray irradiation using the linear quadratic model

    Bromley, Regina; Oliver, Lyn [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Davey, Ross; Harvie, Rozelle [Department of Medical Oncology, Bill Walsh Cancer Research Laboratories, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Baldock, Clive [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, Sydney University, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2009-01-21

    In this study we present two prediction methods, mean dose and summed dose, for predicting the number of A549 cells that will survive after modulated x-ray irradiation. The prediction methods incorporate the dose profile from the modulated x-ray fluence map applied across the cell sample and the linear quadratic (LQ) model. We investigated the clonogenic survival of A549 cells when irradiated using two different modulated x-ray fluence maps. Differences between the measured and predicted surviving fraction were observed for modulated x-ray irradiation. When the x-ray fluence map produced a steep dose gradient across the sample, fewer cells survived in the unirradiated region than expected. When the x-ray fluence map produced a less steep dose gradient across the sample, more cells survived in the unirradiated region than expected. Regardless of the steepness of the dose gradient, more cells survived in the irradiated region than expected for the reference dose range of 1-10 Gy. The change in the cell survival for the unirradiated regions of the two different dose gradients may be an important factor to consider when predicting the number of cells that will survive at the edge of modulated x-ray fields. This investigation provides an improved method of predicting cell survival for modulated x-ray radiation treatment. It highlights the limitations of the LQ model, particularly in its ability to describe the biological response of cells irradiated under these conditions.

  14. Predicting the clonogenic survival of A549 cells after modulated x-ray irradiation using the linear quadratic model

    Bromley, Regina; Oliver, Lyn; Davey, Ross; Harvie, Rozelle; Baldock, Clive

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present two prediction methods, mean dose and summed dose, for predicting the number of A549 cells that will survive after modulated x-ray irradiation. The prediction methods incorporate the dose profile from the modulated x-ray fluence map applied across the cell sample and the linear quadratic (LQ) model. We investigated the clonogenic survival of A549 cells when irradiated using two different modulated x-ray fluence maps. Differences between the measured and predicted surviving fraction were observed for modulated x-ray irradiation. When the x-ray fluence map produced a steep dose gradient across the sample, fewer cells survived in the unirradiated region than expected. When the x-ray fluence map produced a less steep dose gradient across the sample, more cells survived in the unirradiated region than expected. Regardless of the steepness of the dose gradient, more cells survived in the irradiated region than expected for the reference dose range of 1-10 Gy. The change in the cell survival for the unirradiated regions of the two different dose gradients may be an important factor to consider when predicting the number of cells that will survive at the edge of modulated x-ray fields. This investigation provides an improved method of predicting cell survival for modulated x-ray radiation treatment. It highlights the limitations of the LQ model, particularly in its ability to describe the biological response of cells irradiated under these conditions.

  15. Effect of body mass index on shifts in ultrasound-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy for abdominal malignancies

    Background and purpose: We investigated whether corrective shifts determined by daily ultrasound-based image-guidance correlate with body mass index (BMI) of patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) for abdominal malignancies. The utility of daily image-guidance, particularly for patients with BMI > 25.0, is examined. Materials and methods: Total 3162 ultrasound-directed shifts were performed in 86 patients. Direction and magnitude of shifts were correlated with pretreatment BMI. Bivariate statistical analysis and analysis of set-up correction data were performed using systematic and random error calculations. Results: Total 2040 daily alignments were performed. Average 3D vector of set-up correction for all patients was 12.1 mm/fraction. Directional and absolute shifts and 3D vector length were significantly different between BMI cohorts. 3D displacement averaged 4.9 mm/fraction and 6.8mm/fraction for BMI ≤ 25.0 and BMI > 25.0, respectively. Systematic error in all axes and 3D vector was significantly greater for BMI > 25.0. Differences in random error were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Set-up corrections derived from daily ultrasound-based IG-IMRT of abdominal tumors correlated with BMI. Daily image-guidance may improve precision of IMRT delivery with benefits assessed for the entire population, particularly patients with increased habitus. Requisite PTV margins suggested in the absence of daily image-guidance are significantly greater in patients with BMI > 25.0.

  16. Inversely planned intensity modulated radiotheraphy for irradiation of a woman with breast cancer and funnel chest

    Background: A 44-year old woman with breast cancer was transferred to our institution for irradiation. Due to a pronounced funnel chest no satisfying dose distribution was obtained by conventional techniques. Thus an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) based on inverse optimisation was carried out. IMRT was compared to conventional techniques regarding dose distribution and feasibility. Patient and Methods: Tumor site was in the right middle lower quadrant. Target volume included the right breast and the parasternal lymph nodes. Target dose was 50.4 Gy. Based on inverse optimisation irradiation was carried out in 'step-and-short'-technique with twelve intensity modulated beams with six intensity steps. Additionally, treatment plans were calculated using conventional techniques (technique A with two tangential wedged 6-MV photon beams, technique B with additional oblique 15-MeV electron portal). We analysed conformality and homogeneity of target volume and dose distribution within normal tissue. Results: Dose conformality was substantially improved by IMRT. Dose homogeneity was slightly decreased compared to technique A. Lung volume irradiated with a dose higher than 20 Gy was reduced from 56.8% with technique A and 40.1% with technique B, respectively to 22.1% with IMRT. Treatment was tolerated well by the patient without relevant side effects. Mean treatment time was 19.5 min. Conclusion: The inversely planned IMRT using multiple beam directions is suitable for breast irradiation following breast conserving surgery. In the present case of a woman with funnel chest lung dose was substantially reduced without reduction of target dose. In which way the complex treatment technique leads to a clinically detectable advantage is examined at present, in the context of a study. (orig.)

  17. Abdominal Sepsis.

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy. PMID:27363829

  18. Comparison of plan optimization for single and dual volumetric-modulated arc therapy versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy during post-mastectomy regional irradiation

    Zhao, Li-Rong; ZHOU, YI-BING; Sun, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with single arc (1ARC) and dual arc (2ARC), and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and to evaluate the quality and delivery efficiency of post-mastectomy regional irradiation. A total of 24 female patients who required post-mastectomy regional irradiation were enrolled into the current study, and 1ARC, 2ARC and IMRT plans were designed for each individual patient. The quality of these plans was ...

  19. Abdominal Pain

    ... relaxation. Guided imagery for abdominal pain About self-hypnosis and kids See YourChild : Pain and Your Child or Teen for more detail ... how to help your baby cope with the pain of medical procedures, circumcision, and teething. ... Helping Kids YourChild : A Look at Biofeedback YourChild : ...

  20. Phase II study evaluating consolidation whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III - The OVAR-IMRT-02 Study

    Eichbaum Michael H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for patients with advanced FIGO stage III epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite the aggressive standard treatment, consisting of maximal cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. The median time to recurrence is less than 2 years, with a 5-years survival rate of -20-25%. Recurrences of the disease occur mostly intraperitoneally. Ovarian cancer is a radiosensitive tumor, so that the use of whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR as a consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy. WAR used to be the standard treatment after surgery before the chemotherapy era; however, it has been almost totally excluded from the treatment of ovarian cancer during the past decade because of its high toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT has the potential of sparing organs at risk like kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. Our previous phase I study showed for the first time the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated WAR and pointed out promising results concerning treatment tolerance. The current phase-II study succeeds to the phase-I study to further evaluate the toxicity of this new treatment. Methods/design The OVAR-IMRT-02 study is a single-center one arm phase-II trial. Thirty seven patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer stage FIGO III having a complete remission after chemotherapy will be treated with intensity-modulated WAR as a consolidation therapy. A total dose of 30 Gy in 20 fractions of 1.5 Gy will be applied to the entire peritoneal cavity including the liver surface and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organ at risk are kidneys, liver (except the 1 cm-outer border, heart, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones. Primary endpoint is tolerability; secondary objectives are toxicity, quality of life, progression-free and overall survival. Discussion Intensity-modulated WAR provides

  1. Phase II study evaluating consolidation whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III - The OVAR-IMRT-02 Study

    The prognosis for patients with advanced FIGO stage III epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite the aggressive standard treatment, consisting of maximal cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. The median time to recurrence is less than 2 years, with a 5-years survival rate of -20-25%. Recurrences of the disease occur mostly intraperitoneally. Ovarian cancer is a radiosensitive tumor, so that the use of whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) as a consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy. WAR used to be the standard treatment after surgery before the chemotherapy era; however, it has been almost totally excluded from the treatment of ovarian cancer during the past decade because of its high toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential of sparing organs at risk like kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. Our previous phase I study showed for the first time the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated WAR and pointed out promising results concerning treatment tolerance. The current phase-II study succeeds to the phase-I study to further evaluate the toxicity of this new treatment. The OVAR-IMRT-02 study is a single-center one arm phase-II trial. Thirty seven patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer stage FIGO III having a complete remission after chemotherapy will be treated with intensity-modulated WAR as a consolidation therapy. A total dose of 30 Gy in 20 fractions of 1.5 Gy will be applied to the entire peritoneal cavity including the liver surface and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organ at risk are kidneys, liver (except the 1 cm-outer border), heart, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones. Primary endpoint is tolerability; secondary objectives are toxicity, quality of life, progression-free and overall survival. Intensity-modulated WAR provides a new promising option in the consolidation treatment of

  2. Irradiation and testbeam of KEK/HPK planar p-type pixel modules for HL-LHC

    For the ATLAS detector upgrade for the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), an n-in-p planar pixel sensor-module is being developed with HPK. The modules were irradiated at the Cyclotron RadioIsotope Center (CYRIC) using 70 MeV protons. For the irradiation, a novel irradiation box has been designed that carries 16 movable slots to irradiate the samples slot-by-slot independently, to reduce the time for replacing the samples by hand, thus reducing the irradiation to human body. The box can be moved horizontally and vertically to scan the samples for a maximum area of 11 cm × 11 cm. Tests were subsequently carried out with beam at CERN by using 120 GeV pions and at DESY with 4 GeV electrons. We describe the analyses of the testbeam data of the KEK/HPK sensor-modules, focussing on the comparison of the performance of old and new designs of pixel structures, together with a reference of the simplest design (no biasing structure). The novel design has shown comparably good performance as the no-structure design in detecting passing-through charged particles

  3. Minimising contralateral breast dose in post-mastectomy intensity-modulated radiotherapy by incorporating conformal electron irradiation

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Korevaar, Erik W; Dolsma, Willemtje; Maduro, John H; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the potential benefit of incorporating conformal electron irradiation in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for loco-regional post-mastectomy RT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten consecutive patients that underwent left-sided mastectomy were selected for this comparative planning st

  4. Total body irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy: Dosimetric data and first clinical experience

    To implement total body irradiation (TBI) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). We applied the Varian RapidArc™ software to calculate and optimize the dose distribution. Emphasis was placed on applying a homogenous dose to the PTV and on reducing the dose to the lungs. From July 2013 to July 2014 seven patients with leukaemia were planned and treated with a VMAT-based TBI-technique with photon energy of 6 MV. The overall planning target volume (PTV), comprising the whole body, had to be split into 8 segments with a subsequent multi-isocentric planning. In a first step a dose optimization of each single segment was performed. In a second step all these elements were calculated in one overall dose-plan, considering particular constraints and weighting factors, to achieve the final total body dose distribution. The quality assurance comprised the verification of the irradiation plans via ArcCheck™ (Sun Nuclear), followed by in vivo dosimetry via dosimeters (MOSFETs) on the patient. The time requirements for treatment planning were high: contouring took 5–6 h, optimization and dose calculation 25–30 h and quality assurance 6–8 h. The couch-time per fraction was 2 h on day one, decreasing to around 1.5 h for the following fractions, including patient information, time for arc positioning, patient positioning verification, mounting of the MOSFETs and irradiation. The mean lung dose was decreased to at least 80 % of the planned total body dose and in the central parts to 50 %. In two cases we additionally pursued a dose reduction of 30 to 50 % in a pre-irradiated brain and in renal insufficiency. All high dose areas were outside the lungs and other OARs. The planned dose was in line with the measured dose via MOSFETs: in the axilla the mean difference between calculated and measured dose was 3.6 % (range 1.1–6.8 %), and for the wrist/hip-inguinal region it was 4.3 % (range 1.1–8.1 %). TBI with VMAT provides the benefit of satisfactory dose

  5. Planning Hybrid Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Whole-breast Irradiation

    Farace, Paolo, E-mail: paolofarace@gmail.com [Medical Physics Department, Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy); Zucca, Sergio; Solla, Ignazio; Fadda, Giuseppina; Durzu, Silvia; Porru, Sergio; Meleddu, Gianfranco [Medical Physics Department, Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy); Deidda, Maria Assunta; Possanzini, Marco; Orru, Sivia; Lay, Giancarlo [Radiotherapy Department, Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To test tangential and not-tangential hybrid intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight (36 right-, 42 left-) breast patients were randomly selected. Hybrid IMRT was performed by direct aperture optimization. A semiautomated method for planning hybrid IMRT was implemented using Pinnacle scripts. A plan optimization volume (POV), defined as the portion of the planning target volume covered by the open beams, was used as the target objective during inverse planning. Treatment goals were to prescribe a minimum dose of 47.5 Gy to greater than 90% of the POV and to minimize the POV and/or normal tissue receiving a dose greater than 107%. When treatment goals were not achieved by using a 4-field technique (2 conventional open plus 2 IMRT tangents), a 6-field technique was applied, adding 2 non tangential (anterior-oblique) IMRT beams. Results: Using scripts, manual procedures were minimized (choice of optimal beam angle, setting monitor units for open tangentials, and POV definition). Treatment goals were achieved by using the 4-field technique in 61 of 78 (78%) patients. The 6-field technique was applied in the remaining 17 of 78 (22%) patients, allowing for significantly better achievement of goals, at the expense of an increase of low-dose ({approx}5 Gy) distribution in the contralateral tissue, heart, and lungs but with no significant increase of higher doses ({approx}20 Gy) in heart and lungs. The mean monitor unit contribution to IMRT beams was significantly greater (18.7% vs 9.9%) in the group of patients who required 6-field procedure. Conclusions: Because hybrid IMRT can be performed semiautomatically, it can be planned for a large number of patients with little impact on human or departmental resources, promoting it as the standard practice for whole-breast irradiation.

  6. Dosimetric aspects of inverse-planned modulated-arc total-body irradiation

    Purpose: To develop optimal beam parameters and to verify the dosimetric aspects of the recently developed modulated-arc total-body irradiation (MATBI) technique, which delivers an inverse-planned dose to the entire body using gantry rotation. Methods: The patient is positioned prone and supine underneath the gantry at about 2 m source-to-surface distance (SSD). Then, up to 28 beams irradiate the patient from different gantry angles. Based on full-body computed-tomography (CT) images of the patient, the weight of each beam is optimized, using inverse planning, to create a uniform body dose. This study investigates how to best simulate patients and the ideal beam setup parameters, such as field size, number of beams, and beam geometry, for treatment time and dose homogeneity. In addition, three anthropomorphic water phantoms were constructed and utilized to verify the accuracy of dose delivery, with both diode array and ion chamber measurements. Furthermore, to improve the accuracy of the new technique, a beam model is created specifically for the extended-SSD positioning for MATBI. Results: Low dose CT scans can be utilized for dose calculations without affecting the accuracy. The largest field size of 40 × 40 cm2 was found to deliver the most uniform dose in the least amount of time. Moreover, a higher number of beams improves dose homogeneity. The average dose discrepancy between ion chamber measurements and extended-SSD beam model calculations was 1.2%, with the largest discrepancy being 3.2%. This average dose discrepancy was 1.4% with the standard beam model for delivery at isocenter. Conclusions: The optimum beam setup parameters, regarding dose uniformity and treatment duration, are laid out for modulated-arc TBI. In addition, the presented dose measurements show that these treatments can be delivered accurately. These measurements also indicated that a new beam model did not significantly improve the accuracy of dose calculations. The optimum beam setup

  7. High dose for prostate irradiation with image guided radiotherapy: Contribution of intensity modulation arc-therapy

    Purpose: To compare two Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) techniques for prostate cancer: the Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and the 'Step and Shoot' technique (S and S). Materials and methods: VMAT and S and S plans (RX 18 MV) were created and compared (Wilcoxon test) for 10 patients. The dosimetric goal of both treatments was to deliver 46 Gy to the seminal vesicles and 80 Gy to the prostate, while respecting the dose constrains in the organs at risk of toxicity. For one patient, the two techniques were compared for dose painting and escalation in target volumes defined on MRI and registered thanks to intra-prostatic fiducial. Results: VMAT, compared to S and S, offered: an increase of the PTV2s (prostate) volume receiving 77 to 80 Gy and a decrease of V82 and V83; a decrease of V4 to V6, V16 to V23, and V69 to V73 for the rectal wall; a decrease of V25 for the bladder wall; a decrease of V21 to V43 for the femoral heads; a decrease of V26 to V44 and V72 to V80 but an increase of V1 to V21 and V49 to V60 for the healthy tissues. The Conformal Index 'COIN' was better with VMAT than S and S (0.60 to 0.66). The delivered MU were significantly reduced with VMAT (8% mean) as well as the delivery time (4 min to 1.5 min). VMAT allowed delivering theoretically 90 Gy in the peripheral zone and 100 Gy in the tumor. Conclusion: In case of prostate irradiation, VMAT shows improvement compared with S and S. In particular, organs at risk are better spared, the delivery time is shortened and the number of delivered UM is decreased. (authors)

  8. Proton irradiation impacts age-driven modulations of cancer progression influenced by immune system transcriptome modifications from splenic tissue

    Age plays a crucial role in the interplay between tumor and host, with additional impact due to irradiation. Proton irradiation of tumors induces biological modulations including inhibition of angiogenic and immune factors critical to 'hallmark' processes impacting tumor development. Proton irradiation has also provided promising results for proton therapy in cancer due to targeting advantages. Additionally, protons may contribute to the carcinogenesis risk from space travel (due to the high proportion of high-energy protons in space radiation). Through a systems biology approach, we investigated how host tissue (i.e. splenic tissue) of tumor-bearing mice was altered with age, with or without whole-body proton exposure. Transcriptome analysis was performed on splenic tissue from adolescent (68-day) versus old (736-day) C57BL/6 male mice injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells with or without three fractionations of 0.5 Gy (1-GeV) proton irradiation. Global transcriptome analysis indicated that proton irradiation of adolescent hosts caused significant signaling changes within splenic tissues that support carcinogenesis within the mice, as compared with older subjects. Increases in cell cycling and immunosuppression in irradiated adolescent hosts with CDK2, MCM7, CD74 and RUVBL2 indicated these were the key genes involved in the regulatory changes in the host environment response (i.e. the spleen). Collectively, these results suggest that a significant biological component of proton irradiation is modulated by host age through promotion of carcinogenesis in adolescence and resistance to immunosuppression, carcinogenesis and genetic perturbation associated with advancing age. (author)

  9. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    ... access catheters Vertebroplasty Women and vascular disease Women's health Social Media Facebook Twitter ... Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists are vascular ...

  10. Abdominal trauma

    Radiologic evaluation of abdominal trauma must provide a quick and accurate assessment of the lesions in order to improve the management of the patient. The technique used varies depending on the mechanism of the trauma (blunt trauma or stab wounds) and the hemodynamic status. Radiologic evaluation is usually performed in blunt trauma whereas stab wound trauma is usually explored surgically. The various techniques available are standard radiographs, ultrasonography, computed tomography and arteriography. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the immediate evaluation is still not well defined. It appears to be useful method in the delayed evaluation of diaphragmatic trauma. Computed tomography is the method most commonly performed in trauma patients. This technique is accurate and allows correct assessment of the lesions. The disadvantages are the radiation induced and the need for a hemo-dynamically stable patient. The aim of the radiologic evaluation is to provide the clinicians with an accurate description of the lesions. It can help in the management of the patient usually in association with clinical and laboratory data. It can also guide interventional procedures (drainage, embolization...). Finally, it allows radiographic follow-up when conservative treatment is performed. (authors). 26 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  11. Dosimetric comparison of three dimensional conformal radiation therapy versus intensity modulated radiation therapy in accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Moorthy, S; H S Elhateer; SKD Majumdar; Mohammed, S; Patnaik, R; Narayanamurty

    2016-01-01

    Aim of Study: Breast conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for stage I and II breast cancer. Multiple studies have shown that recurrences after lumpectomy occur mainly in or near the tumor bed. Use of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) allows for significant reduction in the overall treatment time that results in increasing patient compliance and decreasing healthcare costs. We conducted a treatment planning study to evaluate the role of intensity modulated radiation t...

  12. In vivo transcriptome modulation after low dose of high energy neutron irradiation

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: This project aims to the identification of an hypothetical transcriptome modulation of mouse peripheral blood lymphocytes and skin after exposure to high energy neutron in vivo. Positive candidate genes isolated from mice in in vivo experiments will be selected and evaluated for both radioprotection issues dealing with cosmic ray exposure, and for biomedical issues mainly for low doses and non-cancer effects. Methods: High energy neutron irradiation is performed at the ENEA Frascati, neutron generator facilities (FNG), specifically dedicated to biological samples. FNG is a linear electrostatic accelerator that produces up to 1.0 x 1011 n/s 14 MeV neutrons via the D-T nuclear reaction. The dose-rate applied for this study is of 0.7 cGy/min. The functional genomic approach has been performed on six animals for each experimental points: un-irradiated; 20 cGy, 6 hours and 24 hours delayed time after exposure. Preliminarily, a pool of total RNA is evaluated on commercial micro-arrays containing large collections of mus musculus cDNAs. Statistical filtering and functional clustering of the data is carried out using dedicated software packages. Results: Candidate genes are selected on the basis of responsiveness to 20 cGy of exposure, with a defined temporal regulation. We plan to organize a systematic screen focused on genes responding to our selection criteria, in in vivo mouse experiments, and correlate their differential expression to the human counterparts. A specific cross species database will be created with all the functional information available in standardized format (MIAME: minimal information about micro-arrays experiments). Conclusions: A lack of information on in vivo experiments is still evident for low doses exposure, especially for neutron of cosmic interest. Individual susceptibility, extensive number of animals to be processed, lack of standardization methodologies are among problems to be solved for

  13. Postoperative irradiation of thymomas: intensity-modulated radiotherapy or deep-inspiration breath-hold? Dosimetric investigation; Irradiation postoperatoire des thymomes: radiotherapie avec modulation d'intensite ou en inspiration profonde bloquee? etude dosimetrique

    Paumier, A.; Azoury, F.; Bretel, J.J.; Le Pechoux, C. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Beaudre, A.; Brahim, J.; Ferreira, I.; Lefkopoulos, D. [Unite de physique, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Besse, B. [Departement de medecine, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Dartevelle, P. [Departement de chirurgie, centre chirurgical Marie-Lannelongue, 92 - Le Plessis-Robinson (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report an investigation which aimed at assessing the protection of organs at risk whether conformational radiotherapy with or without intensity modulation is delivered with free breathing or with deep-inspiration breath-hold. Four treatment plans have been computed for eight patients: conventional conformational radiotherapy with free breathing or with deep-inspiration breath-hold, intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy or IMRT with free breathing or with deep-inspiration breath-hold. They compared the mean dose received by the organs at risk: lungs, heart, anterior intraventricular coronary artery, right coronary artery, circumflex coronary artery, oesophagus, and the whole body. A variance analysis has been performed on dosimetric data. It appears that intensity modulation allows the doses delivered to organs at risk to be reduced in the case of postoperative irradiation of thymomas. The breath-hold technique has no real interest for these patients. Short communication

  14. Intensity-modulated whole abdomen irradiation following adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Four-year outcomes

    Rochet, Nathalie; Lindel, Katja; Katayama, Sonja; Schubert, Kai; Herfarth, Klaus; Harms, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Schneeweiss, Andreas [University of Heidelberg, Nationales Centrum fuer Tumorerkrankungen (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Sohn, Christoph [University of Heidelberg, Department of Gynecology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    A prospective study to assess toxicity and survival outcomes after intensity-modulated whole-abdominal irradiation (IM-WAI) following surgery and adjuvant intravenous carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy in advanced FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Between 2006 and 2009, 16 patients with optimally resected FIGO stage III ovarian cancer, who had received six cycles of adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy were treated with consolidation IM-WAI. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions, using step-and-shoot (n = 3) or helical tomotherapy (n = 13). The first 10 patients were treated within a phase I trial; the following patients received the same treatment modality. The target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity, the diaphragm, the liver capsule, and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, and bone marrow. Median follow-up was 44 months (range 19.2-67.2 months). No grade 4 toxicities occurred during IM-WAI. Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) grade 3 toxicities were: diarrhea (25 %), leucopenia (19 %), nausea/vomiting (6 %), and thrombocytopenia (6 %). No toxicity-related treatment break was necessary. Small bowel obstruction occurred in a total of 6 patients: in 3 cases (19 %) due to postsurgical adhesions and in 3 cases due to local tumor recurrence (19 %). Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 27.6 months (95 % confidence interval, CI = 24-44 months) and median overall survival (OS) was 42.1 months (95 %CI = 17-68 months). The peritoneal cavity was the most frequent site of initial failure. Consolidation IM-WAI following surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy is feasible and can be performed with manageable acute and late toxicity. The favorable RFS outcome is promising and justifies further clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Es wurden Akut- und Langzeittoxizitaet sowie Ueberlebensdaten der konsolidierenden intensitaetsmodulierten Ganzabdomenbestrahlung (''intensity-modulated

  15. Dosimetric study on conventional mantle-field irradiation and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Objective: To compare the dose distribution of mantle-field radiotherapy using conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and four intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) techniques in stage I and II Hodgkin's lymphoma(HL). Methods: Ten patients with pathologically proved early stage HL underwent CT simulation. Then both CRT and IMRT planning performed using ECLIPS treatment planning system(TPS). The dosimetric parameters of different irradiation plans were analyzed, including conformal index (CI), homogeneity index (H), D95 and V95 of planning target volume (PTV), Dmax, Dmean, Dmin, V5, V10, V20 and V30 of the lung, as well as Dmax of the spinal cord. Results: The isodose distribution and homogeneity of PTV were better in IMRT plans when compared with CRT plans. Target coverage, target dose conformity and homogeneity were similar among all the four IMRT techniques. The V30 of the lung using IMRT was lower than using CRT, but the low-dose volume of the lung was higher. Among the four IMRT technique plans, the lung V20 and V30 were lower in plans with more-field technique, but the V5 and V10 were higher. The Dmax of the spinal cord using IMRT was all lower than that using CRT. Conclusions: IMRT is better than CRT in target coverage, conformity, homogeneity and normal tissue sparing, especially in protecting the spinal cord and decreasing high-dose lung volume, though the low-dose lung volume is higher. Seven-field IMRT technique for mantle-field radiotherapy is recommended. (authors)

  16. Postoperative Irradiation of Gynecologic Malignancies: Improving Treatment Delivery Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric and treatment delivery advantages of aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for the treatment of patients receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy after resection of endometrial cancers were selected. A 45-Gy dose was prescribed to the target volume delineated on a planning CT scan. An in-house inverse planning system, Ballista, was used to develop a treatment plan using aperture-based multileaf collimator segments. This approach was compared with conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and static beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT) techniques in terms of target coverage, dose-volume histogram statistics for surrounding normal tissues, and numbers of segments and monitor units (MU). Results: Three quarters (76.4%) of the planning target volume received the prescription dose with conventional four-field plans. With adequate target coverage, the Ballista plans significantly reduced the volume of bowel and bladder irradiated at the prescribed dose (p < 0.001), whereas the two approaches provided equivalent results for the rectum (p 0.5). On the other hand, AB-IMRT and BB-IMRT plans showed only small differences in dose-volume histogram statistics of unknown clinical impact, whereas Ballista plan delivery required on average 73% and 59% fewer segments and MU, respectively. Conclusion: With respect to conventional techniques, AB-IMRT for the treatment of gynecologic malignancies provides dosimetric advantages similar to those with BB-IMRT but with clear treatment delivery improvements

  17. Verification of dose distribution for volumetric modulated arc therapy total marrow irradiation in a humanlike phantom

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning studies have been reported to provide good target coverage and organs at risk (OARs) sparing in total marrow irradiation (TMI). A comprehensive dosimetric study simulating the clinical situation as close as possible is a norm in radiotherapy before a technique can be used to treat a patient. Without such a study, it would be difficult to make a reliable and safe clinical transition especially with a technique as complicated as VMAT-TMI. To this end, the dosimetric feasibility of VMAT-TMI technique in terms of treatment planning, delivery efficiency, and the most importantly three dimensional dose distribution accuracy was investigated in this study. The VMAT-TMI dose distribution inside a humanlike Rando phantom was measured and compared to the dose calculated using RapidArc especially in the field junctions and the inhomogeneous tissues including the lungs, which is the dose-limiting organ in TMI. Methods: Three subplans with a total of nine arcs were used to treat the planning target volume (PTV), which was determined as all the bones plus the 3 mm margin. Thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) were placed at 39 positions throughout the phantom. The measured TLD doses were compared to the calculated plan doses. Planar dose for each arc was verified using mapcheck. Results: TLD readings demonstrated accurate dose delivery, with a median dose difference of 0.5% (range: -4.3% and 6.6%) from the calculated dose in the junctions and in the inhomogeneous medium including the lungs. Conclusions: The results from this study suggest that RapidArc VMAT technique is dosimetrically accurate, safe, and efficient in delivering TMI within clinically acceptable time frame.

  18. Intensity-modulated whole abdomen irradiation following adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Four-year outcomes

    A prospective study to assess toxicity and survival outcomes after intensity-modulated whole-abdominal irradiation (IM-WAI) following surgery and adjuvant intravenous carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy in advanced FIGO stage III ovarian cancer. Between 2006 and 2009, 16 patients with optimally resected FIGO stage III ovarian cancer, who had received six cycles of adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy were treated with consolidation IM-WAI. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions, using step-and-shoot (n = 3) or helical tomotherapy (n = 13). The first 10 patients were treated within a phase I trial; the following patients received the same treatment modality. The target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity, the diaphragm, the liver capsule, and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, and bone marrow. Median follow-up was 44 months (range 19.2-67.2 months). No grade 4 toxicities occurred during IM-WAI. Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) grade 3 toxicities were: diarrhea (25 %), leucopenia (19 %), nausea/vomiting (6 %), and thrombocytopenia (6 %). No toxicity-related treatment break was necessary. Small bowel obstruction occurred in a total of 6 patients: in 3 cases (19 %) due to postsurgical adhesions and in 3 cases due to local tumor recurrence (19 %). Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 27.6 months (95 % confidence interval, CI = 24-44 months) and median overall survival (OS) was 42.1 months (95 %CI = 17-68 months). The peritoneal cavity was the most frequent site of initial failure. Consolidation IM-WAI following surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy is feasible and can be performed with manageable acute and late toxicity. The favorable RFS outcome is promising and justifies further clinical trials. (orig.)

  19. Effectiveness of Melatonin, as a Radiation Damage-Mitigating Drug in Modulating Liver Biochemical disorders in γ-Irradiated Rats

    Melatonin has an anti per oxidative effect on several tissues as well as a scavenger effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS). Whilst radiation-hazards due to free radical generation, present enormous challenges for biological and medical safety. Therefore, rats were classified into four groups; control (n= 8), (received 0.5 ml of alcoholic saline as a vehicle for 5 days). Melatonin-treated rats received 10 mg/ kg body wt, for 5 days (given to the animals in the morning via stomach tube). gamma-irradiated rats received 0.5 ml of the melatonin vehicle followed by one shot dose of 3 Gy gamma-rays. Each of these groups was compared with a further group, which-received melatonin for 5 days after 3 Gy gamma-irradiation exposure. The results revealed that all considered biochemical parameters were not changed significantly in melatonin-treated group as compared with control one. In the liver tissue of the gamma-irradiated animals (3 Gy), the oxidative stress markers malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl (PC) were significantly increased, while a marked decrease occurred in the contents of deoxy- and ribo-nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and glutathione (GSH) as well as activity of glutathione-S-transferase (GST). In addition, catalase (CAT) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities were increased. Activities of aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) were significantly increased in sera of the irradiated rats. Treatment with melatonin for 5 days after gamma-rays exposure significantly modulated the radiation-induced elevations in MDA and PC levels in the liver tissue and significantly restored hepatic GSH content, GST, CAT and MPO activities. Post-irradiation treatment with melatonin showed significant higher hepatic DNA and RNA contents than irradiated rats. The activities of AST, ALP, and GGT in serum were significantly ameliorated when melatonin was administrated after irradiation. Conclusion: Melatonin has effective

  20. The effects of nonadiabatic dust charge variation and ultraviolet irradiation on the modulational instability of dust ion acoustic waves

    The effects of nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation on the nonlinear propagation of the dust ion acoustic (DIA) waves in the dusty plasma with positively charged dust grains have been investigated. By using the reductive perturbation technique, a three-dimensional modified nonlinear Schroedinger equation (mNLSE) governing the nonlinear envelope DIA waves was derived and the approximate solitary wave solution of the mNLSE was also obtained in the weak effect of nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation limit, which shows that the amplitude of the DIA solitary wave exponentially decreases with time due to the collisionless dissipation caused by the nonadiabatic dust charge variation. The frequency, instability growth rate, and the critical modulational wave number of the small amplitude modulation are all dependent on photoelectron generated by ultraviolet irradiation and time due to the presence of nonadiabatic dust charge variation. The transverse perturbation plays an important role in the modulational instability region.

  1. Topogram-based automated selection of the tube potential and current in thoraco-abdominal trauma CT - a comparison to fixed kV with mAs modulation alone

    Frellesen, Claudia; Stock, Wenzel; Kerl, J.M.; Lehnert, Thomas; Wichmann, Julian L.; Beeres, Martin; Schulz, Boris; Bodelle, Boris; Vogl, Thomas J. [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Nau, Christoph; Geiger, Emanuel; Wutzler, Sebastian [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Biostatistics and Mathematical Modelling, Frankfurt (Germany); Bauer, Ralf W. [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Klinikum der Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    To investigate the impact of automated attenuation-based tube potential selection on image quality and exposure parameters in polytrauma patients undergoing contrast-enhanced thoraco-abdominal CT. One hundred patients were examined on a 16-slice device at 120 kV with 190 ref.mAs and automated mA modulation only. Another 100 patients underwent 128-slice CT with automated mA modulation and topogram-based automated tube potential selection (autokV) at 100, 120 or 140 kV. Volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}), dose-length product (DLP), body diameters, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and subjective image quality were compared. In the autokV group, 100 kV was automatically selected in 82 patients, 120 kV in 12 patients and 140 kV in 6 patients. Patient diameters increased with higher kV settings. The median CTDI{sub vol} (8.3 vs. 12.4 mGy; -33 %) and DLP (594 vs. 909 mGy cm; -35 %) in the entire autokV group were significantly lower than in the group with fixed 120 kV (p < 0.05 for both). Image quality remained at a constantly high level at any selected kV level. Topogram-based automated selection of the tube potential allows for significant dose savings in thoraco-abdominal trauma CT while image quality remains at a constantly high level. (orig.)

  2. Topogram-based automated selection of the tube potential and current in thoraco-abdominal trauma CT - a comparison to fixed kV with mAs modulation alone

    To investigate the impact of automated attenuation-based tube potential selection on image quality and exposure parameters in polytrauma patients undergoing contrast-enhanced thoraco-abdominal CT. One hundred patients were examined on a 16-slice device at 120 kV with 190 ref.mAs and automated mA modulation only. Another 100 patients underwent 128-slice CT with automated mA modulation and topogram-based automated tube potential selection (autokV) at 100, 120 or 140 kV. Volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), body diameters, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and subjective image quality were compared. In the autokV group, 100 kV was automatically selected in 82 patients, 120 kV in 12 patients and 140 kV in 6 patients. Patient diameters increased with higher kV settings. The median CTDIvol (8.3 vs. 12.4 mGy; -33 %) and DLP (594 vs. 909 mGy cm; -35 %) in the entire autokV group were significantly lower than in the group with fixed 120 kV (p < 0.05 for both). Image quality remained at a constantly high level at any selected kV level. Topogram-based automated selection of the tube potential allows for significant dose savings in thoraco-abdominal trauma CT while image quality remains at a constantly high level. (orig.)

  3. Post-irradiation tensile properties of the first and second operational target modules at the Spallation Neutron Source

    During neutron production the target module at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is damaged by cavitation-induced erosion and the mechanical properties of the AISI 316L vessel material are altered by high-energy proton and neutron radiation. Recently the first and second operational target modules at the SNS reached the end of their useful lifetime, and disk shaped specimens were sampled from the beam entrance region of both targets. Tensile specimens ranging in dose from 3 to 7 displacements per atom (dpa) were fabricated from the disk specimens using wire electrical discharge machining and tested at room temperature. This paper presents the tensile properties of the irradiated 316L vessel material removed from the first and second operational SNS target modules. Results show an increase in tensile strength and decrease in elongation values similar to previous spallation irradiated 316L results. Abnormally large elongation, 57% total elongation, was observed in a specimen irradiated to 5.4 dpa and considerable scatter was observed in the uniform and total elongation data. One possible explanation for the abnormally large elongations and scatter observed in tensile test results is the so-called deformation wave phase transformation-induced plasticity effect. Microscopy characterization revealed the presence of large nonmetallic inclusions rich in Al, S, Ca, O, and Mg on the fracture surface, which may have also contributed to the scatter in the tensile elongation results. While all specimens exhibited radiation-induced hardening and a decrease in ductility, the predominate topographical morphology on all specimen fracture surfaces examined was ductile microvoid coalescence and all specimens experienced appreciable necking prior to fracture. These findings indicate that 316L retains sufficient ductility (10–20% total elongation) and fractures in a ductile manor after irradiation to approximately 6–7 dpa in the mixed proton/neutron radiation environment at the

  4. 2-DG induced modulation of chromosomal DNA profile, cell survival, mutagenesis and gene conversion in x-irradiated yeast

    Effect of post-irradiation modulation in presence of 2-deoxy-D-glucose and yeast extract, on chromosomal DNA profile, cell survival, reverse mutation (ILV+) and gene conversion (TRP+), were studied in x-irradiated stationary phase yeast cells (diploid strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The damage and repair in chromosomal DNA bands, resolved by using contour clamped homogeneous electric pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) technique, was estimated by calculating intensity ratio, Ρn (Ρn=In/It; where In is the intensity of nth band in a lane and It is the sum of intensities of all bands and the well in the lane). The data indicate linear correlation between relative compactness (τ) of a chromosome [chromosome size (Kb)/length of synaptonemal complex (μm)[ and DNA damage and repair. The chromosome repair kinetics were biphasic, showing initial decrease followed by an increase in Ρn. Variations were observed among different chromosomes with respect to DNA damage, repair and post-irradiation repair modulation. 2-DG inhibited both components of chromosomal DNA repair and also repair of potentially lethal damage but enhanced frequencies of mutants. Relatively the effects on revertants were greater in cells irradiated with lower doses (50 Gy) of x-rays and post-irradiation incubation in presence of phosphate buffer having 2-DG (50 mM) and glucose (10 mM). Yeast extract increased frequencies of revertants and convertants thus promoting error-prone DNA repair. Yeast extract in combination with 2-DG showed complex effects on chromosomal DNA repair and enhanced mutagenesis further. (author). 35 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  5. TH-C-12A-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Modulated Arc Technique for Total Body Irradiation

    Tsiamas, P; Czerminska, M; Makrigiorgos, G; Karen, M; Zygmanski, P [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/ Dana-Farber Institute/ Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A simplified Total Body Irradiation (TBI) was developed to work with minimal requirements in a compact linac room without custom motorized TBI couch. Results were compared to our existing fixed-gantry double 4 MV linac TBI system with prone patient and simultaneous AP/PA irradiation. Methods: Modulated arc irradiates patient positioned in prone/supine positions along the craniocaudal axis. A simplified inverse planning method developed to optimize dose rate as a function of gantry angle for various patient sizes without the need of graphical 3D treatment planning system. This method can be easily adapted and used with minimal resources. Fixed maximum field size (40×40 cm2) is used to decrease radiation delivery time. Dose rate as a function of gantry angle is optimized to result in uniform dose inside rectangular phantoms of various sizes and a custom VMAT DICOM plans were generated using a DICOM editor tool. Monte Carlo simulations, film and ionization chamber dosimetry for various setups were used to derive and test an extended SSD beam model based on PDD/OAR profiles for Varian 6EX/ TX. Measurements were obtained using solid water phantoms. Dose rate modulation function was determined for various size patients (100cm − 200cm). Depending on the size of the patient arc range varied from 100° to 120°. Results: A PDD/OAR based beam model for modulated arc TBI therapy was developed. Lateral dose profiles produced were similar to profiles of our existing TBI facility. Calculated delivery time and full arc depended on the size of the patient (∼8min/ 100° − 10min/ 120°, 100 cGy). Dose heterogeneity varied by about ±5% − ±10% depending on the patient size and distance to the surface (buildup region). Conclusion: TBI using simplified modulated arc along craniocaudal axis of different size patients positioned on the floor can be achieved without graphical / inverse 3D planning.

  6. In vivo skin leptin modulation after 14 MeV neutron irradiation: a molecular and FT-IR spectroscopic study

    Cestelli Guidi, M.; Mirri, C.; Marcelli, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati - INFN, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Fratini, E.; Amendola, R. [ENEA, UT BIORAD-RAB, Rome (Italy); Licursi, V.; Negri, R. [Universita La Sapienza, Dip. Biologia e Biotecnologie ' ' Charles Darwin' ' , Rome (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    This paper discusses gene expression changes in the skin of mice treated by monoenergetic 14 MeV neutron irradiation and the possibility of monitoring the resultant lipid depletion (cross-validated by functional genomic analysis) as a marker of radiation exposure by high-resolution FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) imaging spectroscopy. The irradiation was performed at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG), which is specifically dedicated to biological samples. FNG is a linear electrostatic accelerator that produces up to 1.0 x 10{sup 11} 14-MeV neutrons per second via the D-T nuclear reaction. The functional genomic approach was applied to four animals for each experimental condition (unirradiated, 0.2 Gy irradiation, or 1 Gy irradiation) 6 hours or 24 hours after exposure. Coregulation of a subclass of keratin and keratin-associated protein genes that are physically clustered in the mouse genome and functionally related to skin and hair follicle proliferation and differentiation was observed. Most of these genes are transiently upregulated at 6 h after the delivery of the lower dose delivered, and drastically downregulated at 24 h after the delivery of the dose of 1 Gy. In contrast, the gene coding for the leptin protein was consistently upregulated upon irradiation with both doses. Leptin is a key protein that regulates lipid accumulation in tissues, and its absence provokes obesity. The tissue analysis was performed by monitoring the accumulation and the distribution of skin lipids using FT-IR imaging spectroscopy. The overall picture indicates the differential modulation of key genes during epidermis homeostasis that leads to the activation of a self-renewal process at low doses of irradiation. (orig.)

  7. Optimal I-V Curve Scan Time of Solar Cells and Modules in Light of Irradiance Level

    Matic Herman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High-efficiency solar cells and modules exhibit strong capacitive character resulting in limited speed of transient responses. A too fast I-V curve measurement can thus introduce a significant error due to its internal capacitances. This paper analyses the I-V curve error of a measured solar cell or module in light of scan time and irradiance level. It rests on a two-diode solar cell model extended by two bias-dependent capacitances, modelling the junction, and the diffusion capacitance. A method for determination of all extended model parameters from a quasistatic I-V curve and open-circuit voltage decay measurement is presented and validated. Applicability of the extended model and the developed parameter extraction method to PV modules is demonstrated and confirmed. SPICE simulations of the extended model are used to obtain the I-V curve error versus scan time dependence and the I-V curve hysteresis. Determination of the optimal scan time is addressed, and finally the influence of the irradiance level on the I-V curve scan time and error is revealed. The method is applied but is not limited to three different wafer-based silicon solar cell types.

  8. Abdominal Pain or Cramping

    ... Body & lifestyle changes > Abdominal pain or cramping Abdominal pain or cramping E-mail to a friend Please ... signs of severe pain. What causes mild belly pain in pregnancy? There are different causes for mild ...

  9. Effect of irradiation and nutrition modulation on apoptosis and some biochemical activities in rats

    This study designed to evaluate the hazardous effects of gamma-radiation and to investigate the role of high protein diet, vitamin C and vitamin E as radioprotectors in rats followed exposure to a single dose of whole body gamma irradiation of 7 Gy. 120 male albino rats were divided into six equal groups of 20 rats each : control, irradiated , high protein (P), vitamin C, vitamin E and combination (C + E + P) supplemented groups. The variation in levels of total protein, albumin, globulin, A/G ratio, cholesterol, triglycerides, urea, creatinine, corticosterone, testosterone, apoptosis and the activities of ALT ,AST ,LDH ,CK and CKMB were estimated for all groups. Serum corticosterone and testosterone detection were carried out according to the radioimmunoassay (RIA) technique. Serum apoptosis detection was carried out using the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Analyses were carried out at the end of one week pre gamma irradiation, one and two weeks post gamma irradiation . In the irradiated group, an increase in serum triglycerides, urea, creatinine and testosterone levels, apoptosis and ALT, AST, CK, LDH activities were observed compared to control. While there was a decrease in both globulin and cholesterol levels and no changes in albumin level and CKMB activity. In almost supplemented groups, the reverse was occurred except in triglycerides, cholesterol, globulin and CK . Based on these biochemical observations, it was concluded that vitamin C and vitamin E treatment exerts a protective effect against irradiation damage while high protein diet has protective or ameliorative effects to some extent

  10. Tensor fascia lata musculocutaneous flap for abdominal wall reconstruction

    We report a case of abdominal wall reconstruction following excision of irradiated skin and a ventral hernia. A very large tensor fascia lata musculocutaneous flap was used with good results. The anatomical features of this flap make it an excellent method of abdominal wall reconstruction

  11. Role of Betalains as Natural Antioxidant in Modulating Renal Disorders in γ-Irradiated Mice

    Betalains are natural antioxidants extracted from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.), prevent lipid oxidation and improve antioxidant defence system in the animal tissue. This study investigates the protective role of betalains on γ-rays-induced renal disorders in mice. Thirty two mice were divided into four groups; the first (control group) received the vehicle only for 33 days (control), the second (betalains group) received betalains (80 mg/kg body weight/day) for 33 days, the third (irradiated group) received the vehicle for 30 days before exposed to 4 Gy γ-rays (one shot) and for 3 days after irradiation and the last (protected group) received betalains for 30 days before γ-irradiation and for 3 days after irradiation. Gamma-rays-provoked oxidative stresses in renal tissue were indicated by significant increases of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs), carbonyl content (PC) and total nitrate/ nitrite (NOx) as well as an increase of plasma renal tubular and glomerular markers; urea (Ur), creatinine (Cr) and γ-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT). In dissimilarity, γ-rays-induced significant decreases of renal reduced glutathione (GSH) level as well as peripheral blood indices; total red blood cells (RBC), haemoglobin (Hb), platelets (Pt) and total white blood cells (WBC) and renal enzymatic antioxidants; super oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). The results indicate that the administration of betalains protects against renal disorders in mice irradiated by γ-rays

  12. On the problem of using immune modulators for prophylaxis of late effects induced by internal irradiation

    Using the experimental modeling of late effects induced by intake of radionuclides (131I, 238,239Pu, 90Sr) the attempt to investigate the possibility of protection using immune modulators was made. Co-polymer of 2-methyl-5-vinylpyridine and N-vinylpyrrolidone (sovidon), G immunoglobulin and interferon, Fc-fragment of immunoglobulin and S, parathyphi B. Breslau vaccine were used as immune modulators. The positive prophylactic influence of immune modulators was found for average life span, radiation action, immune status, of rates of occurrence and developments of breast tumors induced by 131I, 239Pu and 90Sr. At the same time the increase in osteosarcoma cumulative rate induced by immune modulators in case of body intake of 238Pu and 90Sr was registered

  13. Combined modulated electron and photon beams planned by a Monte-Carlo-based optimization procedure for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Atriana Palma, Bianey; Ureba Sánchez, Ana; Salguero, Francisco Javier; Arráns, Rafael; Míguez Sánchez, Carlos; Walls Zurita, Amadeo; Romero Hermida, María Isabel; Leal, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a Monte-Carlo (MC)-based optimization procedure to improve conventional treatment plans for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using modulated electron beams alone or combined with modulated photon beams, to be delivered by a single collimation device, i.e. a photon multi-leaf collimator (xMLC) already installed in a standard hospital. Five left-sided breast cases were retrospectively planned using modulated photon and/or electron beams with an in-house treatment planning system (TPS), called CARMEN, and based on MC simulations. For comparison, the same cases were also planned by a PINNACLE TPS using conventional inverse intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Normal tissue complication probability for pericarditis, pneumonitis and breast fibrosis was calculated. CARMEN plans showed similar acceptable planning target volume (PTV) coverage as conventional IMRT plans with 90% of PTV volume covered by the prescribed dose (Dp). Heart and ipsilateral lung receiving 5% Dp and 15% Dp, respectively, was 3.2-3.6 times lower for CARMEN plans. Ipsilateral breast receiving 50% Dp and 100% Dp was an average of 1.4-1.7 times lower for CARMEN plans. Skin and whole body low-dose volume was also reduced. Modulated photon and/or electron beams planned by the CARMEN TPS improve APBI treatments by increasing normal tissue sparing maintaining the same PTV coverage achieved by other techniques. The use of the xMLC, already installed in the linac, to collimate photon and electron beams favors the clinical implementation of APBI with the highest efficiency.

  14. Baicalin modulates microRNA expression in UVB irradiated mouse skin.

    Xu, Yang; Zhou, Bingrong; Wu, Di; Yin, Zhiqiang; Luo, Dan

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of baicalin on ultraviolet radiation B (UVB)-mediated microRNA (miRNA) expression in mouse skin. We determined miRNA expression profiles in UVB irradiated mice, baicalin treated irradiated mice, and untreated mice, and conducted TargetScan and Gene Ontology analyses to predict miRNA targets. Three miRNAs (mmu-miR-125a-5p, mmu-miR-146a, and mmu-miR-141) were downregulated and another three (mmu-miR-188-5p, mmu-miR-223 and mmu-miR-22) were upregulated in UVB irradiated mice compared with untreated mice. Additionally, these miRNAs were predicted to be related to photocarcinogenesis, hypomethylation and apoptosis. Three miRNAs (mmu-miR-378, mmu-miR-199a-3p and mmu-miR-181b) were downregulated and one (mmu-miR-23a) was upregulated in baicalin treated mice compared with UVB irradiated mice, and they were predicted to be related to DNA repair signaling pathway. These deregulated miRNAs are potentially involved in the pathogenesis of photodamage, and may aid treatment and prevention of UVB-induced dermatoses. PMID:23554741

  15. Irradiation of a 2.5 m long SciFi module with 24 GeV/c protons to the dose profile expected in LHCb

    Rodrigues Cavalcante, Ana Barbara; Glaser, Maurice; Joram, Christian; Karacson, Matthias; Kristic, Robert; Ravotti, Federico; Riggaz, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    A 2.5 m long and 13 cm wide SciFi module, made of a 6-layer single fibre mat, was irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons in the new CERN PS IRRAD facility. The module is equipped with an aluminised mylar mirror and was previously carefully characterised in a test beam experiment in the CERN H8 zone. For the irradiation the module was tilted by $7 ^o$ w.r.t. the beam axis. A translation table allowed to move the module during the irradiation transverse to the beam in order to generate the dose distribution expected in LHCb after an integrated luminosity of 50 fb$^{-1}$, including the very sharp rise at the mirror end to 35 kGy. The dose distribution was derived from the generation of sodium isotopes in the aluminium strips placed in front of and behind the module. The dosimetry relies mainly on the activity of the long-lived Na-22 isotope, as the short-lived Na-24 gave in our specific case less precise results. The irradiated zone corresponds to an approximately 25 mm wide band running along the fibre mat, at 32 mm ...

  16. Recovery from Hematopoietic Injury by Modulating Prostaglandin E2 Signaling Post-Irradiation

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Singh, Pratibha; Stilger, Kayla N.; Plett, P. Artur; Sampson, Carol H.; Chua, Hui Lin; Orschell, Christie M.; Pelus, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    While high dose total body irradiation (TBI) is used therapeutically, the proliferation of nuclear weapons, increasing use of nuclear power, and worldwide radical terrorism underscore the need to develop countermeasures to a radiological mass casualty event. The hematopoietic syndrome of the acute radiation syndrome (HS-ARS) results from severe compromise to the hematopoietic system, including lymphocytopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and possible death from infection and/or hemorrhage....

  17. Modulation of Immune Disorders Induced-Arthritis in γ- Irradiated Rats

    This study was to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capability of a laboratory preparation mixture Nano Selenium-lovastatin (Lov-Se) against oxidative stress and inflammatory cascade in irradiated and/or adjuvant arthritic rats. The experimental animals were divided into: adjuvant free groups and adjuvant induced groups. Rats were exposed to whole body γ-radiation (2 Gy every 3 days up to total dose of 8 Gy) and received oral administration of 1 ml Lov-Se mixture (≈ 20 mg kg-1 Lov and 0.1 mg kg-1 day-1 Se) for 14 successive days. Animal model of arthritis was organized by subcutaneous injection of complete freund’s adjuvant. The antioxidant parameters (heart GSH-Px, CAT, SOD, XDH, GSH and blood Se), and oxidant markers (heart XO, NO, protein carbonyls and TBARS) and Also, the inflammatory molecules (serum TNF-α, CRP and RF) were determined. In irradiated Lov-Se rats, the results obtained reveals that, TBARS, protein carbonyl, TNF-α, CRP levels, and XO, CAT and SOD activities were significantly ameliorated as compared to irradiated rats. Also, heart GSH, NO levels, XDH, GSH-Px activities and blood Se level were significantly improved. In addition, the administration of Lov-Se to the arthritic and arthritic irradiated rats ameliorates the disturbance occurs in oxidative stress, inflammatory cascades and antioxidant indicators when compared to control rats. In conclusion, the proper administration of Lov-Se mixture might reduce the radiation-induced heart injury via amending the antioxidant molecules and decreasing lipid and protein oxidation. Also, it could be suggested that Lov-Se mixture might posses a considerable anti-inflammatory properties

  18. Black tea (camellia sinensis ) role in modulating antioxidant enzymes and biochemical changes in γ -irradiated rats

    In the present work, we investigated the efficacy of camellia sinensis beverage in reducing gamma-irradiation - induced oxidative damage to the liver, lipid profile and antioxidant enzymes in adult male rats. Animals were received the black tea beverage (BTB) as a sole source of potable liquid for seven consecutive days before exposing them to single dose of 6 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation . The irradiated rats continued to receive BTB for 21 days before sacrifice. The effect of BTB was assessed by monitoring the plasma aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), acid phosphatase (AcP), total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high, low and very low density lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-C,LDL-C and VLDL-C) as well as protein carbonyl content (PCC). In addition, the concentration of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and catalase activity (CAT) in blood and liver of experimental rats. It was observed that tea administration lowers significantly (p< 0.05), the plasma AST, ALT, AcP activities and TC, TG, LDL-C, VLDL-C and PCC concentration as well as blood and liver TBARS. The level of GSH and activity of CAT in the blood and liver tissue were however shown to be significantly elevated (p< 0.05).The results provide useful information for future investigations and strongly implicate the beneficial application of BTB

  19. Abdominal MRI in childhood

    MRI provides diagnostic information in multiple abdominal diseases in childhood. Additional information to sonographic findings can be achieved in the diagnosis of abdominal malformation as well as in several inflammatory processes. In childhood cancer imaging MRI is essential at the beginning as well as during therapy to assess response to therapy. Because of radiation protection MRI has to replace CT in abdominal imaging in children. Some technical details have to be considered when children are examined. (orig.)

  20. Melatonin may play a role in modulation of bax and bcl-2 expression levels to protect rat peripheral blood lymphocytes from gamma irradiation-induced apoptosis

    The close relationship between free radicals effects and apoptosis process has been proved. Melatonin has been reported as a direct free radical scavenger. We investigated the capability of melatonin in the modification of radiation-induced apoptosis and apoptosis-associated upstream regulators expression in rat peripheral blood lymphocytes. Rats were irradiated with a single whole body Cobalt 60-gamma radiation dose of 8 Gy at a dose rate of 101 cGy/min with or without melatonin pretreatments at different concentrations of 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight. The rats were divided into eight groups of control, irradiation-only, vehicle-only, vehicle plus irradiation, 10 mg/kg melatonin alone, 10 mg/kg melatonin plus irradiation, 100 mg/kg melatonin alone and 100 mg/kg melatonin plus irradiation. Rats were given an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of melatonin or the same volume of vehicle alone 1 h prior to irradiation. Blood samples were taken 4, 24, 48 and 72 h after irradiation for evaluation of flow cytometric analysis of apoptotic lymphocytes using Annexin V/PI assay and measurement of bax and bcl-2 expression using quantitative real-time PCR (RT2qPCR). Irradiation-only and vehicle plus irradiation showed an increase in the percentage of apoptotic lymphocytes significantly different from control group (P < 0.01), while melatonin pretreatments in a dose-dependent manner reduced it as compared with the irradiation-only and vehicle plus irradiation groups (P < 0.01) in all time points. This reduced apoptosis by melatonin was related to the downregulation of bax, upregulation of bcl-2, and therefore reduction of bax/bcl-2 ratio. Our results suggest that melatonin in these doses may provide modulation of bax and bcl-2 expression as well as bax/bcl-2 ratio to protect rat peripheral blood lymphocytes from gamma irradiation-induced apoptosis.

  1. Melatonin may play a role in modulation of bax and bcl-2 expression levels to protect rat peripheral blood lymphocytes from gamma irradiation-induced apoptosis

    Mohseni, Mehran [Department of Radiology and Medical Physics, Faculty of Paramedicine, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mihandoost, Ehsan, E-mail: mihandoost.e@gmail.com [Department of Medical Radiation Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirazi, Alireza [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sepehrizadeh, Zargham [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazzaz, Javad Tavakkoly [Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghazi-khansari, Mahmoud [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The close relationship between free radicals effects and apoptosis process has been proved. Melatonin has been reported as a direct free radical scavenger. We investigated the capability of melatonin in the modification of radiation-induced apoptosis and apoptosis-associated upstream regulators expression in rat peripheral blood lymphocytes. Rats were irradiated with a single whole body Cobalt 60-gamma radiation dose of 8 Gy at a dose rate of 101 cGy/min with or without melatonin pretreatments at different concentrations of 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight. The rats were divided into eight groups of control, irradiation-only, vehicle-only, vehicle plus irradiation, 10 mg/kg melatonin alone, 10 mg/kg melatonin plus irradiation, 100 mg/kg melatonin alone and 100 mg/kg melatonin plus irradiation. Rats were given an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of melatonin or the same volume of vehicle alone 1 h prior to irradiation. Blood samples were taken 4, 24, 48 and 72 h after irradiation for evaluation of flow cytometric analysis of apoptotic lymphocytes using Annexin V/PI assay and measurement of bax and bcl-2 expression using quantitative real-time PCR (RT{sup 2}qPCR). Irradiation-only and vehicle plus irradiation showed an increase in the percentage of apoptotic lymphocytes significantly different from control group (P < 0.01), while melatonin pretreatments in a dose-dependent manner reduced it as compared with the irradiation-only and vehicle plus irradiation groups (P < 0.01) in all time points. This reduced apoptosis by melatonin was related to the downregulation of bax, upregulation of bcl-2, and therefore reduction of bax/bcl-2 ratio. Our results suggest that melatonin in these doses may provide modulation of bax and bcl-2 expression as well as bax/bcl-2 ratio to protect rat peripheral blood lymphocytes from gamma irradiation-induced apoptosis.

  2. Efficiency of corn steep liquor for modulation of certain biochemical and histological impairments in lung tissue of gamma irradiated rat

    Corn steep liquor (CSL) rich in phenolic antioxidant compounds remains as leftover material during starch manufacturing processes. The objective of this study was to evaluate its efficiency in the modulation of oxidative stress. Results showed that oral supplementation of CSL (1 ml/kg/day) to rats for 15 successive days enhanced the activity of extra-cellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) in lung tissues. Histological examination showed normal architecture. Supplementation of CSL to animals before whole body gamma exposure at 6 Gy (delivered as a single dose) has significantly minimized the amount of thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) produced from lipid peroxidation in lung tissues and erythrocytes. This was associated with significant amelioration in the activities of intra-cellular SOD, catalase and glutathione peroxidase (G-Px) enzymes. The extra-cellular SOD activity in lung tissues of CSL treated and irradiated rats was significantly higher than its activity in the lung tissues of irradiated rats. Microscopic examination of lung tissues demonstrated that CSL treatment minimized radiation-induced damages. According to the results obtained, it could be suggested that by enhancing extra-cellular SOD activity, CSL liquor helps in adjusting intra-cellular antioxidant status and the tissue integrity

  3. Intensity modulated irradiation of a thorax phantom: comparisons between measurements, Monte Carlo calculations and pencil beam calculations

    Laub, Wolfram U.; Bakai, Annemarie; Nüsslin, Fridtjof

    2001-06-01

    The present study investigates the application of compensators for the intensity modulated irradiation of a thorax phantom. Measurements are compared with Monte Carlo and standard pencil beam algorithm dose calculations. Compensators were manufactured to produce the intensity profiles that were generated from the scientific version of the KonRad IMRT treatment-planning system for a given treatment plan. The comparison of dose distributions calculated with a pencil beam algorithm, with the Monte Carlo code EGS4 and with measurements is presented. By measurements in a water phantom it is demonstrated that the method used to manufacture the compensators reproduces the intensity profiles in a suitable manner. Monte Carlo simulations in a water phantom show that the accelerator head model used for simulations is sufficient. No significant overestimations of dose values inside the target volume by the pencil beam algorithm are found in the thorax phantom. An overestimation of dose values in lung by the pencil beam algorithm is also not found. Expected dose calculation errors of the pencil beam algorithm are suppressed, because the dose to the low density region lung is reduced by the use of a non-coplanar beam arrangement and by intensity modulation.

  4. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:9737070

  5. Imaging in abdominal trauma

    Imaging in abdominal trauma with special regard to the value of abdominal X-ray, ultrasound and computed tomography is described. The introduction to each organ focusses on the clinical situation, special mechanism of trauma, symptoms and the pathological staging of trauma. (orig.)

  6. Optimal Normal Tissue Sparing in Craniospinal Axis Irradiation Using IMRT With Daily Intrafractionally Modulated Junction(s)

    Purpose: To develop a treatment technique for craniospinal irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with improved dose homogeneity at the field junction(s), increased target volume conformity, and minimized dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: Five patients with high-risk medulloblastoma underwent CT simulation in supine position. For each patient, an IMRT plan with daily intrafractionally modulated junction(s) was generated, as well as a treatment plan based on conventional three-dimensional planning (3DCRT). A dose of 39.6 Gy in 22 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy was prescribed. Dose–volume parameters for target volumes and OARs were compared for the two techniques. Results: The maximum dose with IMRT was and V>107 were 3 for IMRT compared with 3–9 cm3 for the craniospinal and 26–43 cm3 for the spinal–spinal junction with 3DCRT. These observations corresponded with a lower homogeneity index and a higher conformity index for the spinal planning target volume with IMRT. IMRT provided considerable sparing of acute and late reacting tissues. V75 for the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction, and intestine was 81%, 81%, and 22% with 3DCRT versus 5%, 0%, and 1% with IMRT, respectively. V75 for the heart and thyroid was 42% and 32% vs. 0% with IMRT. Conclusion: IMRT with daily intrafractionally modulated junction results in a superior target coverage and junction homogeneity compared with 3DCRT. A significant dose reduction can be obtained for acute as well as late-reacting tissues.

  7. Optimal Normal Tissue Sparing in Craniospinal Axis Irradiation Using IMRT With Daily Intrafractionally Modulated Junction(s)

    Kusters, Johannes M.A.M.; Louwe, Rob J.W.; Kollenburg, Peter G.M. van; Kunze-Busch, Martina C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Gidding, Corrie E.M. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lindert, Erik J. van [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Janssens, Geert O.R.J., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment technique for craniospinal irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with improved dose homogeneity at the field junction(s), increased target volume conformity, and minimized dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: Five patients with high-risk medulloblastoma underwent CT simulation in supine position. For each patient, an IMRT plan with daily intrafractionally modulated junction(s) was generated, as well as a treatment plan based on conventional three-dimensional planning (3DCRT). A dose of 39.6 Gy in 22 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy was prescribed. Dose-volume parameters for target volumes and OARs were compared for the two techniques. Results: The maximum dose with IMRT was <107% in all patients. V{sub <95} and V{sub >107} were <1 cm{sup 3} for IMRT compared with 3-9 cm{sup 3} for the craniospinal and 26-43 cm{sup 3} for the spinal-spinal junction with 3DCRT. These observations corresponded with a lower homogeneity index and a higher conformity index for the spinal planning target volume with IMRT. IMRT provided considerable sparing of acute and late reacting tissues. V{sub 75} for the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction, and intestine was 81%, 81%, and 22% with 3DCRT versus 5%, 0%, and 1% with IMRT, respectively. V{sub 75} for the heart and thyroid was 42% and 32% vs. 0% with IMRT. Conclusion: IMRT with daily intrafractionally modulated junction results in a superior target coverage and junction homogeneity compared with 3DCRT. A significant dose reduction can be obtained for acute as well as late-reacting tissues.

  8. Acetyl L-Carnitine Modulating Irradiation Induced Cardio-Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    In The Present study male adult Wister albino rats were irradiated at 4 Gy whole body gamma irradiation and Acetyl L-carnitine (ALC) was evaluated as a potential radio-protector under conditions that would model the oxidative stress syndrome. ALC protect the heart and lung from the depletion of SOD, GSHPx activities and GSH content followed radiation exposure. Protection from the increase of malonaldehyde (MDA) in heart and lung tissues as well as serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK), AST and LDH has been observed. These results imply that ALC can act as a radio-protector against many aspects of oxidative damage. ALC is an ester of the tri methylated amino acid L-carnitine, and is synthesized endogenously in the human brain, liver and kidney by the enzyme ALC transferase or obtained from dietary sources (Goa and Brogden, 1987). L carnitine and short chain derivatives are essential cofactors for mitochondrial transport and oxidation of long chain fatty acid and act also as scavengers of oxygen free radicals in mammalian tissue (Izgut-Uysal et al., 2001). The transport of ALC and PLC occurs more easily than L-carnitine through the lipid component of the intestinal barrier suggesting possible better oral bioavailability of the esters than L-carnitine (Marciniani et al., 1991). ALC has antioxidant activity towards oxidative stress via an inhibition of the increase in lipid hydro peroxidation (Yasui et al., 2002). ALC significantly enhances the regenerative capacity of neurons that survive peripheral nerve trauma (Marciniani et al., 1991) and has also shown neuro-protective effect in rats (Bigini et al., 2002)

  9. Modulation of the brain acetylcholinesterase activity after gamma irradiation or cytokine administration

    The central nervous system exhibits a functional radiosensitivity, with different abnormalities in the neuronal transmission. In particular we observed a decrease in AChE activity in the rat brain after a whole body gamma exposure. This could not be explained by a direct effect on the protein: the AChE is particularly radioresistant, since several hundred of grays are necessary to modify the in vitro enzymatic activity. Radiations have no effect on primary neuronal culture, and the in vivo radiogenic decrease in brain AChE activity could imply more complex mechanisms than nervous transmissions alone, involving the participation of several intercellular communication systems. The second part of our experimental results showed that both peripheral or central administration of IL-6 can reproduce the decrease in the brain AChE activity observed after an irradiation. The role of inflammatory mediators in the acute radiation syndrome is now well documented. The way these cellular mediators could activate the CNS remains unclear. An induction of messengers of IL-1 and TNF in different brain areas has been recently demonstrated. However, it could be mentioned that, by using primary neuronal cultures, neither the membranes-bound nor the release enzyme activities were modified by incubation with IL-6. On the other hand, when the primary neurons were plated with a subculture of glial cells, the release of enzyme was greatly reduced during a few hours after incubation with IL-6, but the membrane-bound enzyme, which represent more than 90% of the total activity, was not modified. Hence, the mechanisms by which cytokines act on the CNS seem to be more complex, with the participation of glial cells. We suggest that the peripheral early inflammatory response which occurs after irradiation might participate in the nervous damage. (N.C.)

  10. The Karlsruhe solid breeder blanket and the test module to be irradiated in ITER/NET

    The blanket for the DEMO reactor should operate at an average neutron flux of 2.2 MW/m2 for 20000 h. This requires the use of a structural material which can withstand high neutron fluences without swelling. The ferritic steel Manet was chosen for this purpose. The breeder material is in the form of Li4SiO4 pebbles of 0.35 to 0.6 mm diameter. The 6 mm thick beds of pebbles are placed between beryllium plates which are cooled by high pressure helium flowing inside steel tubes. Breeder material and beryllium are contained in radial canisters, placed inside boxes. The coolant helium enters the blanket at 250deg C, cools first the box walls and then the breeder and multiplier, and leaves the blanket at 450deg C. The maximum temperature in the first wall steel is 550deg C, while the minimum and maximum temperatures in the breeder are 380 and 820deg C, respectively. The resulting total tritium inventory in the breeder is only 10 g, and the real tridimensional tritium breeding ratio is 1.11. The conceptual design of the test module, of its extraction system and of the required out-of-reactor ancillary systems has allowed an estimate of the time constants of the various components and thus allowed an assessment of the requirements given by the testing of the modules on the NET/ITER machine. (orig.)

  11. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester modifies the Th1/Th2 balance in ileal mucosa after γ-irradiation in the rat by modulating the cytokine pattern

    Olivier Grémy; Marc Benderitter; Christine Linard

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To pharmacologically modulate Th polarization in the ileum exposed to ionizing radiation by using the immuno-modulatory/apoptotic properties of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE).METHODS: Rats received CAPE (30 mg/kg) treatment ip 15 min prior to intestinal 10 Gy γ-irradiation and once a day for a 6 d period after irradiation. Expression of genes implicated in Th differentiation in ileal mucosa (IL-23/IL12Rβ2), Th cytokine responses (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13),Th migratory behaviour (CXCR3, CCR5, CCR4), Th signailing suppressors (SOCS1, SOCS3), transcription factor (T-Bet, GATA-3) and apoptosis (FasL/Fas, TNF/TNFR,XIAP, Bax, caspase-3) was analyzed by RT-PCR 6 h and 7 d post-irradiation. CD4+ and TUNEL positive cells were visualized by immunostaining.RESULTS: The expression of Th1-related cytokine/chemokine receptors (IFN-γ, IL-2, CXCR3, CCR5) was repressed at 7 d post-irradiation while Th2 cell cytokine/chemokines (IL-4, IL-13, CCR4) were not repressed or even upregulated. The irradiation-induced Th2 profile was confirmed by the upregulation of both Th2-specific transcription factor GATA-3 and SOCS3. Although an apoptosis event occurred 6 h after 10 Gy of intestinal γ-irradiation, apoptotic mediator analysis showed a tendency to apoptotic resistance 7 d post-irradiation. CAPE amplified apoptotic events at 6h and normalized Bax/FasL expressions at 7 d.CONCLUSION: CAPE prevented the ileal Th2 immune response by modulating the irradiation-influenced cytokine environment and apoptosis.

  12. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique compared to whole breast irradiation for patients aged 70 years or older: subgroup analysis from a randomized phase 3 trial

    Meattini, Icro; Saieva, Calogero; Marrazzo, Livia; Di Brina, Lucia; Pallotta, Stefania; Mangoni, Monica; Meacci, Fiammetta; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Francolini, Giulio; Desideri, Isacco; De Luca Cardillo, Carla; Scotti, Vieri; Furfaro, Ilaria Francesca; Rossi, Francesca; Greto, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the efficacy and the safety profile on the subset of selected early breast cancer (BC) patients aged 70 years or older from a single-center phase 3 trial comparing whole breast irradiation (WBI) to accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique. Between 2005 and 2013, 520 patients aged more than 40 years old were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either WBI or APBI in a 1:1 ratio. Eligible pat...

  13. Possible role of calcium dependent protein phosphorylation in the modulation of wound induced HRGP gene activation in potatoes after gamma irradiation

    Hydroxyproline rich glycoprotein (HRGP) gene is induced in both control and gamma irradiated potato tubers after wounding. The enhanced RNA synthesis in response to wounding correlated well with the accumulation of both HRGP gene transcripts and protein. Initially, the level of HRGP gene expression in gamma irradiated potatoes in response to wounding was 30% more than the corresponding controls. After post irradiation storage of 3-5 weeks, HRGP gene expression in response to wounding was significantly lower than the unirradiated samples. This low level of HRGP gene expression in irradiated potatoes was partially retrieved by 5 mM Ca2+ treatment. Prior treatment with trifluoperazine, a calcium channel blocker resulted in 35% reduction in wound induced HRGP gene expression in control potatoes, further providing evidence for the involvement of Ca2+ dependency for HRGP gene activation. A comparative study on in vivo protein phosphorylation induced by wounding in control and irradiated potatoes exhibited significant differences. A good correlation was observed in the modulation of phosphorylation and HRGP gene expression by Ca2+ in irradiated potatoes. Wound induced signal transduction system and subsequent Ca2+ dependent protein phosphorylation for the activation of HRGP gene is affected in potatoes after gamma irradiation, thus impairing the wound healing process adversely. (author). 25 refs., 5 figs

  14. Testing of irradiated spherical fuel elements at HTR MODUL relevant accident conditions

    It is reported that the German 200 MWth MODUL HTR uses spherical fuel elements having 10% enriched UO2 TRISO coated particles. Since 1984 the behavior of such elements of modern design under accident conditions has been studied at the Research Centre Juelich, FRG. By help of the Cold Finger Apparatus even the smallest release of fission products during testing up to 1800 deg. C can be analysed. Post heating examinations allowed important correlations between the distribution within the fuel element and the measured sphere release. The results of heating tests are described. Further work was carried out to simulate water and air ingress in a HTR. AN apparatus was built and is now commissioned. Tests with special samples and fuel spheres, and also with USA fuel are planned, to examine the influence of humidity on the fission product release. 14 refs, 13 figs, 7 tabs

  15. TH-C-BRD-12: Robust Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Plan Can Eliminate Junction Shifts for Craniospinal Irradiation

    Liao, L [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Jiang, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Instit, Houston, TX (United States); Li, Y [Varian Medical Systems, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, X [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, H; Zhu, X; Sahoo, N; Gillin, M; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D; Zhang, X [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lim, G [University of Houston, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) technique is the commonly used radiotherapy technique for craniospinal irradiation (CSI). However, PSPT involves many numbers of junction shifts applied over the course of treatment to reduce the cold and hot regions caused by field mismatching. In this work, we introduced a robust planning approach to develop an optimal and clinical efficient techniques for CSI using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) so that junction shifts can essentially be eliminated. Methods: The intra-fractional uncertainty, in which two overlapping fields shift in the opposite directions along the craniospinal axis, are incorporated into the robust optimization algorithm. Treatment plans with junction sizes 3,5,10,15,20,25 cm were designed and compared with the plan designed using the non-robust optimization. Robustness of the plans were evaluated based on dose profiles along the craniospinal axis for the plans applying 3 mm intra-fractional shift. The dose intra-fraction variations (DIV) at the junction are used to evaluate the robustness of the plans. Results: The DIVs are 7.9%, 6.3%, 5.0%, 3.8%, 2.8% and 2.2%, for the robustly optimized plans with junction sizes 3,5,10,15,20,25 cm. The DIV are 10% for the non-robustly optimized plans with junction size 25 cm. The dose profiles along the craniospinal axis exhibit gradual and tapered dose distribution. Using DIVs less than 5% as maximum acceptable intrafractional variation, the overlapping region can be reduced to 10 cm, leading to potential reduced number of the fields. The DIVs are less than 5% for 5 mm intra-fractional shifts with junction size 25 cm, leading to potential no-junction-shift for CSI using IMPT. Conclusion: This work is the first report of the robust optimization on CSI based on IMPT. We demonstrate that robust optimization can lead to much efficient carniospinal irradiation by eliminating the junction shifts.

  16. SU-E-T-489: Plan Comparisons of Re-Irradiation Treatment of Three Intensity Modulated Techniques

    Lian, J; Tang, X [University North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Liu, R [Robert Boissoneault Oncology Inst., Ocala, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There have been controversial reports on the comparison of dosimetric quality of TomoTherapy (Tomo), VMAT and IMRT. One of the main reasons is the sampled cases are often not dosimetrically challenging enough to test the limit of optimization/delivery modalities. We chose difficult re-irradiation cases when certain organ at risk (OAR) requires extremely low dose to examine the ability of OAR sparing of three main intensity modulated techniques. Methods: Three previous treated patients with disease site on head and neck (HN), brain and lung are planned for reirradiation treatment. The Tomo planning used jaw 2.5cm and pitch 0.3. VMAT and IMRT were planned on Pinnacle for a Varian 21iX Linac with MLC leaf width 5mm. VMAT plan used 2 Arcs and IMRT plan had beams 11–13. The dosimetric endpoints and treatment time were compared for each technique of each patient. Results: Plans of three techniques cover PTV similarly. The HN case requires PTV dose 60Gy but to limit dose of cord which is 8mm away <12Gy. The cord dose of Tomo, VMAT and IMRT plan is 11.6Gy, 11.3Gy and 11.0Gy, respectively. The brain case has PTV prescription 50.4 Gy while requiring the dose of brainstem < 28Gy. Tomo, VMAT and IMRT plan generate brainstem dose 27.6Gy, 27.6Gy and 27.1Gy respectively. For the lung case, PTV was prescribed 42.5Gy but cord dose constraint was 22.5Gy. The cord dose is optimized to 22.3Gy, 20.8Gy and 21.4Gy by Tomo, VMAT and IMRT, respectively. The delivery time if normalized to Tomo is 47.0%/145.6% (VMAT/IMRT), 33.3%/106.3% and 74.1%/245.4% for HN, brain and lung case, respectively. Conclusion: Difficult re-irradiation cases were used to test the limit of three intensity modulated techniques. Tomo, VMAT and IMRT show similar dosimetry while VMAT is the most efficient one and IMRT is the least.

  17. SU-E-T-489: Plan Comparisons of Re-Irradiation Treatment of Three Intensity Modulated Techniques

    Purpose: There have been controversial reports on the comparison of dosimetric quality of TomoTherapy (Tomo), VMAT and IMRT. One of the main reasons is the sampled cases are often not dosimetrically challenging enough to test the limit of optimization/delivery modalities. We chose difficult re-irradiation cases when certain organ at risk (OAR) requires extremely low dose to examine the ability of OAR sparing of three main intensity modulated techniques. Methods: Three previous treated patients with disease site on head and neck (HN), brain and lung are planned for reirradiation treatment. The Tomo planning used jaw 2.5cm and pitch 0.3. VMAT and IMRT were planned on Pinnacle for a Varian 21iX Linac with MLC leaf width 5mm. VMAT plan used 2 Arcs and IMRT plan had beams 11–13. The dosimetric endpoints and treatment time were compared for each technique of each patient. Results: Plans of three techniques cover PTV similarly. The HN case requires PTV dose 60Gy but to limit dose of cord which is 8mm away <12Gy. The cord dose of Tomo, VMAT and IMRT plan is 11.6Gy, 11.3Gy and 11.0Gy, respectively. The brain case has PTV prescription 50.4 Gy while requiring the dose of brainstem < 28Gy. Tomo, VMAT and IMRT plan generate brainstem dose 27.6Gy, 27.6Gy and 27.1Gy respectively. For the lung case, PTV was prescribed 42.5Gy but cord dose constraint was 22.5Gy. The cord dose is optimized to 22.3Gy, 20.8Gy and 21.4Gy by Tomo, VMAT and IMRT, respectively. The delivery time if normalized to Tomo is 47.0%/145.6% (VMAT/IMRT), 33.3%/106.3% and 74.1%/245.4% for HN, brain and lung case, respectively. Conclusion: Difficult re-irradiation cases were used to test the limit of three intensity modulated techniques. Tomo, VMAT and IMRT show similar dosimetry while VMAT is the most efficient one and IMRT is the least

  18. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma after remote abdominal radiation

    Peritoneal mesothelioma in a 61-year-old man, occurred 26 years after abdominal radiotherapy for a testicular seminoma. The patient had no history of asbestos exposure. After asbestos, radiation is the second most frequent defined cause of mesothelioma in North America, but the number of well-documented cases is small; this case represents only the fifth example of peritoneal mesothelioma after therapeutic irradiation of the abdomen. 16 references

  19. Skin aging modulates percutaneous drug absorption: the impact of ultraviolet irradiation and ovariectomy.

    Hung, Chi-Feng; Chen, Wei-Yu; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Lin, Yin-Ku; Shih, Hui-Chi; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) exposure and menopause are known as the inducers of damage to the skin structure. The combination of these two factors accelerates the skin aging process. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the influence of UV and ovariectomy (OVX) on the permeation of drugs through the skin. The role of tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) in the cutaneous absorption of extremely lipophilic permeants and macromolecules was explored. The OVX nude mouse underwent bilateral ovary removal. Both UVA and UVB were employed to irradiate the skin. The physiological and biochemical changes of the skin structure were examined with focus on transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin color, immunohistochemistry, and mRNA levels of proteins. UVB and OVX increased TEWL, resulting in stratum corneum (SC) integrity disruption and dehydration. A hyperproliferative epidermis was produced by UVB. UVA caused a pale skin color tone due to keratinocyte apoptosis in the epidermis. E-cadherin and β-catenin showed a significant loss by both UVA and UVB. OVX downregulated the expression of filaggrin and involucrin. A further reduction was observed when UV and OVX were combined. The in vitro cutaneous absorption demonstrated that UV increased the skin permeation of tretinoin by about twofold. However, skin accumulation and flux of estradiol were not modified by photoaging. OVX basically revealed a negligible effect on altering the permeation of small permeants. OVX increased tretinoin uptake by the appendages from 1.36 to 3.52 μg/cm(2). A synergistic effect on tretinoin follicular uptake enhancement was observed for combined UV and OVX. However, the intervention of OVX to photoaged skin resulted in less macromolecule (dextran, molecular weight = 4 kDa) accumulation in the skin reservoir because of retarded partitioning into dry skin. The in vivo percutaneous absorption of lipophilic dye examined by confocal microscopy had indicated that the SC was still important to

  20. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a whole-ventricular irradiation: A planning comparison study

    This study evaluated the dosimetric difference between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (cIMRT) in whole-ventricular irradiation. Computed tomography simulation data for 13 patients were acquired to create plans for VMAT and cIMRT. In both plans, the same median dose (100% = 24 Gy) was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV), which comprised a tumor bed and whole ventricles. During optimization, doses to the normal brain and body were reduced, provided that the dose constraints of the target coverage were satisfied. The dose-volume indices of the PTV, normal brain, and body as well as monitor units were compared between the 2 techniques by using paired t-tests. The results showed no significant difference in the homogeneity index (0.064 vs 0.065; p = 0.824) of the PTV and conformation number (0.78 vs 0.77; p = 0.065) between the 2 techniques. In the normal brain and body, the dose-volume indices showed no significant difference between the 2 techniques, except for an increase in the volume receiving a low dose in VMAT; the absolute volume of the normal brain and body receiving 1 Gy of radiation significantly increased in VMAT by 1.6% and 8.3%, respectively, compared with that in cIMRT (1044 vs 1028 mL for the normal brain and 3079.2 vs 2823.3 mL for the body; p<0.001). The number of monitor units to deliver a 2.0-Gy fraction was significantly reduced in VMAT compared with that in cIMRT (354 vs 873, respectively; p<0.001). In conclusion, VMAT delivers IMRT to complex target volumes such as whole ventricles with fewer monitor units, while maintaining target coverage and conformal isodose distribution comparable to cIMRT; however, in addition to those characteristics, the fact that the volume of the normal brain and body receiving a low dose would increase in VMAT should be considered

  1. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  2. Abdominal CT scan

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CAT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... An abdominal CT scan makes detailed pictures of the structures inside your belly (abdomen) very quickly. This test may be used to ...

  3. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    ... inspection of a drop of urine), and urine culture for bacterial infection. Stools can be analyzed for ... Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity Digestive Health Topics Abdominal Pain Syndrome Belching, Bloating, ...

  4. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  5. Role of Vitamin E and/or High Protein Diet in Modulating Antioxidant Status and Certain Biochemical Changes in Gamma-Irradiated Rats

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the modulator effect of vitamin E and/ or high protein diet on the gamma irradiation induced changes in antioxidant Status and certain biochemical parameters. Male albino rats were exposed to 6 Gy (single dose: 0.48 Gy/min) of whole body gamma radiation. Vitamin E (50 mg/kg body weight) was daily administrated to rats via stomach tube for 3 weeks before exposure to gamma radiation continued for 3 weeks post irradiation. Other animals fed daily on high protein diet for 3 weeks before irradiation continued for 3 weeks post irradiation. A combined administration of vitamin E and Feeding on high protein diet was daily applied to another rats group for 3 weeks before irradiation continued for 3 weeks post irradiation. The results obtained revealed that the administration of vitamin E and/or feeding on high protein diet were significantly reduced the changes. induced by gamma irradiation in blood antioxidant enzymes activities (Superoxide dismutase: SOD and Catalase; CAT). concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH). Significant amelioration in the plasma level of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), Low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and High density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) associated with remarkable decrease in the level of malondialdhyde (MDA) were observed. In addition, significant improvements were observed in liver function parameters (activities of serum aminotransferases (AST, ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and concentration of total protein and globulin. As well as, the changes in kidney function (serum creatinine and urea levels) were significantly improved. The improvements also extended to include the serum level of uric acid. Accordingly, it could be concluded that. via the adjustment of the antioxidant status, decreasing the releasing of lipid peroxides and the subsequent amending of different biochemical pathways. vitamin E and high protein diet could modulate the radiation injuries in

  6. Imaging in Tuberculosis abdominal

    In this article we illustrate and discuss imaging features resulting from Tuberculosis abdominal affectation. We present patients evaluated with several imaging modalities who had abdominal symptoms and findings suggestive of granulomatous disease. Diagnosis was confirm including hystopatology and clinical outgoing. Cases involved presented many affected organs such as lymphatic system, peritoneum, liver, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, ureters, adrenal glands and pelvic organs Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis renal, Tuberculosis hepatic, Tuberculosis splenic Tomography, x-ray, computed

  7. Accelerating total body irradiation with large field modulated arc therapy in standard treatment rooms without additional equipment

    Polednik, Martin; Lohr, Frank; Ehmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a generic and ultra-efficient modulated arc technique for treatment with total body irradiation (TBI) without additional equipment in standard treatment rooms. A continuous gantry arc between 300 and 70 composed of 26 subarcs (5 per subarc) using a field size of 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} was used to perform the initial beam data measurements. The profile was measured parallel to the direction of gantry rotation at a constant depth of 9 cm (phantom thickness 18 cm). Beam data were measured for single 5 subarcs, dissecting the individual contribution of each subarc to a certain measurement point. The phantom was moved to 20 measurement positions along the profile. Then profile optimization was performed manually by varying the weighting factors of all segments until calculated doses at all points were within ± 1 %. Finally, the dose distribution of the modulated arc was verified in phantom thicknesses of 18 and 28 cm. The measured profile showed a relative mean dose of 99.7 % [standard deviation (SD) 0.7 %] over the length of 200 cm at a depth of 9 cm. The measured mean effective surface dose (at a depth of 2 cm) was 102.7 % (SD 2.1 %). The measurements in the 28 cm slab phantom revealed a mean dose of 95.9 % (SD 2.9 %) at a depth of 14 cm. The mean dose at a depth of 2 cm was 111.9 % (SD 4.1 %). Net beam-on-time for a 2 Gy fraction is approximately 8 min. This highly efficient modulated arc technique for TBI can replace conventional treatment techniques, providing a homogeneous dose distribution, dosimetric robustness, extremely fast delivery, and applicability in small treatment rooms, with no need for additional equipment. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieses Projekts war die Entwicklung einer generischen, hocheffizienten und modulierten Rotationsbestrahlungstechnik fuer Ganzkoerperbestrahlung (TBI, ''total body irradiation''), die ohne zusaetzliches Equipment in Standartbehandlungsraeumen angewendet werden kann. Ein

  8. Elective Lymph Node Irradiation With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: Is Conventional Dose Fractionation Necessary?

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the standard of care for head-and-neck cancer (HNC). We treated patients with HNC by delivering either a moderate hypofractionation (MHF) schedule (66 Gy at 2.2 Gy per fraction to the gross tumor [primary and nodal]) with standard dose fractionation (54–60 Gy at 1.8–2.0 Gy per fraction) to the elective neck lymphatics or a conventional dose and fractionation (CDF) schedule (70 Gy at 2.0 Gy per fraction) to the gross tumor (primary and nodal) with reduced dose to the elective neck lymphatics. We analyzed these two cohorts for treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between November 2001 and February 2009, 89 patients with primary carcinomas of the oral cavity, larynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and nasopharynx received definitive IMRT with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Twenty patients were treated using the MHF schedule, while 69 patients were treated with the CDF schedule. Patient characteristics and dosimetry plans were reviewed. Patterns of failure including local recurrence (LR), regional recurrence (RR), distant metastasis (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicities, including rate of feeding tube placement and percentage of weight loss, were reviewed and analyzed. Results: Median follow-up was 31.2 months. Thirty-five percent of patients in the MHF cohort and 77% of patients in the CDF cohort received chemotherapy. No RR was observed in either cohort. OS, DFS, LR, and DM rates for the entire group at 2 years were 89.3%, 81.4%, 7.1%, and 9.4%, respectively. Subgroup analysis showed no significant differences in OS (p = 0.595), DFS (p = 0.863), LR (p = 0.833), or DM (p = 0.917) between these two cohorts. Similarly, no significant differences were observed in rates of feeding tube placement and percentages of weight loss. Conclusions: Similar treatment outcomes were observed for MHF and CDF cohorts. A dose of 50 Gy at 1.43 Gy per fraction may be sufficient to

  9. Irradiation of head-and-neck tumors with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Comparison between two IMRT techniques with 3D conformal irradiation

    For 12 patients with inoperable head-neck carcinoma that were treated with 3D conformal irradiation techniques additional irradiation plans using IMRT were developed. It was shown that the IMRT techniques are superior to the 3D conformal technique. The new rapid arc technique is unclear with respect to the critical organs (parotid glands, spinal canal and mandibles) but is significantly advantageous for the other normal tissue with respect to conformity (steeper dose gradients) and thus radiation dose reduction. The resulting lower irradiation time and the reduced radiation exposure being important for the treatment economy and patients' comfort should favor the more planning intensive rapid arc technique.

  10. Modulation of Extracellular ATP Content of Mast Cells and DRG Neurons by Irradiation: Studies on Underlying Mechanism of Low-Level-Laser Therapy

    Lina Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level-laser therapy (LLLT is an effective complementary treatment, especially for anti-inflammation and wound healing in which dermis or mucus mast cells (MCs are involved. In periphery, MCs crosstalk with neurons via purinergic signals and participate in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Whether extracellular ATP, an important purine in purinergic signaling, of MCs and neurons could be modulated by irradiation remains unknown. In this study, effects of red-laser irradiation on extracellular ATP content of MCs and dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons were investigated and underlying mechanisms were explored in vitro. Our results show that irradiation led to elevation of extracellular ATP level in the human mast cell line HMC-1 in a dose-dependent manner, which was accompanied by elevation of intracellular ATP content, an indicator for ATP synthesis, together with [Ca2+]i elevation, a trigger signal for exocytotic ATP release. In contrast to MCs, irradiation attenuated the extracellular ATP content of neurons, which could be abolished by ARL 67156, a nonspecific ecto-ATPases inhibitor. Our results suggest that irradiation potentiates extracellular ATP of MCs by promoting ATP synthesis and release and attenuates extracellular ATP of neurons by upregulating ecto-ATPase activity. The opposite responses of these two cell types indicate complex mechanisms underlying LLLT.

  11. Interplay effects between dose distribution quality and positioning accuracy in total marrow irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric consequences of inaccurate isocenter positioning during treatment of total marrow (lymph-node) irradiation (TMI-TMLI) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT).Methods: Four patients treated with TMI and TMLI were randomly selected from the internal database. Plans were optimized with VMAT technique. Planning target volume (PTV) included all the body bones; for TMLI, lymph nodes and spleen were considered into the target, too. Dose prescription to PTV was 12 Gy in six fractions, two times per day for TMI, and 2 Gy in single fraction for TMLI. Ten arcs on five isocenters (two arcs for isocenter) were used to cover the upper part of PTV (i.e., from cranium to middle femurs). For each plan, three series of random shifts with values between −3 and +3 mm and three between −5 and +5 mm were applied to the five isocenters simulating involuntary patient motion during treatment. The shifts were applied separately in the three directions: left–right (L-R), anterior–posterior (A-P), and cranial–caudal (C-C). The worst case scenario with simultaneous random shifts in all directions simultaneously was considered too. Doses were recalculated for the 96 shifted plans (24 for each patient).Results: For all shifts, differences 100 cm3. Maximum doses increased up to 15% for C-C shifted plans. PTV covered by the 95% isodose decreased of 2%–8% revealing target underdosage with the highest values in C-C direction.Conclusions: The correct isocenter repositioning of TMI-TMLI patients is fundamental, in particular in C-C direction, in order to avoid over- and underdosages especially in the overlap regions. For this reason, a dedicated immobilization system was developed in the authors' center to best immobilize the patient

  12. Interplay effects between dose distribution quality and positioning accuracy in total marrow irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Reggiori, Giacomo; Tomatis, Stefano; Alongi, Filippo; Scorsetti, Marta [Department of Radiation Oncology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, Milan 20089 (Italy); Castagna, Luca; Sarina, Barbara [Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, Milan 20089 (Italy); Nicolini, Giorgia; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona 6500 (Switzerland)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric consequences of inaccurate isocenter positioning during treatment of total marrow (lymph-node) irradiation (TMI-TMLI) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT).Methods: Four patients treated with TMI and TMLI were randomly selected from the internal database. Plans were optimized with VMAT technique. Planning target volume (PTV) included all the body bones; for TMLI, lymph nodes and spleen were considered into the target, too. Dose prescription to PTV was 12 Gy in six fractions, two times per day for TMI, and 2 Gy in single fraction for TMLI. Ten arcs on five isocenters (two arcs for isocenter) were used to cover the upper part of PTV (i.e., from cranium to middle femurs). For each plan, three series of random shifts with values between −3 and +3 mm and three between −5 and +5 mm were applied to the five isocenters simulating involuntary patient motion during treatment. The shifts were applied separately in the three directions: left–right (L-R), anterior–posterior (A-P), and cranial–caudal (C-C). The worst case scenario with simultaneous random shifts in all directions simultaneously was considered too. Doses were recalculated for the 96 shifted plans (24 for each patient).Results: For all shifts, differences <0.5% were found for mean doses to PTV, body, and organs at risk with volumes >100 cm{sup 3}. Maximum doses increased up to 15% for C-C shifted plans. PTV covered by the 95% isodose decreased of 2%–8% revealing target underdosage with the highest values in C-C direction.Conclusions: The correct isocenter repositioning of TMI-TMLI patients is fundamental, in particular in C-C direction, in order to avoid over- and underdosages especially in the overlap regions. For this reason, a dedicated immobilization system was developed in the authors' center to best immobilize the patient.

  13. Dosimetric comparison of three dimensional conformal radiation therapy versus intensity modulated radiation therapy in accelerated partial breast irradiation

    S Moorthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of Study: Breast conserving surgery (BCS is the standard treatment for stage I and II breast cancer. Multiple studies have shown that recurrences after lumpectomy occur mainly in or near the tumor bed. Use of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI allows for significant reduction in the overall treatment time that results in increasing patient compliance and decreasing healthcare costs. We conducted a treatment planning study to evaluate the role of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT with regards to three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in APBI. Materials and Methods: Computed tomography planning data sets of 33 patients (20 right sided and 13 left sided with tumor size less than 3 cm and negative axillary lymph nodes were used for our study. Tumor location was upper outer, upper inner, central, lower inner, and lower outer quadrants in 10, 10, 5, 4 and 4 patients, respectively. Multiple 3DCRT and IMRT plans were created for each patient. Total dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions were planned. Dosimetric analysis was done for the best 3DCRT and IMRT plans. Results: The target coverage has been achieved by both the methods but IMRT provided better coverage (P = 0.04 with improved conformity index (P = 0.01. Maximum doses were well controlled in IMRT to below 108% (P < 0.01. Heart V2 Gy (P < 0.01, lung V5 Gy (P = 0.01, lung V10 Gy (P = 0.02, contralateral breast V1 Gy (P < 0.01, contralateral lung V2 Gy (P < 0.01, and ipsilateral uninvolved breast (P < 0.01 doses were higher with 3DCRT compared to IMRT. Conclusion: Dosimetrically, IMRT–APBI provided best target coverage with less dose to normal tissues compared with 3DCRT-APBI.

  14. SU-E-T-138: Dosimetric Verification For Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Cranio-Spinal Irradiation Technique

    Purpose: Dosimetric feasibility of cranio-spinal irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT-CSI) technique in terms of dose distribution accuracy was investigated using a humanlike phantom. Methods: The OARs and PTV volumes for the Rando phantom were generated on supine CT images. Eclipse (version 8.6) TPS with AAA algorithm was used to create the treatment plan with VMAT-CSI technique. RapidArc plan consisted of cranial, upper spinal (US) and lower spinal (LS) regions that were optimized in the same plan. US field was overlapped by 3cm with cranial and LS fields. Three partial arcs for cranium and 1 full arc for each US and LS region were used. The VMAT-CSI dose distribution inside the Rando phantom was measured with thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and film dosimetry, and was compared to the calculated doses of field junctions, target and OARs. TLDs were placed at 24 positions throughout the phantom. The measured TLD doses were compared to the calculated point doses. Planar doses for field junctions were verified with Gafchromic films. Films were analyzed in PTW Verisoft application software using gamma analysis method with the 4 mm distance to agreement (DTA) and 4% dose agreement criteria. Results: TLD readings demonstrated accurate dose delivery, with a median dose difference of -0.3% (range: -8% and 12%) when compared with calculated doses for the areas inside the treatment portal. The maximum dose difference was 12% higher in testicals that are outside the treatment region and 8% lower in lungs where the heterogeinity was higher. All planar dose verifications for field junctions passed the gamma analysis and measured planar dose distributions demonstrated average 97% agreement with calculated doses. Conclusion: The dosimetric data verified with TLD and film dosimetry shows that VMAT-CSI technique provides accurate dose distribution and can be delivered safely

  15. Feasibility of accelerated partial breast irradiation with volumetric-modulated arc therapy in elderly and frail patients

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an option for adjuvant radiotherapy according to ASTRO and ESTRO recommendations. Among the available techniques, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is attractive but has not been extensively studied for APBI. This study assessed its feasibility, tolerance and early oncological outcomes. We analysed the data of nine patients (median age 74 years) with ten lesions (one bilateral cancer) treated from May 2011 to July 2012 with APBI using VMAT. The radiation oncologist delineated the surgical tumour bed, and added an 18 mm isotropic margin to obtain the planning target volume (PTV). The dose was 40 Gy prescribed in 4 Gy fractions given twice a day over five days. Patients were regularly followed for toxicities and oncological outcomes. Mean PTV was 100.0 cm3 and 95 % of the PTV received a mean dose of 99.7 % of the prescribed dose. Hot spots represented 0.3 % of the PTV. 6.2 %, 1.6 % and 0.3 % of the ipsilateral lung volume received 5 Gy (V5Gy), 10 Gy (V10Gy) and 20 Gy (V20Gy), respectively. Regarding the contralateral lung, V5Gy was 0.3 %, and V10Gy and V20Gy were nil. V5Gy accounted for 3.1 % of the heart. An average 580 monitor units were delivered. No acute or late grade ≥ 2 toxicities were observed. With a median follow-up of 26 months, no relapses occurred. In our study, VMAT allowed optimal dosimetry with consequential high therapeutic ratio in elderly and frail patients

  16. Abdominal Dual Energy Imaging

    Sommer, F. Graham; Brody, William R.; Cassel, Douglas M.; Macovski, Albert

    1981-11-01

    Dual energy scanned projection radiography of the abdomen has been performed using an experimental line-scanned radiographic system. Digital images simultaneously obtained at 85 and 135 kVp are combined, using photoelectric/Compton decomposition algorithms to create images from which selected materials are cancelled. Soft tissue cancellation images have proved most useful in various abdominal imaging applications, largely due to the elimination of obscuring high-contrast bowel gas shadows. These techniques have been successfully applied to intravenous pyelography, oral cholecystography, intravenous abdominal arteriog-raphy and the imaging of renal calculi.

  17. Childhood abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    Konen, Osnat; Rathaus, Valeria; Shapiro, Myra [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Meir General Hospital, Sapir Medical Centre, Kfar Saba (Israel); Dlugy, Elena [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Schneider Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Freud, Enrique [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sapir Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Kessler, Ada [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sourasky Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Horev, Gadi [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Schneider Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2002-02-01

    Background: Abdominal lymphangioma is a rare benign congenital malformation of the mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal lymphatics. Clinical presentation is variable and may be misleading; therefore, complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. US and CT have a major role in the correct preoperative diagnosis and provide important information regarding location, size, adjacent organ involvement, and expected complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging findings of seven children with proven abdominal cystic lymphangioma. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging files of seven children with pathologically proven abdominal lymphangioma, from three university hospitals, were retrospectively evaluated. Patient's ages ranged from 1 day to 6 years (mean, 2.2 years). Symptoms and signs included evidence of inflammation, abnormal prenatal US findings, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage following trauma, clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, and abdominal distension with lower extremities lymphoedema. Plain films of five patients, US of six patients and CT of five patients were reviewed. Sequential imaging examinations were available in two cases. Results: Abdominal plain films showed displacement of bowel loops by a soft tissue mass in five of six patients, two of them with dilatation of small bowel loops. US revealed an abdominal multiloculated septated cystic mass in five of six cases and a single pelvic cyst in one which changed in appearance over 2 months. Ascites was present in three cases. CT demonstrated a septated cystic mass of variable sizes in all available five cases. Sequential US and CT examinations in two patients showed progressive enlargement of the masses, increase of fluid echogenicity, and thickening of walls or septa in both cases, with multiplication of septa in one case. At surgery, mesenteric lymphangioma was found in five patients and retroperitoneal lymphangioma in the other two

  18. Childhood abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    Background: Abdominal lymphangioma is a rare benign congenital malformation of the mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal lymphatics. Clinical presentation is variable and may be misleading; therefore, complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. US and CT have a major role in the correct preoperative diagnosis and provide important information regarding location, size, adjacent organ involvement, and expected complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging findings of seven children with proven abdominal cystic lymphangioma. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging files of seven children with pathologically proven abdominal lymphangioma, from three university hospitals, were retrospectively evaluated. Patient's ages ranged from 1 day to 6 years (mean, 2.2 years). Symptoms and signs included evidence of inflammation, abnormal prenatal US findings, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage following trauma, clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, and abdominal distension with lower extremities lymphoedema. Plain films of five patients, US of six patients and CT of five patients were reviewed. Sequential imaging examinations were available in two cases. Results: Abdominal plain films showed displacement of bowel loops by a soft tissue mass in five of six patients, two of them with dilatation of small bowel loops. US revealed an abdominal multiloculated septated cystic mass in five of six cases and a single pelvic cyst in one which changed in appearance over 2 months. Ascites was present in three cases. CT demonstrated a septated cystic mass of variable sizes in all available five cases. Sequential US and CT examinations in two patients showed progressive enlargement of the masses, increase of fluid echogenicity, and thickening of walls or septa in both cases, with multiplication of septa in one case. At surgery, mesenteric lymphangioma was found in five patients and retroperitoneal lymphangioma in the other two. Conclusions: US

  19. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  20. Endometriosis Abdominal wall

    Endometriosis of abdominal wall is a rare entity wi ch frequently appears after gynecological surgery. Case history includes three cases of parietal endometriosis wi ch were treated in Maciel Hospital of Montevideo. The report refers to etiological diagnostic aspects and highlights the importance of total resection in order to achieve definitive healing

  1. Adult abdominal hernias.

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-06-01

    Educational Objectives and Key Points. 1. Given that abdominal hernias are a frequent imaging finding, radiologists not only are required to interpret the appearances of abdominal hernias but also should be comfortable with identifying associated complications and postrepair findings. 2. CT is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of a known adult abdominal hernia in both elective and acute circumstances because of rapid acquisition, capability of multiplanar reconstruction, good spatial resolution, and anatomic depiction with excellent sensitivity for most complications. 3. Ultrasound is useful for adult groin assessment and is the imaging modality of choice for pediatric abdominal wall hernia assessment, whereas MRI is beneficial when there is reasonable concern that a patient\\'s symptoms could be attributable to a hernia or a musculoskeletal source. 4. Fluoroscopic herniography is a sensitive radiologic investigation for patients with groin pain in whom a hernia is suspected but in whom a hernia cannot be identified at physical examination. 5. The diagnosis of an internal hernia not only is a challenging clinical diagnosis but also can be difficult to diagnose with imaging: Closed-loop small-bowel obstruction and abnormally located bowel loops relative to normally located small bowel or colon should prompt assessment for an internal hernia.

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the abdomen ... limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? What is Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ...

  3. MASM, a Matrine Derivative, Offers Radioprotection by Modulating Lethal Total-Body Irradiation-Induced Multiple Signaling Pathways in Wistar Rats

    Jianzhong Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Matrine is an alkaloid extracted from Sophora flavescens Ait and has many biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antitumor, anti-fibrosis, and immunosuppressive properties. In our previous studies, the matrine derivative MASM was synthesized and exhibited potent inhibitory activity against liver fibrosis. In this study, we mainly investigated its protection against lethal total-body irradiation (TBI in rats. Administration of MASM reduced the radiation sickness characteristics and increased the 30-day survival of rats before or after lethal TBI. Ultrastructural observation illustrated that pretreatment of rats with MASM significantly attenuated the TBI-induced morphological changes in the different organs of irradiated rats. Gene expression profiles revealed that pretreatment with MASM had a dramatic effect on gene expression changes caused by TBI. Pretreatment with MASM prevented differential expression of 53% (765 genes of 1445 differentially expressed genes induced by TBI. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 21 pathways, such as metabolic pathways, pathways in cancer, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways. Our data indicated that pretreatment of rats with MASM modulated these pathways induced by TBI, suggesting that the pretreatment with MASM might provide the protective effects on lethal TBI mainly or partially through the modulation of these pathways, such as multiple MAPK pathways. Therefore, MASM has the potential to be used as an effective therapeutic or radioprotective agent to minimize irradiation damages and in combination with radiotherapy to improve the efficacy of cancer therapy.

  4. MASM, a Matrine Derivative, Offers Radioprotection by Modulating Lethal Total-Body Irradiation-Induced Multiple Signaling Pathways in Wistar Rats.

    Li, Jianzhong; Xu, Jing; Lu, Yiming; Qiu, Lei; Xu, Weiheng; Lu, Bin; Hu, Zhenlin; Chu, Zhiyong; Chai, Yifeng; Zhang, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Matrine is an alkaloid extracted from Sophora flavescens Ait and has many biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antitumor, anti-fibrosis, and immunosuppressive properties. In our previous studies, the matrine derivative MASM was synthesized and exhibited potent inhibitory activity against liver fibrosis. In this study, we mainly investigated its protection against lethal total-body irradiation (TBI) in rats. Administration of MASM reduced the radiation sickness characteristics and increased the 30-day survival of rats before or after lethal TBI. Ultrastructural observation illustrated that pretreatment of rats with MASM significantly attenuated the TBI-induced morphological changes in the different organs of irradiated rats. Gene expression profiles revealed that pretreatment with MASM had a dramatic effect on gene expression changes caused by TBI. Pretreatment with MASM prevented differential expression of 53% (765 genes) of 1445 differentially expressed genes induced by TBI. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 21 pathways, such as metabolic pathways, pathways in cancer, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Our data indicated that pretreatment of rats with MASM modulated these pathways induced by TBI, suggesting that the pretreatment with MASM might provide the protective effects on lethal TBI mainly or partially through the modulation of these pathways, such as multiple MAPK pathways. Therefore, MASM has the potential to be used as an effective therapeutic or radioprotective agent to minimize irradiation damages and in combination with radiotherapy to improve the efficacy of cancer therapy. PMID:27196884

  5. Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Craniospinal Irradiation: Organ-at-Risk Exposure and a Low-Gradient Junctioning Technique

    Stoker, Joshua B., E-mail: stoker.joshua@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Grant, Jonathan [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald; Pidikiti, Rajesh [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahajan, Anita; Grosshans, David R. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To compare field junction robustness and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) during craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to conventional passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients, 5 adult and 5 pediatric patients, previously treated with PSPT-based CSI were selected for comparison. Anterior oblique cranial fields, using a superior couch rotation, and posterior spinal fields were used for IMPT planning. To facilitate low-gradient field junctioning along the spine, the inverse-planning IMPT technique was divided into 3 stages. Dose indices describing target coverage and normal tissue dose, in silico error modeling, and film dosimetry were used to assess plan quality. Results: Field junction robustness along the spine was improved using the staged IMPT planning technique, reducing the worst case impact of a 4-mm setup error from 25% in PSPT to <5% of prescription dose. This was verified by film dosimetry for clinical delivery. Exclusive of thyroid dose in adult patients, IMPT plans demonstrated sparing of organs at risk as good or better than PSPT. Coverage of the cribriform plate for pediatric (V95% [percentage of volume of the target receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose]; 87 ± 11 vs 92 ± 7) and adult (V95%; 94 ± 7 vs 100 ± 1) patients and the clinical target in pediatric (V95%; 98 ± 2 vs 100 ± 1) and adult (V95%; 100 ± 1 vs 100 ± 1) patients for PSPT and IMPT plans, respectively, were comparable or improved. For adult patients, IMPT target dose inhomogeneity was increased, as determined by heterogeneity index (HI) and inhomogeneity coefficient (IC). IMPT lowered maximum spinal cord dose, improved spinal dose homogeneity, and reduced exposure to other OARs. Conclusions: IMPT has the potential to improve CSI plan quality and the homogeneity of intrafractional dose at match lines. The IMPT approach developed may also simplify treatments and reduce

  6. Component separation in abdominal trauma.

    Rawstorne, Edward; Smart, Christopher J; Fallis, Simon A; Suggett, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Component separation is established for complex hernia repairs. This case presents early component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath to facilitate closure of the abdominal wall following emergency laparotomy, reinforcing the repair with a biological mesh. On Day 11 following an emergency laparotomy for penetrating trauma, this patient underwent component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath. An intra-abdominal biological mesh was secured, and the fascia and skin closed successfully. Primary abdominal closure can be achieved in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma with the use of component separation and insertion of intra-abdominal biological mesh, where standard closure is not possible. PMID:24876334

  7. CT of abdominal trauma

    Soon after it became available for clinical use, cranial CT became the method of choice for evaluating head trauma. Only relatively recently have newer generation full-body scanners been installed at major trauma centers, but experience is rapidly being gained in the utilization of CT for abdominal trauma. CT has proved highly accurate in diagnosing a wide variety of injuries to both intra- and retroperitoneal organs in pediatric and adult patient populations. The impact has been evident not only in decreasing utilization of other diagnostic tests, such as angiography, but also in practical management decisions, such as whether to perform exploratory laparotomy. This chapter details the authors' approach to evaluation of abdominal trauma by CT

  8. The blunt abdominal trauma

    Up to 1970 the number of patients suffering from blunt abdominal trauma showed a substantial increase. In more than 50% of all cases there are additional injuries. The most important factor influencing the prognosis of these patients is the early and correct indication for operation and the avoidance of unnecessary laparotomies. As a primary aim in diagnosis one should consider the recognition of an intraperitoneal bleeding without risk for the patient. Peritoneal lavage as an invasive method with low complication rates has proved good. First reports also show good results using the sonography of the abdomen. The recognition of the injured organ allows a carefully directed operation. Concerning the prognosis it is of minor importance. The diagnosis in patients with blunt abdominal trauma at the university clinic of Freiburg consists of: sonography, followed in positive cases by laparotomy or angiography and laparotomy. In cases with questionable results a lavage is done. (orig.)

  9. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B; Olsen, P S; Perko, M J; Agerskov, Kim; Røder, O; Lorentzen, Jørgen Ewald

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 55......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems.......The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553...

  10. The abdominal circulatory pump.

    Andrea Aliverti

    Full Text Available Blood in the splanchnic vasculature can be transferred to the extremities. We quantified such blood shifts in normal subjects by measuring trunk volume by optoelectronic plethysmography, simultaneously with changes in body volume by whole body plethysmography during contractions of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. Trunk volume changes with blood shifts, but body volume does not so that the blood volume shifted between trunk and extremities (Vbs is the difference between changes in trunk and body volume. This is so because both trunk and body volume change identically with breathing and gas expansion or compression. During tidal breathing Vbs was 50-75 ml with an ejection fraction of 4-6% and an output of 750-1500 ml/min. Step increases in abdominal pressure resulted in rapid emptying presumably from the liver with a time constant of 0.61+/-0.1SE sec. followed by slower flow from non-hepatic viscera. The filling time constant was 0.57+/-0.09SE sec. Splanchnic emptying shifted up to 650 ml blood. With emptying, the increased hepatic vein flow increases the blood pressure at its entry into the inferior vena cava (IVC and abolishes the pressure gradient producing flow between the femoral vein and the IVC inducing blood pooling in the legs. The findings are important for exercise because the larger the Vbs the greater the perfusion of locomotor muscles. During asystolic cardiac arrest we calculate that appropriate timing of abdominal compression could produce an output of 6 L/min. so that the abdominal circulatory pump might act as an auxiliary heart.

  11. The Abdominal Circulatory Pump

    Andrea Aliverti; Dario Bovio; Irene Fullin; Dellacà, Raffaele L.; Antonella Lo Mauro; Antonio Pedotti; Macklem, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Blood in the splanchnic vasculature can be transferred to the extremities. We quantified such blood shifts in normal subjects by measuring trunk volume by optoelectronic plethysmography, simultaneously with changes in body volume by whole body plethysmography during contractions of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. Trunk volume changes with blood shifts, but body volume does not so that the blood volume shifted between trunk and extremities (Vbs) is the difference between changes in trunk ...

  12. Obesity-Associated Abdominal Elephantiasis

    Ritesh Kohli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal elephantiasis is a rare entity. Abdominal elephantiasis is an uncommon, but deformative and progressive cutaneous disease caused by chronic lymphedema and recurrent streptococcal or Staphylococcus infections of the abdominal wall. We present 3 cases of patients with morbid obesity who presented to our hospital with abdominal wall swelling, thickening, erythema, and pain. The abdominal wall and legs were edematous, with cobblestone-like, thickened, hyperpigmented, and fissured plaques on the abdomen. Two patients had localised areas of skin erythema, tenderness, and increased warmth. There was purulent drainage from the abdominal wall in one patient. They were managed with antibiotics with some initial improvement. Meticulous skin care and local keratolytic treatment for the lesions were initiated with limited success due to their late presentation. All three patients refused surgical therapy. Conclusion. Early diagnosis is important for the treatment of abdominal elephantiasis and prevention of complications.

  13. Abdominal aspergillosis: CT findings

    Yeom, Suk Keu, E-mail: pagoda20@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jin, E-mail: kimhyejin@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Ho, E-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ah Young, E-mail: aykim@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Moon-Gyu, E-mail: mglee@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon, E-mail: hkha@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: In order to retrospectively evaluate the CT findings of abdominal aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: CT scans were reviewed with regard to the sites, number, morphologic appearance, attenuation, and the contrast enhancement patterns of the lesions in six patients (5 women, 1 man; mean age, 43.4 years; range, 23-59 years) with pathologically proved abdominal aspergillosis by two gastrointestinal radiologists in consensus. Medical records were also reviewed to determine each patient's clinical status and outcome. Results: All patients were immunocompromised state: 4 patients received immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation and 2 patients received chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Aspergillosis involved blood vessels (n = 3), liver (n = 2), spleen (n = 2), gastrointestinal tract (n = 2), native kidney (n = 1), transplanted kidney (n = 1), peritoneum (n = 1), and retroperitoneum (n = 1). CT demonstrated solid organ or bowel infarction or perforation secondary to vascular thrombosis or pseudoaneurysm, multiple low-attenuating lesions of solid organs presenting as abscesses, concentric bowel wall thickening mimicking typhlitis, or diffuse or nodular infiltration of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Conclusion: Familiarity with findings commonly presenting as angioinvasive features or abscesses on CT, may facilitate the diagnosis of rare and fatal abdominal aspergillosis.

  14. Abdominal aspergillosis: CT findings

    Objective: In order to retrospectively evaluate the CT findings of abdominal aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: CT scans were reviewed with regard to the sites, number, morphologic appearance, attenuation, and the contrast enhancement patterns of the lesions in six patients (5 women, 1 man; mean age, 43.4 years; range, 23-59 years) with pathologically proved abdominal aspergillosis by two gastrointestinal radiologists in consensus. Medical records were also reviewed to determine each patient's clinical status and outcome. Results: All patients were immunocompromised state: 4 patients received immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation and 2 patients received chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Aspergillosis involved blood vessels (n = 3), liver (n = 2), spleen (n = 2), gastrointestinal tract (n = 2), native kidney (n = 1), transplanted kidney (n = 1), peritoneum (n = 1), and retroperitoneum (n = 1). CT demonstrated solid organ or bowel infarction or perforation secondary to vascular thrombosis or pseudoaneurysm, multiple low-attenuating lesions of solid organs presenting as abscesses, concentric bowel wall thickening mimicking typhlitis, or diffuse or nodular infiltration of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Conclusion: Familiarity with findings commonly presenting as angioinvasive features or abscesses on CT, may facilitate the diagnosis of rare and fatal abdominal aspergillosis.

  15. Modulation of gamma-irradiation and carbon tetrachloride induced oxidative stress in the brain of female rats by flaxseed oil.

    Ismail, Amel F M; Salem, Asmaa A M; Eassawy, Mamdouh M T

    2016-08-01

    The activity of flaxseed oil (FSO) on gamma-irradiation (7Gy) and/or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced acute neurotoxicity in rats' brain was investigated. The results revealed a significant decrease (poxide (NO), Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-β1), iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), copper (Cu) and magnesium (Mg) levels were observed. Furthermore, the relative ratio of xanthine oxidase (XO) and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression levels were elevated in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated and CCl4 intoxicated animals. Those effects were augmented due to the effect of CCl4-induced toxicity in γ-irradiated rats. The treatment of FSO displayed significant amendment of the studied parameters in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated and CCl4 intoxicated animals. FSO has a neuroprotective effect against CCl4-induced brain injury in gamma-irradiated rats. This effect is interrelated to the ability of FSO to scavenges the free radicals, enhances the antioxidant enzymes activity, increases GSH contents, down-regulates the inflammatory responses, ameliorates the iron, calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese levels and inhibiting the gene expression level of XO and iNOS in the brain tissues of intoxicated animals. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of FSO have the ability to improve the antioxidant status, suppress the inflammatory responses, and regulate the trace elements in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated, CCl4, and their combined effect in intoxicated animals. Consequently, FSO exhibited neuroprotective activity on γ-irradiated, CCl4, and their combined effect induced brain injury in rats. PMID:27232147

  16. Accelerated hyperfractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent/unresectable rectal cancer in patients with previous pelvic irradiation: results of a phase II study

    This study was conducted to investigate the local effects and toxicity of accelerated hyperfractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent/unresectable rectal cancer in patients with previous pelvic irradiation. Twenty-two patients with recurrent/unresectable rectal cancer who previously received pelvic irradiation were enrolled in our single-center trial between January 2007 and August 2012. Reirradiation was scheduled for up to 39 Gy in 30 fractions using intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. The dose was delivered via a hyperfractionation schedule of 1.3 Gy twice daily. Patient follow-up was performed by clinical examination, CT/MRI, or PET/CT every 3 months for the first 2 years and every 6 months thereafter. Tumor response was evaluated 1 month after reirradiation by CT/MRI based on the RECIST criteria. Adverse events were assessed using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) common toxicity criteria (version 3.0). The median time from the end of the initial radiation therapy to reirradiation was 30 months (range, 18-93 months). Overall local responses were observed in 9 patients (40.9%). None of the patients achieved a complete response (CR), and 9 patients (40.9%) had a partial response (PR). Thirteen patients failed to achieve a clinical response: 12 (54.5%) presented with stable disease (SD) and 1 (4.5%) with progressive disease (PD). Among all the patients who underwent reirradiation, partial or complete symptomatic relief was achieved in 6 patients (27.3%) and 13 patients (59.1%), respectively. Grade 4 acute toxicity and treatment-related deaths were not observed. The following grade 3 acute toxicities were observed: diarrhea (2 patients, 9.1%), cystitis (1 patient, 4.5%), dermatitis (1 patient, 4.5%), and intestinal obstruction (1 patient, 4.5%). Late toxicity was infrequent. Chronic severe diarrhea, small bowel obstruction, and dysuria were observed in 2 (9.1%), 1 (4.5%) and 2 (9.1%) of the patients, respectively. This study showed that

  17. Fraxinus paxiana bark mediated photosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their size modulation using swift heavy ion irradiation

    Sharma, Hemant; Vendamani, V. S.; Pathak, Anand P.; Tiwari, Archana

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthesis of silver nanoparticles is presented using bark extracts of Fraxinus paxiana var. sikkimensis. The synthesized nanoparticles are characterised by UV-Vis absorption, photoluminescence, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the bark samples are irradiated with 100 MeV silver ions and the subsequent structural modifications are analyzed. The swift heavy ion irradiated Fraxinus paxiana var. sikkimensis bark is also used for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. It is illustrated that the irradiated bark assists in synthesizing smaller nanoparticles of homogenous size distribution as compared to when the pristine bark is used. The newly synthesized silver nanoparticles are also used to demonstrate the antimicrobial activities on Escherichia coli bacteria.

  18. Superior optical properties of homogeneous liquid crystal alignment on a tin (IV) oxide surface sequentially modulated via ion beam irradiation.

    Kang, Young-Gu; Park, Hong-Gyu; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Young-Hwan; Oh, Byeong-Yun; Kim, Byoung-Yong; Kim, Dai-Hyun; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2010-10-11

    We first investigated the alignment characteristics of tin (IV) oxide (SnO(2)) thin films deposited by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. This study demonstrates that liquid crystal (LC) molecules could be aligned homogeneously by controlling the Ion Beam (IB) irradiation energy densities. We also show that the pretilt angle of the LC molecules has a close relation with the surface energy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates that a non-stoichiometric SnO(2-x) surface converted by ion beam irradiation can horizontally align the LC molecules. The measured electro-optical (EO) characteristics showed high performance, comparable with those of rubbed and ion-beam irradiated polyimide (PI) layers. PMID:20941057

  19. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain. PMID:26331201

  20. Dolor abdominal recurrente .

    Rodrigo De Vivero

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available El dolor abdominal recurrente (DAR es un problema frecuente en la consulta médica y en la subespecialidad médica y quirúrgica. El DAR es frecuentemente funcional, es decir, sin una causa orgánica aparente. El diagnóstico diferencial debe incluir pérdida de peso, sangrado gastrointestinal, fiebre persistente, diarrea crónica y vómito importante. En este artículo se revisa el diagnóstico y tratamiento, pruebas diagnósticas y manejo farmacológico y ambiental.

  1. Hypnosis for functional abdominal pain.

    Gottsegen, David

    2011-07-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common pediatric condition affecting 20% of the pediatric population worldwide. Most children with this disorder are found to have no specific organic etiology and are given the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain. Well-designed clinical trials have found hypnotherapy and guided imagery to be the most efficacious treatments for this condition. Hypnotic techniques used for other somatic symptoms are easily adaptable for use with functional abdominal pain. The author discusses 2 contrasting hypnotic approaches to functional abdominal pain and provides implications for further research. These approaches may provide new insights into this common and complex disorder. PMID:21922712

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  3. Practical pediatric abdominal CT

    This course is designed to help the radiologist in a hospital setting successfully approach abdominal CT in the infant and child. Emphasis is placed on techniques necessary for a high-quality examination of the upper abdomen, as applied to common pediatric problems such as trauma, tumor, and infection. Material is presented on technical considerations, including patient sedation, preparation, and potential pitfalls and helpful hints for imaging. An emphasis is placed on dynamic scanning with table incrementation. The section on trauma focuses on an approach to imaging the abdomen in the injured child, typical injuries, patterns of injury in the upper abdomen, and why CT is the best imaging modality for blunt upper abdominal trauma. The discussion of tumor imaging reviews the appearance of typical childhood neoplasia including Wilms tumor, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin and Burkitt lymphoma, and disseminated solid tumors such as rhabdomyosarcoma. The authors emphasize what to look for and where, both on initial and on later (for recurrences) examinations. The discussion of infection addresses detection of abscesses and occult infections in children, as well as imaging of abscesses prior to intervention

  4. Possible Role of ?-Irradiated Ginseng in the Modulation of Some Biochemical Disorders Produced by Aluminum in Rats

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity in human and animals has been a matter of concern. Ginseng is liable to be contaminated by micro-organisms during the pre- and post-harvest hand lings. Thus, ginseng decontamination by gamma- rays is needed to warrant the microbiological quality. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the protective effect of gamma-irradiated ginseng against Al-induced toxicity in rat model. Male albino rats were divided into four groups of 8 rats: A control group, the ?- irradiated ginseng extract (IGE) group; daily received the IGE (400 mg kg-1 body wt) for 6 weeks, the Al group received orally a daily dose (0.5 mg kg-1 body wt) of aluminum chloride (AlCl3) for 6 weeks and the irradiated ginseng extract+ AlCl3 (IGE-Al) group, received IGE+ AlCl3 for 6 weeks. Al administration significantly decreased some haematological parameters, sex hormones. Antioxidant enzymes activity in liver and testes showed a decrease. The results also showed a significant increase in some hepatic marker enzymes associated with an elevation of tissue lipid peroxidation (LPO). When experimental animals received IGE+ ALCL3, all these parameters were restored to approximately the control levels. These results demonstrated that administration of gamma-irradiated ginseng could be effective in the protection against the toxicity of AlCl3

  5. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    Marincek, B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  6. Abdominal Burkitt lymphoma

    Purpose: As scarce information is available, in this research we have tried to describe the imaging findings of the Burkitt's lymphoma. Retrospective analysis of the clinical and imaging presentation of a 4 years old boy, is given. Biopsy confirmed the BL. Different imaging techniques were combined. The X-rays were negative. The US revealed a moderate hepatomegaly with multiple hypoechoic nodules and free fluid in the abdominal cavity. The CT showed the hepatomegaly as well as solid nodules in great number and different sizes(due to the densitometric behaviour and to post contrast enhancement), a scarce amount of ascites and a density increase of the mesentery fat. The MRI characterized and revealed in detail the US and the CT findings. The Burkitt's lymphoma is a rare entity; several methods are needed to approach the diagnosis. It represents a great clinical and imaging challenge. (author)

  7. Modulation of the Antioxidant System Efficacy in Irradiated Rats Supplemented with Vitamin B12 cobalamin and Folic Acid

    The present study has been performed to investigate the possible curative and protective role of supplemented vitamin B12 and folic acid in the irradiation induced changes in certain biochemical parameters in hepatic tissue and blood. The biochemical analysis was done at one and fourteen days post irradiation. The data revealed serious effects of radiation exposure on the membrane integrity as reflected by increased serum potassium associated with decreased sodium levels. Oxidation of lipid and protein with antioxidant disorders were recorded after radiation exposure as reflected by increased contents of carbonyl and Gamma glutamyl transferase. The results showed significant increase in the level of lipid peroxide product (malonaldehyde) and significant decrease in the level of antioxidant defense system (glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, super oxid dismutase, catalase and glucose-6-phospate dehydrogenase) after one and fourteen day's supplementation with vitamin B12 and folic acid. Supplemented of vitamin B12 and folic acid before radiation exposure attenuated the harmful effects of irradiation on the most chosen parameters. The beneficial role of supplemented vitamin B12 and folic acid may be related to its ability in quenching free radicals scavenging reactive oxygen species and improving regeneration in the biological tissues

  8. Volumetric modulated arc therapy and breath-hold in image-guided locoregional left-sided breast irradiation

    Osman, S.O.; Hol, S.; Poortmans, P.M.P.; Essers, M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and/or voluntary moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (vmDIBH) in the radiation therapy (RT) of left-sided breast cancer including the regional lymph nodes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 13 patients, four treatment co

  9. Locally advanced cervical cancer: Should intensity-modulated radiotherapy replace brachytherapy?; Complement d'irradiation dans le cancer du col de l'uterus localement evolue: curietherapie uterovaginale ou radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite?

    Mazeron, R.; Gilmore, J.; Khodari, W.; Dumas, I.; Haie-Meder, C. [Service de radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    Intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy (IMRT) is booming as treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. This technique reduces the doses delivered to organs at risk and, by analogy to the irradiation of prostate cancer, opens the door to the possibility of dose escalation to levels close or similar to those achieved by brachytherapy. To date, several studies comparing IMRT with brachytherapy have been published, often methodologically flawed, concluding sometimes that both techniques are comparable. These results should be taken with extreme caution and should not overshadow the recent advances in brachytherapy with the use of 3D imaging and optimization. Preliminary works also showed that the combination of 3D optimized brachytherapy with IMRT could improve the management of the local disease especially for lesions poorly covered by intracavitary techniques. (authors)

  10. Local Setup Reproducibility of the Spinal Column When Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Craniospinal Irradiation With Patient in Supine Position

    Purpose: To evaluate local positioning errors of the lumbar spine during fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy of patients treated with craniospinal irradiation and to assess the impact of rotational error correction on these uncertainties for one patient setup correction strategy. Methods and Materials: 8 patients (6 adults, 2 children) treated with helical tomotherapy for craniospinal irradiation were retrospectively chosen for this analysis. Patients were immobilized with a deep-drawn Aquaplast head mask. Additionally to daily megavoltage control computed tomography scans of the skull, once-a-week positioning of the lumbar spine was assessed. Therefore, patient setup was corrected by a target point correction, derived from a registration of the patient's skull. The residual positioning variations of the lumbar spine were evaluated applying a rigid-registration algorithm. The impact of different rotational error corrections was simulated. Results: After target point correction, residual local positioning errors of the lumbar spine varied considerably. Craniocaudal axis rotational error correction did not improve or deteriorate these translational errors, whereas simulation of a rotational error correction of the right–left and anterior–posterior axis increased these errors by a factor of 2 to 3. Conclusion: The patient fixation used allows for deformations between the patient's skull and spine. Therefore, for the setup correction strategy evaluated in this study, generous margins for the lumbar spinal target volume are needed to prevent a local geographic miss. With any applied correction strategy, it needs to be evaluated whether or not a rotational error correction is beneficial.

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysm demonstrated on renal scintigraphy.

    Phisitkul, Sorot; Brian, Susan; Rakvit, Ariwan; Jenkins, Leigh A; Bohannon, W Todd; Harris, Jennifer; Tsikouris, James; Silva, Michael B; Meyerrose, Gary E

    2003-08-01

    A 74-year-old hypertensive woman presented with abdominal discomfort and a pulsatile abdominal mass. Anterior abdominal angiography during cardiac blood pool, and renal scintigraphic imaging demonstrated a large abdominal aortic aneurysm. 1, 2 Before endovascular repair with an aortoiliac endograft, the abdominal aneurysm measured 7.5 x 7.0 cm on abdominal computed tomography. This study demonstrates that a suspected abdominal aortic aneurysm can be confirmed using the addition of anterior abdominal imaging with normal posterior imaging at the time of renal scintigraphy. PMID:12897671

  12. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  13. Modulation of toxicity following external beam irradiation preceded by high-dose rate brachytherapy in inoperable oesophageal cancer

    To induce fast relief of dysphagia in inoperable oesephageal cancer, we applied high-dose rate (HDR) intraluminal irradiation followed by external irradiation (EBRT) in a phase II study. 15 patients (group A: n = 15; 10 men, 5 women; median age 66 years) were treated with 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy plus 40 Gy EBRT (15 fractions of 2.67 Gy). Severe side-effects were encountered in 60% of patients: 3 late ulceration, 2 pending fistula and 2 patients with fatal haemorrhage after an interval of 6 months. Overall response was excellent: 9 complete remissions (60%) and 6 partial responses (40%). Because of the high toxicity rate, in a subsequent study (group B: n = 30; 23 mean, 7 women; median age 66 years) the EBRT scheme was changed using smaller fractions (2.0 Gy) to reach the same total dose of 40 Gy. The complication rate (17%) was significantly reduced, while the overall response remained excellent (83%): 17 complete and 8 partial responses. The impressive change in complication rate of HDR brachytherapy and EBRT stresses the impact of the fraction per dose and illustrates the small therapeutic margins. (author)

  14. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24035086

  15. An Improved Approach to External Beam Radiation Therapy for Intra-Abdominal Cavity Lesions for Rural Cancer Centers

    Radiation therapy of abdominal lesions is problematic at best. The proximity of highly critical structures, tumor locations, and necessary margins combine to make prescription dose delivery with conventional 3-dimensional (3D) conformal techniques difficult. Others have tried to overcome these hurdles with newer modalities including intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and heavy particle irradiation. These techniques have had moderate success but are not readily available and are therefore limited in application. These factors have lead to the development of a modified, noncoplanar 4-field box technique that demonstrates significant improvement in critical structure sparing, i.e., kidney(s), bowel, and liver doses reduced while simultaneously improving isodose coverage to the target

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... located within a child's abdomen. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of a child's abdominal ultrasound ... pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, your child may actually hear pulse- ...

  17. JAMA Patient Page: Abdominal Hernia

    ... an operation. Umbilical hernia Abdominal wall Intestinal loop Peritoneum Skin Peritoneum Umbilical annulus SYMPTOMS The first symptom of a ... vomiting, or constipation. Inguinal hernia Indirect inguinal hernia Peritoneum Deep inguinal ring Inguinal canal Superficial inguinal ring ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the ... the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed to evaluate the: appendix stomach/ pylorus liver gallbladder spleen pancreas ...

  19. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique compared to whole breast irradiation for patients aged 70 years or older: subgroup analysis from a randomized phase 3 trial.

    Meattini, Icro; Saieva, Calogero; Marrazzo, Livia; Di Brina, Lucia; Pallotta, Stefania; Mangoni, Monica; Meacci, Fiammetta; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Francolini, Giulio; Desideri, Isacco; De Luca Cardillo, Carla; Scotti, Vieri; Furfaro, Ilaria Francesca; Rossi, Francesca; Greto, Daniela; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Casella, Donato; Bernini, Marco; Sanchez, Luis; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Simoncini, Roberta; Nori, Jacopo; Bianchi, Simonetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the efficacy and the safety profile on the subset of selected early breast cancer (BC) patients aged 70 years or older from a single-center phase 3 trial comparing whole breast irradiation (WBI) to accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique. Between 2005 and 2013, 520 patients aged more than 40 years old were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either WBI or APBI in a 1:1 ratio. Eligible patients were women with early BC (maximum diameter 2.5 cm) suitable for breast conserving surgery. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02104895. A total of 117 patients aged 70 years or more were analyzed (58 in the WBI arm, 59 in the APBI arm). At a median follow-up of 5-years (range 3.4-7.0), the ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rate was 1.9 % in both groups. No significant difference between the two groups was identified (log-rank test p = 0.96). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates in the WBI group and APBI group were 6.1 and 1.9 %, respectively (p = 0.33). The APBI group presented significantly better results in terms of acute skin toxicity, considering both any grade (p = 0.0001) and grade 2 or higher (p = 0.0001). Our subgroup analyses showed a very low rate and no significant difference in terms of IBTR, using both WBI and APBI. A significant impact on patients compliance in terms of acute and early late toxicity was shown, which could translate in a consistent improvement of overall quality of life. PMID:26350524

  20. A novel technique for post-mastectomy breast irradiation utilising non-coplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Koshy, M; Zhang, B; S Naqvi; B. Liu; Mohiuddin, M M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if non-coplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the post-mastectomy setting can reduce the dose to normal structures and improve target coverage. We compared this IMRT technique with a standard partial wide tangential (PWT) plan and a five-field (5F) photon-electron plan. 10 patients who underwent left-sided mastectomy were planned to 50.4 Gy using either (1) PWT to cover the internal mammary (IM) nodes and supraclavicular fields, (2) 5...

  1. Component separation in abdominal trauma

    Rawstorne, Edward; Smart, Christopher J.; Fallis, Simon A.; Suggett, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Component separation is established for complex hernia repairs. This case presents early component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath to facilitate closure of the abdominal wall following emergency laparotomy, reinforcing the repair with a biological mesh. On Day 11 following an emergency laparotomy for penetrating trauma, this patient underwent component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath. An intra-abdominal biological mesh was secured, and t...

  2. Updates on abdominal desmoid tumors

    2007-01-01

    Desmoid tumor is a monoclonal, fibroblastic proliferation arising in musculoaponeurotic structures. This connective tissue hyperplasia infiltrates locally, recurs frequentiy after resection but does not metastasize. Abdominal desmoid occurs sporadically, in association with some familial syndromes and often represents a clinical dilemma for surgeons. The enigmatic biology and anatomical location of abdominal desmoids make treatment recommendations difficult. This distinct pathological entity is reviewed with a specific focus on aetiology and management.

  3. Abdominal muscle training in sport.

    Norris, C M

    1993-01-01

    This paper evaluates several abdominal exercises, and highlights factors which are important for their safe prescription and effective use. The function of the abdominal muscles and hip flexors is considered, and the importance of the infra-umbilical portion of the rectus abdominis is emphasized. The effects of flexion on the lumbar spine are outlined. The trunk curl, sit-up, and straight leg raise are analysed, together with modifications of these exercises. The effect of foot fixation and h...

  4. Computer tomography following blunt abdominal trauma

    The computer tomographic appearances of lesions of parenchymatous organs following blunt abdominal trauma are described in 13 patients (five liver, four renal, two splenic and two pancreatic injuries). The value of abdominal computer tomography is discussed in relation to the interval between injury and time of abdominal examination and compared with the diagnostic value of abdominal angiography. (orig.)

  5. Imaging of gastrointestinal and abdominal tuberculosis

    Vanhoenacker, FM; De Backer, AI; Op de Beeck, B; Maes, M; Van Altena, R; Van Beckevoort, D; Kersemans, P; De Schepper, AM

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the range of manifestations of tuberculosis (TB) of the abdomen, including involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneum, mesentery, omentum, abdominal lymph nodes, solid abdominal organs, the genital system and the abdominal aorta. Abdominal TB is a diagnostic cha

  6. HemoHIM ameliorates the persistent down-regulation of Th1-like immune responses in fractionated γ-irradiated mice by modulating the IL-12p70-STAT4 signaling pathway.

    Park, Hae-Ran; Jo, Sung-Kee; Choi, Nam-Hee; Jung, Uhee

    2012-05-01

    Whole body irradiated mice appear to experience a down-regulation of the helper T (Th)1-like immune response, and maintain a persistent immunological imbalance. In the current study, we evaluated the effect of HemoHIM (an herbal product made from Angelica Radix, Cnidium officinale , and Paeonia japonica cultivated in Korea) to ameliorate the immunological imbalance induce in fractionated γ-irradiated mice. The mice were exposed to γ rays twice a week (0.5 Gy fractions) for a total dose of 5 Gy, and HemoHIM was administrated orally from 1 week before the first irradiation to 1 week before the final analysis. All experiments were performed 4 and 6 months after their first exposure. HemoHIM ameliorated the Th1- and Th2-related immune responses normally occur in irradiated mice with or without dinitrophenylated keyhole limpet hemocyanin immunization. HemoHIM also restored the natural killer cell activities without changing the percentage of natural killer cells in irradiated mice. Furthermore, the administration of HemoHIM prevented the reduction in levels of interleukin-12p70 in irradiated mice. Finally, we found that HemoHIM enhanced the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 4 that was reduced in irradiated mice. Our findings suggest that HemoHIM ameliorates the persistent down-regulation of Th1-like immune responses by modulating the IL-12p70/pSTAT4 signaling pathway. PMID:22439601

  7. Fast, simple, and informative patient-specific dose verification method for intensity modulated total marrow irradiation with helical tomotherapy

    Patient-specific dose verification for treatment planning in helical tomotherapy is routinely performed using a homogeneous virtual water cylindrical phantom of 30 cm diameter and 18 cm length (Cheese phantom). Because of this small length, treatment with total marrow irradiation (TMI) requires multiple deliveries of the dose verification procedures to cover a wide range of the target volumes, which significantly prolongs the dose verification process. We propose a fast, simple, and informative patient-specific dose verification method which reduce dose verification time for TMI with helical tomotherapy. We constructed a two-step solid water slab phantom (length 110 cm, height 8 cm, and two-step width of 30 cm and 15 cm), termed the Whole Body Phantom (WB phantom). Three ionization chambers and three EDR-2 films can be inserted to cover extended field TMI treatment delivery. Three TMI treatment plans were conducted with a TomoTherapy HiArt Planning Station and verified using the WB phantom with ion chambers and films. Three regions simulating the head and neck, thorax, and pelvis were covered in a single treatment delivery. The results were compared to those with the cheese phantom supplied by Accuray, Inc. following three treatment deliveries to cover the body from head to pelvis. Use of the WB phantom provided point doses or dose distributions from head and neck to femur in a single treatment delivery of TMI. Patient-specific dose verification with the WB phantom was 62% faster than with the cheese phantom. The average pass rate in gamma analysis with the criteria of a 3-mm distance-to-agreement and 3% dose differences was 94% ± 2% for the three TMI treatment plans. The differences in pass rates between the WB and cheese phantoms at the upper thorax to abdomen regions were within 2%. The calculated dose agreed with the measured dose within 3% for all points in all five cases in both the WB and cheese phantoms. Our dose verification method with the WB phantom

  8. Study on cytokine modulation in mast cell-induced allergic reactions by using gamma-irradiated natural herbal extracts

    Gwon, Hui Jeong; Lim, Youn Mook; Kim, Yong Soo; Nho, Young Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Kim Hae Kyoung [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    We previously described that some natural herbal extracts such as Houttuynia cordata (H), Centella asiatica (C), Plantago asiatica (P), Morus alba L. (M), and Ulmus davidiana (U), differentially suppress an atopic dermatitis like skin lesions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pro-inflammatory cytokine modulation of the water extract of the H, C, P, M, U, and those mixtures (M) and their mechanism in a phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus calcium inopore A23187 treated human mast cell line (HMC-1). The H, C, P, M, U, and M inhibited the inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-{alpha}, IL-6 and IL-8 stimulated by PMA plus A23187 from HMC-1 cells. In addition, the M did not significantly affect the cell viability and had no toxicity on the HMC-1 cells. Based on these results, M can be used for the treatment of an allergic inflammation response.

  9. SU-E-T-340: Use of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for Reducing the Dose to Cochlea in Craniospinal Irradiation (CSI) of Pediatric Patients

    Purpose: To evaluate use of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and number of beams for sparing cochlea in treatment of whole brain for pediatric medulloblastoma patients. Methods: In our institution, craniospinal irradiation patients are treated in supine position on our proton gantries using pencil beam scanning with each beam uniformly covering the target volume (SFUD). Each treatment plan consists of two opposed lateral whole brain fields and one or two spinal fields. For sparing the cochlea for the whole brain treatment, we created three different plans using IMPT for five pediatric patients. The first plan consisted of two lateral fields, the second two lateral fields and a superior-inferior field, and the third two lateral fields and two superior oblique fields. Optimization was performed with heavy weights applied to the eye, lens and cochlea while maintaining a dose prescription of 36 Gy to the whole brain. Results: IMPT plans reduce the dose to the cochlea. Increasing the number of treatment fields was found to lower the average dose to the cochlea: 15.0, 14.5 and 12.5 Gy for the two-field, three-field, and four-field plans respectively. The D95 for the two-field plan was 98.2%, compared to 100.0% for both the three-field and four-field plan. Coverage in the mid-brain was noticeably better in the three- and four-field plans, with more dose conformality surrounding the cochlea. Conclusion: IMPT plans for CSI and the whole brain irradiations are capable of sparing cochlea and reduce the dose considerably without compromising treating brain tissues. The reduction in average dose increases with three and four field plans as compared to traditional two lateral beam plans

  10. SU-E-T-340: Use of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for Reducing the Dose to Cochlea in Craniospinal Irradiation (CSI) of Pediatric Patients

    Dormer, J; Kassaee, A; Lin, H; Ding, X; Lustig, R [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate use of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and number of beams for sparing cochlea in treatment of whole brain for pediatric medulloblastoma patients. Methods: In our institution, craniospinal irradiation patients are treated in supine position on our proton gantries using pencil beam scanning with each beam uniformly covering the target volume (SFUD). Each treatment plan consists of two opposed lateral whole brain fields and one or two spinal fields. For sparing the cochlea for the whole brain treatment, we created three different plans using IMPT for five pediatric patients. The first plan consisted of two lateral fields, the second two lateral fields and a superior-inferior field, and the third two lateral fields and two superior oblique fields. Optimization was performed with heavy weights applied to the eye, lens and cochlea while maintaining a dose prescription of 36 Gy to the whole brain. Results: IMPT plans reduce the dose to the cochlea. Increasing the number of treatment fields was found to lower the average dose to the cochlea: 15.0, 14.5 and 12.5 Gy for the two-field, three-field, and four-field plans respectively. The D95 for the two-field plan was 98.2%, compared to 100.0% for both the three-field and four-field plan. Coverage in the mid-brain was noticeably better in the three- and four-field plans, with more dose conformality surrounding the cochlea. Conclusion: IMPT plans for CSI and the whole brain irradiations are capable of sparing cochlea and reduce the dose considerably without compromising treating brain tissues. The reduction in average dose increases with three and four field plans as compared to traditional two lateral beam plans.

  11. Clinical efficacy of radical intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with reduction in dose of prophylactic irradiation in treatment of stage Ⅲ small cell lung cancer

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and toxicities of radical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) combined with reduction in dose of prophylactic irradiation in the treatment of stage Ⅲ small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 40 patients with stage Ⅲ SCLC who were admitted from January 2010 to August 2012. The prescribed dose was 60 Gy in 30 fractions to the primary gross tumor volume and was 54 Gy in 30 fractions to the planning target volume. All patients received induction chemotherapy,31 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, and 22 patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy; the platinum-based chemotherapy combined with etoposide or teniposide was adopted. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (25 Gy in 10 fractions) was administered to 17 patients. The short-term tumor response was evaluated by RECIST 1.0, and radiation-related toxicities were assessed by CTCAE 4.0. Overall survival (OS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and progression-free survival (PFS) were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The short-term tumor response rate was 98%. The follow-up rate was 100%. Twenty-two patients were followed up for at least 2 years. The 1-and 2-year OS rates were 84% and 48%, respectively; the LRFS rates were 89% and 85%, respectively; the PFS rates were 61% and 41%, respectively. Grade 0-1 radiation-related pneumonia was observed in 65% (26/40) of all patients, grade 2 in 25% (10/40),grade 3 in 5% (2/40), and grade 5 in 5% (2/40). Grade 0-1 radiation-related esophagitis was observed in 53% (21/40) of all patients, grade 2 in 43% (17/40), and grade 3 in 5 % (2/40). Conclusions: Preliminary results from this study suggested that IMRT combined with reduction in dose of prophylactic irradiation is safe and effective in patients with stage Ⅲ SCLC and is worth further evaluation in a large, prospective, randomized study. (authors)

  12. SU-E-T-226: Junction Free Craniospinal Irradiation in Linear Accelerator Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy : A Novel Technique Using Dose Tapering

    Purpose: Spatially separated fields are required for craniospinal irradiation due to field size limitation in linear accelerator. Field junction shits are conventionally done to avoid hot or cold spots. Our study was aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of junction free irradiation plan of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) for Meduloblastoma cases treated in linear accelerator using Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique. Methods: VMAT was planned using multiple isocenters in Monaco V 3.3.0 and delivered in Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. A full arc brain and 40° posterior arc spine fields were planned using two isocentre for short (<1.3 meter height ) and 3 isocentres for taller patients. Unrestricted jaw movement was used in superior-inferior direction. Prescribed dose to PTV was achieved by partial contribution from adjacent beams. A very low dose gradient was generated to taper the isodoses over a long length (>10 cm) at the conventional field junction. Results: In this primary study five patients were planned and three patients were delivered using this novel technique. As the dose contribution from the adjacent beams were varied (gradient) to create a complete dose distribution, therefore there is no specific junction exists in the plan. The junction were extended from 10–14 cm depending on treatment plan. Dose gradient were 9.6±2.3% per cm for brain and 7.9±1.7 % per cm for spine field respectively. Dose delivery error due to positional inaccuracy was calculated for brain and spine field for ±1mm, ±2mm, ±3mm and ±5 mm were 1%–0.8%, 2%–1.6%, 2.8%–2.4% and 4.3%–4% respectively. Conclusion: Dose tapering in junction free CSI do not require a junction shift. Therefore daily imaging for all the field is also not essential. Due to inverse planning dose to organ at risk like thyroid kidney, heart and testis can be reduced significantly. VMAT gives a quicker delivery than Step and shoot or dynamic IMRT

  13. TH-C-12A-09: Planning and Delivery of the Fully Dynamic Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Application to Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Liang, J; Atwood, T; Fahimian, B; Chin, E; Hristov, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, CA (United States); Otto, K [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, BC (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A novel trajectory modulated arc therapy (TMAT) system was developed that uses source motion trajectory involving synchronized gantry rotation with translational and rotational couch movement. MLC motion and dose rate were fully optimized for dynamic beam delivery. This work presents a platform for planning deliverable TMAT on a collision free coronal trajectory and evaluates its benefit for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in a prone position. Methods: The TMAT algorithm was built on VMAT with modifications (physical properties on couch movement were defined) and enhancements (pencil beam dose calculation engine to support extended SSDs) to make it feasible for TMAT delivery. A Matlab software environment for TMAT optimization and dose calculation was created to allow any user specified motion axis. TMAT delivery was implemented on Varian TrueBeamTM STx via XML scripts. 10 prone breast irradiation cases were evaluated in VMAT and compared with a 6- field non-coplanar IMRT plan. Patient selection/exclusion criteria and structure contouring followed the guidelines of NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol. Results: TMAT delivery time was ∼4.5 minutes. 251.5°±7.88° of non-isocentric couch arc was achieved by the optimized trajectory with 180– 210 control points at 1°–2° couch increments. The improved dose distribution by TMAT was most clearly observed by the marked reduction in the volume of irradiated normal breast tissue in the high dose region. The ratios of the normal breast tissue volume receiving more than 50%, 80% and 100% of the prescription dose for TMAT versus IMRT were: V50%(TMAT/IMRT) = 78.38%±13.03%, V80%(TMAT/IMRT) = 44.19%±9.04% and V100% (TMAT/IMRT) = 9.96%±7.55%, all p≤0.01. Conclusion: The study is the first demonstration of planning and delivery implementation of a fully dynamic APBI TMAT system with continuous couch motion. TMAT achieved significantly improved dosimetry over noncoplanar IMRT on dose volume parameters

  14. Detection of abdominal bleeding in blunt abdominal trauma

    Arterial hemorrhage is the most serious immediate complication of blunt abdominal trauma. This paper discusses the detection and localization of active hemorrhage in nonpenetrating injury, as a modification of the technique using technetium-99m sulfur colloid to localize the site of active bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Any imaging protocol for suspected hepatosplenic injury can be easily modified to search for active intra-abdominal hemorrhage. The timely detection of unsuspected bleeding improves patient management by allowing the surgeon to reorder his or her treatment priorities. The early detection of clinically unsuspected intra-abdominal, retroperitoneal, or pelvic hemorrhage will identify those patients who may need more definitive diagnostic procedures, interventional angiography for control of bleeding, or surgical intervention. The 500,000-count view of the abdomen and pelvis can be easily incorporated into any existing trauma protocol using technetium-99m sulfur colloid, is of proven value, and adds little additional time to the study

  15. 20 years of experience in static intensity-modulated total-body irradiation and lung toxicity. Results in 257 consecutive patients

    Schneider, R.A.; Schultze, J.; Jensen, J.M.; Hebbinghaus, D.; Galalae, R.; Kimmig, B.N. [University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein (UHK), Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2007-10-15

    Purpose: To analyze lung complications after allogeneic or autologous transplantation following total-body irradiation (TBI) with compensators, so-called sIMRT (static intensity-modulated radiotherapy). Patients and Methods: Between 1983 and 1998, 257 patients with different hematologic malignancies underwent TBI in six fractions to a total dose of 12 Gy within 3 consecutive days (212 with 11 Gy lung dose) prior to allogeneic (n = 174) or autologous (n = 83) transplantation. 40 patients were < 16 years of age. Minimum follow-up time was 5 years. Median follow-up period was 110 months (13-231 months). Results: 5-year survival rate was 47.9%, 5-year tumor-related mortality 23%, 5-year treatment-related mortality 29.2% (12 Gy lung dose: 53.3% {+-} 14.6%, 11 Gy: 24.1% {+-} 5.7%). Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) developed in 28 of 257 patients (10.9% {+-} 3.8%). IP incidences in the allogeneic and autologous groups were 14.4% ({+-} 5.6%) and 3.6% (0-7.6%), respectively. IP incidences with 12/11 Gy lung dose were 22% ({+-} 12%)/8.5% ({+-} 3.7%). IP mortality was 9.3% ({+-} 3.6%). 13 of 28 patients with IP had a cytomegalovirus infection, five an acute graft-versus-host disease grade IV of the lungs. IP incidences with 12/11 Gy lung dose were 25% (9-50%)/4.2% (0.2-19.1%) in patients < 16 years, and 20.7% (9.4-37.4%) and 13.3% ({+-} 6.5%) in older patients after allogeneic transplantation. Conclusion: Compensator-generated static intensity-modulated TBI with a total dose of 12 Gy and a lung dose of 11 Gy is a modern and comfortable treatment with moderate lung toxicity, small dose inhomogeneities and little setup failure before transplantation. Especially patients < 16 years of age benefit from lung dose reduction.

  16. Videolaparoscopia no trauma abdominal Videolaparoscopy in the abdominal trauma

    Átila Varela Velho

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available A videolaparoscopia (VL vem contribuindo de forma crescente, para diagnóstico e terapêutica de várias afecções cirúrgicas abdominais, introduzindo profundas mudanças na cirurgia contemporânea. Esse avanço incorporou-se também às urgências traumáticas, fazendo parte da avaliação diagnóstica e, às vezes, da terapêutica do trauma abdominal. Os autores apresentam uma revisão concisa da literatura sobre a VL no trauma, atualizando o tema e discutindo os aspectos mais relevantes das indicações, limitações e complicações do método.Videolaparoscopy has been contributing for the diagnostic and therapeutic approach in the abdominal surgical diseases in the last years. Representing real modification in the conventional elective and traumatic abdominal surgery. Its has been recognized as a safe procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of abdominal trauma. Diagnostic predictive values, sensibility and specificity are greater than when obtained by the other diagnostic methods such as peritoneal lavage, ultrasonography and computed tomography. Despite their limitations, when indicated for selected patients seems to reduce non terapeutic laparotomies, postoperative morbidity, hospital stay and costs. The authors present a review of the literature regarding videolaparoscopy in the abdominal trauma, its limitations and complications. Based an a complex protocol for the indications of videolaparoscopy for abdominal trauma, the authors sugested their exclusive use by level trauma centers.

  17. A clinical dilemma: abdominal tuberculosis

    Oya Uygur-Bayramicli; G(u)l Dabak; Resat Dabak

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical, radiological and microbiological properties of abdominal tuberculosis (TB) and to discuss methods needed to get the diagnosis.METHODS: Thirty-one patients diagnosed as abdominal TB between March 1998 and December 2001 at the Gastroenterology Department of Kartal State Hospital,Istanbul, Turkey were evaluated prospectively. Complete physical examination, medical and family history, blood count erythrocyte sedimentation rate, routine biochemical tests,Mantoux skin test, chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasonography (USG) were performed in all cases, whereas microbiological examination of ascites, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy or barium enema, abdominal tomography, mediastinoscopy, laparoscopy or laparotomy were done when needed.RESULTS: The median age of patients (14 females, 17males) was 34.2 years (range 15-65 years). The most frequent symptoms were abdominal pain and weight loss.Eleven patients had active pulmonary TB. The most common abdominal USG findings were ascites and hepatomegaly. Ascitic fluid analysis performed in 13 patients was found to be exudative and acid resistant bacilli were present in smear and cultured only in one patient with BacTec (3.2 %). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy yielded nonspecific findings in 16 patients. Colonoscopy performed in 20 patients showed ulcers in 9 (45 %), nodules in 2 (10 %)and, stricture, polypoid lesions, granulomatous findings in terminal ileum and rectal fistula each in one patient (5 %).Laparoscopy on 4 patients showed dilated bowel loops,thickening in the mesentery, multiple ulcers and tubercles on the peritoneum. Patients with abdominal TB were divided into three groups according to the type of involvement.Fifteen patients (48 %) had intestinal TB, L1 patients (35.2 %) had tuberculous peritonitis and 5 (16.8 %)tuberculous lymphadenitis. The diagnosis of abdominal TB was confirmed microbiologically in 5 (16 %) and histopathologically in 19 patients (60.8 %). The

  18. Abdominal tuberculosis and amoebic abscess. Abdominal tuberkulose og amoebeabscess

    Myklebust, G.; Bardstad, J.; Brabrand, K. (Aust-Agder Central Hospital, Arendal (Norway))

    1993-03-01

    A 26-years-old Indian male was admitted to hospital with loss of weight and vague abdominal pain of several weeks duration. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed several expansive lesions near the pancreatic head, probably representing enlarged lymph nodes. A few milliliters of yellowish pus were aspirated by ultrasound guided aspiration. Microscopic examination of the pus showed trophozoits, and mycobacterium tuberculosis subsequently grew from the pus culture. Abdominal tuberculosis is a rare condition, particularly in the pancreas and the peripancreatic region. The report stresses the importance of considering the possible coexistance of more than one infectious disease in patients from endemic areas. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Uso da peritoneostomia na sepse abdominal Laparostomy in abdominal sepsis

    Juvenal da Rocha Torres Neto; Adonai Pinheiro Barreto; Ana Carolina Lisboa Prudente; Allisson Mário dos Santos; Rodrigo Rocha Santiago

    2007-01-01

    Dentre as modalidades terapêuticas da sepse abdominal, a peritoneostomia tem papel decisivo permitindo explorações e lavagens da cavidade de forma facilitada. Observamos pacientes com diagnóstico clínico de sepse abdominal internados no Serviço de Coloproctologia do Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal de Sergipe, e que foram submetidos a peritoneostomia de janeiro de 2004 a janeiro de 2006. Foram avaliados quanto ao diagnóstico primário e secundário, tipo de peritonite secundária, ...

  20. Volumetric modulated arc therapy and breath-hold in image-guided locoregional left-sided breast irradiation

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and/or voluntary moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (vmDIBH) in the radiation therapy (RT) of left-sided breast cancer including the regional lymph nodes. Materials and methods: For 13 patients, four treatment combinations were compared; 3D-conformal RT (i.e., forward IMRT) in free-breathing 3D-CRT(FB), 3D-CRT(vmDIBH), 2 partial arcs VMAT(FB), and VMAT(vmDIBH). Prescribed dose was 42.56 Gy in 16 fractions. For 10 additional patients, 3D-CRT and VMAT in vmDIBH only were also compared. Results: Dose conformity, PTV coverage, ipsilateral and total lung doses were significantly better for VMAT plans compared to 3D-CRT. Mean heart dose (Dmean,heart) reduction in 3D-CRT(vmDIBH) was between 0.9 and 8.6 Gy, depending on initial Dmean,heart (in 3D-CRT(FB) plans). VMAT(vmDIBH) reduced the Dmean,heart further when Dmean,heart was still >3.2 Gy in 3D-CRT(vmDIBH). Mean contralateral breast dose was higher for VMAT plans (2.7 Gy) compared to 3DCRT plans (0.7 Gy). Conclusions: VMAT and 3D-CRT(vmDIBH) significantly reduced heart dose for patients treated with locoregional RT of left-sided breast cancer. When Dmean,heart exceeded 3.2 Gy in 3D-CRT(vmDIBH) plans, VMAT(vmDIBH) resulted in a cumulative heart dose reduction. VMAT also provided better target coverage and reduced ipsilateral lung dose, at the expense of a small increase in the dose to the contralateral breast

  1. Cilengitide modulates attachment and viability of human glioma cells, but not sensitivity to irradiation or temozolomide in vitro.

    Maurer, Gabriele D; Tritschler, Isabel; Adams, Barbara; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Wick, Wolfgang; Stupp, Roger; Weller, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Cilengitide is a cyclic peptide antagonist of integrins alphavbeta3 and alphavbeta5 that is currently being evaluated as a novel therapeutic agent for recurrent and newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Its mode of action is thought to be mainly antiangiogenic but may include direct effects on tumor cells, notably on attachment, migration, invasion, and viability. In this study we found that, at clinically relevant concentrations, cilengitide (1-100 microM) induces detachment in some but not all glioma cell lines, while the effect on cell viability is modest. Detachment induced by cilengitide could not be predicted by the level of expression of the cilengitide target molecules, alphavbeta3 and alphavbeta5, at the cell surface. Glioma cell death induced by cilengitide was associated with the generation of caspase activity, but caspase activity was not required for cell death since ectopic expression of cytokine response modifier (crm)-A or coexposure to the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk was not protective. Moreover, forced expression of the antiapoptotic protein marker Bcl-X(L) or altering the p53 status did not modulate cilengitide-induced cell death. No consistent effects of cilengitide on glioma cell migration or invasiveness were observed in vitro. Preliminary clinical results indicate a preferential benefit from cilengitide added to temozolomide-based radiochemotherapy in patients with O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter methylation. Accordingly, we also examined whether the MGMT status determines glioma cell responses to cilengitide alone or in combination with temozolomide. Neither ectopic expression of MGMT in MGMT-negative cells nor silencing the MGMT gene in MGMT-positive cells altered glioma cell responses to cilengitide alone or to cilengitide in combination with temozolomide. These data suggest that the beneficial clinical effects derived from cilengitide in vivo may arise from altered perfusion, which promotes temozolomide

  2. Empirical evidences for a planetary modulation of total solar irradiance and the TSI signature of the 1.09-year Earth-Jupiter conjunction cycle

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    The time series of total solar irradiance (TSI) satellite observations since 1978 provided by ACRIM and PMOD TSI composites are studied. We find empirical evidence for planetary-induced forcing and modulation of solar activity. Power spectra and direct data pattern analysis reveal a clear signature of the 1.09-year Earth-Jupiter conjunction cycle, in particular during solar cycle 23 maximum. This appears to suggest that the Jupiter side of the Sun is slightly brighter during solar maxima. The effect is observed when the Earth crosses the Sun-Jupiter conjunction line every 1.09 years. Multiple spectral peaks are observed in the TSI records that are coherent with known planetary harmonics such as the spring, orbital and synodic periods among Mercury, Venus, Earth and Jupiter: the Mercury-Venus spring-tidal cycle (0.20 year); the Mercury orbital cycle (0.24 year); the Venus-Jupiter spring-tidal cycle (0.32 year); the Venus-Mercury synodic cycle (0.40 year); the Venus-Jupiter synodic cycle (0.65 year); and the Ve...

  3. Selective Nodal Irradiation for Head and Neck Cancer Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: Application of RTOG Consensus Guidelines in Routine Clinical Practice

    Purpose: We have been using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for selective neck irradiation. This article presents an analysis of patterns of failure and their dosimetric correlation. Methods and Materials: Between October 2003 and January 2008, 83 patients with head-and-neck cancer were treated with IMRT. Nodal levels were contoured as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines. Results: There were 32 relapses with 23 local relapses (21 local relapses alone and 2 local and regional relapses, simultaneously), 9 regional relapses (including 2 simultaneous local and regional relapses), and 5 distant relapses, of which 2 patients had local relapses. At 2 and 3 years, the locoregional relapse-free survival rates were was 68.3% and 60.8%, respectively, while the overall survival rates were 84.1% and 81.7%, respectively. Subgroup analyses revealed significant differences in locoregional relapse-free survival rates for total treatment times of 53 days, a volume of CTV1PTV (i.e., the volume prescribed 70 Gy) 177 cc, a V100 for CTV1PTV of 91%, and a minimum dose to CTV1PTV of 54 Gy. There were no failures in the elective nodal volume, substantiating both the nodal selection criteria and the RTOG consensus guidelines for delineation of neck node levels. Conclusions: IMRT for head-neck cancer is feasible, using elective nodal selection criteria along with RTOG consensus guidelines for the radiological boundaries of levels of neck nodes.

  4. Postoperative intensity-modulated irradiation (IMRT) of endometrial cancers: results of the 'dummy run' quality assurance procedure for phase 2 RTCMIENDOMETRE multicentric French test; Irradiation avec modulation d'intensite (RCMI) postoperatoire des cancers de l'endometre: resultats de la procedure d'assurance de qualite -dummy run- de l'essai francais multicentrique de phase 2 RTCMIENDOMETRE

    Kreps, S.; Barillot, I. [CHU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Peignaux, K. [Centre Georges FrancoisLeclerc, 21 - Dijon (France); Nickers, P. [Centre Oscar Lambret, 59 - Lille (France); Leblanc-Onfroy, M. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes (France); Williaume, D. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France); Haie-Meder, C. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Lerouge, D. [Centre Francois Baclesse, 14 - Caen (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a study which aims at assessing the impact of the intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy on the acute intestinal toxicity of a postoperative irradiation of stage I and II endometrial cancers. Seven radiotherapy centres participated to this study. They followed a 'dummy run' procedure in order to assess their ability to respect the irradiation protocol. The authors discuss the contouring correlation for different organs. The use of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas leads to a better concordance between the centres. Short communication

  5. Contemporary imaging in abdominal emergencies

    Imaging is often a fundamental part in the evaluation of an injured or ill child. A variety of imaging modalities (radiography, angiography/fluoroscopy, sonography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy) are among the options. CT is worth focused attention because of its usefulness in a variety of emergency department settings, its increasing use, and its potential radiation risks. CT plays an important role in the evaluation of traumatic and nontraumatic abdominal emergencies in children. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to review current imaging approaches and controversies in the evaluation of common acute abdominal emergencies. Through discussion of various modalities, especially CT in evaluation of abdominal pain and trauma, the relative advantages and disadvantages including radiation risk will be reviewed. (orig.)

  6. CT evaluation of abdominal trauma

    Objective: An evaluation of CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma. Methods: CT appearance of abdominal trauma was analyzed retrospectively in 95 cases. thirty-three patients were cured by operation, and the other 59 patients received conservative treatment. Fifty-one patients out of 59 were seen healed or improved by a follow up CT scan after the conservative treatment. Results: The study included: 31 cases of splenic contusion, accompanying with hemoperitoneum in 25 cases; 3 cases of hepatic laceration; 33 cases of liver and spleen compound trauma accompanying with hemoperitoneum; 18 cases of renal contusion, with subcapsular hemorrhage in 12 cases; 4 cases of midriff colic; 3 cases of mesentery breach; 3 cases of digestive tract perforation. Conclusion: CT is sensitive and precise in evaluating abdominal trauma, providing important information for treatment. (author)

  7. Contemporary imaging in abdominal emergencies

    Sivit, Carlos J. [Rainbow Babies and Children' s Hospital, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Imaging is often a fundamental part in the evaluation of an injured or ill child. A variety of imaging modalities (radiography, angiography/fluoroscopy, sonography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy) are among the options. CT is worth focused attention because of its usefulness in a variety of emergency department settings, its increasing use, and its potential radiation risks. CT plays an important role in the evaluation of traumatic and nontraumatic abdominal emergencies in children. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to review current imaging approaches and controversies in the evaluation of common acute abdominal emergencies. Through discussion of various modalities, especially CT in evaluation of abdominal pain and trauma, the relative advantages and disadvantages including radiation risk will be reviewed. (orig.)

  8. Abdominal wall hernia and pregnancy

    Jensen, K K; Henriksen, N A; Jorgensen, L N

    2015-01-01

    Med and Embase in combination with a cross-reference search of eligible papers. RESULTS: We included 31 papers of which 23 were case reports. In fertile women undergoing sutured or mesh repair, pain was described in a few patients during the last trimester of a subsequent pregnancy. Emergency surgery of......PURPOSE: There is no consensus as to the treatment strategy for abdominal wall hernias in fertile women. This study was undertaken to review the current literature on treatment of abdominal wall hernias in fertile women before or during pregnancy. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken in Pub...... incarcerated hernias in pregnant women, as well as combined hernia repair and cesarean section appears as safe procedures. No major complications were reported following hernia repair before or during pregnancy. The combined procedure of elective cesarean section and abdominal wall hernia repair was reported...

  9. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa

  10. Radiological evaluation of abdominal trauma

    Simple abdomen film has played an important role in decision of emergency operations in patients with the abdominal trauma. Nowadays, it still acts as a primary and inevitable processes in emergency condition. At the Department of Radiology, Hanil Hospital, 70 patients, who were laparotomied due to penetrating or nonpernetraing abdominal trauma, were observed and analyzed with simple abdomen film after comparison with the operative findings. The results are as follows: 1. Most frequent age distribution was 10 to 39 years and marked 70%. Male was in 90% incidence. 2. Penetrating injury largely involved the small bowel and abdominal wall. Non-penetrating injury usually involved the spleen, small bowel, liver, kidney, pancreas, duodenum. 3. Single organ injury occurred in higher incidence at the small bowel and abdominal wall. Multiple organ injury occurred in higher incidence at the spleen, liver, kidney and pancreas. 4. Organ distribution was 26% in spleen, 22% in small bowel, 14% in liver, 11% in abdominal wall. 7% in pancreas, 7% in kidney. 5% in duodenum, 4% in GB and CBD, 2% in diaphragm, 2% in colon, and 1% in stomach. 5. The specific roentgen findings and their frequency which useful in differential diagnosis at abdominal trauma, were as follows: a) flank fluid; Detectable possibility was 71% in liver laceration, 69% in spleen laceration and 57% in pancreas laceration. b) ipsilateral psoas shadow obliteration; Detectable possibility was 57% in liver laceration, 57% in kidney laceration and 46% in spleen laceration. c) free air; Detactable possibility was 60% in duodenal perforation, and 36% in peroration of upper part of small bowel. d) Reflex ileus; Detectable possibility was 64% in small bowel, 50% in liver laceration and 35% in spleen laceration. e) rib fracture; Detactable possibility was 36% in liver laceration and 23% in spleen laceration. f) pleural effusion; Detectable possibility was 29% in liver laceration and 27% in spleen laceration

  11. Secondary abdominal appendicular ectopic pregnancy.

    Nama, Vivek; Gyampoh, Bright; Karoshi, Mahantesh; McRae, Reynold; Opemuyi, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    Although the case fatality rate for ectopic pregnancies has decreased to 0.08% in industrialized countries, it still represents 3.8% of maternal mortality in the United States alone. In developing countries, the case fatality rate varies from 3% to 27%. Laparoscopic management of tubal pregnancies is now the standard form of treatment where this technology is available. Abdominal pregnancies are rare, and secondary implantation of tubal ectopic pregnancies is the most common cause of abdominal gestations. We present an interesting case of secondary implantation of a tubal ectopic pregnancy to highlight the appendix as a possible secondary implantation site after a tubal ectopic pregnancy. PMID:17630175

  12. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    Lee, W.-K., E-mail: leewk33@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Van Tonder, F.; Tartaglia, C.J.; Dagia, C. [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Cazzato, R.L. [Department of Radiology, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome (Italy); Duddalwar, V.A. [Department of Radiology, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Chang, S.D. [Department of Medical Imaging, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, British Columbia (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  13. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  14. Recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    Buch, Niyaz A; Ahmad, Sheikh Mushtaq; Ahmed, S Zubair; Ali, Syed Wazid; Charoo, B A; Hassan, Masood Ul

    2002-09-01

    Eighty five children with recurrent abdominal pain(RAP) were studied. Organic cause was noticed in 70 cases and non-organic in 15 cases. Giardiasis was the commonest organic cause in 57 (67.0 percent), either alone or with other parasitic infestations. Other organic causes include gallstones (4.7 percent), urinary infections (4.7 percent), esophagitis/gastritis (3.5 percent) and abdominal tuberculosis (2.3 percent). Single parent, school phobia, sibling rivalry, RAP in other family members and nocturnal enuresis are significant factors associated with nonorganic causes PMID:12368527

  15. Hypofractionated intensity modulated irradiation for localized prostate cancer, results from a phase I/II feasibility study

    Depuydt Tom

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess acute (primary endpoint and late toxicity, quality of life (QOL, biochemical or clinical failure (secondary endpoints of a hypofractionated IMRT schedule for prostate cancer (PC. Methods 38 men with localized PC received 66 Gy (2.64 Gy to prostate,2 Gy to seminal vesicles (50 Gy total using IMRT. Acute toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy (RT, at 1–3 months afterwards using RTOG acute scoring system. Late side effects were scored at 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 36 months after RT using RTOG/EORTC criteria. Quality of life was assessed by EORTC-C30 questionnaire and PR25 prostate module. Biochemical failure was defined using ASTRO consensus and nadir+2 definition, clinical failure as local, regional or distant relapse. Results None experienced grade III-IV toxicity. 10% had no acute genito-urinary (GU toxicity, 63% grade I; 26% grade II. Maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI scores 0, I, II were 37%, 47% and 16%. Maximal acute toxicity was reached weeks 4–5 and resolved within 4 weeks after RT in 82%. Grade II rectal bleeding needing coagulation had a peak incidence of 18% at 16 months after RT but is 0% at 24–36 months. One developed a urethral stricture at 2 years (grade II late GU toxicity successfully dilated until now. QOL urinary symptom scores reached a peak incidence 1 month after RT but normalized 6 months later. Bowel symptom scores before, at 1–6 months showed similar values but rose slowly 2–3 years after RT. Nadir of sexual symptom scores was reached 1–6 months after RT but improved 2–3 years later as well as physical, cognitive and role functional scales. Emotional, social functional scales were lowest before RT when diagnosis was given but improved later. Two years after RT global health status normalized. Conclusion This hypofractionated IMRT schedule for PC using 25 fractions of 2.64 Gy did not result in severe acute side effects. Until now late urethral, rectal toxicities seemed

  16. Hypofractionated intensity modulated irradiation for localized prostate cancer, results from a phase I/II feasibility study

    To assess acute (primary endpoint) and late toxicity, quality of life (QOL), biochemical or clinical failure (secondary endpoints) of a hypofractionated IMRT schedule for prostate cancer (PC). 38 men with localized PC received 66 Gy (2.64 Gy) to prostate,2 Gy to seminal vesicles (50 Gy total) using IMRT. Acute toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy (RT), at 1–3 months afterwards using RTOG acute scoring system. Late side effects were scored at 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 36 months after RT using RTOG/EORTC criteria. Quality of life was assessed by EORTC-C30 questionnaire and PR25 prostate module. Biochemical failure was defined using ASTRO consensus and nadir+2 definition, clinical failure as local, regional or distant relapse. None experienced grade III-IV toxicity. 10% had no acute genito-urinary (GU) toxicity, 63% grade I; 26% grade II. Maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) scores 0, I, II were 37%, 47% and 16%. Maximal acute toxicity was reached weeks 4–5 and resolved within 4 weeks after RT in 82%. Grade II rectal bleeding needing coagulation had a peak incidence of 18% at 16 months after RT but is 0% at 24–36 months. One developed a urethral stricture at 2 years (grade II late GU toxicity) successfully dilated until now. QOL urinary symptom scores reached a peak incidence 1 month after RT but normalized 6 months later. Bowel symptom scores before, at 1–6 months showed similar values but rose slowly 2–3 years after RT. Nadir of sexual symptom scores was reached 1–6 months after RT but improved 2–3 years later as well as physical, cognitive and role functional scales. Emotional, social functional scales were lowest before RT when diagnosis was given but improved later. Two years after RT global health status normalized. This hypofractionated IMRT schedule for PC using 25 fractions of 2.64 Gy did not result in severe acute side effects. Until now late urethral, rectal toxicities seemed acceptable as well as failure rates. Detailed analysis of

  17. Plain abdominal film and abdominal ultrasound in intestine occlusion

    Plain film of the abdomen is widely used in the diagnostic evaluation of intestinal occlusion. Even though this technique can yield a panoramic and high-resolution view of gas-filled intestinal loops, several factors, such as type and duration of occlusion, neurovascular status of the intestine and general patient condition, may reduce the diagnostic specificy of the plain film relative to the organic or functional nature of the occlusion. From 1987 to 1989, fifty-four patients with intestinal occlusion were studied combining plain abdominal film with abdominal ultrasound (US). This was done in order to evaluate whether the additional information obtained from US could be of value in better determining the nature of the ileus. US evaluation was guided by the information already obtained from plain film which better demonstrates gas-filled loops. The results show that in all 27 cases of dynamic ileus (intestinal ischemia, acute appendicitis, acute cholecistis, acute pancreatitis or blunt abdominal trauma) US demonstrates: intestinal loops slightly increased in caliber, with liquid content, or loops containing rare hyperechoic particles, intestinal wall thickening and no peristalsis. In 27 cases of acute, chronic or complicated mechanical ileus (adhesions, internal hernia, intestinal neoplasm, peritoneal seedings) US shows: 1) in acute occlusion: hyperperistaltic intestinal loops containing inhomogeneous liquid; 2) in chronic occlusion: liquid content with a solid echigenic component; 3) in complicated occlusion: liquid stasis, frequent increase in wall thickness, moderate peritoneal effusion and inefficient peristalsis. In conclusion, based on the obtained data, the authors feel that the combination of plain abdominal film and abdominal US can be useful in the work-up of patient with intestinal occlusion. The information provided by US allows a better definition of the nature of the ileus

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... gallbladder spleen pancreas intestines kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help ... that is being examined to the transducer (the device used to examine the patient), as well ... is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical ...

  19. Sequential PTA of abdominal aorta

    A case of sequential dilatation of a subtotal stenosis of the abdominal aorta in a young subject is reported. Initial and long-term success of the procedure is recorded using haemodynamic evaluation and intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IV-DSA) follow-up on an outpatient basis. In addition, the significance of biplane aortography with IV-DSA is illustrated. (orig.)

  20. Dehydration related abdominal pain (drap)

    Objective: To describe the frequency of dehydration as a medical cause of acute abdomen. Subjects and Methods: All the patients reporting with abdominal pain to the surgical outpatient department or the emergency department were reviewed in the study. The clinical findings in all these cases were studied along with the mode of their management and outcome. Results: Of all the patients presenting with abdominal pain, 3.3% (n=68) were suffering from dehydration related abdominal pain. They were predominantly males in a ratio of 8.7: 1, mostly in the 2nd and 3rd decades of their lives. All these cases were suffering from acute or chronic dehydration were provisionally diagnosed by general practitioners as 'acute abdomen' and referred for surgical consultation. Associated symptoms included vomiting in 42.6%, backache in 91.2%, headache in 95.6%, and pain in lower limbs in 97.1 % of the cases. 83.8% required indoor management with intravenous fluids. All the patients became asymptomatic with rehydration therapy. Conclusion: Dehydration is a possible cause of severe abdominal pain. There is a need to educate the general public about the benefits of adequate fluid intake. (author)

  1. Computed tomography of abdominal trauma

    Abdominal lesions following an accident or surgical interventions are becoming more frequently indications for investigations by computed tomography. Changes of spleen, liver, kidneys, pancreas, and of the retroperitoneal space are discussed. Advantages of computed tomography compared to other investigative methods are shown. (orig.)

  2. CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma

    Computed tomography (CT) findings from 95 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were evaluated. Among them, there was no false negative case. It can thus be said that if CT is negative the patient can be treated conservatively. The efficacy of CT in diagnosing injuries of various organs was also evaluated. (author)

  3. A dosimetric comparison of three plans in simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy in cervical esophageal carcinoma undergoing prophylactic lymphatic irradiation

    Objective: To evaluate the optimized simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) plans in cervical esophageal carcinoma underwent prophylactic lymphatic irradiation. Methods: Six patients with cervical esophageal carcinoma were studied.The gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) (including bilateral mid-lower neck and supraclavicular lymph drainage regions, upper mediastinal lymph drainage regions) were delineated on sim-CT images, GTV and CTV were uniformly expanded by 5 mm to create PGTV and PTV. Five fields (5F), 7F and 9F SIB-IMRT plans were designed. The prescribed doses to PGTV and PTV were 66 Gy and 60 Gy in 30 fractions respectively. The parameters of dose-volume histograms in three groups planning were compared. Results: The values of conformity index (CI) of PGTV were 0.56, 0.62 and 0.69 (F =6.22, P<0.01), the V66 with 88.24%, 95.03% and 94.91% (F=4.39, P<0.05) and D95 with 6539.67, 6601.83 and 6602.00 cGy (F=4.46, P<0.05) in 5F, 7F and 9F SIB-IMRT plans. The values of CI, V66 and D95 of PTV were 0.80, 0.85 and 0.87 (F=11.29, P<0.01), with 91.64%, 94.05% and 95.06% (F=4.10, P<0.05) and with 5934.00, 5987.17 and 6006.33 cGy (F=4.01, P<0.05). The values of maximal dose of spinal cord were 4707.17, 4497.83 and 4357.00 cGy (F=11.26, P<0.011) in 5F, 7F and 9F SIB-IMRT plans. The values of all dosimetric parameters about PGTV and PTV were same in 7F and 9F SIB-IMRT plans (all P>0.05). Conclusion: 7F-SIB-IMRT plan is best one scheme for cervical esophageal carcinoma underwent prophylactic lymphatic irradiation. (authors)

  4. Single Vocal Cord Irradiation: Image Guided Intensity Modulated Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for T1a Glottic Cancer: Early Clinical Results

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim, E-mail: a.almamgani@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology – Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kwa, Stefan L.S.; Tans, Lisa; Moring, Michael; Fransen, Dennie; Mehilal, Robert; Verduijn, Gerda M. [Department of Radiation Oncology – Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Baatenburg de Jong, Rob J. [Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery – Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology – Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To report, from a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data, on the feasibility, outcome, toxicity, and voice-handicap index (VHI) of patients with T1a glottic cancer treated by a novel intensity modulated radiation therapy technique developed at our institution to treat only the involved vocal cord: single vocal cord irradiation (SVCI). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with T1a glottic cancer were treated by means of SVCI. Dose prescription was set to 16 × 3.63 Gy (total dose 58.08 Gy). The clinical target volume was the entire vocal cord. Setup verification was done by means of an online correction protocol using cone beam computed tomography. Data for voice quality assessment were collected prospectively at baseline, end of treatment, and 4, 6, and 12 weeks and 6, 12, and 18 months after treatment using VHI questionnaires. Results: After a median follow-up of 30 months (range, 7-50 months), the 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 100% and 90% because no single local recurrence was reported and 3 patients died because of comorbidity. All patients have completed the intended treatment schedule; no treatment interruptions and no grade 3 acute toxicity were reported. Grade 2 acute dermatitis or dysphagia was reported in only 5 patients (17%). No serious late toxicity was reported; only 1 patient developed temporary grade 2 laryngeal edema, and responded to a short-course of corticosteroid. The VHI improved significantly, from 33.5 at baseline to 9.5 and 10 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively (P<.001). The control group, treated to the whole larynx, had comparable local control rates (92.2% vs 100%, P=.24) but more acute toxicity (66% vs 17%, P<.0001) and higher VHI scores (23.8 and 16.7 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively, P<.0001). Conclusion: Single vocal cord irradiation is feasible and resulted in maximal local control rate at 2 years. The deterioration in VHI scores was slight and temporary and

  5. Single Vocal Cord Irradiation: Image Guided Intensity Modulated Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for T1a Glottic Cancer: Early Clinical Results

    Purpose: To report, from a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data, on the feasibility, outcome, toxicity, and voice-handicap index (VHI) of patients with T1a glottic cancer treated by a novel intensity modulated radiation therapy technique developed at our institution to treat only the involved vocal cord: single vocal cord irradiation (SVCI). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with T1a glottic cancer were treated by means of SVCI. Dose prescription was set to 16 × 3.63 Gy (total dose 58.08 Gy). The clinical target volume was the entire vocal cord. Setup verification was done by means of an online correction protocol using cone beam computed tomography. Data for voice quality assessment were collected prospectively at baseline, end of treatment, and 4, 6, and 12 weeks and 6, 12, and 18 months after treatment using VHI questionnaires. Results: After a median follow-up of 30 months (range, 7-50 months), the 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 100% and 90% because no single local recurrence was reported and 3 patients died because of comorbidity. All patients have completed the intended treatment schedule; no treatment interruptions and no grade 3 acute toxicity were reported. Grade 2 acute dermatitis or dysphagia was reported in only 5 patients (17%). No serious late toxicity was reported; only 1 patient developed temporary grade 2 laryngeal edema, and responded to a short-course of corticosteroid. The VHI improved significantly, from 33.5 at baseline to 9.5 and 10 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively (P<.001). The control group, treated to the whole larynx, had comparable local control rates (92.2% vs 100%, P=.24) but more acute toxicity (66% vs 17%, P<.0001) and higher VHI scores (23.8 and 16.7 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively, P<.0001). Conclusion: Single vocal cord irradiation is feasible and resulted in maximal local control rate at 2 years. The deterioration in VHI scores was slight and temporary and

  6. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  7. Preoperative steroid in abdominal wall reconstruction

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Brøndum, Tina Lee; Belhage, Bo;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative administration of high-dose glucocorticoid leads to improved recovery and decreased length of stay after abdominal surgery. Even so, studies on administration of glucocorticoids for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for giant ventral hernia repair ...

  8. ADULT ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIA IN IBADAN

    Ayandipo, O.O; Afuwape, O.O.; Irabor, D. O.; Abdurrazzaaq, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal wall hernias are very common diseases encountered in surgical practice. Groin hernia is the commonest type of abdominal wall hernias. There are several methods of hernia repair but tension-free repair (usually with mesh) offers the least recurrent rate. Aim: To describe the clinical profile of anterior abdominal wall hernias and our experience in the surgical management of identified hernias Method: The project was a retrospective study of all patients with abdominal wal...

  9. Abdominal shotgun trauma: A case report

    Toutouzas, Konstantinos G; Larentzakis, Andreas; Drimousis, Panagiotis; Riga, Maria; Theodorou, Dimitrios; Katsaragakis, Stylianos

    2008-01-01

    Introduction One of the most lethal mechanisms of injury is shotgun wound and particularly the abdominal one. Case presentation We report a case of a 45 years old male suffering abdominal shotgun trauma, who survived his injuries. Conclusion The management of the abdominal shotgun wounds is mainly dependent on clinical examination and clinical judgment, while requires advanced surgical skills.

  10. Dosimetric comparison of three different treatment modalities for total scalp irradiation. The conventional lateral photon–electron technique, helical tomotherapy, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy

    The aim of this study was to compare lateral photon–electron (LPE), helical tomotherapy (HT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for total scalp irradiation. We selected a single adult model case and compared the dosimetric results for the three plans. All plans mainly used 6-MV photon beams, and the prescription dose was 60 Gy in 30 fractions. First, we compared the LPE, HT and VMAT plans, with all plans including a 1-cm bolus. We also compared HT plans with and without the bolus. The conformity indices for LPE, HT and VMAT were 1.73, 1.35 and 1.49, respectively. The HT plan showed the best conformity and the LPE plan showed the worst. However, the plans had similar homogeneity indexes. The dose to the hippocampus was the highest in the VMAT plan, with a mean of 6.7 Gy, compared with 3.5 Gy in the LPE plan and 4.8 Gy in the HT plan. The doses to the optical structures were all within the clinically acceptable range. The beam-on time and monitor units were highest in the HT plan. The HT plans with and without a bolus showed similar target coverage and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. The HT plan showed the best target coverage and conformity, with low doses to the brain and hippocampus. This plan also had the advantage of not necessarily requiring a bolus. Although the VMAT plan showed better conformity than the LPE plan and acceptable OAR sparing, the dose to the hippocampus should be considered when high doses are prescribed. (author)

  11. Modulation of the ρ/rock pathway in heart and lung after thorax irradiation reveals targets to improve normal tissue toxicity

    The medical options available to prevent or treat radiation-induced injury are scarce and developing effective countermeasures is still an open research field. In addition, more than half of cancer patients are treated with radiation therapy, which displays a high antitumor efficacy but can cause, albeit rarely, disabling long-term toxicities including radiation fibrosis. Progress has been made in the definition of molecular pathways associated with normal tissue toxicity that suggest potentially effective therapeutic targets. Targeting the Rho/ROCK pathway seems a promising anti-fibrotic approach, at least in the gut; the current study was performed to assess whether this target was relevant to the prevention and/or treatment of injury to the main thoracic organs, namely heart and lungs. First, we showed activation of two important fibro-genic pathways (Smad and Rho/ROCK) in response to radiation-exposure to adult cardio-myocytes; we extended these observations in vivo to the heart and lungs of mice, 15 and 30 weeks post-irradiation. We correlated this fibro-genic molecular imprint with alteration of heart physiology and long-term remodelling of pulmonary and cardiac histological structures. Lastly, cardiac and pulmonary radiation injury and bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis were successfully modulated using Rho/ROCK inhibitors (statins and Y-27632) and this was associated with a normalization of fibro-genic markers. In conclusion, the present paper shows for the first time, activation of Rho/ROCK and Smad pathways in pulmonary and cardiac radiation-induced delayed injury. Our findings thereby reveal a safe and efficient therapeutic opportunity for the abrogation of late thoracic radiation injury, potentially usable either before or after radiation exposure; this approach is especially attractive in (1) the radiation oncology setting, as it does not interfere with prior anti-cancer treatment and in (2) radioprotection, as applicable to the treatment of

  12. Intestinal contrasting in abdominal CT

    In 56 patients undergoing abdominal CT the gastro-intestinal tract was defined by negative contrast instead of the conventional positive contrast from an iodine containing contrast medium. The contrast material was a 2 1/2% mannitol solution and was used for filling the rectum. Filling of the gastro-intestinal tract was of similar quality to that obtained with positve contrast media. The number of artifacts due to high contrast boundaries was slightly greater with the negative contrast than if would have been with positive contrast. Differentiation of the gastro-intestinal tract from other abdominal organs was equally good for both methods. The negative contrast method was poor in diagnosing cystic tumours but proved much better than positive contrast for evaluating the wall of the gastro-intestinal tract. (orig.)

  13. Sonography of blunt abdominal trauma

    Sonographic examination of the abdomen after blunt abdominal trauma represents a rapid and effective diagnostic method without bothering the patient. It has proved its value not only in the confirmation or exclusion of free fluid in the abdomen caused by liver of spleen rupture, but also in such cases actually it replaces peritoneal lavage or exploratory laparotomy. It is also qualified for diagnosis of intraparenchymal or subcapsular hemorrhages, intraperitoneal as well as retroperitoneal and for follow up. In particualr delayed bleedings including the risk of a retarded organ rupture can be detected early. A failure rate of 1.4% in 282 sonographically examined cases of blunt abdominal trauma further confirms the reliability of this method. (orig.)

  14. Acupuncture Treatment of Abdominal Pain

    胡金生

    2002-01-01

    @@ Case History Mr. Li, a university student aged 23 years, paid his first visit on July 16, 2001, with the chief complaint of abdominal pain for one day. The patient stated that one day before when it happened to be the weekend, he got abdominal pain after supper, which went worse gradually and caused him to roll all over in bed. The pain was slightly alleviated half an hour later after he had taken some pain killers. Upon inquiry, the patient said that because of their newly graduation from the university, he and his classmates were so excited that they went to have a sumptuous lunch with alcoholic drinks. And in the evening he ate again a delicious supper cooked for him by his mother, after which he continued to have some fruit and dessert.

  15. Functional Abdominal Bloating with Distention

    Sullivan, Stephen Norman

    2012-01-01

    Ten to 25% of healthy persons experience bloating. It is particularly common in persons with the irritable bowel syndrome and constipation. While the cause of bloating remains unknown old explanations such as a excessive intestinal gas, exaggerated lumbar lordosis and psychiatric problems have been disproved. New suggestions include recent weight gain, weak or inappropriately relaxed abdominal muscles, an inappropriately contracted diaphragm and retained fluid in loops of distal small bowel. ...

  16. CT of abdominal blunt trauma

    We studied CT findings and interventional radiology including therapeutic procedures in 43 cases with abdominal blunt trauma, retrospectively. All of parenchymal organ's injuries, and injuries of duodenum and retroperitoneum were correctly diagnosed by CT. In 14 cases with only hemoperitoneum or no positive findings on CT, 4 cases were jejunal perforations, and remaining 10 cases were conservatively treated and relieved. We have to take care that the similar CT findings include the opposite results to need surgery and not. (author)

  17. [A case of abdominal wall actinomycosis].

    Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Jin Soo; Cho, Hyeong Jun; Choi, Seung Bong; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Il; Lee, In Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative granulomatous infectious disease caused by actinomyces species that is characterized by formation of characteristic clumps called as sulfur granules. Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare disease and is often difficult to diagnose before operation. Abdominal actinomycosis infiltrating into the abdominal wall and adhering to the colon is even rarer. Most abdominal actinomycosis develops after operation, trauma or inflammatory bowel disease, and is also considered as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patient with underlying malignancy, diabetes mellitus, human immunodeficiency virus infection, etc. Actinomycosis is diagnosed based on histologic demonstration of sulfur granules in surgically resected specimen or pus, and treatment consists of long-term penicillin based antibiotics therapy with or without surgical resection. Herein, we report an unusual case of abdominal wall actinomycosis which developed in a patient after acupuncture and presented as abdominal wall mass that was first mistaken for abdominal wall invasion of diverticulum perforation. PMID:25896158

  18. Abdominal wound closure: current perspectives

    Williams ZF

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Zachary F Williams, William W Hope Department of Surgery, South East Area Health Education Center, New Hanover Regional Medical Center, Wilmington, NC, USA Abstract: This review examines both early and late wound complications following laparotomy closure, with particular emphasis on technical aspects that reduce hernia formation. Abdominal fascial closure is an area of considerable variation within the field of general surgery. The formation of hernias following abdominal wall incisions continues to be a challenging problem. Ventral hernia repairs are among the most common surgeries performed by general surgeons, and despite many technical advances in the field, incisional hernia rates remain high. Much attention and research has been directed to the surgical management of hernias. Less focus has been placed on prevention of hernia formation despite its obvious importance. This review examines the effects of factors such as the type of incision, suture type and size, closure method, patient risk factors, and the use of prophylactic mesh. Keywords: incisional, abdominal, hernia, prevention, wound closure techniques 

  19. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  20. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  1. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    Catherine S Hubbard

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional gastrointestinal (GI disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL. Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC, whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI, whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease

  2. Urgent Abdominal Re-Explorations

    Peskersoy Mustafa

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of a number of complications that occur after abdominal surgeries may require that Urgent Abdominal Re-explorations (UARs, the life-saving and obligatory operations, are performed. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reasons for performing UARs, outcomes of relaparotomies (RLs and factors that affect mortality. Methods Demographic characteristics; initial diagnoses; information from and complications of the first surgery received; durations and outcomes of UAR(s performed in patients who received early RLs because of complicated abdominal surgeries in our clinic between 01.01.2000 and 31.12.2004 were investigated retrospectively. Statistical analyses were done using the chi-square and Fisher exact tests. Results Early UAR was performed in 81 out of 4410 cases (1.8%. Average patient age was 50.46 (13–81 years with a male-to-female ratio of 60/21. Fifty one (62.96% patients had infection, 41 (50.61% of them had an accompanying serious disease, 24 (29.62% of them had various tumors and 57 (70.37% patients were operated under emergency conditions during first operation. Causes of urgent abdominal re-explorations were as follows: leakage from intestinal repair site or from anostomosis (n:34; 41.97%; hemorrhage (n:15; 18.51%; intestinal perforation (n:8; 9.87%; intraabdominal infection or abscess (n:8; 9.87%; progressive intestinal necrosis (n:7; 8.64%; stomal complications (n:5; 6.17%; and postoperative ileus (n:4; 4.93%. Two or more UARs were performed in 18 (22.22% cases, and overall mortality was 34.97% (n:30. Interval between the first laparotomy and UAR averaged as 6.95 (1–20 days, and average hospitalization period was 27.1 (3–78 days. Mortality rate was found to be higher among the patients who received multiple UARs. The most common (55.5% cause of mortality was sepsis/multiple organ failure (MOF. The rates for common mortality and sepsis/MOF-dependent mortality that occured following UAR were

  3. Intra-abdominal metastasis of an intracranial germinoma via ventriculo-peritoneal shunt in a 13-year-old female.

    Murray, Matthew J; Metayer, Lucy E; Mallucci, Conor L; Hale, Juliet P; Nicholson, James C; Kirollos, Ramez W; Burke, G A Amos

    2011-12-01

    A 13-year-old patient presented with massive intra-abdominal metastasis and spontaneous acute tumour lysis syndrome, 17-months after VP shunt placement for metastatic pineal germinoma treated with cranio-spinal-irradiation. Hyperhydration/rasburicase improved renal function, allowing chemotherapy with subsequent surgery. The patient remains event-free 34-months later. Risk of intra-abdominal metastasis from VP shunts is discussed. PMID:21501064

  4. Decline of Cosmetic Outcomes Following Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Results of a Single-Institution Prospective Clinical Trial

    Liss, Adam L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ben-David, Merav A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Jagsi, Reshma; Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Biostatistics Unit, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean M.; Marsh, Robin B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pierce, Lori J., E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To report the final cosmetic results from a single-arm prospective clinical trial evaluating accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with active-breathing control (ABC). Methods and Materials: Women older than 40 with breast cancer stages 0-I who received breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective study evaluating APBI using IMRT administered with deep inspiration breath-hold. Patients received 38.5 Gy in 3.85-Gy fractions given twice daily over 5 consecutive days. The planning target volume was defined as the lumpectomy cavity with a 1.5-cm margin. Cosmesis was scored on a 4-category scale by the treating physician. Toxicity was scored according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3.0). We report the cosmetic and toxicity results at a median follow-up of 5 years. Results: A total of 34 patients were enrolled. Two patients were excluded because of fair baseline cosmesis. The trial was terminated early because fair/poor cosmesis developed in 7 of 32 women at a median follow-up of 2.5 years. At a median follow-up of 5 years, further decline in the cosmetic outcome was observed in 5 women. Cosmesis at the time of last assessment was 43.3% excellent, 30% good, 20% fair, and 6.7% poor. Fibrosis according to CTCAE at last assessment was 3.3% grade 2 toxicity and 0% grade 3 toxicity. There was no correlation of CTCAE grade 2 or greater fibrosis with cosmesis. The 5-year rate of local control was 97% for all 34 patients initially enrolled. Conclusions: In this prospective trial with 5-year median follow-up, we observed an excellent rate of tumor control using IMRT-planned APBI. Cosmetic outcomes, however, continued to decline, with 26.7% of women having a fair to poor cosmetic result. These results underscore the need for continued cosmetic assessment for patients treated with APBI by technique.

  5. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Is Safe and Effective Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Selected Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Lewin, Alan A., E-mail: alanl@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Derhagopian, Robert [Department of Surgery, Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Saigal, Kunal; Panoff, Joseph E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Abitbol, Andre; Wieczorek, D. Jay; Mishra, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Reis, Isildinha; Ferrell, Annapoorna [Division of Biostatistics, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Moreno, Lourdes [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Takita, Cristiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility, toxicity, cosmesis, and efficacy of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with respiratory gating to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in selected Stage I/II breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with node-negative Stage I/II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled in an institutional review board approved protocol to receive APBI using IMRT after breast-conserving surgery. The target volume was treated at 3.8 Gy/fraction twice daily for 5 days, to a total dose of 38 Gy. Results: Thirty-six patients were enrolled for a median follow-up time of 44.8 months. The median tumor size was 0.98 cm (range, 0.08-3 cm). The median clinical target volume (CTV) treated was 71.4 cc (range, 19-231 cc), with the mean dose to the CTV being 38.96 Gy. Acute toxicities included Grade 1 erythema in 44% of patients and Grade 2 in 6%, Grade 1 hyperpigmentation in 31% of patients and Grade 2 in 3%, and Grade 1 breast/chest wall tenderness in 14% of patients. No Grade 3/4 acute toxicities were observed. Grade 1 and 2 late toxicities as edema, fibrosis, and residual hyperpigmentation occurred in 14% and 11% of patients, respectively; Grade 3 telangiectasis was observed in 3% of patients. The overall cosmetic outcome was considered 'excellent' or 'good' by 94% of patients and 97% when rated by the physician, respectively. The local control rate was 97%; 1 patient died of a non-cancer-related cause. Conclusions: APBI can be safely and effectively administered using IMRT. In retrospective analysis, IMRT enabled the achievement of normal tissue dose constraints as outlined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 04-13/NSABP B-13 while providing excellent conformality for the CTV. Local control and cosmesis have remained excellent at current follow-up, with acceptable rates of acute/late toxicities. Our data suggest that cosmesis is dependent on target volume

  6. Decline of Cosmetic Outcomes Following Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Results of a Single-Institution Prospective Clinical Trial

    Purpose: To report the final cosmetic results from a single-arm prospective clinical trial evaluating accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with active-breathing control (ABC). Methods and Materials: Women older than 40 with breast cancer stages 0-I who received breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective study evaluating APBI using IMRT administered with deep inspiration breath-hold. Patients received 38.5 Gy in 3.85-Gy fractions given twice daily over 5 consecutive days. The planning target volume was defined as the lumpectomy cavity with a 1.5-cm margin. Cosmesis was scored on a 4-category scale by the treating physician. Toxicity was scored according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3.0). We report the cosmetic and toxicity results at a median follow-up of 5 years. Results: A total of 34 patients were enrolled. Two patients were excluded because of fair baseline cosmesis. The trial was terminated early because fair/poor cosmesis developed in 7 of 32 women at a median follow-up of 2.5 years. At a median follow-up of 5 years, further decline in the cosmetic outcome was observed in 5 women. Cosmesis at the time of last assessment was 43.3% excellent, 30% good, 20% fair, and 6.7% poor. Fibrosis according to CTCAE at last assessment was 3.3% grade 2 toxicity and 0% grade 3 toxicity. There was no correlation of CTCAE grade 2 or greater fibrosis with cosmesis. The 5-year rate of local control was 97% for all 34 patients initially enrolled. Conclusions: In this prospective trial with 5-year median follow-up, we observed an excellent rate of tumor control using IMRT-planned APBI. Cosmetic outcomes, however, continued to decline, with 26.7% of women having a fair to poor cosmetic result. These results underscore the need for continued cosmetic assessment for patients treated with APBI by technique

  7. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Is Safe and Effective Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Selected Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Purpose: To report the feasibility, toxicity, cosmesis, and efficacy of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with respiratory gating to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in selected Stage I/II breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with node-negative Stage I/II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled in an institutional review board approved protocol to receive APBI using IMRT after breast-conserving surgery. The target volume was treated at 3.8 Gy/fraction twice daily for 5 days, to a total dose of 38 Gy. Results: Thirty-six patients were enrolled for a median follow-up time of 44.8 months. The median tumor size was 0.98 cm (range, 0.08–3 cm). The median clinical target volume (CTV) treated was 71.4 cc (range, 19–231 cc), with the mean dose to the CTV being 38.96 Gy. Acute toxicities included Grade 1 erythema in 44% of patients and Grade 2 in 6%, Grade 1 hyperpigmentation in 31% of patients and Grade 2 in 3%, and Grade 1 breast/chest wall tenderness in 14% of patients. No Grade 3/4 acute toxicities were observed. Grade 1 and 2 late toxicities as edema, fibrosis, and residual hyperpigmentation occurred in 14% and 11% of patients, respectively; Grade 3 telangiectasis was observed in 3% of patients. The overall cosmetic outcome was considered “excellent” or “good” by 94% of patients and 97% when rated by the physician, respectively. The local control rate was 97%; 1 patient died of a non–cancer-related cause. Conclusions: APBI can be safely and effectively administered using IMRT. In retrospective analysis, IMRT enabled the achievement of normal tissue dose constraints as outlined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 04-13/NSABP B-13 while providing excellent conformality for the CTV. Local control and cosmesis have remained excellent at current follow-up, with acceptable rates of acute/late toxicities. Our data suggest that cosmesis is dependent on target volume size

  8. Estimated Probability of Traumatic Abdominal Injury During an International Space Station Mission

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Brooker, John E.; Weavr, Aaron S.; Myers, Jerry G., Jr.; McRae, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a decision support tool that is useful to spaceflight mission planners and medical system designers when assessing risks and optimizing medical systems. The IMM project maintains a database of medical conditions that could occur during a spaceflight. The IMM project is in the process of assigning an incidence rate, the associated functional impairment, and a best and a worst case end state for each condition. The purpose of this work was to develop the IMM Abdominal Injury Module (AIM). The AIM calculates an incidence rate of traumatic abdominal injury per person-year of spaceflight on the International Space Station (ISS). The AIM was built so that the probability of traumatic abdominal injury during one year on ISS could be predicted. This result will be incorporated into the IMM Abdominal Injury Clinical Finding Form and used within the parent IMM model.

  9. FULL TERM EXTRAUTERINE ABDOMINAL PREGNANCY

    Neetu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extrauterine abdominal pregnancy is extremely rare and is frequently missed during antenatal care, despite the routine use of obstetrics ultrasound. A 23 year old primigravida at 39 weeks of gestation was admitted to the department on December 2 , 2012, in routine hour with transverse lie with oligohydramnios. On examination her vitals and laboratory investigation were within normal limits . One of the ultrasonographic scanning done by radiologist at 35 wk. 3 days gestation demonstrated a single live intrauterine fetus of CGA 33 wk. 1 day with transverse lie , fundal gr II placenta and AFI - 10 cm. Ultrasonography done at the department on the day of admission demonstrated single live intrauterine fetus with transverse lie and AFI - 3.8 cm and EFW 2.4 Kg and placenta was right anterior.. She was planned for elective caesarean section on account of transverse lie and oligohydramnios at term. At laparotomy the following findings were made: Secondary abdominal pregnancy arising from right tubal ectopic rupture and making pseudogesta tional sac with meconium stained liquor. Omentum , right tube and ovary were adhered to sac. The uterus and left tube and ovary were healthy and normal . Other abdominal organs were normal. A 1.5 Kg live male baby with good Apgar score and incompletely formed mandible extracted from pseudo gestational sac. There was significant bleeding from pseudogestational sac and patient went in shock during intraoperative period. One unit whole blood transfused during intraoperative period. Placenta was adherent to the pseudogestational sac so Psudogestational sac was removed with placenta in situ and right sided salpingo - o ophrectomy was also done due to their adherence. Hemostasis was secured. The patient and baby progressed well and were discharged on the seventh postoperative day

  10. Radiography of the abdominal cavity

    Radiography is a very important part of the diagnostic procedure in many small animal diseases. Technically perfect X-rays are essential for the exact diagnosis. The general appearance of the abdominal cavity should be evaluated at first, e.g. the overall contrast and the definition of the visualized organs. Then particular attention should be paid, if there is any peritoneal effusion or free air in the peritoneal cavity. Subsequently each radiographically visible organ has to be evaluated for its position, size, shape and radiographic density

  11. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Linné, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease with a prevalence of 1.5-2.0% in 65-year old men in Sweden. The risk of having AAA is increased with smoking, high age, family history of AAA and cardiovascular disease. Women have a lower prevalence (0.5%) and develop AAA later in life. An AAA seldom gives any symptom prior to rupture. Untreated rupture is associated with 100% mortality, while surgically treated rupture is associated with 25-70% mortality. Prophylactic sur...

  12. Abdominal manifestations of autoimmune disorders

    Full text: Immunoglobulin G4-related disease was recognized as a systemic disease since various extrapancreatic lesions were observed in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The real etiology and pathogenesis of IgG4-RD is still not clearly understood. Moreover the exact role of IgG4 or IgG4-positive plasma cells in this disease has not yet been elucidated. only some inconsistent biological features such as hypergammaglobulinemia or hypocomplementemia support the autoimmune nature of the disease process. various names have been ascribed to this clinicopathological entity including IgG4-related sclerosing disease, IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease, IgG4-related disease, IgG4-related autoimmune disease, hyper-IgG4 disease and IgG4-related systemic disease. The extrapancreatic lesions of IgG4-RD also exhibit the same characteristic histologic features including dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, massive storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis as seen in IgG4-related pancreatitis. Abdominal manifestations include the following organs/systems: Bile ducts: Sclerosing cholangitis; Gallbladder and liver: Acalculous sclerosis cholecytitis with diffuse wall thickening; hepatic inflammatory pseudotumorts; Kidneys: round or wedge-shaped renal cortical nodules, peripheral cortical; lesions, mass like lesions or renal pelvic involvement; Prostate, urethra, seminal vesicle, vas deferens, uterine cervix; Autoimmune prostatitis; Retroperitoneum: Retroperitoneal fibrosis. thin or mildly thick homogeneous soft tissue lesion surrounding the abdominal aorta and its branches but also bulky masses causing hydronephroureterosis; Mesentery: Sclerosing mesenteritis usually involving the root of the mesentery; Bowel: Inflammatory bowel diseases mimicking Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. various types of sclerosing nodular lesions of the bowel wall; Stomach: Gastritis, gastric ulcers and focal masses mimicking submucosal tumor; omentum: Infiltration mimicking

  13. Association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis

    Chen, Jinmei; Hong, Jinsheng; Zou, Xi; Lv, Wenlong; Guo, Feibao; Hong, Hualan; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lung cancer. The normal lung relative volumes receiving greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V5–30) mean lung dose (MLD), and absolute volumes spared from greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (AVS5–30) for the bilateral and ipsilateral lungs of 83 patients were recorded. Any association of...

  14. On the abdominal pressure volume relationship

    Mulier, Jan Paul; Dillemans, Bruno; Crombach, Mark; Missant, Carlo; Sels, Annabel

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: During insufflation of the abdomen to create a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopy, both intra abdominal pressure and insufflated volume can be measured and are used to calculate the abdominal pressure-volume relationship. First, an accurate, linear relationship was identified using a mathematical model with an elastance, E, or its reciprocal the compliance C and with a pressure at zero volume, PV0. This function was stable and could be used to describe the abdominal characteristics of...

  15. TODDLER WITH RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN: MIGRAINE?

    Amit; Vaishali

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal migraine is a migraine variant, causing chronic idiopathic recurrent abdominal pain in 4-15% of children. It is usually seen between the ages of seven to twelve years and is more common in girls, with peak prevalence at the age of ten years. We report a 3 year old girl suffering from recurrent abdominal pain since 1½ years of age, who underwent extensive investigations as well as diagnostic laparotomy with appendectomy, and was ultimately diagnosed to have abdomi...

  16. Abdominal migraine in childhood: a review

    Scicchitano B

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice Scicchitano,1 Gareth Humphreys,1 Sally G Mitton,2 Thiagarajan Jaiganesh1 1Children's Emergency Department, 2Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, St Georges Hospital, St Georges Healthcare NHS Trust, Tooting, London, United Kingdom Abstract: The childhood condition of abdominal migraine has been described under many different synonyms, including "abdominal epilepsy", "recurrent abdominal pain", "cyclical vomiting syndrome", and "functional gastrointestinal disorder". In the early literature, abdominal migraine is included in the "childhood periodic syndrome", first described by Wyllie and Schlesinger in 1933. Abdominal migraine has emerged over the last century as a diagnostic entity in its own right thanks to the development of well defined diagnostic criteria and its recent inclusion in the International Headache Society's Classification of Headache disorders. Despite this progress, little is known about the pathophysiology of the condition, and the treatment options are poorly defined. Here we summarize the recent literature, with particular focus on establishing the diagnosis of abdominal migraine and its pathophysiology, and suggest an approach to management. Keywords: abdominal migraine, recurrent abdominal pain, abdominal epilepsy, cyclical vomiting

  17. TODDLER WITH RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN: MIGRAINE?

    Amit

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal migraine is a migraine variant, causing chronic idiopathic recurrent abdominal pain in 4-15% of children. It is usually seen between the ages of seven to twelve years and is more common in girls, with peak prevalence at the age of ten years. We report a 3 year old girl suffering from recurrent abdominal pain since 1½ years of age, who underwent extensive investigations as well as diagnostic laparotomy with appendectomy, and was ultimately diagnosed to have abdominal migraine. She responded well to the prophylactic drug Flunarizine.

  18. 5-AED enhances survival of irradiated mice in a G-CSF-dependent manner, stimulates innate immune cell function, reduces radiation-induced DNA damage and induces genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis

    The steroid androst-5-ene-3β, 17β-diol (5-androstenediol, 5-AED) elevates circulating granulocytes and platelets in animals and humans, and enhances survival during the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in mice and non-human primates. 5-AED promotes survival of irradiated human hematopoietic progenitors in vitro through induction of Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB)-dependent Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) expression, and causes elevations of circulating G-CSF and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, the in vivo cellular and molecular effects of 5-AED are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of action of 5-AED administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to mice 24 h before total body γ- or X-irradiation (TBI). We used neutralizing antibodies, flow cytometric functional assays of circulating innate immune cells, analysis of expression of genes related to cell cycle progression, DNA repair and apoptosis, and assessment of DNA strand breaks with halo-comet assays. Neutralization experiments indicated endogenous G-CSF but not IL-6 was involved in survival enhancement by 5-AED. In keeping with known effects of G-CSF on the innate immune system, s.c. 5-AED stimulated phagocytosis in circulating granulocytes and oxidative burst in monocytes. 5-AED induced expression of both bax and bcl-2 in irradiated animals. Cdkn1a and ddb1, but not gadd45a expression, were upregulated by 5-AED in irradiated mice. S.c. 5-AED administration caused decreased DNA strand breaks in splenocytes from irradiated mice. Our results suggest 5-AED survival enhancement is G-CSF-dependent, and that it stimulates innate immune cell function and reduces radiation-induced DNA damage via induction of genes that modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis. (author)

  19. Abdominal ultrasound in AIDS patients

    To analyze the ultrasonography findings in abdomen in the AIDS patients in our hospital, as well as the indications for this exploration, assessing the role of abdominal ultrasound (AU). The ultrasonographic and clinical findings in 527 patients who underwent a total of 715 explorations between 1992 and 1996 were studied. Hepatomegaly and/or splenomegaly, usually homogeneous, were observed in nearly half of the studies (45%); one third of the patients with marked splenomegaly presented visceral leishmaniasis. Focal lesions in liver and/or spleen, corresponding to angiomas, abscesses, lymphomatous lesions and metastasis, were detected in 5.7% of the explorations. Thirty-five percent of the AU revealed the presence of lymphadenopathy; nodes measuring over 2.5 cm were usually related to potential treatable infection or neoplasm. Thickening of the gallbladder wall did not usually indicate the presence of acute cholecystitis unless Murphy''s sign was also detected. Bile duct dilation and wall thickening was related to opportunistic cholangitis, and the increase in the echogenicity of the renal parenchyma was linked to AIDS-related nephropathy. Despite the fact that many of findings with AU are nonspecific, we consider that this approach should be the principal diagnostic technique in AIDS patients with suspected abdominal pathology or fever of unknown origin. (Author) 43 refs,

  20. The Neonate with Abdominal Mass

    M. Bajoghli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal abdominal masses have broad spectrum of pathology, ranging from small lesions found incidentally to large masses occupying the entire of peritoneal cavity. These tumors are benign to malignant, and from unilocular cysts to complex solid lesions. Many of these lesions identified and will treat before delivery. Others are discovered during routine examination. These lesions may be life threatening, or cause persistent morbidity. Some of these have no sequel."nDiagnosis began with history. Characteristic of the mass which must be note include location, size, shape, texture, mobility and tenderness. Other findings should be in mind to find out nature of mass, for example hypoplasia of chest wall with oligohydramnios due to GU tract obstruction (potter sequwnce, a bulging hymen due to hydrometrocolpus, skin metastasis due to neuroblastoma. Radiography is the next step that shows organomegaly and calcification. Next step is US which is an excellent screening tool. CT and MRI are occasionally indicated."nThe purpose of this presentation is to review the diagnosis of abdominal masses in neonates.

  1. Percutaneous drainage of abdominal abcess

    Men, Sueleyman E-mail: suleyman.men@deu.edu.tr; Akhan, Okan; Koeroglu, Mert

    2002-09-01

    The mortality in undrained abdominal abscesses is high with a mortality rate ranging between 45 and 100%. The outcome in abdominal abscesses, however, has improved due to advances in image guided percutaneous interventional techniques. The main indications for the catheter drainage include treatment or palliation of sepsis associated with an infected fluid collection, and alleviation of the symptoms that may be caused by fluid collections by virtue of their size, like pancreatic pseudocele or lymphocele. The single liver abscesses may be drained with ultrasound guidance only, whereas the multiple abscesses usually require computed tomography (CT) guidance and placement of multiple catheters. The pancreatic abscesses are generally drained routinely and urgently. Non-infected pancreatic pseudocysts may be simply observed unless they are symptomatic or cause problems such as pain or obstruction of the biliary or the gastrointestinal tract. Percutaneous routes that have been described to drain pelvic abscesses include transrectal or transvaginal approach with sonographic guidance, a transgluteal, paracoccygeal-infragluteal, or perineal approach through the greater sciatic foramen with CT guidance. Both the renal and the perirenal abscesses are amenable to percutaneous drainage. Percutaneous drainage provides an effective and safe alternative to more invasive surgical drainage in most patients with psoas abscesses as well.

  2. Uso da peritoneostomia na sepse abdominal Laparostomy in abdominal sepsis

    Juvenal da Rocha Torres Neto

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Dentre as modalidades terapêuticas da sepse abdominal, a peritoneostomia tem papel decisivo permitindo explorações e lavagens da cavidade de forma facilitada. Observamos pacientes com diagnóstico clínico de sepse abdominal internados no Serviço de Coloproctologia do Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal de Sergipe, e que foram submetidos a peritoneostomia de janeiro de 2004 a janeiro de 2006. Foram avaliados quanto ao diagnóstico primário e secundário, tipo de peritonite secundária, antibioticoterapia, esquema de lavagens, tempo de peritoneostomia, complicações e desfecho. Estudamos 12 pacientes, com idade de 15 a 57, média de 39,3 anos. Diagnóstico primário: abdome agudo inflamatório em 6(50%, abdome agudo obstrutivo em 2(16,7%, abdome agudo perfurativo em 2(16,7%, fístula enterocutânea em 1(8,3% e abscesso intra-cavitário em 1(8,3%. Diagnóstico secundário: perfuração de cólon em 4(33,3%, abscessos intra-cavitários em 3(25%, deiscências de anastomoses em 3(25%, 1(8,3% com tumor perfurado de sigmóide e 1(8,3% com necrose de cólon abaixado. Peritonite fecal em 10(83,3% e purulenta em 2(16,7%. A antibioticoterapia teve duração média de 19 dias. Lavagens de demanda em 6(50%, programadas em 4(33,3% e regime misto em 2(16,7%. O tempo médio de peritoneostomia foi de 10,9 dias (1-36. Como complicações: evisceração em 2(16,7% e fistulização em 1(8,3%. Quatro pacientes evoluíram com óbito.Among the therapeutics approach form of abdominal sepsis, the laparostomy has a decisive role allowing cavity explorations and lavages in an easier way. We study patients with abdominal sepsis diagnoses admitted to our surgical service of Coloproctology form Sergipe´s Federal University Hospital who underwent a Bogotá Bag laparostomy associated or not with polypropylene mesh from January 2004 to January 2006. These patients were assessed as: first and second diagnosis; secondary peritonitis type; antibiotic

  3. Synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall

    A case report of synovial sarcoma arising in the abdominal wall is presented. A brief review of the clinical and radiological features of synovial sarcoma is made. Pre-operative diagnosis of an abdominal wall synovial sarcoma is virtually impossible, but should be considered when a soft tissue swelling is found to show amorphous stippled calcification X-ray. (author)

  4. Abdominal Wall Modification for the Difficult Ostomy

    Beck, David E.

    2008-01-01

    A select group of patients with major stomal problems may benefit from operative modification of the abdominal wall. Options may include a modified abdominoplasty (abdominal wall contouring), localized flaps, or liposuction. Although frequently successful, these techniques have the potential for significant morbidity.

  5. Hypoxia inhibits abdominal expiratory nerve activity.

    Fregosi, R F; Knuth, S L; Ward, D K; Bartlett, D

    1987-07-01

    Our purpose was to examine the influence of steady-state changes in chemical stimuli, as well as discrete peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation, on abdominal expiratory motor activity. In decerebrate, paralyzed, vagotomized, and ventilated cats that had bilateral pneumothoraces, we recorded efferent activity from a phrenic nerve and from an abdominal nerve (cranial iliohypogastric nerve, L1). All cats showed phasic expiratory abdominal nerve discharge at normocapnia [end-tidal PCO2 38 +/- 2 Torr], but small doses (2-6 mg/kg) of pentobarbital sodium markedly depressed this activity. Hyperoxic hypercapnia consistently enhanced abdominal expiratory activity and shortened the burst duration. Isocapnic hypoxia caused inhibition of abdominal nerve discharge in 11 of 13 cats. Carotid sinus nerve denervation (3 cats) exacerbated the hypoxic depression of abdominal nerve activity and depressed phrenic motor output. Stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors with NaCN increased abdominal nerve discharge in 7 of 10 cats, although 2 cats exhibited marked inhibition. Four cats with intact neuraxis, but anesthetized with ketamine, yielded qualitatively similar results. We conclude that when cats are subjected to steady-state chemical stimuli in isolation (no interference from proprioceptive inputs), hypercapnia potentiates, but hypoxia attenuates, abdominal expiratory nerve activity. Mechanisms to explain the selective inhibition of expiratory motor activity by hypoxia are proposed, and physiological implications are discussed. PMID:3624126

  6. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Full Text Available COMPONENT SEPARATION FOR COMPLEX ABDOMINAL WALL RECONSTRUCTION ALBANY MEDICAL CENTER ALBANY, NY April 30, 2008 00:00:07 ANNOUNCER: This event is being ... the premiere webcast of a component separation for complex abdominal-wall reconstruction, performed by Dr. Jerome D. ...

  7. Actinomycosis mimicking abdominal neoplasm. Case report

    Waaddegaard, P; Dziegiel, M

    1988-01-01

    In a patient with a 6-month history of nonspecific abdominal complaints, preoperative examination indicated malignant disease involving the right ovary, rectum and sigmoid, but laparotomy revealed abdominal actinomycosis. Removal of the ovary and low anterior colonic resection followed by penicil...

  8. Live secondary abdominal pregnancy- by chance!!

    Akanksha Sood

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pregnancy though rare but is a life threatening situation, if not recognized and managed properly. We are hereby presenting a rare successful outcome in a case of ruptured live Secondary Abdominal pregnancy with placental implants over intestines. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(2.000: 251-253

  9. Cranial radiotherapy predisposes to abdominal adiposity in survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Advances in treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia increased the likelihood of developing late treatment-associated effects, such as abdominal adiposity, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population. Cranial radiotherapy is one of the factors that might be involved in this process. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cranial radiotherapy on adiposity indexes in survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia. A comparative cross-sectional study of 56 acute lymphocytic leukemia survivors, chronological age between 15 and 24 years, assigned into two groups according to the exposure to cranial radiotherapy (25 irradiated and 31 non-irradiated), assessed according to body fat (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), computed tomography scan-derived abdominal adipose tissue, lipid profile, and insulin resistance. Cranial radiotherapy increased body fat and abdominal adipose tissue and altered lipid panel. Yet, lipids showed no clinical relevance so far. There were significantly more obese patients among those who received cranial radiotherapy (52% irradiated versus 22.6% non-irradiated), based on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry body fat measurements. Nonetheless, no association was observed between cranial radiotherapy and body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio or insulin resistance. Adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia showed an increase in body fat and an alteration of fat distribution, which were related to cranial radiotherapy. Fat compartment modifications possibly indicate a disease of adipose tissue, and cranial radiotherapy imports in this process

  10. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages

  11. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.brugger@meduniwien.ac.at; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages.

  12. Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: A Fully Dynamic Delivery With Synchronized Couch and Gantry Motion Significantly Improves Dosimetric Indices Correlated With Poor Cosmesis in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Liang, Jieming; Atwood, Todd; Eyben, Rie von; Fahimian, Benjamin; Chin, Erika; Horst, Kathleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, California (United States); Otto, Karl [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, British Columbia (Canada); Hristov, Dimitre, E-mail: dimitre.hristov@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To develop planning and delivery capabilities for linear accelerator–based nonisocentric trajectory modulated arc therapy (TMAT) and to evaluate the benefit of TMAT for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with the patient in prone position. Methods and Materials: An optimization algorithm for volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was generalized to allow for user-defined nonisocentric TMAT trajectories combining couch rotations and translations. After optimization, XML scripts were automatically generated to program and subsequently deliver the TMAT plans. For 10 breast patients in the prone position, TMAT and 6-field noncoplanar intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were generated under equivalent objectives and constraints. These plans were compared with regard to whole breast tissue volume receiving more than 100%, 80%, 50%, and 20% of the prescription dose. Results: For TMAT APBI, nonisocentric collision-free horizontal arcs with large angular span (251.5 ± 7.9°) were optimized and delivered with delivery time of ∼4.5 minutes. Percentage changes of whole breast tissue volume receiving more than 100%, 80%, 50%, and 20% of the prescription dose for TMAT relative to IMRT were −10.81% ± 6.91%, −27.81% ± 7.39%, −14.82% ± 9.67%, and 39.40% ± 10.53% (P≤.01). Conclusions: This is a first demonstration of end-to-end planning and delivery implementation of a fully dynamic APBI TMAT. Compared with IMRT, TMAT resulted in marked reduction of the breast tissue volume irradiated at high doses.

  13. Modulation of in vitro transformation and the early and late modes of DNA replication of uv-irradiation Syrian hamster cells by caffeine

    The effect of caffeine on post-uv DNA replication was studied to determine its relevance to carcinogenesis. The level of uv-induced transformed colonies of Syrian hamster embryo cells (HEC) was increased up to fivefold when caffeine was added to cells between 0 and 6 h post-uv. The greatest increase was observed when the interval between uv irradiation and caffeine addition was 4 h. Two modes of DNA replication occurred after uv irradiation. During the early mode (0 to 3 h post-uv) the size of nascent strands, as measured by alkaline sucrose sedimentation, was smaller than those in nonirradiated cells, whereas during the late mode they recovered to normal size. Caffeine inhibited the rate of elongation of nascent strands during the early mode. When caffeine was added immediately after uv irradiation, the conversion of the early mode to the late mode was inhibited. Studies on the effects of caffeine have now been extended to the late mode. While caffeine has little effect with the fd elements beginning from the 10th day after irradiation is connected with their proliferation but not with the migration out from lymphoid organs

  14. Radio-prophylactic treatment with imidazole and/or Serotonin for Modulation of Tissue Catecholamines in whole body gamma irradiated Rats

    The present study has been conducted to evaluate the radioprotective effects of imidazole, serotonin and their combination on radiation induced reduction in catecholamine contents of the heart and adrenal glands in albino rat. The contribution of catecholamines in the radioprotective role of these agents has been evaluated. Whole-body gamma-irradiation (6 Gy) induced a significant reduction in heart and adrenal glands contents of catecholamine (epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine) one day post irradiation. Such reduction in catecholamine contents was more pronounced on the seventh day post exposure. Administration of imidazole (350 mg kg-1) or serotonin. (15 mg. kg-1) controlled the radiation induced reduction in catecholamine contents of heart as well as adrenal glands. Whereas, combination of imidazole (17 mg kg-1) serotonin (15 mg. kg-1) afforded a better protection than either agent given alone, in view that all the measured parameters could be fully restored to the values pre-irradiation. This study appreciate the usage of such combination as a prophylactic treatment for controlling the stress-state induced by irradiation which is associated with disturbed level of endogenous catecholamine contents in those sensitive patients undergoing radiotherapy. 2 tabs

  15. Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). Patients and methods The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatmen...

  16. Exogenous modulation of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} influences TGF-{beta}R-III-associated vascularization during wound healing in irradiated tissue

    Wehrhan, F.; Schultze-Mosgau, S. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany). Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Roedel, F. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany). Department of Radiation Oncology; Amann, K. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany). Institute of Pathology

    2004-08-01

    Background and purpose: Following preoperative radiotherapy prior to ablative surgery of squamous epithelial cell carcinomas of the head and neck region, wound-healing disorders occur. Previous experimental studies showed altered expression of transforming growth factor-(TGF-){beta} isoforms following surgery in irradiated graft beds. Altered levels of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} are reported to promote fibrosis and to suppress vascularization during wound healing, whereas expression of TGF-{beta} receptor-III (TGF-{beta}R-III) is associated with vascularization. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} treatment on TGF-{beta}R-III-associated vascularization in the transition area between irradiated graft bed and graft. Material and methods: Wistar rats (male, weight 300-500 g) underwent preoperative irradiation of the head and neck region with 40 Gy (four fractions of 10 Gy each; n=16 animals). A free myocutaneous gracilis flap taken from the groin was then transplanted to the neck in all rats. The time interval between operation and transplantation was 4 weeks. Eight animals received 1 {mu}g anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} into the graft bed by intradermal injection on days 1-7 after surgery. On days 3, 7, 14, 28, 56, and 120, skin samples were taken from the transition area between transplant and graft bed and from the graft bed itself. Immunohistochemistry was performed using the ABC-POX method to analyze the TGF-{beta}R-III and E-selection expression. Histomorphometry was performed to analyze the percentage and the area of positively stained vessels. Results: A significantly higher expression of TGF-{beta}R-III was seen in the irradiated and anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-treated graft bed in comparison to the group receiving preoperative irradiation followed by transplantation alone. The percentage of TGF-{beta}R-III positively staining capillaries from the total amount of capillaries in the anti-TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-treated graft bed was higher than in

  17. Effect of hepatic irradiation on the toxicity and pharmacokinetics of adriamycin in children

    The effect of hepatic irradiation on adriamycin toxicity and pharmacokinetics was studied in 10 children who received adriamycin with concurrent abdominal irradiation for Wilms' tumor. Hepatic irradiation to 2400 to 2700 rad at 100 to 150 rad per fraction did not alter the clinical toxicity or plasma pharmacokinetics of adriamycin

  18. Radiotherapy of ovarian epithelial cancer by total orthogonal field irradiation of the abdomen

    Isotopic intraperitoneal curietherapy by 32P is the simplest method for irradiating the peritoneum, but it has only limited indications. This irradiation has usually to be given by the percutaneous route, but because of the size of the region to be irradiated it raises delicate problems poorly resolved by the traditional methods applied. For this reason, a particular method is suggested including, among other characteristics: 4 orthogonal fields; 2 sessions daily, irradiating one part of the abdomen in the morning and the other part in the afternoon; spreading of the doses in confirmity with current specifications; and modulation of the total dose as a function of the maximum size of the tumoral remnants. Abdominal radiotherapy is currently the method of choice in cases where lesions are in their early stages, in so far as chemotherapy, much more restrictive for the patient, has not yet demonstrated its long-term efficacy. A controlled clinical study is necessary in order to determine the most effective method

  19. Abdominal Burkitt lymphoma in children : CT finding

    To evaluate the CT findings of Burkitt's lymphoma involving the abdomen in children We retrospectively analyzed the abdominal CT of ten children who presented with abdominal symptom. They were confirmed by operation in two cases and by fine needle aspiration biopsy in eight to be suffering from Burkitt's lymphoma. We also abdominal ultrasonography(USG)(n=10) and carried out small bowel follow-through examination(SBS)(n=5). Analyses focused on features of the abdominal mass : bowel wall thickening, ascites, lymphadenopathy, and the involvement of intra-abdominal solid organ. Abdominal CT at the time of presentation showed a huge conglomerated mass encasing segments of small bowel and also peripherally displacing bowel loops(n=9), bowel wall thickening(n=10), and ascites(n=10). In three of these cases, we were able to see tumor necrosis and cavity formation. Extensive infiltration into mesenteric fat and obliteration of tissue plane made it impossible to identify on CT the margin of the tumor and the presence of mesenteric lymphadenopathy. In four patients, sonography showed enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes(15-20mm), and in three, retroperitoneal lymph nodes(5mm, 10mm, 12mm in long dimension) were detected on CT and USG. Abdominal CT can reveal the characteristic imaging features of Burkitt's lymphoma in children. These are a huge conglomerate mass with or without cavity formation, that encases the small bowel and infiltrates the mesentery, ascites, and the relatively spared retroperitoneal lymph nodes

  20. Abdominal Burkitt lymphoma in children : CT finding

    Song, Jae Uoo; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Ahn, Hyo Seop; Shin, Hee Young [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chi Sung [Seoul City Boramae Hospital Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of Burkitt's lymphoma involving the abdomen in children We retrospectively analyzed the abdominal CT of ten children who presented with abdominal symptom. They were confirmed by operation in two cases and by fine needle aspiration biopsy in eight to be suffering from Burkitt's lymphoma. We also abdominal ultrasonography(USG)(n=10) and carried out small bowel follow-through examination(SBS)(n=5). Analyses focused on features of the abdominal mass : bowel wall thickening, ascites, lymphadenopathy, and the involvement of intra-abdominal solid organ. Abdominal CT at the time of presentation showed a huge conglomerated mass encasing segments of small bowel and also peripherally displacing bowel loops(n=9), bowel wall thickening(n=10), and ascites(n=10). In three of these cases, we were able to see tumor necrosis and cavity formation. Extensive infiltration into mesenteric fat and obliteration of tissue plane made it impossible to identify on CT the margin of the tumor and the presence of mesenteric lymphadenopathy. In four patients, sonography showed enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes(15-20mm), and in three, retroperitoneal lymph nodes(5mm, 10mm, 12mm in long dimension) were detected on CT and USG. Abdominal CT can reveal the characteristic imaging features of Burkitt's lymphoma in children. These are a huge conglomerate mass with or without cavity formation, that encases the small bowel and infiltrates the mesentery, ascites, and the relatively spared retroperitoneal lymph nodes.

  1. Abdominal ultrasonographic findings of Yersiniosis in children

    To review abdominal ultrasonography in Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis(YP) infection. From June 1993 through June 1994, abdominal ultrasonograms were reviewed in 36 patients with YP infection. The age of patients was from 4 to 14 years. A diagnosis of YP infection was made on the basis of isolation of YP from stool (n=15/36, 41.7%) and by documenting at least a minimum agglutination antibody titer of 1;160 or greater (n=34/36, 94.4%). Abdominal US findings were identified in 33/36 (91.7%) of patients with YP infection. US abnormalities included right lower quadrant abdominal lymphadenopathy in 28/36 (77.8%) of cases: increased bilateral renal cortical echogenecity with renal enlargement, 11/36 (30.6%) of cases:hepatosplenomegaly, 6/36 (16.7%) of cases: bowel wall thickening in termnal ileum and cecum, 4/36 (11.1%) of cases:and ascites, 2/36 (5.5%) of cases. Three patients revealed no abdominal sonographic finding. We conclude that abdominal US can help in the diagnosis of YP infection when US demonstrates multiple right lower quadrant abdominal lymphadenopathy, increased renal cortical echogenecity with renal enlargement, hepatosplenomegaly, intestinal wall thickening or ascites

  2. Radiologic findings of abdominal wall endometriosis

    To evaluate the imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis. In seven of 17 patients with surgically proven endometriosis of the abdominal wall, we retrospectively reviewed the findings of radiologic studies such as abdominal US (n=3), CT (n=4), and MRI (n=1). One patient under went more than one type of imaging, apparently. The surgical history of the seven, and their symptoms and preoperative diagnosis were reviewed, and the size, location, margin and nature of the mass, and the contrast enhancement patterns observed at radiologic studies, were assessed. The chief symptoms were palpable abdominal wall mass (n=5) and lower abdominal pain (n=2) around a surgical scar. Previous surgery included cesarean section (n=5), cesarean section with oophorectomy (n=1) and appendectomy (n=1). Masses were located in the subcutaneous fat layer (n=5) or rectus abdominis muscle (n=2), and their maximum diameter was 2.6 cm. Imaging findings, which correlated closely with the pathologic findings, included a well (n=5) or poorly marginated (n=2) solid mass, with a focal cystic area apparent in two cases. Although imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis may not be specific for diagnosis, the presence of a solid abdominal mass in female patients of reproductive age with a history of surgery is a diagnostic pointer

  3. Radiologic findings of abdominal wall endometriosis

    Seo, Jung Wook [Inje Univ. Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis. In seven of 17 patients with surgically proven endometriosis of the abdominal wall, we retrospectively reviewed the findings of radiologic studies such as abdominal US (n=3), CT (n=4), and MRI (n=1). One patient under went more than one type of imaging, apparently. The surgical history of the seven, and their symptoms and preoperative diagnosis were reviewed, and the size, location, margin and nature of the mass, and the contrast enhancement patterns observed at radiologic studies, were assessed. The chief symptoms were palpable abdominal wall mass (n=5) and lower abdominal pain (n=2) around a surgical scar. Previous surgery included cesarean section (n=5), cesarean section with oophorectomy (n=1) and appendectomy (n=1). Masses were located in the subcutaneous fat layer (n=5) or rectus abdominis muscle (n=2), and their maximum diameter was 2.6 cm. Imaging findings, which correlated closely with the pathologic findings, included a well (n=5) or poorly marginated (n=2) solid mass, with a focal cystic area apparent in two cases. Although imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis may not be specific for diagnosis, the presence of a solid abdominal mass in female patients of reproductive age with a history of surgery is a diagnostic pointer.

  4. Performance studies for the new CMS Outer Tracker module concept at HL-LHC based on measurements of charge collection properties in irradiated silicon sensors

    In order to increase the discovery potential of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, the high-luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) is expected to deliver a total of 3000 fb−1 integrated luminosity. The instantaneous luminosity will be increased by a factor of five compared to the LHC design luminosity. This results in an intensified track density and radiation level especially in the tracking systems, requiring new radiation hard silicon sensors for the CMS Outer Tracker. To cope with the increased track density and trigger rates, a new module concept based on the coincidence of hits in two closely stacked sensors is pursued for the new tracker, allowing the use of tracking and transverse momentum information already at the first trigger level. The performance of the new trigger module concept has been studied using a parametrization of the charge drift in the electric and magnetic field in the sensor. From that, the phase-space of efficient operation for this module concept and the binary readout in terms of collected charge and noise has been explored. - Highlights: • A module concept for the use in the upgraded CMS tracker at the HL-LHC is investigated. • The module provides track momentum information to the first trigger level of CMS. • pT-information is obtained by correlation of hits in two closely stacked sensors. • The performance is studied using a parametrization of the sensor response. • The possible phase-space of noise and clustering threshold is evaluated

  5. Combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic and abdominal splenosis.

    Javadrashid, Reza; Paak, Neda; Salehi, Ahad

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic, and abdominal splenosis who presented with attacks of flushing, tachycardia and vague abdominal pain. The patient's past medical history included a splenectomy due to abdominal trauma and years later, a lung lobectomy due to recurrent pneumonia. An enhancing solid mass adjacent to the upper pole of the left kidney and nodular pleural based lesions in the left hemi-thorax along with nodular lesions in subcutaneous tissue of the left chest wall suggested possible adrenal malignancy with multiple metastases. Histopathologic examination demonstrated benign lesions of ectopic splenic tissue. PMID:20804314

  6. Roentgenologic evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma

    This study comprises 25 cases of blunt abdominal trauma proved by surgery. It is concluded that visceral damage by blunt abdominal trauma may be suspected, but can not be satisfactorily diagnosed upon a single plane abdominal roentgenologic examination with clinical support. Contrary to some reports in the literature, rupture of the hallow, viscus is more susceptible than solid organ and ileum is more than jejunum. It is a useful roentgenologic sign denoting distension and small cresent air shadow in the duodenal sweep of the damaged pancreas

  7. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  8. Staging of pediatric abdominal malignancies

    The scope of this review is the role of CT in the staging of childhood solid abdominal malignancies. Owing to the limitations of space, only the commonest lesions will be discussed in detail: Wilms' tumor, neuroblastoma, and liver tumors. The TNM staging system has been utilized throughout this monograph. It will not be used in this chapter, however, since in this country different staging systems individualized to each pediatric tumor have been developed. These staging systems take into account the different biology of each tumor and have clear correlations with prognosis and therapeutic programs. The discussion centers almost exclusively on the role of CT in the staging and management of neoplastic processes in children. The information required for staging can sometimes be obtained by other imaging modalities (i.e., ultrasound, excretory urography, etc.) The choice of modality will be strongly influenced by techniques and expertise available as well as by the bias of the institution. An additional factor to be taken into consideration will be the economic factor. Prospective reimbursement will strongly encourage the use of tests that are cost-effective and clinically efficacious

  9. Early intestinal changes following abdominal radiotherapy. Comparison of endpoints

    Purpose: To compare tests for intestinal function with clinical scores after abdominal irradiation. Patients and Methods: At the Department of Radiotherapy, Erfurt, Germany, intestinal changes were studied in 91 patients receiving abdominal radiotherapy between 1992 and 1996. Conventional fractionation (1.8-2 Gy per fraction, total doses 30.6-62.5 Gy) was applied. Before and at weekly intervals during radiotherapy, the clinical response was scored according to RTOG/EORTC for the upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract. REsorption tests for vitamin B12 and D-xylose were performed before the onset and immediately after treatment. Results: The clinical response displayed a well-defined dose-effects relationship with grade 1 effects in 5% and 50% of the patients at about 10 Gy and 50 Gy, respectively. For grade 2 reactions, 5%- and 50%-effective doses were 20-30 Gy and 60-80 Gy. Effects in the upper and lower GI tract were highly correlated. Changes in body weight did not show a correlation with other clinical symptoms. Changes in resorption also displayed a significant dose effect. However, no correlation was found with the clinical symptoms in the individual patient. Conclusion: In the present study, the clinical manifestation of intestinal side effects according to RTOG/EORTC criteria was reflected by neither the vitamin B12 nor by the D-xylose resorption test. Hence, these tests cannot be regarded as useful for objective quantitation of intestinal radiation injury. (orig.)

  10. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Full Text Available ... was yes, it did -- right here -- it did cause seromas as well. Another thing was that the ... is two things: one is it's going to cause more adherence of the Veritas to the abdominal ...

  11. An Unusual Case of Abdominal Pain

    Bobby Desai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal calyceal rupture is a usual etiology of abdominal pain in the emergency department. We present a case of unexpected renal calyx rupture in a patient with symptomatology of renal colic. A discussion and review are provided.

  12. Asthma May Raise Risk for Abdominal Aneurysm

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157202.html Asthma May Raise Risk for Abdominal Aneurysm Airway disease ... People 50 and older who have had recent asthma activity appear to be at an increased risk ...

  13. Adhesive intestinal obstruction following blunt abdominal trauma

    Advances in diagnosis and management of multiple trauma patients have lead to adopting a conservative approach for most patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Intestinal obstruction is a rare complication for this approach. Herein, we report a 37-year-old male, who did not have an abdominal operation, and who developed adhesive intestinal obstruction 7 weeks following blunt abdominal trauma. We detected no signs of peritonitis or intra-abdominal bleeding clinically or radiologically on admission. We initially treated the intestinal obstruction conservatively, but the obstruction did not resolve. Finally, we performed laparotomy, which showed that the small bowel was matted together by thick fibrous layers of adhesions. We performed adhesiolysis, and the patient was discharged home 3 weeks later. Histopathological findings of the fibrous layer were consistent with repair due to previous trauma and hemorrhage. We review the literature of this rare condition. (author)

  14. Rotura e Hematoma do Recto Abdominal

    Moura, D.; Lindo, T

    2013-01-01

    A miologia ântero-lateral do abdómen é constituída por dois músculos longos, o recto abdominal e o piramidal e três músculos largos, o oblíquo externo, oblíquo interno e transverso abdominal. A bainha do recto abdominal é formada pelas aponevroses de inserção anteriores dos músculos largos do abdómen em volta do recto abdominal, tendo camada anterior e camada posterior. Estes músculos abdominais são responsáveis por flexão e rotação do tronco, compressão e suporte/estabilidade de vísceras abd...

  15. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Full Text Available COMPONENT SEPARATION FOR COMPLEX ABDOMINAL WALL RECONSTRUCTION ALBANY MEDICAL CENTER ALBANY, NY April 30, 2008 00:00: ... Koumanis. The surgery comes to you from Albany Medical Center in Albany, New York. In just moments, ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    ... size and can usually be diagnosed early in fetal development, typically between the tenth and fourteenth weeks of ... organs at the abdominal wall opening late in fetal development may also contribute to organ injury. Intestinal damage ...

  17. Surveillance intervals for small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Bown, Matthew J; Sweeting, Michael J; Brown, Louise C;

    2013-01-01

    Small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs [3.0 cm-5.4 cm in diameter]) are monitored by ultrasound surveillance. The intervals between surveillance scans should be chosen to detect an expanding aneurysm prior to rupture....

  18. Audit of abdominal pain in general practice

    Edwards, M.W.; Forman, W.M.; Walton, J.

    1985-01-01

    An audit of 150 consecutive cases of abdominal pain presenting to an urban teaching practice between October 1983 and May 1984 was performed. The median duration of pain prior to presentation was two days. Females predominated in all age groups.

  19. [Intestinal occlusion and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS)].

    Stagnitti, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal occlusion is defined as an independent predictive factor of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) which represents an independent predictor of mortality. Baggot in 1951 classified patients operated with intestinal occlusion as being at risk for IAH ("abdominal blow-out"), recommending them for open abdomen surgery proposed by Ogilvie. Abdominal surgery provokes IAH in 44.7% of cases with mortality which, in emergency, triples with respect to elective surgery (21.9% vs 6.8%). In particular, IAH is present in 61.2% of ileus and bowel distension and is responsible for 52% of mortality (54.8% in cases with intra-abdominal infection). These patients present with an increasing intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) which, over 20-25 mmHg, triggers an Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (ACS) with altered functions in some organs arriving at Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS). The intestine normally covers 58% of abdominal volume but when there is ileus distension, intestinal pneumatosis develops (third space) which can occupy up to 90% of the entire cavity. At this moment, Gastro Intestinal Failure (GIF) can appear, which is a specific independent risk factor of mortality, motor of "Organ Failure". The pathophysiological evolution has many factors in 45% of cases: intestinal pneumatosis is associated with mucosal and serous edema, capillary leakage with an increase in extra-cellular volume and peritoneal fluid collections (fourth space). The successive loss of the mucous barrier permits a bacterial translocation which includes bacteria, toxins, pro-inflammatory factors and oxygen free radicals facilitating the passage from an intra-abdominal to inter-systemic vicious cyrcle. IAH provokes the raising of the diaphragm, and vascular and visceral compressions which induce hypertension in the various spaces with compartmental characteristics. These trigger hypertension in the renal, hepatic, pelvic, thoracic, cardiac, intracranial, orbital and lower extremity areas, giving

  20. Performance studies for the new CMS Outer Tracker module concept at HL-LHC based on measurements of charge collection properties in irradiated silicon sensors

    Nürnberg, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.nuernberg@kit.edu

    2015-10-01

    In order to increase the discovery potential of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, the high-luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) is expected to deliver a total of 3000 fb{sup −1} integrated luminosity. The instantaneous luminosity will be increased by a factor of five compared to the LHC design luminosity. This results in an intensified track density and radiation level especially in the tracking systems, requiring new radiation hard silicon sensors for the CMS Outer Tracker. To cope with the increased track density and trigger rates, a new module concept based on the coincidence of hits in two closely stacked sensors is pursued for the new tracker, allowing the use of tracking and transverse momentum information already at the first trigger level. The performance of the new trigger module concept has been studied using a parametrization of the charge drift in the electric and magnetic field in the sensor. From that, the phase-space of efficient operation for this module concept and the binary readout in terms of collected charge and noise has been explored. - Highlights: • A module concept for the use in the upgraded CMS tracker at the HL-LHC is investigated. • The module provides track momentum information to the first trigger level of CMS. • p{sub T}-information is obtained by correlation of hits in two closely stacked sensors. • The performance is studied using a parametrization of the sensor response. • The possible phase-space of noise and clustering threshold is evaluated.

  1. Using abdominal massage in bowel management.

    Connor, Michelle; Hunt, Catherine; Lindley, Alison; Adams, John

    2014-07-15

    This article describes the introduction of abdominal massage techniques by a community team as part of a total bowel management programme for people with learning disabilities. A trust-wide audit of prescribed laxative use by this client group raised concerns, and led to a more systematic approach to managing constipation in people with learning disabilities. An education programme for carers proved to be successful. Some reported that adopting abdominal massage provided further opportunity to develop the therapeutic relationship. PMID:25005415

  2. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes Melzer; Isabella Mastrangi Magrini; Semíramis Martins Álvares Domene; Paula Andrea Martins

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's wa...

  3. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta.

    Barchiche, R; Bové, T; Demanet, H; Goldstein, J P; Deuvaert, F E

    1999-08-01

    A traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta is a rare entity, occurring as the result of a missed aortic lesion at the time of the initial injury. Therefore, clinical suspicion and careful abdominal exploration at first laparotomy is mandatory to prevent aortic pseudoaneurysm formation and its risk of delayed rupture. We present a case of successful surgical treatment of a suprarenal aortic false aneurysm, presenting 4 weeks after a life-threatening gunshot wound in a 13-year-old child. PMID:10499389

  4. A rare nonincisional lateral abdominal wall hernia

    Kim, Dong-Ju; Park, Jin-Woo

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman presented a rare lateral abdominal wall hernia. Three month before admission to Chungbuk National University Hospital, she found a large protruding mass measuring 8 cm in diameter in the midaxillary line just below the costal margin upon heavy coughing. She had no history of abdominal trauma, infection, or operation previously. The mass was easily reduced manually or by position change to left lateral decubitus. CT scan showed a defect of the right transversus abdominis mu...

  5. Abdominal integument atrophy after operative procedures

    Smereczyński, Andrzej; Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Lubiński, Jan; Bojko, Stefania; Gałdyńska, Maria; Bernatowicz, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze clinical material concerning postoperative atrophy of abdominal integument. Material and methods The evaluated group consisted of 29 patients with sonographically revealed atrophy of the abdominal wall. Those changes were observed after various surgical procedures: mainly after long, anterolateral laparotomies or several classical operations. Ultrasound examinations up to the year 2000 were performed with analog apparatus, in the latter years only with digi...

  6. Anesthetic Considerations for Abdominal Wall Reconstructive Surgery

    Slabach, Rachel; Suyderhoud, Johan P.

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia considerations for abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) are numerous and depend upon the medical status of the patient and the projected procedure. Obesity, sleep apnea, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease are not uncommon in patients with abdominal wall defects; pulmonary functions and cardiac output can be affected by the surgical procedure. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are also at a higher risk of coughing during the postoperative awakening process, wh...

  7. Asymptomatic torsion of intra-abdominal testis

    M. Amin El-Gohary

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of intra-abdominal testicular torsion, of eight years old boy who presented with asymptomatic left impalpable testis. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed a twisted small intra-abdominal testis in which the spermatic cord twisted 3 times over a band attached to the internal ring. The cord was long enough to bring the small testis into the scrotal sac. This case highlights the pole of laparoscopy in the management of impalpable testes.

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of expanding haematoma of the lateral abdominal wall after blunt abdominal trauma

    We report a rare case of an expanding post-traumatic lateral abdominal wall haematoma. A superselective arteriogram of the deep circumflex iliac artery showed extravasation from the ascending branch, urging emergency therapy. Microcoil and Gelfoam embolisation was successfully performed. Haematomas of the abdominal wall can be divided in the common rectus sheath haematomas and the rare haematomas of the lateral abdominal wall. Differentiating both entities is essential, since there is a strong difference in their vascular supply. The typical vascular supply of the lateral abdominal wall is discussed, with emphasis on the ascending branch of the deep circumflex iliac artery. (orig.)

  9. Abdominal tuberculosis: clinical presentation and outcome

    To study the clinical presentation and outcome of cases of Abdominal Tuberculosis. Fifty four patients of Abdominal Tuberculosis were seen during the study period. Four patients were lost to follow-up, which were excluded. Detailed information of all the patients including age, sex, symptoms, signs, investigations and management was recorded, analyzed and compared with local and international data. Out of the 50 patients with Abdominal Tuberculosis, 31 were females and 19 males. Their ages ranged from 17 to 63 years, with a mean age of 25.1 years. Thirty five cases were admitted through Emergency and 15 through Outpatients departments. Abdominal pain was the most common symptom found in 44 (88%) patients followed by vomiting in 33 (66%). Abdominal tenderness was seen in 22 (44%) patients, while 16 (32%) patients had rigidity and other features of peritonitis. Surgery was performed in all these patients, limited right hemicolectomy in 17 (34%), segmental resection and anastomosis in 12 (24%), ileostomy and strictureplasty in six (12%) each, repair of perforation in five (10%) and adhesiolysis in four (8%) patients. Overall mortality was 8% due to septicaemia and multiorgan failure. Abdominal Tuberculosis is a significant clinical entity with lethal complications in neglected cases. It affects a younger age group and is more common in females. Clinical features are rather non-specific but vague ill health, low grade fever, weight loss and anorexia may help to diagnose the case. (author)

  10. Effect of rectal distension on abdominal girth.

    Marino, B; Ogliari, C; Basilisco, G

    2004-08-01

    It has been postulated that a viscerosomatic reflex activated by gut distension and inhibiting abdominal wall muscle tone may be one of the mechanisms underlying functional abdominal distension. Any demonstration of such a reflex has to take into account the fact that gut distension may increase abdominal girth as a result of volume displacement. As biomechanical and sensory rectal responses vary at different rates of rectal distension, we hypothesized that different rates of rectal distension might reveal different changes in abdominal girth. Abdominal girth was continuously recorded in 14 healthy subjects using a previously validated extensometer. The rectal distensions were made in a randomized order at rates of 100 mL min(-1) or 10 mL min(-1) up to 150 mL, and sham distensions were used as controls. An increase in abdominal girth was observed at the end of both distensions (P

  11. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes Melzer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998 and Taylor et al. (2000 were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3, female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3 and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0 were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Conclusions: Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children.

  12. Nutritional and metabolic changes due the abdominal radiation: experimental study

    In this study the effects on nutritional status and energetic metabolism due the abdominal irradiation were analysed. Adult male wistar rats (48), were divided in two groups Control (C) and radiated (R). The rats were maintained all time in metabolic cages. the study was done in two periods: period 1 begun at 0 day, were rats adapted to cages and oral diet, had food and water ad libitum. At the day four indirect calorimetric measurements were performed (calorimetry 1). At period 2, group R rats abdominal radiation at a 300 c Gy/day rate, for 5 consecutive days, and group C started a pair-feeding process linked individually to R rats and suffered application to simulated-irradiation. Two other calorimetric measurements (II,III) were performing during period 2. After radiation the last calorimetry was performed (IV). At sacrifice (day 14) blood was collected for determination of hemoglobin, hematocrit, albumin and transferrin. There were no statistical differences among groups C and R during period 1 (p < 0.05). Great reduction in food intake and weight variation were found in period 2, but weight loss was significantly higher in R rats. Nitrogen balance decrease in period 2, but without difference among the groups (p < 0.05). Serum albumin was significantly lower in R rats. Respiratory quotient decreased in both groups during period 2, but rats kept it lower (p < 0.05). The energy expenditure level decreased after radiation in group R. During period 2 total substrate oxidation decreased in R rats. Radiation decrease glucose and protein oxidation. In conclusion, in this study's conditions, radiation produced malnutrition by reducing food intake by bringing weight loss, hypoalbuminemia and decrease nitrogen balance. Radiation was also responsible for a reduction of metabolism, by promoting the fall of energy expenditure. These changes are not only due the anorexia, undoubtful a main factor. (author)

  13. Renal Atrophy Secondary to Chemoradiotherapy of Abdominal Malignancies

    Purpose: To identify factors predictive of renal atrophy after chemoradiotherapy of gastrointestinal malignancies. Methods and Materials: Patients who received chemotherapy and abdominal radiotherapy (RT) between 2002 and 2008 were identified for this study evaluating change in kidney size and function after RT. Imaging and biochemical data were obtained before and after RT in 6-month intervals. Kidney size was defined by craniocaudal measurement on CT images. The primarily irradiated kidney (PK) was defined as the kidney that received the greater mean kidney dose. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to predict risk for renal atrophy. Results: Of 130 patients, median age was 64 years, and 51.5% were male. Most primary disease sites were pancreas and periampullary tumors (77.7%). Median follow-up was 9.4 months. Creatinine clearance declined 20.89%, and size of the PK decreased 4.67% 1 year after completion of chemoradiation. Compensatory hypertrophy of the non-PK was not seen. Percentage volumes of the PK receiving ≥10 Gy (V10), 15 Gy (V15), and 20 Gy (V20) were significantly associated with renal atrophy 1 year after RT (p = 0.0030, 0.0029, and 0.0028, respectively). Areas under the ROC curves for V10, V15, and V20 to predict >5% decrease in PK size were 0.760, 0.760, and 0.762, respectively. Conclusions: Significant detriments in PK size and renal function were seen after abdominal RT. The V10, V15, and V20 were predictive of risk for PK atrophy 1 year after RT. Analyses suggest the association of lower-dose renal irradiation with subsequent development of renal atrophy.

  14. Impact of planning target volume (PTV) on the late toxicity and on survival without biochemical relapse among patients suffering from a prostate cancer and treated by intensity-modulated conformational irradiation guided by three-dimensional echography; Impact du volume cible previsionnel (PTV) sur la toxicite tardive et la survie sans rechute biochimique chez des patients atteints d'un cancer de la prostate traite par irradiation conformationnalle avec modulation d'intensite guidee par echographie tridimensionnelle

    Mirjolet, C.; Crehange, G.; Gauthier, M.; Azelie, C.; Martin, E.; Truc, G.; Peignaux, K.; Bonnetain, F.; Naudy, S.; Maingon, P. [Centre Georges Francois Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France)

    2010-10-15

    As several dosimetric studies demonstrated a theoretical benefit of the image-guided and intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) to reduce the planning target volume (PTV) margins and irradiated healthy tissues, the authors report and discuss data obtained on 170 men suffering from a prostate cancer and treated by IMRT with a daily repositioning performed using a three-dimensional echography. Patients have been classified in two groups with respect to the margin value. Toxicity has been assessed and survival without biochemical progress has been computed. Few grade 2 genital-urinary effects have been observed. Only patients having a Gleason score greater than 7 or suffering from diabetes have a lower survival rate without biochemical advance. Short communication

  15. Modulation of radioprotective effects of respiratory hypoxia by changing the duration of hypoxia before irradiation and by combining hypoxia and administration of hemopoiesis-stimulating agents

    Aim: Analysis of radioprotective effect of respiratory hypoxia on hemopoietic tissue and enhancement of this effect by hemopoietic activation. Material and methods: In mice breathing hypoxic gas mixture during total body gamma irradiation the recovery of pluripotent and committed granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells and animal lethality were determined. Results: In mice forced to breathe 10% O2 and 8% O2 during irradiation, the oxygen tension in the spleen decreased to 40% and 20%, respectively, of control values. Hypoxia mitigated the lethal effect of gamma-rays and improved the recovery of hemopoiesis in compartments of pluripotent and committed progenitor cells. Enhancement of the proliferative activity in hemopoietic tissue by a cytokine (rmGM-CSF) or an immunomodulator (dextran sulfate) increased the effect of hypoxic radioprotection, while elimination of proliferative cells by hydroxyurea decreased the radioprotective effect. Adaptation of experimental animals to hypoxic conditions was found to reduce the radioprotective effect without influencing tissue partial oxygen pressure lowered by hypoxic conditions. Conclusion: The data presented confirm the radioprotective effect of 10% and 8% O2 respiratory hypoxia on hemopoiesis. These findings may represent a way out for further experimental and clinical research aimed at considering differential protection of various tissues by hypoxia. (orig.)

  16. DIEP breast reconstruction following multiple abdominal liposuction procedures

    Farid, Mohammed; Nicholson, Simon; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Akali, Augustine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Previous abdominal wall surgery is viewed as a contraindication to abdominal free tissue transfer. We present two patients who underwent multiple abdominal liposuction procedures, followed by successful free deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. We review the literature pertaining to reliability of abdominal free flaps in those with previous abdominal surgery. Methods: Review of case notes and radiological investigations of two patients, and a PubMed search using the ter...

  17. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Intra-abdominal Ischemia in Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Smit, M.; Buddingh, K. T.; Bosma, B; Nieuwenhuijs, V B; Hofker, H.S.; Zijlstra, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Severe acute pancreatitis may be complicated by intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), and intestinal ischemia. The aim of this retrospective study is to describe the incidence, treatment, and outcome of patients with severe acute pancreatitis and ACS

  18. The therapeutic impact of abdominal ultrasound in patients with acute abdominal symptoms

    AIM: The technical performance of abdominal ultrasound in the investigation of acute abdominal pain has been thoroughly investigated but its therapeutic effects are less well understood. We aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of abdominal ultrasound in the investigation of acute abdominal pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A pre- and post-intervention observational study design was used to determine the diagnostic and therapeutic effects of abdominal ultrasound for acute abdominal pain. Referring clinicians completed a pre-ultrasound questionnaire that detailed their leading diagnosis, confidence in this and intended management in 100 consecutive adult patients. Following ultrasound a second questionnaire was completed. This again detailed the leading diagnosis, confidence in this and their intended management. Clinicians quantified the management contribution of ultrasound both for the individual case in question and in their clinical experience generally. RESULTS: The leading diagnosis was either confirmed or rejected in 72 patients and a new diagnosis provided where no prior differential diagnosis existed in 10. Diagnostic confidence increased significantly following ultrasound (mean score 6·5 pre-ultrasound vs 7·6 post-ultrasound, P < 0·001). Intended management changed following ultrasound in 22 patients; 15 intended laparotomies were halted and a further seven patients underwent surgery where this was not originally intended. Ultrasound was rated either 'very' or 'moderately' helpful in 87% of patients, with 99% of clinicians finding it either 'very' or 'moderately' helpful generally. CONCLUSION: Abdominal ultrasound has considerable diagnostic and therapeutic effect in the setting of acute abdominal pain. Dhillon, S. et al. (2002)

  19. Prenatal diagnosis of a fetal abdominal eventration: a rare congenital abdominal wall defect.

    Roth, Philippe; Martin, Alain; Bawab, Fariz; Fellmann, Florence; Aubert, Didier; Maillet, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of abdominal eventration associated with cystic fibrosis, diagnosed by mid-trimester ultrasonography. The defect concerned the abdominal muscles and their aponevrotic sheath, but respected the skin. There was no associated malformation. The outcome was favorable after surgery, and the infant is well at the age of 6 months. PMID:18046068

  20. Adjuvant whole abdominal radiotherapy in epithelial cancer of the ovary

    Purpose: To reexamine the use of adjuvant radiotherapy in optimally debulked patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 1985 and April 1998, 60 patients were treated with adjuvant whole abdominal radiotherapy (A-WART). The stage distribution was Stage IC in 17 patients, Stage II in 9, and Stage III in 34. The grade distribution was Grade 1 in 9 patients, Grade 2 in 27, and Grade 3 in 24; thus, 60% of the patients had Stage III disease and 40% had Grade 3 tumors. After surgery, no residuum was left in 42 (70%), ≤2 cm in 13 (22%), and >2 cm in 5 (8%) of 60 patients. Of the 60 patients, 19 also received platinum-based chemotherapy; in 12 of the 19, the chemotherapy was before A-WART. Thirty-seven of the patients had undergone previous abdominal procedures and a second-look operation was performed in 25% of them. A-WART consisted of 22 Gy in 22 fractions, at 5 fractions weekly in 90% of the patients. The remaining 10% received 25 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. The A-WART was delivered using a 4-MV linear accelerator. After abdominal irradiation, a boost to the pelvis was given to reach 45 Gy at 1.8 cGy/fraction, using a 4-15-MV linear accelerator. Results: Treatment was delivered in a median of 50 days (range 48-70). In 12 (20%) of the 60 patients, a transient treatment interruption occurred because of acute toxicity, mainly vomiting and diarrhea. The overall survival rate was 55% at 5 years (median follow-up 96.5 months). Patients with low-histologic grade tumors (Grade 1-2) had a better 5-year survival rate (66%) than those with Grade 3 tumors (35%; p<0.03). A tendency for better survival was found for those with Stage I-II than for those with Stage III (69% vs. 43%). Nonetheless, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p 0.17). For patients receiving chemotherapy, the 5-year survival rate was 51%, not statistically different from the 58% 5-year survival rate observed among those patients without adjuvant chemotherapy (p=0.9). The

  1. Comparison of Performance Measurements of Photovoltaic Modules during Winter Months in Taxila, Pakistan

    Muhammad Anser Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the comparative performance evaluation of three commercially available photovoltaic modules (monocrystalline, polycrystalline, and single junction amorphous silicon in Taxila, Pakistan. The experimentation was carried out at outdoor conditions for winter months. Power output, module efficiency, and performance ratio were calculated for each module and the effect of module temperature and solar irradiance on these parameters was investigated. Module parameters showed strong dependence on the solar irradiance and module temperature. Monocrystalline and polycrystalline modules showed better performance in high irradiance condition whereas it decreased suddenly with decrease in irradiance. Amorphous solar module also showed good performance in low irradiance due to its better light absorbing characteristics and thus showed higher average performance ratio. Monocrystalline photovoltaic module showed higher monthly average module efficiency and was found to be more efficient at this site. Module efficiency and performance ratio showed a decreasing trend with increase of irradiance and photovoltaic module back surface temperature.

  2. Upper abdominal malignancies (not including esophagus)

    combined with chemotherapy in patients with unresectable disease, and that radiation therapy and chemotherapy is of value as an adjuvant therapy in patients who have had a potentially curative surgical resection. There is relatively little information on the treatment of cancers of the biliary tract with radiation therapy. However, the existing data on recurrence patterns and therapy will be reviewed. The use of brachytherapy for patients with biliary obstruction will be discussed. In most tumors of the GI tract, the combination of radiation therapy with 5-FU chemotherapy seems to be more effective than radiation therapy alone. Newer information suggests that modulators of 5-FU effect such as leucovorin, or altered modes of administration such as continuous infusion, may be beneficial. These issues will be discussed as they relate to the upper abdominal malignancies

  3. Modulation of macrophage function by gamma-irradiation. Acquisition of the primed cell intermediate stage of the macrophage tumoricidal activation pathway

    Macrophage activation for tumor cell killing is a multistep pathway in which responsive macrophages interact sequentially with priming and triggering stimuli in the acquisition of full tumoricidal activity. Although this synergistic response of normal macrophages to sequential incubation with activation signals has been well established, characterization of the intermediate stages in this pathway has been difficult, due in large measure to the instability of the intermediate cell phenotypes. We have developed a model system for examination of macrophage-mediated tumor cell lysis, with the use of the murine macrophage tumor cell line RAW 264.7. These cells, like normal macrophages, exhibit a strict requirement for interaction with both interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma, the priming signal) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the triggering signal) in the development of tumor cytolytic activity. In this system, the priming effects of IFN-gamma decay rapidly after withdrawal of this mediator and the cells become unresponsive to LPS triggering. We have recently observed that gamma-irradiation of the RAW 264.7 cells also results in development of a primed activation state for tumor cell killing. The effects of gamma-radiation on the RAW 264.7 cell line are strikingly similar to those resulting from incubation with IFN-gamma, with the exception that the irradiation-induced primed cell intermediate is stable and responsive to LPS triggering for at least 24 hr. Treatment with gamma-radiation also results in increased cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex-encoded class I antigens; however, class II antigen expression is not induced

  4. CT diagnosis of abdominal ectopic pheochromocytoma

    Objective: To discuss the value of CT in diagnosis of abdominal ectopic pheochromocytoma. Methods: CT findings of 5 cases surgically and pathologically proved with ectopic pheochromocytoma were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Soft tissue mass with light asymmetry enhancement was found between the abdominal aorta and the inferior vena ca-va in one case. 1 case was completely cystic with light enhancement of the cystwall located in front of the left side of the abdominal aorta. 1 case of large solid mass occurred between the renal hilum and the tail of pancreas, with irregular shape, unclear boundary, central necrosis, calcification and obviously enhancement at the solid part. 2 cases showed as oval soft lump with even density, moderate strengthening located before the abdominal aorta. Paroxysmal hypertension occurred in 3 cases and didn't in 2 cases. Hypertension happened in 1 case during the operation because of stimulation. Blood pressure appeared in 1 case during and after operation. Blood and urinary catecholamine increased significantly in 4 cases. Conclusion: Ectopic pheochromocytoma mainly located surround the abdominal aorta with diverse CT performance. It is helpful for diagnosing when finding a lesion locates at the specified sites combined with typical clinical presentation. CT can not only depict small tumor, but also can show the relationship with surrounding structure, and it provides important information for the operation and prognosis. (authors)

  5. Abdominal tuberculosis, clinical-radiological revision

    We retrospectively evaluated the clinical charts and diagnostic images of hospitalised patients with histological or bacteriologic demonstration of abdominal tuberculosis (TB) including those with probable abdominal TB, who had pulmonary TB and radiologic findings highly suggestive of abdominal TB with favourable response to treatment. Cases with genitourinary TB were excluded. We found 24 patients with an average age of 25 yrs. In some cases this entity was not suspected on the imaging studies, and diagnosis was made on surgery. The most frequent symptoms were: abdominal pain, diarrhoea, fever, vomiting, weight loss and abdominal mass. Active pulmonary TB was demonstrated on 8 cases (33%) Peritoneal presentation was the most frequent (54%) with septated or simple ascites, cystic ascites or pseudocysts within bowel loops. Mesenteric involvement (21 %) showed adenopathy or masses identified with CT. Intestinal forms (17%) showed pseudo-polyps on terminal ileum and ulcers on ileum, cecum and colon. We found one case with diffuse ulcerative involvement of the colon. Two cases showed hepatic involvement, one with an abscess and a tuberculosis Cole cystitis, with pyloric syndrome due to fibrosis

  6. Paediatric emergencies: non-traumatic abdominal emergencies

    Presentation with acute abdominal pain or abdominal symptopathology is a very common cause of presentation of children to hospital. The causes are dependent in part on the age of the child, in part on the presence of previous surgery, and can be divided into those that relate to congenital abnormalities at whatever age they present, acquired disease and infection. Children, particularly young children are often poor historians, and therefore the clinical examination and the laboratory investigations are important in helping to come to a diagnosis. Primary imaging of abdominal emergencies in childhood is a radiograph of the abdomen, followed by ultrasound. Further imaging depends on the results of these studies. An ordered review of the abdomen radiograph is important if the salient features on X-ray are not to be missed. Practitioners should be competent with abdominal ultrasound in children and know where to seek the causes of disease, as these are different from those that are obtained in many instances in adults. Familiarity with the likely causes is important. The three commonest causes of acute abdominal pain in childhood are, in young infants, intussusception, appendicitis and mesenteric adenitis. In older children, inflammatory bowel disease and ovarian pathology are also included. This article details the approach to imaging and the salient features of some of the conditions. (orig.)

  7. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in Association with Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in the Endovascular Era: Vigilance Remains Critical

    Matthew C. Bozeman

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we describe published experience with IAH and ACS complicating abdominal vascular catastrophes, experience with ACS complicating endovascular repair of rAAAs, and techniques for management of the abdominal wound. Vigilance and appropriate management of IAH and ACS remains critically important in decreasing morbidity and optimizing survival following catastrophic intra-abdominal vascular events.

  8. Re-irradiation of recurrent head and neck carcinomas: comparison of robust intensity modulated proton therapy treatment plans with helical tomotherapy

    To test the hypothesis that the therapeutic ratio of intensity-modulated photon therapy using helical tomotherapy (HT) for retreatment of head and neck carcinomas can be improved by robust intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Comparative dose planning with robust IMPT was performed for 7 patients retreated with HT. On average, HT yielded dose gradients steeper in a distance ≤ 7.5 mm outside the target (p<0.0001, F-test) and more conformal high dose regions down to the 50% isodose than IMPT. Both methods proved comparably robust against set-up errors of up to 2 mm, and normal tissue exposure was satisfactory. The mean body dose was smaller with IMPT. IMPT was found not to be uniformly superior to HT and the steeper average dose fall-off around the target volume is an argument pro HT under the methodological implementations used. However, looking at single organs at risk, the normal tissue sparing of IMPT can surpass tomotherapy for an individual patient. Therefore, comparative dose planning is recommended, if both methods are available

  9. Thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis in a horse.

    Toribio, R E; Kohn, C W; Lawrence, A E; Hardy, J; Hutt, J A

    1999-05-01

    A 5-year-old Quarter Horse mare was examined because of lethargy, fever, and weight loss of 1 month's duration. Thoracic auscultation revealed decreased lung sounds cranioventrally. Thoracic ultrasonography revealed bilateral anechoic areas with hyperechoic strands, consistent with pleural effusion and fibrin tags. A large amount of free fluid was evident during abdominal ultrasonography. Abnormalities included anemia, hyperproteinemia, hyperglobulinemia, hyperfibrinogenemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Thoracic radiography revealed alveolar infiltrates in the cranial and caudoventral lung fields. A cavitary mass, consistent with an abscess, could be seen caudodorsal to the crura of the diaphragm. Ultrasonographic evaluation of this area revealed a hypoechoic mass with septations. Bilateral thoracocentesis was performed. Bacterial culture of the pleural fluid did not yield growth, but Blastomyces dermatitidis was isolated from pleural fluid, abdominal fluid, and an aspirate of the abscess. The mare was euthanatized, and a diagnosis of thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:10319179

  10. [Pediatric Abdominal Pain – Harmless or Harmful?].

    Furlano, Raoul Ivano

    2016-04-27

    Abdominal pain is a very common pediatric complaint. In the majority of cases there is no life-threatening pathology behind this symptom, but a functional disease. However, all-day activities of children and adolescents are often limited, frequent absences from school, and general physician/ pediatrician office visits with often unnecessary diagnostic and therapies are registered. Once an organic etiology of the abdominal pain is excluded by a thoroughly medical history taking and physical examination, the first steps for a successful alleviation of the pain is the reassurance of the patients and their family that there is no life-threatening pathology. There is evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapy may be useful in improving pain and disability outcome in the short term. There is no evidence for pharmacological, dietetic, or complementary intervention in the treatment of chronic functional abdominal pain. PMID:27120211

  11. Food irradiation

    Food irradiation is a promising technology in which food products are exposed to a controlled amount of radiant energy to eliminate disease-causing bacteria. The process can also control parasites and insects, reduce spoilage and inhibit ripening and sprouting. Food irradiation is endorsed by the most important health organisations (WHO, CDC, USDA, FDA, EFSA, etc.) and allowed in nearly 40 Countries. It is to remember that irradiation is not a substitute either for comprehensive food safety programs or for good food-handling practices. Irradiated foods must be labelled with either the statement treated with radiation or treated by irradiation and the international symbol for irradiation, the radura. Some consumer associations suppose negative aspects of irradiation, such as increase of the number of free radicals in food and decrease of antioxidant vitamins that neutralize them

  12. Indium 111 leucocyte scintigraphy in abdominal sepsis

    We have studied the clinical utility of indium 111 autologous leucocyte scintigraphy retrospectively in 45 patients presenting with suspected intra-abdominal sepsis. The sensitivity was 95% (21/22) and the specificity was 91% (21/23). Some 34 of the studies (17 positive and 17 negative) were considered helpful in furthering patient management (76%) and 8, unhelpful (18%). In 3, the study results were misleading and led to inappropriate treatment. Indium 111 scintigraphy, whether positive or negative, provides information in patients with suspected intra-abdominal sepsis upon which therapeutic decisions can be based. (orig.)

  13. Aggressive malignant abdominal mesothelioma: Clinical report

    A 32-year-old Filipino female, working as an x-ray technician, presented to the Emergency Room (ER) with acute abdominal pain for one day. The pain was mainly on the left side and left hypochondrium. She had recurring abdominal pain before but not significant to worry her. She also complained of abdominal distension, which she noticed one week ago. Abdominal examination revealed fullness in the left hypochondrium with marked tenderness but negative rebound. Abdominal ultrasound (US) showed a huge mass mainly in the left hypochondrium. The origin of the mass cannot be identified by US. A computerized tomography scan showed a mass in the left side of the abdomen crossing the midline with a necrotic centre. The hospital course of the patient runs smoothly, and she was discharged after 7-days and referred to an Oncology Center. Abdominal mesothelioma is a neoplasm arising from the mesothelial surface lining the abdominal cavity. It is less frequent than that of the pleura. It is a rapidly growing and fatal malignancy with a median survival of less than 1-year. The relation between pleural malignant mesothelioma and asbestos is well recognized since it was described in 19602 but implication of asbestos exposure in the etiology of the peritoneal type is less obvious. This patient history is giving no obvious exposure to asbestos but as she is working in the Radiology Department as an x-ray technician she is well exposed to x-ray, but the effect of radioactivity on induction of mesothelioma is still disputed.4 There are several reports linking malignant mesothelioma to radioactivity due to radiation therapy.The fibrous mesothelioma (sarcomatous), as in this case, which is difficult to diagnose microscopically, looks like a fibroma, unless helped by tissue culture. The treatment options of malignant mesothelioma include surgery, intraperitoneal chemotherapy and whole abdominal radiation or multimodality therapy, which were suggested that might prolong the survival in

  14. Intra-abdominal manifestations of Recklinghausen's Neurofibromatosis

    Neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF-1), also known as von Recklinghausendisease, is a common autosomal dominant condition with an approximateincidence of one per 300 births. NF1 involves multiple systems of the body.Abdominal involvement occurs in the form of neurofibroma and tumor growth inthe liver, mesentery, retroperitoneum, gastric and bowel. Gastrointestinalneoplasms have a reported occurrence of 2-25%. Two cases are reported hereinas well as a review of the literature of the intra-abdominal manifestationsof NF1, including a discussion on the radiological appearance and diagnosis.The article provides an insight into the intriguing variety of clinicalproblems that such patients may present. (author)

  15. Giant cystic abdominal masses in children

    Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Thomas, Kristen B.; Harned, Roger K.; Wu, Sarah R.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Strain, John D. [University of California, Davis Health Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Davis Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2005-12-01

    In this pictorial essay the common and uncommon causes of large cystic and cyst-like abdominal masses in children are reviewed. We discuss and illustrate the following: mesenchymal hamartoma, choledochal cyst, hydrops of the gallbladder, congenital splenic cyst, pancreatic pseudocyst, pancreatic cystadenoma, hydronephrosis, multicystic dysplastic kidney, multilocular cystic nephroma, adrenal hemorrhage, mesenteric and omental cysts, gastrointestinal duplication cyst, meconium pseudocyst, ovarian cysts and cystic neoplasms, hematocolpos, urachal cysts, appendiceal abscess, abdominal and sacrococcygeal teratoma, and CSF pseudocyst. We also describe imaging features and clues to the diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Upper abdominal trauma in children: imaging evaluation

    One hundred consecutive children with serious blunt upper-abdominal injury were evaluated prospectively to assess the accuracy and usefulness of emergency computed tomography (CT) compared with liver-spleen scintigraphy and sonography. Ninety-five hemodynamically stable patients were imaged. The results of this 20-month study indicated that CT has fewer false negatives and false positives than scintigraphy or sonography, that CT is useful in abdominal trauma, and that CT provides the most information of any single diagnostic imaging test commonly available

  17. Systemic lupus erythematosus : abdominal radiologic findings

    Oh, Jae Cheon; Cho, On Koo; Lee, Yong Joo; Bae, Jae Ik; Kim, Yong Soo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Ko, Byung Hee [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE) is a systemic disease of unknown etiology. Its main pathology is vasculitis and serositis, due to deposition of the immune complex or antibodies. Most findings are nonspecific ; abdominal manifestations include enteritis, hepatomegaly, pancreatic enlargement, serositis, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, nephritis, interstitial cystitis, and thrombophlebitis. We described radiologic findings of various organ involvement of SLE; digestive system, serosa, reticuloendothelial system, urinary system, and venous system. Diagnosis of SLE was done according to the criteria of American Rheumatism Association. Understanding of the variable imaging findings in SLE may be helpful for the early detection of abdominal involvement and complications.

  18. Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Preschool Children.

    * Ritu Gupta, **Ravinder K. Gupta

    2004-01-01

    One hundred fifty preschool children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) were studied. Organiccause was observed in 135 (90%) and non-organic in 15 (10%). Giardiasis was the commonestorganic cause in 81 (60%) either alone or with other parasites followed by ascariasis 27 (20%) alone.Other cause of organic pain were urinary tract infection (UTI) 9 (6.7%), abdominal tuberculosis 9(6.7%), eosophagitis/gastritis 4 (2.9%) and gall stones 2 (1.4%). School phobia, sibling rivalry,unpleasant relation...

  19. Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Preschool Children.

    Ritu Gupta, Ravinder K Gupta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred fifty preschool children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP were studied. Organiccause was observed in 135 (90% and non-organic in 15 (10%. Giardiasis was the commonestorganic cause in 81 (60% either alone or with other parasites followed by ascariasis 27 (20% alone.Other cause of organic pain were urinary tract infection (UTI 9 (6.7%, abdominal tuberculosis 9(6.7%, eosophagitis/gastritis 4 (2.9% and gall stones 2 (1.4%. School phobia, sibling rivalry,unpleasant relations among parents and nocturnal enuresis were significant factors associated withnon-organic causes.

  20. An unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    Terneu, S; Verhelst, D; Thys, F; Ketelslegers, E; Hantson, P; Wittebole, X

    2003-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Room because of abdominal pain associated with hematuria and red blood blending to stool. On admission, the physical examination revealed abdominal tenderness and diffuse cutaneous hematoma. The laboratory findings showed abnormal clotting tests with high International Normalised Ratio (INR) and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. Hemoperitoneum and ureteral hematoma were noted on the abdomen computed tomography. The patient confessed she had ingested difenacoum for several weeks. All the symptoms resolved with fresh frozen plasma perfusion and vitamin K. PMID:14635532

  1. Evaluation of tritium breeding and irradiation damage for the EU water-cooled lithium-lead test blanket module in ITER-FEAT

    Comprehensive neutronic analyses have been carried out for the EU water-cooled lithium-lead test blanket module (TBM) integrated into ITER-FEAT to assess tritium generation and parameters relevant to the lifetime performance of the TBM, such as helium and atomic displacement production. The analyses have been performed utilizing models representing the complex ITER and TBM structure close to reality. The Monte Carlo transport code MCNP-4C and cross-sections from the FENDL-2.0 data library have been used in the analyses. Theoretical estimates of the radial distribution of tritium production density, total tritium production rate, radial distribution of helium and displacement formation along the TBM, and poloidal distribution of helium and displacement generation in demountable hydraulic connections of the TBM have been obtained. (author)

  2. Low-power laser irradiation suppresses inflammatory response of human adipose-derived stem cells by modulating intracellular cyclic AMP level and NF-κB activity.

    Jyun-Yi Wu

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-based tissue regeneration is a promising therapeutic strategy for treating damaged tissues. However, the inflammatory microenvironment that exists at a local injury site might restrict reconstruction. Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI has been widely applied to retard the inflammatory reaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of LPLI on human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs in an inflammatory environment. We showed that the hADSCs expressed Toll-like Receptors (TLR 1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR6 and that lipopolysaccharide (LPS significantly induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2, Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, and Interleukin-8 (IL-8. LPLI markedly inhibited LPS-induced, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression at an optimal dose of 8 J/cm². The inhibitory effect triggered by LPLI might occur through an increase in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP (cAMP, which acts to down-regulate nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB transcriptional activity. These data collectively provide insight for further investigations of the potential application of anti-inflammatory treatment followed by stem cell therapy.

  3. Modelling the Photovoltaic Module

    Katsanevakis, Markos

    2011-01-01

    This paper refers into various ways in simulation the Photovoltaic (PV) module behaviour under any combination of solar irradiation and ambient temperature. There are three different approaches presented here briefly and one of them is chosen because of its good accuracy and relatively low...

  4. A phase I/II study piloting accelerated partial breast irradiation using CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy in the prone position

    Background and purpose: External beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (EB-aPBI) is noninvasive with broader potential applicability than aPBI using brachytherapy. However, it has inherent challenges in daily reproducibility. Image-guide radiotherapy (IGRT) can improve daily reproducibility, allowing smaller treatment margins. Our institution proposed IG-IMRT in the prone position to evaluate dose homogeneity, conformality, normal tissue avoidance, and reliable targeting for EB-aPBI. We report preliminary results and toxicity from a phase I/II study evaluating the feasibility of EB-aPBI in the prone position using IG-IMRT. Materials and methods: Twenty post-menopausal women with node-negative breast cancer, excised tumors 99% of the PTV. Dose constraints for the whole breast, lungs and heart were met. Results: The median patient age was 61.5. Mean tumor size was 1.0 cm. 35% of patients had DCIS. Median PTV was 243 cc (108–530) and median breast reference volume was 1698 cc (647–3627). Average daily shifts for IGRT were (0.6, −4.6, 1.7 mm) with standard deviations of (6.3, 6.5, 6.4 mm). Acute toxicity was G1 erythema in 80%, and G2 erythema, G2 fatigue, and G2 breast pain each occurred in 1 patient. With a median follow-up of 18.9 months (12–35), 40% of patients have G1 fibrosis and 30% have G1 hyperpigmentation. 95% of patients have good to excellent cosmesis. There have been no recurrences. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that EB-aPBI in the prone position using IG-IMRT is well tolerated, yields good dosimetric conformality, and results in promising early toxicity profiles

  5. Application of automatic tube current modulation on image quality and radiation dose at abdominal CT%自动管电流调制技术对腹部CT图像质量及辐射剂量影响的体模研究

    王倩; 赵心明; 宋俊峰; 郭宁; 朱颖; 刘建新; 綦维维; 武靖; 梁媛

    2013-01-01

    .20 mSv.NI值与图像质量主、客观评价指标及辐射剂量指标间呈高度线性相关(r=0.871~0.982,P值均<0.05).实验组NI =4 ~7组与对照组间SD、CNR差异均无统计学意义(t值分别为-1.63 ~-0.17,0.03 ~1.12,P值均>0.05).实验组NI=4~ 10组与对照组间LCD评分差异均无统计学意义(Z值为-1.637 ~0.000,P值均>0.05).实验组NI =4 ~ 13组与对照组间HCD得分差异均无统计学意义(Z值为-1.423 ~0.000,P值均>0.05).3名医师对LCD、HCD评分的Kappa一致性检验结果分别为0.743、0.795.结论 在腹部CT扫描中应用自动管电流调制技术可确保图像质量,同时降低辐射剂量.%Objective To investigate the effect of automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) on image quality and radiation dose for abdominal CT.Methods An abdomen-equivalent tissue model in the present study was developed,by referring to the CTP515 auxiliary performance testing model made by the internationally recognized Phantom Laboratory,in conjunction with the real data from 68 Chinese male subjects with BMI between 18 to 24 kg/cm2 (subjects with fatty liver,cirrhosis,intraperitoneal huge tumor,ascites or pleural effusion or who were under 18 years old were excluded).Catphan600 performance served as observation object,and simulating adult abdominal CT low and high contrast characteristics to research.Control groups were scanned with CT protocol at fixed 120 kV,450 mA and experimental group were scanned with the same tube voltage and variable current range from 10 to 450 mA (NI value:4 to 20),respectively.CT value was measured by homogeneous area in the center of Catphan600 to verify the phantom for X-ray attenuation of equivalence.CT dose index (CTDIvol),size-specific dose estimates (SSDE),dose length product (DLP),image noise (SD) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) were recorded and measured.Fifteen mm diameter low-contrast detectability in CTP515 and high-contrast detectability in CTP528 at Catphan600 were

  6. CT features of abdominal plasma cell neoplasms

    Monill, J.; Pernas, J.; Montserrat, E.; Perez, C.; Clavero, J.; Martinez-Noguera, A.; Guerrero, R.; Torrubia, S. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the CT features of abdominal plasma cell neoplasms. We reviewed CT imaging findings in 11 patients (seven men, four women; mean age 62 years) with plasma cell neoplasms and abdominal involvement. Helical CT of the entire abdomen and pelvis was performed following intravenous administration of contrast material. Images were analyzed in consensus by two radiologists. Diagnoses were made from biopsy, surgery and/or clinical follow-up findings. Multiple myeloma was found in seven patients and extramedullary plasmacytoma in four patients. All patients with multiple myeloma had multifocal disease with involvement of perirenal space (4/7), retroperitoneal and pelvic lymph nodes (3/7), peritoneum (3/7), liver (2/7), subcutaneous tissues (2/7) and kidney (1/7). In three of the four patients with extramedullary plasmacytoma, a single site was involved, namely stomach, vagina and retroperitoneum. In the fourth patient, a double site of abdominal involvement was observed with rectal and jejunal masses. Plasma cell neoplasm should be considered in the differential diagnosis of single or multiple enhancing masses in the abdomen or pelvis. Abdominal plasma cell neoplasms were most frequently seen as well-defined enhancing masses (10/11). (orig.)

  7. Case series of abdominal sacral colpopexy

    Vandana Dhama

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Abdominal sacral colpopexy with polypropylene mesh is a safe, effective treatment in patients having post hysterectomy vaginal vault proplase. When done by experienced gynecologist, major post-operative complications seem to be very few in patients having normal BMI and no major systemic illnesses. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(6.000: 1992-1995

  8. Abdominal cavity exploration with kinetic scintimaging

    Nuclear medicine procedures are being utilized in an increasing variety and number of intra-abdominal clinical problems. These non-invasive intra-abdominal exploratory scintimaging procedures are often dynamic or kinetic in nature, i.e. revealing primarily functional information even to the point of employing adjunctive drugs and multiple simultaneous radiotracers. The advent of correlative non-invasive diagnostic imaging modalities has thus far largely complemented abdominal nuclear medicine procedures. The luminal gastro-intestinal tract has yielded to investigation with radiotracers with procedures now widely employed to study gastric function, gastro-oesophagal reflux and intestinal bleeding. The role of hepatic and splenic reticuloendethelial compartment imaging has been strengthened by increased dependability, and remains as the first line screening test for a variety of suspected intrahepatic lesions, especially neoplasia. The recent introduction of improved hepatobiliary radiotracers, mostly iminodiacetic acid derivatives, has considerably expanded the scope of diagnostic investigations of the liver, especially in problems of jaundice and acute cholecystitis. Pancreatic imaging continues to be a disappointment and at best is only adjunctive to correlative imaging procedures. Some hope may be seen in the recent reports of successful pancreatic imaging with positron emission tomography utilizing labelled amino-acid derivatives. Diffuse abdominal processes, especially abcesses and suspected infection, have been efficaciously approached with 67Ga citrate and also, more recently, 111-In-labelled leucocytes. Many of these advances and applications have also been readily applicable to pediatric problems. (author)

  9. Intra-abdominal tumors in children

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to observe the histopathological pattern of intra-abdominal tumors in children less than 16 years. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out at the Department of Histopathology, Children's Hospital and the Institute of Child Health and King Edward Medical College, Lahore, over a period of 5 years, from January 1997 to December 2002. Subjects and Methods: The histopathological and demographic data of 264 intra-abdominal tumors of both the sexes under 16 years of age was collected and analyzed to determine the various morphological types of intra- abdominal tumors in relation to age and sex. Results: Neuroblastoma was the most common tumor constituting 29.6% of all cases, followed by Wilms' tumor (25.1%). Others were non-Hodgkins Iymphomas (15.5%), germ cell tumors and hepatoblastoma (9%) each, rhabdomyosarcoma (4.4%), hepatocellular carcinoma (1.4%) and miscellaneous (6%). Majority of the patients (77.2%) were under 5 years of age. The male to female ratio was 1.1 :0.9. Conclusion: Intra-abdominal tumors are more common in males. Most of the tumors were noted in children less than 5 years of age. (author)

  10. [Catheter jejunostomy in elective abdominal surgery].

    Bodoky, A; Heberer, M; Iwatschenko, P; Harder, F

    1985-10-01

    Needle catheter jejunostomy is used to a varying extent today. Therefore, the need for nutritional support was evaluated following elective abdominal surgery and compared to experiences with postoperative enteral feeding. Oesophagectomy, total gastrectomy and the Whipple procedure were identified as good indications for catheter jejunostomy, whereas with other types of operation an individual decision is required. PMID:3935397

  11. CT features of abdominal plasma cell neoplasms

    The aim of this study was to describe the CT features of abdominal plasma cell neoplasms. We reviewed CT imaging findings in 11 patients (seven men, four women; mean age 62 years) with plasma cell neoplasms and abdominal involvement. Helical CT of the entire abdomen and pelvis was performed following intravenous administration of contrast material. Images were analyzed in consensus by two radiologists. Diagnoses were made from biopsy, surgery and/or clinical follow-up findings. Multiple myeloma was found in seven patients and extramedullary plasmacytoma in four patients. All patients with multiple myeloma had multifocal disease with involvement of perirenal space (4/7), retroperitoneal and pelvic lymph nodes (3/7), peritoneum (3/7), liver (2/7), subcutaneous tissues (2/7) and kidney (1/7). In three of the four patients with extramedullary plasmacytoma, a single site was involved, namely stomach, vagina and retroperitoneum. In the fourth patient, a double site of abdominal involvement was observed with rectal and jejunal masses. Plasma cell neoplasm should be considered in the differential diagnosis of single or multiple enhancing masses in the abdomen or pelvis. Abdominal plasma cell neoplasms were most frequently seen as well-defined enhancing masses (10/11). (orig.)

  12. Connective tissue alteration in abdominal wall hernia

    Henriksen, N A; Yadete, D H; Sørensen, Lars Tue; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2011-01-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of abdominal wall hernia formation is complex. Optimal treatment of hernias depends on a full understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in their formation. The aim of this study was to review the literature on specific collagen alterations in abdom...

  13. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Perko, M J; Schroeder, T V; Olsen, P S;

    1993-01-01

    During a 10-year period in which 735 patients presented with abdominal aortic aneurysms to our clinic, 63 were not offered operative treatment. The primary reason for choosing conservative treatment was concomitant diseases that increased the risk of operation. After 2 years of followup, half of ...

  14. Pulmonary complications of upper abdominal surgery.

    Deodhar S

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary complications encountered in 67 patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery in our unit in one year period are analysed. Pulmonary function tests and their post-operative reduction, as also the risk factors are discussed. Pathophysiology responsible for pulmonary complications is outlined.

  15. Abdominal CT in acute arterial pathology

    The abdominal arterial pathology as studied by CT imagings is reviewed. The illustrated morphology of aortic aneurysms complications (arterial embolism, dissection and arteriosclerotic ulcer ) are studied. The signs that lead to diagnosis are assessed and the major points on which to base a correct radiological study are reviewed

  16. Clinical profile of abdominal tuberculosis in children

    Ira Shah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A retrospective study was conducted in children, suffering from abdominal TB, attending Pediatric TB clinic from 2007 to 2009. Materials And Methods: Age-wise distribution and type of abdominal TB were analyzed with clinical features. Results : Out of 285 children with TB, 32 (11.2% had abdominal tuberculosis. Male: Female ratio was 2.1:1. 7 (21.9% children were 10 years of age. The most common clinical features were fever in 24 (75%, pain in abdomen in 17 (53.1%, loss of weight in 15 (46.9%, raised ESR in 14 (43.8%, and loss of appetite in 13 (40.6% children. TB contact was present in 10 (31.2%, and 7 (21.9% children had tuberculosis in the past. 28 (87.5% children had received BCG vaccine, and 17 (53.1% had a positive Mantoux test. Extra-abdominal tuberculosis was found in 17 patients (53.1%. Duration of fever was more in children less than 5 years of age (127 ± 66 days than that in children between 5 -10 years (37 ± 30 days and in > 10 years of age (73 ± 66 days, which is statistically significant (P = 0.0228. Lymph node TB (17 patients, 53.1% was found to be the commonest, followed by intestinal (10 patients, 31.2% and peritoneal TB (4 patients, 12.5%. 18 (56.2% of the total patients had recovered, 7 (21.9% of all patients failed first line therapy and had to be started on second line drugs, of which 4 (12.5% were proven to have drug-resistant TB. Conclusion : Abdominal TB is seen in 11.2% of children affected with TB, of which over 53% will have extra-abdominal manifestations. Common clinical and laboratory features include fever, pain in abdomen, loss of weight, loss of appetite, and raised ESR. The duration of fever is more in children of younger age group. Lymph node TB is the most common type of abdominal TB. Drug-resistant TB is seen in at least 12.5% of the patients.

  17. Splenic trauma during abdominal wall liposuction: a case report

    Harnett, Paul; Koak, Yashwant; Baker, Daryl

    2008-01-01

    A 35-year-old woman collapsed 18 hours after undergoing abdominal wall liposuction. Abdominal CT scan revealed a punctured spleen. She underwent an emergency splenectomy and made an uneventful recovery.

  18. Evaluation of abdominal CT in the initial treatment of abdominal trauma

    During the last four years 102 patients with abdominal trauma were examined by CT for preoperative evaluation in our hospital. In 35 patients (34 %), the CT scans revealed no abnormal findings. They were all managed conservatively except for one case of perforated small bowel. In 67 patients (66 %) CT revealed evidences of substantial abdominal or retroperitoneal trauma. In 30 of them CT findings were confirmed by surgery. Hepatic injury is usually easily recognized by CT. CT is also useful for the detection of renal or splenic injuries. The majority of those parenchymatous organ injuries were successfully managed with conservative therapy, despite apparent traumatic lesions revealed by CT. Repeat CT scans is proved to be very useful to follow the changes of these traumatic lesions. In conclusion, application of abdominal CT is extremely useful for the initial decision making in treatment of patients with abdominal trauma and for the follow-up observation of injured lesions. (author)

  19. Isolated duodenal rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma

    Celik Atilla

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal rupture following blunt abdominal trauma is rare and it usually seen with other abdominal organ injuries. It represents approximately 2% to 20% of patients with blunt abdominal injury and often occurs after blows to the upper abdomen, or abdominal compression from high-riding seat belts. Two cases of blunt duodenal rupture successfully treated surgically, are presented with their preoperative diagnosis and final out comes.

  20. A case report of abdominal distention caused by herpes zoster

    Su-Rong Zhou; Chuan-Yu Liu

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal complications caused by herpes zoster are extremely rare. Here, we described a case of abdominal distention caused by herpes zoster. The patient was a 59-year-old female who suffered from unexplained paroxysmal and a burning pain on the right part of her waist and abdomen, accompanied by abdominal distention. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction was diagnosed by abdominal radiography. Distention of the right abdominal wall was still apparent after one month. In this report, we found...

  1. [Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum in the treatment of giant abdominal hernias].

    Szekeres, Pál; Krémer, Ildikó; Bukovácz, Róbert; Varga, János

    2007-10-01

    Careful preoperative treatment of giant abdominal hernias can prevent severe postoperative complications such as abdominal compartment syndrome and uncontrollable cardiorespiratory failure. Our departments have been studying the various pathological conditions associated with enormous abdominal hernias (eventration disease) and the possibilities of preventing visceral abnormalities caused by the reconstruction of the abdominal wall. Here, we present the indication, technique and the results of using progressive preoperative pneumo-peritoneum based on two cases. PMID:17984016

  2. Spectrum of abdominal organ injury in a primary blast type

    Amin Abid; Wani Rauf A; Sheikh Tariq; Parray Fazal Q; Wani Imtiaz; Gul Imran; Nazir Mir

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Abdominal organ injury in a primary blast type is always challenging for diagnosis. Air containing abdominal viscera is most vulnerable to effects of primary blast injury. In any patient exposed to a primary blast wave who presents with an acute abdomen, an abdominal organ injury is to be kept in a clinical suspicion. Aim Study various abdominal organ injuries occurring in a primary type of blast injury. Material and methods: All those who had exploratory laparotomy for ...

  3. Power Module

    Gang Fang

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: In this paper, we discuss the upgrade problem of module, and introduce the concepts of the power module, regular power module and uniform power module. We give some results of them. Key words: power group; power module; regular power module; uniform power module

  4. Multi-scale comparative spectral analysis of satellite total solar irradiance measurements from 2003 to 2013 reveals a planetary modulation of solar activity and its non-linear dependence on the 11-year solar cycle

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Herein we adopt a multi-scale dynamical spectral analysis technique to compare and study the dynamical evolution of the harmonic components of the overlapping ACRIMSAT/ACRIM3, SOHO/VIRGO and SORCE/TIM total solar irradiance (TSI) records during 2003.15 to 2013.16 in solar cycles 23 and 24. The three TSI time series present highly correlated patterns. Significant power spectral peaks are common to these records and are observed at the following periods: 0.070 year, 0.097 year, 0.20 year, 0.25 year, 0.30-0.34 year, 0.39 year. Less certain spectral peaks occur at about 0.55 year, 0.60-0.65 year and 0.7-0.9 year. Four main frequency periods at 24.8 days (0.068 year), 27.3 days (0.075 year), at 34-35 days (0.093-0.096 year) and 36-38 days (0.099-0.104 year) characterize the solar rotation cycle. The amplitude of these oscillations, in particular of those with periods larger than 0.5 year, appears to be modulated by the 11-year solar cycle. Similar harmonics have been found in other solar indices. The observed peri...

  5. Effects of ovariohysterectomy on intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal perfusion pressure in cats.

    Bosch, L; Rivera del Álamo, M M; Andaluz, A; Monreal, L; Torrente, C; García-Arnas, F; Fresno, L

    2012-12-15

    Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and abdominal perfusion pressure (APP) have shown clinical relevance in monitoring critically ill human beings submitted to abdominal surgery. Only a few studies have been performed in veterinary medicine. The aim of this study was to assess how pregnancy and abdominal surgery may affect IAP and APP in healthy cats. For this purpose, pregnant (n=10) and non-pregnant (n=11) queens undergoing elective spaying, and tomcats (n=20, used as controls) presented for neutering by scrotal orchidectomy were included in the study. IAP, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), APP, heart rate and rectal temperature (RT) were determined before, immediately after, and four hours after surgery. IAP increased significantly immediately after abdominal surgery in both female groups when compared with baseline (P<0.05) and male (P<0.05) values, and returned to initial perioperative readings four hours after surgery. Tomcats and pregnant females (P<0.05) showed an increase in MAP and APP immediately after surgery decreasing back to initial perioperative values four hours later. A significant decrease in RT was appreciated immediately after laparotomy in both pregnant and non-pregnant queens. IAP was affected by abdominal surgery in this study, due likely to factors, such as postoperative pain and hypothermia. Pregnancy did not seem to affect IAP in this population of cats, possibly due to subjects being in early stages of pregnancy. PMID:23118052

  6. Salmonellosis mimicking abdominal lymphoma in a young boy

    We report on a child with intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly due to salmonellosis, whose initial diagnosis was erroneously based on computed tomography (CT) findings suggestive of abdominal lymphoma. Awareness that salmonellosis can produce large abdominal masses should assist in ruling out neoplastic disease in the differential diagnosis, thus avoiding unnecessary laparotomy. (orig.)

  7. Soft-tissue masses in the abdominal wall

    Masses involving the abdominal wall arise from a large number of aetiologies. This article will describe a diagnostic approach, imaging features of the most common causes of abdominal wall masses, and highly specific characteristics of less common diseases. A diagnostic algorithm for abdominal wall masses combines clinical history and imaging appearances to classify lesions

  8. 2013 WSES guidelines for management of intra-abdominal infections

    Sartelli Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite advances in diagnosis, surgery, and antimicrobial therapy, mortality rates associated with complicated intra-abdominal infections remain exceedingly high. The 2013 update of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES guidelines for the management of intra-abdominal infections contains evidence-based recommendations for management of patients with intra-abdominal infections.

  9. 21 CFR 884.5225 - Abdominal decompression chamber.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abdominal decompression chamber. 884.5225 Section... Devices § 884.5225 Abdominal decompression chamber. (a) Identification. An abdominal decompression chamber... decompression chamber that was in commercial distribution before May 28, 1976, or that has, on or...

  10. Primary abdominal pregnancy following intra-uterine insemination

    Sujata Kar

    2011-01-01

    Primary abdominal pregnancy is an extremely rare type of extrauterine pregnancy. It has been reported from many unusual intra-abdominal sites. We report a case of primary abdominal pregnancy following intra-uterine insemination (not reported earlier to our knowledge). Implanted on the anterior surface of the uterus possibly related to an endometriotic foci. Early diagnosis enabled laparoscopic management of this case.

  11. Can release of urinary retention trigger abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture?

    Luhmann, Andreas; Powell-Bowns, Matilda; Elseedawy, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Only 50% of abdominal aortic aneurysms present with the classic triad of hypotension, back pain and a pulsatile abdominal mass. This variability in symptoms can delay diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a patient presenting with a unique combination of symptoms suggesting that decompression of urinary retention can lead to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. PMID:24964430

  12. Characterization and pharmacological modulation of intestinal inflammation induced by ionizing radiation; Caracterisation et modulation pharmacologique de l'inflammation intestinale induite par les rayonnements ionisants

    Gremy, O

    2006-12-15

    The use of radiation therapy to treat abdominal and pelvic malignancies inevitably involves exposure of healthy intestinal tissues which are very radiosensitive. As a result, most patients experience symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhea. Such symptoms are associated with acute damage to intestine mucosa including radio-induced inflammatory processes. With a rat model of colorectal fractionated radiation, we have shown a gradual development of a colonic inflammation during radiation planning, without evident tissue injury. This radio-induced inflammation is characterized not only by the sur expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, a NF-kB activation, but also by a repression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and the nuclear receptors PPARa and RXRa, both involved in inflammation control. This early inflammation is associated with a discreet neutrophil recruitment and a macrophage accumulation. Macrophages are still abnormally numerous in tissue 27 weeks after the last day of irradiation. Inflammatory process is the most often related to a specific immune profile, either a type Th1 leading to a cellular immune response, or a type Th2 for humoral immunity. According to our studies, a unique abdominal radiation in the rat induces an ileum inflammation and an immune imbalance resulting in a Th2-type profile. Inhibiting this profile is important as its persistence promotes chronic inflammation, predisposition to bacterial infections and fibrosis which is the main delayed side-effect of radiotherapy. The treatment of rats with an immuno-modulator compound, the caffeic acid phenethyl ester (C.A.P.E.), have the potential to both reduce ileal mucosal inflammation and inhibit the radio-induced Th2 status. In order to search new therapeutic molecular target, we has been interested in the PPARg nuclear receptor involved in the maintenance of colon mucosal integrity. In our abdominal irradiation model, we have demonstrated that the prophylactic

  13. Development of a new illumination procedure for photodynamic therapy of the abdominal cavity

    Guyon, Laurie; Claude Lesage, Jean; Betrouni, Nacim; Mordon, Serge

    2012-03-01

    A homogeneous illumination of intra-abdominal organs is essential for successful photodynamic therapy of the abdominal cavity. Considering the current lack of outstanding light-delivery systems, a new illumination procedure was assessed. A rat model of peritoneal carcinomatosis was used. Four hours after intraperitoneal injection of hexaminolevulinate, a square illuminating panel connected to a 635-nm laser source was inserted vertically into the abdominal cavity. The abdominal incision was sutured and a pneumoperitoneum created prior to illumination. Light dosimetry was based on the calculation of the peritoneal surface by MRI. The rats were treated with a light dose of 20, 10, 5 or 2.5 J/cm2 administered continuously with an irradiance of 7 mW/cm2. The homogeneity of the cavity illumination was assessed by quantification of the photobleaching of the tumor lesions according to their localization and by scoring of that of the liver and of the bowel immediately after treatment. Photobleaching quantification for tumor lesions relied on the calculation of the fluorescence intensity ratio (after/before treatment) after recording of the lesions during blue-light laparoscopy and determination of their fluorescence intensity with Sigmascan Pro software. The procedure led to a homogeneous treatment of the abdominal cavity. No statistical difference was observed for the photobleaching values according to the localization of the lesions on the peritoneum (p=0.59) and photobleaching of the liver and of the intestine was homogeneous. We conclude that this procedure can successfully treat the major sites involved in peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  14. Gamma-H2Ax quantification of low dose irradiation-induced DNA damage in patients receiving intensity modulated radiotherapy (IRMT)

    The full text of the publication follows. Purpose/Objective: IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy) offers greater target dose compliance yet may produce a comparative higher whole body dose. The aim of this study is to quantify γH2Ax foci in lymphocytes (an established marker of DNA double strand breaks) in patients undergoing IMRT. Material/Methods: Radical inverse planned IMRT was delivered to patients with brain tumours. Peripheral blood samples were collected from each patient at the following time points: baseline; weekly- prior to and 30 minutes after one treatment fraction; 2 and 6 weeks following completion of treatment. Whole blood was centrifuged to separate lymphocytes, which were fixed and stained for fluorescent immunocytochemistry. 150 cells per sample were visualized. γH2Ax foci were identified and counted using confocal microscopy. Results A low basal level of foci was present in all samples prior to any radiation exposure (0.233, SD 0.028). There was a significant increase in mean foci per cell in post radiotherapy treatment samples(0.367 foci per cell pre-treatment and 0.612 foci per cell post treatment, p=0.000) and no significant difference between post-treatment foci numbers at different times during treatment(for example, 0.518 foci per cell at week 1 and 0.760 at week 6, p=0.279). Mean foci numbers returned to background levels at 6 weeks following completion of radiotherapy (0.239 foci per cell at baseline and 0.219 foci per cell at 6 weeks, p=0.529). Comparison between patients treated with different delivery methods is ongoing. Conclusion: γH2Ax is a feasible marker of DNA damage in lymphocytes during IMRT. These data demonstrate a reproducible level of foci induction in patients undergoing IMRT for tumour targets in brain. There is no significant accumulation of foci during treatment and foci numbers return to baseline post treatment. This assay may be useful to assess differences in whole body dose when different delivery methods

  15. Irradiated planets

    We present models for the spectra emitted by irradiated planets and discuss the numerical methods used in the modeling. In addition, we show results of simple 3D calculations that are designed as a first step toward detailed multi-dimensional models of irradiated planets

  16. Food irradiation

    The paper discusses the need for effective and efficient technologies in improving the food handling system. It defines the basic premises for the development of food handling. The application of food irradiation technology is briefly discussed. The paper points out key considerations for the adoption of food irradiation technology in the ASEAN region (author)

  17. Food irradiation

    The author reviews in outline the present status of industrial gamma irradiation plants for food and medical sterilization and in particular lists commercial irradiation plants currently operating in the U.K., considering briefly plant design, efficiency, costs and dose control. (UK)

  18. Focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma

    Objective: To evaluate the role of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma patients, and to see if the role of computed tomography scan could be limited to only those cases in which sonography was positive. Methods: The retrospective study covered 10 years, from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009, and was conducted at the Department of Radiology and Department of Emergency Medicine, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised cases of 174 children from birth to 14 years who had presented with blunt abdominal trauma and had focussed abdominal sonography for trauma done at the hospital. The findings were correlated with computed tomography scan of the abdomen and clinical follow-up. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma were calculated for blunt abdominal trauma. SPSS 17 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total 174 cases, 31 (17.81%) were later confirmed by abdominal scan. Of these 31 children, sonography had been positive in 29 (93.54%) children. In 21 (67.74%) of the 31 children, sonography had been true positive; 8 (25%) (8/31) were false positive; and 2 (6%) (2/31) were false negative. There were 6 (19.3%) children in which sonography was positive and converted to laparotomy. There was no significant difference on account of gender (p>0.356). Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in the study had sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value of 73%, and negative predictive value of 73% with accuracy of 94%. All patients who had negative sonography were discharged later, and had no complication on clinical follow-up. Conclusions: Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma is a fairly reliable mode to assess blunt abdominal trauma in children. It is a useful tool to pick high-grade solid and hollow viscous injury. The results suggest that the role of computed tomography scan can be

  19. Irradiation damage

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  20. Food irradiation

    Food irradiation can have a number of beneficial effects, including prevention of sprouting; control of insects, parasites, pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, moulds and yeasts; and sterilization, which enables commodities to be stored for long periods. It is most unlikely that all these potential applications will prove commercially acceptable; the extend to which such acceptance is eventually achieved will be determined by practical and economic considerations. A review of the available scientific literature indicates that food irradiation is a thoroughly tested food technology. Safety studies have so far shown no deleterious effects. Irradiation will help to ensure a safer and more plentiful food supply by extending shelf-life and by inactivating pests and pathogens. As long as requirement for good manufacturing practice are implemented, food irradiation is safe and effective. Possible risks of food irradiation are not basically different from those resulting from misuse of other processing methods, such as canning, freezing and pasteurization. (author)

  1. Irradiation damage

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  2. Reducing Abdominal Fat Deposition in Broiler Through Feeding Management

    Cecep Hidayat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal fat in broiler carcass is considered as a waste and its existence reduces the carcass quality. Abdominal fat deposition is affected by several factors such as genetic, nutrition, feed, sex, age and environment. Reducing abdominal fat deposition can be carried out by regulating the nutrient intake to ensure that no excessive nutrient was consumed. Nutrition effects to reduce abdominal fat deposition are associated with nutrient concentration of ration and quantity of daily feed intake. Daily nutrient intake can be limited, especially through restricted feeding. It is concluded that an appropriate feeding management can reduce abdominal fat deposition in broiler.

  3. Handlebar Hernia: A Rare Type of Abdominal Wall Hernia

    Rooh-Allah Yegane

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic abdominal wall hernias are a type of acquired hernia secondary to blunt trauma Caused, by direct trauma from handlebar like objects. This rare hernia is named ‘Handlebar hernia'. We report a case of such hernia without any significant intra-abdominal injury. The abdominal wall defect was repaired in layers by Jones technique. Postoperative course was uneventful. The authors recommend clinical suspicion for traumatic hernia in all patients with traumatic abdominal wall injury. Definitive treatment includes surgical exploration with primary repair of all tissue layers of the abdominal wall.

  4. Diagnostic imaging of infantile abdominal cystic disease

    Thirty-seven patients with infantile abdominal cystic disorders were studied by ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). US studies are simple to conduct, and commonly show an echo-free mass, but tend to yield hyperechoic images when fat and blood are present in the cystic fluid. CT studies, which distinctly demonstrate water, fat, soft tissue density and calcification, are very helpful in the diagnosis of cystic tumor, especially cystic teratoma. MR imaging, which is capable of distinguishing the nature of the cystic fluid (e.g., serous, chylous, bloody, fatty, etc.), is useful in the diagnosis of lymphangioma, teratoma, and torsion of ovarian cystic tumor. Based on the results of the present study, US may be considered to be the modality of first choice in the examination of infantile abdominal cystic disorders, and MRI and/or CT should be employed additionally as necessary in that order. (author)

  5. Drug Therapy for Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Ramachandran Meenakshisundaram

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm is often asymptomatic, less recognized, and causes considerable mortalityand morbidity, if missed. The incidence varies from country to country and the occurrence is influencedby modifiable (smoking, coronary heart disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and prolonged steroid therapyand non-modifiable risk factors (increasing age, male gender, and positive family history. Most ofthe patients with such aneurysm do not exhibit symptoms and the diagnosis is made accidentally duringroutine medical investigations, abdominal ultrasonography, or by an astute surgeon during an abdominalprocedure. Sometimes the diagnosis is made in an emergency room, if the attending resident/doctor isaware of it. Despite good diagnosis and effective management, the outcomes of complicated cases arepoor and the treatment cost is prohibitive. Hence, we reviewed the literature to find out the pathogenesisof such aneurysms and the usefulness of available drugs in its prevention.

  6. Evidence-based diagnosis of abdominal trauma

    Abdominal trauma is a common cause of death particularly in patients up to 40 years of age. In order to reduce mortality a rapid radiologic diagnosis is essential. At present, sonography plays a role only in the evaluation of minor trauma and as a ''focused assessment with sonography for trauma'' (FAST) to clarify free intraperitoneal fluid immediately on admittance in severely injured patients. However, computed tomography has proven to be a potent tool for the triage of patients with abdominal trauma, because, based on the results of the CT scan, patients can be referred for laparotomy or safely classified for ''wait and see'' treatment. Therapeutic decisions are largely based on injury severity scores and the radiologist must be familiar with them as well as with the associated therapeutic consequences. (orig.)

  7. Abdominal pregnancy as a cause of hemoperitoneum

    Shafi Sheikh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of intrauterine and extrauterine pregnancy, the heterotopic pregnancy, is a rare obstetric phenomenon. The preoperative diagnosis of this condition is very difficult; leading to a higher maternal morbidity and fetal loss. We experienced a case of intrauterine pregnancy and ruptured abdominal pregnancy implanted on the illeocaecal region in a 26-year-old primiparous woman. She was clinically misdiagnosed as a case of ruptured ectopic pregnancy, but ultrasonography showed it to be a case of heterotopic pregnancy. Subsequently, the patient was subjected to laparotomy and the ruptured abdominal pregnancy was evacuated. She continued with the intrauterine pregnancy till term and delivered a healthy female baby. Although this condition is unusual, any general surgeon in the emergency department must be aware of this complication and its management, which is often initially misdiagnosed.

  8. [Surgical criteria for reoperation in abdominal surgery].

    Bricot, R

    1975-07-01

    Analysis of the surgical criteria for reintervention in Abdominal Surgery led to the accentuation of a certain number of pictures of occlusion, general infectious syndromes, postoperative peritonitis, gastro-intestinal fistula and hemorrhagic syndrome. In all cases, the clinical examination can be misleading in particular in the case of peritonitis, and the history and non-surgical criteria must be strongly borne in mind. PMID:2036

  9. Mycobacterium fortuitum abdominal wall abscesses following liposuction

    Al Soub, Hussam; Al-Maslamani, Eman; Al-Maslamani, Mona

    2008-01-01

    We describe here a case of abdominal abscesses due to Mycobacterium fortuitum following liposuction. The abscesses developed three months after the procedure and diagnosis was delayed for five months. The clues for diagnosis were persistent pus discharge in spite of broad spectrum antibiotics and failure to grow any organisms on routine culture. This condition has been rarely reported; however, the increasing number of liposuction procedures done and awareness among physicians will probably r...

  10. Computed tomography of pediatric abdominal masses

    Ultrasonography is a very useful diagnostic modality for evaluation of the pediatric abdominal masses, due to faster, cheaper, and no radiation hazard than CT. But CT has more advantages in assessing precise anatomic location, and extent of the pathologic process, and also has particular value in defining the size, relation of the mass to surrounding organs and detection of lymphadenopathy. We analyzed CT features of 35 cases of pathologically proven pediatric abdominal masses for recent 2 years at Ewha Woman's University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1.The most common originating site was kidney (20 cases, 57.1%); followed by gastrointestinal (5 cases, 14.3%), nonrenal retroperitoneal (4 cases, 11.4%), hepatobiliary (3 cases, 8.6%), and genital (3 cases, 8.6%) in order of frequency. 2.The most common mass was hydronephrosis (11 cases, 31.4%), Wilms' tumor (7 cases, 20.0%), neuroblastoma, choledochal cyst, periappendiceal abscess (3 cases, 8.6%, respectively), ovarian cyst (2 cases, 5.7%) were next in order of frequency. 3.Male to female ratio was 4:5 and choledochal cyst and ovarian cyst were found only in females. The most prevalent age group was 1-3 year old (12 cases, 34.3%). 4.With CT, the diagnosis of hydronephrosis was easy in all cases and could evaluate of its severity, renal function and obstruction site with high accuracy. 5.Wilms' tumor and neuroblastoma were relatively well differentiated by their characteristic CT features; such as location, shape, margin, middle cross, calyceal appearance and calcification, etc. 6.Ovarian and mensentric cysts had similar CT appearance. 7.In other pediatric abdominal masses, CT provided excellent information about anatomic detail, precise extent of tumor and differential diagnostic findings. So, CT is useful imaging modality for the demonstration and diagnosis of abdominal mass lesions in pediatric patients

  11. Laparoscopic biopsy in patients with abdominal lymphadenopathy

    Bhandarkar D

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abdominal lymphadenopathy (AL - a common clinical scenario faced by clinicians - often poses a diagnostic challenge. In the absence of palpable peripheral nodes, tissue has to be obtained from the abdominal nodes by image-guided biopsy or surgery. In this context a laparoscopic biopsy avoids the morbidity of a laparotomy. Aim: This retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data represents our experience with laparoscopic biopsy of abdominal lymph nodes. Materials and Methods: Between October 2000 and November 2005, 28 patients with AL underwent laparoscopic biopsy. Pre-operative radiological imaging studies had identified a nodal mass in 20, a solitary node in 1, a cold abscess in 1 and a mesenteric cystic lesion in 1 patient. In five patients with chronic right lower abdominal pain and normal ultra-sonographic findings mesenteric nodes were identified and biopsied during diagnostic laparoscopy. Results: The sites of biopsied lymph nodes included para-aortic (10, mesenteric (8, external iliac (3, left gastric (2, obturator (1, aorto-caval (1 and porta hepatis (1. One patient with enlarged peripancreatic nodes mass and another with a mesenteric cystic mass had cold abscesses drained in addition to biopsy. There were no perioperative complications and the median postoperative stay was 2 days (range 1-4 days. Histopathology revealed tuberculosis in 23 patients, reactive adenitis in 2, lymphoma in 1 metastatic carcinoma in 1, and a retroperitoneal sarcoma in 1. Conclusions: In patients with AL, laparoscopy provides a safe and effective means of obtaining biopsy. It is of particular value in patients in whom (a the nodes are small or present in locations unsuitable for image-guided biopsy, (b adequate tissue cannot be obtained by image-guided biopsy or (c previously undiagnosed lymphadenopathy is encountered during diagnostic laparoscopy.

  12. Reconstruction of chest, abdominal walls and perineum

    Vijaykumar D; Vijayaraghavan Sundeep

    2007-01-01

    The structural integrity of the chest and abdominal walls and perineum is frequently altered by cancer extirpation. Advances in reconstructive surgery and the availability of innovative techniques have helped the cancer surgeon to proceed with radical excisions with minimum morbidity. The ability to harvest flaps from distant sites and the availability of good prosthetic materials have now become part of the routine armamentarium of the plastic surgeon engaged in reconstructive surgery of the...

  13. Dose reduction in abdominal computed tomography

    The broad availability and use of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in recent years has increased the radiation dose for patients. Multiphase MDCT protocols are used in abdominal imaging for various indications. Dose reduction though novel technologies, such as dual energy CT or adapted contrast injection protocols (split bolus etc.) for reduction of scans. An optimized dose reduction can be achieved by using strict protocols which are adapted to the clinical situation of the patient. (orig.)

  14. The vanishing giant abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Krivoshei, Lian; Halak, Moshe; Schneiderman, Jacob; Silverberg, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Spontaneous sac size regression of a giant abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a rare event that has not been previously described. We report a case of an 89-year-old woman with a known 9-cm AAA, which was diagnosed in 2003. The patient had refused any kind of treatment at that time. Recent imaging studies obtained 7 years later revealed an AAA of 4 cm diameter. This is the first recorded case of significant spontaneous AAA sac shrinkage. PMID:21444348

  15. Abdominal pregnancy as a cause of hemoperitoneum

    Shafi Sheikh; Malla Misbha; Salaam Parvaiz; Kirmani Omer

    2009-01-01

    The coexistence of intrauterine and extrauterine pregnancy, the heterotopic pregnancy, is a rare obstetric phenomenon. The preoperative diagnosis of this condition is very difficult; leading to a higher maternal morbidity and fetal loss. We experienced a case of intrauterine pregnancy and ruptured abdominal pregnancy implanted on the illeocaecal region in a 26-year-old primiparous woman. She was clinically misdiagnosed as a case of ruptured ectopic pregnancy, but ultrasonography showed it to ...

  16. Child abdominal tumour in tropical context: Think about schistosomiasis!

    A. M. Napon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis presenting as an abdominal mass with chronic pain in a child is not common. This report presents case of child presenting with schistosomiasis presenting as an abdominal mass with chronic pain. Abdominal ultrasonography did not particularly contribute to definitive pre-operative diagnosis. However, pathological examination of surgical specimen confirmed Schistosoma mansoni eggs in the biospy. A decrease in the mass volume was noticed under medical treatment (Biltricide. The aim of this report was to intimate clinicians on possible abdominal schistosomiasis as differential diagnosis of childhood abdominal mass. This is a clarion call for a high index of suspicion of childhood abdominal schistosomiasis in children presenting with abdominal mass in a tropical setting.

  17. Risk factors of thrombosis in abdominal veins

    Amit Kumar Durra; Ashok Chacko; Biju George; Joseph Anjilivelil Joseph; Sukesh Chandran Nair; Vikram Mathews

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of inherited and acquired thrombophilic risk factors in patients with abdominal venous thrombosis and to compare the risk factor profiles between Budd-Chiari syndromes (BCS) and splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT).METHODS: In this retrospective study, 36 patients with abdominal venous thrombosis were studied.The patients were divided into Budd-Chiari group (hepatic vein, IVC thrombosis) and splanchnic venous thrombosis group (portal, splenic, superior mesenteric veins) based on the veins involved. Hereditary and acquired thrombophilic risk factors were evaluated in all patients.RESULTS: Twenty patients had SVT, 14 had BCS,and 2 had mixed venous thrombosis. Ten patients (28%) had hereditary and 10 patients (28%) acquired thrombophilic risk factors. The acquired risk factors were significantly more common in the SVT group (SVT vs BCS:45% vs 7%,x2=5.7,P=0.02) while hereditary risk factors did not show significant differences between the two groups (SVT vs BCS: 25%vs 36%, x2=0.46,P=0.7). Multiple risk factors were present in one (7%) patient with BCS and in 3 patients (15%) with SVT. No risk factors were identified in 57% of patients with BCS and in 45% of patients with SVT.CONCLUSION: Hereditary and acquired risk factors play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of abdominal venous thrombosis. Acquired risk factors are significantly more common in SVT patients while hereditary factors are similar in both groups.

  18. Sagittal Abdominal Diameter: Application in Clinical Practice

    Thaís Da Silva-Ferreira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Excess visceral fat is associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD has recently been highlighted as an indicator of abdominal obesity, and also may be useful in predicting cardiovascular risk. The purpose of the present study was to review the scientific literature on the use of SAD in adult nutritional assessment. A search was conducted for scientific articles in the following electronic databases: SciELO , MEDLINE (PubMed and Virtual Health Library. SAD is more associated with abdominal fat (especially visceral, and with different cardiovascular risk factors, such as, insulin resistance, blood pressure, and serum lipoproteins than the traditional methods of estimating adiposity, such as body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio. SAD can also be used in association with other anthropometric measures. There are still no cut-off limits established to classify SAD as yet. SAD can be an alternative measure to estimate visceral adiposity. However, the few studies on this diameter, and the lack of consensus on the anatomical site to measure SAD, are obstacles to establish cut-off limits to classify it.

  19. Midgut malrotation with chronic abdominal pain

    Anil K Wanjari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in midgut rotation occur during the physiological herniation of midgut between the 5 th and 10 th week of gestation. The most significant abnormality is narrow small bowel mesentery which is prone to volvulus. This occurs most frequently in the neonatal period, less commonly midgut malrotation presents in adulthood with either acute volvulus or chronic abdominal symptoms. It is the latter group that represents a diagnostic challenge. We report a case of a 17-year-old male patient who presented with 10-year history of nonspecific gastro-intestinal symptoms. After extensive investigation the patient was diagnosed with midgut malrotation following computed tomography of abdomen. The patient was treated with a laparoscopic Ladd′s procedure and at 3 months he was gaining weight and had stopped vomiting. A laparoscopic Ladd′s procedure is an acceptable alternative to the open technique in treating symptomatic malrotation in adults. Midgut malrotation is a rare congenital anomaly which may present as chronic abdominal pain. Abdominal CT is helpful for diagnosis.

  20. Intra-abdominal hypertension and acute pancreatitis.

    Mifkovic, A; Skultety, J; Sykora, P; Prochotsky, A; Okolicany, R

    2013-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) contributes to organ dysfunction and leads to the development of the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). IAH and ACS are relatively frequent findings in patiens with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and are associated with deterioration in organ functions. The most affected are cardiovascular, respiratory and renal functions. The incidence of IAH in patients with SAP is approximately 60-80%. There is an accumulating evidence in human and animal studies that changes of perfusion, particularly to the microvasculature, are crucial events in the progression of acute pancreatitis (AP). The perfusion of the small and large intestine is impaired due to reduced arterial pressure, increased vascular resistence and diminished portal blood flow. Bacterial translocation has been described in patients with ACS, and this may apply to patients with SAP. Approximately 30-40% of SAP patients develop ACS because of pancreatic (retroperitoneal) inflammation, peripancreatic tissue edema, formation of fluid collections or abdominal distension. Surgical debridement was the preferred treatment to control necrotizing pancreatitis in the past. However, the management of necrotizing pancreatitis has changed over the last decade. The main objective of this article is to describe the association between IAH and AP and to emphasize this situation in clinical praxis as well (Fig. 1, Ref. 38). PMID:23406186

  1. CT of hemodynamically unstable abdominal trauma

    This article is an appraisal of the use of CT in the management of patients with unstable abdominal trauma. We examined 41 patients with abdominal trauma using noncontrast dynamic CT. In 17 patients a postcontrast dynamic CT was also carried out. On CT, 25 patients had hemoperitoneum. Thirteen patients had splenic, 12 hepatic, 6 pancreatic, 8 bowel and mesenteric, 12 renal and 2 vascular injuries. Seven patients had retroperitoneal and 2 patients adrenal hematomas. All but five lesions (three renal, one pancreatic, and one splenic) were hypodense when CT was performed earlier than 8 h following the injury. Postcontrast studies (n = 17), revealed 4 splenic, 3 hepatic, 1 pancreatic, 3 renal, and 2 bowel and mesenteric injuries beyond what was found on noncontrast CT. Surgical confirmation (n = 21) was obtained in 81.81 % of splenic, 66.66 % of hepatic, 83.33 % of pancreatic, 100 % of renal, 100 % of retroperitoneal, and 85.71 % of bowel and mesenteric injuries. The majority of false diagnoses was obtained with noncontrast studies. Computed tomography is a remarkable method for evaluation and management of patients with hemodynamically unstable abdominal trauma, but only if it is revealed in the emergency room. Contrast injection, when it could be done, revealed lesions that were not suspected on initial plain scans. (orig.)

  2. Computed tomography in therapy planning: Abdominal region

    The radiotherapy community is continuing to appreciate the significant contribution CBT can make to planning abdominal radiotherapy and is also beginning to appreciate the pitfalls and limitations of the technique. Specific attention should continue to focus on patient registration with the scanner and simulator radiographs, patient position during scanning and treatment, and effects of involuntary patient motion, especially breathing, on organ and tumor localization. Effects of patient positional changes and of involuntary motion during treatment on treatment planning and execution should be quantitated, as should effects of inhomogeneities, especially gut air, on abdominal dose distribution. Radiotherapy planned with CBT data can impact significantly on morbidity and mortality associated with abdominal malignancies. Faster scanners (with a scanning time of 9 sec or less) should be employed where possible to obtain maximum diagnostic information. Multiplanar reconstruction and true three-dimensional treatment planning can enhance significantly the value of CBT in treatment planning. Radiotherapists, radiodiagnosticians, radiation physicists, and oncologists must be continue to meet the challenge of realizing the true potential of CBT for the benefit of the cancer patients entrusted to their care

  3. Multidetector CT of blunt abdominal trauma.

    Soto, Jorge A; Anderson, Stephan W

    2012-12-01

    The morbidity, mortality, and economic costs resulting from trauma in general, and blunt abdominal trauma in particular, are substantial. The "panscan" (computed tomographic [CT] examination of the head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis) has become an essential element in the early evaluation and decision-making algorithm for hemodynamically stable patients who sustained abdominal trauma. CT has virtually replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage for the detection of important injuries. Over the past decade, substantial hardware and software developments in CT technology, especially the introduction and refinement of multidetector scanners, have expanded the versatility of CT for examination of the polytrauma patient in multiple facets: higher spatial resolution, faster image acquisition and reconstruction, and improved patient safety (optimization of radiation delivery methods). In this article, the authors review the elements of multidetector CT technique that are currently relevant for evaluating blunt abdominal trauma and describe the most important CT signs of trauma in the various organs. Because conservative nonsurgical therapy is preferred for all but the most severe injuries affecting the solid viscera, the authors emphasize the CT findings that are indications for direct therapeutic intervention. PMID:23175542

  4. Inter-observer agreement for abdominal CT in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain

    The level of inter-observer agreement of abdominal computed tomography (CT) in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department (ED) was evaluated. Two hundred consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain were prospectively included. Multi-slice CT was performed in all patients with intravenous contrast medium only. Three radiologists independently read all CT examinations. They recorded specific radiological features and a final diagnosis on a case record form. We calculated the proportion of agreement and kappa values, for overall, urgent and frequently occurring diagnoses. The mean age of the evaluated patients was 46 years (range 19-94), of which 54% were women. Overall agreement on diagnoses was good, with a median kappa of 0.66. Kappa values for specific urgent diagnoses were excellent, with median kappa values of 0.84, 0.90 and 0.81, for appendicitis, diverticulitis and bowel obstruction, respectively. Abdominal CT has good inter-observer agreement in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED, with excellent agreement for specific urgent diagnoses as diverticulitis and appendicitis. (orig.)

  5. Inter-observer agreement for abdominal CT in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain

    Randen, Adrienne van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lameris, Wytze [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nio, C.Y.; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Meier, Mark A.; Tutein Nolthenius, Charlotte; Smithuis, Frank; Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    The level of inter-observer agreement of abdominal computed tomography (CT) in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department (ED) was evaluated. Two hundred consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain were prospectively included. Multi-slice CT was performed in all patients with intravenous contrast medium only. Three radiologists independently read all CT examinations. They recorded specific radiological features and a final diagnosis on a case record form. We calculated the proportion of agreement and kappa values, for overall, urgent and frequently occurring diagnoses. The mean age of the evaluated patients was 46 years (range 19-94), of which 54% were women. Overall agreement on diagnoses was good, with a median kappa of 0.66. Kappa values for specific urgent diagnoses were excellent, with median kappa values of 0.84, 0.90 and 0.81, for appendicitis, diverticulitis and bowel obstruction, respectively. Abdominal CT has good inter-observer agreement in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED, with excellent agreement for specific urgent diagnoses as diverticulitis and appendicitis. (orig.)

  6. Intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal compartment syndrome in acute general surgery.

    Sugrue, Michael

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is a harbinger of intra-abdominal mischief, and its measurement is cheap, simple to perform, and reproducible. Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), especially grades 3 and 4 (IAP > 18 mmHg), occurs in over a third of patients and is associated with an increase in intra-abdominal sepsis, bleeding, renal failure, and death. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Increased IAP reading may provide an objective bedside stimulus for surgeons to expedite diagnostic and therapeutic work-up of critically ill patients. One of the greatest challenges surgeons and intensivists face worldwide is lack of recognition of the known association between IAH, ACS, and intra-abdominal sepsis. This lack of awareness of IAH and its progression to ACS may delay timely intervention and contribute to excessive patient resuscitation. CONCLUSIONS: All patients entering the intensive care unit (ICU) after emergency general surgery or massive fluid resuscitation should have an IAP measurement performed every 6 h. Each ICU should have guidelines relating to techniques of IAP measurement and an algorithm for management of IAH.

  7. Significance of residual abdominal masses in children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma

    Karmazyn, B.; Horev, G.; Kornreich, L. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah-Tikva (Israel); Ash, S.; Goshen, Y.; Yaniv, I. [Dept. of Hematology and Oncology, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah-Tikva (Israel)

    2001-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history of children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma who had complete clinical remission and residual abdominal mass after treatment. Material and methods: The charts and imaging findings of all children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma treated and followed at our medical center between 1988 and 1999 were reviewed for the presence, management, clinical course, and prognosis of residual mass. Results: Only children who achieved complete clinical remission were included. The study group consisted of 33 children (20 boys and 13 girls) aged 2.6-17.6 years (mean 7.2 years). Of these, seven (20.6 %) were found to have a residual abdominal mass. Two underwent second-look operation with no evidence of viable tumor on histology. The remaining five were followed by imaging studies for 2.2-9.1 years (mean 6.1 years); none relapsed. Conclusion: Residual mass is not uncommon in children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma. The presence of residual mass in a child with complete clinical remission does not alter the long-term prognosis. Therefore, in children with Burkitt's lymphoma and residual mass with no other signs of disease activity, expectant watching may be appropriate. (orig.)

  8. Significance of residual abdominal masses in children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history of children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma who had complete clinical remission and residual abdominal mass after treatment. Material and methods: The charts and imaging findings of all children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma treated and followed at our medical center between 1988 and 1999 were reviewed for the presence, management, clinical course, and prognosis of residual mass. Results: Only children who achieved complete clinical remission were included. The study group consisted of 33 children (20 boys and 13 girls) aged 2.6-17.6 years (mean 7.2 years). Of these, seven (20.6 %) were found to have a residual abdominal mass. Two underwent second-look operation with no evidence of viable tumor on histology. The remaining five were followed by imaging studies for 2.2-9.1 years (mean 6.1 years); none relapsed. Conclusion: Residual mass is not uncommon in children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma. The presence of residual mass in a child with complete clinical remission does not alter the long-term prognosis. Therefore, in children with Burkitt's lymphoma and residual mass with no other signs of disease activity, expectant watching may be appropriate. (orig.)

  9. Characterization and pharmacological modulation of intestinal inflammation induced by ionizing radiation

    The use of radiation therapy to treat abdominal and pelvic malignancies inevitably involves exposure of healthy intestinal tissues which are very radiosensitive. As a result, most patients experience symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhea. Such symptoms are associated with acute damage to intestine mucosa including radio-induced inflammatory processes. With a rat model of colorectal fractionated radiation, we have shown a gradual development of a colonic inflammation during radiation planning, without evident tissue injury. This radio-induced inflammation is characterized not only by the sur expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, a NF-kB activation, but also by a repression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and the nuclear receptors PPARa and RXRa, both involved in inflammation control. This early inflammation is associated with a discreet neutrophil recruitment and a macrophage accumulation. Macrophages are still abnormally numerous in tissue 27 weeks after the last day of irradiation. Inflammatory process is the most often related to a specific immune profile, either a type Th1 leading to a cellular immune response, or a type Th2 for humoral immunity. According to our studies, a unique abdominal radiation in the rat induces an ileum inflammation and an immune imbalance resulting in a Th2-type profile. Inhibiting this profile is important as its persistence promotes chronic inflammation, predisposition to bacterial infections and fibrosis which is the main delayed side-effect of radiotherapy. The treatment of rats with an immuno-modulator compound, the caffeic acid phenethyl ester (C.A.P.E.), have the potential to both reduce ileal mucosal inflammation and inhibit the radio-induced Th2 status. In order to search new therapeutic molecular target, we has been interested in the PPARg nuclear receptor involved in the maintenance of colon mucosal integrity. In our abdominal irradiation model, we have demonstrated that the prophylactic

  10. Abdominal cancer during early childhood: A dosimetric comparison of proton beams to standard and advanced photon radiotherapy

    Purpose: Evaluation of dosimetric benefits of advanced radiotherapy techniques for the treatment of abdominal lesions during early childhood. Patients and methods: Treatment planning was performed for five Neuroblastoma (NBL) and four Wilms Tumor (WT) patients. Opposing fields (2F), photon intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMXT) and two proton techniques (passively scattered (PT) and scanned beams (IMPT)) were considered. Averaged dose-volume histograms, associated dosimetric parameters and a radiobiological model for the estimation of the therapy related carcinogenic effect were evaluated. Results: With respect to the 2F technique, both proton techniques enabled to reduce mean liver and kidney dose by 40-60%; Organ fractions irradiated at the level of the tolerance dose were reduced by 65% for kidneys and 75% for the liver in NBL patients and by additional 10% for WT patients. IMXT enabled to reduce parameters related to the steep high-dose gradient, e.g., V15Gy for the kidneys was reduced by a factor 2-3 compared to 2F. V12Gy was reduced by 40% in the liver. On the other side, the improvement of those parameters characterizing the low isodose domain was limited for IMXT. The risk for radiation-induced secondary cancer was doubled for IMXT and even more increased for PT if secondary neutrons were taken into account, while this risk remained the same or was reduced by IMPT with respect to 2F. Conclusions: Proton beams improved all dosimetric parameters for NBL and WT patients compared to photon techniques. This improvement was limited for IMXT mainly to parameters related to the steep high-dose gradient. Further research is needed to minimize uncertainties for secondary cancer estimations

  11. Food irradiation

    Food treatment by means of ionizing energy, or irradiation, is an innovative method for its preservation. In order to treat important volumes of food, it is necessary to have industrial irradiation installations. The effect of radiations on food is analyzed in the present special work and a calculus scheme for an Irradiation Plant is proposed, discussing different aspects related to its project and design: ionizing radiation sources, adequate civil work, security and auxiliary systems to the installations, dosimetric methods and financing evaluation methods of the project. Finally, the conceptual design and calculus of an irradiation industrial plant of tubercles is made, based on the actual needs of a specific agricultural zone of our country. (Author)

  12. Fruits irradiation

    The objectives of this project in food irradiation are two-fold, to study the effect of irradiation in prolongation of useful storage life of fruits and to evaluate irradiation as a means of preserving fruits. However radiation is not intended to replace existing preservation processes but may be used in conjunction with current methods such as refrigeration, drying, fermentation etc. In fact radiation should combine with proper storage and packaging techniques in order to ensure maximum benefits. Ripening retardation of fruits by irradiation kinds of fruits: papaya, mango, rambutan, longan and durian. Changes in organoleptic properties of fruit flavor and taste, texture changes by taste panel estimation of significance level of results by statistical mathematical methods, chemical changes determination of climacteric peak in fruits by estimation of carbon dioxide evolution, vitamin C determination by Tillmann's method, carotenoid separation by thin layer chromatography, reducing sugars and acidity determination, volatile components of durian by gas-chromatography

  13. Association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    Chen, Jinmei; Hong, Jinsheng; Zou, Xi; Lv, Wenlong; Guo, Feibao; Hong, Hualan; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lung cancer. The normal lung relative volumes receiving greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V5-30) mean lung dose (MLD), and absolute volumes spared from greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (AVS5-30) for the bilateral and ipsilateral lungs of 83 patients were recorded. Any association of clinical factors and dose-volume parameters with Grade ≥2 RILI was analyzed. The median follow-up was 12.3 months; 18 (21.7%) cases of Grade 2 RILI, seven (8.4%) of Grade 3 and two (2.4%) of Grade 4 were observed. Univariate analysis revealed the located lobe of the primary tumor. V5, V10, V20, MLD of the ipsilateral lung, V5, V10, V20, V30 and MLD of the bilateral lung, and AVS5 and AVS10 of the ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI (P lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI (P = 0.010, OR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.102-0.729). Receiver operating characteristic curves indicated Grade ≥2 RILI could be predicted using AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung (area under curve, 0.668; cutoff value, 564.9 cm(3); sensitivity, 60.7%; specificity, 70.4%). The incidence of Grade ≥2 RILI was significantly lower with AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung ≥564.9 cm(3) than with AVS5 lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI, and AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI for lung cancer after IMRT. PMID:26454068

  14. Nuclear irradiation parameters of beryllium under fusion, fission and IFMIF irradiation conditions

    A computational analysis is presented of the nuclear irradiation parameters for Beryllium under irradiation in typical neutron environments of fission and fusion reactors, and of the presently designed intense fusion neutron source IFMIF. The analysis shows that dpa and Tritium production rates at fusion relevant levels can be achieved with existing high flux fission reactors while the achievable Helium production is too low. The resulting He-Tritium and He/dpa ratios do not meet typical fusion irradiation conditions. Irradiation simulations in the medium flux test modules of the IFMIF neutron source facility were shown to be more suitable to match fusion typical irradiation conditions. To achieve sufficiently high production rates it is suggested to remove the creep-fatigue testing machine together with the W spectra shifter plate and move the tritium release module upstream towards the high flux test module. (author)

  15. Food irradiation

    The preservation of food using irradiation may replace or be used in combination with traditional or conventional food preservation techniques. Studies have shown that the irradiation technique which uses less energy than other preservation methods is a potential way for reducing post harvest losses. However, economic feasibility among other constraints is the core factor to determine the success of the technique at commercial scale. The need and importance for considering this new technique in Malaysia are discussed here. (author)

  16. Food irradiation

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and The World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19 MeV, 1 kW) and industrial unit Electronika (10 MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permissions for irradiation for; spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. (author)

  17. Evaluation of Forty-Nine Patients with Abdominal Tuberculosis

    Murat Kilic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Abdominal tuberculosis is an uncommon form of extrapulmonary infection. In this study, we aimed to highlight the nonspecific clinical presentations and diagnostic difficulties of abdominal tuberculosis. Material and Method: Clinical features, diagnostic methods, and the therapeutic outcomes of 49 patients diagnosed as abdominal tuberculosis between 2003 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The patients were classified into four subgroups including peritoneal (28, nodal (14, intestinal (5, and solid organ tuberculosis (2. The most frequent symptoms were abdominal pain, abdominal distention and fatique. Ascites appeared to be the most frequent clinical finding. Ascites and enlarged abdominal lymph nodes were the most frequent findings on ultrasonography and tomography. Diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis was mainly depended on histopathology of ascitic fluid and biopsies from peritoneum, abdominal lymph nodes or colonoscopic materials. Forty patients healed with standart 6-month therapy while extended treatment for 9-12 months was needed in 8 whom had discontinued drug therapy and had persistent symptoms and signs. One patient died within the treatment period due to disseminated infection. Discussion: The diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis is often difficult due to diverse clinical presentations. The presence of ascites, personal/familial/contact history of tuberculosis, and coexisting active extraabdominal tuberculosis are the most significant marks in diagnosis. Diagnostic laparoscopy and tissue sampling seem to be the best diagnostic approach for abdominal tuberculosis.

  18. Skin Injuries Reduce Survival and Modulate Corticosterone, C-Reactive Protein, Complement Component 3, IgM, and Prostaglandin E 2 after Whole-Body Reactor-Produced Mixed Field (n + γ-Photons) Irradiation

    Kiang, Juliann G; Ledney, G. David

    2013-01-01

    Skin injuries such as wounds or burns following whole-body γ-irradiation (radiation combined injury (RCI)) increase mortality more than whole-body γ-irradiation alone. Wound-induced decreases in survival after irradiation are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to systemic bacterial infection. Among these factors, radiation-induced increases in interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrat...

  19. Skin Inqjuries Reduce Survival and Modulate Corticosterone, C-Reactive Protein, Complement Component 3, IgM, and Prostaglandin E2 after Whole-Body Reactor-Produced Mixed Field (n + γ-Photons) Irradiation

    Kiang, Juliann G; G. David Ledney

    2013-01-01

    Skin injuries such as wounds or burns following whole-body γ-irradiation (radiation combined injury (RCI)) increase mortality more than whole-body γ-irradiation alone. Wound-induced decreases in survival after irradiation are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to systemic bacterial infection. Among these factors, radiation-induced increases in interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrat...

  20. [Intra-abdominal infection and new quinolones].

    Gnocchi, C A

    1999-01-01

    Intra-abdominal infection is defined as the presence of an infectious process within the peritoneal cavity. It may be local or have a systemic consequence generating multiple organic disfunction. Most of the studies report a mortality of 30% in severe intra-abdominal infection. Secondary peritonitis is caused by the loss of integrity of the gastrointestinal apparatus, which contaminates with pathogens the peritoneal cavity. Invariably they are polymicrobial infections, mostly due to facultative anaerobic and anaerobic Gram negative bacilli. Prognosis of peritonitis depends on the struggle between two forces: local and systemic immunity of the host and the volume, nature and length of the contamination. Microorganisms and their products estimulate cellular defenses in the host and activate numerous inflammatory mediators responsible for sepsis. Antibiotic treatment of secondary peritonitis must act mainly against Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis. The adequate and early empirical administration of antibiotics against these bacteria is well established. It is necessary to consider if the infection is localized or generalized and if it is accompanied or not by organic disfunction. It also has to be taken into account if peritonitis is community or hospital-acquired when choosing the antibiotic scheme. In community-acquired peritonitis with low to moderate infections a combination of metronidazole-ceftriaxone, metronidazole-gentamycin or a monodrug like ampicillin-sulbactam may be used. In severe hospital-acquired peritonitis imipenem or the combination piperacillin-tazobactam are effective. New quinolones such as trovafloxacin or clinafloxacin, with excellent activity against aerobes and anaerobes producing intra-abdominal infections, may be effective. Future clinical trials are needed to determine their utility. Tertiary peritonitis represent a systemic inflammatory response with multiorganic failure due to the uncontrolled activation of the inflammatory

  1. Functional Abdominal Pain: "Get" the Function, Loose the Pain.

    Draeger-Muenke, Reinhild

    2015-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain is a mind-body, psychosocial, and self-reinforcing experience with significant consequences for the sufferer and the surrounding support network. The occurrence of unpredictable symptoms and their severity add an element of dread and feeling out-of-control to daily life and often reduce overall functioning in a downward spiral. Two clinical presentations of functional abdominal pain are offered in this article (composites to protect confidentiality) dealing with abdominal pain syndrome and abdominal migraines. The treatment demonstrates the use of hypnotic principles for self-regulation, exploration, and meaning-making. Hypnosis treatment is conducted in combination with mindfulness-based interventions and Traditional Chinese Medicine's (TCM) teachings regarding abdominal health and illness. The clinical examples illustrate medical findings that suggest children with early life stress and an early onset of gastrointestinal somatization may not simply outgrow their functional abdominal pain but may suffer into adulthood. PMID:26046716

  2. Chylous complications after abdominal aortic surgery.

    Haug, E S; Saether, O D; Odegaard, A; Johnsen, G; Myhre, H O

    1998-12-01

    Two patients developed chylous complications following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. One patient had chylous ascitis and was successfully treated by a peritoneo-caval shunt. The other patient developed a lymph cyst, which gradually resorbed after puncture. Chylous complications following aortic surgery are rare. Patients in bad a general condition should be treated by initial paracentesis and total parenteral nutrition, supplemented by medium-chain triglyceride and low-fat diet. If no improvement is observed on this regimen, the next step should be implementation of a peritoneo-venous shunt, whereas direct ligation of the leak should be reserved for those who are not responding to this treatment. PMID:10204656

  3. Mycobacterium fortuitum abdominal wall abscesses following liposuction

    Al Soub Hussam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a case of abdominal abscesses due to Mycobacterium fortuitum following liposuction. The abscesses developed three months after the procedure and diagnosis was delayed for five months. The clues for diagnosis were persistent pus discharge in spite of broad spectrum antibiotics and failure to grow any organisms on routine culture. This condition has been rarely reported; however, the increasing number of liposuction procedures done and awareness among physicians will probably result in the identification of more cases. Combination antibiotic therapy with surgical drainage in more extensive diseases is essential for cure.

  4. Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP).

    Morton, Darren; Callister, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP), commonly referred to as 'stitch', is an ailment well known in many sporting activities. It is especially prevalent in activities that involve repetitive torso movement with the torso in an extended position, such as running and horse riding. Approximately 70% of runners report experiencing the pain in the past year and in a single running event approximately one in five participants can be expected to suffer the condition. ETAP is a localized pain that is most common in the lateral aspects of the mid abdomen along the costal border, although it may occur in any region of the abdomen. It may also be related to shoulder tip pain, which is the referred site from tissue innervated by the phrenic nerve. ETAP tends to be sharp or stabbing when severe, and cramping, aching, or pulling when less intense. The condition is exacerbated by the postprandial state, with hypertonic beverages being particularly provocative. ETAP is most common in the young but is unrelated to sex or body type. Well trained athletes are not immune from the condition, although they may experience it less frequently. Several theories have been presented to explain the mechanism responsible for the pain, including ischemia of the diaphragm; stress on the supportive visceral ligaments that attach the abdominal organs to the diaphragm; gastrointestinal ischemia or distension; cramping of the abdominal musculature; ischemic pain resulting from compression of the celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament; aggravation of the spinal nerves; and irritation of the parietal peritoneum. Of these theories, irritation of the parietal peritoneum best explains the features of ETAP; however, further investigations are required. Strategies for managing the pain are largely anecdotal, especially given that its etiology remains to be fully elucidated. Commonly purported prevention strategies include avoiding large volumes of food and beverages for at least 2 hours

  5. Should intensivist do routine abdominal ultrasound?

    Sukhen Samanta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Roundworm infestation is common in tropical climate population with a low socioeconomic status. We describe a case of a young male with polytrauma accident who presented with small bowel dysfunction with a high gastric residual volume during enteral feeding. While searching the etiology, the intensivist performed bedside abdominal ultrasound (USG as a part of whole body USG screening along with clinical examination using different frequency probes to examine bowel movement and ultimately found ascariasis to be the cause. This case report will boost up the wide use of bedside USG by critical care physicians in their patient workup.

  6. Should intensivist do routine abdominal ultrasound?

    Samanta, Sukhen; Samanta, Sujay; Soni, Kapil Dev; Aggarwal, Richa

    2015-09-01

    Roundworm infestation is common in tropical climate population with a low socioeconomic status. We describe a case of a young male with polytrauma accident who presented with small bowel dysfunction with a high gastric residual volume during enteral feeding. While searching the etiology, the intensivist performed bedside abdominal ultrasound (USG) as a part of whole body USG screening along with clinical examination using different frequency probes to examine bowel movement and ultimately found ascariasis to be the cause. This case report will boost up the wide use of bedside USG by critical care physicians in their patient workup. PMID:26430346

  7. Dog with Hydronephrosis Due to Abdominal Trauma

    Talita Mariana Morata Raposo1, Giovanna Rossi Varallo1, Rafael Ricardo Huppes1, Alexandre Martini de Brum2 and Andrigo Barboza De Nardi1*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydronephrosis is a condition that results from complete or partial obstruction of the urinary flow. This paper reports the case of a two-year-old, mixed-breed dog diagnosed with hydronephrosis of the left kidney six months after being kicked in the thoraco-abdominal region. The diagnosis was based on radiographic and ultrasonographic examinations. Percutaneous antegrade pyelography was also performed and allowed the visualization of opacification of the left kidney, which confirmed the diagnosis. Because the exams indicated that the patient had normal renal function, nephrectomy was performed. The patient remained in good health during the postoperative period and in subsequent evaluations.

  8. Commercial irradiator

    Commercial irradiation, the treatment of products with gamma radiation principally using a Cobalt-60 source, had its beginnings in Europe and Australia 25 years ago. To date the most successful application of the process is the sterilization of medical products and, for a variety of reasons, gamma sterilization is now becoming dominant in this important field. Many other applications have been evaluated over the years and the most exciting is undoubtedly food irradiation for which there is a vast potential. The commercial feasibility of setting up and irradiation facility is a complex subject and the selection of Cobalt-60 gamma plant depends on a number of technical and economic considerations. The parameters which determine the design and capacity of the optimum plant include throughput, product size and dose requirements; a balance has to be struck between plant flexibility and overall economy. The Ansell irradiators are designed primarily for the sterilization of medical products although some experimental food irradiation has been done, particularly in Australia. (author)

  9. Report of a Case of Primary Abdominal Pregnancy

    Sh Beigi

    2006-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy (EP) is a potentially life-threatening condition in which the embryo implants outside the uterine endometrial cavity. Abdominal pregnancy is an atypical site wherein the product of conception lies totally outside the reproductive tract. Primary abdominal pregnancy is a very rare condition with a high mortality rate. Diagnosis is often late or misdiagnosed. The aim of introducing this case report is to present a new case of early primary abdominal pregnancy. Despite regular m...

  10. Abdominal Wall Schwannoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Mishra, A.; Hamadto, M.; Azzabi, M.; M. Elfagieh

    2013-01-01

    A 29-year-old female had presented to surgical outpatient's department complaining of lump in the anterior abdominal wall. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solid degenerated tumor in the anterior abdominal wall. It was surgically excised, and histopathology confirmed it to be “ancient” schwannoma. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of an abdominal wall ancient schwannoma in the medical literature.

  11. Abdominal Computed Tomography Findings of Malaria Infection with Plasmodium vivax

    Kim, Eun Mi; Cho, Hyeon Je; Cho, Chong Rae; Kwak, Yee Gyung; Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Yun Ku

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) findings of malaria are not well-known even though malaria is a serious infectious disease. To identify abdominal CT findings, we selected 34 of 405 patients who had a positive peripheral blood smear for Plasmodium vivax and had underwent abdominal CT as the malaria group. We also selected 80 patients who had fever and a negative peripheral blood smear as the control group and 120 healthy people as the normal group. We reviewed and analyzed their medical rec...

  12. Transformation of Abdominal Wall Endometriosis to Clear Cell Carcinoma

    Maria Paula Ruiz; Darryl Lewis Wallace; Matthew Thomas Connell

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell carcinoma is the least common of the malignant transformations reported in nonpelvic sites of endometriosis. Two cases with clear cell carcinoma transformation arising from endometriosis in abdominal wall scars are presented. These patients underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, pelvic washings, and abdominal wall lesion resection. The first case had initial treatment with chemotherapy, while chemotherapy and radiation therapy were given for th...

  13. A prospective study on geriatric abdominal surgical emergencies

    Deepak R. Chavan; Shailesh Kannur; B. B. Metan; Girish Kullolli

    2014-01-01

    Background: Geriatric population is a special subgroup of population undergoing emergency abdominal surgeries. Both higher age group and emergency surgical procedure are considered as high risk factors. In this study, we study the most common cause for geriatric population to undergo an emergency abdominal surgery and the therapeutic outcomes. Methods: All the patients aged more than 60 years coming to surgical department, BLDEU's hospital with acute abdominal conditions. Study period was ...

  14. Computed tomography for the assessment of blunt abdominal trauma

    Computed tomography (CT) was carried out on 70 patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Damage to the abdominal organs was clearly demonstrated by CT. The positive rates of CT in traumatic lesions were higher than those of ultrasound (US). Intraperitoneal hemorrhage was well demonstrated by US. Serum GPT levels were significantly elevated in patients with liver damage (p<0.001). CT proved to be useful for detecting damage to organs in patients with abdominal trauma. (author)

  15. Primary abdominal pregnancy following intra-uterine insemination

    Sujata Kar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary abdominal pregnancy is an extremely rare type of extrauterine pregnancy. It has been reported from many unusual intra-abdominal sites. We report a case of primary abdominal pregnancy following intra-uterine insemination (not reported earlier to our knowledge. Implanted on the anterior surface of the uterus possibly related to an endometriotic foci. Early diagnosis enabled laparoscopic management of this case.

  16. A large abdominal desmoid tumour associated with pregnancy and puerperium

    Setu Rathod; Sunil Kumar Samal; Purna Chandra Mahapatra

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of huge abdominal desmoid tumour first detected during pregnancy. The patient delivered vaginally and the size of the tumour increased during puerperium for which resection was done. Most of these tumours occur in the abdominal muscles particularly right rectus abdominis, perhaps related to trauma from abdominal stretching and movement. These tumours are known to regress spontaneously after delivery which was not in our case. Subsequent pregnancies do not appear to resul...

  17. Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis caused by paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Riccioni, G; Bucciarelli, V; Bisceglia, N; Totaro, G; Scotti, L; Aceto, A; Martini, F; Gallina, S; Bucciarelli, T; Macarini, L

    2013-01-01

    Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis is a rare and potential fatal event, which occurs in adult subjects. We present the case of a 72-year-old-man, who referred to the emergency Department of our hospital because of persistent severe abdominal and perineal pain. Doppler ultrasounds and computerized tomography angiography revealed the acute thrombosis of the abdominal aorta. Immediate revascularization through aortic thrombo-endoarterectomy resolved the disease. PMID:23830410

  18. Healing of the suture line in the irradiated small intestine

    With the help of data from literature the author goes more deeply into the aetiology, treatment and possible prevention of lesions of the small intestine related to preceding irradiation. In a clinical retrospective study at twenty patients who, after irradiation of the abdominal and pelvic areas, have been submitted to abdominal surgery, the relation is studied between predistion factors for gastrointestinal complications after irradiation, the surgeries applied in case of small-intestine problems and postoperative complications. The third part of the thesis covers an experimental part in which the healing process of suture line in the terminal ileum has been studied after resection and reanastomosis in previously irradiated bowel of the rat. It was investigated whether differences occurred in the healing process of suture line after various periods - 4, 10 and 40 weeks, after irradiation. Also comparison took place with a control group which underwent a similar procedure with the exception of the radiation treatment, which was simulated in this group. In a second experiment it was investigated if the healing process of suture line depends on the type of anastomosis. An end-to-end anastomosis was chosen versus side-to-side anastomosis. Also in this experiment an irradiated group was compared with a control group. Furthermore a method was developed for performing micro-angiographies of the rat intestine in order to demonstrate obliteration of blood vessels in irradiated intestine and to assess neovascularization in the intestinal wall at the suture line. (author). 84 refs.; 18 figs.; 27 tabs

  19. [Influences of chest deformation by upper abdominal retractor on respiratory system impedance during abdominal surgery].

    Oka, T; Ozawa, Y; Sato, J

    1999-02-01

    The present study was carried out to clarify the effects of chest deformation by upper abdominal retractor on respiratory system impedance during abdominal surgery. We measured the impedances of respiratory system (RS), lung, and chest wall (CW) in nine anesthetized paralyzed subjects employing a pseudorandom noise forced volume oscillation technique. These measurements were performed before and after the lifting chest wall by upper abdominal retractor. The effects of chest deformation was significant on the impedances of RS, lung, while no discernible effect was found in CW impedance. Lifting chest wall decreased RS resistance which was totally accounted for by the decrease in lung resistance, whereas the lifting did not affect reactance in either RS or lung. The mathematical modeling showed the significant lifting effect on the resistance of the parenchyma. In conclusion, change in RS mechanics produced by chest deformation by upper abdominal retractor is dominated in lung but not in CW. Among the lung mechanical components, parenchyma is the primary site of the lifting effect. PMID:10087819

  20. Prevalence of abdominal migraine and recurrent abdominal pain in a Japanese clinic.

    Hikita, Toshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    Prevalence of abdominal migraine (AM) and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) was evaluated in patients who visited Hikita Pediatric Clinic between May 2010 and April 2015. Patient data were collected prospectively using a questionnaire. Out of a total of 3611 cases, observed prevalence was 2.44% for repeated abdominal pain over a period of ≥3 months, 1.47% for RAP, and 0.19% for AM. Duration of abdominal pain was longer for AM than for non-AM RAP. Certain clinical features were significantly different between AM and non-AM RAP. No correlations were found among age at onset, frequency of attack, and duration of attack for various types of RAP. It was difficult to determine useful diagnostic criteria for distinguishing between AM and non-AM RAP. They did not appear to be separate disease entities but, instead, lie on a disease spectrum. The present prevalence of AM (0.19%) was lower than that in many previous studies from countries other than Japan. PMID:27460403

  1. Vinca irradiator

    The development programme of the VINCA radiosterilisation centre involves plans for an irradiator capable of working in several ways. Discontinuous operation. The irradiator is loaded for a certain period then runs automatically until the moment of unloading. This method is suitable as long as the treatment capacity is relatively small. Continuous operation with permanent batch loading and unloading carried out either manually or automatically (by means of equipment to be installed later). Otherwise the design of the apparatus is highly conventional. The source is a vertical panel submersible in a pool. The conveyor is of the 'bucket' type, with 4 tiers to each bucket. The batches pass successively through all possible irradiation positions. Transfert into and out of the cell take place through a maze, which also provides access to the cell when the sources are in storage at the bottom of the pool

  2. Abdominal alterations in disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis: computed tomography findings

    Objective: to evaluate the incidence and spectrum of abdominal computed tomography imaging findings in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis of abdominal computed tomography images of 26 patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. Results: abnormal abdominal tomographic findings were observed in 18 patients (69.2%), while no significant finding was observed in the other 8 (30.8%) patients. Conclusion: computed tomography has demonstrated to play a relevant role in the screening and detection of abdominal abnormalities in patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. (author)

  3. Diagnostic problems of abdominal desmoid tumors in various locations

    Kreuzberg, B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty Hospital and Medical Faculty of Charles University, Alej Svobody 80, 30460 Pilsen (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: kreuzberg@fnplzen.cz; Koudelova, J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty Hospital and Medical Faculty of Charles University, Alej Svobody 80, 30460 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Ferda, J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty Hospital and Medical Faculty of Charles University, Alej Svobody 80, 30460 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Treska, V. [Department of Surgery, Faculty Hospital and Medical Faculty of Charles University, Alej Svobody 80, 30460 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Spidlen, V. [Department of Surgery, Faculty Hospital and Medical Faculty of Charles University, Alej Svobody 80, 30460 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Mukensnabl, P. [Sikl' s Department of Pathology, Faculty Hospital and Medical Faculty of Charles University, Alej Svobody 80, 30460 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2007-05-15

    Background: Abdominal desmoid tumor is one of the forms of deep (musculoaponeurotic) fibromatosis. It occurs more often as a desmoid tumor in the abdominal wall, less often in various intra-abdominal locations. In this work, we performed retrospective study concerning diagnostic problems of this disease with the use of imaging techniques. Method: Four patients (three females and one male) were examined by postcontrast CT (computed tomography) and one of them also by MR (magnetic resonance). All findings were correlated with the operational findings and histologic examination. Results: The findings were typical only in the case with the lesion located in the abdominal wall, three described cases of the intra-abdominal desmoid provided a broad range of differentially diagnostic possibilities (metastases, GIT tumors, lymphomas, etc.). In particular, the findings in infiltrative processes in intra-abdominal location and retroperitoneal involvement were less typical. Ultimately, the histological findings were decisive. Conclusion: The possibility of the occurrence of intra-abdominal desmoid tumor must be considered particularly in younger individuals with rapidly growing tumorous process, which does not immediately arise from the surrounding organs (digestive tract, internal genitalia, etc.), and is located in the abdominal wall or in the abdominal cavity.

  4. Diagnostic problems of abdominal desmoid tumors in various locations

    Background: Abdominal desmoid tumor is one of the forms of deep (musculoaponeurotic) fibromatosis. It occurs more often as a desmoid tumor in the abdominal wall, less often in various intra-abdominal locations. In this work, we performed retrospective study concerning diagnostic problems of this disease with the use of imaging techniques. Method: Four patients (three females and one male) were examined by postcontrast CT (computed tomography) and one of them also by MR (magnetic resonance). All findings were correlated with the operational findings and histologic examination. Results: The findings were typical only in the case with the lesion located in the abdominal wall, three described cases of the intra-abdominal desmoid provided a broad range of differentially diagnostic possibilities (metastases, GIT tumors, lymphomas, etc.). In particular, the findings in infiltrative processes in intra-abdominal location and retroperitoneal involvement were less typical. Ultimately, the histological findings were decisive. Conclusion: The possibility of the occurrence of intra-abdominal desmoid tumor must be considered particularly in younger individuals with rapidly growing tumorous process, which does not immediately arise from the surrounding organs (digestive tract, internal genitalia, etc.), and is located in the abdominal wall or in the abdominal cavity

  5. Abdominal alterations in disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis: computed tomography findings

    Vermelho, Marli Batista Fernandes; Correia, Ademir Silva; Michailowsky, Tania Cibele de Almeida; Suzart, Elizete Kazumi Kuniyoshi; Ibanes, Aline Santos; Almeida, Lanamar Aparecida; Khoury, Zarifa; Barba, Mario Flores, E-mail: marlivermelho@globo.com [Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas (IIER), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Objective: to evaluate the incidence and spectrum of abdominal computed tomography imaging findings in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis of abdominal computed tomography images of 26 patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. Results: abnormal abdominal tomographic findings were observed in 18 patients (69.2%), while no significant finding was observed in the other 8 (30.8%) patients. Conclusion: computed tomography has demonstrated to play a relevant role in the screening and detection of abdominal abnormalities in patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. (author)

  6. Value of abdominal CT in the emergency department for patients with abdominal pain

    The purpose of our study is to demonstrate the value of CT in the emergency department (ED) for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. Between August 1998 and April 1999, 536 consecutive patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain were entered into our study. Using a computer order entry system, physicians were asked to identify: (a) their most likely diagnosis; (b) their level of certainty in their diagnosis; (c) if they thought CT would be normal or abnormal; (d) their treatment plan (prior to knowledge of the CT results); and (e) their role in deciding to order CT. This information was correlated with each patient's post-CT diagnosis and subsequent management. Pre- and post-CT diagnoses were concordant in 200 of 536 (37%) patients. The physicians' certainty in the accuracy of their pre-CT diagnosis was less than high in 88% of patients. Prior to CT, the management plan included hospital admission for 402 patients. Following CT, only 312 patients were actually admitted; thus, the net impact of performing CT was to obviate the need for hospital admission in 90 of 536 (17%) of patients with abdominal pain. Prior to CT, 67 of 536 (13%) of all patients would have undergone immediate surgery; however, following CT only 25 (5%) actually required immediate surgery. Among patients with the four most common pre-CT diagnoses (appendicitis, abscess, diverticulitis, and urinary tract stones) CT had the greatest impact on hospital admission and surgical management for patients with suspected appendicitis. For patients with suspected appendicitis, CT reduced the hospital admission rate in 28% (26 of 91) of patients and changed the surgical management in 40% (39 of 91) of patients. Our study demonstrates the advantage of performing abdominal CT in the ED for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  7. [Endometriosis in the abdominal wall (author's transl)].

    Caligaris, P; Masselot, R; Ducassou, M J; Le Treut, Y; Bricot, R

    1981-01-01

    The authors give 9 case histories of endometriosis localised to the abdominal wall : 3 of them in the umbilicus, 3 in laparotomy incisions (2 of those were Caesareans), 2 of them in the round ligaments at the external opening of the inguinal canal and 1 of them in the right rectus muscle sheath in the abdomen. The functional symptomatology is rhythmical according to menstruation; it is associated with a burning type of pain, a tumour and blood loss. Over and above the theories of aetiology that are now classical, namely tubal retrograde spill, and lymphatic or venous spread, it would seem that prostaglandins and in particular the ratio of P.G.E. divided by P.D.F2 alpha can play a big role. Although Danazol is an effective treatment for endometriosis, the treatment of choice is, in these lesions that are superficial in localisation and easily accessible, to cut them out surgically. This makes it possible on the one hand to look for other intra-abdominal lesions and also on the other hand to confirm the anatomy and pathology (this was done in 7 out of 9 of our cases). PMID:6459361

  8. Imaging modalities of abdominal tumors in children

    Further technological progress in cross-sectional imaging modalities, accumuting experience with increasingly refined hardware and software and accumulating specific contrast media allow new algorithms for the assessment of abdominal tumors in children. However, ultrasound remains the diagnostic method of choice: Conventional roentgenology with or without contrast media is decreasing, but often reveals further differential diagnostic details. MRI is becoming more prominent and is often performed immediately after ultrasound. The inauguration of gradient echo sequences and consequent shorter examination times combined with the elimination of pulsation and motion artefacts extends the diagnostic spectrum of the upper and middle abdomen. The application of oral or rectal contrast agents for imaging of the GI tract ameliorates the differentiation of pathologic processes. Recently volumetric CT/ultrafast CT has been gaining in importance for abdominal examinations in the pediatric age group. CT especially is helpful if there are bony structures in the region being examined. CT, however, involves ionizing radiation and timely administration of oral and intravenous contrast material. Moreover, as pediatric radiologists, we must strongly withstand tendencies to perform CT more often because it is less expensive, rather than avoiding ionizing radiation by using MRI. (orig.)

  9. Abdominal lymphadenopathy detection using random forest

    Cherry, Kevin M.; Wang, Shijun; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a new method for detecting abdominal lymphadenopathy by utilizing a random forest statistical classifier to create voxel-level lymph node predictions, i.e. initial detection of enlarged lymph nodes. The framework permits the combination of multiple statistical lymph node descriptors and appropriate feature selection in order to improve lesion detection beyond traditional enhancement filters. We show that Hessian blobness measurements alone are inadequate for detecting lymph nodes in the abdominal cavity. Of the features tested here, intensity proved to be the most important predictor for lymph node classification. For initial detection, candidate lesions were extracted from the 3D prediction map generated by random forest. Statistical features describing intensity distribution, shape, and texture were calculated from each enlarged lymph node candidate. In the last step, a support vector machine (SVM) was trained and tested based on the calculated features from candidates and labels determined by two experienced radiologists. The computer-aided detection (CAD) system was tested on a dataset containing 30 patients with 119 enlarged lymph nodes. Our method achieved an AUC of 0.762+/-0.022 and a sensitivity of 79.8% with 15 false positives suggesting it can aid radiologists in finding enlarged lymph nodes.

  10. Abdominal manifestations of cystic fibrosis in children

    Pulmonary complications remain the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis, but the presenting symptoms in children are often related to gastrointestinal or pancreaticobiliary disease. Furthermore, abdominal manifestations are now seen throughout childhood, from infancy to adolescence. The child might present in the neonatal period with meconium ileus or its attendant complications. The older child might present with distal intestinal obstruction syndrome or colonic stricture secondary to high doses of pancreatic enzyme replacement. Less-common gastrointestinal manifestations include intussusception, duodenitis and fecal impaction of the appendix. Most children also show evidence of exocrine pancreatic deficiency. Radiologically, the combination of fat deposition and pancreatic fibrosis leads to varying CT and MR appearances. A higher than normal incidence of pancreatic cysts and calcification is also seen. Decreased transport of water and chloride also increases the viscosity of bile, with subsequent obstruction of the biliary ductules. If extensive, this can progress to obstructive cirrhosis, portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Diffuse fatty infiltration, hypersplenism and gallstones are also commonly seen in these patients. We present a pictorial review of the radiological appearance of these abdominal manifestations. The conditions are dealt with individually, together with typical appearances in various imaging modalities. (orig.)

  11. Abdominal manifestations of cystic fibrosis in children

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Navarro, Oscar M.; Levine, Daniel S.; Oudjhane, Kamaldine [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-03-15

    Pulmonary complications remain the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis, but the presenting symptoms in children are often related to gastrointestinal or pancreaticobiliary disease. Furthermore, abdominal manifestations are now seen throughout childhood, from infancy to adolescence. The child might present in the neonatal period with meconium ileus or its attendant complications. The older child might present with distal intestinal obstruction syndrome or colonic stricture secondary to high doses of pancreatic enzyme replacement. Less-common gastrointestinal manifestations include intussusception, duodenitis and fecal impaction of the appendix. Most children also show evidence of exocrine pancreatic deficiency. Radiologically, the combination of fat deposition and pancreatic fibrosis leads to varying CT and MR appearances. A higher than normal incidence of pancreatic cysts and calcification is also seen. Decreased transport of water and chloride also increases the viscosity of bile, with subsequent obstruction of the biliary ductules. If extensive, this can progress to obstructive cirrhosis, portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Diffuse fatty infiltration, hypersplenism and gallstones are also commonly seen in these patients. We present a pictorial review of the radiological appearance of these abdominal manifestations. The conditions are dealt with individually, together with typical appearances in various imaging modalities. (orig.)

  12. Abdominal computed tomography in malignant lymphoma

    The computed tomographic findings of malignant lymphoma in the pelvis and abdomen is described. Characteristic symptoms are lymph node enlargement in the diameter greater than 1,0 cm, obliteration of the contour of the surrounding structures and displacement of the neighbouring organs. In contrast to the conventional lymphography, CT gives information about mesenterial and retrocrural lymph nodes. In patients with involvement of liver and spleen, CT defines only the size of the organs, because of differences in density to normal patients are seldom observed and focal lesions are rare. 71 patients with newly diagnosed, histologically proved and untreated malignant lymphoma are investigated by CT. In 27 patients CT detected pathological findings, the sensitivity was 72%, the specifity 100%. False-negative results has been attributed to the failure to identify not enlarged, but involved lymph nodes and involved liver and spleen without focal lesions or enlargement. CT replaces lymphography in diagnosis and staging of patients with abdominal malignant lymphoma, lymphography is indicated only in patients with expected abdominal disease and normal CT to identify involved, not enlarged lymph nodes. (orig.)

  13. Abdominal-Pelvic Actinomycosis Mimicking Malignant Neoplasm

    Teresa Pusiol

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal-pelvic actinomycosis is often mistaken for other conditions, presenting a preoperative diagnostic challenge. In a 46-year-old female, computed tomography showed an abdominal-pelvic retroperitoneal mass extending from the lower pole of the right kidney to the lower pelvis. The patient had a 3-year history of intrauterine device. The mass appeared to involve the ascending colon, cecum, distal ileum, right Fallopian tube and ovary, and ureter anteriorly and the psoas muscle posteriorly. The resection of retroperitoneal mass, distal ileum appendicectomy, right hemicolectomy, and right salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. The postoperative period was uneventful. Penicillin therapy was given for six months without any complication. The retroperitoneal mass measured 4.5 × 3.5 × 3 cm, surrounded adjacent organs and histologically showed inflammatory granulomatous tissue, agglomeration of filaments, and sulfur granules of Actinomyces, with positive reaction with periodic acid Schiff. Right tubo-ovarian abscess was present. Abdominalpelvic actinomycosis should always be considered in patients with a pelvic mass especially in ones using intrauterine device.

  14. PET/CT Interpretation: Abdominal Anatomy

    Detail knowledge of abdominal anatomy is essential for accurate interpretation of oncologic PET/CT. The objective of this lecture is to provide the core knowledge and guidance about, peritoneal cavity, vessels, nodal, internal organ, especially liver segmental anatomy, and retroperitoneal spaces to nuclear medicine physicians in their interpretation of oncologic PET/CT. Peritoneal Cavity: The peritoneal spaces are easiest to recognize when there is ascites. The right subphrenic space communicates with anterior and posterior subhepatic (Morrison's) space. The left subphrenic space freely communicate with the left subhepatic space. The right and left subphrenic spaces are separated by falciform ligament and do not communicate directly. The lesser sac is the isolated peritoneal compartment between the stomach and pancreas. It communicates with the rest of the peritoneal cavity (greater sac) through the Foramen of Winslow. The right subphrenic and subhepatic spaces communicate freely with the pelvic peritoneal cavity thru the right paracolic gutter. The phrenicocolic ligament prevents free communication between the left subphrenic / subhepatic space and left paracolic gutter. Free fluid and peritoneal metastases commonly settles in pelvis as the most dependent portion of the peritoneal cavity. The small mesentery suspends the jejunum and ileum and extends obliquely from the left upper quadrant to right lower quadrant. Disease originating above the ligament is directed towards the right lower quadrant and below the ligament can spread to pelvis. The greater omentum hangs from the greater curvature of the stomach and descends in front of the abdominal viscera and serves as a fertile ground for peritoneal metastases. Vessels: The abdominal aorta descends anterior to the left side of the spine to its bifurcation at the level of the iliac crest. The normal aorta does not exceed 3 cm diameter and tapers progressively as it descends distally. The common iliac arteries

  15. Ultrasonographic findings of pediatric abdominal masses

    Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Gyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chung, Hyun De [Chonnam University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    Ultrasonography is a very useful diagnostic modality for the evaluation of clinically suspicious abdominal masses in infants and children, especially in assessing their existence, size, location, origin and internal consistency. Authors analyzed and present ultrasonographic findings of 92 pathologically and/or clinically proven pediatric abdominal masses that were studied and treated in Chonnam University Hospital during recent 4 years. The results were as follows: 1. The most common originating site was kidney (26 cases: 28.3%), followed by gastrointestinal tract (21 cases: 22.8%), genital organ (17 cases: 18.5%), non-renal retroperitoneum (13 cases: 18.5%), hepatobiliary tract (12 cases: 13.0%), and anterior abdominal wall (3 cases: 3.3%) in order to frequency. 2. The most common mass was hydronephrosis (18 cases: 19.6%). Neuroblastoma (7 cases: 7.6%), hepatoblatoma, ovarian teratoma, periappendiceal abscess and abdominal tuberculosis (6 cases: 6.5%, respectively), Wilms tumor (5 cases: 5.4%) were next in order of frequency. 3. The sex distribution is rather similar, that is, male 42 (45.7%) and female 50 (54.3%), but characteristically choledochal cyst (2 cases) and genital mass (17 cases) were found only in females. Considering age distribution, 78 cases (84.8%) were found within the range of one to 15 years of age. The rest, 14 cases (15.2%), were under the age of one year. 4. With ultrasonography, the diagnosis of hydronephrosis could be made easily in every case and we could evaluate its severity and level of obstruction with high accuracy. 5. All Wilms tumor were large, round or oval, sharply marinated and relatively homogeneous solid masses. 6. All neuroblastomas were irregular shaped, poorly defined, heterogeneous solid masses. Tumor calcification and extension across the midline were noted in 6 cases (85.7%) and 5 cases (71.4%), respectively. 7. All periappendiceal abscess had irregular thickened wall and posterior acoustic enhancement; 4 cases (66

  16. Abdominal wall protrusion following herpes zoster Protrusão de parede abdominal secundária a herpes zoster

    Facundo Burgos Ruiz Junior; Jullyanna Sabrysna Morais Shinosaki; Wilson Marques Junior; Marcelo Simão Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    We present the case of a 62-year-old woman with abdominal segmental paresis consequent to radiculopathy caused by zoster, which was confirmed by electroneuromyography. The paresis resolved completely within three months. Recognition of this complication caused by zoster, which is easily misdiagnosed as abdominal herniation, is important for diagnosing this self-limited condition and avoiding unnecessary procedures.Apresenta-se caso de uma paciente de 62 anos com paresia abdominal segmentar, c...

  17. Influence of dose-rate on inflammatory damage and adhesion molecule expression after abdominal radiation in the rat

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to assess the effects of two clinically relevant radiation dose-rates on endothelial adhesion molecule expression, inflammatory response, and microvascular dysfunction. Methods and Materials: Rats were irradiated with 10 Gy at low (0.9 Gy/min) or high (3 Gy/min) dose-rates. Control animals received sham irradiation. Leukocyte rolling, adhesion, emigration, and microvascular permeability were assessed in mesenteric venules by intravital microscopy 6 hours after irradiation. P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression were measured using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Results: Low dose-rate (LDR) abdominal irradiation increased leukocyte adhesion compared with sham-irradiated animals, whereas high dose-rate (HDR) irradiation resulted in enhanced leukocyte rolling, adhesion, and emigration, compared with the LDR or with sham-irradiated rats. Both dose-rates increased microvascular permeability, although this effect was significantly greater after radiation with the high (8-fold) than the low (5-fold) dose-rate. HDR radiation induced significantly larger increments in P-selectin expression in splanchnic organs than LDR, whereas in most organs ICAM-1 expression was only upregulated by the HDR. Blockade of ICAM-1, but not P-selectin, abrogated leukocyte adhesion at both dose-rates. Conclusions: The magnitude of upregulation of endothelial adhesion molecules, leukocyte recruitment, and endothelial barrier dysfunction elicited by radiation therapy is dependent on the dose-rate at which the radiation is delivered

  18. Abdominal tuberculosis. On-going challenge to gastroenterologists

    The aim of this study is to record the observations and experience on the diagnosis and management of abdominal tuberculosis (TB) and to highlight the difficulties in the diagnosis and management of this condition. Two hundred consecutive patients attending the Gastroenterology Department of the King Khalid National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between May 1991 and May 2001, suspected with abdominal TB were investigated. A detailed clinical history and physical examination were obtained. Data of 75 confirmed cases of abdominal TB were analyzed. The most common presenting symptoms were anorexia (84%), abdominal pain (84%) and weight loss (72%). Abdominal tenderness was the most common clinical finding, followed by ascites and abdominal mass (42%). The chest radiograph suggestive of pulmonary TB was diagnosed in 24 patients (32%). Computed tomographic (CT) scanning revealed abnormalities in all 51 patients who underwent the procedure, while positive findings were observed by abdominal ultrasound in 66% of the tested patients. Histopathological examination of patients showed tuberculosis granuloma, while acid fast bacilli were seen in 34%. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified by microbiological methods in 60% of patients. The most common presenting symptoms were anorexia (84%), abdominal pain (84%) and weight loss (72%). Abdominal tenderness was the most common clinical finding, followed by ascites and abdominal mass (42%). The chest radiograph suggestive of pulmonary TB was diagnosed in 24 patients (32%). Computed tomographic (CT) scanning revealed abnormalities in all 51 patients who underwent the procedure, while positive findings were observed by abdominal ultrasound in 66% of the tested patients. Histopathological examination of patients showed tuberculous granuloma, while acid fast bacilli were seen in 34%. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified by microbiological methods in 60% of patients. A high index of clinical suspicion is

  19. Food irradiation

    The colloquium has been held on the occasion of the commissioning of a new linear electron accelerator. The 17 papers presented by the experts give a survey of the present status of food irradiation and related aspects. Every paper has been analysed and prepared for retrieval from the database. (orig.)

  20. Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms Rastreamento de aneurismas da aorta abdominal

    Telmo Pedro Bonamigo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE AND METHODS: Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms may be useful to decrease mortality related to rupture. We conducted a study to assess the prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysms in southern Brazil and to define risk factors associated with high prevalence of this disorder. The screening was conducted using abdominal ultrasound. Three groups were studied: Group 1 - cardiology clinic patients; Group 2 - individuals with severe ischemic disease and previous coronary surgery, or important lesions on cardiac catheterism; Group 3 - individuals without cardiac disease selected from the general population. All individuals were male and older than 54 years of age. The ultrasonographic diagnosis of aneurysm was based on an anteroposterior abdominal aorta diameter of 3 cm, or on an abdominal aorta diameter 0.5 cm greater than that of the supra-renal aorta. RESULTS: A total of 2.281 people were screened for abdominal aortic aneurysms in all groups: Group 1 - 768 individuals, Group 2 - 501 individuals, and Group 3 - 1012 individuals. The prevalence of aneurysms was 4.3%, 6.8% and 1.7%, respectively. Age and cigarette smoking were significantly associated with increased prevalence of aneurysms, as was the diagnosis of peripheral artery disease. DISCUSSION: We concluded that screening may be an important tool to prevent the mortality associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms surgery. Additionally, the cost of screening can be decreased if only individuals presenting significant risk factors, such as coronary and peripheral artery disease, smokers and relatives of aneurysm patients, are examined.OBJETIVO E MÉTODOS: O rastreamento de aneurisma da aorta abdominal infra-renal é importante pois pode diminuir a mortalidade relacionada à ruptura. Realizamos um estudo para definir a prevalência desses aneurismas em diversos segmentos da população em nossa região do Brasil. O rastreamento foi realizado utilizando-se a ecografia de abdômen. Tr

  1. WR2721 ameliorates the radiation-induced depression in reactivity of rat abdominal aorta to U46619

    Previous studies showed that 20 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation results in a decreased response of the abdominal aorta to the stable thromboxane A2 (TXA2) mimic, U46619. The present study evaluated the effect of WR2721 on this radiation-induced decrease in vascular responsiveness. Rats receiving WR2721 (200 mg/kg, i.p.) 20 min before irradiation showed no depression in vascular reactivity to U46619 compared to control. The abolition of the radiation-induced decrease in vascular responsiveness was not caused by a direct vasoconstrictor action of WR2721 or its metabolites. The vascular response of rat abdominal aortic rings to KCl was unchanged after in vivo exposure to ionizing radiation. WR2721 did not alter the vascular response to KCl. These studies confirm that exposure to whole-body ionizing radiation decreased abdominal aortic vascular responsiveness to U46619. This depressed vascular reactivity can be abolished by pretreatment with the radioprotectant, WR2721. These observations may provide a rapid initial screening method for evaluating the in vivo efficacy of radioprotectant drugs

  2. High dose for prostate irradiation with image guided radiotherapy: Contribution of intensity modulation arc-therapy; Haute dose dans la prostate par radiotherapie guidee par l'image: apport de l'arctherapie avec modulation d'intensite du faisceau

    Jouyaux, B.; De Crevoisier, R.; Manens, J.P.; Bellec, J.; Chira, C.; Le Prise, E.; Lafond, C. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France); De Crevoisier, R.; Manens, J.P.; Cazoulat, G.; Haigron, P.; Lafond, C. [Inserm, U642, 35 - Rennes (France); Universite de Rennes-1, LTSI, 35 - Rennes (France)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: To compare two Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) techniques for prostate cancer: the Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and the 'Step and Shoot' technique (S and S). Materials and methods: VMAT and S and S plans (RX 18 MV) were created and compared (Wilcoxon test) for 10 patients. The dosimetric goal of both treatments was to deliver 46 Gy to the seminal vesicles and 80 Gy to the prostate, while respecting the dose constrains in the organs at risk of toxicity. For one patient, the two techniques were compared for dose painting and escalation in target volumes defined on MRI and registered thanks to intra-prostatic fiducial. Results: VMAT, compared to S and S, offered: an increase of the PTV2s (prostate) volume receiving 77 to 80 Gy and a decrease of V{sub 82} and V{sub 83}; a decrease of V{sub 4} to V{sub 6}, V{sub 16} to V{sub 23}, and V{sub 69} to V{sub 73} for the rectal wall; a decrease of V{sub 25} for the bladder wall; a decrease of V{sub 21} to V{sub 43} for the femoral heads; a decrease of V{sub 26} to V{sub 44} and V{sub 72} to V{sub 80} but an increase of V{sub 1} to V{sub 21} and V{sub 49} to V{sub 60} for the healthy tissues. The Conformal Index 'COIN' was better with VMAT than S and S (0.60 to 0.66). The delivered MU were significantly reduced with VMAT (8% mean) as well as the delivery time (4 min to 1.5 min). VMAT allowed delivering theoretically 90 Gy in the peripheral zone and 100 Gy in the tumor. Conclusion: In case of prostate irradiation, VMAT shows improvement compared with S and S. In particular, organs at risk are better spared, the delivery time is shortened and the number of delivered UM is decreased. (authors)

  3. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operates over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  4. Increased Auditory Startle Reflex in Children with Functional Abdominal Pain

    Bakker, Mirte J.; Boer, Frits; Benninga, Marc A.; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders have a general hypersensitivity for sensory stimuli. Study design Auditory startle reflexes were assessed in 20 children classified according to Rome III classifications of abdominal pain

  5. Small Bowel Injury in Peritoneal Encapsulation following Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

    Naidoo, K.; Mewa Kinoo, S.; Singh, B.

    2013-01-01

    Small bowel encapsulation is a rare entity which is usually found incidentally at autopsy. We report the first case of peritoneal encapsulation encountered serendipitously at laparotomy undertaken for penetrating abdominal trauma and review the literature on peritoneal encapsulation. We also compare this phenomenon to abdominal cocoon and sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis.

  6. Small Bowel Injury in Peritoneal Encapsulation following Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

    K. Naidoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel encapsulation is a rare entity which is usually found incidentally at autopsy. We report the first case of peritoneal encapsulation encountered serendipitously at laparotomy undertaken for penetrating abdominal trauma and review the literature on peritoneal encapsulation. We also compare this phenomenon to abdominal cocoon and sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis.

  7. Practical Approaches to Definitive Reconstruction of Complex Abdominal Wall Defects.

    Latifi, Rifat

    2016-04-01

    With advances in abdominal surgery and the management of major trauma, complex abdominal wall defects have become the new surgical disease, and the need for abdominal wall reconstruction has increased dramatically. Subsequently, how to reconstruct these large defects has become a new surgical question. While most surgeons use native abdominal wall whenever possible, evidence suggests that synthetic or biologic mesh needs to be added to large ventral hernia repairs. One particular group of patients who exemplify "complex" are those with contaminated wounds, enterocutaneous fistulas, enteroatmospheric fistulas, and/or stoma(s), where synthetic mesh is to be avoided if at all possible. Most recently, biologic mesh has become the new standard in high-risk patients with contaminated and dirty-infected wounds. While biologic mesh is the most common tissue engineered used in this field of surgery, level I evidence is needed on its indication and long-term outcomes. Various techniques for reconstructing the abdominal wall have been described, however the long-term outcomes for most of these studies, are rarely reported. In this article, I outline current practical approaches to perioperative management and definitive abdominal reconstruction in patients with complex abdominal wall defects, with or without fistulas, as well as those who have lost abdominal domain. PMID:26585951

  8. Computed tomography and nonoperative treatment for blunt abdominal trauma

    Studies were undertaken to determine if computed tomography (CT) could reliably assist physical examination in the initial assessment of blunt abdominal trauma, and also to examine how various abdominal injuries were managed with the guidance of CT. A total of 255 patients underwent emergency abdominal CT following blunt abdominal trauma over a period of seven years. One hundred and fifty two patients had abnormal CT scans, including 58 hepatic, 36 renal, 25 splenic and 9 pancreatic injuries as well as 67 patients with intra-abdominal hemorrhage and 21 patients with free abdominal air. A comparative study on the detection of pneumoperitoneum revealed CT to be far superior to plain radiography. One hundred and three patients had normal CT scans, all of whom were managed nonoperatively, except for three false-negative cases and two nontherapeutic cases. The patients with injury to the parenchymal organs were given nonoperative treatment if they had stable vital signs and no evidence of associated injuries demanding immediate surgery and the majority of these patients were managed well nonoperatively. CT was thus found to be a useful adjunct in the management of victims of blunt abdominal trauma, since in a rapid and noninvasive fashion, CT accurately defined the extent of parenchymal organ injury and also disclosed any other abdominal injuries. (author)

  9. The clinical picture of duodenal rupture after blunt abdominal trauma

    The case of a 30 years old woman who suffered a pneumoretroperitoneum due to a blunt abdominal trauma is reported. The characteristic roentgen signs showing the source of the retroperitoneal air trappings are discussed. The exact analysis of simple abdominal plain films allows early references to an often life-threatening disease without expensive additional examinations. (orig.)

  10. Abelian modules

    S. Halıcıoğlu; Harmanci, A.; GÜNGÖROĞLU, G.; N. Agayev

    2009-01-01

    In this note, we introduce abelian modules as a generalization of abelian rings. Let R be an arbitrary ring with identity. A module M is called abelian if, for any m Î M and any a Î R, any idempotent e Î R, mae=mea. We prove that every reduced module, every symmetric module, every semicommutative module and every Armendariz module is abelian. For an abelian ring R, we show that the module MR is abelian iff M[x]R[x] is abelian. We produce an example to show that M[x, α] need not be abe...

  11. Nutritional and metabolic changes due the abdominal radiation: experimental study; Alteracoes nutricionais e do metabolismo energetico na irradiacao abdominal: estudo experimental

    Mucerino, Donato R.; Waitzberg, Dan L.; Campos, Fabio G. de; Melo Auricchio, Maria T. de; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim J.; Lima-Goncalves, Ernesto L. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Div. de Clinica Cirurgica II

    1995-01-01

    In this study the effects on nutritional status and energetic metabolism due the abdominal irradiation were analysed. Adult male wistar rats (48), were divided in two groups Control (C) and radiated (R). The rats were maintained all time in metabolic cages. the study was done in two periods: period 1 begun at 0 day, were rats adapted to cages and oral diet, had food and water ad libitum. At the day four indirect calorimetric measurements were performed (calorimetry 1). At period 2, group R rats abdominal radiation at a 300 c Gy/day rate, for 5 consecutive days, and group C started a pair-feeding process linked individually to R rats and suffered application to simulated-irradiation. Two other calorimetric measurements (II,III) were performing during period 2. After radiation the last calorimetry was performed (IV). At sacrifice (day 14) blood was collected for determination of hemoglobin, hematocrit, albumin and transferrin. There were no statistical differences among groups C and R during period 1 (p < 0.05). Great reduction in food intake and weight variation were found in period 2, but weight loss was significantly higher in R rats. Nitrogen balance decrease in period 2, but without difference among the groups (p < 0.05). Serum albumin was significantly lower in R rats. Respiratory quotient decreased in both groups during period 2, but rats kept it lower (p < 0.05). The energy expenditure level decreased after radiation in group R. During period 2 total substrate oxidation decreased in R rats. Radiation decrease glucose and protein oxidation. In conclusion, in this study`s conditions, radiation produced malnutrition by reducing food intake by bringing weight loss, hypoalbuminemia and decrease nitrogen balance. Radiation was also responsible for a reduction of metabolism, by promoting the fall of energy expenditure. These changes are not only due the anorexia, undoubtful a main factor. (author). 60 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Significant reductions in heart and lung doses using deep inspiration breath hold with active breathing control and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for patients treated with locoregional breast irradiation

    Purpose: To evaluate the heart and lung sparing effects of moderate deep inspiration breath hold (mDIBH) achieved using an active breathing control (ABC) device, compared with free breathing (FB) during treatment with deep tangents fields (DT) for locoregional (LR) irradiation of breast cancer patients, including the internal mammary (IM) nodes (IMNs). To compare the DT-mDIBH technique to other standard techniques and to evaluate the dosimetric effect of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients (9 left-sided and 6 right-sided lesions) with Stages 0-III breast cancer underwent standard FB and ABC computed tomographic (CT) scans in the treatment position. A dosimetric planning study was performed. In FB, the 9 left-sided patients were planned with a 5-field technique where electron fields covering the IM region were matched to shallow tangents using wedges (South West Oncology Group [SWOG] protocol S9927 technique A). This method was compared with a 3-field DT technique covering the breast and the IMNs (SWOG S9927 technique B). Compensation with IMRT was then compared with wedges for each technique. For the 15 total patients, dosimetric planning using DT with IMRT was then reoptimized on the mDIBH CT data set for comparison. Dose-volume histograms for the clinical target volume (CTV) (including the IMNs), planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral and contralateral breast, and organs at risk (OAR) were analyzed. In addition, normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) for lung and heart, mean lung doses, and the number of monitor units (MUs) for a 1.8 Gy fraction were compared. Results: For the 9 left-sided patients, the mean percentage of heart receiving more than 30 Gy (heart V30) was lower with the 5-field wedged technique than with the DT wedged technique (6.8% and 19.1%, respectively, p<0.004). For the DT technique, the replacement of wedges with IMRT slightly diminished the mean heart V30 to 16.3% (p<0.51). The

  13. An unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    Mc Cabe, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department with abdominal pain, diarrhoea, anorexia and haematemesis. The patient was previously diagnosed with latent tuberculosis (TB). On examination, his abdomen was diffusely tender, with localised guarding in the right iliac fossa. CT imaging of his abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a low volume of ascites, diffuse studding of the peritoneum, omental caking and several bulky low-density lymph nodes in the retroperitoneum. A laparoscopy was performed to obtain a peritoneal biopsy. Histology demonstrated fragments of peritoneum with necrotising granulomatous inflammatory infiltrate in keeping with an infectious process, favouring TB. He was commenced on rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and pyridoxine under the direct observed therapy by the infectious diseases team. In view of his extensive peritoneal involvement, he was empirically started on high-dose prednisolone for symptomatic control and to reduce complications related to peritoneal adhesions.

  14. Simulation-Based Abdominal Ultrasound Training

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Ewertsen, C; Konge, L;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim is to provide a complete overview of the different simulation-based training options for abdominal ultrasound and to explore the evidence of their effect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This systematic review was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines and Medline, Embase, Web of...... evidence, and 14 had the lowest level. Bias was high for 11 studies, low for four, and unclear for two. No studies used a test with established evidence of validity or examined the correlation between obtained skills on the simulators and real-life clinical skills. Only one study used blinded assessors....... CONCLUSION: The included studies were heterogeneous in the choice of simulator, study design, participants, and outcome measures, and the level of evidence for effect was inadequate. In all studies simulation training was equally or more beneficial than other instructions or no instructions. Study designs...

  15. Abdominal muscle function and incisional hernia

    Jensen, K K; Kjaer, M; Jorgensen, L N

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although ventral incisional hernia (VIH) repair in patients is often evaluated in terms of hernia recurrence rate and health-related quality of life, there is no clear consensus regarding optimal operative treatment based on these parameters. It was proposed that health-related quality...... of life depends largely on abdominal muscle function (AMF), and the present review thus evaluates to what extent AMF is influenced by VIH and surgical repair. METHODS: The PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched for articles following a systematic strategy for inclusion. RESULTS: A total of seven...... studies described AMF in relation to VIH. Five studies examined AMF using objective isokinetic dynamometers to determine muscle strength, and two studies examined AMF by clinical examination-based muscle tests. CONCLUSION: Both equipment-related and functional muscle tests exist for use in patients...

  16. Changing spleen size after blunt abdominal trauma

    The authors studied the incidence and significance of splenic enlargement on serial CT after abdominal trauma. Spleen size and density in 44 trauma patients were studied with serial, contrast-enhanced Ct. In 58% of the patients, ≥ 10% enlargement of the spleen was seen on follow-up scans. Ten patients had >50% enlargement. In several, the initial density of the spleen was less than that of the liver. Spleen density returned to normal on subsequent scans. Correlations between splenic changes and clinical parameters (such as blood replacement, hypotension, and various trauma indexes) were weak. The author's study indicated that serial splenic enlargement was a physiologic return to normal after major trauma, not a pathologic condition requiring splenectomy

  17. Intra-Abdominal Hematoma Following Enoxaparin Injection.

    Chung, Kin Tong

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient, who was being treated for therapeutic enoxaparin for a couple of days due to suspected deep vein thrombosis, was admitted to hospital following a collapse and severe abdominal pain. She was in hypovolemic shock and was fluid resuscitated. Ultrasound scan and computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large pelvic hematoma. Radiologists also suspected a possibility of bleeding from inferior epigastric artery following a CT angiogram. The patient was stabilized and transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for further hemodynamic supports and close monitoring. The patient was then transferred back to the general ward when she was stable. She was managed conservatively as there were no more signs of active bleeding. Unfortunately, she died of recurrent bleeding three days after ICU discharge. PMID:27158226

  18. [Abdominal ischemia and lesions of the pancreas].

    Myshanych, T V; Moskal', O M; Arkhiĭ, E Ĭ; Sozoniuk, O V

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the results of 50 patients with diseases of coronary heart disease (25 pers.) And chronic pancreatitis (25 people) are submitted. Along with the standard test from these patients underwent Doppler-ultrasonography of abdominal aorta and its visceral branches. Conclusions: A characteristic feature of Doppler indices in AIC is to reduce Vps and Ved, and PI BbA, increase Vps, Ved, IR and PI after exercise in chBA, chC and BbA. At patients with CP with IHD feature is the increase in Ved and IR in the chC, and Ved and PI in BbA under act of loading Bleed a feature at CP with IHD must be taken into account for optimization of treatment of IHD at CP. PMID:25796868

  19. Food irradiation: An update

    Recent regulatory and commercial activity regarding food irradiation is highlighted. The effects of irradiation, used to kill insects and microorganisms which cause food spoilage, are discussed. Special attention is given to the current regulatory status of food irradiation in the USA; proposed FDA regulation regarding the use of irradiation; pending irradiation legislation in the US Congress; and industrial applications of irradiation

  20. Standardized anatomic space for abdominal fat quantification

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) from images is important for improved assessment and management of patients with various conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and degenerative disease. Although imaging and analysis methods to measure the volume of these tissue components have been developed [1, 2], in clinical practice, an estimate of the amount of fat is obtained from just one transverse abdominal CT slice typically acquired at the level of the L4-L5 vertebrae for various reasons including decreased radiation exposure and cost [3-5]. It is generally assumed that such an estimate reliably depicts the burden of fat in the body. This paper sets out to answer two questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? At what anatomic location do the volumes of SAT and VAT correlate maximally with the corresponding single-slice area measures? To answer these questions, we propose two approaches for slice localization: linear mapping and non-linear mapping which is a novel learning based strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. We then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. We demonstrate on 50 abdominal CT data sets that this mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Our results also indicate that maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized.