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Sample records for abdominal injuries

  1. Spectrum of abdominal organ injury in a primary blast type

    Amin Abid; Wani Rauf A; Sheikh Tariq; Parray Fazal Q; Wani Imtiaz; Gul Imran; Nazir Mir

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Abdominal organ injury in a primary blast type is always challenging for diagnosis. Air containing abdominal viscera is most vulnerable to effects of primary blast injury. In any patient exposed to a primary blast wave who presents with an acute abdomen, an abdominal organ injury is to be kept in a clinical suspicion. Aim Study various abdominal organ injuries occurring in a primary type of blast injury. Material and methods: All those who had exploratory laparotomy for ...

  2. Spectrum of abdominal organ injury in a primary blast type

    Amin Abid

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Abdominal organ injury in a primary blast type is always challenging for diagnosis. Air containing abdominal viscera is most vulnerable to effects of primary blast injury. In any patient exposed to a primary blast wave who presents with an acute abdomen, an abdominal organ injury is to be kept in a clinical suspicion. Aim Study various abdominal organ injuries occurring in a primary type of blast injury. Material and methods: All those who had exploratory laparotomy for abdominal organ injuries after a primary blast injury for a period of 10 years from January 1998 - January 2008 were included in this retrospective study. Results Total 154 patients had laparotomy for abdominal organ injuries with a primary blast type of injury. Small intestine was damaged in 48 patients (31.1% followed by spleen in 22.7% cases. 54 patients (35.06% had more than one organ injured. Liver laceration was present in 30 patients (19.48%. Multiple small gut perforations were present in 37 patients (77.08%. Negative laparotomy was found in 5 patients (3.24% whereas 3 (1.94% had re-exploration. Mortality was present in 6 patients (3.89%. Conclusions Primary blast injury causes varied abdominal organ injuries. Single or multiple organ damage can be there. Small intestine is commonest viscera injured. Laparotomy gives final diagnosis.

  3. Abdominal injuries in communal crises: The Jos experience

    Emmanuel Olorundare Ojo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abdominal injuries contribute significantly to battlefield trauma morbidity and mortality. This study sought to determine the incidence, demographics, clinical features, spectrum, severity, management, and outcome of abdominal trauma during a civilian conflict. Materials and Methods: A prospective analysis of patients treated for abdominal trauma during the Jos civil crises between December 2010 and May 2012 at the Jos University Teaching Hospital. Results: A total of 109 victims of communal conflicts with abdominal injuries were managed during the study period with 89 (81.7% males and 20 (18.3% females representing about 12.2% of the total 897 combat related injuries. The peak age incidence was between 21 and 40 years (range: 3–71 years. The most frequently injured intra-abdominal organs were the small intestine 69 (63.3%, colon 48 (44%, and liver 41 (37.6%. Forty-four (40.4% patients had extra-abdominal injuries involving the chest in 17 (15.6%, musculoskeletal 12 (11%, and the head in 9 (8.3%. The most prevalent weapon injuries were gunshot 76 (69.7%, explosives 12 (11%, stab injuries 11 (10.1%, and blunt abdominal trauma 10 (9.2%. The injury severity score varied from 8 to 52 (mean: 20.8 with a fatality rate of 11 (10.1% and morbidity rate of 29 (26.6%. Presence of irreversible shock, 3 or more injured intra-abdominal organs, severe head injuries, and delayed presentation were the main factors associated with mortality. Conclusion: Abdominal trauma is major life-threatening injuries during conflicts. Substantial mortality occurred with loss of nearly one in every 10 hospitalized victims despite aggressive emergency room resuscitation. The resources expenditure, propensity for death and expediency of timing reinforce the need for early access to the wounded in a concerted trauma care systems.

  4. Analysis of closed abdominal injury in pregnant women

    TU Chang-di; WANG Shao-juan; ZHOU Ri-guang; WEI Yang-yi; TAN Qiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the characteristics of closed abdominal injury in pregnancy women and its treatment.Methods: The clinical data of 37 pregnancy patients with closed abdominal injury treated in our hospital from June 1993 to June 2003 were collected and analyzed.Results: All the 37 patients were treated with operation. Among them 2 early pregnancy patients with intestinal rupture and 1 patient with retroperitoneal hematoma were treated under laparoscope; in other 34 pregnancy patients laparotomy was performed. Of the 34 patients 8 used cesarean section because premature separation of placenta and enlarged womb interrupted the management of intra-abdominal organ injury. In the 37 patients 33 (89.1%) were cured, 4 (10.8%) die, postoperative complication rate was 16.2% (6/37). Two patients (5.4%) suffered from abdominal cavity infection, 3 (8.1%) from pulmonary infection, and 1 (2.7%) had multi-organ failure.Conclusions: For pregnancy patients with closed abdominal injury, besides obsteric diseases intra-abdominal injury should be given much attention. Accurate diagnosis and timely treatment can gain the time to save the life of both mother and fetus.

  5. Neurologic injury after endovascular exclusion of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of neurologic injury after endovascular graft exclusion of abdominal aortic aneurysms and the methods of prevention and treatment. Materials: Since March 1997 to October 2002, endovascular graft exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm have been preformed on 136 patients, with one occurrence of neurologic injury after the operation. The main body-short limb graft was used in this case (Talent) and the operation was successful. The patient complained of bilateral lower extremities pain and disability. Electromusculogram showed bilateral femoral nerve injury. Then the patient was treated with vitamin B12, hyperbaric oxygen and physical therapy for 2 months outcoming with the symptom improvement. Conclusions: Neurologic injury after endovascular graft exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysms is possible due to the occlusion of the lumbar artery during the operation. Early treatment is important and more effective. Later nerve nutrition and physical treatment can improve some symptoms partly

  6. Isolated pancreatic injury following blunt abdominal trauma in a child

    Jain Sandeep

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic injury following blunt abdominal trauma is rare as compared to other visceral organs. Isolated injury to the pancreas is even more rare. The clinical presentation is subtle resulting in delayed treatment with high morbidity and mortality. A three-year-old female child presented with vomiting 18h following a motor vehicle accident. She was hemodynamically stable with no external signs of injury. Investigations revealed hyperamylasemia and isolated grade III pancreatic injury. Laparotomy with distal pancreatic resection and splenectomy was done. A high degree of clinical suspicion with due consideration to the mechanism of injury is the key to good outcome in these patients. Major ductal injury is the critical issue in the management and a number of therapeutic choices are available specific to the location of the insult.

  7. Gunshot injuries of the abdominal aorta: a continuing challenge.

    Degiannis, E; Levy, R D; Florizoone, M G; Badicel, T V; Badicel, M; Saadia, R

    1997-04-01

    This is a retrospective study of 57 patients with gunshot injuries of the abdominal aorta. The aortic repair was achieved by various means: lateral aortorraphy, patch aortoplasty and graft insertion. There was an 85 per cent mortality rate from bleeding or secondary coagulopathy directly related to the aortic injuries. The need for resuscitative thoracotomy, shock, lack of response to fluid resuscitation and intraperitoneal bleeding were directly related to mortality. We feel that shortening of prehospital transfer time will increase the absolute number of patients surviving this grave injury. PMID:9274736

  8. A CLINICAL STUDY AND MANAGEMENT OF ABDOMINAL INJURIES

    Sreenidhi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: 1. to evaluate the impact of blunt abdominal trauma on the Solid abdominal viscera’s, hollow viscera’s, mesentery and Retroperitoneal structures and various modes of presentation in early diagnosis. 2. To evaluate various modalities of management and complications. BACKGROUND DATA: Blunt abdominal trauma is one of the most common injuries caused mainly by road traffic accidents. They are usually not obvious. Hence, often missed unless, strong suspicion. In view of increasing number of motor vehicles and consequently road traffic accidents, this study has been chosen to study the cases of injury to solid organs in blunt abdominal trauma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a prospective study of blunt injury abdomen during the period from September 2010 to September 2013. Number of cases studied is 100. Data were collected from the Patients by their clinical history, examination and appropriate investigations. Post-operative follow-up was done to note for complications. Documentation of patients, which included, identification, history, clinical findings, diagnostic test, operative findings, operative procedures, complications during the stay in the hospital and during subsequent follow-up period, were all recorded on a proforma specially prepared. The decision for operative or non-operative management depended on the outcome of the Hemodynamic status and Computed Tomography. RESULTS: The majority of the patients belonged to 11 to 20 years age group, followed by 21-30 years age group. 91 cases were males, with females accounting for only about 9 cases. 74 patients were operated and 26 patients were subjected for non- operative management. Road traffic accident was responsible for 62% of blunt abdominal trauma cases, while fall from heights accounted for 27% of cases and blow with blunt object was responsible for 11% of injuries. Majority of the patients presented with abdominal pain (90% and abdominal tenderness (82%. Average latent

  9. Latest progress of research on acute abdominal injuries

    Ionut Negoi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Major abdominal trauma, both blunt and penetrating, is commonly seen nowadays, being particularly difficult to manage due to the frequent altered mental status of the patients and severity of associated injuries. The review article aims to make an uptodate study of the current strategies for therapeutic approach of abdominal injuries in polytrauma setting. Review of the medical literature is up to 2015, by using the PubMed/Medline, Science Direct, Cochrane Library and Web of Science databases. We have used different combinations of the keywords of “abdominal trauma”, “liver”, “spleen”, “renal”, to review the reference list of retrieved articles for further relevant studies. Nowadays, we are facing a major change in abdominal trauma therapeutic approach, due to the continuous extending indications and very high successful rate of selective nonoperative management, completed or not with minimally invasive techniques like angiography and angiographic embolization. New imaging methods offer a high-quality characterization of solid organ injuries, being a secure support for decision algorithm in polytrauma patients. After a continuous decrease in number of laparotomies for trauma, new techniques should be developed for maintaining and developing the trauma surgeons' skills. According to the current standards, for a low morbidity and mortality, the trauma patients may be approached by a multidisciplinary and experienced trauma team. Even if nonoperative management is continuously expanding, this may be applied only by a trained and skillful trauma surgeon, who is able to perform difficult surgical techniques at any moments.

  10. Latest progress of research on acute abdominal injuries

    Ionut Negoi; Sorin Paun; Bogdan Stoica; Ioan Tanase; Mihaela Vartic; Ruxandra Irina Negoi; Sorin Hostiuc; Mircea Beuran

    2016-01-01

    Major abdominal trauma, both blunt and penetrating, is commonly seen nowadays, being particularly difficult to manage due to the frequent altered mental status of the patients and severity of associated injuries. The review article aims to make an uptodate study of the current strategies for therapeutic approach of abdominal injuries in polytrauma setting. Review of the medical literature is up to 2015, by using the PubMed/Medline, Science Direct, Cochrane Library and Web of Science databases. We have used different com-binations of the keywords of“abdominal trauma”,“liver”,“spleen”,“renal”, to review the reference list of retrieved articles for further relevant studies. Nowadays, we are facing a major change in abdominal trauma therapeutic approach, due to the continuous extending indications and very high successful rate of selective nonoperative management, completed or not with minimally invasive techniques like angiography and angiographic embolization. New imaging methods offer a high-quality characterization of solid organ injuries, being a secure support for decision algorithm in polytrauma patients. After a continuous decrease in number of laparotomies for trauma, new techniques should be developed for maintaining and developing the trauma surgeons' skills. According to the current standards, for a low morbidity and mortality, the trauma patients may be approached by a multidisciplinary and experienced trauma team. Even if nonoperative management is continuously expanding, this may be applied only by a trained and skillful trauma surgeon, who is able to perform difficult surgical techniques at any moments.

  11. Emergency CT in blunt abdominal trauma of multiple injury patients

    Multiple injury patients with blunt abdominal trauma (n = 110) were examined by abdominal CT. An i.v., but not peroral, contrast medium was used, thereby eliminating the delay caused by administering peroral contrast medium and any subsequent delay in making the diagnoses and beginning operative treatment. Eighteen patients underwent emergency laparotomy after the initial CT examination. The preoperative CT findings were compared to the laparotomy findings. CT revealed all but one of the severe parenchymal organ lesions requiring surgery. The one liver laceration that went undetected had caused hemoperitoneum, which was diagnosed by CT. The bowel and mesenteric lesions presented as intra-abdominal blood, and the hemoperitoneum was discovered in every patient with these lesions. Fourteen patients also initially had positive abdominal CT findings; 10 of them underwent an additional abdominal CT within 3 days, but the repeat studies did not reveal any lesions in need of surgery. Omission of the oral contrast medium did not jeopardize making the essential diagnoses, but it did save time. (orig.)

  12. Conservative management of an abdominal gunshot injury with a peritoneal breach: wisdom or absurdity?

    Khan, Salma; Pardhan, Amyn; Bawa, Tufail; Haroon, Naveed

    2013-01-01

    Surgical exploration has been the standard of care for abdominal gunshot injuries. The authors report a case of a 28-year-old man who sustained a transabdominal gunshot injury, which entered the anterior abdominal wall and exited adjacent to the T12 vertebra posteriorly with a tangential trajectory. On presentation, the patient was haemodynamically stable with no peritoneal signs. Based on trajectory of the bullet, intra-abdominal injury was suspected. Therefore a CT scan abdomen with intrave...

  13. Athletic injuries of the lateral abdominal wall: review of anatomy and MR imaging appearance

    The lateral abdominal wall is comprised of three muscles, each with a different function and orientation. The transversus abdominus, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles span the abdominal cavity between the iliocostalis lumborum and quadratus lumborum posteriorly and the rectus abdominis anteriorly. The lateral abdominal wall is bound superiorly by the lower ribs and costal cartilages and inferiorly by the iliac crest and inguinal ligament. The lateral abdominal wall may be acutely or chronically injured in a variety of athletic endeavors, with occasional acute injuries in the setting of high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle collisions. Injuries to the lateral abdominal wall may result in lumbar hernia formation, unique for its high incarceration rate, and also Spigelian hernias. This article will review the anatomy, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging approach, and the features and complications of lateral abdominal wall injuries. (orig.)

  14. Athletic injuries of the lateral abdominal wall: review of anatomy and MR imaging appearance

    Stensby, J.D. [University of Virginia, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, 1218 Lee Street, Box 800170, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, 510 S. Kingshighway, Campus Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States); Baker, Jonathan C. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, 510 S. Kingshighway, Campus Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States); Fox, Michael G. [University of Virginia, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, 1218 Lee Street, Box 800170, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The lateral abdominal wall is comprised of three muscles, each with a different function and orientation. The transversus abdominus, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles span the abdominal cavity between the iliocostalis lumborum and quadratus lumborum posteriorly and the rectus abdominis anteriorly. The lateral abdominal wall is bound superiorly by the lower ribs and costal cartilages and inferiorly by the iliac crest and inguinal ligament. The lateral abdominal wall may be acutely or chronically injured in a variety of athletic endeavors, with occasional acute injuries in the setting of high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle collisions. Injuries to the lateral abdominal wall may result in lumbar hernia formation, unique for its high incarceration rate, and also Spigelian hernias. This article will review the anatomy, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging approach, and the features and complications of lateral abdominal wall injuries. (orig.)

  15. Athletic injuries of the lateral abdominal wall: review of anatomy and MR imaging appearance.

    Stensby, J Derek; Baker, Jonathan C; Fox, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    The lateral abdominal wall is comprised of three muscles, each with a different function and orientation. The transversus abdominus, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles span the abdominal cavity between the iliocostalis lumborum and quadratus lumborum posteriorly and the rectus abdominis anteriorly. The lateral abdominal wall is bound superiorly by the lower ribs and costal cartilages and inferiorly by the iliac crest and inguinal ligament. The lateral abdominal wall may be acutely or chronically injured in a variety of athletic endeavors, with occasional acute injuries in the setting of high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle collisions. Injuries to the lateral abdominal wall may result in lumbar hernia formation, unique for its high incarceration rate, and also Spigelian hernias. This article will review the anatomy, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging approach, and the features and complications of lateral abdominal wall injuries. PMID:26450606

  16. CT identification of abdominal injuries in abused pre-school-age children

    Although the abdominopelvic CT findings of abdominal trauma in children have been described, little has been written about the subset of children who are victims of abuse. Our purpose is to describe abdominopelvic injuries in abused pre-school-age children as identified on CT. An IRB-approved retrospective review of our institutional child abuse registry was performed. Searching a 14-year period, we identified 84 children ≤ 5 years of age with medically diagnosed abuse who underwent CT. We reviewed imaging studies, operative reports, autopsy findings and patient outcomes. Consensus review of the CT examinations was performed by CAQ-certified pediatric radiologists, and findings were categorized as normal or by injury types (solid organ versus bowel). The injuries were analyzed in light of existing literature on pediatric accidental and non-accidental injuries. Of the 84 children, 35 (41.7%) had abdominal injuries. Abdominal injuries included liver (15), bowel (13), mesentery (4), spleen (6), kidneys (7), pancreas (4) and adrenal glands (3). Of these children, 26% (9/35) required surgical intervention for bowel, mesenteric and pancreatic injuries. Another 9/35 children died, not as a result of abdominal injuries but as a direct result of inflicted intracranial injuries. Our data indicate that abdominal injuries in abused children present in a pattern similar to that of children with accidental abdominal trauma, underscoring the need for vigilance and correlative historical and clinical data to identify victims of abuse. Mortality in abused children with intra-abdominal injury was frequently related to concomitant head injury. (orig.)

  17. CT identification of abdominal injuries in abused pre-school-age children

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Kan, J.H. [Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Greeley, Christopher S. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of Pediatrics, Houston, TX (United States); Piercey, Lisa M. [Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Although the abdominopelvic CT findings of abdominal trauma in children have been described, little has been written about the subset of children who are victims of abuse. Our purpose is to describe abdominopelvic injuries in abused pre-school-age children as identified on CT. An IRB-approved retrospective review of our institutional child abuse registry was performed. Searching a 14-year period, we identified 84 children {<=} 5 years of age with medically diagnosed abuse who underwent CT. We reviewed imaging studies, operative reports, autopsy findings and patient outcomes. Consensus review of the CT examinations was performed by CAQ-certified pediatric radiologists, and findings were categorized as normal or by injury types (solid organ versus bowel). The injuries were analyzed in light of existing literature on pediatric accidental and non-accidental injuries. Of the 84 children, 35 (41.7%) had abdominal injuries. Abdominal injuries included liver (15), bowel (13), mesentery (4), spleen (6), kidneys (7), pancreas (4) and adrenal glands (3). Of these children, 26% (9/35) required surgical intervention for bowel, mesenteric and pancreatic injuries. Another 9/35 children died, not as a result of abdominal injuries but as a direct result of inflicted intracranial injuries. Our data indicate that abdominal injuries in abused children present in a pattern similar to that of children with accidental abdominal trauma, underscoring the need for vigilance and correlative historical and clinical data to identify victims of abuse. Mortality in abused children with intra-abdominal injury was frequently related to concomitant head injury. (orig.)

  18. Estimated Probability of Traumatic Abdominal Injury During an International Space Station Mission

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Brooker, John E.; Weavr, Aaron S.; Myers, Jerry G., Jr.; McRae, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a decision support tool that is useful to spaceflight mission planners and medical system designers when assessing risks and optimizing medical systems. The IMM project maintains a database of medical conditions that could occur during a spaceflight. The IMM project is in the process of assigning an incidence rate, the associated functional impairment, and a best and a worst case end state for each condition. The purpose of this work was to develop the IMM Abdominal Injury Module (AIM). The AIM calculates an incidence rate of traumatic abdominal injury per person-year of spaceflight on the International Space Station (ISS). The AIM was built so that the probability of traumatic abdominal injury during one year on ISS could be predicted. This result will be incorporated into the IMM Abdominal Injury Clinical Finding Form and used within the parent IMM model.

  19. Abdominal Injury Patterns in Real Frontal Crashes: Influence of Crash Conditions, Occupant Seat and Restraint Systems

    Lamielle, S.; CUNY,S; Foret-Bruno, JY.; Petit, P.; VEZIN,P; Verriest, JP.; Guillemot, H.

    2006-01-01

    An in-depth study was conducted through the analysis of medical reports and crash data from real world accidents. The objective was to investigate the abdominal injury patterns among car occupants in frontal crashes. The influence of the type of restraint system, the occupant seat, the age and the crash severity was investigated. The results indicate that the risk of abdominal AIS 3+ injuries increased with crash severity and decreased with the introduction of belt retractors. Rear belted pas...

  20. Conservative management of an abdominal gunshot injury with a peritoneal breach: wisdom or absurdity?

    Khan, Salma; Pardhan, Amyn; Bawa, Tufail; Haroon, Naveed

    2013-01-01

    Surgical exploration has been the standard of care for abdominal gunshot injuries. The authors report a case of a 28-year-old man who sustained a transabdominal gunshot injury, which entered the anterior abdominal wall and exited adjacent to the T12 vertebra posteriorly with a tangential trajectory. On presentation, the patient was haemodynamically stable with no peritoneal signs. Based on trajectory of the bullet, intra-abdominal injury was suspected. Therefore a CT scan abdomen with intravenous and rectal contrast was performed. The CT scan revealed no extravasation of the rectal contrast but showed free air specks behind the descending colon. Delayed renal images of the left ureter were also normal. Based on the clinical findings, the patient was managed non-operatively with nothing per oral, intravenous antibiotics and frequent abdominal assessments. He made an uneventful recovery without necessitating laparotomy. PMID:24272989

  1. Delayed presentation of a sigmoid colon injury following blunt abdominal trauma: a case report

    Ertugrul Gokhan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The low incidence of colon injury due to blunt abdominal trauma and the lack of a definitive diagnostic method for the same can lead to delays in diagnosis and treatment, subsequently resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Case presentation A 66-year-old woman with sigmoid colon injury was admitted to our emergency department after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma. Her physical examination findings and laboratory results led to a decision to perform a laparotomy; exploration revealed a sigmoid colon injury that was treated by sigmoid loop colostomy. Conclusions Surgical abdominal exploration revealed gross fecal contamination and a perforation site. Intra-abdominal irrigation and a sigmoid loop colostomy were performed. Our patient was discharged on post-operative day six without any problems. Closure of the sigmoid loop colostomy was performed three months after the initial surgery.

  2. Small Bowel Injury in Peritoneal Encapsulation following Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

    Naidoo, K.; Mewa Kinoo, S.; Singh, B.

    2013-01-01

    Small bowel encapsulation is a rare entity which is usually found incidentally at autopsy. We report the first case of peritoneal encapsulation encountered serendipitously at laparotomy undertaken for penetrating abdominal trauma and review the literature on peritoneal encapsulation. We also compare this phenomenon to abdominal cocoon and sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis.

  3. Small Bowel Injury in Peritoneal Encapsulation following Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

    K. Naidoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel encapsulation is a rare entity which is usually found incidentally at autopsy. We report the first case of peritoneal encapsulation encountered serendipitously at laparotomy undertaken for penetrating abdominal trauma and review the literature on peritoneal encapsulation. We also compare this phenomenon to abdominal cocoon and sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis.

  4. Abdominal aortic injury due to lumbar disc surgery: A case report

    Yıldız, Ramazan; Öztaş, Muharrem; Şahin, Mehmet Ali; Yağcı, Gökhan

    2013-01-01

    Complications arising from lumbar intervertebral disc surgery are rare but fatal. Major vascular injury is one complication that may end in death unless it is diagnosed and treated immediately. Herein we report an abdominal aortic injury due to L3–L4 intervertebral disc surgery that was treated successfully and discuss it in light of current literature. Diagnosis and treatment of an abdominal aortic injury in a 31-year-old male patient operated on for L3–L4 intervertebral disc degeneration is...

  5. Imaging of abdominal and pelvic injuries from the Boston Marathon bombing.

    Singh, Ajay K; Sodickson, Aaron; Abujudeh, Hani

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the imaging findings of abdominal and pelvic injuries in victims of the Boston Marathon bombing. A retrospective review of 87 patients following the Boston Marathon bombing was performed to evaluate for abdominal and pelvic injuries on plain radiography or CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis. Imaging exams were evaluated for shrapnel, soft tissue injury, visceral damage, vascular disruption, and fractures. The injuries were classified as primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injuries. Eleven of the 87 patients had positive findings in the abdomen or pelvis (M:F = 7:4, average age 34.6 years). There were 22 ball bearings, two nails, one screw, and two irregular metal fragments in the 11 patients with secondary blast (shrapnel) injuries. There was no peritoneal penetration or visceral injury seen in any of the patients. One patient had multiple transverse process fractures, representing tertiary blast injury. All but one patient had superficial penetrating abdominal or pelvic injuries secondary to shrapnel. There were no cases of bowel or solid visceral organ injuries due to the lack of peritoneal violation from the relatively low-powered explosions. Absence of peritoneal penetration by shrapnel indicates no need for laparotomy following low-powered explosions. PMID:26445949

  6. Blunt Abdominal Wall Disruption by Seatbelt Injury; A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Maarten Philip Cornelissen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of the use of seatbelts in cars, mortality following motor vehicle crashes has decreased significantly. However, two patterns of injuries, the ‘seatbelt sign’ and ‘seatbelt syndrome’ have emerged. Injuries may consist of traumatic abdominal wall disruption. We present two cases of severe abdominal wall disruption caused by a seatbelt injury and treated with primary repair. A review of the literature is provided. Two patients were brought in after a high velocity Motor Vehicle Collision. Both presented with an acute abdomen and a seatbelt sign upon which the decision was made to perform emergency laparotomies. Both patients had an abdominal wall disruption along the seatbelt sign. These disruptions were primarily closed and during six months of follow-up no complications occurred. A disruption of the abdominal wall is a rare complication. However, it is a diagnosis that may not be missed as patients have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality. CT-scanning is an accurate method to detect disruptions. Closure of blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption can be done primarily with sutures or addition of a mesh. In both cases of the severe abdominal wall disruption, primary repair without mesh in the acute phase was successful. When a laparotomy is not indicated, the abdominal wall must be assessed for disruption. If there is a disruption primary repair is a good option.

  7. Abdominal aortic injury in a child: intravenous digital subtraction angiogram (IVDSA) for the diagnosis of pediatric vascular trauma

    Abdominal aortic injury due to trauma is a rare entity, especially in the pediatric population. We report a 6-year-old girl with partial transection of the abdominal aorta as a result of a motor vehicle accident. The diagnosis was made with IVDSA. The patient survived the injury. We discuss the imaging findings, mechanisms, and associated injuries of abdominal aortic trauma in children. (orig.)

  8. CT findings of bowel injury following blunt abdominal trauma

    To determine the diagnostic value of CT, the author retrospectively reviewed preoperative CT findings of 57 cases with surgically proven bowel injury following blunt trauma. The small bowel injuries were divided into two groups, i.e., those without mesenteric injury, group A, and those with mesenteric injury, group B. The incidence of CT findings including extraluminal air, bowel wall thickening, peritoneal fluid, mesenteric thickening, and high density hematoma, were determined. CT findings were also assessed by time intervals between injury and examination. CT scans of small bowel injury were compared with those of surgically proven 25 cases of mesenteric injury without bowel injury, group C. CT showed findings suggestive of bowel injury in 96.4% of the cases. There were 5 false negative CT scans, which consisted of 4 small bowel and one large bowel injuries, all performed within 2 hours from injury. The patients in group A small bowel injury had a higher incidence of pneumoperitoneum on CT scans performed over 4 hours after injury than on those performed within 4 hours. Bowel wall thickening was more frequent in group A than in group B or C. Peritoneal fluid collection within 4 hours from injury was less frequent in group A than in group B or C. High density hematoma was more frequent in group B and C than in group A. The analysis suggested that early diagnosis of isolated small bowel injury was difficult because of lack of signs indicating mesenteric injury. In these cases bowel wall thickening appeared earlier, then peritoneal fluid developed, with and without mesenteric thickening or extraluminal air. Thus in those with suspicion of bowel injury, bowel wall thickening on initial CT should be carefully followed up in regard to additional or progressive findings. Operative indication can be determined with careful clinical correlation before detection of extraluminal air. (K.H.)

  9. Frequency and significance of thoracic injuries detected on abdominal trauma CT scans

    The authors have noted that in multiple trauma patients chest injuries inapparent on initial chest radiographs may be detected at abdominal CT. In an ongoing series of 112 patients to date, 50 chest injuries were detected in 33 patients (29%). The injuries included 15 bilateral hemothoraces, seven unilateral hemothoraces, seven posttraumatic atrelectasis, seven lung contusions, five pneumothoraces, four rib factures, two thoracic spine fractures, two chest wall emphysema, and one mediastinal emphysema. In 24 of the 33 patients (72%) the injury was not seen on the initial chest radiographs; in seven patients treatment of the chest injury was required. The authors have included screening cuts of the middle and upper chest as part of their abdominal CT protocol

  10. Abdominal injury patterns in patients with seatbelt signs requiring laparotomy

    Seema Biswas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: We analyzed our series of patients with seatbelt signs (bruising that underwent laparotomy in order to correlate injury pattern with clinical course and outcome. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients with seatbelt signs presenting to the level 1 Trauma Unit between 2005 and 2010 was performed. We evaluated the nature of injuries during laparotomy associated with seatbelt signs and their treatment and complications. Results: There were 41 patients, 25 (61% male, with a median age of 26 years. Median injury severity score (ISS was 25 (range 6-66 and overall mortality was 10% (four patients. Patients were classified into three groups according to time from injury to surgery. Median time to surgery for the immediate group (n = 12 was 1.05 h, early group (n = 22 was 2.7 h, and delayed group (n = 7 was 19.5 h. Patients in the immediate group tended to have solid organ injuries; whereas, patients in the delayed group had bowel injury. Patients with solid organ injuries were found to be more seriously injured and had higher mortality (P < 0.01 and morbidity compared with patients with the "classic" bowel injury pattern associated with a typical seatbelt sign. Conclusion: Our data suggest that there is a cohort of patients with seatbelt injury who have solid organ injury requiring urgent intervention. Solid organ injuries associated with malpositioned seatbelts lying higher on the abdomen tend to result in hemodynamic instability necessitating immediate surgery. They have more postoperative complications and a greater mortality. Seatbelt signs should be accurately documented after any car crash.

  11. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury

    West, CR; Goosey-Tolfrey, VL; Campbell, IG; Romer, LM

    2014-01-01

    West CR, Goosey-Tolfrey VL, Campbell IG, Romer LM. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury. J Appl Physiol 117: 36–45, 2014. First published May 22, 2014; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00218.2014.—We asked whether elastic binding of the abdomen influences respiratory mechanics during wheelchair propulsion in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Eight Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with m...

  12. Uncommon abdominal muscle injury in a tennis player: internal oblique strain

    Maquirriain, J; Ghisi, J P

    2006-01-01

    The case of a strain injury of the internal oblique abdominal muscle in a professional tennis player is presented. This uncommon lesion resulted from eccentric, unbalanced trunk rotation. Magnetic resonance imaging helped to confirm the diagnosis. Tennis specific core strengthening is crucial for rehabilitation and recurrence prevention.

  13. Liver injury following blunt abdominal trauma: a new mechanism-driven classification

    Slotta, J. E.; Justinger, C.; Kollmar, O; Kollmar, C.; Schäfer, T.; Schilling, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Purposes The current classifications for blunt liver trauma focus only on the extent of liver injury. However, these scores are independent from the localization of liver injury and mechanism of trauma. Methods The type of liver injury after blunt abdominal trauma was newly classified as type A when it was along the falciform ligament with involvement of segments IVa/b, III, or II, and type B when there was involvement of segments V–VIII. With the use of a prospectively established database, ...

  14. Presentation of small intestinal and mesenteric injuries caused by abdominal trauma

    We retrospectively reviewed 58 patients who had undergone surgery at our institute for small intestinal and mesenteric injuries caused by abdominal trauma between January 1997 and December 2007. 47 men and 11 women were examined, ranging in age from 18 to 81 years (average 51 yrs). Shock on admission was present in 39.7% of the patients and generalized abdominal tenderness in 60.3%. Abdominal ultrasonography was positive for fluid in 46/58 cases (79.3%). Computed tomography was positive for fluid in 46/57 cases (80.7%), and for free air in 20/47 cases (35.1%). It has been suggested that small intestinal and mesenteric injuries were difficult to diagnose, however in our study, computed tomography was helpful to diagnose small intestinal and mesenteric injuries. In some studies, a delay in the diagnosis of small intestinal and mesenteric injuries resulted in clinical increases in hospital stay and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, morbidity and mortality. Our univariate analysis concluded that early diagnosis was not associated with morbidity and mortality. We suggested that low platelet counts was one of the predictive indicators regarding the mortality rate of small intestinal and mesenteric injuries. (author)

  15. Whole-body MSCT of patients after polytrauma: abdominal injuries; Ganzkoerper-MSCT beim Polytrauma: Abdominelle Verletzungen

    Roehrl, B.; Sadick, M.; Diehl, S.; Dueber, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie (Germany); Obertacke, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Zentrum fuer Orthopaedie und Traumatologie (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Purpose: The goal of this retrospective study was to evaluate the spectrum of abdominal injuries and the reliability of computed tomography-based diagnosis in patients after polytrauma. Material and methods: CT findings and clinical reports for 177 patients after polytrauma were evaluated with regard to abdominal injuries. Clinical patient reports at the time of discharge from the hospital were utilized as the standard of reference. Abdominal injuries resulting from an accident, frequent additional traumas and following therapeutic procedures were recorded. In the case of discrepancies in the reports, the CT scans were viewed retrospectively. Results: In 30 out of 177 patients, 42 abdominal injuries were detected. 69% of the injuries were caused by traffic accidents while 31% resulted from falls. Liver and spleen injuries were the most common. 50% of the cases were treated surgically, and the other half of the cases underwent non-surgical conservative therapy. Massive chest traumas, pelvic injuries, cerebral traumas and injuries to extremities were commonly associated with abdominal injuries. Evaluation of the discrepancies in the clinical reports showed that injury to the pancreas and the small intestine were not successfully detected on CT, thus resulting in a false negative diagnosis. Early stages of organ parenchyma laceration were also initially misdiagnosed on CT. (orig.)

  16. Thymoquinone protects end organs from abdominal aorta ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model

    Mehmet Salih Aydin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous studies have demonstrated that thymoquinone has protective effects against ischemia reperfusion injury to various organs like lungs, kidneys and liver in different experimental models. Objective: We aimed to determine whether thymoquinone has favorable effects on lung, renal, heart tissues and oxidative stress in abdominal aorta ischemia-reperfusion injury. Methods: Thirty rats were divided into three groups as sham (n=10, control (n=10 and thymoquinone (TQ treatment group (n=10. Control and TQ-treatment groups underwent abdominal aorta ischemia for 45 minutes followed by a 120-min period of reperfusion. In the TQ-treatment group, thymoquinone was given 5 minutes. before reperfusion at a dose of 20 mg/kg via an intraperitoneal route. Total antioxidant capacity, total oxidative status (TOS, and oxidative stress index (OSI in blood serum were measured and lung, kidney, and heart tissue histopathology were evaluated with light microscopy. Results: Total oxidative status and oxidative stress index activity in blood samples were statistically higher in the control group compared to the sham and TQ-treatment groups (P<0.001 for TOS and OSI. Control group injury scores were statistically higher compared to sham and TQ-treatment groups (P<0.001 for all comparisons. Conclusion: Thymoquinone administered intraperitoneally was effective in reducing oxidative stress and histopathologic injury in an acute abdominal aorta ischemia-reperfusion rat model.

  17. Management of Pancreatic Injuries after Blunt Abdominal Trauma. Experience at a Single Institution

    Ker-Kan Tan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma could result in significant morbidity, and even mortality if missed. Objective Our aim was to review our institution’s experience with blunt pancreatic trauma. Setting Our study included all cases of blunt traumatic pancreatic injuries. Patients Sixteen patients (median age 41 years; range: 18-60 years were treated for blunt pancreatic trauma from December 2002 to June 2008. Main outcome measure Pancreatic injuries were graded according to the definition of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST. Results CT scans were performed on 10 (62.5% patients, with the remaining 6 (37.5% sent to the operating theatre immediately due to their injuries. Of the 12 (75.0% patients who underwent exploratory laparotomy, 2 (12.5% had a distal pancreatectomy (AAST grade III, 1 (6.3% underwent a Whipple procedure (AAST grade IV while another 2 (12.5% were too hemodynamically unstable for any definitive surgery (AAST grade IV and V; the remaining 7 (43.8% pancreatic injuries were managed conservatively. Four (25.0% patients had their injuries managed non-operatively. Some of the associated complications included intra-abdominal collection (n=2, 12.5% and chest infection (n=2, 12.5%. Conclusion Blunt pancreatic trauma continues to pose significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. In view of the numerous associated injuries, priority must be given to stabilizing the patient before any definitive management of the pancreatic injuries is carried out. Mortality in these patients is usually a result of the magnitude of their associated injuries.

  18. CATASTROPHIC ABDOMINAL INJURY WITH EVISCERATION OF JEJUNUM AND ILEUM IN A DRAUGHT DONKEY

    M. H. Hussain, M. Athar, A. Yousaf, G. Muhammad and M. Saqib

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a catastrophic penetrating abdominal injury associated with a roadside accident in a draught donkey. Though repair of the eviscerated, damaged portion of the small intestine was accomplished successfully, the animal could not be saved. After postmortem it was concluded that hypovolemia and respiratory distress resulted in the death of the wounded donkey before any resuscitating attempt could be made.

  19. Vasopressin improves survival in a porcine model of abdominal vascular injury

    Stadlbauer, Karl H; Wagner-Berger, Horst G; Krismer, Anette C; Voelckel, Wolfgang G; Konigsrainer, Alfred; Lindner, Karl H; Wenzel, Volker

    2007-01-01

    Introduction We sought to determine and compare the effects of vasopressin, fluid resuscitation and saline placebo on haemodynamic variables and short-term survival in an abdominal vascular injury model with uncontrolled haemorrhagic shock in pigs. Methods During general anaesthesia, a midline laparotomy was performed on 19 domestic pigs, followed by an incision (width about 5 cm and depth 0.5 cm) across the mesenterial shaft. When mean arterial blood pressure was below 20 mmHg, and heart rat...

  20. Does Severity of Pelvic Fractures Correlate with the Incidence of Associated Intra-Abdominal Injuries in Children?

    Swaid, Forat; Peleg, Kobi; Alfici, Ricardo; Olsha, Oded; Givon, Adi; Kessel, Boris

    2016-06-01

    Background Pelvic fractures are considered a marker of injury severity, especially in the pediatric population. However, the correlation between the severity of pelvic fractures and incidence of associated abdominal injuries is not clear. Methods A retrospective cohort study involving blunt trauma patients up to the age of 14 years, who suffered from pelvic fractures, with or without associated intra-abdominal injuries. Results A total of 812 trauma patients were included in this study. Overall, 671 of them suffered from pelvic fractures with abbreviated injury scale (AIS) of 2, 103 with AIS of 3, and 38 with AIS of 4 to 5. Overall mortality was found to be 5.2%, strongly correlating with the severity of the pelvic fractures (p value abdominal organ injuries (liver, spleen, small bowel, and pancreas) and the severity of pelvic fractures. A significant correlation was found with intrapelvic organ injuries (p value trauma patients with pelvic fractures is correlated with the severity of the fractures. An increase in the severity of pelvic fractures in this population is associated with an increased incidence of pelvic organ injury, but is not associated with the presence of extrapelvic abdominal injuries, except for kidney injuries. PMID:25988750

  1. Abdominal Muscle Activity during Mechanical Ventilation Increases Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Xianming Zhang

    Full Text Available It has proved that muscle paralysis was more protective for injured lung in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, but the precise mechanism is not clear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation increases lung injury in severe ARDS.Eighteen male Beagles were studied under mechanical ventilation with anesthesia. Severe ARDS was induced by repetitive oleic acid infusion. After lung injury, Beagles were randomly assigned into spontaneous breathing group (BIPAPSB and abdominal muscle paralysis group (BIPAPAP. All groups were ventilated with BIPAP model for 8h, and the high pressure titrated to reached a tidal volume of 6ml/kg, the low pressure was set at 10 cmH2O, with I:E ratio 1:1, and respiratory rate adjusted to a PaCO2 of 35-60 mmHg. Six Beagles without ventilator support comprised the control group. Respiratory variables, end-expiratory volume (EELV and gas exchange were assessed during mechanical ventilation. The levels of Interleukin (IL-6, IL-8 in lung tissue and plasma were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Lung injury scores were determined at end of the experiment.For the comparable ventilator setting, as compared with BIPAPSB group, the BIPAPAP group presented higher EELV (427±47 vs. 366±38 ml and oxygenation index (293±36 vs. 226±31 mmHg, lower levels of IL-6(216.6±48.0 vs. 297.5±71.2 pg/ml and IL-8(246.8±78.2 vs. 357.5±69.3 pg/ml in plasma, and lower express levels of IL-6 mRNA (15.0±3.8 vs. 21.2±3.7 and IL-8 mRNA (18.9±6.8 vs. 29.5±7.9 in lung tissues. In addition, less lung histopathology injury were revealed in the BIPAPAP group (22.5±2.0 vs. 25.2±2.1.Abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation is one of the injurious factors in severe ARDS, so abdominal muscle paralysis might be an effective strategy to minimize ventilator-induce lung injury.

  2. Characteristics of Hollow Viscus Injury following Blunt Abdominal Trauma; a Single Centre Experience from Eastern India

    Nawal Kishore Jha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the presentation, anatomical distribution, diagnostic method, management and outcome of hollow viscus injury (HVI from blunt abdominal trauma. Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study including patients with blunt abdominal trauma leading to HVI admitted at Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences, Ranchi, over a period of 4.5 years (January 2009 to July 2014. Data were retrieved from patients’ medical records. Total 173 patients with HVI due to blunt abdominal trauma, who underwent laparotomy at our institute, were reviewed. Data regarding clinical presentation, anatomical distribution, management and outcome were recorded and analysed. Results: Out of 173 patients 87.1% were men and 12.9% were women. Mean age of patients was 29±14.02 years. The most common site of injury was ileum (46.2% followed by jejunum (44.5%. There were 5 gastric perforations (2.9%, 2 (1.15% duodenal, 2 (1.15% colonic, 2 (1.15% sigmoidal and 2 (1.15% rectal injuries. One caecal injury was also recorded. Road traffic accident was the most common mechanism of injury (57.2% followed by fall from height (36.4% and assault (6.4%. Free gas under diaphragm on erect abdomen radiography was seen in 85.5% of cases while preoperative CT Abdomen was done in 11.6% of cases. Treatment consisted of simple closure of the perforation (66.5%, resection and anastomosis (11.0% and stoma (22.5%. Major complication was anastamotic leak which was recorded in 6.4% cases and 15.6% patients developed burst abdomen. Average hospital stay was 13±6 days. Overall mortality rate was 12.7%. Conclusion: Although early recognition of intestinal injuries from blunt abdominal trauma may be difficult in all cases, it is very important due to its tremendous life threatening potential. Age of the patient, anatomical site and time of presentation are probably main prognostic factors.

  3. Complications and risk factors for mortality in penetrating abdominal firearm injuries: analysis of 120 cases.

    Iflazoglu, Nidal; Ureyen, Orhan; Oner, Osman Z; Tusat, Mustafa; Akcal, Mehmet A

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high kinetic energy, of bullets and explosive gun particles, their paths through the abdomen (permanent cavity effect), and the blast effect (temporary cavity effect), firearm injuries (FAI) can produce damage not only in the organ they enter, but in the surrounding tissues as well. Since they change route after entering the body they may cause organ damage in locations other than those at the path of entry. For example, as a result of the crushing onto bone tissues, bullet particles or broken bone fragments may cause further damage outside of the path of travel, For these reasons it is very difficult to predict the possible complications from the size of the actual injury in patients with penetrating abdominal firearm injuries. The factors affecting the mortality and morbidity from firearm injuries have been evaluated in various studies. Insufficient blood transfusion, long duration of time until presenting to a hospital and the presence of colon injuries are common factors that cause the high complication rates and mortality. A total of 120 cases injured in the civil war at Turkey's southern neighbouring countries were admitted to our hospital and evaluated in terms of: development of complications and factors affecting mortality; age, gender, time of presentation to the hospital, number of injured organs, the type of injuring weapon, the entrance site of the bullet, the presence of accompanying chest trauma, the amount of administered blood, the penetrating abdominal trauma index (PATI) and the injury severity score (ISS) scores were determined and evaluated retrospectively. The most significant factors for the development of complications and mortality include: accompanying clinical shock, high number of injured organs, numerous blood transfusions administered and accompanying thoracic trauma. It has also been observed that the PATI and ISS scoring systems can be used in predicting the complication and mortality rates in firearm injuries

  4. Abdominal trauma

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  5. Biomechanical Analysis of Abdominal Injury in Tennis Serves. A Case Report

    Tubez, François; Forthomme, Bénédicte; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Cordonnier, Caroline; Brüls, Olivier; Denoël, Vincent; Berwart, Gilles; Joris, Maurice; Grosdent, Stéphanie; Schwartz, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    The serve is an important stroke in any high level tennis game. A well-mastered serve is a substantial advantage for players. However, because of its repeatability and its intensity, this stroke is potentially deleterious for upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk. The trunk is a vital link in the production and transfer of energy from the lower limbs to the upper limbs; therefore, kinematic disorder could be a potential source of risk for trunk injury in tennis. This research studies the case of a professional tennis player who has suffered from a medical tear on the left rectus abdominis muscle after tennis serve. The goal of the study is to understand whether the injury could be explained by an inappropriate technique. For this purpose, we analyzed in three dimensions the kinematic and kinetic aspects of the serve. We also performed isokinetic tests of the player’s knees. We then compared the player to five other professional players as reference. We observed a possible deficit of energy transfer because of an important anterior pelvis tilt. Some compensation made by the player during the serve could be a possible higher abdominal contraction and a larger shoulder external rotation. These particularities could induce an abdominal overwork that could explain the first injury and may provoke further injuries. Key points In the proximal-distal sequence, energy is transmitted from lower limbs to upper limps via trunk. The 3D analysis tool is an indispensable test for an objective evaluation of the kinematic in the tennis serve. Multiple evaluations techniques are useful for fuller comprehension of the kinematics and contribute to the awareness of the player’s staff concerning pathologies and performance. PMID:25983591

  6. Pattern of visceral injuries following blunt abdominal trauma in motor vehicular accidents

    To determine the frequency of various visceral injuries following, high-speed motor vehicle crashes with special reference to frequency of liver injuries, severity and complications. The study included 100 consecutive patients of blunt abdominal trauma. Patients of either gender and age above 12 and below 70 were included in this study. Purposive non-probability sampling was done. Injuries were identified, graded and managed accordingly. The data was then entered into SPSS and descriptive statistical tests were applied. Liver was the most common organ injured (35%), followed by spleen (32 %) and small gut (30 %). In 23 patients, liver was the only organ injured. Most of the liver injuries fell under grade I (42.8%) followed by grade II (28.35%) and grade III (22.85%) and were treated by suture hepatorrhaphy alone in 71.42% cases. The operated cases were mostly complicated by wound infection (33.76%). Overall mortality remained high (12%) and was related to a combination of delays in arriving at a diagnosis due to nonavailability of CT scan and routine use of peritoneal lavage. (author)

  7. INTRA-ABDOMINAL HYPERTENSION AS A RISK FACTOR FOR ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS

    Sreelatha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS Increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP, also referred to as intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH, affects organ function in critically ill patients. The prevalence of IAH is between 32% - 65% in intensive care units. Normal IAP is ≈ 5–7 mmHg. According to WSACS definition, IAH = IAP ≥12 mmHg and is divided into 4 grades. They are Grade I (12-15 mmHg, Grade II (16-20 mmHg, Grade III (21-25 mmHg, Grade IV (>25 mmHg. Transvesical measurement of IAP currently is the most popular technique. Several systems with or without the need for electronic equipment are available that allow IAP measurement. The aim is to study the incidence of IAH in critically ill patients, to assess the risk factors for development of IAH, to study the role of IAH as a risk factor for Acute Kidney Injury (AKI, to assess the role of IAH as a risk factor for increased (Intensive Care Unit ICU mortality. SUBJECTS AND METHODS This is a prospective observational study. Study period was six months. The study included 52 patients admitted to Medical ICU in Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION There was a very high incidence of intra-abdominal hypertension in critically ill patients. IAH was significantly associated with risk factors like sepsis, mechanical ventilation, pancreatitis, capillary leak, ascites, cumulative fluid balance and cirrhosis. IAH is an independent risk factor for development of acute kidney injury. IAH is an independent predictor of mortality in critically ill patients.

  8. Evaluation of gastrointestinal injury in blunt abdominal trauma "FAST is not reliable": the role of repeated ultrasonography

    Mohammadi Afshin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the diagnostic Accuracy of Focused Assessment Sonography for Trauma (FAST and repeated FAST in the patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Methods In this retrospective study we collected the data of all patients from September 2007 to July 2011 with gastrointestinal injury. The intraoperative outcome was compared with FAST technique and the repeated or delayed sonography. Results A total number of 1550 patients with blunt abdominal trauma underwent FAST in a period of 4 years in our hospital. Eighty-eight (5.67% patients were found to have gastrointestinal injury after exploratory laparotomy. Fifty-five (62.5% patients had isolated gastrointestinal injury and 33 (37.5% patients had concomitant injury to the other solid organs. In those with isolated gastrointestinal injury, the sensitivity of FAST was 38.5%. Repeated ultrsonography was performed in 34 patients with false negative initial FAST after 12-24 hours. The sensitivity of repeated ultrasonography in negative initial FAST patients in detection of gastrointestinal injury was 85.2% (95% CI, 68.1%, and 94.4%. Conclusion Repeated sonography after 12 to 24 hours in patients with negative initial FAST but sustain abdominal symptom can facilitated a diagnosis of GI tract injury and can be as effective method instead of Computed tomography in developing country.

  9. Objective Assessment of the Severity of Patients Suffering from Fall from Height with Combined Injuries of the Abdominal Parenchymal Organs

    Abdukhakim Khadjibaev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, fall from a height (FFH has been a relatively frequent cause of injury and death in the urban environment. The purpose of this study was to optimize the risk stratification of FFH victims with combined injuries of the abdominal organs by using Injury Severity Score (ISS scale. The study included 111 patients (aged between 15 and 80 years injured by FFH. All the falls were accidental and occurred mainly among males (82%. The height of the fall ranged from 2 to 5 meters. Combined injuries were found in 98 patients and isolated injuries in 13 patients. The combination of the 6 injured body regions was identified in 5 patients, 5 regions in 17, 4 in 35, 3 in 23, and 2 in 18. The abdomen trauma was most commonly associated with the following injured body regions: head and neck-chest-extremities and pelvis (13.3%, head and neck-chest-extremities (12.2%, and head and neck-chest-pelvis (9.2%. Among the combined injuries of the abdomen, ruptures of parenchymal organs (liver, spleen and kidneys were predominant. To assess the severity of the injury, the ISS scale was applied. The injuries of abdominal parenchymal organs were evaluated according to the AAST (American Association for the Surgery of Trauma classification. Comparative analysis of the assessment of the severity of a patient's condition according to the traditional scale and the ISS scale showed that the ISS scale promotes the active and timely detection of the extremely severe and terminal condition in patients with injuries due to FFH with combined trauma of the abdominal organs. Objective assessment of the severity of trauma and the dominant injury region allows determining the optimal treatment algorithm and predicting the outcome of the injury.

  10. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    West, Christopher R; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Campbell, Ian G; Romer, Lee M

    2014-07-01

    We asked whether elastic binding of the abdomen influences respiratory mechanics during wheelchair propulsion in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Eight Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) performed submaximal and maximal incremental exercise tests on a treadmill, both with and without abdominal binding. Measurements included pulmonary function, pressure-derived indices of respiratory mechanics, operating lung volumes, tidal flow-volume data, gas exchange, blood lactate, and symptoms. Residual volume and functional residual capacity were reduced with binding (77 ± 18 and 81 ± 11% of unbound, P tolerance. Changes in respiratory mechanics with binding may benefit O2 transport capacity by an improvement in central circulatory function. PMID:24855136

  11. New scoring system for intra-abdominal injury diagnosis after blunt trauma

    Shojaee Majid

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: An accurate scoring system for intra-abdominal injury (IAI based on clinical manifestation and examination may decrease unnecessary CT scans, save time, and reduce healthcare cost. This study is designed to provide a new scoring system for a better diagno- sis of IAI after blunt trauma. Methods: This prospective observational study was performed from April 2011 to October 2012 on patients aged above 18 years and suspected with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT admitted to the emergency department (ED of Imam Hussein Hospital and Shohadaye Hafte Tir Hospital. All patients were assessed and treated based on Advanced Trauma Life Support and ED protocol. Diagnosis was done according to CT scan findings, which was considered as the gold standard. Data were gathered based on patient's history, physical exam, ultrasound and CT scan findings by a general practitioner who was not blind to this study. Chisquare test and logistic regression were done. Factors with significant relationship with CT scan were imported in multivariate regression models, where a coefficient (β was given based on the contribution of each of them. Scoring system was developed based on the obtained total βof each factor. Results: Altogether 261 patients (80.1% male were enrolled (48 cases of IAI. A 24-point blunt abdominal trauma scoring system (BATSS was developed. Patients were divided into three groups including low (score<8, moderate (8≤score<12 and high risk (score≥12. In high risk group immediate laparotomy should be done, moderate group needs further assessments, and low risk group should be kept under observation. Low risk patients did not show positive CT-scans (specificity 100%. Conversely, all high risk patients had positive CT-scan findings (sensitivity 100%. The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated a close relationship between the results of CT scan and BATSS (sensitivity=99.3%. Conclusion: The present scoring system furnishes a

  12. Blunt abdominal trauma with handlebar injury: A rare cause of traumatic amputation of the appendix associated with acute appendicitis

    Amanda Jensen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe traumatic appendicitis in a 7-year-old boy who presented after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma to his right lower abdomen secondary to bicycle handlebar injury. With diffuse abdominal pain following injury, he was admitted for observation. Computed axial tomography (CT obtained at an outside hospital demonstrated moderate stranding of the abdomen in the right lower quadrant. The CT was non-contrasted and therefore significant appendiceal distention could not be confirmed. However, there was a calcified structure in the right pelvis with trace amount of free fluid. Patient was observed with conservative management and over the course of 15 h his abdominal pain continued to intensify. With his worsening symptoms, we elected to take him for diagnostic laparoscopy. In the operating room we found an inflamed traumatically amputated appendix with the mesoappendix intact. We therefore proceeded with laparoscopic appendectomy. Pathology demonstrated acute appendicitis with fecalith. It was unclear as to whether the patient's appendicitis and perforation were secondary to fecalith obstruction, his blunt abdominal trauma or if they concurrently caused his appendicitis. Acute appendicitis is a common acute surgical condition in the pediatric population and continues to be a rare and unique cause of operative intervention in the trauma population.

  13. Abdominal trauma

    The potential for multiple intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal organ injuries often makes accurate clinical evaluation of abdominal trauma patients difficult. Additionally, patients may be unresponsive, have unreliable abdominal physical examinations, or have concurrent serious head and cervical spine injuries which delay diagnosis of and attention to abdominal problems. In these situations radiologic abdominal imaging is often requested. To expedite patient evaluation, close cooperation between the emergency physician and the radiologist is essential. It is the clinical stability of the traumatized patient that dictates the extent of radiologic imaging. Life-threatening hypotension, positive peritoneal signs, or clear evidence of penetrating abdominal injury are indications for immediate surgery. Stable patients with signs suggesting intra-abdominal injury will benefit by further radiologic evaluation with appropriate imaging modalities. The selection of an appropriate modality in any one clinical situation depends upon many criteria including accessibility to diagnostic equipment, the sensitivity and specificity of each technique, and the expertise and preference of the attending radiologist. A suggested scheme for evaluating abdominal trauma patients is presented. Most aspects of this evaluation scheme will be discussed in depth

  14. Right hepatic vein injury after blunt abdominal trauma in a 12-year-old boy- case report

    Blunt abdominal trauma in children is one of the most frequent causes of hospitalization. We present a rare case of traumatic liver injury. A 12-year-old boy was admitted to the Surgery Department after a bicycle fall and handlebar impact injury to the right infracostal area. At admission he was stable, with no abnormalities except for a subcutaneous hepatoma found in the injured area. Abdominal ultrasound examination revealed free intraperitoneal fluid. Computed tomography (CT) revealed irregular branching laceration of the right superior hepatic segments with extension into the hepatic veins. No active extravasation of contrast material was seen. On the next day, cause of the deterioration of the patient's condition, CT examination was repeated and revealed focal extravasation of contrast material in the portal hilum posterior to the gallbladder. An injury of the right hepatic vein was found on laparotomy. Hepatic vein injury is a rare but very serious complication after blunt liver trauma and it is an indication for surgical treatment. Diagnostic imaging is essential for therapeutic decisions, but its value is sometimes limited.The precise analysis of injury mechanism and localization may be very helpful.CT is currently the modality of choice for the evaluation of blunt liver trauma. If an active bleeding is suspected the delayed scans seem to be recommended. (author)

  15. Bullet embolization to the external iliac artery after gunshot injury to the abdominal aorta: a case report

    Jaha Luan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Abdominal vascular trauma is fairly common in modern civilian life and is a highly lethal injury. However, if the projectile is small enough, if its energy is diminished when passing through the tissue and if the arterial system is elastic enough, the entry wound into the artery may close without exsanguination and therefore may not be fatal. A projectile captured may even travel downstream until it is arrested by the smaller distal vasculature. The occurrence of this phenomenon is rare and was first described by Trimble in 1968. Case presentation Here we present a case of a 29-year-old Albanian man who, due to a gunshot injury to the back, suffered fracture of his twelfth thoracic and first lumbar vertebra, injury to the posterior wall of his abdominal aorta and then bullet embolism to his left external iliac artery. It is interesting that the signs of distal ischemia developed several hours after the exploratory surgery, raising the possibility that the bullet migrated in the interim or that there was a failure to recognize it during the exploratory surgery. Conclusion In all cases where there is a gunshot injury to the abdomen or chest without an exit wound and with no projectile in the area, there should be a high index of suspicion for possible bullet embolism, particularly in the presence of the distal ischemia.

  16. Severe abdominal injuries sustained in an adult wearing a pelvic seatbelt: a case report and review of the literature.

    O'Kelly, F

    2008-12-01

    In automobile accidents, the "seatbelt syndrome" (SBS) consists of a constellation of injuries, predominantly involving thoraco-lumbar vertebral fractures and intraabdominal organ injury. A recent amendment to Irish legislation has made the wearing of seatbelts mandatory for all rear seated passengers in an effort to protect children. Whilst rear seatbelts result in a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality following road traffic accidents (RTA), we present a case in which the rear lap seatbelt caused severe abdominal injuries. It is evident that the current rear seat lapbelt system is an inferior design associated with a significant morbidity and mortality when compared to three-point harness system and consideration should be given to replacing them in all motor vehicles.

  17. Reprodaetion of an animal model of multiple intestinal injuries mimicking "lethal triad" caused by severe penetrating abdominal trauma

    Peng-fei WANG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce an animal model of multi-intestinal injuries with "lethal triad" characterized by low body temperature,acidosis and coagulopathy.Methods Six female domestic outbred pigs were anesthetized,and the carotid artery and jugular vein were cannulated for monitoring the blood pressure and heart rate and for infusion of fluid.The animals were shot with a gun to create a severe penetrating abdominal trauma.Immediately after the shooting,50% of total blood volume(35ml/kg hemorrhage was drawn from the carotid artery in 20min.After a 40min shock period,4h of pre-hospital phase was mimicked by normal saline(NS resuscitation to maintain systolic blood pressure(SBP > 80mmHg or mean arterial pressure(MAP > 60mmHg.When SBP > 80mmHg or MAP > 60mmHg,no fluid infusion or additional bleeding was given.Hemodynamic parameters were recorded,and pathology of myocardium,lung,small intestine and liver was observed.Results There were multiple intestinal perforations(8-10 site injuries/pig leading to intra-abdominal contamination,mesenteric injury(1-2 site injuries/pig resulted in partial intestinal ischemia and intra-abdominal hemorrhage,and no large colon and mesenteric vascular injury.One pig died before the completion of the model establishment(at the end of pre-hospital resuscitation.The typical symptoms of trauma-induced hemorrhagic shock were observed in survival animals.Low temperature(33.3±0.5℃,acidosis(pH=7.242±0.064,and coagulopathy(protrombin time and activated partial thromboplasting time prolonged were observed after pre-hospital resuscitation.Pathology showed that myocardium,lung,small intestine and liver were severely injured.Conclusions A new model,simulating three stages of "traumatic hemorrhagic shock,pre-hospital recovery and hospital treatment" and inducing the "lethal triad" accompanied with abdominal pollution,has been successfully established.This model has good stability and high reproducibility.The survival animals can be

  18. The biological effects of higher and lower positive end-expiratory pressure in pulmonary and extrapulmonary acute lung injury with intra-abdominal hypertension

    Santos, Cíntia Lourenco; Moraes, Lillian; Santos, Raquel Souza; dos Santos Samary, Cynthia; Silva, Johnatas Dutra; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Capelozzi, Vera Lucia; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Schanaider, Alberto; Silva, Pedro Leme; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical ventilation with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has been used in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), but the role of PEEP in minimizing lung injury remains controversial. We hypothesized that in the presence of acute lung injury (ALI) with IAH: 1) higher PEEP levels improve pulmonary morphofunction and minimize lung injury; and 2) the biological effects of higher PEEP are more effective in extra...

  19. Major abdominal evisceration injuries in dogs and cats: 12 cases (1998-2008).

    Gower, Sara B; Weisse, Chick W; Brown, Dorothy C

    2009-06-15

    OBJECTIVE- To describe the clinical characteristics, treatment, complications, and outcome of dogs and cats treated surgically for major abdominal evisceration. DESIGN- Retrospective case series. ANIMALS- 8 dogs and 4 cats. PROCEDURES- Medical records from January 1998 through March 2008 were reviewed to identify animals that underwent surgery for major abdominal evisceration. Data regarding cause of evisceration, signalment, physiologic variables, and hematologic variables were collected. Details of treatment, duration of hospitalization, and outcome were recorded. Linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association of signalment, physiologic variables, and hematologic variables on the number of days of hospitalization. RESULTS- Major abdominal evisceration was secondary to a traumatic event in 4 animals and to postsurgical dehiscence in 8 animals. All animals had evisceration of the intestines and gross contamination with dirt, leaves, or litter. Two animals eviscerated the spleen, and 1 animal had a perforated colon and was leaking feces into the peritoneal cavity. All animals underwent exploratory abdominal surgery. Surgical procedures performed included resection of compromised intestine, body wall repair, diaphragmatic hernia repair, nephrectomy, splenectomy, and primary colonic repair. All animals survived to discharge from the hospital. Median duration of hospitalization was 4 days (range, 1 to 7 days). Factors associated with an increase in duration of hospitalization included evisceration secondary to trauma, high lactate concentration at time of admission, and small body size. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE- Despite the dramatic appearance of major abdominal evisceration in cats and dogs, prompt and aggressive medical and surgical intervention can provide a favorable outcome. PMID:19527132

  20. INTRA-ABDOMINAL HYPERTENSION AS A RISK FACTOR FOR ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS

    Sreelatha; Noushad Thekke; Jayakumar Edathadathe

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS Increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), also referred to as intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), affects organ function in critically ill patients. The prevalence of IAH is between 32% - 65% in intensive care units. Normal IAP is ≈ 5–7 mmHg. According to WSACS definition, IAH = IAP ≥12 mmHg and is divided into 4 grades. They are Grade I (12-15 mmHg), Grade II (16-20 mmHg), Grade III (21-25 mmHg), Grade IV (>25 mmHg). Transvesical measurement of IAP curren...

  1. Blunt abdominal trauma and hollow viscus injury in children: The diagnostic value of plain radiography

    Although blunt abdominal trauma is common in children, the G-I tract is involved only rarely. However, this paper deals with a series of 24 cases in whom a hollow viscus was injured. We present the radiological and operative findings as well as the results of subsequent radiological workup in patients who had no surgery. Contrary to the recent trend which stresses early abdominal CT as critically important for guiding treatment we have retained a more conservative attitude. Our present protocol includes plain radiography frequently combined with sonographic screening of the abdomen. In patients with stable vital signs and when necessary, we follow up with scintigraphy. CT is reserved for complicated cases with obscure clinical manifestations which do not fit the plain radiological findings and also cases running an unexpected course. (orig.)

  2. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 1. Liver and spleen

    Computed tomography is now widely used in the initial diagnostic workup of adult trauma victims with suspected intra-abdominal injuries. We review the role of CT in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in two parts. In the first part we discuss general aspects of performing CT in the setting of abdominal trauma and the diagnostic findings of intra-abdominal hemorrhage and blunt hepatic and splenic injuries. Hepatic and splenic injuries can be detected by means of CT with a high accuracy. The vast majority of hepatic injuries can be successfully managed conservatively, even when CT demonstrates parenchymal damage of more than three segments and major hemoperitoneum. Delayed complications, e. g., formation of biloma or a false aneurysm, can be readily detected on repeat CT studies, although they are quite uncommon. The outcome of conservative treatment of splenic injuries remains unpredictable because delayed splenic rupture may occur even when initial CT shows only minor parenchymal lesions and little or no intraperitoneal hemorrhage. (orig.)

  3. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 1. Liver and spleen

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F. [Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Mentha, G. [Department of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Surgery, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1998-05-01

    Computed tomography is now widely used in the initial diagnostic workup of adult trauma victims with suspected intra-abdominal injuries. We review the role of CT in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in two parts. In the first part we discuss general aspects of performing CT in the setting of abdominal trauma and the diagnostic findings of intra-abdominal hemorrhage and blunt hepatic and splenic injuries. Hepatic and splenic injuries can be detected by means of CT with a high accuracy. The vast majority of hepatic injuries can be successfully managed conservatively, even when CT demonstrates parenchymal damage of more than three segments and major hemoperitoneum. Delayed complications, e. g., formation of biloma or a false aneurysm, can be readily detected on repeat CT studies, although they are quite uncommon. The outcome of conservative treatment of splenic injuries remains unpredictable because delayed splenic rupture may occur even when initial CT shows only minor parenchymal lesions and little or no intraperitoneal hemorrhage. (orig.) With 11 figs., 5 tabs., 64 refs.

  4. The role of imaging studies in pancreatic injury due to blunt abdominal trauma in children

    Bosboom, D. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center St Radboud, Postbus 9101, Route 667, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Braam, A.W.E. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Center St Radboud, Postbus 9101, Route 815, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Blickman, J.G. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center St Radboud, Postbus 9101, Route 667, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Wijnen, R.M.H. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Center St Radboud, Postbus 9101, Route 815, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)]. E-mail: R.Wijnen@kchir.umcn.nl

    2006-07-15

    Background: The role imaging studies play in the choice of treatment in traumatic pancreas damage remains unclear. This study was performed to gain insight into the role of radiological studies in children 16 years of age or younger admitted to our hospital with pancreatic damage due to a blunt abdominal trauma. Method: Retrospectively, the radiological as well as patient clinical records were reviewed of all children admitted to our hospital between 1975 and 2003 with a pancreatic lesion due to blunt abdominal trauma. Results: Thirty-four children with ages ranging from 3 to 14 years old were admitted with traumatic pancreas damage. Initially 33 children were treated conservatively for the pancreatic damage and only one had immediate surgery of the pancreas with a Roux-y pancreaticojejunostomy. Five other children had immediate surgery for other reasons. Overall, five children proved to have a pancreas transection on CT scans or during laparotomy. One child had a pancreas hematoma and 28 a pancreas contusion. In total 15 children developed a pseudocyst (44%), nine of which resolved spontaneously while six were treated by intervention. None of the children had residual morbidity, and there were no deaths. Considering the pancreas, the 11 available CT's were re-evaluated by two radiologists independently. Grade 3 pancreas damage (distal transection of the pancreatic duct) was diagnosed in five patients by radiologist A and four patients by radiologist B (80% match); Grade 1 was diagnosed in, respectively six and one patients (15% match). An US was performed on 19 children with 82 follow-up examinations, mostly for follow-up of the pseudocysts. Conclusion: Traumatic pancreas damage is a rare and difficult diagnosis. There is no straightforward answer for diagnostic imaging in blunt abdominal trauma in children. The diagnostic relevance of CT is limited. CT in combination with MRCP may be a better option for exclusion of pancreatic duct lesions.

  5. The role of imaging studies in pancreatic injury due to blunt abdominal trauma in children

    Background: The role imaging studies play in the choice of treatment in traumatic pancreas damage remains unclear. This study was performed to gain insight into the role of radiological studies in children 16 years of age or younger admitted to our hospital with pancreatic damage due to a blunt abdominal trauma. Method: Retrospectively, the radiological as well as patient clinical records were reviewed of all children admitted to our hospital between 1975 and 2003 with a pancreatic lesion due to blunt abdominal trauma. Results: Thirty-four children with ages ranging from 3 to 14 years old were admitted with traumatic pancreas damage. Initially 33 children were treated conservatively for the pancreatic damage and only one had immediate surgery of the pancreas with a Roux-y pancreaticojejunostomy. Five other children had immediate surgery for other reasons. Overall, five children proved to have a pancreas transection on CT scans or during laparotomy. One child had a pancreas hematoma and 28 a pancreas contusion. In total 15 children developed a pseudocyst (44%), nine of which resolved spontaneously while six were treated by intervention. None of the children had residual morbidity, and there were no deaths. Considering the pancreas, the 11 available CT's were re-evaluated by two radiologists independently. Grade 3 pancreas damage (distal transection of the pancreatic duct) was diagnosed in five patients by radiologist A and four patients by radiologist B (80% match); Grade 1 was diagnosed in, respectively six and one patients (15% match). An US was performed on 19 children with 82 follow-up examinations, mostly for follow-up of the pseudocysts. Conclusion: Traumatic pancreas damage is a rare and difficult diagnosis. There is no straightforward answer for diagnostic imaging in blunt abdominal trauma in children. The diagnostic relevance of CT is limited. CT in combination with MRCP may be a better option for exclusion of pancreatic duct lesions

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of postoperative complicated abdominal infections in abdominal injuries%腹部创伤手术后感染并发症48例分析

    孙士锦; 谭浩; 王韬; 李英才; 姚元章; 张连阳

    2011-01-01

    目的 腹部创伤手术后发生感染并发症的概率高,临床诊治难度大,本文探讨其发生机制及防治策略.方法 回顾性分析第三军医大学附属大坪医院在2005年7月- 2010年12月间收治的腹部创伤手术后发生腹部感染并发症的48例患者,其中男性30例,女性18例,平均年龄38岁;单纯腹部损伤20例,多发伤28例,ISS评分16 ~52分,平均24.42分.腹部切口感染25例,腹腔内感染18例,腹膜后感染5例.40例伤后先在其他医院治疗,分别于伤后2~76 d转至第三军医大学附属大坪医院,其中16例有伤后剖腹探查手术史;8例伤后直接入住第三军医大学附属大坪医院.观察损伤手术后感染的主要临床表现、诊断方法和治疗措施.结果 本组感染并发症经体格检查(26例)、腹腔穿刺(5例)、腹部超声或CT等检查(12例)、PET/CT检查(5例)等确诊,均送检标本进行病原菌培养后证实.切口感染以早期敞开、负压封闭引流25例;腹腔内及腹膜后感染以超声或CT引导下穿刺置管引流13例;再次剖腹探查10例,包括漏诊结肠损伤切除、近端结肠造口6例,坏疽胆囊切除4例.48例患者中46例治愈,2例死亡,其中1例死于重型颅脑损伤,1例死于脓毒症后多器官功能障碍综合征.结论 腹部创伤手术后易发生感染并发症,体格检查、CT等影像学检查是确诊的重要手段;负压封闭引流可用于切口感染治疗,持续脓毒症患者动态CT、果断剖腹探查可改善患者预后.%Objective Because of high incidence rate of complicated postoperative abdominal infections in abdominal injuries and difficulty in their clinical diagnosis and treatment,this article aimed to investigate the mechanism and the surgical tactics for this kind of complication.Methods Totally 48 abdominal-injured cases of postoperative complicated abdominal infections in our hospital from July 2005 to December 2010 were reviewed.These patients (Male 30,Female

  7. Abdominal adiposity is the main determinant of the C-reactive response to injury in subjects undergoing inguinal hernia repair

    Irkulla Sashidhar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity and serum C-reactive protein (CRP (a sensitive marker of inflammatory activity are associated with most chronic diseases. Abdominal adiposity along with age is the strongest determinant of baseline CRP levels in healthy subjects. The mechanism of the association of serum CRP with disease is uncertain. We hypothesized that baseline serum CRP is a marker of inflammatory responsiveness to injury and that abdominal adiposity is the main determinant of this responsiveness. We studied the effect of abdominal adiposity, age and other environmental risk factors for chronic disease on the CRP response to a standardised surgical insult, unilateral hernia repair to not only test this hypothesis but to inform the factors which must be taken into account when assessing systemic inflammatory responses to surgery. Methods 102 male subjects aged 24-94 underwent unilateral hernia repair by a single operator. CRP was measured at 0, 6, 24 and 48 hrs. Response was defined as the peak CRP adjusted for baseline CRP. Results Age and waist:hip ratio (WHR were associated both with basal CRP and CRP response with similar effect sizes after adjustment for a wide-range of covariates. The adjusted proportional difference in CRP response per 10% increase in WHR was 1.50 (1.17-1.91 p = 0.0014 and 1.15(1.00-1.31 p = 0.05 per decade increase in age. There was no evidence of important effects of other environmental cardiovascular risk factors on CRP response. Conclusion Waist:hip ratio and age need to be considered when studying the inflammatory response to surgery. The finding that age and waist:hip ratio influence baseline and post-operative CRP levels to a similar extent suggests that baseline CRP is a measure of inflammatory responsiveness to casual stimuli and that higher age and obesity modulate the generic excitability of the inflammatory system leading to both higher baseline CRP and higher CRP response to surgery. The mechanism for

  8. Biomechanical Analysis of Abdominal Injury in Tennis Serves. A Case Report

    Tubez, François; Forthomme, Bénédicte; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Cordonnier, Caroline; Bruls, Olivier; Denoël, Vincent; Berwart, Gilles; Joris, Maurice; Grosdent, Stéphanie; Schwartz, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    The serve is an important stroke in any high level tennis game. A well-mastered serve is a substantial advantage for players. However, because of its repeatability and its intensity, this stroke is potentially deleterious for upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk. The trunk is a vital link in the production and transfer of energy from the lower limbs to the upper limbs; therefore, kin-ematic disorder could be a potential source of risk for trunk injury in tennis. This research studies the case o...

  9. Biomechanical Analysis of Abdominal Injury in Tennis Serves. A Case Report

    François Tubez, Bénédicte Forthomme, Jean-Louis Croisier, Caroline Cordonnier, Olivier Brüls, Vincent Denoël, Gilles Berwart, Maurice Joris, Stéphanie Grosdent, Cédric Schwartz

    2015-01-01

    The serve is an important stroke in any high level tennis game. A well-mastered serve is a substantial advantage for players. However, because of its repeatability and its intensity, this stroke is potentially deleterious for upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk. The trunk is a vital link in the production and transfer of energy from the lower limbs to the upper limbs; therefore, kinematic disorder could be a potential source of risk for trunk injury in tennis. This research studies the case of...

  10. An epidemiological study on pattern of thoraco-abdominal injuries sustained in fatal road traffic accidents of Bangalore: Autopsy-based study

    N Bayapa Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The statistical profile reflects a global estimate of 5.1 million deaths in 2000, which was due to injuries that accounted for 10% of deaths due to all causes. Out of this, a quarter of injury-related deaths occurred in the South-East Asian region. Road Traffic Accident (RTA is one among the top 5 causes of morbidity and mortality in South-East Asian countries. Most common cause of blunt abdominal trauma in India is road traffic accident followed by pedestrian accidents, abdominal blows, and fall from heights. Aims: To analyze the epidemiology and pattern of fatal thoraco-abdominal injuries in road traffic accidents. Materials and Methods: An autopsy-based cross-sectional study conducted. A purposive sampling technique was applied to select the study sample of 100 post-mortems of road traffic accident between November 2008 and May 2010 subjected to medico-legal autopsy at the department of Forensic Medicine, KIMS Hospital Bangalore. Results: The majority of the victims were aged 21 to 40 years, 50 (50.0%, most of the victims were male 92 (92.0%; and male/female ratio was 11.5:1. Commonest offending agents in heavy motor vehicles were 54 (54.0%. Bony cage sustained injuries were observed in 71; out of this, fractures of ribs were observed in 45 (63.3% victims, clavicle in 14 (19.7%, sternum was 6 (8.4%, and vertebrae 6 (8.4% of fatal road traffic accidents. Internal thoracic injuries were observed in 26 cases. Among internal thoracic injuries, lungs were the most commonly involved organ 24 (92.3% followed by the heart 2 (7.6%. Lung sustained more lacerations 19 (79.1% than contusions 5 (20.8%. Internal abdominal injuries were observed in 49 cases. In road traffic accidents, the most commonly injured abdominal organs were solid organs such as liver 16 (32.6% followed by spleen 9 (18.3%. Conclusions: Majority of the times in road traffic accidents, young and productive males were injured or lost their life. This study may help the

  11. Computer tomography following blunt abdominal trauma

    The computer tomographic appearances of lesions of parenchymatous organs following blunt abdominal trauma are described in 13 patients (five liver, four renal, two splenic and two pancreatic injuries). The value of abdominal computer tomography is discussed in relation to the interval between injury and time of abdominal examination and compared with the diagnostic value of abdominal angiography. (orig.)

  12. Parenteral nutrition in experimental acute radiation injury of the abdominal cavity organs

    The peculiarities of metabolism in rats after partial body irradiation of the abdomen in a high dose and the effect of parenteral nutrition (PN) with various compositions of diagrams on metabolic indexes with the aim of explaining diagram under conditions of intensive radiation injury of gastrointestinal tract, are investigated. Experiments have been carried out on male rats of the Vistar line, subjected to partial-body X-ray irradiation of the abdomen with the dose of 1400 R. It is shown that under conditions of radiation effect with predominnt unjury of the abdomen, considerable suppression of oxidation processes limits metabolism of nutritious substances. A decrease of glucose and amino acid content in PN produces a pronounced therapeutic effect under these conditions. The increase of lipid component in the PN composition and retabolile introduction increases PN therapeutic effect

  13. Effects of CO2 pneumoperitoneum on blood flow vol-ume of abdominal organs of rabbits with controlled hem-orrhagic shock and liver impact injuries

    ZHANG Lian-yang; ZHAO Song; LI Yong; MA Xiao-lin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of CO2 pneumo-peritoneum on blood flow volume of abdominal organs of rabbits with controlled hemorrhagic shock model and liver impact injuries.Methods: After controlled hemorrhagic shock and liver impact injuries, the rabbit model was established. Eighteen rabbits subjected to hemorrhagic shock and liver impact inju-ries were divided into 3 groups randomly according to the volume of lost blood: light hemorrhagic shock (blood loss volume was 10%, 6 ml/kg), moderate hemorrhagic shock (20%, 12 ml/kg) and severe hemorrhagic shock (40%, 22 ml/kg). Intraabdominal pressures of CO2 pneumoperitoneum was 10 mmHg. Color-labeled microspheres were used to mea-sure the blood flow volume of the liver, kidney and stomach before pneumoperitoneum at 30 minutes and 2 hours after pneumoperitoneum and 30 minutes after deflation. And the mortality and hepatic traumatic condition of rabbits were recorded.Results: Of the 18 rabbits, there were 9 with liver impact injuries at Grade Ⅰ, 8 at Grade Ⅱ and Ⅰ at Grade Ⅲ (according to AIS-2005). The mortality rate in light hemorrhagic shock group was 33.33%, and that in moderate or severe hemor-rhagic shock group was 100% within 30 minutes and 2 hours after pneumoperitoneum, respectively. The blood flow vol-ume in the organs detected decreased at 30 minutes under pneumoperitoneum in light and moderate hemorrhagic shock groups. At the same time, the blood flow volume of the liver in moderate hemorrhagic shock group decreased more sig-nificantly than that in light hemorrhagic shock group.Conclusions: The blood flow volume of abdominal organs in rabbits is decreased obviously under CO2 pneumoperitoneum, with fairly high mortality rate. It is be-lieved that CO2 pneumoperitoneum should cautiously be used in abdominal injury accompanied with hemorrhagic shock, especially under non-resuscitation conditions.

  14. A heuristic approach and heretic view on the technical issues and pitfalls in the management of penetrating abdominal injuries

    Smith Martin D

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is a general decline in penetrating abdominal trauma throughout the western world. As a result of that, there is a significant loss of expertise in dealing with this type of injury particularly when the patient presents to theatre with physiological instability. A significant percentage of these patients will not be operated by a trauma surgeon but, by the "occasional trauma surgeon", who is usually trained as a general surgeon. Most general surgeons have a general knowledge of operating penetrating trauma, knowledge originating from their training years and possibly enhanced by reading operative surgery textbooks. Unfortunately, the details included in most of these books are not extensive enough to provide them with enough armamentaria to tackle the difficult case. In this scenario, their operative dexterity and knowledge cannot be compared to that of their trauma surgeon colleagues, something that is taken for granted in the trauma textbooks. Techniques that are considered basic and easy by the trauma surgeons can be unfamiliar and difficult to general surgeons. Knowing the danger points and pitfalls that will be encountered in penetrating trauma to the abdomen, will help the occasional trauma surgeons to avoid intraoperative errors and improve patient care. This manuscript provides a heuristic approach from surgeons working in a high volume penetrating trauma centers in South African. Some of the statements could be considered heretic by the "accepted" trauma literature. We believe that this heuristic ("rule of thumb" approach, that originating from "try and error" experience can help surgical trainees or less experienced in penetrating trauma surgeons to improve their surgical decision making and technique, resulting in better patient outcome.

  15. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 2: Gastrointestinal tract and retroperitoneal organs

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F. [Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Mentha, G. [Department of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Surgery, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Schmidlin, F. [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    1998-06-02

    Computed tomography plays an important role in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in adults. Current standard examination techniques enable detection of the majority of perforating or devascularizing bowel injuries, although diagnostic findings are often subtle and meticulous inspection is required. Computed tomography may demonstrate pancreatic contusions and lacerations and help in distinguishing minor traumatic lesions without involvement of the pancreatic duct (organ injury scale, grades I and II) from deep lacerations with ductal involvement (grades III and V). Computed tomography enables distinguishing renal contusions and minor cortical lacerations that can usually be managed conservatively (injuries of grades I-III) from corticomedullary lacerations and injuries of the major renal vessels (grades IV and V) that have a less favorable prognosis and more commonly require surgical repair. In addition, CT is well suited for the detection of active renal hemorrhage and guidance of transcatheter embolization treatment and delineation of preexisting benign or malignant pathologies that may predispose to posttraumatic hemorrhage. The radiologist`s awareness of the diagnostic CT findings of abdominal visceral injuries as well as their clinical and surgical implications are important prerequisites for optimal patient management. (orig.) With 11 figs., 5 tabs., 56 refs.

  16. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 2: Gastrointestinal tract and retroperitoneal organs

    Computed tomography plays an important role in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in adults. Current standard examination techniques enable detection of the majority of perforating or devascularizing bowel injuries, although diagnostic findings are often subtle and meticulous inspection is required. Computed tomography may demonstrate pancreatic contusions and lacerations and help in distinguishing minor traumatic lesions without involvement of the pancreatic duct (organ injury scale, grades I and II) from deep lacerations with ductal involvement (grades III and V). Computed tomography enables distinguishing renal contusions and minor cortical lacerations that can usually be managed conservatively (injuries of grades I-III) from corticomedullary lacerations and injuries of the major renal vessels (grades IV and V) that have a less favorable prognosis and more commonly require surgical repair. In addition, CT is well suited for the detection of active renal hemorrhage and guidance of transcatheter embolization treatment and delineation of preexisting benign or malignant pathologies that may predispose to posttraumatic hemorrhage. The radiologist's awareness of the diagnostic CT findings of abdominal visceral injuries as well as their clinical and surgical implications are important prerequisites for optimal patient management. (orig.)

  17. Abdominal shotgun trauma: A case report

    Toutouzas, Konstantinos G; Larentzakis, Andreas; Drimousis, Panagiotis; Riga, Maria; Theodorou, Dimitrios; Katsaragakis, Stylianos

    2008-01-01

    Introduction One of the most lethal mechanisms of injury is shotgun wound and particularly the abdominal one. Case presentation We report a case of a 45 years old male suffering abdominal shotgun trauma, who survived his injuries. Conclusion The management of the abdominal shotgun wounds is mainly dependent on clinical examination and clinical judgment, while requires advanced surgical skills.

  18. COMPARATIVE ROLE AND EVALUATION OF ULTRASOUND AND MULTISLICE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN THE GRADING OF HEMOPERITONEUM IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA AND ITS CORRELATION WITH THE GRADING OF ORGAN INJURY

    Kunwarpal; Sukhdeep; Thukral; Amandeep; Harmeet; Sonali

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: 1. To assess the role of Ultrasound (US) and Multislice Computed Tomography (MSCT) in detecting hemoperitoneum in patients with acute blunt abdominal trauma. 2. To study the use of US and MSCT in grading of hemoperitoneum in blunt abdominal trauma patients. 3. To compare the US and MSCT grading of hemoperitoneum with the grading of organ injury. 4. To compare and statistically analyze the spectrum of findings observed in each moda...

  19. Clinical usefulness of urinary liver-type fatty-acid-binding protein as a perioperative marker of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing endovascular or open-abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Obata, Yumi; Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Sugaya, Takeshi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo; Tateda, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common after cardiovascular surgery and is usually diagnosed on the basis of the serum creatinine (SCr) level and urinary output. However, SCr is of low sensitivity in patients with poor renal function. Because urinary liver-type fatty-acid-binding protein (L-FABP) reflects renal tubular injury, we evaluated whether perioperative changes in urinary L-FABP predict AKI in the context of abdominal aortic repair. Methods Study participants were 95 patients who...

  20. Evaluation of hip internal and external rotation range of motion as an injury risk factor for hip, abdominal and groin injuries in professional baseball players

    Xinning Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal hip range of motion (ROM is essential in running and transfer of energy from lower to upper extremities during overhead throwing. Dysfunctional hip ROM may alter lower extremity kinematics and predispose athletes to hip and groin injuries. The purpose of this study is characterize hip internal/external ROM (Arc and its effect on the risk of hip, hamstring, and groin injuries in professional baseball players. Bilateral hip internal and external ROM was measured on all baseball players (N=201 in one professional organization (major and minor league during spring training. Players were organized according to their respective positions. All injuries were documented prospectively for an entire MLB season (2010 to 2011. Data was analyzed according to position and injuries during the season. Total number of players (N=201 with an average age of 24±3.6 (range=17-37. Both pitchers (N=93 and catchers (N=22 had significantly decreased mean hip internal rotation and overall hip arc of motion compared to the positional players (N=86. Players with hip, groin, and hamstring injury also had decreased hip rotation arc when compared to the normal group. Overall, there is a correlation between decreased hip internal rotation and total arc of motion with hip, hamstring, and groin injuries.

  1. Methane-rich saline attenuates ischemia/reperfusion injury of abdominal skin flaps in rats via regulating apoptosis level

    Song, Kexin; Zhang, Mingzi; Hu, Jianqiang; Liu, Yunqi; Liu, Yifang; Wang, Youbin; MA, XUEMEI

    2015-01-01

    Background In plastic surgery, skin damage induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is a multifactorial process that often occurs. Methane gas has been reported to be a new therapeutic gas for attenuating I/R injury. In this study, we assessed the effects of methane-rich saline (MRS) in regulating apoptosis on skin flap I/R injury. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley rats, 6–8 weeks old, were divided randomly into three groups: one sham surgery group (SH) and two surgery groups. After undergoing 6 h of ...

  2. Abdominal Adhesions

    ... adhesions? Abdominal adhesions can cause intestinal obstruction and female infertility—the inability to become pregnant after a year of trying. Abdominal adhesions can lead to female infertility by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus, ...

  3. Abdominal Ultrasound

    ... It is used to help diagnose pain or distention and evaluate the kidneys, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, spleen ... variety of conditions, such as: abdominal pain or distention. abnormal liver function. enlarged abdominal organ. stones in ...

  4. Vascular surgical society of great britain and ireland: inhibition of systemic fibrinolysis is associated with myocardial injury in patients operated on for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Adam; Evans; Ludlam; Bradbury

    1999-05-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous work has demonstrated that ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is associated with systemic thrombin generation and inhibition of systemic fibrinolysis. The procoagulant and hypofibrinolytic state associated with ruptured AAA predisposes to microvascular and macrovascular thrombosis and subsequent myocardial injury. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between haemostatic derangement and biochemical evidence of myocardial injury in patients operated on for ruptured AAA. METHODS: Ten patients undergoing repair of ruptured AAA were studied. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) activity, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) activity, prothrombin fragment (PF) 1 + 2, D-dimer and fibrinogen levels were measured before operation, and immediately before and 5 min after aortic clamp release. Plasma levels of cardiac troponin (cTn) I were measured before operation, and 6 and 24 h after aortic clamp release. RESULTS: There was no relationship between tPA activity, PF 1 + 2, D-dimer or fibrinogen and cTn-I levels at any sampling point. There was, however, a significant positive correlation (Spearman rank test) between PAI activity immediately before (median 38.6 (range 13.0-39.4) units ml-1) and 5 min after (37.2 (10.6-39.4) units ml-1) aortic clamp release, and cTn-I at 6 h (median 3.17 (range less than 0.5 to 71.1) ng ml-1) and 24 h (5.55 (range less than 0.5 to 110) ng ml-1) after aortic clamp release. CONCLUSION: These data strongly support the hypothesis that the inhibition of systemic fibrinolysis which occurs in response to ischaemia and reperfusion during ruptured AAA repair contributes to the development of subsequent myocardial injury. PMID:10361322

  5. Misdiagnosis of multiple fracture and dislocation complicated with closed abdominal injury%多发骨折脱位合并腹腔闭合伤漏诊的临床分析

    马成利; 甄淑平

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨多发骨折脱位合并腹腔闭合伤的漏诊原因,以减少其发生率.方法:对我院2007年1月~2009年12月收治的116例多发骨折脱位合并腹腔闭合伤患者进行回顾性分析,确定漏诊的发生率及引起漏诊的原因.结果:经手术证实多发骨折脱位合并腹腔闭合伤漏诊率为20.7%(24/116),同期单发骨折脱位合并腹腔闭合伤的漏诊率仅为7.4%(4/54).结论:多发骨折脱位合并腹腔闭合伤容易出现漏诊.拓宽诊断视野、全面系统检查、仔细观察病情变化,大多数漏诊是可以避免的,而反复腹腔穿刺是提高腹腔脏器损伤诊断率的重要手段.%Objective:To explore reasons that cause misdiagnosis of multiple fracture and dislocation complicated with closed abdominal injury in order to reduce its incidence. Methods: Data of 116 cases of multiple fracture and dislocation complicated with closed abdominal injury that admitted into our hospital from January 2007 to December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed in order to calculate the incidence and find out cause of misdiagnosis. Results:Incidence of confirmed misdiagnosis of multiple fracture and dislocation complicated with closed abdominal injury was 20. 7% (24/116), while the corresponding incidence for simple fracture and dislocation complicated with closed abdominal injury was 7.4 % (4/54 cases).Conclusions: Multiple fracture and dislocation complicated with closed abdominal injury can be easily misdiagnosed, but comprehensive examination, especially, peritoneo-puncture can screen out closed abdominal injury effectively

  6. Abdominal Assessment.

    Fritz, Deborah; Weilitz, Pamela Becker

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints by patients, and assessment of abdominal pain and associated symptoms can be challenging for home healthcare providers. Reasons for abdominal pain are related to inflammation, organ distention, and ischemia. The history and physical examination are important to narrow the source of acute or chronic problems, identify immediate interventions, and when necessary, facilitate emergency department care. PMID:26925941

  7. Efficacy Observation on Electro-acupuncture Combined with Abdominal Massage for Urinary Retention following Spinal Cord Injury%电针结合腹部按摩治疗脊髓损伤性尿潴留疗效观察

    向慧竹; 贾海鹏; 李茜; 卢添娇

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of electro-acupuncture combined with abdominal massage for urinary retention following spinal cord injury. Methods:27 cases of patients with urinary retention following spinal cord injury were all treated by electro-acupuncture combined with abdominal massage and observed the efficacy. Results: 14 cases were cured, 9 cases turned better and 4 cases invalid, the total effective rate was 85.18%. Conclusion:The treatment of electro-acupuncture combined with abdominal massage for urinary retention following spinal cord injury is safe and effective, deserves clinical promotion and application.%目的:探讨电针结合腹部按摩治疗脊髓损伤性尿潴留的疗效。方法:27例脊髓损伤性尿潴留患者均采用电针结合腹部按摩治疗,观察其临床疗效。结果:治愈14例,好转9例,无效4例,总有效率为85.18%。结论:针灸结合腹部按摩治疗脊髓损伤性尿潴留安全、有效,值得临床推广应用。

  8. Isolated duodenal rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma

    Celik Atilla

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal rupture following blunt abdominal trauma is rare and it usually seen with other abdominal organ injuries. It represents approximately 2% to 20% of patients with blunt abdominal injury and often occurs after blows to the upper abdomen, or abdominal compression from high-riding seat belts. Two cases of blunt duodenal rupture successfully treated surgically, are presented with their preoperative diagnosis and final out comes.

  9. Abdominal sounds

    ... during sleep. They also occur normally for a short time after the use of certain medicines and after abdominal surgery. Decreased or absent bowel sounds often indicate constipation. Increased ( hyperactive ) bowel sounds ...

  10. Abdominal Sepsis.

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy. PMID:27363829

  11. CT of abdominal blunt trauma

    We studied CT findings and interventional radiology including therapeutic procedures in 43 cases with abdominal blunt trauma, retrospectively. All of parenchymal organ's injuries, and injuries of duodenum and retroperitoneum were correctly diagnosed by CT. In 14 cases with only hemoperitoneum or no positive findings on CT, 4 cases were jejunal perforations, and remaining 10 cases were conservatively treated and relieved. We have to take care that the similar CT findings include the opposite results to need surgery and not. (author)

  12. Detection of abdominal bleeding in blunt abdominal trauma

    Arterial hemorrhage is the most serious immediate complication of blunt abdominal trauma. This paper discusses the detection and localization of active hemorrhage in nonpenetrating injury, as a modification of the technique using technetium-99m sulfur colloid to localize the site of active bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Any imaging protocol for suspected hepatosplenic injury can be easily modified to search for active intra-abdominal hemorrhage. The timely detection of unsuspected bleeding improves patient management by allowing the surgeon to reorder his or her treatment priorities. The early detection of clinically unsuspected intra-abdominal, retroperitoneal, or pelvic hemorrhage will identify those patients who may need more definitive diagnostic procedures, interventional angiography for control of bleeding, or surgical intervention. The 500,000-count view of the abdomen and pelvis can be easily incorporated into any existing trauma protocol using technetium-99m sulfur colloid, is of proven value, and adds little additional time to the study

  13. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    ... size and can usually be diagnosed early in fetal development, typically between the tenth and fourteenth weeks of ... organs at the abdominal wall opening late in fetal development may also contribute to organ injury. Intestinal damage ...

  14. CT of abdominal trauma

    Soon after it became available for clinical use, cranial CT became the method of choice for evaluating head trauma. Only relatively recently have newer generation full-body scanners been installed at major trauma centers, but experience is rapidly being gained in the utilization of CT for abdominal trauma. CT has proved highly accurate in diagnosing a wide variety of injuries to both intra- and retroperitoneal organs in pediatric and adult patient populations. The impact has been evident not only in decreasing utilization of other diagnostic tests, such as angiography, but also in practical management decisions, such as whether to perform exploratory laparotomy. This chapter details the authors' approach to evaluation of abdominal trauma by CT

  15. The blunt abdominal trauma

    Up to 1970 the number of patients suffering from blunt abdominal trauma showed a substantial increase. In more than 50% of all cases there are additional injuries. The most important factor influencing the prognosis of these patients is the early and correct indication for operation and the avoidance of unnecessary laparotomies. As a primary aim in diagnosis one should consider the recognition of an intraperitoneal bleeding without risk for the patient. Peritoneal lavage as an invasive method with low complication rates has proved good. First reports also show good results using the sonography of the abdomen. The recognition of the injured organ allows a carefully directed operation. Concerning the prognosis it is of minor importance. The diagnosis in patients with blunt abdominal trauma at the university clinic of Freiburg consists of: sonography, followed in positive cases by laparotomy or angiography and laparotomy. In cases with questionable results a lavage is done. (orig.)

  16. Modulação da pressão intracraniana em um modelo experimental de hipertensão abdominal e lesão pulmonar aguda Factors associated with variation in intracranial pressure in a model of intra-abdominal hypertension with acute lung injury

    Fernando Godinho Zampieri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito de alterações hemodinâmicas, respiratórias e metabólicas sobre a pressão intracraniana em um modelo de lesão pulmonar aguda e síndrome compartimental abdominal. MÉTODOS: Oito porcos Agroceres foram submetidos, após a instrumentação, a cinco cenários clínicos: 1 estado basal com baixa pressão intra-abdominal e pulmão sadio; 2 pneumoperitôneo, com pressão intra-abdominal de 20 mm Hg; 3 lesão pulmonar aguda induzida por lavagem pulmonar e desativação de surfactante; 4 pneumoperitôneo com pressão intra-abdominal de 20 mm Hg na vigência de lesão pulmonar aguda e com PEEP baixo; e 5 PEEP ajustado a 27 cm H2O na vigência de pneumoperitôneo e lesão pulmonar aguda. Variáveis respiratórias e hemodinâmicas foram coletadas. Análise multivariada foi realizada buscando as variáveis associadas com elevação da pressão intracraniana nos cinco cenários estudados. RESULTADOS: Após a análise multivariada, nas situações não associadas com lesão pulmonar aguda apenas a pressão de platô das vias aéreas se correlacionou positivamente com a pressão intracraniana. Nos modelos associados com lesão pulmonar aguda, a pressão de platô de vias aéreas, a pressão arterial de CO2, o CO2 no final da expiração e a pressão venosa central se correlacionaram positivamente com incrementos da pressão intracraniana. CONCLUSÃO: Em um modelo de disfunção orgânica múltipla com situações clínicas associadas com aumento da pressão torácica e abdominal, o incremento da pressão intracraniana desencadeado pela elevação da pressão abdominal parece ser decorrente da piora da complacência do sistema respiratório e da redução do gradiente para drenagem venosa cerebral ocasionado pela elevação da pressão venosa central.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of hemodynamic, respiratory and metabolic changes on intracranial pressure in a model of acute lung injury and abdominal compartment syndrome

  17. CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma

    Computed tomography (CT) findings from 95 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were evaluated. Among them, there was no false negative case. It can thus be said that if CT is negative the patient can be treated conservatively. The efficacy of CT in diagnosing injuries of various organs was also evaluated. (author)

  18. Abdominal Pain

    ... relaxation. Guided imagery for abdominal pain About self-hypnosis and kids See YourChild : Pain and Your Child or Teen for more detail ... how to help your baby cope with the pain of medical procedures, circumcision, and teething. ... Helping Kids YourChild : A Look at Biofeedback YourChild : ...

  19. Radiological evaluation of abdominal trauma

    Simple abdomen film has played an important role in decision of emergency operations in patients with the abdominal trauma. Nowadays, it still acts as a primary and inevitable processes in emergency condition. At the Department of Radiology, Hanil Hospital, 70 patients, who were laparotomied due to penetrating or nonpernetraing abdominal trauma, were observed and analyzed with simple abdomen film after comparison with the operative findings. The results are as follows: 1. Most frequent age distribution was 10 to 39 years and marked 70%. Male was in 90% incidence. 2. Penetrating injury largely involved the small bowel and abdominal wall. Non-penetrating injury usually involved the spleen, small bowel, liver, kidney, pancreas, duodenum. 3. Single organ injury occurred in higher incidence at the small bowel and abdominal wall. Multiple organ injury occurred in higher incidence at the spleen, liver, kidney and pancreas. 4. Organ distribution was 26% in spleen, 22% in small bowel, 14% in liver, 11% in abdominal wall. 7% in pancreas, 7% in kidney. 5% in duodenum, 4% in GB and CBD, 2% in diaphragm, 2% in colon, and 1% in stomach. 5. The specific roentgen findings and their frequency which useful in differential diagnosis at abdominal trauma, were as follows: a) flank fluid; Detectable possibility was 71% in liver laceration, 69% in spleen laceration and 57% in pancreas laceration. b) ipsilateral psoas shadow obliteration; Detectable possibility was 57% in liver laceration, 57% in kidney laceration and 46% in spleen laceration. c) free air; Detactable possibility was 60% in duodenal perforation, and 36% in peroration of upper part of small bowel. d) Reflex ileus; Detectable possibility was 64% in small bowel, 50% in liver laceration and 35% in spleen laceration. e) rib fracture; Detactable possibility was 36% in liver laceration and 23% in spleen laceration. f) pleural effusion; Detectable possibility was 29% in liver laceration and 27% in spleen laceration

  20. Handlebar Hernia: A Rare Type of Abdominal Wall Hernia

    Rooh-Allah Yegane

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic abdominal wall hernias are a type of acquired hernia secondary to blunt trauma Caused, by direct trauma from handlebar like objects. This rare hernia is named ‘Handlebar hernia'. We report a case of such hernia without any significant intra-abdominal injury. The abdominal wall defect was repaired in layers by Jones technique. Postoperative course was uneventful. The authors recommend clinical suspicion for traumatic hernia in all patients with traumatic abdominal wall injury. Definitive treatment includes surgical exploration with primary repair of all tissue layers of the abdominal wall.

  1. Abdominal pain

    ... What makes the pain better? For example, drinking milk, having a bowel movement, or taking an antacid? What medications are you taking? OTHER MEDICAL HISTORY Have you had a recent injury? Are you ...

  2. Practical pediatric abdominal CT

    This course is designed to help the radiologist in a hospital setting successfully approach abdominal CT in the infant and child. Emphasis is placed on techniques necessary for a high-quality examination of the upper abdomen, as applied to common pediatric problems such as trauma, tumor, and infection. Material is presented on technical considerations, including patient sedation, preparation, and potential pitfalls and helpful hints for imaging. An emphasis is placed on dynamic scanning with table incrementation. The section on trauma focuses on an approach to imaging the abdomen in the injured child, typical injuries, patterns of injury in the upper abdomen, and why CT is the best imaging modality for blunt upper abdominal trauma. The discussion of tumor imaging reviews the appearance of typical childhood neoplasia including Wilms tumor, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin and Burkitt lymphoma, and disseminated solid tumors such as rhabdomyosarcoma. The authors emphasize what to look for and where, both on initial and on later (for recurrences) examinations. The discussion of infection addresses detection of abscesses and occult infections in children, as well as imaging of abscesses prior to intervention

  3. Measurement of abdominal wall compliance in normal subjects and tetraplegic patients.

    Goldman, J M; Rose, L S; Morgan, M D; Denison, D M

    1986-01-01

    On inspiration descent of the diaphragm is opposed by the passive properties of the abdominal wall, the tone of its muscles, and the inertia of the abdominal contents. As a result, intra-abdominal pressure rises and promotes rib cage expansion. In patients with high spinal injury the diaphragm is the most important muscle of inspiration and abdominal wall displacement is more evident than in normal subjects. Abdominal wall compliance has been measured by relating gastric pressure to abdominal...

  4. 腹部闭合伤致儿童胰腺外伤的诊治探讨%Pancreatic injury in children with blunt abdominal trauma: a report of 14 cases

    李长春; 王珊; 李晓庆; 章均; 欧阳军

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the management of pancreatic injury in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma.Methods Fourteen children with closed pancreatic injury from January 1999 to May 2008 were reviewed.Results There were 11 boys and 3 of girls (M:F = 3.7:1).Five injuries were a result of bicycle handlebar injury,4 were from vehicle-related accidents,3 from direct blow and 2 from fall.The clinical presentations of pancreatic injury were abdominal pain,tenderness,leukocytosis,hy-peramylasemia and fever.The laboratory findings associated with pancreatic injury were elevated serum amylase level in 10 (71.5%) and leukocytosis in all cases.No correlation was found between leukocyte level,amylase value and the severity of pancreas injury.Repeated amylase values and CT scans were useful in detecting pancreatic injuries.CT scan was obtained in 11(78.6%) patients and was diagnostic in 6 (54.5%).Two of four children with negative CT scan finding had pancreatic injuries confirmed by exploratory laparotomy.Ultrasound scan was performed in 12 (85.7%) patients and was positive for pancreatic injury in 8 (66.7%).One child had emergency endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP).Nine children were treated conservatively.This included six with minor pancreas injuries,one with proximal pancreatic duct injury,and two with duct injuries that were missed at admission.Five children were operated.The procedures included exploratory laparoto-mies and external drainage of pseudocysts.Four children had external drainage of pseudocysts.Conclusions The diagnosis of pancreatic injury was confirmed by hyperamylasemia,CT evaluation and ultrasound scan,and laparotomy.Initial serum amylase level and leukocytosis do not correlate with the severity of pancreatic injury.The majority of pancreatic injuries can be managed non-operatively.The non-operative management of proximal pancreatic duct injury allows the formation pseudocyst which could be subsequently drained.Distal duct injuries are best

  5. COMPARATIVE ROLE AND EVALUATION OF ULTRASOUND AND MULTISLICE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN THE GRADING OF HEMOPERITONEUM IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA AND ITS CORRELATION WITH THE GRADING OF ORGAN INJURY

    Kunwarpal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: 1. To assess the role of Ultrasound (US and Multislice Computed Tomography (MSCT in detecting hemoperitoneum in patients with acute blunt abdominal trauma. 2. To study the use of US and MSCT in grading of hemoperitoneum in blunt abdominal trauma patients. 3. To compare the US and MSCT grading of hemoperitoneum with the grading of organ injury. 4. To compare and statistically analyze the spectrum of findings observed in each modality. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted at advanced diagnostics and institute of imaging , Amritsar. The study comprised of 50 patients who were stable enough to undergo both US and CT scans.US was preceded by MSCT in most of the patients and the time gap between the imaging modalities was less than 1 hour to make the study comparable. TECHNIQUES ADOPTED : 1. US was performed on Versa plus (Siemens and Xario (Toshiba with Cardiac , 3.5 - 5 Mhz - Convex and 5 - 7.5 Mhz - Line ar probes. Particular attention was paid to the amount of free fluid in the abdomen and pelvis. 2. MSCT was performed with MSCT Volume Zoom (Siemens Forchheim Germany AG. 500 - 1000cc of water orally or through nasogastric tube was given 15 - 20 minutes before the study , followed by 120cc I/V contrast at the rate of 2 - 3ml/second using power injector. Parameters used: Single breath hold ; A. 165 mAs . B. 120 kvp . C. Scan delay - 40 seconds . D. Collimation - 4x2.5mm . E. Pitch - 5mm . Following findings were observed : a. Presence of peritoneal fluid. B. Any tear or hematoma in the solid abdominal organs like spleen and liver. C. Status of hollow viscera like small bowel , large bowel and urinary bladder. Hemoperitoneum was scored on both US and MSCT. Visceral injuries were graded according to O.I.S grading system. Score was correlated with the underlying organ injury and the management of the patient. US scoring (Table A and MSCT quantification of hemoperitoneum was done. (Table B Location of hemoperitoneum . A

  6. Urological injuries following trauma

    Bent, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.bent@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N. [Department of Urology, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Fotheringham, T. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  7. Lesões abdominais por uso do fio guia em ensaios cirúrgicos do quadril: estudo em cadáver Abdominal injuries due to the use of guide wire in hip surgery experiments: cadaveric study

    Anderson Freitas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a relação entre lesões abdominais e a introdução de fios guia em ensaios cirúrgicos do quadril, propor um sistema de escorização e conduta médica em função da distância percorrida pelo fio guia a partir da placa quadrilátera e a estrutura anatômica lesionada. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Utilizou-se 18 quadris de cadáveres, um fio de Steimann de 3.2 x 300 mm, um perfurador elétrico e um paquímetro. Introduziu-se o fio no centro do colo femoral por via de acesso lateral no quadril sob visualização direta. Por via de acesso abdominal mediana longitudinal estendida à região pélvica, observou-se a placa quadrilátera até o fio a transfixar. A partir deste ponto, prolongou-se a inserção por mais 140 mm, a fim de observar seu trajeto abdominal e descrever as lesões apresentadas em função da distância percorrida. RESULTADOS: Houve cinco (27% lesões de cólon sigmóide e uma (5% lesão transfixante do nervo obturador. Artérias e veias ilíacas comuns contra laterais ao quadril fixado não foram lesionadas. CONCLUSÃO: O fio guia não deve ultrapassar a placa quadrilátera. Medidas de prevenção são importantes no pré e intra-operatório e o escore e a conduta médica propostos neste estudo devem ser criteriosamente observados nos casos de lesão comprovada.OBJECTIVES: Evaluate the relationship between abdominal injuries and the introduction of guide wire in experimental hip surgery, to propose a scoring system and a medical management based on the distance traveled by the guide wire from the quadrilateral plate until the damaged anatomical structure. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 18 cadaveric hips, a Steimann pin of 3.2 x 300mm, an electric drill and a caliper were used. The wire was inserted in the center of the femoral neck through a lateral approach in the hip under direct visualization. Via median abdominal extended approach to the pelvic region, the quadrilateral plate was observed until the wire crossed it. From

  8. Computed tomography and nonoperative treatment for blunt abdominal trauma

    Studies were undertaken to determine if computed tomography (CT) could reliably assist physical examination in the initial assessment of blunt abdominal trauma, and also to examine how various abdominal injuries were managed with the guidance of CT. A total of 255 patients underwent emergency abdominal CT following blunt abdominal trauma over a period of seven years. One hundred and fifty two patients had abnormal CT scans, including 58 hepatic, 36 renal, 25 splenic and 9 pancreatic injuries as well as 67 patients with intra-abdominal hemorrhage and 21 patients with free abdominal air. A comparative study on the detection of pneumoperitoneum revealed CT to be far superior to plain radiography. One hundred and three patients had normal CT scans, all of whom were managed nonoperatively, except for three false-negative cases and two nontherapeutic cases. The patients with injury to the parenchymal organs were given nonoperative treatment if they had stable vital signs and no evidence of associated injuries demanding immediate surgery and the majority of these patients were managed well nonoperatively. CT was thus found to be a useful adjunct in the management of victims of blunt abdominal trauma, since in a rapid and noninvasive fashion, CT accurately defined the extent of parenchymal organ injury and also disclosed any other abdominal injuries. (author)

  9. Evaluation of abdominal CT in the initial treatment of abdominal trauma

    During the last four years 102 patients with abdominal trauma were examined by CT for preoperative evaluation in our hospital. In 35 patients (34 %), the CT scans revealed no abnormal findings. They were all managed conservatively except for one case of perforated small bowel. In 67 patients (66 %) CT revealed evidences of substantial abdominal or retroperitoneal trauma. In 30 of them CT findings were confirmed by surgery. Hepatic injury is usually easily recognized by CT. CT is also useful for the detection of renal or splenic injuries. The majority of those parenchymatous organ injuries were successfully managed with conservative therapy, despite apparent traumatic lesions revealed by CT. Repeat CT scans is proved to be very useful to follow the changes of these traumatic lesions. In conclusion, application of abdominal CT is extremely useful for the initial decision making in treatment of patients with abdominal trauma and for the follow-up observation of injured lesions. (author)

  10. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    ... access catheters Vertebroplasty Women and vascular disease Women's health Social Media Facebook Twitter ... Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists are vascular ...

  11. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta.

    Barchiche, R; Bové, T; Demanet, H; Goldstein, J P; Deuvaert, F E

    1999-08-01

    A traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta is a rare entity, occurring as the result of a missed aortic lesion at the time of the initial injury. Therefore, clinical suspicion and careful abdominal exploration at first laparotomy is mandatory to prevent aortic pseudoaneurysm formation and its risk of delayed rupture. We present a case of successful surgical treatment of a suprarenal aortic false aneurysm, presenting 4 weeks after a life-threatening gunshot wound in a 13-year-old child. PMID:10499389

  12. Abdominal trauma

    Radiologic evaluation of abdominal trauma must provide a quick and accurate assessment of the lesions in order to improve the management of the patient. The technique used varies depending on the mechanism of the trauma (blunt trauma or stab wounds) and the hemodynamic status. Radiologic evaluation is usually performed in blunt trauma whereas stab wound trauma is usually explored surgically. The various techniques available are standard radiographs, ultrasonography, computed tomography and arteriography. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the immediate evaluation is still not well defined. It appears to be useful method in the delayed evaluation of diaphragmatic trauma. Computed tomography is the method most commonly performed in trauma patients. This technique is accurate and allows correct assessment of the lesions. The disadvantages are the radiation induced and the need for a hemo-dynamically stable patient. The aim of the radiologic evaluation is to provide the clinicians with an accurate description of the lesions. It can help in the management of the patient usually in association with clinical and laboratory data. It can also guide interventional procedures (drainage, embolization...). Finally, it allows radiographic follow-up when conservative treatment is performed. (authors). 26 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  13. Blunt abdominal trauma with transanal small bowel evisceration

    Noushif Medappil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel evisceration through the anus can occur spontaneously or post traumatically. Traumatic transanal small bowel evisceration results from iatrogenic injuries, suction injuries, and blunt abdominal trauma (BAT. We report a 48-year-old female who presented with evisceration of small intestinal loops through the anus following BAT and discuss the etiologies and mechanisms of injury of this rare presentation.

  14. Evaluation of abdominal trauma by computed tomography and ultrasonography

    Out of 75 patients who were admitted to our hospital because of abdominal trauma and were undergone the procedures such as ultrasonography and/or CT scan within 24 hours of abdominal trauma due to suspected abdominal organ injury. We analyzed the results of 38 patients who were confirmed of diagnosis by operation, follow-up CT scan or ultrasonography. We analyzed the results of 38 patients who were confirmed of diagnosis by operation, follow-up CT scan or ultrasonography. 1. In the abdominal organ injury, solid organ injury consists of 8 cases of spleen laceration, 1 of splenic subcapsular hematoma, 7 of hepatic laceration, 7 of pancreas laceration, 3 of renal laceration, and 3 of subcapsular hematoma of kidney. 2. In addition, there were 7 bowel and/or mesenteric laceration, 2 diaphragmatic hernia, and 1 urethral rupture. 3. 2 cases of retroperitoneal hematoma and 1 case in which hemo peritoneum occurred without abdominal organ injury were confirmed by follow-up CT or ultrasonography. 4. In all of the 4 patients with multiple organ injury, pancreatic laceration was associated. 5. In abdominal trauma patients, ultrasonography or CT can be used to survey rapidly the entire abdomen for possible associated injury, and be of great help to clinicians in identifying the patients who need immediate surgery or in minimizing the incidence of unnecessary emergency abdominal exploration.

  15. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and albuminuria as predictors of acute kidney injury in patients treated with goal-directed haemodynamic therapy after major abdominal surgery.

    Cullen, Mr

    2013-10-11

    Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is emerging as a new biomarker for the early identification of acute kidney injury (AKI). There is also increasing evidence of an association between urinary albumin\\/creatinine ratio (ACR) and AKI. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of these biomarkers to predict AKI in a population of perioperative patients treated with goal-directed haemodynamic therapy (GDHT). Secondary aims were to examine NGAL and ACR as sensitive biomarkers to detect the effects of GDHT and to investigate the association of these biomarkers with secondary outcomes.

  16. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  17. Abdominal Pain or Cramping

    ... Body & lifestyle changes > Abdominal pain or cramping Abdominal pain or cramping E-mail to a friend Please ... signs of severe pain. What causes mild belly pain in pregnancy? There are different causes for mild ...

  18. Laparoscopic Bullet Removal in a Penetrating Abdominal Gunshot

    Christos Stefanou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Penetrating abdominal trauma has been traditionally treated by exploratory laparotomy. Nowadays laparoscopy has become an accepted practice in hemodynamically stable patient without signs of peritonitis. We report a case of a lower anterior abdominal gunshot patient treated laparoscopically. A 32-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department with complaint of gunshot penetrating injury at left lower anterior abdominal wall. The patient had no symptoms or obvious bleeding and was vitally stable. On examination we identified 1 cm diameter entry wound at the left lower abdominal wall. The imaging studies showed the bullet in the peritoneal cavity but no injured intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal viscera. We decided to remove the bullet laparoscopically. Twenty-four hours after the intervention the patient was discharged. The decision for managing gunshot patients should be based on clinical and diagnostic findings. Anterior abdominal injuries in a stable patient without other health problems can be managed laparoscopically.

  19. 损伤控制外科在闭合性胰腺创伤中的应用%Damage control surgery for pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma

    赵振国; 李幼生; 王剑; 李刚; 王凯; 胥子玮; 郑磊; 李宁; 黎介寿

    2012-01-01

    Objective To summarize the management of pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma.Methods The clinical data of 42 patients with blunt pancreatic injury admitted from January 2001to December 2010 was analyzed retrospectively.There were 38 male and 4 female patients,aging from 13 to 65 ycars with a mean of 31 years.The organ injury scaling of Committee of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST grade):grade Ⅰ in 3 patients,grade Ⅱ in 12 patients,grade Ⅲ in 9 patients,grade Ⅳ in 13 patients and grade Ⅴ in 5 patients.The mean injury severity score was 27 ± 21.Patients above AAST grade Ⅱ underwent peritoneal drainage and "three neostomy" (gastrostomy,jejunostomy and gallbladder) according to damage control theory.Results Thirty-eight patients got abdominal CT scanning with a positive rate of 79.9% (30/38).Forty patients underwent surgical procedures,and 2 patients with non-operative management.The surgical procedures include peritoneal drainage and "three neostomy" in 32patients,pancreas suture or pancreatic tail resection in 6 patients,pancreatoduodenectomy or caudal pancreaticojejunostomy in 2 patients.Forty patients (95.2%) survived,2 patients (4.8% ) died and 16patients (38.1% ) had complications such as pancreatic fistula,pulmonary infection.Conclusions Abdominal CT scanning will benefit the preoperative diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma. Although the survival rate of patients with blunt pancreatic trauma might be improved by using the damage control surgery,the management of damage control surgery also needs to be modified because of the high rate of complications.%目的 总结闭合性胰腺创伤的外科治疗经验.方法 回顾性分析2001年1月至2010年12月收治的42例闭合性胰腺创伤患者的临床资料.其中男性38例,女性4例;年龄13~65岁,平均年龄31岁.根据美国创伤外科协会脏器损伤委员会(AAST)的器官损伤分级:Ⅰ级3例,Ⅱ级12例,Ⅲ级9例,Ⅳ级13

  20. Upper abdominal trauma in children: imaging evaluation

    One hundred consecutive children with serious blunt upper-abdominal injury were evaluated prospectively to assess the accuracy and usefulness of emergency computed tomography (CT) compared with liver-spleen scintigraphy and sonography. Ninety-five hemodynamically stable patients were imaged. The results of this 20-month study indicated that CT has fewer false negatives and false positives than scintigraphy or sonography, that CT is useful in abdominal trauma, and that CT provides the most information of any single diagnostic imaging test commonly available

  1. CT of hemodynamically unstable abdominal trauma

    This article is an appraisal of the use of CT in the management of patients with unstable abdominal trauma. We examined 41 patients with abdominal trauma using noncontrast dynamic CT. In 17 patients a postcontrast dynamic CT was also carried out. On CT, 25 patients had hemoperitoneum. Thirteen patients had splenic, 12 hepatic, 6 pancreatic, 8 bowel and mesenteric, 12 renal and 2 vascular injuries. Seven patients had retroperitoneal and 2 patients adrenal hematomas. All but five lesions (three renal, one pancreatic, and one splenic) were hypodense when CT was performed earlier than 8 h following the injury. Postcontrast studies (n = 17), revealed 4 splenic, 3 hepatic, 1 pancreatic, 3 renal, and 2 bowel and mesenteric injuries beyond what was found on noncontrast CT. Surgical confirmation (n = 21) was obtained in 81.81 % of splenic, 66.66 % of hepatic, 83.33 % of pancreatic, 100 % of renal, 100 % of retroperitoneal, and 85.71 % of bowel and mesenteric injuries. The majority of false diagnoses was obtained with noncontrast studies. Computed tomography is a remarkable method for evaluation and management of patients with hemodynamically unstable abdominal trauma, but only if it is revealed in the emergency room. Contrast injection, when it could be done, revealed lesions that were not suspected on initial plain scans. (orig.)

  2. Abdominal MRI in childhood

    MRI provides diagnostic information in multiple abdominal diseases in childhood. Additional information to sonographic findings can be achieved in the diagnosis of abdominal malformation as well as in several inflammatory processes. In childhood cancer imaging MRI is essential at the beginning as well as during therapy to assess response to therapy. Because of radiation protection MRI has to replace CT in abdominal imaging in children. Some technical details have to be considered when children are examined. (orig.)

  3. Repair of multiple finger degloving injuries using lower abdominal three-leaf flap based on a single pedicle%下腹部单蒂三叶薄皮瓣修复多指套脱伤

    宿晓雷; 杜志国; 丁明斌; 赵建勇; 张远林; 王鸿飞

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report the surgical technique and treatment outcomes of lower abdominal three-leaf flap based on a single pedicle in treating degloving injuries of three fingers. Methods Eleven cases of degloving injury of the index,middle and ring fingers were treated between March 2007 and April 2009.Double flaps with superficial iliac circumferential artery as the axial artery and a single flap with superficial external genicular artery as the axial artery were combined to form a three-leaf flp based on the femoral artery.The flaps were transferred to cover the skin defects of the fingers.The pedicle was divided 4 weeks later.Results All the flaps survived after dividing the pedicle 4 weeks later.Postoperative follow-up ranged from 6 to 12 months,with an average of 8.7 months.The flaps had acceptable appearances,soft texture and no scar contractures.Movement of the affected fingers was normal.The flaps gained partial sensation.The patients were satisfied with the flap appearances. Conclusion Three-leaf flap based on a single pedicle is an ideal option for treating multiple finger degloving injury.There is no need for second stage finger separation and skin graft.This largely reduces patient suffering and financial burden.%目的 报告应用下腹部单蒂三叶薄皮瓣修复三指套脱伤的手术方法及临床疗效.方法 2007年3月至2009年4月,对11例示、中、环指套脱伤患者,应用下腹部旋髂浅动脉为轴心血管的双叶薄皮瓣及阴部外浅动脉为轴心血管的单叶薄皮瓣,使其形成以股动脉主干为蒂的三叶薄皮瓣,修复手指皮肤缺损,4周后行皮瓣断蒂术.结果 术后4周断蒂,皮瓣全部存活.术后随访6~ 12个月,平均8.7个月.皮瓣外形好,质地柔软,无瘢痕挛缩,患指活动正常,皮瓣恢复部分感觉功能;患者对皮瓣外形较满意.结论 单蒂三叶薄皮瓣修复手指皮肤套脱伤,不需二期分指植皮,减轻了患者的痛苦及经济负担.

  4. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:9737070

  5. Imaging in abdominal trauma

    Imaging in abdominal trauma with special regard to the value of abdominal X-ray, ultrasound and computed tomography is described. The introduction to each organ focusses on the clinical situation, special mechanism of trauma, symptoms and the pathological staging of trauma. (orig.)

  6. Traumatic abdominal wall hernia in two adults: a case series

    Agarwal Nitin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Traumatic hernia of the abdominal wall is a rare entity. A large proportion of reported cases are in children with a particular type of injury, i.e. from a handlebar injury. In adults, the presentation can vary substantially and the diagnosis is difficult. We present two cases in adults, with widely varying presentations and management. Case presentations A 40-year-old woman from rural north India presented with a low-velocity blunt injury to the lower abdomen. She was attacked by a bull. She had a clinically evident abdominal fascial disruption with intact skin, and was hemodynamically stable. An emergency mesh repair of the defect was performed, and she recovered well. A 38-year-old man from rural north India presented with blunt trauma to the abdomen following a motor vehicle accident. He was stable, with a central abdominal parietal wall swelling and bruising. A computed tomography scan revealed herniation of bowel loops in the area with minor intra-abdominal injuries. A laparotomy, resection-anastomosis of the ischemic bowel, and primary repair of the defect was performed and he recovered well. Conclusion Following blunt abdominal trauma, particularly high-velocity injuries, a high index of suspicion must be reserved for parietal wall swellings, as missed hernias in this setting have a high risk of strangulation. Computed tomography is the best aid to diagnosis. Management of each case needs to be individualized.

  7. Experimental study of acute spinal cord injury in rats with lipopolysaccharide infection after abdominal aorta clamping%腹主动脉阻断合并脓毒症大鼠脊髓损伤的实验研究

    尹述洲; 吴安石

    2011-01-01

    great quantity of dynamoneure necrosis. The expressional amount of TNF-α in spinal cord showed significant difference between A,C groups and B,D groups(P<0. 05 or P<0. 01). Conclusion TNF-α may play an important role in rat acute spinal cord injury after abdominal aorta clamping with LPS infection. The organism might suffer an immunologic paralysis,if developed a sepsis at this time, TNF-α might not elevate significantly as those simple sepsis.

  8. The intestinal tract as the major source of interleukin 6 production during abdominal aortic clamping and hind limb ischaemia-reperfusion injury O trato intestinal como a principal fonte na producao de interleucina 6 durante clampeamento da aorta abdominal e lesão de isquemia/rererfusão de membros inferiores

    Márcio Benedito Palma Pimenta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the hind limbs or intestinal tract is the most important initiator of the inflammatory response secondary aortic clamping and hind limb ischemia/reperfusion injury. METHODS: Blood samples of Wistar rats obtained from posterior cava vein, portal vein, and heart cavity during either laparotomy (control group, n=8 or laparotomy + 2 h of aortic clamping and bilateral hind limb ischemia (ischemia group, n=8, or 2 h after ischemia and 2 h of reperfusion (ischemia-reperfusion group, n=8 were assayed for interleukin 6 (IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP. RESULTS: Serum IL-6 at the heart (223.6±197.9 [10-832] pg/mL was higher (pOBJETIVO: Investigar qual o principal mediador da resposta inflamatória na lesao de isquemia/reperfusão após clampeamento da aorta abdominal e isquemia dos membros inferiores: o intestine ou as extremidades inferiores. MÉTODOS: amostra de sangue de ratos Wistar coletados da cava posterior, porta e cavidade cardíaca during tanto laparotomia (grupo controle n=8 ou laparotomia + 2 horas de clampeamento aórtico e isquemia bilateral de membros posteriores (grupo isquemia n=8, ou 2 h de isquemia seguido por 2 horas de reperfusão (grupo isquemia/reperfusão n=8, onde foram dosados interleucina 6 e proteína C-reativa. RESULTADOS: Il-6 no coração (223.6±197.9 [10-832] pg/mL foi maior (p<0.001 tanto na veia porta (133.08±108.52 [4-372] pg/mL quanto na veia cava posterior (127.58±109.15 [8-388] pg/mL. PCR não foi significativamente diferente entre os grupos. CONCLUSÃO: o trato intestinal foi responsável pela resposta inflamatória secundária a lesão de isquemia/reperfusão.

  9. Pediatric abdominal injury : initial treatment and diagnostics

    Nellensteijn, David

    2015-01-01

    We hebben aangetoond dat de inter- en intraobserver variatie voor het graderen van leverletsel met behulp van CT scan significant is. Dit impliceert dat CT scan niet geschikt is om behandelingsrichtlijnen op te baseren. Daarnaast is de diagnostische opbrengst van CT scan gering maar het stralingsris

  10. Abdominal computed tomography scan as a screening tool in blunt trauma

    Background. One of the most difficult problems in blunt trauma is evaluation for potential intraabdominal injury. Admission for serial abdominal exams remains the standard of care after intraabdominal injury has been initially excluded. We hypothesized a normal abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan in a subgroup of minimally injured patients would obviate admission for serial abdominal examinations, allowing safe discharge from the emergency department (ED). Methods. We reviewed our blunt trauma experience with patients admitted solely for serial abdominal examinations after a normal CT. Patients were identified from the trauma registry at a Level 1 trauma center from July 1991 through June 1995. Patients with abnormal CTs, extra-abdominal injuries necessitating admission, hemodynamic abnormalities, a Glasgow Coma Scale less than 13, or injury severity scores (ISSs) greater than 15 were excluded. Records of 238 patients remained; we reviewed them to determine the presence of missed abdominal injury. Results. None of the 238 patients had a missed abdominal injury. Average ISS of these patients was 3.2 (range, 0 to 10). Discharging these patients from the ED would result in a yearly cost savings of $32,874 to our medical system. Conclusions. Abdominal CT scan is a safe and cost-effective screening tool in patients with blunt trauma. A normal CT scan in minimally injured patients allows safe discharge from the ED. (authors)

  11. [Blunt abdominal trauma.--analysis of 201 cases (author's transl)].

    Pannenborg, G; Wolf, O; Voigtsberger, P

    1978-01-01

    201 blunt abdominal traumata treated clinically at the surgical department of the Medical Academy in Erfurt from 1967 to 1976 are reported: No increase of blunt abdominal traumata within the period of the report in spite of considerable growth of trafficdensity and industrialization could be observed.--The percentage of severe secundary injuries remained approximately constant, too.--Intestinal lesions, combined hepatolienal ruptures caused the highest mortality especially in combination with severe craniocerebral lesions. PMID:685552

  12. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  13. Abdominal CT scan

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CAT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... An abdominal CT scan makes detailed pictures of the structures inside your belly (abdomen) very quickly. This test may be used to ...

  14. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    ... inspection of a drop of urine), and urine culture for bacterial infection. Stools can be analyzed for ... Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity Digestive Health Topics Abdominal Pain Syndrome Belching, Bloating, ...

  15. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  16. Imaging in Tuberculosis abdominal

    In this article we illustrate and discuss imaging features resulting from Tuberculosis abdominal affectation. We present patients evaluated with several imaging modalities who had abdominal symptoms and findings suggestive of granulomatous disease. Diagnosis was confirm including hystopatology and clinical outgoing. Cases involved presented many affected organs such as lymphatic system, peritoneum, liver, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, ureters, adrenal glands and pelvic organs Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis renal, Tuberculosis hepatic, Tuberculosis splenic Tomography, x-ray, computed

  17. Accuracy of CT in the detection of abdominal trauma

    This paper determines the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of CT for detection of various abdominal injuries. WE examined 551 patients with CT (intravenous contrast material; oral contrast agent not routinely used) for suspected abdominal trauma. The CT scans were reviewed, and interpretations were compared with the findings at surgery, autopsy, and clinical follow-up (535 patients). Of these 535, 508 suffered blunt trauma and 27 had penetrating injuries. Thirty-five underwent laparotomy, four died and were autopsied, and 496 were managed nonoperatively (in none of the 496 was delayed laparotomy required)

  18. Multidetector CT of blunt abdominal trauma.

    Soto, Jorge A; Anderson, Stephan W

    2012-12-01

    The morbidity, mortality, and economic costs resulting from trauma in general, and blunt abdominal trauma in particular, are substantial. The "panscan" (computed tomographic [CT] examination of the head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis) has become an essential element in the early evaluation and decision-making algorithm for hemodynamically stable patients who sustained abdominal trauma. CT has virtually replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage for the detection of important injuries. Over the past decade, substantial hardware and software developments in CT technology, especially the introduction and refinement of multidetector scanners, have expanded the versatility of CT for examination of the polytrauma patient in multiple facets: higher spatial resolution, faster image acquisition and reconstruction, and improved patient safety (optimization of radiation delivery methods). In this article, the authors review the elements of multidetector CT technique that are currently relevant for evaluating blunt abdominal trauma and describe the most important CT signs of trauma in the various organs. Because conservative nonsurgical therapy is preferred for all but the most severe injuries affecting the solid viscera, the authors emphasize the CT findings that are indications for direct therapeutic intervention. PMID:23175542

  19. Mechanical ventilation and intra-abdominal hypertension: 'Beyond Good and Evil'

    Pelosi, Paolo; Vargas, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension is frequent in surgical and medical critically ill patients. Intra-abdominal hypertension has a serious impact on the function of respiratory as well as peripheral organs. In the presence of alveolar capillary damage, which occurs in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), intra-abdominal hypertension promotes lung injury as well as edema, impedes the pulmonary lymphatic drainage, and increases intra-thoracic pressures, leading to atelectasis, airway closure, ...

  20. Urinary tract injuries in children

    As shown by literature data, abdominal trauma in children is responsible for 14% of deaths, whereas in adults for 10%. Although abdominal traumas in children can be severe and lead to massive blood loss, most children die because of accompanying traumas of the thorax and head. It validates the surgical rule concerning abdominal traumas 'investigate aggressively, manage conservatively'. Posttraumatic injury of the urinary system is not frequent in children and its specificity (compared with adults), depends on greater susceptibility to external aggressive factors. Blunt trauma is the cause of renal parenchyma injury and acceleration/deceleration injury affects the excretory system and vessels. Extension mechanism is the cause of ureter avulsion and/or thrombus formation in stretched renal vessels- it is characteristic in children with non-accidental traumas. Bladder and urethra injuries are rare in children. During car accidents, a rupture of full bladder (seat belt injury) or bladder perforation by fractured bones of the pelvis is possible. We analyzed all hospitalizations of abdominal trauma in our surgical ward in the year 2004 (70 cases). Renal injuries were found in 6 children (8.6%). Thanks to five-year clinical experience of our hospital, on the average only 1-2 cases per annum needed operation. The management of renal injuries involves first of all conservative treatment. This publication has educational character and may serve as a valuable reminder of the useful knowledge in daily cooperation between the emergency room, radiology department and surgical ward. Based on available literature from recent few years, we quote suggested renal injuries classifications and procedures.This publication contains only images from our department of radiology archives. Clinical symptoms are often not appropriate for blunt abdominal traumas diagnosis. Owing to clinical status, which is difficult to interpret, fast and complete radiological diagnosis is necessary for

  1. Comparison between plain abdominal radiographs and CT in patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    Plain abdominal radiographs (PAR) and CT in 186 cases of blunt abdominal trauma were reviewed. In the group of normal PAR, CT was normal in 56 cases (30%) and CT was abnormal in 9 (5%). They were all treated conservatively and had on uneventful course. It can be said that possibility of missing significant injury in cases of normal PAR is minimal. Both PAR and CT were abnormal in 88 cases (47%). All patients treated surgically were included in this group. CT is indicated in this group. False negative CT results were seen in 13 cases (7%). It consisted of minor fractures and had no clinical significance. False positive PAR findings were seen in 32 cases (18%). PAR is suitable as the first modality of choice. Among various findings on PAR, obliteration of organs and intraperitoneal fluid collection suggested abdominal injury most frequently. Thorough work-up is necessary when such findings were recognized on PAR. There was no relationship between abnormal injury and specific fractures as has been described in previous reports. (author)

  2. Abdominal Dual Energy Imaging

    Sommer, F. Graham; Brody, William R.; Cassel, Douglas M.; Macovski, Albert

    1981-11-01

    Dual energy scanned projection radiography of the abdomen has been performed using an experimental line-scanned radiographic system. Digital images simultaneously obtained at 85 and 135 kVp are combined, using photoelectric/Compton decomposition algorithms to create images from which selected materials are cancelled. Soft tissue cancellation images have proved most useful in various abdominal imaging applications, largely due to the elimination of obscuring high-contrast bowel gas shadows. These techniques have been successfully applied to intravenous pyelography, oral cholecystography, intravenous abdominal arteriog-raphy and the imaging of renal calculi.

  3. Childhood abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    Konen, Osnat; Rathaus, Valeria; Shapiro, Myra [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Meir General Hospital, Sapir Medical Centre, Kfar Saba (Israel); Dlugy, Elena [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Schneider Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Freud, Enrique [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sapir Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Kessler, Ada [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sourasky Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Horev, Gadi [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Schneider Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2002-02-01

    Background: Abdominal lymphangioma is a rare benign congenital malformation of the mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal lymphatics. Clinical presentation is variable and may be misleading; therefore, complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. US and CT have a major role in the correct preoperative diagnosis and provide important information regarding location, size, adjacent organ involvement, and expected complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging findings of seven children with proven abdominal cystic lymphangioma. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging files of seven children with pathologically proven abdominal lymphangioma, from three university hospitals, were retrospectively evaluated. Patient's ages ranged from 1 day to 6 years (mean, 2.2 years). Symptoms and signs included evidence of inflammation, abnormal prenatal US findings, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage following trauma, clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, and abdominal distension with lower extremities lymphoedema. Plain films of five patients, US of six patients and CT of five patients were reviewed. Sequential imaging examinations were available in two cases. Results: Abdominal plain films showed displacement of bowel loops by a soft tissue mass in five of six patients, two of them with dilatation of small bowel loops. US revealed an abdominal multiloculated septated cystic mass in five of six cases and a single pelvic cyst in one which changed in appearance over 2 months. Ascites was present in three cases. CT demonstrated a septated cystic mass of variable sizes in all available five cases. Sequential US and CT examinations in two patients showed progressive enlargement of the masses, increase of fluid echogenicity, and thickening of walls or septa in both cases, with multiplication of septa in one case. At surgery, mesenteric lymphangioma was found in five patients and retroperitoneal lymphangioma in the other two

  4. Childhood abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    Background: Abdominal lymphangioma is a rare benign congenital malformation of the mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal lymphatics. Clinical presentation is variable and may be misleading; therefore, complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. US and CT have a major role in the correct preoperative diagnosis and provide important information regarding location, size, adjacent organ involvement, and expected complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging findings of seven children with proven abdominal cystic lymphangioma. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging files of seven children with pathologically proven abdominal lymphangioma, from three university hospitals, were retrospectively evaluated. Patient's ages ranged from 1 day to 6 years (mean, 2.2 years). Symptoms and signs included evidence of inflammation, abnormal prenatal US findings, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage following trauma, clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, and abdominal distension with lower extremities lymphoedema. Plain films of five patients, US of six patients and CT of five patients were reviewed. Sequential imaging examinations were available in two cases. Results: Abdominal plain films showed displacement of bowel loops by a soft tissue mass in five of six patients, two of them with dilatation of small bowel loops. US revealed an abdominal multiloculated septated cystic mass in five of six cases and a single pelvic cyst in one which changed in appearance over 2 months. Ascites was present in three cases. CT demonstrated a septated cystic mass of variable sizes in all available five cases. Sequential US and CT examinations in two patients showed progressive enlargement of the masses, increase of fluid echogenicity, and thickening of walls or septa in both cases, with multiplication of septa in one case. At surgery, mesenteric lymphangioma was found in five patients and retroperitoneal lymphangioma in the other two. Conclusions: US

  5. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  6. Glass Microparticulate Ingestion: An Unusual and Difficult-to-Diagnose Cause of Chronic Abdominal Pain

    Vance, R. Brooks; Mühlbauer, Marcus; Dreesen, Elizabeth B.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Dent, Georgette A.; Herfarth, Hans; Jobin, Christian; Dellon, Evan S.

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of overt structural abnormalities, the diagnostic approach to chronic abdominal pain can be challenging. Occupational particulate inhalation causing injury to an organ other than the lung is rare. We report a case of inadvertent glass microparticulate ingestion causing chronic abdominal pain with altered local and systemic inflammatory responses.

  7. Evidence-based diagnosis of abdominal trauma

    Abdominal trauma is a common cause of death particularly in patients up to 40 years of age. In order to reduce mortality a rapid radiologic diagnosis is essential. At present, sonography plays a role only in the evaluation of minor trauma and as a ''focused assessment with sonography for trauma'' (FAST) to clarify free intraperitoneal fluid immediately on admittance in severely injured patients. However, computed tomography has proven to be a potent tool for the triage of patients with abdominal trauma, because, based on the results of the CT scan, patients can be referred for laparotomy or safely classified for ''wait and see'' treatment. Therapeutic decisions are largely based on injury severity scores and the radiologist must be familiar with them as well as with the associated therapeutic consequences. (orig.)

  8. Focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma

    Objective: To evaluate the role of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma patients, and to see if the role of computed tomography scan could be limited to only those cases in which sonography was positive. Methods: The retrospective study covered 10 years, from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009, and was conducted at the Department of Radiology and Department of Emergency Medicine, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised cases of 174 children from birth to 14 years who had presented with blunt abdominal trauma and had focussed abdominal sonography for trauma done at the hospital. The findings were correlated with computed tomography scan of the abdomen and clinical follow-up. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma were calculated for blunt abdominal trauma. SPSS 17 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total 174 cases, 31 (17.81%) were later confirmed by abdominal scan. Of these 31 children, sonography had been positive in 29 (93.54%) children. In 21 (67.74%) of the 31 children, sonography had been true positive; 8 (25%) (8/31) were false positive; and 2 (6%) (2/31) were false negative. There were 6 (19.3%) children in which sonography was positive and converted to laparotomy. There was no significant difference on account of gender (p>0.356). Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in the study had sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value of 73%, and negative predictive value of 73% with accuracy of 94%. All patients who had negative sonography were discharged later, and had no complication on clinical follow-up. Conclusions: Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma is a fairly reliable mode to assess blunt abdominal trauma in children. It is a useful tool to pick high-grade solid and hollow viscous injury. The results suggest that the role of computed tomography scan can be

  9. Peritoneal lavage and other diagnostic procedures in blunt abdominal trauma

    Diagnostic procedures such as peritoneal lavage, computed tomography, emergency angiography, nuclear scintigraphy, and contrast studies of the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts can assist in the identification, quantification, and localization of injury after blunt abdominal trauma. Use of these procedures should be determined by careful clinically assessment as part of an aggressive approach to the diagnosis of the injured patient. 22 references

  10. Lap belt injuries in children.

    McGrath, N

    2010-07-01

    The use of adult seat belts without booster seats in young children may lead to severe abdominal, lumbar or cervical spine and head and neck injuries. We describe four characteristic cases of lap belt injuries presenting to a tertiary children\\'s hospital over the past year in addition to a review of the current literature. These four cases of spinal cord injury, resulting in significant long-term morbidity in the two survivors and death in one child, arose as a result of lap belt injury. These complex injuries are caused by rapid deceleration characteristic of high impact crashes, resulting in sudden flexion of the upper body around the fixed lap belt, and consequent compression of the abdominal viscera between the lap belt and spine. This report highlights the dangers of using lap belts only without shoulder straps. Age-appropriate child restraint in cars will prevent these injuries.

  11. CT diagnosis of concealed rupture of intestine following abdominal trauma

    Objective: To investigate CT findings of concealed rupture of intestine following abdominal trauma. Methods: CT findings of 11 cases with concealed rupture of intestine following abdominal trauma proved by surgery were identified retrospectively. Results: The main special signs included: (1) Free air in 4 cases, mainly around injured small bowel or under the diaphragm, or in the retroperitoneal space or and in the lump. (2) High density hematoma between the intestines or in the bowel wall (4 cases). (3) Bowel wall injury sign, demonstrated as low density of the injured intestinal wall, attenuated locally but relatively enhanced in neighbor wall on enhanced CT. (4) Lump around the injured bowel wall with obvious ring-shaped enhancement (4 cases). Other signs included: (1) Free fluid in the abdominal cavity or between the intestines with blurred borders. (2) Bowel obstruction. Conclusion: CT is valuable in diagnosing concealed rupture of intestine following abdominal trauma. (authors)

  12. Endometriosis Abdominal wall

    Endometriosis of abdominal wall is a rare entity wi ch frequently appears after gynecological surgery. Case history includes three cases of parietal endometriosis wi ch were treated in Maciel Hospital of Montevideo. The report refers to etiological diagnostic aspects and highlights the importance of total resection in order to achieve definitive healing

  13. Adult abdominal hernias.

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-06-01

    Educational Objectives and Key Points. 1. Given that abdominal hernias are a frequent imaging finding, radiologists not only are required to interpret the appearances of abdominal hernias but also should be comfortable with identifying associated complications and postrepair findings. 2. CT is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of a known adult abdominal hernia in both elective and acute circumstances because of rapid acquisition, capability of multiplanar reconstruction, good spatial resolution, and anatomic depiction with excellent sensitivity for most complications. 3. Ultrasound is useful for adult groin assessment and is the imaging modality of choice for pediatric abdominal wall hernia assessment, whereas MRI is beneficial when there is reasonable concern that a patient\\'s symptoms could be attributable to a hernia or a musculoskeletal source. 4. Fluoroscopic herniography is a sensitive radiologic investigation for patients with groin pain in whom a hernia is suspected but in whom a hernia cannot be identified at physical examination. 5. The diagnosis of an internal hernia not only is a challenging clinical diagnosis but also can be difficult to diagnose with imaging: Closed-loop small-bowel obstruction and abnormally located bowel loops relative to normally located small bowel or colon should prompt assessment for an internal hernia.

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the abdomen ... limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? What is Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ...

  15. MULTI - DETECTOR COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND INTRA - OPERATIVE CORRELATION IN BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA

    Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : With the change in the pace of life fast , faster , fastest being the motto of the present day , the incidence of trauma and the associated mortality and morbidities is on a continuous rise.Imaging plays a very important role in the management of these injuries in deciding which injuries , in trauma the final verdict of organ injury in abdomen is intra - ope rative findings. AIMS : In view of the above said we considered to study to determine diagnostic accuracy of MDCT (Multi - Detector Computed Tomography in detection of intra - abdominal solid organ injury in blunt abdominal trauma and to highlight the importance of MDCT in evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma. METHODS AND MATERIALS : This was a prospective study done between over a period of 2 years from between January 2011 to February 2013 on patients who presented with blun t abdominal trauma after excluding patients who were managed conservatively and normal on imaging , the data we compared had 32 patients and the analysis was as follows. RESULTS : Blunt abdominal trauma was common in males , the male to female ratio was 9:1 , road traffic accident is the most common mode of injury in blunt abdominal trauma with 60% of the patients in this mode of injury , single organ injury is 22 patients (76% spleen is the most commonly injured organ 15(47% patients having splenic injury , wi th grade 3 being the commonest splenic injury 8 out of the 15 patients had splenic injury bowel injury was the second common organ injured in blunt trauma abdomen. In this study computed tomography grading correlated well with intra - operative grading with a PPV of= 95.45 % (95% ci: 84.50 % to 99.31 % Asensitivityof 76.36 % (95% ci: 62.98 % to 86.76 % . CONCLUSION : Computed tomography is an important imaging technique for diagnosis of organ injuries in patients with abdominal trauma. It helps in grading of the type of injury and accordingly deciding the management of patient. It is a highly

  16. Component separation in abdominal trauma.

    Rawstorne, Edward; Smart, Christopher J; Fallis, Simon A; Suggett, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Component separation is established for complex hernia repairs. This case presents early component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath to facilitate closure of the abdominal wall following emergency laparotomy, reinforcing the repair with a biological mesh. On Day 11 following an emergency laparotomy for penetrating trauma, this patient underwent component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath. An intra-abdominal biological mesh was secured, and the fascia and skin closed successfully. Primary abdominal closure can be achieved in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma with the use of component separation and insertion of intra-abdominal biological mesh, where standard closure is not possible. PMID:24876334

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B; Olsen, P S; Perko, M J; Agerskov, Kim; Røder, O; Lorentzen, Jørgen Ewald

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 55......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems.......The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553...

  18. Acute and overuse injuries of the abdomen and groin in athletes.

    Atkins, Justin M; Taylor, Jonathan C; Kane, Shawn F

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal and groin injuries are common problems encountered by athletes across a wide variety of sports. They range from benign but annoying, such as exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP), to the activity-limiting and possibly career-ending condition of athletic hernia. This article covers ETAP, rectus abdominus injuries, osteitis pubis, athletic hernia, and abdominal/groin hernias to provide an update on the current pathophysiology and treatment of common abdominal and pelvic conditions in the athlete. PMID:20220355

  19. The abdominal circulatory pump.

    Andrea Aliverti

    Full Text Available Blood in the splanchnic vasculature can be transferred to the extremities. We quantified such blood shifts in normal subjects by measuring trunk volume by optoelectronic plethysmography, simultaneously with changes in body volume by whole body plethysmography during contractions of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. Trunk volume changes with blood shifts, but body volume does not so that the blood volume shifted between trunk and extremities (Vbs is the difference between changes in trunk and body volume. This is so because both trunk and body volume change identically with breathing and gas expansion or compression. During tidal breathing Vbs was 50-75 ml with an ejection fraction of 4-6% and an output of 750-1500 ml/min. Step increases in abdominal pressure resulted in rapid emptying presumably from the liver with a time constant of 0.61+/-0.1SE sec. followed by slower flow from non-hepatic viscera. The filling time constant was 0.57+/-0.09SE sec. Splanchnic emptying shifted up to 650 ml blood. With emptying, the increased hepatic vein flow increases the blood pressure at its entry into the inferior vena cava (IVC and abolishes the pressure gradient producing flow between the femoral vein and the IVC inducing blood pooling in the legs. The findings are important for exercise because the larger the Vbs the greater the perfusion of locomotor muscles. During asystolic cardiac arrest we calculate that appropriate timing of abdominal compression could produce an output of 6 L/min. so that the abdominal circulatory pump might act as an auxiliary heart.

  20. The Abdominal Circulatory Pump

    Andrea Aliverti; Dario Bovio; Irene Fullin; Dellacà, Raffaele L.; Antonella Lo Mauro; Antonio Pedotti; Macklem, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Blood in the splanchnic vasculature can be transferred to the extremities. We quantified such blood shifts in normal subjects by measuring trunk volume by optoelectronic plethysmography, simultaneously with changes in body volume by whole body plethysmography during contractions of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. Trunk volume changes with blood shifts, but body volume does not so that the blood volume shifted between trunk and extremities (Vbs) is the difference between changes in trunk ...

  1. Obesity-Associated Abdominal Elephantiasis

    Ritesh Kohli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal elephantiasis is a rare entity. Abdominal elephantiasis is an uncommon, but deformative and progressive cutaneous disease caused by chronic lymphedema and recurrent streptococcal or Staphylococcus infections of the abdominal wall. We present 3 cases of patients with morbid obesity who presented to our hospital with abdominal wall swelling, thickening, erythema, and pain. The abdominal wall and legs were edematous, with cobblestone-like, thickened, hyperpigmented, and fissured plaques on the abdomen. Two patients had localised areas of skin erythema, tenderness, and increased warmth. There was purulent drainage from the abdominal wall in one patient. They were managed with antibiotics with some initial improvement. Meticulous skin care and local keratolytic treatment for the lesions were initiated with limited success due to their late presentation. All three patients refused surgical therapy. Conclusion. Early diagnosis is important for the treatment of abdominal elephantiasis and prevention of complications.

  2. Abdominal aspergillosis: CT findings

    Yeom, Suk Keu, E-mail: pagoda20@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jin, E-mail: kimhyejin@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Ho, E-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ah Young, E-mail: aykim@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Moon-Gyu, E-mail: mglee@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon, E-mail: hkha@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: In order to retrospectively evaluate the CT findings of abdominal aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: CT scans were reviewed with regard to the sites, number, morphologic appearance, attenuation, and the contrast enhancement patterns of the lesions in six patients (5 women, 1 man; mean age, 43.4 years; range, 23-59 years) with pathologically proved abdominal aspergillosis by two gastrointestinal radiologists in consensus. Medical records were also reviewed to determine each patient's clinical status and outcome. Results: All patients were immunocompromised state: 4 patients received immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation and 2 patients received chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Aspergillosis involved blood vessels (n = 3), liver (n = 2), spleen (n = 2), gastrointestinal tract (n = 2), native kidney (n = 1), transplanted kidney (n = 1), peritoneum (n = 1), and retroperitoneum (n = 1). CT demonstrated solid organ or bowel infarction or perforation secondary to vascular thrombosis or pseudoaneurysm, multiple low-attenuating lesions of solid organs presenting as abscesses, concentric bowel wall thickening mimicking typhlitis, or diffuse or nodular infiltration of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Conclusion: Familiarity with findings commonly presenting as angioinvasive features or abscesses on CT, may facilitate the diagnosis of rare and fatal abdominal aspergillosis.

  3. Abdominal aspergillosis: CT findings

    Objective: In order to retrospectively evaluate the CT findings of abdominal aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: CT scans were reviewed with regard to the sites, number, morphologic appearance, attenuation, and the contrast enhancement patterns of the lesions in six patients (5 women, 1 man; mean age, 43.4 years; range, 23-59 years) with pathologically proved abdominal aspergillosis by two gastrointestinal radiologists in consensus. Medical records were also reviewed to determine each patient's clinical status and outcome. Results: All patients were immunocompromised state: 4 patients received immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation and 2 patients received chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Aspergillosis involved blood vessels (n = 3), liver (n = 2), spleen (n = 2), gastrointestinal tract (n = 2), native kidney (n = 1), transplanted kidney (n = 1), peritoneum (n = 1), and retroperitoneum (n = 1). CT demonstrated solid organ or bowel infarction or perforation secondary to vascular thrombosis or pseudoaneurysm, multiple low-attenuating lesions of solid organs presenting as abscesses, concentric bowel wall thickening mimicking typhlitis, or diffuse or nodular infiltration of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Conclusion: Familiarity with findings commonly presenting as angioinvasive features or abscesses on CT, may facilitate the diagnosis of rare and fatal abdominal aspergillosis.

  4. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  5. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hong Il [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  6. Clinical and CT imaging features of abdominal fat necrosis

    Fat necrosis is a common pathological change at abdominal cross-sectional imaging, and it may cause abdominal pain, mimic pathological change of acute abdomen, or be asymptomatic and accompany other pathophysiologic processes. Fat necrosis is actually the result of steatosis by metabolism or mechanical injury. Common processes that are present in fat necrosis include epiploic appendagitis, infarction of the greater omentum, pancreatitis, and fat necrosis related to trauma or ischemia. As a common fat disease, fat necrosis should be known by clinicians and radiologists. Main content of this text is the clinical symptoms and CT findings of belly fat necrosis and related diseases. (authors)

  7. Traumatic Abdominal Wall Hernia After a Blunt Trauma: A Case Report

    Ersin Dumlu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic abdominal wall hernia is a rare result of blunt abdominal traumas in adults. Altough the detection of the injuries of the abdominal organs is the priority in blunt traumas, abdominal wall defect may also occur in these patients. These hernias can go undetected due to preservation of the skin overlying the hernia defect. Traumatic abdominal wall hernias can have high morbidity and mortality rates due to incarceration and perforation of tubular hollow organs, especially if there is any delay. The possibility of traumatic hernia should always be considered in cases with serious blunt trauma. Computed Tomography (CT scan examinations should be performed routinely due to their high diagnostic value if trumatic hernia is suspected. In this report, a traumatic abdominal wall hernia patient who was treated by surgery has been presented with the review of the current literature.

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasonography in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    A. Mohammadi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Patients in unstable clinical conditions with blunt abdominal trauma require rapid evaluation of the abdominal organ injury to assess the need for laparatomy. This prospective study was conducted to determine the use of emergency sonography for evaluating patients with blunt abdominal trauma and to compare the accuracy of sonography with the results of diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL, exploratory laparatomy and CT"nscan."nPatients and Methods: Emergency sonography was performed prior to any of the diagnostic methods, peritoneal lavage, exploratory laparatomy and CT, on 204 patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Sonography was performed with the "focused abdominal sonography for trauma" (FAST technique and six areas of the abdomen were examined to detect free peritoneal fluid."nResults: Sonography showed a sensitivity of 95.4%, specificity of 78.4% and an overall accuracy of 89% in the diagnosis of free peritoneal fluid. The positive and negative predictive values of sonography were 89.2% and 90.6%, respectively."nConclusion: Sonography is a reliable and accurate method for the emergency evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma.

  9. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain. PMID:26331201

  10. Dolor abdominal recurrente .

    Rodrigo De Vivero

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available El dolor abdominal recurrente (DAR es un problema frecuente en la consulta médica y en la subespecialidad médica y quirúrgica. El DAR es frecuentemente funcional, es decir, sin una causa orgánica aparente. El diagnóstico diferencial debe incluir pérdida de peso, sangrado gastrointestinal, fiebre persistente, diarrea crónica y vómito importante. En este artículo se revisa el diagnóstico y tratamiento, pruebas diagnósticas y manejo farmacológico y ambiental.

  11. Abdominopelvic vascular injuries.

    Sriussadaporn, S

    2000-01-01

    The clinical records of 25 patients with 32 abdominopelvic vascular injuries were reviewed. Sixty per cent of patients sustained blunt trauma and 40 per cent sustained penetrating trauma. Nineteen patients (76%) were in shock on arrival, 2 of them underwent ER thoracotomy when they first arrived in the emergency room. Nine patients (36%) had signs of lower extremity ischemia. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) ranged from 16-50, mean 29 +/- 10.0. Nineteen patients (76%) had 35 associated injuries. Of the 32 injured vessels; 8 were external iliac artery, 5 were renal vein, 4 were abdominal aorta, 3 were common iliac artery, common iliac vein, external iliac vein and inferior vena cava, and 1 was superior mesenteric artery, superior mesenteric vein and median sacral artery. Treatments included: 13 lateral repair, 4 prosthetic grafting, 4 nephrectomy, 3 ligation, 3 reversed saphenous vein grafting, 2 end to end anastomosis, 1 internal iliac artery grafting, 1 intravascular shunt and packing and 1 perihepatic packing. Nine patients (36%) died. High mortality was observed in injuries to the abdominal aorta (75%), inferior vena cava (66.7%), common iliac vein (66.7%) and associated major pelvic fractures (50%). Factors significantly associated with mortality were the presence of shock on arrival, associated injuries and high Injury Severity Score. The author concludes that short prehospital time, effective resuscitation and proper surgical decision making are important for survival in these critically injured patients. PMID:10710864

  12. Hypnosis for functional abdominal pain.

    Gottsegen, David

    2011-07-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common pediatric condition affecting 20% of the pediatric population worldwide. Most children with this disorder are found to have no specific organic etiology and are given the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain. Well-designed clinical trials have found hypnotherapy and guided imagery to be the most efficacious treatments for this condition. Hypnotic techniques used for other somatic symptoms are easily adaptable for use with functional abdominal pain. The author discusses 2 contrasting hypnotic approaches to functional abdominal pain and provides implications for further research. These approaches may provide new insights into this common and complex disorder. PMID:21922712

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  14. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    Marincek, B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  15. Bilateral ureteropelvic disruption following blunt abdominal trauma: Case report

    Kikuchi Hiroko

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ureteral injury occurs in less than 1% of blunt abdominal trauma cases, partly because the ureters are relatively well protected in the retroperitoneum. Bilateral ureteral injury is extremely rare, with only 10 previously reported cases. Diagnosis may be delayed if ureteric injury is not suspected, and delay of 36 hours or longer has been observed in more than 50% of patients with ureteric injury following abdominal trauma, leading to increased morbidity. Case presentation A 29-year-old man was involved in a highway motor vehicle collision and was ejected from the front passenger seat even though wearing a seatbelt. He was in a preshock state at the scene of the accident. An intravenous line and left thoracic drain were inserted, and he was transported to our hospital by helicopter. Whole-body, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT scan showed left diaphragmatic disruption, splenic injury, and a grade I injury to the left kidney with a retroperitoneal haematoma. He underwent emergency laparotomy. The left diaphragmatic and splenic injuries were repaired. Although a retroperitoneal haematoma was observed, his renal injury was treated conservatively because the haematoma was not expanding. In the intensive care unit, the patient's haemodynamic state was stable, but there was no urinary output for 9 hours after surgery. Anuresis prompted a review of the abdominal x-ray which had been performed after the contrast-enhanced CT. Leakage of contrast material from the ureteropelvic junctions was detected, and review of the repeat CT scan revealed contrast retention in the perirenal retroperitoneum bilaterally. He underwent cystoscopy and bilateral retrograde pyelography, which showed bilateral complete ureteral disruption, preventing placement of ureteral stents. Diagnostic laparotomy revealed complete disruption of the ureteropelvic junctions bilaterally. Double-J ureteral stents were placed bilaterally and ureteropelvic

  16. Traumatic abdominal aortic dissection in a 16-month-old child

    Heck, Josh M. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States); Bittles, Mark A. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Abdominal aortic injury after blunt trauma is rare in the pediatric population. There have been fewer than 20 reported cases in the literature since 1960, and most were the result of motor vehicle collisions. We report the case of a 16-month-old boy who is the youngest reported patient to sustain this type of injury. We discuss the radiologic findings in multiple imaging modalities, mechanisms, associated injuries and management options. (orig.)

  17. Traumatic abdominal aortic dissection in a 16-month-old child

    Abdominal aortic injury after blunt trauma is rare in the pediatric population. There have been fewer than 20 reported cases in the literature since 1960, and most were the result of motor vehicle collisions. We report the case of a 16-month-old boy who is the youngest reported patient to sustain this type of injury. We discuss the radiologic findings in multiple imaging modalities, mechanisms, associated injuries and management options. (orig.)

  18. Effect of oral contrast administration for abdominal computed tomography in the evaluation of acute blunt trauma

    The objective of this study was to determine how frequently oral contrast medium (OC) is essential for computed tomography (CT) diagnosis of blunt abdominal injury and to quantify delay associated with OC administration and the incidence of adverse effects. In conclusion, OC is rarely essential for CT diagnostic of intraabdominal injury. It may improve sensitivity for pancreatic injury, but it does not help identify injuries requiring surgical treatment. Even with OC, CT is insensitive for intestinal injury. Vomiting and aspiration are significant risks. Use of OC adds a significant amount of time to ED evaluation. Adverse effects of OC administration, in this setting, mays outweigh its benefits. (N.C.)

  19. Abdominal Burkitt lymphoma

    Purpose: As scarce information is available, in this research we have tried to describe the imaging findings of the Burkitt's lymphoma. Retrospective analysis of the clinical and imaging presentation of a 4 years old boy, is given. Biopsy confirmed the BL. Different imaging techniques were combined. The X-rays were negative. The US revealed a moderate hepatomegaly with multiple hypoechoic nodules and free fluid in the abdominal cavity. The CT showed the hepatomegaly as well as solid nodules in great number and different sizes(due to the densitometric behaviour and to post contrast enhancement), a scarce amount of ascites and a density increase of the mesentery fat. The MRI characterized and revealed in detail the US and the CT findings. The Burkitt's lymphoma is a rare entity; several methods are needed to approach the diagnosis. It represents a great clinical and imaging challenge. (author)

  20. Diaphragmatic rupture precipitated by intercostal chest tube drainage in a patient of blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma

    Mehrotra, Ashok Kumar; Feroz, Asif; Dawar, Sachet; Kumar, Prem; Singh, Anupam; Khublani, Trilok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma in collision injuries in road traffic accident (RTA) occasionally results in diaphragmatic injury and rupture besides other serious multisystem injuries. These diaphragmatic injuries (DI) frequently go undetected specially when occur on the right side. DI associated with hemothorax need insertion of intercostal tube drainage (ICTD). ICTD has never been reported to precipitate diaphragmatic rupture and hernia. We are reporting such a rare case for the first time in medical literature. PMID:26933316

  1. Splenic injury diagnosis & splenic salvage after trauma

    D.C. Olthof

    2014-01-01

    Non-operative management (NOM) has replaced surgery as the treatment of choice for hemodynamically stable patients with splenic injury after trauma. The growing use of NOM for blunt abdominal organ injury has been made possible by the progress in the quality and availability of the multidetector CT

  2. Diagnostic management of blunt abdominal trauma in children

    Children with abdominal injuries after blunt trauma can be managed non operatively in most cases. Rapid diagnosis is essential to select those patients who need immediate operation. Diagnostic methods of choice are ultrasonography, already performed in the emergency setting and contrast enhanced CT of the abdomen in hemodynamically stable patients. This work discusses the different diagnostic strategies and their use in the clinical practice. (orig.)

  3. Management of stab wounds to the anterior abdominal wall

    João Baptista Rezende-Neto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The meeting of the Publication "Evidence Based Telemedicine - Trauma and Emergency Surgery" (TBE-CiTE, through literature review, selected three recent articles on the treatment of victims stab wounds to the abdominal wall. The first study looked at the role of computed tomography (CT in the treatment of patients with stab wounds to the abdominal wall. The second examined the use of laparoscopy over serial physical examinations to evaluate patients in need of laparotomy. The third did a review of surgical exploration of the abdominal wound, use of diagnostic peritoneal lavage and CT for the early identification of significant lesions and the best time for intervention. There was consensus to laparotomy in the presence of hemodynamic instability or signs of peritonitis, or evisceration. The wound should be explored under local anesthesia and if there is no injury to the aponeurosis the patient can be discharged. In the presence of penetration into the abdominal cavity, serial abdominal examinations are safe without CT. Laparoscopy is well indicated when there is doubt about any intracavitary lesion, in centers experienced in this method.

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm demonstrated on renal scintigraphy.

    Phisitkul, Sorot; Brian, Susan; Rakvit, Ariwan; Jenkins, Leigh A; Bohannon, W Todd; Harris, Jennifer; Tsikouris, James; Silva, Michael B; Meyerrose, Gary E

    2003-08-01

    A 74-year-old hypertensive woman presented with abdominal discomfort and a pulsatile abdominal mass. Anterior abdominal angiography during cardiac blood pool, and renal scintigraphic imaging demonstrated a large abdominal aortic aneurysm. 1, 2 Before endovascular repair with an aortoiliac endograft, the abdominal aneurysm measured 7.5 x 7.0 cm on abdominal computed tomography. This study demonstrates that a suspected abdominal aortic aneurysm can be confirmed using the addition of anterior abdominal imaging with normal posterior imaging at the time of renal scintigraphy. PMID:12897671

  5. Emergency diagnostic laparoscopy in abdominal trauma: a study of 41 patients

    Marcos Félix Osorio Pagola

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: laparoscopy is a test used in the patients with abdominal trauma with suspicion of intra-abdominal organic damage and an imminent surgical behavior. Objectives: to expose the results of the urgency laparoscopic diagnosis in the traumatic acute abdomen. Methods: an descriptive and retrospective study in patient with diagnosis of abdominal trauma to which were carried out urgency laparoscopy at the Hospital Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima", from january 2001 to december 2008, when not being possible to define injury of intra-abdominal viscera performing other tests. Inclusion and exclusion criterion were applied. Results: we study 41 patients with average of 39, 2 ± 7, 7 years. Most of the studied patients were in the age range from 31 to 40 years with 21 patients (51, 2 % the open abdominal trauma with 26 patients prevailed (63, 4 %. The masculine sex prevailed with 38 patients (92,7 % and as much the open trauma as the closed one were more frequent in this sex with 25 patients (96,2 % and 13 patients (86,7 % respectively. They didn't show visceral damage during the laparoscopy 93, 3 % of the patients with closed abdominal trauma by what the surgical treatment was avoided, the same as in the patients with open abdominal trauma which had a non penetrating damage in abdominal cavity (80, 8 %. Conclusion: laparoscopic diagnosis is a useful test in patients with abdominal trauma and it avoids a considerable number of unnecessary conventional surgical treatment.

  6. Trauma abdominal em grávidas Abdominal trauma in pregnant women

    Gustavo Pereira Fraga

    2005-09-01

    abdominal trauma and surgical treatment, from 1990 to 2002. Thirteen pregnant women with abdominal injury were identified. All cases were registered in the Epi-Info 6.04 protocol and data were analyzed statistically by the Fisher exact test, with confidence interval of 95%. RESULTS: ages ranged from 13 to 34 years (mean of 22.5. Six women (46.2% were in the third trimester of pregnancy. Penetrating trauma accounted for 53.8% of injuries and in six of these patients the mechanism of trauma was gunshot wounds. Three patients had uterine injuries associated with fetal death. There were no maternal deaths and fetal mortality was 30.7%. The use of trauma scores was not associated with maternal and fetal mortality. Uterine injury was the only predictive risk factor for fetal loss (p=0.014. CONCLUSIONS: this is a retrospective study analyzing a small number of pregnant women victims of severe trauma. However, the results show that there are no predictive accuracy scores to evaluate maternal and fetal outcomes.

  7. A rare case of chronic traumatic diaphragmatic hernia requiring complex abdominal wall reconstruction

    Andrea Pakula; Amber Jones; Javed Syed; Ruby Skinner

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernia is a rare and often under recognized complication of penetrating and blunt trauma. These injuries are often missed or there is a delay in diagnosis which can lead to enlargement of the defect and the development of abdominal or respiratory symptoms. Presentation of case: We report a case of an otherwise healthy 37 year old male who was involved in a motor vehicle accident at age twelve. He presented 25 years later with vague lower abdominal symp...

  8. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24035086

  9. Nursing assistance during endovascular reconstruction using balloon occlusion of the abdominal aorta for patients with severe pelvic trauma and vascular injury%严重骨盆外伤合并血管损伤应用腹主动脉球囊阻断技术的护理配合

    钱维明; 杜丽丽; 项海燕

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the experience of nursing assistance during endovascular reconstruction using balloon occlusion of the abdominal aorta for patients with severe pelvic trauma and vascular injury in traffic accidents. Measures of nursing assistance included preoperative preparation,maintaining vascular access,monitoring urine volume,bilateral dorsalis pedis arterial pulses and the change of blood pressure during the operation. Postoperative nursing focused on effective compression on femoral artery after withdrawal of catheter,observation of urine volume,and local hematoma and skin temperature of lower extremities. The four patients got through the perioperative period safely and were discharged with recovery.%总结了4例因车祸致严重骨盆外伤合并血管损伤的急诊患者应用腹主动脉球囊阻断技术的护理配合经验.护理配合重点包括:完善术前准备,术中确保动静脉通路畅通,准确观察尿量,密切观察双侧足背动脉的搏动,监测血压的变化,穿刺侧肢体拔管后予有效压迫,观察尿量、局部血肿及肢体皮温.4例患者均安全度过围手术期,痊愈出院.

  10. Cough induced rib fracture, rupture of the diaphragm and abdominal herniation

    Wurl Peter

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cough can be associated with many complications. In this article, we present a 59 year old male patient with a very rare combination of a cough related stress fracture of the ninth rib, a traumatic rupture of the diaphragm, and an abdominal wall herniation. The hernia was repaired through surgical treatment without bowel resection, the diaphragm and the internal and oblique abdominal muscle were adapted, and the abdomen was reinforced with a prolene net. Although each individual injury is well documented in the literature, the combination of rib fracture, abdominal herniation and diaphragm rupture has not been reported.

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... located within a child's abdomen. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of a child's abdominal ultrasound ... pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, your child may actually hear pulse- ...

  12. JAMA Patient Page: Abdominal Hernia

    ... an operation. Umbilical hernia Abdominal wall Intestinal loop Peritoneum Skin Peritoneum Umbilical annulus SYMPTOMS The first symptom of a ... vomiting, or constipation. Inguinal hernia Indirect inguinal hernia Peritoneum Deep inguinal ring Inguinal canal Superficial inguinal ring ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the ... the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed to evaluate the: appendix stomach/ pylorus liver gallbladder spleen pancreas ...

  14. A case of abdominal trauma

    Stephens, Georgina C.; Claydon, Matthew H.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple injuries resulting from the use of nail guns have been described in the literature; however, to date there has been no report of a nail gun injury to the abdomen. We describe the case of a 30-year-old male tradesperson who suffered a penetrating nail gun injury to the epigastrium, resulting in multiple injuries to the bowel and an inferior vena caval injury with massive haemorrhage. This case demonstrates the wide range of injuries capable of being inflicted by a single penetrating i...

  15. Component separation in abdominal trauma

    Rawstorne, Edward; Smart, Christopher J.; Fallis, Simon A.; Suggett, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Component separation is established for complex hernia repairs. This case presents early component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath to facilitate closure of the abdominal wall following emergency laparotomy, reinforcing the repair with a biological mesh. On Day 11 following an emergency laparotomy for penetrating trauma, this patient underwent component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath. An intra-abdominal biological mesh was secured, and t...

  16. Updates on abdominal desmoid tumors

    2007-01-01

    Desmoid tumor is a monoclonal, fibroblastic proliferation arising in musculoaponeurotic structures. This connective tissue hyperplasia infiltrates locally, recurs frequentiy after resection but does not metastasize. Abdominal desmoid occurs sporadically, in association with some familial syndromes and often represents a clinical dilemma for surgeons. The enigmatic biology and anatomical location of abdominal desmoids make treatment recommendations difficult. This distinct pathological entity is reviewed with a specific focus on aetiology and management.

  17. Abdominal muscle training in sport.

    Norris, C M

    1993-01-01

    This paper evaluates several abdominal exercises, and highlights factors which are important for their safe prescription and effective use. The function of the abdominal muscles and hip flexors is considered, and the importance of the infra-umbilical portion of the rectus abdominis is emphasized. The effects of flexion on the lumbar spine are outlined. The trunk curl, sit-up, and straight leg raise are analysed, together with modifications of these exercises. The effect of foot fixation and h...

  18. Abdominal versus vaginal hysterectomy in non-descent cases

    Kavitha Gayak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hysterectomy is the most frequently performed elective major operation in gynaecology by vaginal and abdominal route. Gynaecologic surgeons worldwide said that two are not competitive procedures but each one has its own place in the operative armamentarium. Present study is done to comparative risks of complications in abdominal route versus vaginal route of hysterectomy in intra operative and post-operative periods. Methods: It's a retrospective study was done from Dec 2013 - Dec 2014 for a period of one year in 82 women who had undergone hysterectomy, divided as group A with abdominal hysterectomies (44 cases and group B with vaginal hysterectomies (38. Information on the indications, operative procedures, and complications were noted and analyzed. Results: Intra-operative blood loss, mean operating time was more in group A than in group B. The mean duration of surgery in group B was 76 +/- 12 min and that of group B was 101 +/- 14 min. The mean blood loss was also more in case of group A than that of group B (219 ml vs. 172 ml. Bladder injury occurred in 1 case in group B (3% and in 3 cases in group B (7%. Ureter injury occurred in 1 (2% case in group A. Postoperative fever (20% and 8%, UTI (13% and 11% and wound infection (10%, 0%. Only one patient underwent relaparotomy for internal bleeding via abdominal route was more common in group A as compared to group B. Only one patient underwent re-laparotomy for internal bleeding via abdominal route. Conclusions: Study results conclude that patients requiring hysterectomy for benign non prolapse cases be offered the option of vaginal route which is quicker recovery, early mobilization, shorter hospitalization, less operative and post-operative morbidity, more economical and effective. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 419-423

  19. Imaging of gastrointestinal and abdominal tuberculosis

    Vanhoenacker, FM; De Backer, AI; Op de Beeck, B; Maes, M; Van Altena, R; Van Beckevoort, D; Kersemans, P; De Schepper, AM

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the range of manifestations of tuberculosis (TB) of the abdomen, including involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneum, mesentery, omentum, abdominal lymph nodes, solid abdominal organs, the genital system and the abdominal aorta. Abdominal TB is a diagnostic cha

  20. Major abdominal vascular trauma--a unified approach.

    Kashuk, J L; Moore, E E; Millikan, J S; Moore, J B

    1982-08-01

    Advances in prehospital emergency care have increased the numbers of patients arriving at the hospital with immediate life-threatening trauma. This is a review of our recent 6-year experience with 161 major abdominal vascular injuries in 123 patients. The distribution by injury site and respective mortality were: 18, aortic (56%); 39, aortic branch (37%); 51, inferior vena cava (39%); 30, inferior vena cava branch (45%); and 23, portal venous system (39%). The overall death rate was 37%. Forty-six patients presented with unobtainable blood pressure and 19 (41%) survived. Left thoracotomy and temporary aortic occlusion were required in the resuscitation of 45 patients; when applied in the emergency department the salvage rate was 7%, and in the operating room, 35%. Forty-four patients had more than one major vascular injury and 17 (39% recovered, compared to a survival rate of 76% with single vascular trauma. Others have emphasized that most deaths from major abdominal vascular injury are a result of hemorrhage. In our study although 89% of mortality was due to bleeding, half occurred after control of the major bleeding sites. These findings suggest that coagulopathy, hypothermia, and acidosis are complicating factors which demand as much attention by the surgeon as the initial resuscitation and operative control classically emphasized. PMID:6980992

  1. Intraperitoneal wound in abdominal surgery

    Kahokehr, Arman Adam

    2013-01-01

    The intraperitoneal wound is often forgotten after transperitoneal surgery. This review is a on the peritoneum and the implications of peritoneal injury after surgery. This review will focus on the intraperitoneal wound response after surgical injury.

  2. Management of Anterior Abdominal Wall Defect Using a Pedicled Tensor Fascia Lata Flap: A Case Report

    K. D. Ojuka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Degloving injuries to anterior abdominal wall are rare due to the mechanism of injury. Pedicled tensor fascia lata is known to be a versatile flap with ability to reach the lower anterior abdomen. A 34-year-old man who was involved in a road traffic accident presented with degloving injury and defect at the left inguinal region, sigmoid colon injury, and scrotal bruises. At investigation, he was found to have pelvic fracture. The management consisted of colostomy and tensor fascia lata to cover the defect at reversal. Though he developed burst abdomen on fifth postoperative day, the flap healed with no complications.

  3. Management of Anterior Abdominal Wall Defect Using a Pedicled Tensor Fascia Lata Flap: A Case Report

    K. D. Ojuka; Nangole, F.; M. Ngugi

    2012-01-01

    Degloving injuries to anterior abdominal wall are rare due to the mechanism of injury. Pedicled tensor fascia lata is known to be a versatile flap with ability to reach the lower anterior abdomen. A 34-year-old man who was involved in a road traffic accident presented with degloving injury and defect at the left inguinal region, sigmoid colon injury, and scrotal bruises. At investigation, he was found to have pelvic fracture. The management consisted of colostomy and tensor fascia lata to cov...

  4. The usefulness of physical examination and laboratory data in pediatric patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    To evaluate the usefulness of clinical and laboratory data in pediatric patients with abdominal blunt trauma, the case records of 43 pediatric cases with blunt trauma who were admitted to our hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Among these patients, 23 were determined to have intraabdominal injury. Abdominal physical examination was not statistically identified to be a predictor of intraabdominal injury, however, the hematocrit and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) values were significantly aberrant in these cases. Furthermore, the mean AST and ALT values in the non-hepatic injury cases were also apt to be higher than those in the no-injury group. These findings suggested that the serum AST and ALT may be possible predictors of intraabdominal injury, not only that restricted to the liver. Additionally, in our cases, abdominal CT examination was more diagnostic than ultrasound examination. Accordingly, in cases of pediatric abdominal blunt trauma with aberrant serum values of the liver transaminases, CT san should be performed electively. (author)

  5. [Traumatic Injury of the Diaphragm].

    Kadokura, Mitsutaka

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic injury (TDI) is relatively rare condition, and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. TDI usually results from blunt trauma and penetrating trauma. The majority causes of blunt TDI are victims of motor vehicle accidents. The incidence rates of TDI is unknown because of it can be overlooked if it is unsuspected with non-specific radiological and clinical findings. The mortality rates associated with blunt and penetrating TDI are affected by the severity of concurrent organ injuries. The diagnoses of TDI are frequently missed in the post-traumatic assessment because of non-specific symptoms or physical findings. When the site of trauma is in the abdomen, there will be high rate of an intra-abdominal organ injury. Furthermore, when the site of trauma is in the chest, there will be the abdominal organ injury in 50%.Surgical operation should be performed as soon as possible for concomitant injuries. Diaphragmatic repair can be performed using laparotomy, thoracotomy, or both approaches. Primary suture of the diaphragm can be performed in the majority of TDI patients. The outcome of post TDI depends on concurrent organ injury. In case of emergency, it is important to take an appropriate diagnosis and treatment for any concomitant injuries. PMID:26197916

  6. Videolaparoscopia no trauma abdominal Videolaparoscopy in the abdominal trauma

    Átila Varela Velho

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available A videolaparoscopia (VL vem contribuindo de forma crescente, para diagnóstico e terapêutica de várias afecções cirúrgicas abdominais, introduzindo profundas mudanças na cirurgia contemporânea. Esse avanço incorporou-se também às urgências traumáticas, fazendo parte da avaliação diagnóstica e, às vezes, da terapêutica do trauma abdominal. Os autores apresentam uma revisão concisa da literatura sobre a VL no trauma, atualizando o tema e discutindo os aspectos mais relevantes das indicações, limitações e complicações do método.Videolaparoscopy has been contributing for the diagnostic and therapeutic approach in the abdominal surgical diseases in the last years. Representing real modification in the conventional elective and traumatic abdominal surgery. Its has been recognized as a safe procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of abdominal trauma. Diagnostic predictive values, sensibility and specificity are greater than when obtained by the other diagnostic methods such as peritoneal lavage, ultrasonography and computed tomography. Despite their limitations, when indicated for selected patients seems to reduce non terapeutic laparotomies, postoperative morbidity, hospital stay and costs. The authors present a review of the literature regarding videolaparoscopy in the abdominal trauma, its limitations and complications. Based an a complex protocol for the indications of videolaparoscopy for abdominal trauma, the authors sugested their exclusive use by level trauma centers.

  7. A clinical dilemma: abdominal tuberculosis

    Oya Uygur-Bayramicli; G(u)l Dabak; Resat Dabak

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical, radiological and microbiological properties of abdominal tuberculosis (TB) and to discuss methods needed to get the diagnosis.METHODS: Thirty-one patients diagnosed as abdominal TB between March 1998 and December 2001 at the Gastroenterology Department of Kartal State Hospital,Istanbul, Turkey were evaluated prospectively. Complete physical examination, medical and family history, blood count erythrocyte sedimentation rate, routine biochemical tests,Mantoux skin test, chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasonography (USG) were performed in all cases, whereas microbiological examination of ascites, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy or barium enema, abdominal tomography, mediastinoscopy, laparoscopy or laparotomy were done when needed.RESULTS: The median age of patients (14 females, 17males) was 34.2 years (range 15-65 years). The most frequent symptoms were abdominal pain and weight loss.Eleven patients had active pulmonary TB. The most common abdominal USG findings were ascites and hepatomegaly. Ascitic fluid analysis performed in 13 patients was found to be exudative and acid resistant bacilli were present in smear and cultured only in one patient with BacTec (3.2 %). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy yielded nonspecific findings in 16 patients. Colonoscopy performed in 20 patients showed ulcers in 9 (45 %), nodules in 2 (10 %)and, stricture, polypoid lesions, granulomatous findings in terminal ileum and rectal fistula each in one patient (5 %).Laparoscopy on 4 patients showed dilated bowel loops,thickening in the mesentery, multiple ulcers and tubercles on the peritoneum. Patients with abdominal TB were divided into three groups according to the type of involvement.Fifteen patients (48 %) had intestinal TB, L1 patients (35.2 %) had tuberculous peritonitis and 5 (16.8 %)tuberculous lymphadenitis. The diagnosis of abdominal TB was confirmed microbiologically in 5 (16 %) and histopathologically in 19 patients (60.8 %). The

  8. Abdominal tuberculosis and amoebic abscess. Abdominal tuberkulose og amoebeabscess

    Myklebust, G.; Bardstad, J.; Brabrand, K. (Aust-Agder Central Hospital, Arendal (Norway))

    1993-03-01

    A 26-years-old Indian male was admitted to hospital with loss of weight and vague abdominal pain of several weeks duration. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed several expansive lesions near the pancreatic head, probably representing enlarged lymph nodes. A few milliliters of yellowish pus were aspirated by ultrasound guided aspiration. Microscopic examination of the pus showed trophozoits, and mycobacterium tuberculosis subsequently grew from the pus culture. Abdominal tuberculosis is a rare condition, particularly in the pancreas and the peripancreatic region. The report stresses the importance of considering the possible coexistance of more than one infectious disease in patients from endemic areas. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Uso da peritoneostomia na sepse abdominal Laparostomy in abdominal sepsis

    Juvenal da Rocha Torres Neto; Adonai Pinheiro Barreto; Ana Carolina Lisboa Prudente; Allisson Mário dos Santos; Rodrigo Rocha Santiago

    2007-01-01

    Dentre as modalidades terapêuticas da sepse abdominal, a peritoneostomia tem papel decisivo permitindo explorações e lavagens da cavidade de forma facilitada. Observamos pacientes com diagnóstico clínico de sepse abdominal internados no Serviço de Coloproctologia do Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal de Sergipe, e que foram submetidos a peritoneostomia de janeiro de 2004 a janeiro de 2006. Foram avaliados quanto ao diagnóstico primário e secundário, tipo de peritonite secundária, ...

  10. CT findings of small bowel rupture after abdominal trauma

    The accuracy of CT in the detection of injuries of the solid visceral organ is well established, but the value of CT in diagnosing small bowel rupture after abdominal trauma is controversal. This study was conducted to ascertain CT finding of small bowel rupture result from abdominal trauma. A retrospective analysis of preoperative abdominal CT findings in 40 patients was performed. Small bowel rupture was confirmed by surgery. Precontrast and postcontrast enhanced CT images were obtained in all patients. Diagnostic findings of small bowel rupture including pneumoperitoneum or retroperitoneal air, discontinuity of the bowel wall and extravasation of oral contrast materials were observed in 33 cases(83%). Intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal free air was seen in 31 cases(78%) and intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal free fluid collection was seen in 38 patients(95%). Small bowel wall was thickened in 31 cases(78%), bowel wall was enhanced in 12 cases(30%) and bowel wall discontinuity and extravasation of oral contrast material was seen in 5 cases, respectively. The CT scan is sensitive and effective modality for evaluation of small bowel rupture after abdominal trauma, because of high detectability of diagnostic and suggestive CT findings

  11. URETER INJURY PRESENTIN G AS ASCITES AFTER HYSTERECTOMY: A CASE REPORT

    Venugopalan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Urinary bladder injury or injury to ureter is a recognized complication of lower abdominal surgery and it is the most common organ injured during gynecological procedures. We report here, history of a 48 year old female developing ascites and respiratory distress on 3 rd postoperative day of abdominal hysterectomy for fibroid ut e rus. Ultrasound guided abdominal tap showed urine. Computed tomography of abdomen revealed double ureter and injury to one of the left ureters. It was re implanted and bladder site repaired throug h emergency lap a rotomy. The key to the diagnosis of ureter injury is awareness of this clinical entity.

  12. Sports Injuries

    ... most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen muscles Achilles tendon injuries Pain along the shin bone Rotator cuff injuries Fractures Dislocations If you get hurt, stop playing. Continuing ...

  13. Renal Pelvis Injury in Case of Blunt Trauma Abdomen

    Rajendra B. Nerli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Isolated renal pelvis/upper ureteric injuries are uncommon in a case of blunt abdominal trauma. These injuries are associated with fractures of transverse process of the adjoining vertebrae. We report a case of such a case in a 35 year old male involved in road traffic accident. He underwent exploration and repair of the right UPJ/Upper ureteric injury. This case presented with injury to the transverse processes on the left side, which is unusual.

  14. Advances in small intestinal ionizing radiation injury research

    Intestinal ionising radiation injuries are a dose limiting factor in the course of radiotherapy of abdominal and pelvic malignancies. In this paper it is reviewed that ionizing radiation injuries of small intestine,including clinical symptoms, epithelium and submucosa changes, signal molecular expression changes, histological and ultrastructure changes. The ongoing works of our laboratory on subjects of intestinal injuries induced by heavy ions and protection against these injuries are also presented. (authors)

  15. Contemporary imaging in abdominal emergencies

    Imaging is often a fundamental part in the evaluation of an injured or ill child. A variety of imaging modalities (radiography, angiography/fluoroscopy, sonography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy) are among the options. CT is worth focused attention because of its usefulness in a variety of emergency department settings, its increasing use, and its potential radiation risks. CT plays an important role in the evaluation of traumatic and nontraumatic abdominal emergencies in children. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to review current imaging approaches and controversies in the evaluation of common acute abdominal emergencies. Through discussion of various modalities, especially CT in evaluation of abdominal pain and trauma, the relative advantages and disadvantages including radiation risk will be reviewed. (orig.)

  16. CT evaluation of abdominal trauma

    Objective: An evaluation of CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma. Methods: CT appearance of abdominal trauma was analyzed retrospectively in 95 cases. thirty-three patients were cured by operation, and the other 59 patients received conservative treatment. Fifty-one patients out of 59 were seen healed or improved by a follow up CT scan after the conservative treatment. Results: The study included: 31 cases of splenic contusion, accompanying with hemoperitoneum in 25 cases; 3 cases of hepatic laceration; 33 cases of liver and spleen compound trauma accompanying with hemoperitoneum; 18 cases of renal contusion, with subcapsular hemorrhage in 12 cases; 4 cases of midriff colic; 3 cases of mesentery breach; 3 cases of digestive tract perforation. Conclusion: CT is sensitive and precise in evaluating abdominal trauma, providing important information for treatment. (author)

  17. Contemporary imaging in abdominal emergencies

    Sivit, Carlos J. [Rainbow Babies and Children' s Hospital, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Imaging is often a fundamental part in the evaluation of an injured or ill child. A variety of imaging modalities (radiography, angiography/fluoroscopy, sonography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy) are among the options. CT is worth focused attention because of its usefulness in a variety of emergency department settings, its increasing use, and its potential radiation risks. CT plays an important role in the evaluation of traumatic and nontraumatic abdominal emergencies in children. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to review current imaging approaches and controversies in the evaluation of common acute abdominal emergencies. Through discussion of various modalities, especially CT in evaluation of abdominal pain and trauma, the relative advantages and disadvantages including radiation risk will be reviewed. (orig.)

  18. Abdominal wall hernia and pregnancy

    Jensen, K K; Henriksen, N A; Jorgensen, L N

    2015-01-01

    Med and Embase in combination with a cross-reference search of eligible papers. RESULTS: We included 31 papers of which 23 were case reports. In fertile women undergoing sutured or mesh repair, pain was described in a few patients during the last trimester of a subsequent pregnancy. Emergency surgery of......PURPOSE: There is no consensus as to the treatment strategy for abdominal wall hernias in fertile women. This study was undertaken to review the current literature on treatment of abdominal wall hernias in fertile women before or during pregnancy. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken in Pub...... incarcerated hernias in pregnant women, as well as combined hernia repair and cesarean section appears as safe procedures. No major complications were reported following hernia repair before or during pregnancy. The combined procedure of elective cesarean section and abdominal wall hernia repair was reported...

  19. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa

  20. Intrathoracic Kidney after Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Halis, Fikret; Amasyali, Akin Soner; Yucak, Aysel; Yildiz, Turan; Gokce, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal trauma is responsible for most genitourinary injuries. The incidence of renal artery injury and intrathoracic kidney is quite low in patients who present with blunt trauma experiencing damage. There are four defined etiologies for intrathoracic kidney, which include real intrathoracic ectopic kidney, eventration of the diaphragm, congenital diaphragmatic herniation, and traumatic diaphragmatic rupture. The traumatic intrathoracic kidney is an extremely rare case. We presented intrathoracic kidney case after traumatic posterior diaphragmatic rupture. PMID:26881170

  1. Intrathoracic Kidney after Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Fikret Halis; Akin Soner Amasyali; Aysel Yucak; Turan Yildiz; Ahmet Gokce

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal trauma is responsible for most genitourinary injuries. The incidence of renal artery injury and intrathoracic kidney is quite low in patients who present with blunt trauma experiencing damage. There are four defined etiologies for intrathoracic kidney, which include real intrathoracic ectopic kidney, eventration of the diaphragm, congenital diaphragmatic herniation, and traumatic diaphragmatic rupture. The traumatic intrathoracic kidney is an extremely rare case. We presented intrat...

  2. Secondary abdominal appendicular ectopic pregnancy.

    Nama, Vivek; Gyampoh, Bright; Karoshi, Mahantesh; McRae, Reynold; Opemuyi, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    Although the case fatality rate for ectopic pregnancies has decreased to 0.08% in industrialized countries, it still represents 3.8% of maternal mortality in the United States alone. In developing countries, the case fatality rate varies from 3% to 27%. Laparoscopic management of tubal pregnancies is now the standard form of treatment where this technology is available. Abdominal pregnancies are rare, and secondary implantation of tubal ectopic pregnancies is the most common cause of abdominal gestations. We present an interesting case of secondary implantation of a tubal ectopic pregnancy to highlight the appendix as a possible secondary implantation site after a tubal ectopic pregnancy. PMID:17630175

  3. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    Lee, W.-K., E-mail: leewk33@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Van Tonder, F.; Tartaglia, C.J.; Dagia, C. [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Cazzato, R.L. [Department of Radiology, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome (Italy); Duddalwar, V.A. [Department of Radiology, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Chang, S.D. [Department of Medical Imaging, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, British Columbia (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  4. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  5. Recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    Buch, Niyaz A; Ahmad, Sheikh Mushtaq; Ahmed, S Zubair; Ali, Syed Wazid; Charoo, B A; Hassan, Masood Ul

    2002-09-01

    Eighty five children with recurrent abdominal pain(RAP) were studied. Organic cause was noticed in 70 cases and non-organic in 15 cases. Giardiasis was the commonest organic cause in 57 (67.0 percent), either alone or with other parasitic infestations. Other organic causes include gallstones (4.7 percent), urinary infections (4.7 percent), esophagitis/gastritis (3.5 percent) and abdominal tuberculosis (2.3 percent). Single parent, school phobia, sibling rivalry, RAP in other family members and nocturnal enuresis are significant factors associated with nonorganic causes PMID:12368527

  6. Localized fluid collection of hepatic bare area in children with blunt abdominal trauma

    To investigate the incidence and significance of localized fluid collection in the hepatic bare area resulting from blunt abdominal trauma in children. We retrospectively reviewed the CT scans and medical records of eighty children with blunt abdominal trauma and evaluated the incidence of fluid collection in the hepatic bare area. The findings were correlated with the presence of injury to adjacent organs. Fluid collection in the hepatic bare area was noted in 23 of 80 patients (28.7%). Associated organ injuries included liver laceration (17/23), contusion of the right hemidiaphragm (7/23), right adrenal injury (5/23), and right renal injury (5/23). In one patient, organic injury was not detected in spite of fluid collection in the hepatic bare area. Eight of 23 patients (34.8%) showed fluid collection in this area, but not intraperitoneally. Fluid collection in the hepatic bare area after blunt abdominal trauma was noted in about 30% of patients and was frequently accompanied by injury to adjacent organs. Since right hemidiaphragmatic contusion associated with fluid collection in the bare area was not a uncommon CT finding, close observation of the condition is warranted. (author)

  7. Plain abdominal film and abdominal ultrasound in intestine occlusion

    Plain film of the abdomen is widely used in the diagnostic evaluation of intestinal occlusion. Even though this technique can yield a panoramic and high-resolution view of gas-filled intestinal loops, several factors, such as type and duration of occlusion, neurovascular status of the intestine and general patient condition, may reduce the diagnostic specificy of the plain film relative to the organic or functional nature of the occlusion. From 1987 to 1989, fifty-four patients with intestinal occlusion were studied combining plain abdominal film with abdominal ultrasound (US). This was done in order to evaluate whether the additional information obtained from US could be of value in better determining the nature of the ileus. US evaluation was guided by the information already obtained from plain film which better demonstrates gas-filled loops. The results show that in all 27 cases of dynamic ileus (intestinal ischemia, acute appendicitis, acute cholecistis, acute pancreatitis or blunt abdominal trauma) US demonstrates: intestinal loops slightly increased in caliber, with liquid content, or loops containing rare hyperechoic particles, intestinal wall thickening and no peristalsis. In 27 cases of acute, chronic or complicated mechanical ileus (adhesions, internal hernia, intestinal neoplasm, peritoneal seedings) US shows: 1) in acute occlusion: hyperperistaltic intestinal loops containing inhomogeneous liquid; 2) in chronic occlusion: liquid content with a solid echigenic component; 3) in complicated occlusion: liquid stasis, frequent increase in wall thickness, moderate peritoneal effusion and inefficient peristalsis. In conclusion, based on the obtained data, the authors feel that the combination of plain abdominal film and abdominal US can be useful in the work-up of patient with intestinal occlusion. The information provided by US allows a better definition of the nature of the ileus

  8. Delayed Presentation of Renocolic Fistula at 4 Months after Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Sang Don Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Causes of previously reported reno-colic fistulas included primary renal and colonic pathologic states involving infectious, malignant or other inflammatory processes. However, reno-colic fistula after renal injury is extremely uncommon. We report an unusual delayed presentation of reno-colic fistula that occurred at 4 months later after blunt abdominal trauma.

  9. Delayed Presentation of Renocolic Fistula at 4 Months after Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Sang Don Lee; Tae Nam Kim; Hong Koo Ha

    2011-01-01

    Causes of previously reported reno-colic fistulas included primary renal and colonic pathologic states involving infectious, malignant or other inflammatory processes. However, reno-colic fistula after renal injury is extremely uncommon. We report an unusual delayed presentation of reno-colic fistula that occurred at 4 months later after blunt abdominal trauma.

  10. Chylous ascites associated with chylothorax; a rare sequela of penetrating abdominal trauma: a case report

    Plummer Joseph M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present the case of a patient with the rare combination of chylous ascites and chylothorax resulting from penetrating abdominal injury. This patient was successfully managed with total parenteral nutrition. This case report is used to highlight the clinical features and management options of this uncommon but challenging clinical problem.

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... gallbladder spleen pancreas intestines kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help ... that is being examined to the transducer (the device used to examine the patient), as well ... is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical ...

  12. Sequential PTA of abdominal aorta

    A case of sequential dilatation of a subtotal stenosis of the abdominal aorta in a young subject is reported. Initial and long-term success of the procedure is recorded using haemodynamic evaluation and intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IV-DSA) follow-up on an outpatient basis. In addition, the significance of biplane aortography with IV-DSA is illustrated. (orig.)

  13. Dehydration related abdominal pain (drap)

    Objective: To describe the frequency of dehydration as a medical cause of acute abdomen. Subjects and Methods: All the patients reporting with abdominal pain to the surgical outpatient department or the emergency department were reviewed in the study. The clinical findings in all these cases were studied along with the mode of their management and outcome. Results: Of all the patients presenting with abdominal pain, 3.3% (n=68) were suffering from dehydration related abdominal pain. They were predominantly males in a ratio of 8.7: 1, mostly in the 2nd and 3rd decades of their lives. All these cases were suffering from acute or chronic dehydration were provisionally diagnosed by general practitioners as 'acute abdomen' and referred for surgical consultation. Associated symptoms included vomiting in 42.6%, backache in 91.2%, headache in 95.6%, and pain in lower limbs in 97.1 % of the cases. 83.8% required indoor management with intravenous fluids. All the patients became asymptomatic with rehydration therapy. Conclusion: Dehydration is a possible cause of severe abdominal pain. There is a need to educate the general public about the benefits of adequate fluid intake. (author)

  14. Computed tomography of abdominal trauma

    Abdominal lesions following an accident or surgical interventions are becoming more frequently indications for investigations by computed tomography. Changes of spleen, liver, kidneys, pancreas, and of the retroperitoneal space are discussed. Advantages of computed tomography compared to other investigative methods are shown. (orig.)

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of Secondary Ultrasound Exam in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    In stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, accurate diagnosis of visceral injuries is crucial. To determine whether repeating ultrasound exam will increase the sensitivity of focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) through revealing additional free intraperitoneal fluid in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. We performed a prospective observational study by performing primary and secondary ultrasound exams in blunt abdominal trauma patients. All ultrasound exams were performed by four radiology residents who had the experience of more than 400 FAST exams. Five routine intraperitoneal spaces as well as the interloop space were examined by ultrasound in order to find free fluid. All patients who expired or were transferred to the operating room before the second exam were excluded from the study. All positive ultrasound results were compared with intra-operative and computed tomography (CT) findings and/or the clinical status of the patients. Primary ultrasound was performed in 372 patients; 61 of them did not undergo secondary ultrasound exam; thus, were excluded from the study.Three hundred eleven patients underwent both primary and secondary ultrasound exams. One hundred and two of all patients were evaluated by contrast enhanced CT scan and 31 underwent laparotomy. The sensitivity of ultrasound exam in detecting intraperitoneal fluid significantly increased from 70.7% for the primary exam to 92.7% for the secondary exam. Examining the interloop space significantly improved the sensitivity of ultrasonography in both primary (from 36.6% to 70.7%) and secondary (from 65.9% to 92.7%) exams. Performing a secondary ultrasound exam in stable blunt abdominal trauma patients and adding interloop space scan to the routine FAST exam significantly increases the sensitivity of ultrasound in detecting intraperitoneal free fluid

  16. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  17. Preoperative steroid in abdominal wall reconstruction

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Brøndum, Tina Lee; Belhage, Bo;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative administration of high-dose glucocorticoid leads to improved recovery and decreased length of stay after abdominal surgery. Even so, studies on administration of glucocorticoids for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for giant ventral hernia repair ...

  18. Mechanical ventilation and intra-abdominal hypertension: 'Beyond Good and Evil'.

    Pelosi, Paolo; Vargas, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension is frequent in surgical and medical critically ill patients. Intra-abdominal hypertension has a serious impact on the function of respiratory as well as peripheral organs. In the presence of alveolar capillary damage, which occurs in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), intra-abdominal hypertension promotes lung injury as well as edema, impedes the pulmonary lymphatic drainage, and increases intra-thoracic pressures, leading to atelectasis, airway closure, and deterioration of respiratory mechanics and gas exchange. The optimal setting of mechanical ventilation and its impact on respiratory function and hemodynamics in ARDS associated with intra-abdominal hypertension are far from being assessed. We suggest that the optimal ventilator management of patients with ARDS and intra-abdominal hypertension would include the following: (a) intra-abdominal, esophageal pressure, and hemodynamic monitoring; (b) ventilation setting with protective tidal volume, recruitment maneuver, and level of positive end-expiratory pressure set according to the 'best' compliance of the respiratory system or the lung; (c) deep sedation with or without neuromuscular paralysis in severe ARDS; and (d) open abdomen in selected patients with severe abdominal compartment syndrome. PMID:23256904

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of CT scan in abdominal blunt trauma

    Javad Salimi; Khadyjeh Bakhtavar; Mehdi Solimani; Patrcia Khashayar; Ali Pasha Meysamie; Moosa Zargar

    2009-01-01

    Obiective: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of CT scan findings in Patients ith blunt abdominal trauma admitted to the university hospital.Methods: All the atients ith blunt abdominal trauma admitted at a tertiary teaching trauma center in Iran between 2005 and 2007 were enrolled in this study.In the absence of any clinical anifestations,he patients underwent a diagnostic CT scan.Laparatomy was performed in those with positive CT results.Others were observed for 48 hours and discharged in case no problem as reported;otherwise they underwent laparatomy.Information on patients'demographic ata,mechanism of trauma,indication for CT scan,CT scan findings,results of laparotomy ere gathered.The sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of the CT-scan images in regard ith the organ injured were calculated.The sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of the T scan were calculated in each case.Results: CT Scan had the highest sensitivity for etecting the injuries to liver (100%) and spleen (86.6%).The specificity of the method or detecting retroperitoneal hematoma (100%) and injuries to kidney (93.5%) was higher han other organs.The accuracy of CT images to detect the injuries to spleen,liver,idney and retroperitoneal hematoma was reported to be 96.1%,94.4%,91.6% and 91.6% espectively.Conclusion: The findings of the present study reveal that CT scan could econsidered as a good choice,especially for patients with blunt abdominal trauma in eaching hospitals where the radiologic academic staff is not present in the hospital in the night shifts.

  20. ADULT ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIA IN IBADAN

    Ayandipo, O.O; Afuwape, O.O.; Irabor, D. O.; Abdurrazzaaq, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal wall hernias are very common diseases encountered in surgical practice. Groin hernia is the commonest type of abdominal wall hernias. There are several methods of hernia repair but tension-free repair (usually with mesh) offers the least recurrent rate. Aim: To describe the clinical profile of anterior abdominal wall hernias and our experience in the surgical management of identified hernias Method: The project was a retrospective study of all patients with abdominal wal...

  1. MDCT diagnosis of penetrating diaphragm injury

    Bodanapally, Uttam K.; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Mirvis, Stuart E.; Sliker, Clint W.; Fleiter, Thorsten R.; Sarada, Kamal; Miller, Lisa A. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Stein, Deborah M. [University of Maryland, Department of Surgery, Shock Trauma Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Alexander, Melvin [National Study Center for Trauma and Emergency Medical Systems, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of multidetector CT (MDCT) in detection of diaphragmatic injury following penetrating trauma. Chest and abdominal CT examinations performed preoperatively in 136 patients after penetrating trauma to the torso with injury trajectory in close proximity to the diaphragm were reviewed by radiologists unaware of surgical findings. Signs associated with diaphragmatic injuries in penetrating trauma were noted. These signs were correlated with surgical diagnoses, and their sensitivity and specificity in assisting the diagnosis were calculated. CT confirmed diaphragmatic injury in 41 of 47 injuries (sensitivity, 87.2%), and an intact diaphragm in 71 of 98 patients (specificity, 72.4%). The overall accuracy of MDCT was 77%. The most accurate sign helping the diagnosis was contiguous injury on either side of the diaphragm in single-entry penetrating trauma (sensitivity, 88%; specificity, 82%). Thus MDCT has high sensitivity and good specificity in detecting penetrating diaphragmatic injuries. (orig.)

  2. Value of ultrasound in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in an age group including from teenagers to young adults, in a male dominant proportion, resulting in great economic and social impact. Within the complex of trauma, blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is frequent event and presents difficulty in the evaluation and management since the clinical examination shows low sensitivity and specificity. The detection of hemo peritoneum is one of the methods of evaluation of possible indirect intra-abdominal injuries, initially using direct diagnostic abdominal paracentesis and posteriorly the diagnostic peritoneal lavage, that despite the effectiveness, have drawbacks such as invasiveness and the inability of hemo peritoneum quantification and the lesion staging, resulting in non-therapeutic laparotomies. Imaging methods provide useful information in the investigation of abdominal injuries, such as conventional and contrast radiology, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT), which is the best effective method, but has its own drawbacks, such as cost, accessibility, use of ionizing radiation and contrast media and the displacement of the patient to the machine. US presents itself as an alternative in the initial evaluation of these patients as noninvasive method, with lack of harmfulness, low cost, fast answer and portability. Nevertheless, this method also has its limitations, as in cases of abdominal injuries without free fluid. This study was conducted in order to establish the performance of the US in this setting, allowing to rationalise the use of CT. For this purpose we studied 163 patients treated in the ER of HC/FMUSP, with the completion of consecutive US and CT. The population fits the usual profile of trauma victims, with 83% male, 56% in the age group between 20 and 39 years and in 73% of cases victims of traffic accidents. They were brought to the service in an average time of 51 minutes, mainly stable and with satisfactory level of consciousness. US took on

  3. Multiple bowel perforation and necrotising fasciitis secondary to abdominal liposuction in a patient with bilateral lumbar hernia

    Vincent Delliere; Bertheuil, N.; Harnois, Y.; S Thienot; Gerard, M.; Robert, M; Watier, E.

    2014-01-01

    We present a rare complication of abdominal liposuction: bowel perforation and necrotizing fasciitis. Because of bilateral lumbar hernia, a 56-year-old woman had caecum and descending colon perforation during lipoplasty. She had septic shock syndrome at her admission. The authors treated this complex wound with several debridement, omental flap, NPWT and split-thickness skin graft. The incidence of abdominal wall perforation with visceral injury is 14 in 100,000 liposuctions performed. There ...

  4. MR imaging for blunt pancreatic injury

    Objective: To study the MR imaging features of blunt pancreatic injury. Materials and methods: Nine patients with pancreatic injury related to blunt abdominal trauma confirmed by surgery performed MR imaging. Two abdominal radiologists conducted a review of the MR images to assess pancreatic parenchymal and pancreatic duct injury, and associated complications. Result: Diagnostic quality MR images were obtained in each of the nine patients. In the nine patients, pancreatic fracture, laceration and contusion were depicted on MR imaging in five, one and three patients, respectively. There were six patients with pancreatic duct disruption, eight patients with peripancreatic fluid collections, and four patients with peripancreatic pseudocyst or hematoma, respectively. All of the MR imaging findings was corresponded to surgical findings. Conclusion: MR imaging is an effective method to detect blunt pancreatic injury and may provide information to guide management decisions.

  5. MR imaging for blunt pancreatic injury

    Yang Lin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Zhang Xiaoming, E-mail: cjr.zhxm@vip.163.co [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Xu Xiaoxue; Tang Wei; Xiao Bo; Zeng Nanlin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Objective: To study the MR imaging features of blunt pancreatic injury. Materials and methods: Nine patients with pancreatic injury related to blunt abdominal trauma confirmed by surgery performed MR imaging. Two abdominal radiologists conducted a review of the MR images to assess pancreatic parenchymal and pancreatic duct injury, and associated complications. Result: Diagnostic quality MR images were obtained in each of the nine patients. In the nine patients, pancreatic fracture, laceration and contusion were depicted on MR imaging in five, one and three patients, respectively. There were six patients with pancreatic duct disruption, eight patients with peripancreatic fluid collections, and four patients with peripancreatic pseudocyst or hematoma, respectively. All of the MR imaging findings was corresponded to surgical findings. Conclusion: MR imaging is an effective method to detect blunt pancreatic injury and may provide information to guide management decisions.

  6. Thoracic injury: a review of 276 cases

    Moosa Zargar; Ali Khaji; Mojgan Karbakhsh Davari

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Chest injury, one of the most important aspects of trauma, directly accounts for 25% of all traumarelated deaths and plays a major contributing role in another 25% of trauma deaths. This paper aimed to explore the spectrum and outcome of thoracic injuries seen in a multi centric study of trauma patients.Methods: A total of 276 consecutive trauma patients in 6 general hospitals were analyzed. The feature of injury,injury severity score (ISS), clinical treatment and mortality were recorded in a prospective manner and analyzed retrospectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent predictors of mortality following the chest trauma.Results: There were 246 males ( 89.1%) and 30 females (10.9% ) ranging from 3 to 80 years with a mean age of (34 ± 17) years. Road traffic accident was the main cause of injury, especially for pedestrians, followed by stab wound (89 cases, 32.1% ) and falling injuries (32 cases,11.6% ), respectively. Haemothorax or pneumothorax (50.4%) and rib fracture (38.6%) were the most common types of chest injury. Extremity fracture was the most common associated injury with the rate of 37% ( 85/230), followed by head injury (25.2% ) and abdominal trauma (19.6%). These injuries contributed significantly to the morbidity and mortality of trauma patients.Conclusions: According to the results, most patients with chest injury can be treated conservatively with close observation and tube thoracostomy. The presence of blunt trauma, head injury and abdominal injury independently adversely affect mortality after chest trauma. It is necessary to investigate the causes and patterns of injuries resulting from stab wound for effective prevention.

  7. Proposed protocol for realization of abdominal CT in patients admitted to the emergency room for trauma in HSJD

    A protocol is established for computed tomography in trauma patients treated in emergency of Hospital San Juan de Dios. A literature review is conducted on abdominal CT protocols in specialized databases. The criteria, scanning, parameters and delay time are established for realization of abdominal CT in patients with traumatic emergencies in HSJD. Taking the thickness of the sections, the thickness of the sections in reconstruction, the quantities of contrast and the speed of injection in patients, have been standardized for the realization of abdominal CT in HSJD. Computed tomography should be preferably performed of routine in portal phase and the late from 5 minutes in patients with abdominal trauma, contributing in this phase as much information regarding the extent of abdominal injury

  8. Intestinal contrasting in abdominal CT

    In 56 patients undergoing abdominal CT the gastro-intestinal tract was defined by negative contrast instead of the conventional positive contrast from an iodine containing contrast medium. The contrast material was a 2 1/2% mannitol solution and was used for filling the rectum. Filling of the gastro-intestinal tract was of similar quality to that obtained with positve contrast media. The number of artifacts due to high contrast boundaries was slightly greater with the negative contrast than if would have been with positive contrast. Differentiation of the gastro-intestinal tract from other abdominal organs was equally good for both methods. The negative contrast method was poor in diagnosing cystic tumours but proved much better than positive contrast for evaluating the wall of the gastro-intestinal tract. (orig.)

  9. Sonography of blunt abdominal trauma

    Sonographic examination of the abdomen after blunt abdominal trauma represents a rapid and effective diagnostic method without bothering the patient. It has proved its value not only in the confirmation or exclusion of free fluid in the abdomen caused by liver of spleen rupture, but also in such cases actually it replaces peritoneal lavage or exploratory laparotomy. It is also qualified for diagnosis of intraparenchymal or subcapsular hemorrhages, intraperitoneal as well as retroperitoneal and for follow up. In particualr delayed bleedings including the risk of a retarded organ rupture can be detected early. A failure rate of 1.4% in 282 sonographically examined cases of blunt abdominal trauma further confirms the reliability of this method. (orig.)

  10. Acupuncture Treatment of Abdominal Pain

    胡金生

    2002-01-01

    @@ Case History Mr. Li, a university student aged 23 years, paid his first visit on July 16, 2001, with the chief complaint of abdominal pain for one day. The patient stated that one day before when it happened to be the weekend, he got abdominal pain after supper, which went worse gradually and caused him to roll all over in bed. The pain was slightly alleviated half an hour later after he had taken some pain killers. Upon inquiry, the patient said that because of their newly graduation from the university, he and his classmates were so excited that they went to have a sumptuous lunch with alcoholic drinks. And in the evening he ate again a delicious supper cooked for him by his mother, after which he continued to have some fruit and dessert.

  11. Functional Abdominal Bloating with Distention

    Sullivan, Stephen Norman

    2012-01-01

    Ten to 25% of healthy persons experience bloating. It is particularly common in persons with the irritable bowel syndrome and constipation. While the cause of bloating remains unknown old explanations such as a excessive intestinal gas, exaggerated lumbar lordosis and psychiatric problems have been disproved. New suggestions include recent weight gain, weak or inappropriately relaxed abdominal muscles, an inappropriately contracted diaphragm and retained fluid in loops of distal small bowel. ...

  12. Head Injuries

    ... Aid: Falls First Aid: Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Getting Help: Know the Numbers Concussions Stay Safe: ... Tips: Inline Skating Safety Tips: Skateboarding Dealing With Sports Injuries Concussions: What to Do Contact Us Print Resources ...

  13. Sports Injuries

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  14. Injury Statistics

    ... Data Consumer Opinion Surveys Home / Research & Statistics Injury Statistics This is the statistic reports page for scientific ... Home Appliances, Maintenance and Construction Injury Statistics Injury Statistics September 30, 2012 Submersions Related to Non-Pool ...

  15. Eye Injuries

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  16. [A case of abdominal wall actinomycosis].

    Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Jin Soo; Cho, Hyeong Jun; Choi, Seung Bong; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Il; Lee, In Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative granulomatous infectious disease caused by actinomyces species that is characterized by formation of characteristic clumps called as sulfur granules. Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare disease and is often difficult to diagnose before operation. Abdominal actinomycosis infiltrating into the abdominal wall and adhering to the colon is even rarer. Most abdominal actinomycosis develops after operation, trauma or inflammatory bowel disease, and is also considered as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patient with underlying malignancy, diabetes mellitus, human immunodeficiency virus infection, etc. Actinomycosis is diagnosed based on histologic demonstration of sulfur granules in surgically resected specimen or pus, and treatment consists of long-term penicillin based antibiotics therapy with or without surgical resection. Herein, we report an unusual case of abdominal wall actinomycosis which developed in a patient after acupuncture and presented as abdominal wall mass that was first mistaken for abdominal wall invasion of diverticulum perforation. PMID:25896158

  17. Abdominal wound closure: current perspectives

    Williams ZF

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Zachary F Williams, William W Hope Department of Surgery, South East Area Health Education Center, New Hanover Regional Medical Center, Wilmington, NC, USA Abstract: This review examines both early and late wound complications following laparotomy closure, with particular emphasis on technical aspects that reduce hernia formation. Abdominal fascial closure is an area of considerable variation within the field of general surgery. The formation of hernias following abdominal wall incisions continues to be a challenging problem. Ventral hernia repairs are among the most common surgeries performed by general surgeons, and despite many technical advances in the field, incisional hernia rates remain high. Much attention and research has been directed to the surgical management of hernias. Less focus has been placed on prevention of hernia formation despite its obvious importance. This review examines the effects of factors such as the type of incision, suture type and size, closure method, patient risk factors, and the use of prophylactic mesh. Keywords: incisional, abdominal, hernia, prevention, wound closure techniques 

  18. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  19. Screening US for blunt abdominal trauma: a retrospective study

    Purpose. To assess the accuracy of screening US in patients with blunt abdominal trauma first admitted in the trauma centre of our general hospital. Materials and methods. The reports of 864 abdominal US examinations of primary trauma patients (139 with major and 725 with minor injuries) obtained with standard protocols were retrieved. For each case, US reports were reviewed and compared to the test available reference standard. The accuracy of US was assessed by evaluating the method's overall ability to distinguish negative from positive cases by showing at least one of the lesions documented by the reference standard and its specific ability to depict injuries separately and independently. Results. US exhibited a satisfactory overall ability to distinguish negative from positive patients (91.5% sensibility and 97.5% specificity in major trauma patients vs. 73.3% sensibility and 98.1 % specificity in minor trauma patients) and a satisfactory specific ability to depict injuries separately and independently in major trauma patients. Of the 21/864 false negative reports (5 in patients with major and 16 in cases with minor trauma), only one affected patient management, a major trauma case, by delaying an emergency laparotomy. Conclusions. Its satisfactory accuracy for major trauma suggests that US could be employed not only to screen cases for emergency laparotomy but also as an alternative to screening CT. However, since major traumatic injuries generally carry an imperative indication for CT, especially as regards neurological, thoracic and skeletal evaluation, US has the not secondary task of performing a prompt preliminary examination using a simplified technique in the emergency room simultaneously with resuscitation

  20. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma.

    Miele, Vittorio; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Sessa, Barbara; Trinci, Margherita

    2016-05-01

    Baseline ultrasound is essential in the early assessment of patients with a huge haemoperitoneum undergoing an immediate abdominal surgery; nevertheless, even with a highly experienced operator, it is not sufficient to exclude parenchymal injuries. More recently, a new ultrasound technique using second generation contrast agents, named contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been developed. This technique allows all the vascular phase to be performed in real time, increasing ultrasound capability to detect parenchymal injuries, enhancing some qualitative findings, such as lesion extension, margins and its relationship with capsule and vessels. CEUS has been demonstrated to be almost as sensitive as contrast-enhanced CT in the detection of traumatic injuries in patients with low-energy isolated abdominal trauma, with levels of sensitivity and specificity up to 95%. Several studies demonstrated its ability to detect lesions occurring in the liver, spleen, pancreas and kidneys and also to recognize active bleeding as hyperechoic bands appearing as round or oval spots of variable size. Its role seems to be really relevant in paediatric patients, thus avoiding a routine exposure to ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, CEUS is strongly operator dependent, and it has some limitations, such as the cost of contrast media, lack of panoramicity, the difficulty to explore some deep regions and the poor ability to detect injuries to the urinary tract. On the other hand, it is timesaving, and it has several advantages, such as its portability, the safety of contrast agent, the lack to ionizing radiation exposure and therefore its repeatability, which allows follow-up of those traumas managed conservatively, especially in cases of fertile females and paediatric patients. PMID:26607647

  1. Wartime major venous vessel injuries.

    Hudorovic, Narcis

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study is to declare our experience and to identify the important factors that influence the mortality and morbidity in patients with combat-related penetrating wounds of the abdomen (CR-PWA) with major venous vessel injuries. Twenty-six wounded with combat-related injuries of major abdominal venous vessels, admitted in the University Clinic cardiovascular surgery department during the period from 1 August 1991 through 30 October 1995, were analyzed. Patients with concomitant injured arteries and extra-abdominal injuries (n=150; 85.2%) were excluded from this study. The Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Index (PATI) score for each patient was calculated. Fifteen patients (57.69%) sustained with PATI score greater than 25 died. The mean duration of hospitalization was 16 days (range 0-86). The average hospitalization time for those surviving their complications was 17 days with a PATI of 25 or less, and 43 days with a score more than 25. Three clinical assessments of the long-term outcome were performed after a median of about 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Surviving patients (42.31%) were symptom free and had normal Duplex scans as well as no other surgical related complications. Higher PATI scores, postoperative complications and reoperations exert an unfavorable effect on patient outcome. PMID:18006557

  2. Urgent Abdominal Re-Explorations

    Peskersoy Mustafa

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of a number of complications that occur after abdominal surgeries may require that Urgent Abdominal Re-explorations (UARs, the life-saving and obligatory operations, are performed. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reasons for performing UARs, outcomes of relaparotomies (RLs and factors that affect mortality. Methods Demographic characteristics; initial diagnoses; information from and complications of the first surgery received; durations and outcomes of UAR(s performed in patients who received early RLs because of complicated abdominal surgeries in our clinic between 01.01.2000 and 31.12.2004 were investigated retrospectively. Statistical analyses were done using the chi-square and Fisher exact tests. Results Early UAR was performed in 81 out of 4410 cases (1.8%. Average patient age was 50.46 (13–81 years with a male-to-female ratio of 60/21. Fifty one (62.96% patients had infection, 41 (50.61% of them had an accompanying serious disease, 24 (29.62% of them had various tumors and 57 (70.37% patients were operated under emergency conditions during first operation. Causes of urgent abdominal re-explorations were as follows: leakage from intestinal repair site or from anostomosis (n:34; 41.97%; hemorrhage (n:15; 18.51%; intestinal perforation (n:8; 9.87%; intraabdominal infection or abscess (n:8; 9.87%; progressive intestinal necrosis (n:7; 8.64%; stomal complications (n:5; 6.17%; and postoperative ileus (n:4; 4.93%. Two or more UARs were performed in 18 (22.22% cases, and overall mortality was 34.97% (n:30. Interval between the first laparotomy and UAR averaged as 6.95 (1–20 days, and average hospitalization period was 27.1 (3–78 days. Mortality rate was found to be higher among the patients who received multiple UARs. The most common (55.5% cause of mortality was sepsis/multiple organ failure (MOF. The rates for common mortality and sepsis/MOF-dependent mortality that occured following UAR were

  3. Progress in abdominal organ transplantation

    Kosieradzki, Maciej; Lisik, Wojciech; Rowiński, Wojciech; Małkowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Summary The excellent results of vascularized organ transplantation have resulted in an increasing number of end-stage organ failure patients seeking such treatment. The results of organ transplantation depend on a number of factors – the quality of the donor (and an organ), living vs. deceased donation, magnitude of ischemic injury (and its prevention), and recipient-dependent factors. Ischemia/reperfusion injury in organ transplantation is a multifactorial process, which may lead to delayed...

  4. Hospital management of abdominal trauma in Tehran, Iran: a review of 228 patients

    Javad Salimi; Mohammad Ghodsi; Maryam Nassaji Zavvarh; Ali Khaji

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Today, trauma is a major public health problem in some countries. Abdominal trauma is the source of significant mortality and morbidity with both blunt and penetrating injuries. We performed an epidemiological study of abdominal trauma (AT) in Tehran, Iran. We used all our sources to describe the epidemiology and outcome of patients with AT.Methods: This study was done in Tehran. The study population included trauma patients admitted to the emergency department of six general hospitals in Tehran during one year. The data were collected through a questionnaire that was completed by a trained physician at the trauma center. The statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software (version 11.5 for Windows). The statistical analysis was conducted using the chi-square and P<0.05 was accepted as being statistically significant.Results: Two hundred and twenty-eight (2.8%) out of 8 000 patients were referred to the above mentioned centers with abdominal trauma. One hundred and twenty-five (54.9%)of the patients were in their 2nd and 3rd decades of life and 189 (83%) of our patients were male. Road traffic accidents (RTA) were the leading cause of AT with 119 (52.2%) patients. Spleen was the commonly injured organ with 51 cases. Following the analysis of injury severity, 159 (69.7%) patients had mild injuries (ISS<16) and 69 (30.3%) patients had severe injuries (ISS= 16). The overall mortality rate was 46 (20.2%).Conclusions: Blunt abdominal trauma is more common than penetrating abdominal trauma. Road traffic accidents and stab wound are the most common causes of blunt and penetrating trauma, respectively. Spleen is the most commonly injured organ in these patients. The mortality rate is higher in blunt trauma than penetrating one.

  5. Modern CT diagnosis of acute thoracic and abdominal trauma

    Purpose. To evaluate a modified algorithm in the diagnostic management of polytraumatized patients by using whole body multislice CT (MSCT) as primary diagnostic tool.Material and methods. Between June 1999 and October 2000 532 polytraumatized patients were referred to the emergency department. 336 polytraumatized patients were primarily evaluated using whole body MSCT according to the ''Innsbruck Emergency Algorithm''. MSCT is performed immediately after cardiovascular stabilization of the patient. During the initial stabilization period free intraabdominal fluid is excluded or demonstrated by abdominal ultrasound. Time-consuming conventional radiographs are omitted with exception of an optional chest X-ray. In patients with suspected or obvious arterial injuries or fractures the multislice-CT-dataset is used to perform 2D and 3D reconstructions in order to optimize visualization of additional skeletal and vascular injuries.Results. By means of whole body MSCT it was possible to detect all injuries. The diagnostic advantage of whole body MSCT as compared to conventional X-ray was analyzed in 111 consecutive polytraumatized patients with an injury severity score (ISS) of 34.77. The early use of MSCT shortened the time for diagnostic work-up substantially (approximately 50%).Conclusion. Whole body multislice-CT used as primary diagnostic tool in the management of polytraumatized patients allows for a fast, accurate and comprehensive diagnostic work-up. (orig.)

  6. Emergency diagnostic laparoscopy in abdominal trauma: a study of 41 patients Laparoscopia diagnóstica de urgencia en el traumatismo abdominal: un estudio en 41 pacientes

    Armando Fermín Álvarez Corcuera del Pera

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: laparoscopy is a test used in the patients with abdominal trauma with suspicion of intra-abdominal organic damage and an imminent surgical behavior. Objectives: to expose the results of the urgency laparoscopic diagnosis in the traumatic acute abdomen. Methods: an descriptive and retrospective study in patient with diagnosis of abdominal trauma to which were carried out urgency laparoscopy at the Hospital Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima", from january 2001 to december 2008, when not being possible to define injury of intra-abdominal viscera performing other tests. Inclusion and exclusion criterion were applied. Results: we study 41 patients with average of 39, 2 ± 7, 7 years. Most of the studied patients were in the age range from 31 to 40 years with 21 patients (51, 2 % the open abdominal trauma with 26 patients prevailed (63, 4 %. The masculine sex prevailed with 38 patients (92,7 % and as much the open trauma as the closed one were more frequent in this sex with 25 patients (96,2 % and 13 patients (86,7 % respectively. They didn't show visceral damage during the laparoscopy 93, 3 % of the patients with closed abdominal trauma by what the surgical treatment was avoided, the same as in the patients with open abdominal trauma which had a non penetrating damage in abdominal cavity (80, 8 %. Conclusion: laparoscopic diagnosis is a useful test in patients with abdominal trauma and it avoids a considerable number of unnecessary conventional surgical treatment.Fundamento: la laparoscopia es una prueba utilizada en pacientes con trauma abdominal que enfrentan la sospecha de lesión orgánica intra-abdominal para lo cual se requiere una conducta quirúrgica inminente. Objetivo: exponer los resultados de la laparoscopia diagnóstica de urgencia en traumatismos abdominales. Métodos: estudio descriptivo y

  7. Cycling injuries.

    Cohen, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    Bicycle-related injuries have increased as cycling has become more popular. Most injuries to recreational riders are associated with overuse or improper fit of the bicycle. Injuries to racers often result from high speeds, which predispose riders to muscle strains, collisions, and falls. Cyclists contact bicycles at the pedals, seat, and handlebars. Each is associated with particular cycling injuries.

  8. Back Injuries

    ... pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, or a sudden jolt such as a car accident. The lower back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains and strains Herniated ...

  9. FULL TERM EXTRAUTERINE ABDOMINAL PREGNANCY

    Neetu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extrauterine abdominal pregnancy is extremely rare and is frequently missed during antenatal care, despite the routine use of obstetrics ultrasound. A 23 year old primigravida at 39 weeks of gestation was admitted to the department on December 2 , 2012, in routine hour with transverse lie with oligohydramnios. On examination her vitals and laboratory investigation were within normal limits . One of the ultrasonographic scanning done by radiologist at 35 wk. 3 days gestation demonstrated a single live intrauterine fetus of CGA 33 wk. 1 day with transverse lie , fundal gr II placenta and AFI - 10 cm. Ultrasonography done at the department on the day of admission demonstrated single live intrauterine fetus with transverse lie and AFI - 3.8 cm and EFW 2.4 Kg and placenta was right anterior.. She was planned for elective caesarean section on account of transverse lie and oligohydramnios at term. At laparotomy the following findings were made: Secondary abdominal pregnancy arising from right tubal ectopic rupture and making pseudogesta tional sac with meconium stained liquor. Omentum , right tube and ovary were adhered to sac. The uterus and left tube and ovary were healthy and normal . Other abdominal organs were normal. A 1.5 Kg live male baby with good Apgar score and incompletely formed mandible extracted from pseudo gestational sac. There was significant bleeding from pseudogestational sac and patient went in shock during intraoperative period. One unit whole blood transfused during intraoperative period. Placenta was adherent to the pseudogestational sac so Psudogestational sac was removed with placenta in situ and right sided salpingo - o ophrectomy was also done due to their adherence. Hemostasis was secured. The patient and baby progressed well and were discharged on the seventh postoperative day

  10. Abdominal polytrauma and parenchymal organs

    The acute radiological diagnostics of polytrauma patients has become an essential part of the interdisciplinary treatment in the emergency room. The incidence of polytrauma patients with an injury severity score (ISS) > 16 is approximately 450 cases/million inhabitants/year in Europe. Injuries of the parenchymal organs are of utmost importance for the prognosis and treatment of these patients. The injury patterns are complex and a great deal of experience is necessary to be able to obtain the correct diagnosis within minutes. This review article deals with the radiological diagnostics and grading of the severity of injuries to the spleen, liver, pancreas and kidneys. The use of ultrasound for the evaluation of polytraumatized patients will be discussed. The most important trauma-associated findings for the above mentioned organs using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) will be described and illustrated by dedicated case findings. Ultrasound contrast agents can supply valuable, additional diagnostic information in the evaluation of polytraumatized patients. Computed tomography has become established as the most relevant imaging modality in severe trauma. Innovative organ-adapted and contrast application protocols improve the diagnostic performance of MDCT. The use of focused assessment sonography for trauma (FAST) scanning as a screening tool is in agreement with the other clinical disciplines of the trauma team. The use of MDCT is trauma-dependent and the classification of the severity of the different parenchymal organ injuries is ultimately decisive for further treatment and prognosis of trauma victims. (orig.)

  11. Radiography of the abdominal cavity

    Radiography is a very important part of the diagnostic procedure in many small animal diseases. Technically perfect X-rays are essential for the exact diagnosis. The general appearance of the abdominal cavity should be evaluated at first, e.g. the overall contrast and the definition of the visualized organs. Then particular attention should be paid, if there is any peritoneal effusion or free air in the peritoneal cavity. Subsequently each radiographically visible organ has to be evaluated for its position, size, shape and radiographic density

  12. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Linné, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease with a prevalence of 1.5-2.0% in 65-year old men in Sweden. The risk of having AAA is increased with smoking, high age, family history of AAA and cardiovascular disease. Women have a lower prevalence (0.5%) and develop AAA later in life. An AAA seldom gives any symptom prior to rupture. Untreated rupture is associated with 100% mortality, while surgically treated rupture is associated with 25-70% mortality. Prophylactic sur...

  13. Abdominal manifestations of autoimmune disorders

    Full text: Immunoglobulin G4-related disease was recognized as a systemic disease since various extrapancreatic lesions were observed in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The real etiology and pathogenesis of IgG4-RD is still not clearly understood. Moreover the exact role of IgG4 or IgG4-positive plasma cells in this disease has not yet been elucidated. only some inconsistent biological features such as hypergammaglobulinemia or hypocomplementemia support the autoimmune nature of the disease process. various names have been ascribed to this clinicopathological entity including IgG4-related sclerosing disease, IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease, IgG4-related disease, IgG4-related autoimmune disease, hyper-IgG4 disease and IgG4-related systemic disease. The extrapancreatic lesions of IgG4-RD also exhibit the same characteristic histologic features including dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, massive storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis as seen in IgG4-related pancreatitis. Abdominal manifestations include the following organs/systems: Bile ducts: Sclerosing cholangitis; Gallbladder and liver: Acalculous sclerosis cholecytitis with diffuse wall thickening; hepatic inflammatory pseudotumorts; Kidneys: round or wedge-shaped renal cortical nodules, peripheral cortical; lesions, mass like lesions or renal pelvic involvement; Prostate, urethra, seminal vesicle, vas deferens, uterine cervix; Autoimmune prostatitis; Retroperitoneum: Retroperitoneal fibrosis. thin or mildly thick homogeneous soft tissue lesion surrounding the abdominal aorta and its branches but also bulky masses causing hydronephroureterosis; Mesentery: Sclerosing mesenteritis usually involving the root of the mesentery; Bowel: Inflammatory bowel diseases mimicking Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. various types of sclerosing nodular lesions of the bowel wall; Stomach: Gastritis, gastric ulcers and focal masses mimicking submucosal tumor; omentum: Infiltration mimicking

  14. Ultrasonographic findings in blunt abdominal trauma among Yemeni patients in Sana'a

    A hundred and thirty patients (104 males, and 26 females) with suspected blunt abdominal trauma were admitted to this prospective study at Althawra hospital, Sana'a, Yemen in the period between june and december 2003. Real-time ultrasonography of the abdomen was performed in all patients. Fifty-six patients showed U/S evidence of visceral injury. Fourteen injuries of spleen, 7 had evidence of liver and 8 had renal injuries. Only eight needed a laparatomy because of cardiovascular instability and the laparatomy confirmed the ultrasound findings. The remainder were treated conservatively with good results. It is of interest that there was one ultrasonic sign of fluid in one patient who progressed well on conservative therapy. Ultrasonic signs of visceral laceration or contusion were found in patients who had 2 up to 8 sonic findings. It appears that visceral injury always gives more than two sonic signs. The remaining 33 patients only had intraperitoneal fluid, only one of them had volvulus. It is not possible to state the nature of fluid, whether it is an exudate, transudate, blood or lymph. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage would have been helpful. Seven patients died, most of them due to associated injuries, mainly head injury and cardiovascular collapse, one patient died on table and had retroperitonieal haematoma extending from pelvis to the mesentery of transverse colon and had no abdominal organ injury. The sensitivity of ultrasonography for liver was 87.5% and for spleen 100%. Ultrasonography is sensitive, safe, cost effective and non invasive method for screening patients with blunt abdominal trauma.(Author)

  15. On the abdominal pressure volume relationship

    Mulier, Jan Paul; Dillemans, Bruno; Crombach, Mark; Missant, Carlo; Sels, Annabel

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: During insufflation of the abdomen to create a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopy, both intra abdominal pressure and insufflated volume can be measured and are used to calculate the abdominal pressure-volume relationship. First, an accurate, linear relationship was identified using a mathematical model with an elastance, E, or its reciprocal the compliance C and with a pressure at zero volume, PV0. This function was stable and could be used to describe the abdominal characteristics of...

  16. TODDLER WITH RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN: MIGRAINE?

    Amit; Vaishali

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal migraine is a migraine variant, causing chronic idiopathic recurrent abdominal pain in 4-15% of children. It is usually seen between the ages of seven to twelve years and is more common in girls, with peak prevalence at the age of ten years. We report a 3 year old girl suffering from recurrent abdominal pain since 1½ years of age, who underwent extensive investigations as well as diagnostic laparotomy with appendectomy, and was ultimately diagnosed to have abdomi...

  17. The role of computed tomography in blunt hepatic injury

    Computed tomography (CT) images and medical records of 283 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were reviewed. There were 67 patients with hepatic injury. Liver was the most frequently injured organ in blunt abdominal trauma. Most hepatic injuries occurred in the right lobe of the liver. Of the 67 patients with hepatic injury, 60 patients had associated other injuries. There was a high incidence of associated lung injuries (35.8 %). Of importance is the high incidence of associated head injuries (22.4 %), because, in some patients such as those with concomitant head trauma, abdominal symptom is not obvious. The associated hemoperitoneum were correlated with the mode of therapy used in each case (operative vs. nonoperative). 32 patients with hepatic injury but no hemoperitoneum were managed nonoperatively. 9 patients with hepatic injury and little hemoperitoneum were also managed conservatively. 22 patients with high density hemoperitoneum were surgically treated. By combining information on the clinical state of the patient and CT finding, therapy of hepatic injury can be individualized and the incidence of nontherapeutic laparotomies decreased. (author)

  18. Syndesmosis injuries

    Hunt, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injuries to the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis commonly result from high-energy ankle injuries. They can occur as isolated ligamentous injuries and can be associated with ankle fractures. Syndesmotic injuries can create a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for musculoskeletal physicians. Recent literature has added considerably to the body of knowledge pertaining to injury mechanics and treatment outcomes, but there remain a number of controversies regarding diagnostic tests, imp...

  19. Clinical Findings in Patients with Splenic Injuries: Are Injuries to the Left Lower Chest Important?

    Schneir, Aaron

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical findings in patients with splenic injury and to determine if isolated left lower chest injury may be the single clinical indicator of splenic injury. The medical records of all adult blunt trauma patients with splenic injury over a 14 month period were reviewed. Significant left lower chest injury was considered present if the patient had left sided pleuritic chest pain with tenderness to ribs 7-12 or if these ribs were visualized as fractured on any imaging study. Patients were considered to have clinical findings suggestive of splenic injury if they had pre-hospital or emergency department hypotension, abdominal pain or tenderness, a Glasgow coma scale < 15, or gross hematuria. Ninety patients had splenic injury. Thirty-nine (43%. 95% CI 33, 54% patients had significant left lower chest injury. In five (6%. 95% CI 2, 12% patients, injury to this portion of the chest was the single indicator of splenic injury. Nearly half the patients with splenic injury will have significant injury to the left lower chest and this finding may be the only indicator of splenic injury.

  20. Abdominal migraine in childhood: a review

    Scicchitano B

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice Scicchitano,1 Gareth Humphreys,1 Sally G Mitton,2 Thiagarajan Jaiganesh1 1Children's Emergency Department, 2Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, St Georges Hospital, St Georges Healthcare NHS Trust, Tooting, London, United Kingdom Abstract: The childhood condition of abdominal migraine has been described under many different synonyms, including "abdominal epilepsy", "recurrent abdominal pain", "cyclical vomiting syndrome", and "functional gastrointestinal disorder". In the early literature, abdominal migraine is included in the "childhood periodic syndrome", first described by Wyllie and Schlesinger in 1933. Abdominal migraine has emerged over the last century as a diagnostic entity in its own right thanks to the development of well defined diagnostic criteria and its recent inclusion in the International Headache Society's Classification of Headache disorders. Despite this progress, little is known about the pathophysiology of the condition, and the treatment options are poorly defined. Here we summarize the recent literature, with particular focus on establishing the diagnosis of abdominal migraine and its pathophysiology, and suggest an approach to management. Keywords: abdominal migraine, recurrent abdominal pain, abdominal epilepsy, cyclical vomiting

  1. TODDLER WITH RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN: MIGRAINE?

    Amit

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal migraine is a migraine variant, causing chronic idiopathic recurrent abdominal pain in 4-15% of children. It is usually seen between the ages of seven to twelve years and is more common in girls, with peak prevalence at the age of ten years. We report a 3 year old girl suffering from recurrent abdominal pain since 1½ years of age, who underwent extensive investigations as well as diagnostic laparotomy with appendectomy, and was ultimately diagnosed to have abdominal migraine. She responded well to the prophylactic drug Flunarizine.

  2. Abdominal ultrasound in AIDS patients

    To analyze the ultrasonography findings in abdomen in the AIDS patients in our hospital, as well as the indications for this exploration, assessing the role of abdominal ultrasound (AU). The ultrasonographic and clinical findings in 527 patients who underwent a total of 715 explorations between 1992 and 1996 were studied. Hepatomegaly and/or splenomegaly, usually homogeneous, were observed in nearly half of the studies (45%); one third of the patients with marked splenomegaly presented visceral leishmaniasis. Focal lesions in liver and/or spleen, corresponding to angiomas, abscesses, lymphomatous lesions and metastasis, were detected in 5.7% of the explorations. Thirty-five percent of the AU revealed the presence of lymphadenopathy; nodes measuring over 2.5 cm were usually related to potential treatable infection or neoplasm. Thickening of the gallbladder wall did not usually indicate the presence of acute cholecystitis unless Murphy''s sign was also detected. Bile duct dilation and wall thickening was related to opportunistic cholangitis, and the increase in the echogenicity of the renal parenchyma was linked to AIDS-related nephropathy. Despite the fact that many of findings with AU are nonspecific, we consider that this approach should be the principal diagnostic technique in AIDS patients with suspected abdominal pathology or fever of unknown origin. (Author) 43 refs,

  3. The Neonate with Abdominal Mass

    M. Bajoghli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal abdominal masses have broad spectrum of pathology, ranging from small lesions found incidentally to large masses occupying the entire of peritoneal cavity. These tumors are benign to malignant, and from unilocular cysts to complex solid lesions. Many of these lesions identified and will treat before delivery. Others are discovered during routine examination. These lesions may be life threatening, or cause persistent morbidity. Some of these have no sequel."nDiagnosis began with history. Characteristic of the mass which must be note include location, size, shape, texture, mobility and tenderness. Other findings should be in mind to find out nature of mass, for example hypoplasia of chest wall with oligohydramnios due to GU tract obstruction (potter sequwnce, a bulging hymen due to hydrometrocolpus, skin metastasis due to neuroblastoma. Radiography is the next step that shows organomegaly and calcification. Next step is US which is an excellent screening tool. CT and MRI are occasionally indicated."nThe purpose of this presentation is to review the diagnosis of abdominal masses in neonates.

  4. Percutaneous drainage of abdominal abcess

    Men, Sueleyman E-mail: suleyman.men@deu.edu.tr; Akhan, Okan; Koeroglu, Mert

    2002-09-01

    The mortality in undrained abdominal abscesses is high with a mortality rate ranging between 45 and 100%. The outcome in abdominal abscesses, however, has improved due to advances in image guided percutaneous interventional techniques. The main indications for the catheter drainage include treatment or palliation of sepsis associated with an infected fluid collection, and alleviation of the symptoms that may be caused by fluid collections by virtue of their size, like pancreatic pseudocele or lymphocele. The single liver abscesses may be drained with ultrasound guidance only, whereas the multiple abscesses usually require computed tomography (CT) guidance and placement of multiple catheters. The pancreatic abscesses are generally drained routinely and urgently. Non-infected pancreatic pseudocysts may be simply observed unless they are symptomatic or cause problems such as pain or obstruction of the biliary or the gastrointestinal tract. Percutaneous routes that have been described to drain pelvic abscesses include transrectal or transvaginal approach with sonographic guidance, a transgluteal, paracoccygeal-infragluteal, or perineal approach through the greater sciatic foramen with CT guidance. Both the renal and the perirenal abscesses are amenable to percutaneous drainage. Percutaneous drainage provides an effective and safe alternative to more invasive surgical drainage in most patients with psoas abscesses as well.

  5. Uso da peritoneostomia na sepse abdominal Laparostomy in abdominal sepsis

    Juvenal da Rocha Torres Neto

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Dentre as modalidades terapêuticas da sepse abdominal, a peritoneostomia tem papel decisivo permitindo explorações e lavagens da cavidade de forma facilitada. Observamos pacientes com diagnóstico clínico de sepse abdominal internados no Serviço de Coloproctologia do Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal de Sergipe, e que foram submetidos a peritoneostomia de janeiro de 2004 a janeiro de 2006. Foram avaliados quanto ao diagnóstico primário e secundário, tipo de peritonite secundária, antibioticoterapia, esquema de lavagens, tempo de peritoneostomia, complicações e desfecho. Estudamos 12 pacientes, com idade de 15 a 57, média de 39,3 anos. Diagnóstico primário: abdome agudo inflamatório em 6(50%, abdome agudo obstrutivo em 2(16,7%, abdome agudo perfurativo em 2(16,7%, fístula enterocutânea em 1(8,3% e abscesso intra-cavitário em 1(8,3%. Diagnóstico secundário: perfuração de cólon em 4(33,3%, abscessos intra-cavitários em 3(25%, deiscências de anastomoses em 3(25%, 1(8,3% com tumor perfurado de sigmóide e 1(8,3% com necrose de cólon abaixado. Peritonite fecal em 10(83,3% e purulenta em 2(16,7%. A antibioticoterapia teve duração média de 19 dias. Lavagens de demanda em 6(50%, programadas em 4(33,3% e regime misto em 2(16,7%. O tempo médio de peritoneostomia foi de 10,9 dias (1-36. Como complicações: evisceração em 2(16,7% e fistulização em 1(8,3%. Quatro pacientes evoluíram com óbito.Among the therapeutics approach form of abdominal sepsis, the laparostomy has a decisive role allowing cavity explorations and lavages in an easier way. We study patients with abdominal sepsis diagnoses admitted to our surgical service of Coloproctology form Sergipe´s Federal University Hospital who underwent a Bogotá Bag laparostomy associated or not with polypropylene mesh from January 2004 to January 2006. These patients were assessed as: first and second diagnosis; secondary peritonitis type; antibiotic

  6. Lisfranc injuries.

    Welck, M J; Zinchenko, R; Rudge, B

    2015-04-01

    Lisfranc injuries are commonly asked about in FRCS Orthopaedic trauma vivas. The term "Lisfranc injury" strictly refers to an injury where one or more of the metatarsals are displaced from the tarsus. The term is more commonly used to describe an injury to the midfoot centred on the 2nd tarsometatarsal joint. The injury is named after Jacques Lisfranc de St. Martin (1790-1847), a French surgeon and gynaecologist who first described the injury in 1815. 'Lisfranc injury' encompasses a broad spectrum of injuries, which can be purely ligamentous or involve the osseous and articular structures. They are often difficult to diagnose and treat, but if not detected and appropriately managed they can cause long-term disability. This review outlines the anatomy, epidemiology, classification, investigation and current evidence on management of this injury. PMID:25543185

  7. Evaluation of an abbreviated abdominal-pelvic CT blunt trauma protocol

    In an attempt to expedite computed tomographic (CT) imaging in patients who have suffered multiple blunt trauma, an abbreviated abdominal-pelvic CT protocol was designed and tested. From 30 cases of abnormal full, 1.0-cm abdominal-pelvic scans, only post-contrast scans were selected for blind review at 1.0-cm increments through the spleen, 2.0-cm increments through the liver, and 3.0-cm increments to the symphysis pubis. Results and receiver operating characteristic curves were correlated with formal scan results and medical records. Preliminary results suggest that with adequate plain film spine and pelvic evaluation abbreviated abdominal -pelvic CT scanning may be effective in evaluating solid organ injury and in establishing trauma imaging protocols for the victim of multiple blunt trauma

  8. Radiation-Associated Kidney Injury

    The kidneys are the dose-limiting organs for radiotherapy to upper abdominal cancers and during total body irradiation. The incidence of radiotherapy-associated kidney injury is likely underreported owing to its long latency and because the toxicity is often attributed to more common causes of kidney injury. The pathophysiology of radiation injury is poorly understood. Its presentation can be acute and irreversible or subtle, with a gradual progressive dysfunction over years. A variety of dose and volume parameters have been associated with renal toxicity and are reviewed to provide treatment guidelines. The available predictive models are suboptimal and require validation. Mitigation of radiation nephropathy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and other compounds has been shown in animal models and, more recently, in patients.

  9. Radiographic evaluation of the renal injuries

    Adequate radiologic demonstration of the extent of renal injury following abdominal trauma is an important guide to therapy. In general, renal injuries were classified as minor, major or catastrophic based on a combination of radiological and clinical findings. Diagnostic methods were plain abdominal film, IVP, renal angiography and rapid noninvasive methods, such as ultrasonography and CT. This study was carried out to analyze about each diagnostic modalities including the specific findings of various types and extent of trauma and correlation of these studies for the determination of best diagnostic approach. Case materials were 100 cases of renal injuries during our 5 years experience. The results were as follows: 1. Among 100 patients, men predominated over women; men 82, women 18. About one half (44 cases) of these occurred between the age of 11-30. 2. Nonpenetrating blunt trauma account for 98% of cases. Penetrating injuries were only 3 cases. 3. Associated injuries were noted in 23 cases. 4. Renal injuries were classified into 4 categories. Grade I is contusion (33 cases), II parenchymal injury without pelvocalyceal system involvement (24 cases), III parenchymal injury with pelvocalyceal system involvement (29 cases) and IV injuried involving renal pedicle (15 cases). 5.. IVP is the most common initial diagnostic modality and good for screening of patient, but only 30% of specificity is noted. 6. Renal angiography has many advantage with accurate assesment of variety of lesion and be a good guidance for decision of prognosis and therapy. 7. Ultrasonography and CT are rapid noninvasive study, valuable in assessing the specific type and extent of injury and easily evaluated the entire abdomen. But for the vascular lession, angiography is perfected than ultrasonography or CT. 8. Conservative management was done in 68 cases. Operation were performed in 33 cases and 28 cases of them were major injuries

  10. Synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall

    A case report of synovial sarcoma arising in the abdominal wall is presented. A brief review of the clinical and radiological features of synovial sarcoma is made. Pre-operative diagnosis of an abdominal wall synovial sarcoma is virtually impossible, but should be considered when a soft tissue swelling is found to show amorphous stippled calcification X-ray. (author)

  11. Abdominal Wall Modification for the Difficult Ostomy

    Beck, David E.

    2008-01-01

    A select group of patients with major stomal problems may benefit from operative modification of the abdominal wall. Options may include a modified abdominoplasty (abdominal wall contouring), localized flaps, or liposuction. Although frequently successful, these techniques have the potential for significant morbidity.

  12. Hypoxia inhibits abdominal expiratory nerve activity.

    Fregosi, R F; Knuth, S L; Ward, D K; Bartlett, D

    1987-07-01

    Our purpose was to examine the influence of steady-state changes in chemical stimuli, as well as discrete peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation, on abdominal expiratory motor activity. In decerebrate, paralyzed, vagotomized, and ventilated cats that had bilateral pneumothoraces, we recorded efferent activity from a phrenic nerve and from an abdominal nerve (cranial iliohypogastric nerve, L1). All cats showed phasic expiratory abdominal nerve discharge at normocapnia [end-tidal PCO2 38 +/- 2 Torr], but small doses (2-6 mg/kg) of pentobarbital sodium markedly depressed this activity. Hyperoxic hypercapnia consistently enhanced abdominal expiratory activity and shortened the burst duration. Isocapnic hypoxia caused inhibition of abdominal nerve discharge in 11 of 13 cats. Carotid sinus nerve denervation (3 cats) exacerbated the hypoxic depression of abdominal nerve activity and depressed phrenic motor output. Stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors with NaCN increased abdominal nerve discharge in 7 of 10 cats, although 2 cats exhibited marked inhibition. Four cats with intact neuraxis, but anesthetized with ketamine, yielded qualitatively similar results. We conclude that when cats are subjected to steady-state chemical stimuli in isolation (no interference from proprioceptive inputs), hypercapnia potentiates, but hypoxia attenuates, abdominal expiratory nerve activity. Mechanisms to explain the selective inhibition of expiratory motor activity by hypoxia are proposed, and physiological implications are discussed. PMID:3624126

  13. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Full Text Available COMPONENT SEPARATION FOR COMPLEX ABDOMINAL WALL RECONSTRUCTION ALBANY MEDICAL CENTER ALBANY, NY April 30, 2008 00:00:07 ANNOUNCER: This event is being ... the premiere webcast of a component separation for complex abdominal-wall reconstruction, performed by Dr. Jerome D. ...

  14. Actinomycosis mimicking abdominal neoplasm. Case report

    Waaddegaard, P; Dziegiel, M

    1988-01-01

    In a patient with a 6-month history of nonspecific abdominal complaints, preoperative examination indicated malignant disease involving the right ovary, rectum and sigmoid, but laparotomy revealed abdominal actinomycosis. Removal of the ovary and low anterior colonic resection followed by penicil...

  15. Live secondary abdominal pregnancy- by chance!!

    Akanksha Sood

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pregnancy though rare but is a life threatening situation, if not recognized and managed properly. We are hereby presenting a rare successful outcome in a case of ruptured live Secondary Abdominal pregnancy with placental implants over intestines. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(2.000: 251-253

  16. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages

  17. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.brugger@meduniwien.ac.at; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages.

  18. A review of computerized tomography in blunt abdominal trauma at Christchurch Hospital

    A review was undertaken of computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen, performed between March 1993 and December 1994 for blunt abdominal trauma at Christchurch Hospital. CT findings were correlated with the clinical outcome. The outcome was either recovery from an abdominal point of view with or without laparotomy, or post mortem. A total of 116 CTs were reviewed, of which 76 were normal. CT was highly sensitive and specific for a variety of abdominal traumatic lesions. there were 1 false positive and 4 false negatives (only 2 of these significant). There was 1 non-therapeutic laparotomy based on CT findings. There was only 1 case of delayed treatment based on CT results. Three patients had unexplained findings of pneumoperitoneum. Care should be taken when interpreting the presence of free intraperitoneal air on CT scan. The possibility of missed bowel perforation should be considered, especially in the presence of free intra-abdominal fluid and no solid organ injury to account for it. CT scans are useful in the conservative management of solid organ injuries. 15 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  19. Injury Prevention

    ... Traumatic Brain Injury School sports Injuries can land students in the ER. Text Messaging: Emergency Physicians ... For You American College of Emergency Phycisians Copyright © American College of Emergency ...

  20. Impalement injury by glass shard with delayed colonic perforation

    Rosat, Adriá; Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Chocarro, Cristina; Barrera, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old man experienced a traumatic injury after a fall on top of a glass tea table, which caused some superficial lacerations all around the body. He was examined in the emergency room by a physician. The physician could not feel any foreign body upon wound exploration and sutured the laceration. Fourteen months after the injury, he developed progressive abdominal pain. On emergency room and abdominal x-ray showed a foreign body, which a CT scan revealed as an intraabdominal glass shard. The glass presumably impaled his abdominal wall as a result of his previous traumatic injury. The patient underwent laparotomy, which revealed a large glass (16x1cm) perforating the transverse colon. It was extracted and the perforation closed with a lineal stapler. There was no need of bowel resection and the patient was discharged home nine days after the intervention. PMID:26587176

  1. Inhalation Injury

    Coşkun Araz; Arash Pirat

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant advances in wound care of patients with burn injuries, inhalation injury remains as an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in these patients. Unfortunately, there are limited studies that have focused on the diagnosis, grading, pathophysiology, and therapy of inhalation injury, therefore a widely accepted consensus is lacking on these topics. Inhalation injury is generally defined as the inhalation of thermal or chemical irritants and can be divided into three...

  2. Endovascular Treatment of Blunt Traumatic Abdominal Aortic Occlusion With Kissing Stent Placement

    Blunt traumatic abdominal aortic dissection is extremely rare and potentially deadly. We present the case of a 62-year-old man involved in a frontal car crash. After emergency undergoing laparotomy for bowel injuries, he was referred to our hospital due to acute ischemia of bilateral lower extremities on day 3 after the trauma. Computed tomography and aortography showed an aortobiiliac dissection with complete occlusion. This injury was successfully treated by endovascular treatment with “kissing”-technique stent placement, which appears to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment.

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Blunt Traumatic Abdominal Aortic Occlusion With Kissing Stent Placement

    Idoguchi, Koji, E-mail: idoguchi@ares.eonet.ne.jp; Yamaguchi, Masato; Okada, Takuya [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Center for Endovascular Therapy (Japan); Nomura, Yoshikatsu [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Center for Endovascular Therapy (Japan); Okita, Yutaka [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Japan); Sugimoto, Koji [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Center for Endovascular Therapy (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    Blunt traumatic abdominal aortic dissection is extremely rare and potentially deadly. We present the case of a 62-year-old man involved in a frontal car crash. After emergency undergoing laparotomy for bowel injuries, he was referred to our hospital due to acute ischemia of bilateral lower extremities on day 3 after the trauma. Computed tomography and aortography showed an aortobiiliac dissection with complete occlusion. This injury was successfully treated by endovascular treatment with 'kissing'-technique stent placement, which appears to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment.

  4. Abdominal Wall Hematoma as a Rare Complication following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    Moon, In Tae; Sohn, Young Seok; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Hwan Cheol; Choi, Sung Il; Kim, Soon Gil; Oh, Ji Young

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal wall hematoma is a rare but potentially serious vascular complication that may develop after coronary angiographic procedures. In particular, an oblique muscle hematoma caused by an injury of the circumflex iliac artery is very rare, yet can be managed by conservative treatment including hydration and transfusion. However, when active bleeding continues, angiographic embolization or surgery might be needed. In this study, we report an uncommon case of injury to the circumflex iliac artery by an inappropriate introduction of the hydrophilic guidewire during the performance of a percutaneous coronary intervention.

  5. Successful laparoscopic management of combined traumatic diaphragmatic rupture and abdominal wall hernia: a case report

    Siow, Sze Li; Wong, Chee Ming; Hardin, Mark; Sohail, Mushtaq

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture and traumatic abdominal wall hernia are two well-described but rare clinical entities associated with blunt thoracoabdominal injuries. To the best of our knowledge, the combination of these two clinical entities as a result of a motor vehicle accident has not been previously reported. Case presentation A 32-year-old Indian man was brought to our emergency department after being involved in a road traffic accident. He described a temporary loss of con...

  6. Diagnostic management of blunt abdominal trauma in children; Diagnostik des stumpfen Bauchtraumas bei Kindern und Jugendlichen

    Wickede, M. von [Universitaetsklinikum Frankfurt (Germany). Abt. fuer Paediatrische Radiologie

    2007-06-15

    Children with abdominal injuries after blunt trauma can be managed non operatively in most cases. Rapid diagnosis is essential to select those patients who need immediate operation. Diagnostic methods of choice are ultrasonography, already performed in the emergency setting and contrast enhanced CT of the abdomen in hemodynamically stable patients. This work discusses the different diagnostic strategies and their use in the clinical practice. (orig.)

  7. Melanocortin MC4 receptor agonists alleviate brain damage in abdominal compartment syndrome in the rat.

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Hong-Guang; Zhao, Zi-Ai; Chang, Ming-Tao; Li, Yang; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Lian-Yang

    2015-02-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is accompanied by high morbidity and mortality in surgical departments and ICUs. However, its specific pathophysiology is unclear. IAH not only leads to intra-abdominal tissue damage but also causes dysfunction in distal organs, such as the brain. In this study, we explore the protective effects of melanocortin 4 receptor agonists in IAH-induced brain injury. The IAH rat models were induced by hemorrhagic shock/resuscitation (with the mean arterial pressure (MAP) maintained at 30 mm Hg for 90 min followed by the reinfusion of the withdrawn blood with lactated Ringer's solution). Then, air was injected into the peritoneal cavity of the rats to maintain an intra-abdominal pressure of 20 mm Hg for 4 h. The effects of the melanocortin 4 receptor agonist RO27-3225 in alleviating the rats' IAH brain injuries were observed, which indicated that RO27-3225 could reduce brain edema, the expressions of the IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory cytokines, the blood-brain barrier's permeability and the aquaporin4 (AQP4) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) levels. Moreover, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist chlorisondamine and the selective melanocortin 4 receptor antagonist HS024 can negate the protective effects of the RO27-3225. The MC4R agonist can effectively reduce the intracerebral proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and alleviate the brain injury caused by blood-brain barrier damage following IAH. PMID:25616531

  8. Head injury.

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  9. Abdominal Burkitt lymphoma in children : CT finding

    To evaluate the CT findings of Burkitt's lymphoma involving the abdomen in children We retrospectively analyzed the abdominal CT of ten children who presented with abdominal symptom. They were confirmed by operation in two cases and by fine needle aspiration biopsy in eight to be suffering from Burkitt's lymphoma. We also abdominal ultrasonography(USG)(n=10) and carried out small bowel follow-through examination(SBS)(n=5). Analyses focused on features of the abdominal mass : bowel wall thickening, ascites, lymphadenopathy, and the involvement of intra-abdominal solid organ. Abdominal CT at the time of presentation showed a huge conglomerated mass encasing segments of small bowel and also peripherally displacing bowel loops(n=9), bowel wall thickening(n=10), and ascites(n=10). In three of these cases, we were able to see tumor necrosis and cavity formation. Extensive infiltration into mesenteric fat and obliteration of tissue plane made it impossible to identify on CT the margin of the tumor and the presence of mesenteric lymphadenopathy. In four patients, sonography showed enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes(15-20mm), and in three, retroperitoneal lymph nodes(5mm, 10mm, 12mm in long dimension) were detected on CT and USG. Abdominal CT can reveal the characteristic imaging features of Burkitt's lymphoma in children. These are a huge conglomerate mass with or without cavity formation, that encases the small bowel and infiltrates the mesentery, ascites, and the relatively spared retroperitoneal lymph nodes

  10. Abdominal Burkitt lymphoma in children : CT finding

    Song, Jae Uoo; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Ahn, Hyo Seop; Shin, Hee Young [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chi Sung [Seoul City Boramae Hospital Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of Burkitt's lymphoma involving the abdomen in children We retrospectively analyzed the abdominal CT of ten children who presented with abdominal symptom. They were confirmed by operation in two cases and by fine needle aspiration biopsy in eight to be suffering from Burkitt's lymphoma. We also abdominal ultrasonography(USG)(n=10) and carried out small bowel follow-through examination(SBS)(n=5). Analyses focused on features of the abdominal mass : bowel wall thickening, ascites, lymphadenopathy, and the involvement of intra-abdominal solid organ. Abdominal CT at the time of presentation showed a huge conglomerated mass encasing segments of small bowel and also peripherally displacing bowel loops(n=9), bowel wall thickening(n=10), and ascites(n=10). In three of these cases, we were able to see tumor necrosis and cavity formation. Extensive infiltration into mesenteric fat and obliteration of tissue plane made it impossible to identify on CT the margin of the tumor and the presence of mesenteric lymphadenopathy. In four patients, sonography showed enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes(15-20mm), and in three, retroperitoneal lymph nodes(5mm, 10mm, 12mm in long dimension) were detected on CT and USG. Abdominal CT can reveal the characteristic imaging features of Burkitt's lymphoma in children. These are a huge conglomerate mass with or without cavity formation, that encases the small bowel and infiltrates the mesentery, ascites, and the relatively spared retroperitoneal lymph nodes.

  11. Abdominal ultrasonographic findings of Yersiniosis in children

    To review abdominal ultrasonography in Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis(YP) infection. From June 1993 through June 1994, abdominal ultrasonograms were reviewed in 36 patients with YP infection. The age of patients was from 4 to 14 years. A diagnosis of YP infection was made on the basis of isolation of YP from stool (n=15/36, 41.7%) and by documenting at least a minimum agglutination antibody titer of 1;160 or greater (n=34/36, 94.4%). Abdominal US findings were identified in 33/36 (91.7%) of patients with YP infection. US abnormalities included right lower quadrant abdominal lymphadenopathy in 28/36 (77.8%) of cases: increased bilateral renal cortical echogenecity with renal enlargement, 11/36 (30.6%) of cases:hepatosplenomegaly, 6/36 (16.7%) of cases: bowel wall thickening in termnal ileum and cecum, 4/36 (11.1%) of cases:and ascites, 2/36 (5.5%) of cases. Three patients revealed no abdominal sonographic finding. We conclude that abdominal US can help in the diagnosis of YP infection when US demonstrates multiple right lower quadrant abdominal lymphadenopathy, increased renal cortical echogenecity with renal enlargement, hepatosplenomegaly, intestinal wall thickening or ascites

  12. Radiologic findings of abdominal wall endometriosis

    To evaluate the imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis. In seven of 17 patients with surgically proven endometriosis of the abdominal wall, we retrospectively reviewed the findings of radiologic studies such as abdominal US (n=3), CT (n=4), and MRI (n=1). One patient under went more than one type of imaging, apparently. The surgical history of the seven, and their symptoms and preoperative diagnosis were reviewed, and the size, location, margin and nature of the mass, and the contrast enhancement patterns observed at radiologic studies, were assessed. The chief symptoms were palpable abdominal wall mass (n=5) and lower abdominal pain (n=2) around a surgical scar. Previous surgery included cesarean section (n=5), cesarean section with oophorectomy (n=1) and appendectomy (n=1). Masses were located in the subcutaneous fat layer (n=5) or rectus abdominis muscle (n=2), and their maximum diameter was 2.6 cm. Imaging findings, which correlated closely with the pathologic findings, included a well (n=5) or poorly marginated (n=2) solid mass, with a focal cystic area apparent in two cases. Although imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis may not be specific for diagnosis, the presence of a solid abdominal mass in female patients of reproductive age with a history of surgery is a diagnostic pointer

  13. Radiologic findings of abdominal wall endometriosis

    Seo, Jung Wook [Inje Univ. Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis. In seven of 17 patients with surgically proven endometriosis of the abdominal wall, we retrospectively reviewed the findings of radiologic studies such as abdominal US (n=3), CT (n=4), and MRI (n=1). One patient under went more than one type of imaging, apparently. The surgical history of the seven, and their symptoms and preoperative diagnosis were reviewed, and the size, location, margin and nature of the mass, and the contrast enhancement patterns observed at radiologic studies, were assessed. The chief symptoms were palpable abdominal wall mass (n=5) and lower abdominal pain (n=2) around a surgical scar. Previous surgery included cesarean section (n=5), cesarean section with oophorectomy (n=1) and appendectomy (n=1). Masses were located in the subcutaneous fat layer (n=5) or rectus abdominis muscle (n=2), and their maximum diameter was 2.6 cm. Imaging findings, which correlated closely with the pathologic findings, included a well (n=5) or poorly marginated (n=2) solid mass, with a focal cystic area apparent in two cases. Although imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis may not be specific for diagnosis, the presence of a solid abdominal mass in female patients of reproductive age with a history of surgery is a diagnostic pointer.

  14. Rupture of the ureter following blunt abdominal trauma

    Two male and one female patients, between the ages of four and 25 years, involved in road traffic accidents, sustained isolated ruptures of the right proximal ureter in addition to severe injuries to the skull and extremities. The typical urographic finding of an absent ureter was seen only once. In one incomplete rupture of the ureter from a solitary kidney; the ureter filled with contrast and there was no dilatation of the renal pelvis and in another case, the appearance of the ureter was simulated by a peri-ureteric contrast leak. Ultrasound examinations following abdominal trauma should be directed at finding peri-renal fluid; this should be followed by an urogram in order to recognize ureteric rupture at an early stage, when there may be few symptoms. (orig.)

  15. Study of Duodenal Rupture Followed by Abdominal Blunt Trauma

    Mohammad Reza Abdoulhosseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal rupture followed by blunt trauma is usually very rare and happens by hit to epigastrium region caused by trauma, accident or sport injuries. Because of unclear signs or no specific signs of rupture, usually diagnosis of rupture is delayed and associated with dangerous or occasionally deathful complications. The patient was a 29-year-old male who three days after accident referred to emergency unit of Shahroud Imam Hossein hospital with severe pain of abdomen, nausea, decrease in level of consciousness and unstable vital signs. After resuscitation, the patient with diagnosis of peritonitis underwent laparotomy. He had transverse and severs rupture that after duodenal reconstruction, a jejunostomy was performed, then a drain was placed at the site of duodenum and pancreas and the patient was sent to ICU. After two days followed by leakage from abdominal drain, the patient underwent laparotomy again. Then after one week, followed by leakage from abdominal drain, the patient underwent laparotomy. One week after last operation, due to general condition improvement, the patient was transferred to surgical ward and jejunostomy feeding was started for him and duodenostomy and jejunostomy were excluded. Then with enough speed, and paying attention to clinical signs & symptoms and with patient's exact examination, it is possible to prevent the waste of time and expense and gain desired results of treatment.

  16. Intra-abdominal pressure correlates with extracellular water content.

    Wojciech Dąbrowski

    Full Text Available Secondary increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP may result from extra-abdominal pathology, such as massive fluid resuscitation, capillary leak or sepsis. All these conditions increase the extravascular water content. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between IAP and body water volume.Adult patients treated for sepsis or septic shock with acute kidney injury (AKI and patients undergoing elective pharyngolaryngeal or orthopedic surgery were enrolled. IAP was measured in the urinary bladder. Total body water (TBW, extracellular water content (ECW and volume excess (VE were measured by whole body bioimpedance. Among critically ill patients, all parameters were analyzed over three consecutive days, and parameters were evaluated perioperatively in surgical patients.One hundred twenty patients were studied. Taken together, the correlations between IAP and VE, TBW, and ECW were measured at 408 time points. In all participants, IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE. In critically ill patients, IAP correlated with ECW and VE. In surgical patients, IAP correlated with ECW and TBW. IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE in the mixed population. IAP also correlated with VE in critically ill patients. ROC curve analysis showed that ECW and VE might be discriminative parameters of risk for increased IAP.IAP strongly correlates with ECW.

  17. Early intestinal changes following abdominal radiotherapy. Comparison of endpoints

    Purpose: To compare tests for intestinal function with clinical scores after abdominal irradiation. Patients and Methods: At the Department of Radiotherapy, Erfurt, Germany, intestinal changes were studied in 91 patients receiving abdominal radiotherapy between 1992 and 1996. Conventional fractionation (1.8-2 Gy per fraction, total doses 30.6-62.5 Gy) was applied. Before and at weekly intervals during radiotherapy, the clinical response was scored according to RTOG/EORTC for the upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract. REsorption tests for vitamin B12 and D-xylose were performed before the onset and immediately after treatment. Results: The clinical response displayed a well-defined dose-effects relationship with grade 1 effects in 5% and 50% of the patients at about 10 Gy and 50 Gy, respectively. For grade 2 reactions, 5%- and 50%-effective doses were 20-30 Gy and 60-80 Gy. Effects in the upper and lower GI tract were highly correlated. Changes in body weight did not show a correlation with other clinical symptoms. Changes in resorption also displayed a significant dose effect. However, no correlation was found with the clinical symptoms in the individual patient. Conclusion: In the present study, the clinical manifestation of intestinal side effects according to RTOG/EORTC criteria was reflected by neither the vitamin B12 nor by the D-xylose resorption test. Hence, these tests cannot be regarded as useful for objective quantitation of intestinal radiation injury. (orig.)

  18. Combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic and abdominal splenosis.

    Javadrashid, Reza; Paak, Neda; Salehi, Ahad

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic, and abdominal splenosis who presented with attacks of flushing, tachycardia and vague abdominal pain. The patient's past medical history included a splenectomy due to abdominal trauma and years later, a lung lobectomy due to recurrent pneumonia. An enhancing solid mass adjacent to the upper pole of the left kidney and nodular pleural based lesions in the left hemi-thorax along with nodular lesions in subcutaneous tissue of the left chest wall suggested possible adrenal malignancy with multiple metastases. Histopathologic examination demonstrated benign lesions of ectopic splenic tissue. PMID:20804314

  19. Roentgenologic evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma

    This study comprises 25 cases of blunt abdominal trauma proved by surgery. It is concluded that visceral damage by blunt abdominal trauma may be suspected, but can not be satisfactorily diagnosed upon a single plane abdominal roentgenologic examination with clinical support. Contrary to some reports in the literature, rupture of the hallow, viscus is more susceptible than solid organ and ileum is more than jejunum. It is a useful roentgenologic sign denoting distension and small cresent air shadow in the duodenal sweep of the damaged pancreas

  20. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of Focused Abdominal Sonography for Trauma in blunt abdominal trauma patients in a trauma centre of Hong Kong

    Cheung Kent Shek; Wong Hay Tai; Leung Ling Pong; Tsang Tat Chi; Leung Gilberto Ka Kit

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Focused Abdominal Sonography for Trauma (FAST) is widely used for the detection of intraperitoneal free fluids in patients suffering from blunt abdominal trauma (BAT).This study aimed at assessing the diagnostic accuracy of this investigation in a designated trauma centre.Methods: This was a retrospective study of BAT patients over a 6 year period seen in a trauma centre in Hong Kong.FAST findings were compared with laparotomy,abdominal computed tomography or autopsy findings,which served as the gold standard for presence of intrapcritoneal free fluids.The patients who did not have FAST or gold standard confirmatory test performed,had preexisting peritoneal fluid,died at resuscitation or had imcomplete documentation of FAST findings were excluded.The performance of FAST was expressed as sensitivity,specificity,predictive values (PV),likelihood ratios (LR) and accuracy.Results: FAST was performed in 302 patients and 153 of them were included in this analysis.The sensitivity,specificity,positive PV,negative PV,positive LR,negative LR and accuracy for FAST were respectively 50.0 %,97,3%,87.0%,84.6%,18.8,0.5 and 85.0%.FAST was found to be more sensitive in less severely injured patients and more specific in more severely injured patients.Conclusion: FAST is a reliable investigation iu the initial assessment of BAT patients.The diagnostic values of FAST could be affected by the severity of injury and staff training is needed to further enhance its effective use.

  2. Incidence investigation and analysis of hepatic stress injury after trauma

    WANG Quanchu; ZHANG Yafei; CHENG Zhengxiang

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the etiology and pathogenesis of hepatic stress injury after trauma.Methods 4677 patients with severe trauma in 153th Hospital of PLA from Jan.2004 to Jul.2005 were enrolled in this study to investigate the incidence of hepatic stress injury,and furthermore,in combination with medical information,the possible pathogenesis was analyzed.Results The main manifestation of hepatic stress injury was the elevated ALT or AST levels (387 cases,8.3% ).The incidence of hepatic stress injury after hand injury,burn injury,head injury,bone injury,abdominal injury,and thoracic injury were 16.6%,6.9%,5.6%,5.0%,3.8% and 2.0%,respectively,and among which,the incidence of hepatic stress injury after hand injury was statistically highest (P <0.01 ).Conclusion The total incidence of hepatic stress injury after trauma was 8.3%.Intestinal endotoxemia might be one of the beginning components of hepatic stress injury after trauma.

  3. Lung injury in acute pancreatitis: mechanisms, prevention, and therapy.

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    Lung injury is the most pertinent manifestation of extra-abdominal organ dysfunction in pancreatitis. The propensity of this retroperitoneal inflammatory condition to engender a diffuse and life-threatening lung injury is significant. Approximately one third of patients will develop acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which account for 60% of all deaths within the first week. The variability in the clinical course of pancreatitis renders it a vexing entity and makes demonstration of the efficacy of any specific intervention difficult. The distinct pathologic entity of pancreatitis-associated lung injury is reviewed with a focus on etiology and potential therapeutic maneuvers.

  4. Multi-detector CT (MDCT in bowel and mesenteric injury

    Vajjalla Ravikumar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate multi-detector CT (MDCT findings in bowel and mesenteric injury due to blunt abdominal trauma.Method: Retrospective evaluation of MDCT scan reports of patients admitted in Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar with bowel and mesenteric injury during the period of January 2005 to April 2008.Results: MDCT, without using oral contrast, clearly demonstrated various specific and less specific findings of bowel and mesenteric injury.Conclusion: Multi-detector CT is an excellent diagnostic modality in bowel and mesenteric injury. Routine administration of oral contrast agent is not mandatory for initial evaluation of these patients.

  5. Staging of pediatric abdominal malignancies

    The scope of this review is the role of CT in the staging of childhood solid abdominal malignancies. Owing to the limitations of space, only the commonest lesions will be discussed in detail: Wilms' tumor, neuroblastoma, and liver tumors. The TNM staging system has been utilized throughout this monograph. It will not be used in this chapter, however, since in this country different staging systems individualized to each pediatric tumor have been developed. These staging systems take into account the different biology of each tumor and have clear correlations with prognosis and therapeutic programs. The discussion centers almost exclusively on the role of CT in the staging and management of neoplastic processes in children. The information required for staging can sometimes be obtained by other imaging modalities (i.e., ultrasound, excretory urography, etc.) The choice of modality will be strongly influenced by techniques and expertise available as well as by the bias of the institution. An additional factor to be taken into consideration will be the economic factor. Prospective reimbursement will strongly encourage the use of tests that are cost-effective and clinically efficacious

  6. [Strategies for paediatric spleen and liver injuries].

    Zundel, S; Lieber, J; Tsiflikas, I; Henk, A-K; Schmittenbecher, P

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic injuries of the spleen and liver are typically caused by age-related falls or sports and traffic accidents. Today, the non-operative management for isolated injuries is established and evidence-based guidelines are available. The intact abdominal wall and the limited space within the peritoneum produce a compression which is the pathophysiological explanation for the limitation of the haemorrhage. Precondition for the non-operative therapy is the radiology-based classification of the injury (organ injury scale) and a haemodynamically stable patient. Haemodynamic stability is, if necessary maintained with blood transfusion, volume substitutes and the administration of catecholamines. In cases of hilar vascular injury and devascularisation or haemodynamic instability of the patient, despite utilisation of the measures mentioned above, urgent operative therapy needs to be performed. Organ sparing surgery is the therapy of choice for both liver and spleen. The spleen is required for the development of a competent immune system in the growing organism. Liver injuries can be further complicated by injury to the bile system, which might require operative reconstruction. If a patient suffers from multiple injuries and spleen or liver are involved, the decision on the management needs to be taken individually, no guidelines exist but the rate for operative therapy increases. Independent of the dimensions of injury, an experienced paediatric surgeon with his multidisciplinary team, considering the anatomic and age specific characteristics of a child, achieves the best therapeutic results. PMID:25531632

  7. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Full Text Available ... was yes, it did -- right here -- it did cause seromas as well. Another thing was that the ... is two things: one is it's going to cause more adherence of the Veritas to the abdominal ...

  8. An Unusual Case of Abdominal Pain

    Bobby Desai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal calyceal rupture is a usual etiology of abdominal pain in the emergency department. We present a case of unexpected renal calyx rupture in a patient with symptomatology of renal colic. A discussion and review are provided.

  9. Asthma May Raise Risk for Abdominal Aneurysm

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157202.html Asthma May Raise Risk for Abdominal Aneurysm Airway disease ... People 50 and older who have had recent asthma activity appear to be at an increased risk ...

  10. Adhesive intestinal obstruction following blunt abdominal trauma

    Advances in diagnosis and management of multiple trauma patients have lead to adopting a conservative approach for most patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Intestinal obstruction is a rare complication for this approach. Herein, we report a 37-year-old male, who did not have an abdominal operation, and who developed adhesive intestinal obstruction 7 weeks following blunt abdominal trauma. We detected no signs of peritonitis or intra-abdominal bleeding clinically or radiologically on admission. We initially treated the intestinal obstruction conservatively, but the obstruction did not resolve. Finally, we performed laparotomy, which showed that the small bowel was matted together by thick fibrous layers of adhesions. We performed adhesiolysis, and the patient was discharged home 3 weeks later. Histopathological findings of the fibrous layer were consistent with repair due to previous trauma and hemorrhage. We review the literature of this rare condition. (author)

  11. Rotura e Hematoma do Recto Abdominal

    Moura, D.; Lindo, T

    2013-01-01

    A miologia ântero-lateral do abdómen é constituída por dois músculos longos, o recto abdominal e o piramidal e três músculos largos, o oblíquo externo, oblíquo interno e transverso abdominal. A bainha do recto abdominal é formada pelas aponevroses de inserção anteriores dos músculos largos do abdómen em volta do recto abdominal, tendo camada anterior e camada posterior. Estes músculos abdominais são responsáveis por flexão e rotação do tronco, compressão e suporte/estabilidade de vísceras abd...

  12. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Full Text Available COMPONENT SEPARATION FOR COMPLEX ABDOMINAL WALL RECONSTRUCTION ALBANY MEDICAL CENTER ALBANY, NY April 30, 2008 00:00: ... Koumanis. The surgery comes to you from Albany Medical Center in Albany, New York. In just moments, ...

  13. Surveillance intervals for small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Bown, Matthew J; Sweeting, Michael J; Brown, Louise C;

    2013-01-01

    Small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs [3.0 cm-5.4 cm in diameter]) are monitored by ultrasound surveillance. The intervals between surveillance scans should be chosen to detect an expanding aneurysm prior to rupture....

  14. Audit of abdominal pain in general practice

    Edwards, M.W.; Forman, W.M.; Walton, J.

    1985-01-01

    An audit of 150 consecutive cases of abdominal pain presenting to an urban teaching practice between October 1983 and May 1984 was performed. The median duration of pain prior to presentation was two days. Females predominated in all age groups.

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Injury Psychological Issues After Spinal Cord Injury Psychological Health After Spinal Cord Injury Psychological Health After Spinal Cord Injury The Psychologist's Role After ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Psychological Realities After Spinal Cord Injury Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation How Psychologists Help ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Psychological Realities after Spinal Cord Injury Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation How Psychologists Help ...

  18. [Intestinal occlusion and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS)].

    Stagnitti, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal occlusion is defined as an independent predictive factor of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) which represents an independent predictor of mortality. Baggot in 1951 classified patients operated with intestinal occlusion as being at risk for IAH ("abdominal blow-out"), recommending them for open abdomen surgery proposed by Ogilvie. Abdominal surgery provokes IAH in 44.7% of cases with mortality which, in emergency, triples with respect to elective surgery (21.9% vs 6.8%). In particular, IAH is present in 61.2% of ileus and bowel distension and is responsible for 52% of mortality (54.8% in cases with intra-abdominal infection). These patients present with an increasing intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) which, over 20-25 mmHg, triggers an Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (ACS) with altered functions in some organs arriving at Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS). The intestine normally covers 58% of abdominal volume but when there is ileus distension, intestinal pneumatosis develops (third space) which can occupy up to 90% of the entire cavity. At this moment, Gastro Intestinal Failure (GIF) can appear, which is a specific independent risk factor of mortality, motor of "Organ Failure". The pathophysiological evolution has many factors in 45% of cases: intestinal pneumatosis is associated with mucosal and serous edema, capillary leakage with an increase in extra-cellular volume and peritoneal fluid collections (fourth space). The successive loss of the mucous barrier permits a bacterial translocation which includes bacteria, toxins, pro-inflammatory factors and oxygen free radicals facilitating the passage from an intra-abdominal to inter-systemic vicious cyrcle. IAH provokes the raising of the diaphragm, and vascular and visceral compressions which induce hypertension in the various spaces with compartmental characteristics. These trigger hypertension in the renal, hepatic, pelvic, thoracic, cardiac, intracranial, orbital and lower extremity areas, giving

  19. Missile injuries of the brain

    Data was analyzed relating to a consecutive series of 16 patients of penetrating brain injuries received at forward defense lines. Characteristics studied were the cause of injury, level of consciousness and various neurological deficits presented on initial examination, CT scan findings, the surgical procedures performed and the final outcome after one year of follow-up. One out of 16 patients, died due to severe associated injuries to abdominal viscera and major vessels. Meningitis occurred in one patient during the immediate postoperative period. All patients with motor weakness speech deficits and incontinence showed significant improvement. Hearing loss of one ear persisted in one patient. Two patients developed delayed onset seizures. It is concluded that, patients with penetrating brain injuries should be evacuated to the tertiary care neurosurgical centres as soon as possible. In operation only obviously necrotic brain and easily accessible metal and bone pieces should be removed. There is no need to explore the normal brain as it would only result in increased neurological deficits. The patients with such injuries should receive broad-spectrum antibiotics to prevent the infective complications. (author)

  20. [Surgical treatment of lower extremity peripheral nerve injuries].

    Kaiser, Radek

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries of the lower extremities are not frequent. The most common are traction injury of the peroneal nerve at the knee level or iatrogenic trauma of the pelvic nerves during abdominal surgery. Civil sharp injuries are rare.Indications for surgical revision follow the general rules of nerve surgery. Sharp injury should be treated as soon as possible, ideally within 72 hours. Closed lesions are indicated for surgery if a complete denervation remains unchanged three months after the injury. Best results can be achieved within six months from the injury. Irritations caused by bone fragments or scarring or by iatrogenic injury (clamps, cement, screws, etc.) may be revised later. However, the most important is early clinical examination in a specialized neurosurgical department. PMID:27256143

  1. Using abdominal massage in bowel management.

    Connor, Michelle; Hunt, Catherine; Lindley, Alison; Adams, John

    2014-07-15

    This article describes the introduction of abdominal massage techniques by a community team as part of a total bowel management programme for people with learning disabilities. A trust-wide audit of prescribed laxative use by this client group raised concerns, and led to a more systematic approach to managing constipation in people with learning disabilities. An education programme for carers proved to be successful. Some reported that adopting abdominal massage provided further opportunity to develop the therapeutic relationship. PMID:25005415

  2. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes Melzer; Isabella Mastrangi Magrini; Semíramis Martins Álvares Domene; Paula Andrea Martins

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's wa...

  3. A rare nonincisional lateral abdominal wall hernia

    Kim, Dong-Ju; Park, Jin-Woo

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman presented a rare lateral abdominal wall hernia. Three month before admission to Chungbuk National University Hospital, she found a large protruding mass measuring 8 cm in diameter in the midaxillary line just below the costal margin upon heavy coughing. She had no history of abdominal trauma, infection, or operation previously. The mass was easily reduced manually or by position change to left lateral decubitus. CT scan showed a defect of the right transversus abdominis mu...

  4. Abdominal integument atrophy after operative procedures

    Smereczyński, Andrzej; Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Lubiński, Jan; Bojko, Stefania; Gałdyńska, Maria; Bernatowicz, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze clinical material concerning postoperative atrophy of abdominal integument. Material and methods The evaluated group consisted of 29 patients with sonographically revealed atrophy of the abdominal wall. Those changes were observed after various surgical procedures: mainly after long, anterolateral laparotomies or several classical operations. Ultrasound examinations up to the year 2000 were performed with analog apparatus, in the latter years only with digi...

  5. Anesthetic Considerations for Abdominal Wall Reconstructive Surgery

    Slabach, Rachel; Suyderhoud, Johan P.

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia considerations for abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) are numerous and depend upon the medical status of the patient and the projected procedure. Obesity, sleep apnea, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease are not uncommon in patients with abdominal wall defects; pulmonary functions and cardiac output can be affected by the surgical procedure. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are also at a higher risk of coughing during the postoperative awakening process, wh...

  6. Asymptomatic torsion of intra-abdominal testis

    M. Amin El-Gohary

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of intra-abdominal testicular torsion, of eight years old boy who presented with asymptomatic left impalpable testis. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed a twisted small intra-abdominal testis in which the spermatic cord twisted 3 times over a band attached to the internal ring. The cord was long enough to bring the small testis into the scrotal sac. This case highlights the pole of laparoscopy in the management of impalpable testes.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of expanding haematoma of the lateral abdominal wall after blunt abdominal trauma

    We report a rare case of an expanding post-traumatic lateral abdominal wall haematoma. A superselective arteriogram of the deep circumflex iliac artery showed extravasation from the ascending branch, urging emergency therapy. Microcoil and Gelfoam embolisation was successfully performed. Haematomas of the abdominal wall can be divided in the common rectus sheath haematomas and the rare haematomas of the lateral abdominal wall. Differentiating both entities is essential, since there is a strong difference in their vascular supply. The typical vascular supply of the lateral abdominal wall is discussed, with emphasis on the ascending branch of the deep circumflex iliac artery. (orig.)

  8. Diagnosis and management of colonic injuries following blunt trauma

    Yi-Xiong Zheng; Li Chen; Si-Feng Tao; Ping Song; Shao-Ming Xu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the preoperative diagnostic approaches and management of colonic injuries following blunt abdominal trauma.METHODS: A total of 82 patients with colonic injuries caused by blunt trauma between January 1992 and December 2005 were enrolled. Data were collected on clinical presentation, investigations, diagnostic methods,associated injuries, and operative management. Colonic injury-related mortality and abdominal complications were analyzed.RESULTS: Colonic injuries were caused mainly by motor vehicle accidents. Of the 82 patients, 58 (70.3%) had other associated injuries. Laparotomy was performed within 6 h after injury in 69 cases (84.1%), laparoscopy in 3 because of haemodynamic instability. The most commonly injured site was located in the transverse colon. The mean colon injury scale score was 2.8. The degree of faecal contamination was classified as mild in 18 (22.0%), moderate in 42 (51.2%), severe in 14 (17.1%), and unknown in 8 (9.8%) cases. Sixty-seven patients (81.7%) were treated with primary repair or resection and anastomosis. Faecal stream diversion was performed in 15 cases (18.3%). The overall mortality rate was 6.1%. The incidence of colonic injuryrelated abdominal complications was 20.7%. The only independent predictor of complications was the degree of peritoneal faecal contamination (P = 0.02).CONCLUSION: Colonic injuries following blunt trauma are especially important because of the severity and complexity of associated injuries. A thorough physical examination and a combination of tests can be used to evaluate the indications for laparotomy. One stage management at the time of initial exploration is most often used for colonic injuries.

  9. Abdominal tuberculosis: clinical presentation and outcome

    To study the clinical presentation and outcome of cases of Abdominal Tuberculosis. Fifty four patients of Abdominal Tuberculosis were seen during the study period. Four patients were lost to follow-up, which were excluded. Detailed information of all the patients including age, sex, symptoms, signs, investigations and management was recorded, analyzed and compared with local and international data. Out of the 50 patients with Abdominal Tuberculosis, 31 were females and 19 males. Their ages ranged from 17 to 63 years, with a mean age of 25.1 years. Thirty five cases were admitted through Emergency and 15 through Outpatients departments. Abdominal pain was the most common symptom found in 44 (88%) patients followed by vomiting in 33 (66%). Abdominal tenderness was seen in 22 (44%) patients, while 16 (32%) patients had rigidity and other features of peritonitis. Surgery was performed in all these patients, limited right hemicolectomy in 17 (34%), segmental resection and anastomosis in 12 (24%), ileostomy and strictureplasty in six (12%) each, repair of perforation in five (10%) and adhesiolysis in four (8%) patients. Overall mortality was 8% due to septicaemia and multiorgan failure. Abdominal Tuberculosis is a significant clinical entity with lethal complications in neglected cases. It affects a younger age group and is more common in females. Clinical features are rather non-specific but vague ill health, low grade fever, weight loss and anorexia may help to diagnose the case. (author)

  10. Effect of rectal distension on abdominal girth.

    Marino, B; Ogliari, C; Basilisco, G

    2004-08-01

    It has been postulated that a viscerosomatic reflex activated by gut distension and inhibiting abdominal wall muscle tone may be one of the mechanisms underlying functional abdominal distension. Any demonstration of such a reflex has to take into account the fact that gut distension may increase abdominal girth as a result of volume displacement. As biomechanical and sensory rectal responses vary at different rates of rectal distension, we hypothesized that different rates of rectal distension might reveal different changes in abdominal girth. Abdominal girth was continuously recorded in 14 healthy subjects using a previously validated extensometer. The rectal distensions were made in a randomized order at rates of 100 mL min(-1) or 10 mL min(-1) up to 150 mL, and sham distensions were used as controls. An increase in abdominal girth was observed at the end of both distensions (P

  11. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes Melzer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998 and Taylor et al. (2000 were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3, female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3 and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0 were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Conclusions: Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children.

  12. Inhalation Injury

    Coşkun Araz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant advances in wound care of patients with burn injuries, inhalation injury remains as an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in these patients. Unfortunately, there are limited studies that have focused on the diagnosis, grading, pathophysiology, and therapy of inhalation injury, therefore a widely accepted consensus is lacking on these topics. Inhalation injury is generally defined as the inhalation of thermal or chemical irritants and can be divided into three types of injury: thermal injury, which is mostly restricted to the upper airway; chemical injury, which affects tracheobronchial tree; and systemic toxicity owing to toxic gases such as carbon monoxide. Inhalation injury increases the burn injury associated morbidity and mortality by causing airway problems and respiratory failure during the early phase and by contributing to the development of pneumonia and atelectasis during the late phase. Additionally, systemic effects of toxic gases such as carbon monoxide may also adversely affect the early and long-term outcome in burn victims. The early diagnosis and therapy of these problems plays a key role in improving the outcome of burn patients. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 37-45

  13. Montelukast induced acute hepatocellular liver injury

    Harugeri A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 46-year-old male with uncontrolled asthma on inhaled albuterol and formoterol with budesonide was commenced on montelukast. He developed abdominal pain and jaundice 48 days after initiating montelukast therapy. His liver tests showed an increase in serum total bilirubin, conjugated bilirubin, aspartate aminotranferase, alanine aminotranferase, and alkaline phosphatase. The patient was evaluated for possible non-drug related liver injury. Montelukast was discontinued suspecting montelukast induced hepatocellular liver injury. Liver tests began to improve and returned to normal 55 days after drug cessation. Causality of this adverse drug reaction by the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences or Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method (CIOMS or RUCAM and Naranjo′s algorithm was ′probable′. Liver tests should be monitored in patients receiving montelukast and any early signs of liver injury should be investigated with a high index of suspicion for drug induced liver injury.

  14. Isolated Jejunal Perforation Following Bicycle Handlebar Injury in Adults: A Case Report

    Neofytou, Kyriakos; Michailidou, Maria; Petrou, Athanasios; Loizou, Sakis; Andreou, Charalampos

    2013-01-01

    The small intestine is the third in frequency intraperitoneal organ which is injured after blunt trauma of the abdomen. In most of the cases, this type of injuries is accompanied by other injuries, which make it more difficult to diagnose. Failure of diagnosis and delay in treating these injuries significantly increase the morbidity and mortality of these patients. Abdominal visceral injuries after flipping the handlebar of the bike are common in children. Such injuries can cause injury to both solid and hollow abdominal viscera. Unlike children, adults' abdominal visceral injuries after flipping the bike's handlebar are extremely rare. A 25-year-old man was admitted to our department due to progressively abdominal pain after an accident with the handlebar of his bike. The subsequent CT scan after per os administration of contrast medium revealed the presence of free intraperitoneal contrast. It is a rare case of jejunal perforation after flipping the handlebar of the bicycle which was treated by partial removal of the injured part of jejunum and end-to-end anastomosis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time we describe such an injury with this mechanism to an adult. PMID:23984116

  15. Isolated Jejunal Perforation Following Bicycle Handlebar Injury in Adults: A Case Report

    Kyriakos Neofytou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The small intestine is the third in frequency intraperitoneal organ which is injured after blunt trauma of the abdomen. In most of the cases, this type of injuries is accompanied by other injuries, which make it more difficult to diagnose. Failure of diagnosis and delay in treating these injuries significantly increase the morbidity and mortality of these patients. Abdominal visceral injuries after flipping the handlebar of the bike are common in children. Such injuries can cause injury to both solid and hollow abdominal viscera. Unlike children, adults’ abdominal visceral injuries after flipping the bike’s handlebar are extremely rare. A 25-year-old man was admitted to our department due to progressively abdominal pain after an accident with the handlebar of his bike. The subsequent CT scan after per os administration of contrast medium revealed the presence of free intraperitoneal contrast. It is a rare case of jejunal perforation after flipping the handlebar of the bicycle which was treated by partial removal of the injured part of jejunum and end-to-end anastomosis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time we describe such an injury with this mechanism to an adult.

  16. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound in non-operative management of pancreatic injury in childhood

    Valentino, Massimo; Sartoni Galloni, Stefania; Rimondi, Maria Rita; Barozzi, Libero [University Hospital S. Orsola-Malpighi, Emergency Department, Bologna (Italy); Gentili, Andrea [University Hospital S. Orsola-Malpighi, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Bologna (Italy); Lima, Mario [University Hospital S. Orsola-Malpighi, Department of Paediatrics, Bologna (Italy)

    2006-06-15

    We report a 5-year-old child with pancreatic trauma from a blunt abdominal injury that was monitored with contrast-enhanced sonography. Unenhanced US failed to demonstrate the abnormality that was recognized by CT and MRI. The injury was well demonstrated by contrast-enhanced US which was therefore used for follow-up until its healing. (orig.)

  17. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound in non-operative management of pancreatic injury in childhood

    We report a 5-year-old child with pancreatic trauma from a blunt abdominal injury that was monitored with contrast-enhanced sonography. Unenhanced US failed to demonstrate the abnormality that was recognized by CT and MRI. The injury was well demonstrated by contrast-enhanced US which was therefore used for follow-up until its healing. (orig.)

  18. DIEP breast reconstruction following multiple abdominal liposuction procedures

    Farid, Mohammed; Nicholson, Simon; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Akali, Augustine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Previous abdominal wall surgery is viewed as a contraindication to abdominal free tissue transfer. We present two patients who underwent multiple abdominal liposuction procedures, followed by successful free deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. We review the literature pertaining to reliability of abdominal free flaps in those with previous abdominal surgery. Methods: Review of case notes and radiological investigations of two patients, and a PubMed search using the ter...

  19. Montelukast induced acute hepatocellular liver injury

    Harugeri A; Parthasarathi G; Sharma J; D′Souza G; Ramesh M

    2009-01-01

    A 46-year-old male with uncontrolled asthma on inhaled albuterol and formoterol with budesonide was commenced on montelukast. He developed abdominal pain and jaundice 48 days after initiating montelukast therapy. His liver tests showed an increase in serum total bilirubin, conjugated bilirubin, aspartate aminotranferase, alanine aminotranferase, and alkaline phosphatase. The patient was evaluated for possible non-drug related liver injury. Montelukast was discontinued suspecting montelukast i...

  20. Evaluation of the relationship between pelvic fracture and abdominal compartment syndrome in traumatic patients

    Sheikhi Rahim Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An increase in abdominal pressure can lead to so-called intra-abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS. Multiple factors such as an increase in retroperitoneal volume due to pancreatitis, bleeding and edema as a result of pelvic fracture can lead to compartment syndrome. Prevention is better than cure in compartment syndrome. By measuring the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP through the bladder, a quick and accurate assessment of abdominal pressure is achieved. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between pelvic fracture and ACS in traumatic patients. Materials and Methods: This research was a descriptive-analytical study conducted on 100 patients referring to the Shiraz Nemazee Hospital in 2010. IAP was monitored every 4 h in patients suspected to be at high risk for ACS, e.g., those undergoing severe abdominal trauma and pelvic fracture. The IAP was measured via the urinary bladder using the procedure described by Kron et al. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The findings showed that ACS occurred in 28 of 100 patients. With regard to the associated injuries with abdominal trauma, 19% of all patients and 46/42% of the patients with ACS had pelvic fracture. Chi-square test revealed a significant relationship between pelvic fracture and incidence rate of ACS ( P < 0.001. Conclusions: According to the collected data, pelvic fracture due to a trauma can be one of the important causes of an increase in IAP and ACS. In this lethal condition, prevention is better than cure. Therefore, serial measurement of IAP through the bladder in high-risk patients (those with pelvic fracture by trauma is recommended to the nurses to diagnose this condition and to decrease the incidence of mortality.

  1. Morphologic studies of high fall injuries

    XIA Peng; CHANG Hong-fa; YU Yong-min; DAI Guo-xin; LI Hong-wei; JIANG Qiang-guo; YIN Zhi-yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective:By studying the mode and morphologic character of high fall injuries on the scene,and exploring the injury situation of different heights,different fall ways and postures,to provide a reference for the forensic identification of high fall injury.Methods:All the high fall cases were statistically analysed according to their gender,age,ground-touching posture,fall height,site and type of the injury.Results:Among 134 high fall cases,98 were male and 36 were female with the age ranging from 2-71 years (37.6±16.9 on average),in which,10-60 years old group consisted of 110 cases (82%).Most cases fell from windows or roofs (73%) and the touching objects were cement ground or shaft bottom of elevators.Among these cases,head injury was generally serious,followed by chest and abdominal injuries.The morphologic changes depend upon the height,nature,as well as the posture at the point while the body touches the ground.Conclusion:Morphologic study of high fall injury assists medicolegal physicians to make correct identifications of the cause and nature of high fall injuries.

  2. Pediatric Injury

    ... Ballesteros, M. F., Sleet, D. A. (2008). CDC childhood injury report: patterns of unintentional injuries among 0-19 ... American Academy of Pediatrics. (2008). Management of pediatric trauma. Pediatrics, 121 , 849–854. [top] How many people are ... may slightly increase childhood risk of neurological impairment, NIH study suggests All ...

  3. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Intra-abdominal Ischemia in Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Smit, M.; Buddingh, K. T.; Bosma, B; Nieuwenhuijs, V B; Hofker, H.S.; Zijlstra, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Severe acute pancreatitis may be complicated by intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), and intestinal ischemia. The aim of this retrospective study is to describe the incidence, treatment, and outcome of patients with severe acute pancreatitis and ACS

  4. The therapeutic impact of abdominal ultrasound in patients with acute abdominal symptoms

    AIM: The technical performance of abdominal ultrasound in the investigation of acute abdominal pain has been thoroughly investigated but its therapeutic effects are less well understood. We aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of abdominal ultrasound in the investigation of acute abdominal pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A pre- and post-intervention observational study design was used to determine the diagnostic and therapeutic effects of abdominal ultrasound for acute abdominal pain. Referring clinicians completed a pre-ultrasound questionnaire that detailed their leading diagnosis, confidence in this and intended management in 100 consecutive adult patients. Following ultrasound a second questionnaire was completed. This again detailed the leading diagnosis, confidence in this and their intended management. Clinicians quantified the management contribution of ultrasound both for the individual case in question and in their clinical experience generally. RESULTS: The leading diagnosis was either confirmed or rejected in 72 patients and a new diagnosis provided where no prior differential diagnosis existed in 10. Diagnostic confidence increased significantly following ultrasound (mean score 6·5 pre-ultrasound vs 7·6 post-ultrasound, P < 0·001). Intended management changed following ultrasound in 22 patients; 15 intended laparotomies were halted and a further seven patients underwent surgery where this was not originally intended. Ultrasound was rated either 'very' or 'moderately' helpful in 87% of patients, with 99% of clinicians finding it either 'very' or 'moderately' helpful generally. CONCLUSION: Abdominal ultrasound has considerable diagnostic and therapeutic effect in the setting of acute abdominal pain. Dhillon, S. et al. (2002)

  5. Prenatal diagnosis of a fetal abdominal eventration: a rare congenital abdominal wall defect.

    Roth, Philippe; Martin, Alain; Bawab, Fariz; Fellmann, Florence; Aubert, Didier; Maillet, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of abdominal eventration associated with cystic fibrosis, diagnosed by mid-trimester ultrasonography. The defect concerned the abdominal muscles and their aponevrotic sheath, but respected the skin. There was no associated malformation. The outcome was favorable after surgery, and the infant is well at the age of 6 months. PMID:18046068

  6. The Abdomen in “Thoracoabdominal” Cannot Be Ignored: Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Complicating Extracorporeal Life Support

    Arthur J. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal life support (ECLS is an incredible life-saving measure that is being used ever more frequently in the care of the critically ill. Management of these patients requires extreme vigilance on the part of the care providers in recognizing and addressing the complications and challenges that may arise. We present a case of overt abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS in a previously well young male on ECLS with a history of trauma, submersion, hypothermia, and no intra-abdominal injuries. The patient developed ACS soon after ECLS was initiated which resulted in drastically compromised flow rates. Taking into account the patient’s critical status, an emergent laparotomy was performed in the intensive care unit which successfully resolved the ACS and restored ECLS flow. The patient had an unremarkable course following and was weaned off ECLS but unfortunately died from his original anoxic injury. This case highlights several salient points: first, care of patients on ECLS is challenging and multiple etiologies can affect our ability to manage these patients; second, intra-abdominal pressures should be monitored liberally in the critically ill, especially in patients on ECLS; third, protocols for emergent operative treatment outside of traditional operating rooms should be established and care providers should be prepared for these situations.

  7. Value of ultrasound in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma;O valor da ultra-sonografia na avaliacao do traumatismo abdominal fechado

    Jayanthi, Shri Krishna

    2008-07-01

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in an age group including from teenagers to young adults, in a male dominant proportion, resulting in great economic and social impact. Within the complex of trauma, blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is frequent event and presents difficulty in the evaluation and management since the clinical examination shows low sensitivity and specificity. The detection of hemo peritoneum is one of the methods of evaluation of possible indirect intra-abdominal injuries, initially using direct diagnostic abdominal paracentesis and posteriorly the diagnostic peritoneal lavage, that despite the effectiveness, have drawbacks such as invasiveness and the inability of hemo peritoneum quantification and the lesion staging, resulting in non-therapeutic laparotomies. Imaging methods provide useful information in the investigation of abdominal injuries, such as conventional and contrast radiology, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT), which is the best effective method, but has its own drawbacks, such as cost, accessibility, use of ionizing radiation and contrast media and the displacement of the patient to the machine. US presents itself as an alternative in the initial evaluation of these patients as noninvasive method, with lack of harmfulness, low cost, fast answer and portability. Nevertheless, this method also has its limitations, as in cases of abdominal injuries without free fluid. This study was conducted in order to establish the performance of the US in this setting, allowing to rationalise the use of CT. For this purpose we studied 163 patients treated in the ER of HC/FMUSP, with the completion of consecutive US and CT. The population fits the usual profile of trauma victims, with 83% male, 56% in the age group between 20 and 39 years and in 73% of cases victims of traffic accidents. They were brought to the service in an average time of 51 minutes, mainly stable and with satisfactory level of consciousness. US took on

  8. CT diagnosis of abdominal ectopic pheochromocytoma

    Objective: To discuss the value of CT in diagnosis of abdominal ectopic pheochromocytoma. Methods: CT findings of 5 cases surgically and pathologically proved with ectopic pheochromocytoma were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Soft tissue mass with light asymmetry enhancement was found between the abdominal aorta and the inferior vena ca-va in one case. 1 case was completely cystic with light enhancement of the cystwall located in front of the left side of the abdominal aorta. 1 case of large solid mass occurred between the renal hilum and the tail of pancreas, with irregular shape, unclear boundary, central necrosis, calcification and obviously enhancement at the solid part. 2 cases showed as oval soft lump with even density, moderate strengthening located before the abdominal aorta. Paroxysmal hypertension occurred in 3 cases and didn't in 2 cases. Hypertension happened in 1 case during the operation because of stimulation. Blood pressure appeared in 1 case during and after operation. Blood and urinary catecholamine increased significantly in 4 cases. Conclusion: Ectopic pheochromocytoma mainly located surround the abdominal aorta with diverse CT performance. It is helpful for diagnosing when finding a lesion locates at the specified sites combined with typical clinical presentation. CT can not only depict small tumor, but also can show the relationship with surrounding structure, and it provides important information for the operation and prognosis. (authors)

  9. Abdominal tuberculosis, clinical-radiological revision

    We retrospectively evaluated the clinical charts and diagnostic images of hospitalised patients with histological or bacteriologic demonstration of abdominal tuberculosis (TB) including those with probable abdominal TB, who had pulmonary TB and radiologic findings highly suggestive of abdominal TB with favourable response to treatment. Cases with genitourinary TB were excluded. We found 24 patients with an average age of 25 yrs. In some cases this entity was not suspected on the imaging studies, and diagnosis was made on surgery. The most frequent symptoms were: abdominal pain, diarrhoea, fever, vomiting, weight loss and abdominal mass. Active pulmonary TB was demonstrated on 8 cases (33%) Peritoneal presentation was the most frequent (54%) with septated or simple ascites, cystic ascites or pseudocysts within bowel loops. Mesenteric involvement (21 %) showed adenopathy or masses identified with CT. Intestinal forms (17%) showed pseudo-polyps on terminal ileum and ulcers on ileum, cecum and colon. We found one case with diffuse ulcerative involvement of the colon. Two cases showed hepatic involvement, one with an abscess and a tuberculosis Cole cystitis, with pyloric syndrome due to fibrosis

  10. Paediatric emergencies: non-traumatic abdominal emergencies

    Presentation with acute abdominal pain or abdominal symptopathology is a very common cause of presentation of children to hospital. The causes are dependent in part on the age of the child, in part on the presence of previous surgery, and can be divided into those that relate to congenital abnormalities at whatever age they present, acquired disease and infection. Children, particularly young children are often poor historians, and therefore the clinical examination and the laboratory investigations are important in helping to come to a diagnosis. Primary imaging of abdominal emergencies in childhood is a radiograph of the abdomen, followed by ultrasound. Further imaging depends on the results of these studies. An ordered review of the abdomen radiograph is important if the salient features on X-ray are not to be missed. Practitioners should be competent with abdominal ultrasound in children and know where to seek the causes of disease, as these are different from those that are obtained in many instances in adults. Familiarity with the likely causes is important. The three commonest causes of acute abdominal pain in childhood are, in young infants, intussusception, appendicitis and mesenteric adenitis. In older children, inflammatory bowel disease and ovarian pathology are also included. This article details the approach to imaging and the salient features of some of the conditions. (orig.)

  11. [Abbreviated laparotomy for treatment of severe abdominal trauma: use in austere settings].

    Balandraud, P; Biance, N; Peycru, T; Savoie, P H; Avaro, J P; Tardat, E; Pourrière, M; Cador, L

    2007-10-01

    Abbreviated laparotomy is a recent technique for management of patients with severe abdominal trauma. It is based on a unified approach taking into account the overall extent of injury and the victim's physiologic potential to respond to hemorrhage. It is the first step in a multi-modal strategy. The second step is the critical care phase. The third step consists of "second-look" laparotomy that should ideally be performed on an elective basis within 48 hours and is aimed at definitive treatment of lesions. The goal of abbreviated laparotomy is damage control using temporary quick-fix procedures limited to conspicuous lesions and rapid hemostasis and/or viscerostasis procedures so that the patient can survive the acute critical period. Tension-free closure of the abdominal wall, if necessary using laparostomy, is essential to avoid abdominal compartment syndrome. With reported survival rates of about 50% in Europe and the United States, this simple life-saving technique that requires limited resources should be introduced in Africa where severe abdominal trauma often involves young patients. PMID:18225739

  12. Nonfreezing Tissue Injuries

    ... Wrist Extensor Stretch Additional Content Medical News Nonfreezing Tissue Injuries By Daniel F. Danzl, MD NOTE: This ... Cold Injuries Overview of Cold Injuries Hypothermia Nonfreezing Tissue Injuries Frostbite In nonfreezing tissue injuries, parts of ...

  13. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Repetitive Stress Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Repetitive Stress Injuries Print ... t had any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that ...

  14. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in Association with Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in the Endovascular Era: Vigilance Remains Critical

    Matthew C. Bozeman

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we describe published experience with IAH and ACS complicating abdominal vascular catastrophes, experience with ACS complicating endovascular repair of rAAAs, and techniques for management of the abdominal wound. Vigilance and appropriate management of IAH and ACS remains critically important in decreasing morbidity and optimizing survival following catastrophic intra-abdominal vascular events.

  15. Diagnosis and Treatment of 42 Cases of Multiple Injuries with Pancreatic Injury

    C. MBA MBA; Xiangiun BAI; Zhanfei LI; Zhaohui TANG; Wenxuan WANG; Zhen YANG

    2008-01-01

    In order to summarize the clinical diagnosis and treatment methods for 42 cases of mul- tiple injuries with pancreatic injury, a retrospective analysis on 42 cases of multiple injuries with pancreatic injury from January 1990 to January 2006 was carded out in our hospital. Most cases were associated with hemopneumothorax and rib fractures (52.3%), shock (50%), multiple fractures (47.6%), and severe brain injury (26.1%). In 42 cases, one case died of severe hemorrhagic shock, and the remaining 41 cases (97.6%) were cured (including 40 cases receiving surgical operation and one case receiving the conservative treatment). Postoperative complications occurred in 16 cases (21 cases/times): pancreatic fistula (5 cases/times) and incisional wound infection (5 cases/times), in- tra-abdominal infection (3 cases/times), stress ulcer (3 cases/times), pleural effusion (3 cases/times), pulmonary infection (one case) and wound dehiscence (1 case). The principle therapy of multiple in- juries with pancreatic injury is to rescue life, followed by active treatment to prevent injuries which giving rise to the abnormal respiratory and circulatory functions, management of cerebral hernia and other injuries which endangers life at last, and the pancreatic injury to increase the survival rate and survival quality.

  16. Thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis in a horse.

    Toribio, R E; Kohn, C W; Lawrence, A E; Hardy, J; Hutt, J A

    1999-05-01

    A 5-year-old Quarter Horse mare was examined because of lethargy, fever, and weight loss of 1 month's duration. Thoracic auscultation revealed decreased lung sounds cranioventrally. Thoracic ultrasonography revealed bilateral anechoic areas with hyperechoic strands, consistent with pleural effusion and fibrin tags. A large amount of free fluid was evident during abdominal ultrasonography. Abnormalities included anemia, hyperproteinemia, hyperglobulinemia, hyperfibrinogenemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Thoracic radiography revealed alveolar infiltrates in the cranial and caudoventral lung fields. A cavitary mass, consistent with an abscess, could be seen caudodorsal to the crura of the diaphragm. Ultrasonographic evaluation of this area revealed a hypoechoic mass with septations. Bilateral thoracocentesis was performed. Bacterial culture of the pleural fluid did not yield growth, but Blastomyces dermatitidis was isolated from pleural fluid, abdominal fluid, and an aspirate of the abscess. The mare was euthanatized, and a diagnosis of thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:10319179

  17. [Pediatric Abdominal Pain – Harmless or Harmful?].

    Furlano, Raoul Ivano

    2016-04-27

    Abdominal pain is a very common pediatric complaint. In the majority of cases there is no life-threatening pathology behind this symptom, but a functional disease. However, all-day activities of children and adolescents are often limited, frequent absences from school, and general physician/ pediatrician office visits with often unnecessary diagnostic and therapies are registered. Once an organic etiology of the abdominal pain is excluded by a thoroughly medical history taking and physical examination, the first steps for a successful alleviation of the pain is the reassurance of the patients and their family that there is no life-threatening pathology. There is evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapy may be useful in improving pain and disability outcome in the short term. There is no evidence for pharmacological, dietetic, or complementary intervention in the treatment of chronic functional abdominal pain. PMID:27120211

  18. Computed tomographic evaluation of renal injuries

    Adequate radiographic demonstration of the extent of renal injury following blunt abdominal trauma is an important guide to therapy. The diagnostic evaluation of renal injuries usually begins with excretory urography, but not provide detailed information about the extent of injury. The need for a more accurate noninvasive modality led us to investigate the use of computed tomography. We evaluated with computed tomography and excretory urography 30 selected patients suspected of having major renal injury. Of these patients 11 were also underwent arteriography for assessment of renal arterial injuries. In this paper, we wish to analyze the result of the above modalities, particularly angiography and computed tomography. The brief results were as follow. 1. Among 30 patients, 21 cases were male and 9 cases were female. About one third of these occurred between the age of 20-29. 2. All cases were non penetrating blunt traumas. 3. Renal injuries were categorized into 3 groups. Category I is minor renal injuries (14 cases), II is major renal injuries (13 cases), and III is catastrophic renal injuries (3 cases). 4. IVP is the most common initial diagnostic modality and good for screening of patients, but lack of specificity. In our study the specificity is about 33%. 5. CT is more accurate in detecting hematoma, parenchymal laceration, fracture and extravasation of urine, but angiography is more confirmative in diagnosis of vascular injuries. 6. Conservative management was done in 19 cases; 13 cases of category I and 6 cases of II. Operation was performed in 11 cases; 1 case of category I, 7 cases of II and 3 cases of III. 7. Associated injuries were noted in 17 cases (57%).

  19. Temporary abdominal closure in the critically ill patients with an open abdomen.

    Ghodratollah Maddah

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergent abdominal surgeries from either of traumatic or non traumatic causes can result in situations in which the abdominal wall cannot initially be closed. Many techniques have been reported for temporary coverage of the exposed viscera, but the result of various techniques remains unclear. During 94 months, 19 critically ill patients whit an open abdomen underwent surgery using plastic bags (Bogotá bag. The study population comprised of 11 (57.9% male and 8 (42.1% female with an average age of 32.26+14.8 years. The main indications for temporary abdominal coverage were as follows: planned reoperation in 11 (57.9% patients, subjective judgment that the fascia closure is too tight in 6 (31.6% patient's damage control surgery in one patient (5.3% and development of abdominal compartment surgery in one patient (5.3%. Surgical conditions requiring temporary abdominal closure was severe post operative peritonitis in 9 (47.4% patients, post operative intestinal fistula in 4 (21.1% patients, post traumatic intra abdominal bleeding in 3 (15.8% patients and intestinal obstructions in 3 (15.8% patients. Length of hospitalization was 45+23.25 days and the mean total number of laparotomies was 6.2+3.75 times per patient. Three bowel fistulas occurred due to a missed injury at the time of initial operation that was discovered during changing the plastic sheet. They were unrelated to coverage technique. All of them were treated by repair of the defect and serosal patch by adjacent bowel loop. Only one (10.0% patient underwent definitive closure within 6 months of initial operation. The remaining survivor has declined to have hernia repaired. There were 4 (%21.1 early postoperative deaths that were not related to the abdominal coverage technique. Also, there were 5 (26.3% late deaths that were due to dissemination of malignancy with a mean survival time of 20.8+13 (range 2-54 months. Currently 10 patients (52.6% are alive at a follow up of 45 (range 1

  20. Temporary abdominal closure in the critically ill patients with an open abdomen.

    Maddah, Ghodratollah; Shabahang, Hossein; Abdollahi, Abbas; Zehi, Vahid; Abdollahi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    The emergent abdominal surgeries from either of traumatic or non traumatic causes can result in situations in which the abdominal wall cannot initially be closed. Many techniques have been reported for temporary coverage of the exposed viscera, but the result of various techniques remains unclear. During 94 months, 19 critically ill patients whit an open abdomen underwent surgery using plastic bags (Bogotá bag). The study population comprised of 11 (57.9%) male and 8 (42.1%) female with an average age of 32.26+14.8 years. The main indications for temporary abdominal coverage were as follows: planned reoperation in 11 (57.9%) patients, subjective judgment that the fascia closure is too tight in 6 (31.6%) patient's damage control surgery in one patient (5.3%) and development of abdominal compartment surgery in one patient (5.3%). Surgical conditions requiring temporary abdominal closure was severe post operative peritonitis in 9 (47.4%) patients, post operative intestinal fistula in 4 (21.1%) patients, post traumatic intra abdominal bleeding in 3 (15.8%) patients and intestinal obstructions in 3 (15.8%) patients. Length of hospitalization was 45+23.25 days and the mean total number of laparotomies was 6.2+3.75 times per patient. Three bowel fistulas occurred due to a missed injury at the time of initial operation that was discovered during changing the plastic sheet. They were unrelated to coverage technique. All of them were treated by repair of the defect and serosal patch by adjacent bowel loop. Only one (10.0%) patient underwent definitive closure within 6 months of initial operation. The remaining survivor has declined to have hernia repaired. There were 4 (%21.1) early postoperative deaths that were not related to the abdominal coverage technique. Also, there were 5 (26.3%) late deaths that were due to dissemination of malignancy with a mean survival time of 20.8+13 (range 2-54) months. Currently 10 patients (52.6%) are alive at a follow up of 45 (range 1

  1. Indium 111 leucocyte scintigraphy in abdominal sepsis

    We have studied the clinical utility of indium 111 autologous leucocyte scintigraphy retrospectively in 45 patients presenting with suspected intra-abdominal sepsis. The sensitivity was 95% (21/22) and the specificity was 91% (21/23). Some 34 of the studies (17 positive and 17 negative) were considered helpful in furthering patient management (76%) and 8, unhelpful (18%). In 3, the study results were misleading and led to inappropriate treatment. Indium 111 scintigraphy, whether positive or negative, provides information in patients with suspected intra-abdominal sepsis upon which therapeutic decisions can be based. (orig.)

  2. Aggressive malignant abdominal mesothelioma: Clinical report

    A 32-year-old Filipino female, working as an x-ray technician, presented to the Emergency Room (ER) with acute abdominal pain for one day. The pain was mainly on the left side and left hypochondrium. She had recurring abdominal pain before but not significant to worry her. She also complained of abdominal distension, which she noticed one week ago. Abdominal examination revealed fullness in the left hypochondrium with marked tenderness but negative rebound. Abdominal ultrasound (US) showed a huge mass mainly in the left hypochondrium. The origin of the mass cannot be identified by US. A computerized tomography scan showed a mass in the left side of the abdomen crossing the midline with a necrotic centre. The hospital course of the patient runs smoothly, and she was discharged after 7-days and referred to an Oncology Center. Abdominal mesothelioma is a neoplasm arising from the mesothelial surface lining the abdominal cavity. It is less frequent than that of the pleura. It is a rapidly growing and fatal malignancy with a median survival of less than 1-year. The relation between pleural malignant mesothelioma and asbestos is well recognized since it was described in 19602 but implication of asbestos exposure in the etiology of the peritoneal type is less obvious. This patient history is giving no obvious exposure to asbestos but as she is working in the Radiology Department as an x-ray technician she is well exposed to x-ray, but the effect of radioactivity on induction of mesothelioma is still disputed.4 There are several reports linking malignant mesothelioma to radioactivity due to radiation therapy.The fibrous mesothelioma (sarcomatous), as in this case, which is difficult to diagnose microscopically, looks like a fibroma, unless helped by tissue culture. The treatment options of malignant mesothelioma include surgery, intraperitoneal chemotherapy and whole abdominal radiation or multimodality therapy, which were suggested that might prolong the survival in

  3. Intra-abdominal manifestations of Recklinghausen's Neurofibromatosis

    Neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF-1), also known as von Recklinghausendisease, is a common autosomal dominant condition with an approximateincidence of one per 300 births. NF1 involves multiple systems of the body.Abdominal involvement occurs in the form of neurofibroma and tumor growth inthe liver, mesentery, retroperitoneum, gastric and bowel. Gastrointestinalneoplasms have a reported occurrence of 2-25%. Two cases are reported hereinas well as a review of the literature of the intra-abdominal manifestationsof NF1, including a discussion on the radiological appearance and diagnosis.The article provides an insight into the intriguing variety of clinicalproblems that such patients may present. (author)

  4. Giant cystic abdominal masses in children

    Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Thomas, Kristen B.; Harned, Roger K.; Wu, Sarah R.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Strain, John D. [University of California, Davis Health Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Davis Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2005-12-01

    In this pictorial essay the common and uncommon causes of large cystic and cyst-like abdominal masses in children are reviewed. We discuss and illustrate the following: mesenchymal hamartoma, choledochal cyst, hydrops of the gallbladder, congenital splenic cyst, pancreatic pseudocyst, pancreatic cystadenoma, hydronephrosis, multicystic dysplastic kidney, multilocular cystic nephroma, adrenal hemorrhage, mesenteric and omental cysts, gastrointestinal duplication cyst, meconium pseudocyst, ovarian cysts and cystic neoplasms, hematocolpos, urachal cysts, appendiceal abscess, abdominal and sacrococcygeal teratoma, and CSF pseudocyst. We also describe imaging features and clues to the diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus : abdominal radiologic findings

    Oh, Jae Cheon; Cho, On Koo; Lee, Yong Joo; Bae, Jae Ik; Kim, Yong Soo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Ko, Byung Hee [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE) is a systemic disease of unknown etiology. Its main pathology is vasculitis and serositis, due to deposition of the immune complex or antibodies. Most findings are nonspecific ; abdominal manifestations include enteritis, hepatomegaly, pancreatic enlargement, serositis, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, nephritis, interstitial cystitis, and thrombophlebitis. We described radiologic findings of various organ involvement of SLE; digestive system, serosa, reticuloendothelial system, urinary system, and venous system. Diagnosis of SLE was done according to the criteria of American Rheumatism Association. Understanding of the variable imaging findings in SLE may be helpful for the early detection of abdominal involvement and complications.

  6. Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Preschool Children.

    * Ritu Gupta, **Ravinder K. Gupta

    2004-01-01

    One hundred fifty preschool children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) were studied. Organiccause was observed in 135 (90%) and non-organic in 15 (10%). Giardiasis was the commonestorganic cause in 81 (60%) either alone or with other parasites followed by ascariasis 27 (20%) alone.Other cause of organic pain were urinary tract infection (UTI) 9 (6.7%), abdominal tuberculosis 9(6.7%), eosophagitis/gastritis 4 (2.9%) and gall stones 2 (1.4%). School phobia, sibling rivalry,unpleasant relation...

  7. Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Preschool Children.

    Ritu Gupta, Ravinder K Gupta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred fifty preschool children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP were studied. Organiccause was observed in 135 (90% and non-organic in 15 (10%. Giardiasis was the commonestorganic cause in 81 (60% either alone or with other parasites followed by ascariasis 27 (20% alone.Other cause of organic pain were urinary tract infection (UTI 9 (6.7%, abdominal tuberculosis 9(6.7%, eosophagitis/gastritis 4 (2.9% and gall stones 2 (1.4%. School phobia, sibling rivalry,unpleasant relations among parents and nocturnal enuresis were significant factors associated withnon-organic causes.

  8. An unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    Terneu, S; Verhelst, D; Thys, F; Ketelslegers, E; Hantson, P; Wittebole, X

    2003-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Room because of abdominal pain associated with hematuria and red blood blending to stool. On admission, the physical examination revealed abdominal tenderness and diffuse cutaneous hematoma. The laboratory findings showed abnormal clotting tests with high International Normalised Ratio (INR) and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. Hemoperitoneum and ureteral hematoma were noted on the abdomen computed tomography. The patient confessed she had ingested difenacoum for several weeks. All the symptoms resolved with fresh frozen plasma perfusion and vitamin K. PMID:14635532

  9. Multiple bowel perforation and necrotising fasciitis secondary to abdominal liposuction in a patient with bilateral lumbar hernia

    Vincent Delliere

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare complication of abdominal liposuction: bowel perforation and necrotizing fasciitis. Because of bilateral lumbar hernia, a 56-year-old woman had caecum and descending colon perforation during lipoplasty. She had septic shock syndrome at her admission. The authors treated this complex wound with several debridement, omental flap, NPWT and split-thickness skin graft. The incidence of abdominal wall perforation with visceral injury is 14 in 100,000 liposuctions performed. There are only 12 cases of bowel perforation in literature but this complication is probably underestimated. Prompt surgical debridement is absolutely mandatory in this life threatening scenario. Lumbar hernia is very rare and should be ruled out before every abdominal liposuction clinically or with imaging modalities.

  10. Melatonin reduces cardiac morbidity and markers of myocardial ischemia after elective abdominal aortic aneurism repair

    Gögenür, Ismail; Kücükakin, Bülent; Panduro Jensen, Leif;

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to examine the effect of perioperative melatonin treatment on clinical cardiac morbidity and markers of myocardial ischemia in patients undergoing elective surgery for abdominal aortic aneurism. Reperfusion injury results in increased cardiac morbidity in patients undergoing surgery for...... abdominal aortic aneurisms (AAA). A randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial including patients undergoing surgery for AAA was performed. The patients received by infusion over a 2-hr period either, 50 mg melatonin or placebo intra-operatively, and 10 mg melatonin or placebo orally, the first three...... by Holter monitoring. A total of 26 patients received melatonin, while 24 received placebo. A significant reduction in cardiac morbidity was seen in the melatonin-treated patients compared with those given placebo [4% versus 29% (P = 0.02)]. Five patients (19%) who received melatonin had increased Tp...

  11. Investigation of childhood blunt abdominal trauma: A practical approach using ultrasound as the initial diagnostic modality

    During a 5.5-year retrospective study (1979-84) 170 children with blunt abdominal trauma were investigated with intravenous urography (IVU), ultrasound (US) and scintigraphy. For the investigation of the last 71 children (after 1982) a 4th generation CT scanner was available in the same department. The results of radiologic investigations were compared with clinical outcome in 157 and results at laparotomy in 13 children. During the study period, real time US became the first line screening tool, and was combined with IVU in suspected renal trauma. In spite of permanent accessibility of CT since November 1982, the latter was used only in complex diagnostic problems or in children with multiple injuries (8% of the series). There were no deaths resulting from abdominal trauma. During the study, the incidence of splenectomy and exploratory laparotomy decreased, and no diagnostic peritoneal lavage was performed after 1980. (orig.)

  12. Motor Vehicle Crash–Related Injury Causation Scenarios for Spinal Injuries in Restrained Children and Adolescents

    ZONFRILLO, MARK R.; LOCEY, CAITLIN M.; SCARFONE, STEVEN R.; ARBOGAST, KRISTY B.

    2016-01-01

    s own seat back, or axial loading through the seat pan. Nearly all injuries in children occupants with frontal flexion mechanism had injuries to the lumbar spine, and most (78%) had associated hollow or solid organ abdominal injuries. Conclusions Restrained children in nonrollover MVCs with spinal injuries in the CIREN database are most frequently in high-speed frontal crashes, of teenage age, and have vertebral fractures. There are age-specific mechanism patterns that should be further explored. Because even moderate spinal trauma can result in measurable morbidity, future efforts should focus on mitigating these injuries. PMID:25307398

  13. Clinical diagnosis and surgical treatment of pancreatic and/or duodenal injuries

    Zekuan Xu; Leyao Lian; Yi Miao; Xunliang Liu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the points of the clinical diagnosis and surgical treatment for pancreatic and/or duodenal injuries. Methods: Clinical data of 30 patients who suffered from pancreatic and/or duodenal injuries were reviewed. Results: There were 29 cases who received surgical management. Of the 30 cases, 22 cases were cured, seven cases died, and postoperative complications occurred in 16 cases. The cure rate was 73.3%. Conclusion: Pancreatic and/or duodenal injuries are severe abdominal injuries and difficult to treat. The mortality and complication rate are high. The keys to successful treatments for pancreatic and/or duodenal injuries are early diagnosis, careful exploration and proper operational management.

  14. Rowing Injuries

    Hosea, Timothy M.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Rowing is one of the original modern Olympic sports and was one of the most popular spectator sports in the United States. Its popularity has been increasing since the enactment of Title IX. The injury patterns in this sport are unique because of the stress applied during the rowing stroke. Evidence Acquisition: This review summarizes the existing literature describing the biomechanics of the rowing stroke and rowing-related injury patterns. Data were obtained from previously publish...

  15. Expanding hematoma of the abdominal walI caused by spontaneous rupture of a deep circumflex iliac artery: report of a case treated by coil embolization

    Baik, Jun Hyun; Park, Young Ha; Jeon, Jung Soo; Hwang, Sung Soo; Ihn, Yon Kwon [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-01

    Abdominal wall hematoma is a rare but well-known disease, usually caused by trauma or, on rare occasions, occurring spontaneously. Hematomas of the rectus sheath and the anterolateral abdominal wall are commonly associated with injury to the inferior epigastric artery and the deep circumflex iliac artery, respectively. The diagnosis of spontaneously developed abdominal wall hematoma is sometimes delayed, due its clinical manifestations being similar to those of other causes of the acute abdomen. CT and angiography can be helpful in the diagnosis of the hematoma and the injured vessel. Herein, we report on a rare case of a spontaneously developed anterolateral abdominal wall hematoma treated with microcoil embolization of the left deep circumflex iliac artery.

  16. Expanding hematoma of the abdominal walI caused by spontaneous rupture of a deep circumflex iliac artery: report of a case treated by coil embolization

    Abdominal wall hematoma is a rare but well-known disease, usually caused by trauma or, on rare occasions, occurring spontaneously. Hematomas of the rectus sheath and the anterolateral abdominal wall are commonly associated with injury to the inferior epigastric artery and the deep circumflex iliac artery, respectively. The diagnosis of spontaneously developed abdominal wall hematoma is sometimes delayed, due its clinical manifestations being similar to those of other causes of the acute abdomen. CT and angiography can be helpful in the diagnosis of the hematoma and the injured vessel. Herein, we report on a rare case of a spontaneously developed anterolateral abdominal wall hematoma treated with microcoil embolization of the left deep circumflex iliac artery

  17. CT features of abdominal plasma cell neoplasms

    Monill, J.; Pernas, J.; Montserrat, E.; Perez, C.; Clavero, J.; Martinez-Noguera, A.; Guerrero, R.; Torrubia, S. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the CT features of abdominal plasma cell neoplasms. We reviewed CT imaging findings in 11 patients (seven men, four women; mean age 62 years) with plasma cell neoplasms and abdominal involvement. Helical CT of the entire abdomen and pelvis was performed following intravenous administration of contrast material. Images were analyzed in consensus by two radiologists. Diagnoses were made from biopsy, surgery and/or clinical follow-up findings. Multiple myeloma was found in seven patients and extramedullary plasmacytoma in four patients. All patients with multiple myeloma had multifocal disease with involvement of perirenal space (4/7), retroperitoneal and pelvic lymph nodes (3/7), peritoneum (3/7), liver (2/7), subcutaneous tissues (2/7) and kidney (1/7). In three of the four patients with extramedullary plasmacytoma, a single site was involved, namely stomach, vagina and retroperitoneum. In the fourth patient, a double site of abdominal involvement was observed with rectal and jejunal masses. Plasma cell neoplasm should be considered in the differential diagnosis of single or multiple enhancing masses in the abdomen or pelvis. Abdominal plasma cell neoplasms were most frequently seen as well-defined enhancing masses (10/11). (orig.)

  18. Case series of abdominal sacral colpopexy

    Vandana Dhama

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Abdominal sacral colpopexy with polypropylene mesh is a safe, effective treatment in patients having post hysterectomy vaginal vault proplase. When done by experienced gynecologist, major post-operative complications seem to be very few in patients having normal BMI and no major systemic illnesses. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(6.000: 1992-1995

  19. Abdominal cavity exploration with kinetic scintimaging

    Nuclear medicine procedures are being utilized in an increasing variety and number of intra-abdominal clinical problems. These non-invasive intra-abdominal exploratory scintimaging procedures are often dynamic or kinetic in nature, i.e. revealing primarily functional information even to the point of employing adjunctive drugs and multiple simultaneous radiotracers. The advent of correlative non-invasive diagnostic imaging modalities has thus far largely complemented abdominal nuclear medicine procedures. The luminal gastro-intestinal tract has yielded to investigation with radiotracers with procedures now widely employed to study gastric function, gastro-oesophagal reflux and intestinal bleeding. The role of hepatic and splenic reticuloendethelial compartment imaging has been strengthened by increased dependability, and remains as the first line screening test for a variety of suspected intrahepatic lesions, especially neoplasia. The recent introduction of improved hepatobiliary radiotracers, mostly iminodiacetic acid derivatives, has considerably expanded the scope of diagnostic investigations of the liver, especially in problems of jaundice and acute cholecystitis. Pancreatic imaging continues to be a disappointment and at best is only adjunctive to correlative imaging procedures. Some hope may be seen in the recent reports of successful pancreatic imaging with positron emission tomography utilizing labelled amino-acid derivatives. Diffuse abdominal processes, especially abcesses and suspected infection, have been efficaciously approached with 67Ga citrate and also, more recently, 111-In-labelled leucocytes. Many of these advances and applications have also been readily applicable to pediatric problems. (author)

  20. Intra-abdominal tumors in children

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to observe the histopathological pattern of intra-abdominal tumors in children less than 16 years. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out at the Department of Histopathology, Children's Hospital and the Institute of Child Health and King Edward Medical College, Lahore, over a period of 5 years, from January 1997 to December 2002. Subjects and Methods: The histopathological and demographic data of 264 intra-abdominal tumors of both the sexes under 16 years of age was collected and analyzed to determine the various morphological types of intra- abdominal tumors in relation to age and sex. Results: Neuroblastoma was the most common tumor constituting 29.6% of all cases, followed by Wilms' tumor (25.1%). Others were non-Hodgkins Iymphomas (15.5%), germ cell tumors and hepatoblastoma (9%) each, rhabdomyosarcoma (4.4%), hepatocellular carcinoma (1.4%) and miscellaneous (6%). Majority of the patients (77.2%) were under 5 years of age. The male to female ratio was 1.1 :0.9. Conclusion: Intra-abdominal tumors are more common in males. Most of the tumors were noted in children less than 5 years of age. (author)

  1. [Catheter jejunostomy in elective abdominal surgery].

    Bodoky, A; Heberer, M; Iwatschenko, P; Harder, F

    1985-10-01

    Needle catheter jejunostomy is used to a varying extent today. Therefore, the need for nutritional support was evaluated following elective abdominal surgery and compared to experiences with postoperative enteral feeding. Oesophagectomy, total gastrectomy and the Whipple procedure were identified as good indications for catheter jejunostomy, whereas with other types of operation an individual decision is required. PMID:3935397

  2. CT features of abdominal plasma cell neoplasms

    The aim of this study was to describe the CT features of abdominal plasma cell neoplasms. We reviewed CT imaging findings in 11 patients (seven men, four women; mean age 62 years) with plasma cell neoplasms and abdominal involvement. Helical CT of the entire abdomen and pelvis was performed following intravenous administration of contrast material. Images were analyzed in consensus by two radiologists. Diagnoses were made from biopsy, surgery and/or clinical follow-up findings. Multiple myeloma was found in seven patients and extramedullary plasmacytoma in four patients. All patients with multiple myeloma had multifocal disease with involvement of perirenal space (4/7), retroperitoneal and pelvic lymph nodes (3/7), peritoneum (3/7), liver (2/7), subcutaneous tissues (2/7) and kidney (1/7). In three of the four patients with extramedullary plasmacytoma, a single site was involved, namely stomach, vagina and retroperitoneum. In the fourth patient, a double site of abdominal involvement was observed with rectal and jejunal masses. Plasma cell neoplasm should be considered in the differential diagnosis of single or multiple enhancing masses in the abdomen or pelvis. Abdominal plasma cell neoplasms were most frequently seen as well-defined enhancing masses (10/11). (orig.)

  3. Connective tissue alteration in abdominal wall hernia

    Henriksen, N A; Yadete, D H; Sørensen, Lars Tue; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2011-01-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of abdominal wall hernia formation is complex. Optimal treatment of hernias depends on a full understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in their formation. The aim of this study was to review the literature on specific collagen alterations in abdom...

  4. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Perko, M J; Schroeder, T V; Olsen, P S;

    1993-01-01

    During a 10-year period in which 735 patients presented with abdominal aortic aneurysms to our clinic, 63 were not offered operative treatment. The primary reason for choosing conservative treatment was concomitant diseases that increased the risk of operation. After 2 years of followup, half of ...

  5. Pulmonary complications of upper abdominal surgery.

    Deodhar S

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary complications encountered in 67 patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery in our unit in one year period are analysed. Pulmonary function tests and their post-operative reduction, as also the risk factors are discussed. Pathophysiology responsible for pulmonary complications is outlined.

  6. Abdominal CT in acute arterial pathology

    The abdominal arterial pathology as studied by CT imagings is reviewed. The illustrated morphology of aortic aneurysms complications (arterial embolism, dissection and arteriosclerotic ulcer ) are studied. The signs that lead to diagnosis are assessed and the major points on which to base a correct radiological study are reviewed

  7. Screening US and CT for blunt abdominal trauma: A retrospective study

    Marco, Giuseppetti Gian [Institute of Radiology, Polytechnic University of Marche Medical School, Umberto I Hospital, Ancona (Italy)]. E-mail: gm.giuseppetti@ao-umbertoprimo.marche.it; Diego, Salera [Institute of Radiology, Polytechnic University of Marche Medical School, Umberto I Hospital, Ancona (Italy); Giulio, Argalia [Institute of Radiology, Polytechnic University of Marche Medical School, Umberto I Hospital, Ancona (Italy); Luca, Salvolini [Institute of Radiology, Polytechnic University of Marche Medical School, Umberto I Hospital, Ancona (Italy)

    2005-10-01

    Objective: To assess the accuracy of screening US and CT in patients with blunt abdominal trauma admitted to the trauma centre of our General Hospital. Materials and method: The abdominal US reports of 864 primary trauma patients (139 with major and 725 with minor injuries) and 162 CT reports of a subgroup of the same subjects (64 with major and 98 with minor injuries) were reviewed and compared to the best available reference standard. The accuracy of screening US was assessed by evaluating its overall ability to distinguish negative from positive cases by showing at least one of the lesions documented by the reference standard and its specific ability to depict all lesions; CT reports were evaluated only for the method's performance in depicting all lesions. Results: Screening US exhibited a satisfactory overall ability to distinguish negative from positive patients (91.5% sensitivity and 97.5% specificity in major trauma patients versus 73.3% sensitivity and 98.1% specificity in the minor trauma group) and a satisfactory specific ability to depict all injuries in major trauma patients. In minor trauma cases sensitivity was satisfactory for free fluid but unsatisfactory for organ injuries. Of the 21/864 false negative reports (5 in patients with major and 16 in cases with minor traumas), only one affected patient management, a major trauma case, by delaying an emergency laparotomy. The performance of CT in detecting each single lesion was predictably excellent in both patient groups. Conclusion: Its satisfactory accuracy for major trauma suggests that US could be employed not only to screen cases for emergency laparotomy but also as an alternative to CT. However, since major traumatic injuries generally carry an imperative indication for CT, especially as regards neurological, thoracic and skeletal evaluation, US should be employed to perform a prompt preliminary examination using a simplified technique in the emergency room simultaneously with resuscitation.

  8. Screening US and CT for blunt abdominal trauma: A retrospective study

    Objective: To assess the accuracy of screening US and CT in patients with blunt abdominal trauma admitted to the trauma centre of our General Hospital. Materials and method: The abdominal US reports of 864 primary trauma patients (139 with major and 725 with minor injuries) and 162 CT reports of a subgroup of the same subjects (64 with major and 98 with minor injuries) were reviewed and compared to the best available reference standard. The accuracy of screening US was assessed by evaluating its overall ability to distinguish negative from positive cases by showing at least one of the lesions documented by the reference standard and its specific ability to depict all lesions; CT reports were evaluated only for the method's performance in depicting all lesions. Results: Screening US exhibited a satisfactory overall ability to distinguish negative from positive patients (91.5% sensitivity and 97.5% specificity in major trauma patients versus 73.3% sensitivity and 98.1% specificity in the minor trauma group) and a satisfactory specific ability to depict all injuries in major trauma patients. In minor trauma cases sensitivity was satisfactory for free fluid but unsatisfactory for organ injuries. Of the 21/864 false negative reports (5 in patients with major and 16 in cases with minor traumas), only one affected patient management, a major trauma case, by delaying an emergency laparotomy. The performance of CT in detecting each single lesion was predictably excellent in both patient groups. Conclusion: Its satisfactory accuracy for major trauma suggests that US could be employed not only to screen cases for emergency laparotomy but also as an alternative to CT. However, since major traumatic injuries generally carry an imperative indication for CT, especially as regards neurological, thoracic and skeletal evaluation, US should be employed to perform a prompt preliminary examination using a simplified technique in the emergency room simultaneously with resuscitation

  9. Clinical profile of abdominal tuberculosis in children

    Ira Shah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A retrospective study was conducted in children, suffering from abdominal TB, attending Pediatric TB clinic from 2007 to 2009. Materials And Methods: Age-wise distribution and type of abdominal TB were analyzed with clinical features. Results : Out of 285 children with TB, 32 (11.2% had abdominal tuberculosis. Male: Female ratio was 2.1:1. 7 (21.9% children were 10 years of age. The most common clinical features were fever in 24 (75%, pain in abdomen in 17 (53.1%, loss of weight in 15 (46.9%, raised ESR in 14 (43.8%, and loss of appetite in 13 (40.6% children. TB contact was present in 10 (31.2%, and 7 (21.9% children had tuberculosis in the past. 28 (87.5% children had received BCG vaccine, and 17 (53.1% had a positive Mantoux test. Extra-abdominal tuberculosis was found in 17 patients (53.1%. Duration of fever was more in children less than 5 years of age (127 ± 66 days than that in children between 5 -10 years (37 ± 30 days and in > 10 years of age (73 ± 66 days, which is statistically significant (P = 0.0228. Lymph node TB (17 patients, 53.1% was found to be the commonest, followed by intestinal (10 patients, 31.2% and peritoneal TB (4 patients, 12.5%. 18 (56.2% of the total patients had recovered, 7 (21.9% of all patients failed first line therapy and had to be started on second line drugs, of which 4 (12.5% were proven to have drug-resistant TB. Conclusion : Abdominal TB is seen in 11.2% of children affected with TB, of which over 53% will have extra-abdominal manifestations. Common clinical and laboratory features include fever, pain in abdomen, loss of weight, loss of appetite, and raised ESR. The duration of fever is more in children of younger age group. Lymph node TB is the most common type of abdominal TB. Drug-resistant TB is seen in at least 12.5% of the patients.

  10. Repair of the inferior vena cava with autogenous peritoneo-fascial patch graft following abdominal trauma: a case report.

    Emmiler, Mustafa; Kocogullari, Cevdet Ugur; Yilmaz, Sezgin; Cekirdekci, Ahmet

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal vascular injuries are among the most challenging and lethal injuries in traumatized patients. Inferior vena cava is the most frequently injured vein during the blunt or penetrating trauma. The primary repair, end to end anastomosis, endovascular stenting, or graft interposition with autogenous or synthetic materials should be considered in selected cases. However, in cases the synthetic graft was preferred, intestinal contaminations due to small or large bowel perforation accompanying the trauma have been cited as a limiting factor for the use of such grafts as in the current case. However, a previous history of lower leg variceal surgery prevents the use of great saphenous vein as a graft. So in the present case, the authors report a patient with inferior vena cava injury repaired with autogenous peritoneo-fascial graft. The authors have used APF graft in traumatic inferior vena cava injury for the first time. PMID:18667465

  11. Splenic trauma during abdominal wall liposuction: a case report

    Harnett, Paul; Koak, Yashwant; Baker, Daryl

    2008-01-01

    A 35-year-old woman collapsed 18 hours after undergoing abdominal wall liposuction. Abdominal CT scan revealed a punctured spleen. She underwent an emergency splenectomy and made an uneventful recovery.

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition from ...

  13. A case report of abdominal distention caused by herpes zoster

    Su-Rong Zhou; Chuan-Yu Liu

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal complications caused by herpes zoster are extremely rare. Here, we described a case of abdominal distention caused by herpes zoster. The patient was a 59-year-old female who suffered from unexplained paroxysmal and a burning pain on the right part of her waist and abdomen, accompanied by abdominal distention. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction was diagnosed by abdominal radiography. Distention of the right abdominal wall was still apparent after one month. In this report, we found...

  14. [Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum in the treatment of giant abdominal hernias].

    Szekeres, Pál; Krémer, Ildikó; Bukovácz, Róbert; Varga, János

    2007-10-01

    Careful preoperative treatment of giant abdominal hernias can prevent severe postoperative complications such as abdominal compartment syndrome and uncontrollable cardiorespiratory failure. Our departments have been studying the various pathological conditions associated with enormous abdominal hernias (eventration disease) and the possibilities of preventing visceral abnormalities caused by the reconstruction of the abdominal wall. Here, we present the indication, technique and the results of using progressive preoperative pneumo-peritoneum based on two cases. PMID:17984016

  15. Effects of ovariohysterectomy on intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal perfusion pressure in cats.

    Bosch, L; Rivera del Álamo, M M; Andaluz, A; Monreal, L; Torrente, C; García-Arnas, F; Fresno, L

    2012-12-15

    Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and abdominal perfusion pressure (APP) have shown clinical relevance in monitoring critically ill human beings submitted to abdominal surgery. Only a few studies have been performed in veterinary medicine. The aim of this study was to assess how pregnancy and abdominal surgery may affect IAP and APP in healthy cats. For this purpose, pregnant (n=10) and non-pregnant (n=11) queens undergoing elective spaying, and tomcats (n=20, used as controls) presented for neutering by scrotal orchidectomy were included in the study. IAP, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), APP, heart rate and rectal temperature (RT) were determined before, immediately after, and four hours after surgery. IAP increased significantly immediately after abdominal surgery in both female groups when compared with baseline (P<0.05) and male (P<0.05) values, and returned to initial perioperative readings four hours after surgery. Tomcats and pregnant females (P<0.05) showed an increase in MAP and APP immediately after surgery decreasing back to initial perioperative values four hours later. A significant decrease in RT was appreciated immediately after laparotomy in both pregnant and non-pregnant queens. IAP was affected by abdominal surgery in this study, due likely to factors, such as postoperative pain and hypothermia. Pregnancy did not seem to affect IAP in this population of cats, possibly due to subjects being in early stages of pregnancy. PMID:23118052

  16. Changes in muscle strength and pain in response to surgical repair of posterior abdominal wall disruption followed by rehabilitation

    Hemingway, A; Herrington, L; Blower, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Posterior abdominal wall deficiency (PAWD) is a tear in the external oblique aponeurosis or the conjoint tendon causing a posterior wall defect at the medial end of the inguinal canal. It is often known as sportsman's hernia and is believed to be caused by repetitive stress. Objective: To assess lower limb and abdominal muscle strength of patients with PAWD before intervention compared with matched controls; to evaluate any changes following surgical repair and rehabilitation. Methods: Sixteen subjects were assessed using a questionnaire, isokinetic testing of the lower limb strength, and pressure biofeedback testing of the abdominals. After surgery and a six week rehabilitation programme, the subjects were re-evaluated. A control group were assessed using the same procedure. Results: Quadriceps and hamstrings strength was not affected by this condition. A deficit hip muscle strength was found on the affected limb before surgery, which was significant for the hip flexors (p = 0.05). Before surgery, 87% of the patients compared with 20% of the controls failed the abdominal obliques test. Both the injured and non-injured sides had improved significantly in strength after surgery and rehabilitation. The strength of the abdominal obliques showed the most significant improvement over the course of the rehabilitation programme. Conclusions: Lower limb muscle strength may have been reduced as the result of disuse atrophy or pain inhibition. Abdominal oblique strength was deficient in the injured patients and this compromises rotational control of the pelvis. More sensitive investigations (such as electromyography) are needed to assess the link between abdominal oblique function and groin injury. PMID:12547744

  17. Salmonellosis mimicking abdominal lymphoma in a young boy

    We report on a child with intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly due to salmonellosis, whose initial diagnosis was erroneously based on computed tomography (CT) findings suggestive of abdominal lymphoma. Awareness that salmonellosis can produce large abdominal masses should assist in ruling out neoplastic disease in the differential diagnosis, thus avoiding unnecessary laparotomy. (orig.)

  18. Soft-tissue masses in the abdominal wall

    Masses involving the abdominal wall arise from a large number of aetiologies. This article will describe a diagnostic approach, imaging features of the most common causes of abdominal wall masses, and highly specific characteristics of less common diseases. A diagnostic algorithm for abdominal wall masses combines clinical history and imaging appearances to classify lesions

  19. 2013 WSES guidelines for management of intra-abdominal infections

    Sartelli Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite advances in diagnosis, surgery, and antimicrobial therapy, mortality rates associated with complicated intra-abdominal infections remain exceedingly high. The 2013 update of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES guidelines for the management of intra-abdominal infections contains evidence-based recommendations for management of patients with intra-abdominal infections.

  20. 21 CFR 884.5225 - Abdominal decompression chamber.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abdominal decompression chamber. 884.5225 Section... Devices § 884.5225 Abdominal decompression chamber. (a) Identification. An abdominal decompression chamber... decompression chamber that was in commercial distribution before May 28, 1976, or that has, on or...

  1. Primary abdominal pregnancy following intra-uterine insemination

    Sujata Kar

    2011-01-01

    Primary abdominal pregnancy is an extremely rare type of extrauterine pregnancy. It has been reported from many unusual intra-abdominal sites. We report a case of primary abdominal pregnancy following intra-uterine insemination (not reported earlier to our knowledge). Implanted on the anterior surface of the uterus possibly related to an endometriotic foci. Early diagnosis enabled laparoscopic management of this case.

  2. Can release of urinary retention trigger abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture?

    Luhmann, Andreas; Powell-Bowns, Matilda; Elseedawy, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Only 50% of abdominal aortic aneurysms present with the classic triad of hypotension, back pain and a pulsatile abdominal mass. This variability in symptoms can delay diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a patient presenting with a unique combination of symptoms suggesting that decompression of urinary retention can lead to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. PMID:24964430

  3. Evaluating the Relationship between Rib Fractures and the Probability of Abdominal Trauma; a Brief Report

    Vahid Monsef Kasmaei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trauma is one of the most important causes of death in patients under 40 years of age and the third common cause of death regardless of age. Rib cage damages are one of the major reasons for death in the early minutes post-trauma. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the frequency of intra-abdominal injury in the patients with rib fracture who were referred to emergency department. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 60 patients with rib fractures who were admitted to the emergency department of Poorsina Hospital, Rasht, Iran, from March 2011 to March2012. A checklist was filled out for all the patients including age, sex, trauma mechanism, side and site of fracture, the number of broken ribs, the results of abdominal ultrasonography, the need for laparotomy and mortality. The collected data were classified based on descriptive statistics and analyzed using SPSS 16. Results: 60 patients with the mean age of 47.26±13.71 years were admitted to the emergency department during this time (81.7% male. The most common mechanism of trauma was car accident [22(36.7%]. Among these 60 patients, 71 rib fractures in 3 levels of chest (upper, middle, lower were detected and 50 (83.3% in the same area. Mean number of fractured ribs was 2.85±2.2 (minimum: 1, maximum 10. In 3 (5% patients, fracture was on both sides. The results of abdominal ultrasonography in 7 (11.7% patients were positive. The number of fractured ribs (p=0.017 and the area of the fracture (p=0.048 showed a significant correlation with the presence of intra-abdominal free fluid. The fracture of more than 2 ribs directly correlated with the possibility of intra-abdominal hemorrhage (p<0.0001. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it seems that the number and area of the fractured ribs directly and significantly correlate with the probability of abdominal trauma based on the results of abdominal ultrasonography.

  4. Effects of Berberine Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury in Mice

    Purpose: Radiation-induced intestinal injury is a significant clinical problem in patients undergoing abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Berberine has been used as an antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antimotility agent. The present study investigated the protective effect of berberine against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: The mice were administrated berberine or distilled water. A total of 144 mice underwent 0, 3, 6, 12, or 16 Gy single session whole-abdominal RT and 16 mice underwent 3 Gy/fraction/d for four fractions of fractionated abdominal RT. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-10, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, malonaldehyde, and apoptosis were assayed in the mice after RT. The body weight and food intake of the mice receiving fractionated RT were recorded. Another 72 mice who had undergone 12, 16, or 20 Gy abdominal RT were monitored for mortality every 12 h. Results: The body weight and food intake of the mice administered with distilled water decreased significantly compared with before RT. After the same dose of abdominal RT, tumor necrosis factor-α, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in plasma and malonalhehyde and apoptosis of the intestine were significantly greater in the control group than in the mice administered berberine (p < .05-.01). In contrast, interleukin-10 in the mice with berberine treatment was significantly greater than in the control group (p < .01). A similar result was found in the fractionated RT experiment and at different points after 16 Gy abdominal RT (p < .05-.01). Berberine treatment significantly delayed the point of death after 20 Gy, but not 16 Gy, abdominal RT (p < .01). Conclusion: Treatment with berberine can delay mortality and attenuated intestinal injury in mice undergoing whole abdominal RT. These findings could provide a useful therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  5. Comparison of polyurethane with cyanoacrylate in hemostasis of vascular injury in guinea pigs

    Luiz Fernando Kubrusly; Marina Simões Formighieri; José Vitor Martins Lago; Yorgos Luiz Santos de Salles Graça; Ana Cristina Lira Sobral; Marianna Martins Lago

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the behavior of castor oil-derived polyurethane as a hemostatic agent and tissue response after abdominal aortic injury and to compare it with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. Methods: Twenty-four Guinea Pigs were randomly divided into three groups of eight animals (I, II, and III). The infrarenal abdominal aorta was dissected, clamped proximally and distally to the vascular puncture site. In group I (control), hemostasis was achieved with digital pressure; in group II (polyureth...

  6. Trampoline injuries.

    Esposito, Paul W

    2003-04-01

    As the popularity of trampolines has increased during the past 10 years, so has the number of injuries sustained using them. Whether there is an actual increase in the risk associated with the use of a trampoline for the same number of exposure hours is not known. The marked increase in emergency room visits related to trampoline injuries might reflect only the increased number of trampolines now available for recreational use or the creative manner in which they are being used. The complex factors related to trampolines, their use, and the possible injuries will be discussed. A liberal use of Internet references will be used because this is where much of the advertising and information available to the public regarding trampolines currently is disseminated. PMID:12671484

  7. Facial Sports Injuries

    ... Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Facial Sports Injuries Facial Sports Injuries Patient Health Information News media ... should receive immediate medical attention. Prevention Of Facial Sports Injuries The best way to treat facial sports injuries ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition ...

  9. Eye Injuries at Work

    ... Ask an Ophthalmologist Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Safety Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Work Edited by: Shirley Dang Feb. ...

  10. Preventing Eye Injuries

    ... Ophthalmologist Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Preventing Eye Injuries Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Mar. ...

  11. Tennis injuries: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    Dines, Joshua S; Bedi, Asheesh; Williams, Phillip N; Dodson, Christopher C; Ellenbecker, Todd S; Altchek, David W; Windler, Gary; Dines, David M

    2015-03-01

    Tennis places high loads on the joints of players, with supraphysiologic forces being generated at the shoulder and elbow hundreds of times per match. Acute injuries tend to affect the lower extremity; chronic injuries usually involve the upper extremity. Commonly encountered upper extremity conditions include rotator cuff injury, internal impingement, superior labral tears, and epicondylitis of the elbow. Serving is the most strenuous stroke in tennis, with the highest peak muscle activity in the shoulder and forearm occurring during this stroke. The kinetic chain links upper extremity, lower extremity, and core muscle segments by transmitting coordinated activation and motion; in this regard, any pathologic process that disturbs the groin, hip, and abdominal musculature can further result in an increased risk of injury to the shoulder and upper extremity. Evolution in equipment and in play surfaces has also affected the type and frequency of injuries. Prevention programs that address the muscular imbalances throughout the kinetic chain may help reduce the incidence of both acute and chronic injuries experienced by tennis athletes. PMID:25667400

  12. Reducing Abdominal Fat Deposition in Broiler Through Feeding Management

    Cecep Hidayat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal fat in broiler carcass is considered as a waste and its existence reduces the carcass quality. Abdominal fat deposition is affected by several factors such as genetic, nutrition, feed, sex, age and environment. Reducing abdominal fat deposition can be carried out by regulating the nutrient intake to ensure that no excessive nutrient was consumed. Nutrition effects to reduce abdominal fat deposition are associated with nutrient concentration of ration and quantity of daily feed intake. Daily nutrient intake can be limited, especially through restricted feeding. It is concluded that an appropriate feeding management can reduce abdominal fat deposition in broiler.

  13. Diagnostic imaging of infantile abdominal cystic disease

    Thirty-seven patients with infantile abdominal cystic disorders were studied by ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). US studies are simple to conduct, and commonly show an echo-free mass, but tend to yield hyperechoic images when fat and blood are present in the cystic fluid. CT studies, which distinctly demonstrate water, fat, soft tissue density and calcification, are very helpful in the diagnosis of cystic tumor, especially cystic teratoma. MR imaging, which is capable of distinguishing the nature of the cystic fluid (e.g., serous, chylous, bloody, fatty, etc.), is useful in the diagnosis of lymphangioma, teratoma, and torsion of ovarian cystic tumor. Based on the results of the present study, US may be considered to be the modality of first choice in the examination of infantile abdominal cystic disorders, and MRI and/or CT should be employed additionally as necessary in that order. (author)

  14. Drug Therapy for Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Ramachandran Meenakshisundaram

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm is often asymptomatic, less recognized, and causes considerable mortalityand morbidity, if missed. The incidence varies from country to country and the occurrence is influencedby modifiable (smoking, coronary heart disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and prolonged steroid therapyand non-modifiable risk factors (increasing age, male gender, and positive family history. Most ofthe patients with such aneurysm do not exhibit symptoms and the diagnosis is made accidentally duringroutine medical investigations, abdominal ultrasonography, or by an astute surgeon during an abdominalprocedure. Sometimes the diagnosis is made in an emergency room, if the attending resident/doctor isaware of it. Despite good diagnosis and effective management, the outcomes of complicated cases arepoor and the treatment cost is prohibitive. Hence, we reviewed the literature to find out the pathogenesisof such aneurysms and the usefulness of available drugs in its prevention.

  15. Abdominal pregnancy as a cause of hemoperitoneum

    Shafi Sheikh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of intrauterine and extrauterine pregnancy, the heterotopic pregnancy, is a rare obstetric phenomenon. The preoperative diagnosis of this condition is very difficult; leading to a higher maternal morbidity and fetal loss. We experienced a case of intrauterine pregnancy and ruptured abdominal pregnancy implanted on the illeocaecal region in a 26-year-old primiparous woman. She was clinically misdiagnosed as a case of ruptured ectopic pregnancy, but ultrasonography showed it to be a case of heterotopic pregnancy. Subsequently, the patient was subjected to laparotomy and the ruptured abdominal pregnancy was evacuated. She continued with the intrauterine pregnancy till term and delivered a healthy female baby. Although this condition is unusual, any general surgeon in the emergency department must be aware of this complication and its management, which is often initially misdiagnosed.

  16. [Surgical criteria for reoperation in abdominal surgery].

    Bricot, R

    1975-07-01

    Analysis of the surgical criteria for reintervention in Abdominal Surgery led to the accentuation of a certain number of pictures of occlusion, general infectious syndromes, postoperative peritonitis, gastro-intestinal fistula and hemorrhagic syndrome. In all cases, the clinical examination can be misleading in particular in the case of peritonitis, and the history and non-surgical criteria must be strongly borne in mind. PMID:2036

  17. Mycobacterium fortuitum abdominal wall abscesses following liposuction

    Al Soub, Hussam; Al-Maslamani, Eman; Al-Maslamani, Mona

    2008-01-01

    We describe here a case of abdominal abscesses due to Mycobacterium fortuitum following liposuction. The abscesses developed three months after the procedure and diagnosis was delayed for five months. The clues for diagnosis were persistent pus discharge in spite of broad spectrum antibiotics and failure to grow any organisms on routine culture. This condition has been rarely reported; however, the increasing number of liposuction procedures done and awareness among physicians will probably r...

  18. Computed tomography of pediatric abdominal masses

    Ultrasonography is a very useful diagnostic modality for evaluation of the pediatric abdominal masses, due to faster, cheaper, and no radiation hazard than CT. But CT has more advantages in assessing precise anatomic location, and extent of the pathologic process, and also has particular value in defining the size, relation of the mass to surrounding organs and detection of lymphadenopathy. We analyzed CT features of 35 cases of pathologically proven pediatric abdominal masses for recent 2 years at Ewha Woman's University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1.The most common originating site was kidney (20 cases, 57.1%); followed by gastrointestinal (5 cases, 14.3%), nonrenal retroperitoneal (4 cases, 11.4%), hepatobiliary (3 cases, 8.6%), and genital (3 cases, 8.6%) in order of frequency. 2.The most common mass was hydronephrosis (11 cases, 31.4%), Wilms' tumor (7 cases, 20.0%), neuroblastoma, choledochal cyst, periappendiceal abscess (3 cases, 8.6%, respectively), ovarian cyst (2 cases, 5.7%) were next in order of frequency. 3.Male to female ratio was 4:5 and choledochal cyst and ovarian cyst were found only in females. The most prevalent age group was 1-3 year old (12 cases, 34.3%). 4.With CT, the diagnosis of hydronephrosis was easy in all cases and could evaluate of its severity, renal function and obstruction site with high accuracy. 5.Wilms' tumor and neuroblastoma were relatively well differentiated by their characteristic CT features; such as location, shape, margin, middle cross, calyceal appearance and calcification, etc. 6.Ovarian and mensentric cysts had similar CT appearance. 7.In other pediatric abdominal masses, CT provided excellent information about anatomic detail, precise extent of tumor and differential diagnostic findings. So, CT is useful imaging modality for the demonstration and diagnosis of abdominal mass lesions in pediatric patients

  19. Laparoscopic biopsy in patients with abdominal lymphadenopathy

    Bhandarkar D

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abdominal lymphadenopathy (AL - a common clinical scenario faced by clinicians - often poses a diagnostic challenge. In the absence of palpable peripheral nodes, tissue has to be obtained from the abdominal nodes by image-guided biopsy or surgery. In this context a laparoscopic biopsy avoids the morbidity of a laparotomy. Aim: This retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data represents our experience with laparoscopic biopsy of abdominal lymph nodes. Materials and Methods: Between October 2000 and November 2005, 28 patients with AL underwent laparoscopic biopsy. Pre-operative radiological imaging studies had identified a nodal mass in 20, a solitary node in 1, a cold abscess in 1 and a mesenteric cystic lesion in 1 patient. In five patients with chronic right lower abdominal pain and normal ultra-sonographic findings mesenteric nodes were identified and biopsied during diagnostic laparoscopy. Results: The sites of biopsied lymph nodes included para-aortic (10, mesenteric (8, external iliac (3, left gastric (2, obturator (1, aorto-caval (1 and porta hepatis (1. One patient with enlarged peripancreatic nodes mass and another with a mesenteric cystic mass had cold abscesses drained in addition to biopsy. There were no perioperative complications and the median postoperative stay was 2 days (range 1-4 days. Histopathology revealed tuberculosis in 23 patients, reactive adenitis in 2, lymphoma in 1 metastatic carcinoma in 1, and a retroperitoneal sarcoma in 1. Conclusions: In patients with AL, laparoscopy provides a safe and effective means of obtaining biopsy. It is of particular value in patients in whom (a the nodes are small or present in locations unsuitable for image-guided biopsy, (b adequate tissue cannot be obtained by image-guided biopsy or (c previously undiagnosed lymphadenopathy is encountered during diagnostic laparoscopy.

  20. Reconstruction of chest, abdominal walls and perineum

    Vijaykumar D; Vijayaraghavan Sundeep

    2007-01-01

    The structural integrity of the chest and abdominal walls and perineum is frequently altered by cancer extirpation. Advances in reconstructive surgery and the availability of innovative techniques have helped the cancer surgeon to proceed with radical excisions with minimum morbidity. The ability to harvest flaps from distant sites and the availability of good prosthetic materials have now become part of the routine armamentarium of the plastic surgeon engaged in reconstructive surgery of the...

  1. Dose reduction in abdominal computed tomography

    The broad availability and use of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in recent years has increased the radiation dose for patients. Multiphase MDCT protocols are used in abdominal imaging for various indications. Dose reduction though novel technologies, such as dual energy CT or adapted contrast injection protocols (split bolus etc.) for reduction of scans. An optimized dose reduction can be achieved by using strict protocols which are adapted to the clinical situation of the patient. (orig.)

  2. The vanishing giant abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Krivoshei, Lian; Halak, Moshe; Schneiderman, Jacob; Silverberg, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Spontaneous sac size regression of a giant abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a rare event that has not been previously described. We report a case of an 89-year-old woman with a known 9-cm AAA, which was diagnosed in 2003. The patient had refused any kind of treatment at that time. Recent imaging studies obtained 7 years later revealed an AAA of 4 cm diameter. This is the first recorded case of significant spontaneous AAA sac shrinkage. PMID:21444348

  3. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma after remote abdominal radiation

    Peritoneal mesothelioma in a 61-year-old man, occurred 26 years after abdominal radiotherapy for a testicular seminoma. The patient had no history of asbestos exposure. After asbestos, radiation is the second most frequent defined cause of mesothelioma in North America, but the number of well-documented cases is small; this case represents only the fifth example of peritoneal mesothelioma after therapeutic irradiation of the abdomen. 16 references

  4. Abdominal pregnancy as a cause of hemoperitoneum

    Shafi Sheikh; Malla Misbha; Salaam Parvaiz; Kirmani Omer

    2009-01-01

    The coexistence of intrauterine and extrauterine pregnancy, the heterotopic pregnancy, is a rare obstetric phenomenon. The preoperative diagnosis of this condition is very difficult; leading to a higher maternal morbidity and fetal loss. We experienced a case of intrauterine pregnancy and ruptured abdominal pregnancy implanted on the illeocaecal region in a 26-year-old primiparous woman. She was clinically misdiagnosed as a case of ruptured ectopic pregnancy, but ultrasonography showed it to ...

  5. Child abdominal tumour in tropical context: Think about schistosomiasis!

    A. M. Napon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis presenting as an abdominal mass with chronic pain in a child is not common. This report presents case of child presenting with schistosomiasis presenting as an abdominal mass with chronic pain. Abdominal ultrasonography did not particularly contribute to definitive pre-operative diagnosis. However, pathological examination of surgical specimen confirmed Schistosoma mansoni eggs in the biospy. A decrease in the mass volume was noticed under medical treatment (Biltricide. The aim of this report was to intimate clinicians on possible abdominal schistosomiasis as differential diagnosis of childhood abdominal mass. This is a clarion call for a high index of suspicion of childhood abdominal schistosomiasis in children presenting with abdominal mass in a tropical setting.

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available Experts \\ Spinal Cord Injury 101 Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... in countries outside the US ? A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed to ...

  7. Musculoskeletal injuries

    This presentation is about musculoskeletal injuries and the diagnosis of osseous tumors. The use of the radiology, bone scintigraphy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance contribute to detect the localization of the osseous lesions as well as the density (lytic, sclerotic, mixed) and the benign and malignant tumors.

  8. Inhalation Injuries

    ... increase mortality 30% to 40% when patients with cutaneous burns and inhalation injury are compared with patients ... nasal hairs • Facial burns • Burns around the mouth • Mineral spirits – 104º F – paint thinner, brush cleaner. • Redness, ...

  9. Risk factors of thrombosis in abdominal veins

    Amit Kumar Durra; Ashok Chacko; Biju George; Joseph Anjilivelil Joseph; Sukesh Chandran Nair; Vikram Mathews

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of inherited and acquired thrombophilic risk factors in patients with abdominal venous thrombosis and to compare the risk factor profiles between Budd-Chiari syndromes (BCS) and splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT).METHODS: In this retrospective study, 36 patients with abdominal venous thrombosis were studied.The patients were divided into Budd-Chiari group (hepatic vein, IVC thrombosis) and splanchnic venous thrombosis group (portal, splenic, superior mesenteric veins) based on the veins involved. Hereditary and acquired thrombophilic risk factors were evaluated in all patients.RESULTS: Twenty patients had SVT, 14 had BCS,and 2 had mixed venous thrombosis. Ten patients (28%) had hereditary and 10 patients (28%) acquired thrombophilic risk factors. The acquired risk factors were significantly more common in the SVT group (SVT vs BCS:45% vs 7%,x2=5.7,P=0.02) while hereditary risk factors did not show significant differences between the two groups (SVT vs BCS: 25%vs 36%, x2=0.46,P=0.7). Multiple risk factors were present in one (7%) patient with BCS and in 3 patients (15%) with SVT. No risk factors were identified in 57% of patients with BCS and in 45% of patients with SVT.CONCLUSION: Hereditary and acquired risk factors play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of abdominal venous thrombosis. Acquired risk factors are significantly more common in SVT patients while hereditary factors are similar in both groups.

  10. Sagittal Abdominal Diameter: Application in Clinical Practice

    Thaís Da Silva-Ferreira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Excess visceral fat is associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD has recently been highlighted as an indicator of abdominal obesity, and also may be useful in predicting cardiovascular risk. The purpose of the present study was to review the scientific literature on the use of SAD in adult nutritional assessment. A search was conducted for scientific articles in the following electronic databases: SciELO , MEDLINE (PubMed and Virtual Health Library. SAD is more associated with abdominal fat (especially visceral, and with different cardiovascular risk factors, such as, insulin resistance, blood pressure, and serum lipoproteins than the traditional methods of estimating adiposity, such as body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio. SAD can also be used in association with other anthropometric measures. There are still no cut-off limits established to classify SAD as yet. SAD can be an alternative measure to estimate visceral adiposity. However, the few studies on this diameter, and the lack of consensus on the anatomical site to measure SAD, are obstacles to establish cut-off limits to classify it.

  11. Midgut malrotation with chronic abdominal pain

    Anil K Wanjari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in midgut rotation occur during the physiological herniation of midgut between the 5 th and 10 th week of gestation. The most significant abnormality is narrow small bowel mesentery which is prone to volvulus. This occurs most frequently in the neonatal period, less commonly midgut malrotation presents in adulthood with either acute volvulus or chronic abdominal symptoms. It is the latter group that represents a diagnostic challenge. We report a case of a 17-year-old male patient who presented with 10-year history of nonspecific gastro-intestinal symptoms. After extensive investigation the patient was diagnosed with midgut malrotation following computed tomography of abdomen. The patient was treated with a laparoscopic Ladd′s procedure and at 3 months he was gaining weight and had stopped vomiting. A laparoscopic Ladd′s procedure is an acceptable alternative to the open technique in treating symptomatic malrotation in adults. Midgut malrotation is a rare congenital anomaly which may present as chronic abdominal pain. Abdominal CT is helpful for diagnosis.

  12. Intra-abdominal hypertension and acute pancreatitis.

    Mifkovic, A; Skultety, J; Sykora, P; Prochotsky, A; Okolicany, R

    2013-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) contributes to organ dysfunction and leads to the development of the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). IAH and ACS are relatively frequent findings in patiens with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and are associated with deterioration in organ functions. The most affected are cardiovascular, respiratory and renal functions. The incidence of IAH in patients with SAP is approximately 60-80%. There is an accumulating evidence in human and animal studies that changes of perfusion, particularly to the microvasculature, are crucial events in the progression of acute pancreatitis (AP). The perfusion of the small and large intestine is impaired due to reduced arterial pressure, increased vascular resistence and diminished portal blood flow. Bacterial translocation has been described in patients with ACS, and this may apply to patients with SAP. Approximately 30-40% of SAP patients develop ACS because of pancreatic (retroperitoneal) inflammation, peripancreatic tissue edema, formation of fluid collections or abdominal distension. Surgical debridement was the preferred treatment to control necrotizing pancreatitis in the past. However, the management of necrotizing pancreatitis has changed over the last decade. The main objective of this article is to describe the association between IAH and AP and to emphasize this situation in clinical praxis as well (Fig. 1, Ref. 38). PMID:23406186

  13. Computed tomography in therapy planning: Abdominal region

    The radiotherapy community is continuing to appreciate the significant contribution CBT can make to planning abdominal radiotherapy and is also beginning to appreciate the pitfalls and limitations of the technique. Specific attention should continue to focus on patient registration with the scanner and simulator radiographs, patient position during scanning and treatment, and effects of involuntary patient motion, especially breathing, on organ and tumor localization. Effects of patient positional changes and of involuntary motion during treatment on treatment planning and execution should be quantitated, as should effects of inhomogeneities, especially gut air, on abdominal dose distribution. Radiotherapy planned with CBT data can impact significantly on morbidity and mortality associated with abdominal malignancies. Faster scanners (with a scanning time of 9 sec or less) should be employed where possible to obtain maximum diagnostic information. Multiplanar reconstruction and true three-dimensional treatment planning can enhance significantly the value of CBT in treatment planning. Radiotherapists, radiodiagnosticians, radiation physicists, and oncologists must be continue to meet the challenge of realizing the true potential of CBT for the benefit of the cancer patients entrusted to their care

  14. Inter-observer agreement for abdominal CT in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain

    The level of inter-observer agreement of abdominal computed tomography (CT) in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department (ED) was evaluated. Two hundred consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain were prospectively included. Multi-slice CT was performed in all patients with intravenous contrast medium only. Three radiologists independently read all CT examinations. They recorded specific radiological features and a final diagnosis on a case record form. We calculated the proportion of agreement and kappa values, for overall, urgent and frequently occurring diagnoses. The mean age of the evaluated patients was 46 years (range 19-94), of which 54% were women. Overall agreement on diagnoses was good, with a median kappa of 0.66. Kappa values for specific urgent diagnoses were excellent, with median kappa values of 0.84, 0.90 and 0.81, for appendicitis, diverticulitis and bowel obstruction, respectively. Abdominal CT has good inter-observer agreement in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED, with excellent agreement for specific urgent diagnoses as diverticulitis and appendicitis. (orig.)

  15. Inter-observer agreement for abdominal CT in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain

    Randen, Adrienne van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lameris, Wytze [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nio, C.Y.; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Meier, Mark A.; Tutein Nolthenius, Charlotte; Smithuis, Frank; Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    The level of inter-observer agreement of abdominal computed tomography (CT) in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department (ED) was evaluated. Two hundred consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain were prospectively included. Multi-slice CT was performed in all patients with intravenous contrast medium only. Three radiologists independently read all CT examinations. They recorded specific radiological features and a final diagnosis on a case record form. We calculated the proportion of agreement and kappa values, for overall, urgent and frequently occurring diagnoses. The mean age of the evaluated patients was 46 years (range 19-94), of which 54% were women. Overall agreement on diagnoses was good, with a median kappa of 0.66. Kappa values for specific urgent diagnoses were excellent, with median kappa values of 0.84, 0.90 and 0.81, for appendicitis, diverticulitis and bowel obstruction, respectively. Abdominal CT has good inter-observer agreement in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED, with excellent agreement for specific urgent diagnoses as diverticulitis and appendicitis. (orig.)

  16. Intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal compartment syndrome in acute general surgery.

    Sugrue, Michael

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is a harbinger of intra-abdominal mischief, and its measurement is cheap, simple to perform, and reproducible. Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), especially grades 3 and 4 (IAP > 18 mmHg), occurs in over a third of patients and is associated with an increase in intra-abdominal sepsis, bleeding, renal failure, and death. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Increased IAP reading may provide an objective bedside stimulus for surgeons to expedite diagnostic and therapeutic work-up of critically ill patients. One of the greatest challenges surgeons and intensivists face worldwide is lack of recognition of the known association between IAH, ACS, and intra-abdominal sepsis. This lack of awareness of IAH and its progression to ACS may delay timely intervention and contribute to excessive patient resuscitation. CONCLUSIONS: All patients entering the intensive care unit (ICU) after emergency general surgery or massive fluid resuscitation should have an IAP measurement performed every 6 h. Each ICU should have guidelines relating to techniques of IAP measurement and an algorithm for management of IAH.

  17. Significance of residual abdominal masses in children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma

    Karmazyn, B.; Horev, G.; Kornreich, L. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah-Tikva (Israel); Ash, S.; Goshen, Y.; Yaniv, I. [Dept. of Hematology and Oncology, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah-Tikva (Israel)

    2001-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history of children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma who had complete clinical remission and residual abdominal mass after treatment. Material and methods: The charts and imaging findings of all children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma treated and followed at our medical center between 1988 and 1999 were reviewed for the presence, management, clinical course, and prognosis of residual mass. Results: Only children who achieved complete clinical remission were included. The study group consisted of 33 children (20 boys and 13 girls) aged 2.6-17.6 years (mean 7.2 years). Of these, seven (20.6 %) were found to have a residual abdominal mass. Two underwent second-look operation with no evidence of viable tumor on histology. The remaining five were followed by imaging studies for 2.2-9.1 years (mean 6.1 years); none relapsed. Conclusion: Residual mass is not uncommon in children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma. The presence of residual mass in a child with complete clinical remission does not alter the long-term prognosis. Therefore, in children with Burkitt's lymphoma and residual mass with no other signs of disease activity, expectant watching may be appropriate. (orig.)

  18. Significance of residual abdominal masses in children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history of children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma who had complete clinical remission and residual abdominal mass after treatment. Material and methods: The charts and imaging findings of all children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma treated and followed at our medical center between 1988 and 1999 were reviewed for the presence, management, clinical course, and prognosis of residual mass. Results: Only children who achieved complete clinical remission were included. The study group consisted of 33 children (20 boys and 13 girls) aged 2.6-17.6 years (mean 7.2 years). Of these, seven (20.6 %) were found to have a residual abdominal mass. Two underwent second-look operation with no evidence of viable tumor on histology. The remaining five were followed by imaging studies for 2.2-9.1 years (mean 6.1 years); none relapsed. Conclusion: Residual mass is not uncommon in children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma. The presence of residual mass in a child with complete clinical remission does not alter the long-term prognosis. Therefore, in children with Burkitt's lymphoma and residual mass with no other signs of disease activity, expectant watching may be appropriate. (orig.)

  19. [Hematoma of the abdominal wall. A case report: pitfall of Seldinger method via femoral artery].

    Hiramatsu, Hisaya; Sugiura, Yasushi; Takeda, Ririko; Nanba, Hiroki

    2009-02-01

    We reported a case of an abdominal wall hematoma which caused by Seldinger method via the femoral artery. A 48-year-old female, suffered from direct carotid cavernous fistula, was treated by transfemoral transvenous embolization (TVE). The whole procedure was completed without difficulty except minor resistance of guide wire manipulation during left femoral artery catheterization. Four hours later, the patient became hypotensive and showed the sign of impending shock without definitive causes. Nine hours after the embolization a huge hematoma of the abdominal wall was found. It required the total 1200 m/ of blood transfusion before her blood pressure returned to normal. She recovered fully from this event and discharged uneventfully. There is a speculation that a deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) was injured with an angle-shaped guide wire and bled into the abdominal wall. And subsequent systemic heparinization prevented the coagulation process, resulting a large hematoma. Anatomically, an angle-shaped guide wire is easily able to migrate into DCIA. To prevent a vascular injury, it is very important to manipulate a guide wire under fluoroscopic control and to select a J-shaped guide wire instead of an angle-shaped one. PMID:19227158

  20. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Full Text Available ... surgery, that the patient's coughing, some of that stress can be relieved by the Veritas instead of ... so we're going to make a fresh injury out of this, get these growth factors going. ...

  1. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Full Text Available ... down low because you don't want to leave epithelial cells to create a cyst underneath there. ... with the Bovie, but you're creating thermal injury, and I'd rather cut it and then ...

  2. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Full Text Available ... of these patients can be smokers, some have asthma, et cetera. When the bowel goes back in, ... fresh injury out of this, get these growth factors going. Rev things up again so that the ...

  3. Should blunt segmental vascular renal injuries be considered an AAST grade 4 renal injury?

    Malaeb, Bahaa; Figler, Brad; Wessells, Hunter; Voelzke, Bryan B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal segmental vascular injury (SVI) following blunt abdominal trauma is not part of the original AAST renal injury grading system. Recent recommendations support classifying SVI as an AAST grade 4 injury. Our primary aim was to compare outcomes following blunt renal SVI and blunt renal collecting system lacerations (CSL). We hypothesize that renal SVI fare well with conservative management alone and should be relegated a less severe renal AAST grade. Methods We retrospectively identified patients with SVI and G4 CSL admitted to a Level 1 trauma center between 2003–2010. Penetrating trauma was excluded. Need for surgical intervention, length of stay, kidney salvage (>25% renal preservation on renography 6–12 weeks after injury), and delayed complication rates were compared between the SVI and CSL injuries. Statistical analysis utilized chi squared, Fisher exact, and t-test. Results 56 patients with SVI and 88 patients with G4 CSL sustained blunt trauma. Age, injury severity score, and length of stay were similar for the two groups. Five patients in each group died of concomitant, non-renal injuries. In the G4 CSL group, 15 patients underwent major interventions and 32 patients underwent minor interventions. Only one patient in the SVI group underwent a major intervention. The renal salvage rate was 85.7% following SVI versus 62.5% following CSL (p=0.107). Conclusions Overall surgical interventions are significantly lower among the SVI cohort than G4 CSL cohort. Further analysis using a larger cohort of patients is recommended before revising the current renal grading system. Adding SVI as a grade 4 injury could potentially increase the heterogeneity of grade 4 injuries and decrease the ability of the AAST renal injury grading system to predict outcomes, such as nephrectomy rate. Level of Evidence IV (retrospective, cohort study) PMID:24458054

  4. The efficacy of ultrasonography in hemodynamically stable children with blunt abdominal trauma: a prospective comparison with computed tomography

    Purpose: In this prospective study we aimed to investigate the diagnostic value of ultrasonography (US) in hemodynamically stable children after blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) using computed tomography (CT) as the gold standard. Materials and methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 96 children with BAT were evaluated prospectively. CT was performed first, followed by US. US and CT examinations were independently evaluated by two radiologists for free fluid and organ injury. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and overall accuracy of US were assessed regarding CT as the gold standard. Results: Overall 128 organ injuries were determined in 96 patients with CT; however, 20 (15.6%) of them could not be seen with US. Free intraabdominal fluid (FIF) was seen in 82 of 96 patients by CT (85.4%) and eight of them (9.7%) could not be seen by US. We found that sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and overall accuracy of the US for free intra-abdominal fluid were 90.2, 100, 100, 63.6 and 91.7%, respectively. Conclusions: US for BAT in children is highly accurate and specific. It is highly sensitive in detecting liver, spleen and kidney injuries whereas its sensitivity is moderate for the detection of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and pancreatic injuries

  5. Preparation of vulnerable plaques in abdominal aorta: an experimental study in rabbits

    Objective: To establish an animal model of vulnerable plaque in abdominal aorta by pharmacological triggering of atherosclerosis in rabbits. Methods: Thirty New Zealand white rabbits were randomly and equally divided into 3 groups: group A, receiving balloon injury together with high lipid diet;group B, receiving high lipid diet only, and group C, receiving regular diet only. After feeding for 12 weeks, all the rabbits in three groups underwent pharmacological triggering with Chinese Russell's viper venom(CRVV) and histamine to induce the rupture of the plaque and the formation of thrombosis. Results: In 8 survival rabbits of group A, ten lesions with the stenotic degree over 50% were found, which had large lipid core with the thickness of fibrous cap being thinner than 65μm, by which these ten lesions were judged as vulnerable plaques. In 9 rabbits of group B, only 3 vulnerable plaques could be determined,while no single vulnerable plaque could be identified in the rabbits of group C. Conclusion: For establishing an animal model of vulnerable plaque in abdominal aorta in rabbits, balloon injury combined with high lipid diet is a feasible and reliable method. (authors)

  6. Evaluation of Forty-Nine Patients with Abdominal Tuberculosis

    Murat Kilic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Abdominal tuberculosis is an uncommon form of extrapulmonary infection. In this study, we aimed to highlight the nonspecific clinical presentations and diagnostic difficulties of abdominal tuberculosis. Material and Method: Clinical features, diagnostic methods, and the therapeutic outcomes of 49 patients diagnosed as abdominal tuberculosis between 2003 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The patients were classified into four subgroups including peritoneal (28, nodal (14, intestinal (5, and solid organ tuberculosis (2. The most frequent symptoms were abdominal pain, abdominal distention and fatique. Ascites appeared to be the most frequent clinical finding. Ascites and enlarged abdominal lymph nodes were the most frequent findings on ultrasonography and tomography. Diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis was mainly depended on histopathology of ascitic fluid and biopsies from peritoneum, abdominal lymph nodes or colonoscopic materials. Forty patients healed with standart 6-month therapy while extended treatment for 9-12 months was needed in 8 whom had discontinued drug therapy and had persistent symptoms and signs. One patient died within the treatment period due to disseminated infection. Discussion: The diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis is often difficult due to diverse clinical presentations. The presence of ascites, personal/familial/contact history of tuberculosis, and coexisting active extraabdominal tuberculosis are the most significant marks in diagnosis. Diagnostic laparoscopy and tissue sampling seem to be the best diagnostic approach for abdominal tuberculosis.

  7. Analysis of the association between periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT, after blunt abdominal trauma, and elevated central venous pressure

    To assess the causes of periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT, in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. From among 812 patients who underwent abdominal CT after blunt abdominal trauma, we retrospectively analysed the findings in 124 with evidence of periportal low attenuation. Among these, hepatic injury was noted in only 87. The presence or absence, and extent of hepatic injury, and of periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT, were carefully evaluated. In each case, the ratio of the transverse diameter of the inferior vena cava(IVC) to the aorta at the level of the right adrenal gland provided an indirect measurement of central venous pressure ; for control purposes, the ratio was also obtained in 21 non-traumatic patients with no abnormal abdominal CT findings. Of the 87 patients with hepatic injury, 46 showed no periportal low attenuation, and average value of the ratio between the IVC and aorta was 1.16±0.12, while the remaining 41 patients showed periportal low attenuation with a ratio of 1.51±0.21(p<0.05). In the 37 patients with periportal low attenuation but no evidence of concomitant hepatic injury, the average ratio was 1.52±0.25, while in 21 non-traumatic patients it was 1.15±0.16. For resuscitation, all patients had received 0.5-5.0 litre of IV fluid therapy before CT, and at the time of CT, were normotensive. Rapidly elevated central venous pressure following massive IV infusion therapy in patients with blunt abdominal trauma can be one of the causes of periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT

  8. Abdominal Versus Laparoscopic Sacrocolpopexy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Campbell, Patrick; Cloney, Louise; Jha, Swati

    2016-08-01

    Sacrocolpopexy (SC) is considered the criterion-standard treatment for management of vaginal vault prolapse (VVP), and laparoscopic SC (LSC) has become a popular alternative to the abdominal approach. However, there are limited definitive data comparing the 2 procedures. The aim of this meta-analysis is to compare the abdominal sacrocolpopexy (ASC) with the LSC for the management of VVP. Electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, and Google scholar were performed. A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies comparing ASC and LSC for the management of VVP were performed. Seven studies were included with a total of 1461 patients: 589 in the LSC group and 872 in the ASC group. The conversion rate for LSC to ASC was 3% (17 cases). One LSC and 1 ASC were each converted to vaginal procedures. The operative time was significantly greater with LSC (mean difference, 25 minutes; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.43-45.07 minutes); however, ASC had significantly greater intraoperative blood loss (mean difference, 107 mL; 95% CI, -139.59 to -73.73 mL), longer hospital stay (mean difference, 1.71 days; 95% CI, -2.21 to -1.22 days), and increased risk of postoperative ileus/small bowel obstruction (odds ratio, 2.88; 95% CI, 1.31-6.33). There was no significant difference in rate of bladder injury, bowel injury, mesh exposure, or repeat prolapse surgery. Laparoscopic SC takes longer but is associated with less intraoperative blood loss, shorter hospital stay, and reduced postoperative ileus/small bowel obstruction and hence is a suitable alternative to the abdominal technique. PMID:27436178

  9. CLINICAL STUDY AND MANAGEMENT OF BLUNT INJURY ABDOMEN PERTAINING TO SOLID ORGANS

    Katta Srinivasa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Blunt Abdominal trauma is one of the most common causes among injuries caused mainly due to road traffic accidents. 1 The rapid increase in number of motor vehicles and its aftermath has caused rapid increase in number of victims to blunt abdominal trauma. Motor vehicle accidents account for 75 to 80% of blunt abdominal trauma. 2 Blunt injury of abdomen is also a result of fall from height, assault with blunt objects, industrial mishaps, sport injuries, bomb blast and fall from riding bicycle. 2 In view of increasing number of vehicles and consequently road traffic accidents, this topic is chosen to study the cases of blunt abdominal trauma with reference to the patients presenting at Govt. General Hospital, attached to Guntur Medical College, Guntur. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the study are: 1. To evaluate the impact of blunt abdominal trauma on solid viscera. 2. To evaluate etiology and various modes of presentation. 3. To evaluate various available investigations for the detection of solid organ injuries. 4. To evaluate various modalities of treatment available with aim to reduce the mortality and morbidity. 5. To evaluate common complications of solid organ injury in blunt trauma abdomen. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients admitted in Government General Hospital, Guntur, from November 2012 to October 2014 and studied 50 cases. This is a prospective study conducted over 2 years. RESULTS: Male patients were commonly affected (80%, Peak age group being 21 – 30 years (48%. The commonest mode of injury was road traffic accident (58%. The common organ injured was spleen (54% followed by liver. 70% of the patients were treated by surgery, 30% conservatively. The mortality in this study was 14%. CONCLUSIONS : Blunt injury abdomen forms considerable load and health care system, most common age group is youngsters in road traffic accidents , so efforts should be made to formulate and execute road traffic regulations. Well established trauma care

  10. Stingray injury.

    Evans, R.J.; Davies, R S

    1996-01-01

    A case of stingray injury is reported. Local symptoms and signs include intense pain, oedema around the wound, erythema and petechiae. Systemic symptoms and signs include nausea and vomiting, muscle cramps, diaphoresis, syncope, headache, muscle fasciculations, and cardiac arrhythmias. Treatment aims to reverse local and systemic effects of the venom, alleviate pain, and prevent infection. Antitetanus prophylaxis is important. Treatment for anaphylaxis may be necessary.

  11. Dor abdominal aguda como manifestação de violência física em lactente: alerta aos pediatras Dolor abdominal agudo como manifestación de violencia física en lactante: alerta a los pediatras Acute abdominal pain as a manifestation of physical violence in an infant: alert to pediatricians

    Patricia Gomes de Souza

    2012-12-01

    Pediatría y de los pediatras en general para el acercamiento a la violencia contra el niño, para que estén más preparados para accionar la línea de cuidados en situaciones de violencia.OBJECTIVE: To alert pediatricians and pediatric residents on the possibility of child abuse by reporting a clinical case. CASE DESCRIPTION: An 18 month-old infant was brought to the Emergency Department due to abdominal pain and vomiting for 48 hours. Abdominal examination revealed two holes and a small hardened mass. An abdominal X-ray showed three metallic objects. Two sewing needles and one nail without a head were removed from the abdominal cavity by laparotomy. COMMENTS: Diagnosis was performed in the second medical care, probably because the intentional injury had not been considered in the first visit. Physical violence is a differential diagnosis to be considered in the presence of abdominal pain in children. It is worth noting the importance of improving pediatric resident training, and also of pediatricians in general, in relation to the approach of child abuse, enabling them to use adequate care in cases of violence.

  12. Benefits of immediate jejunostomy feeding after major abdominal trauma--a prospective, randomized study.

    Moore, E E; Jones, T N

    1986-10-01

    Benefits of immediate postinjury nutritional support remain ill defined. Seventy-five consecutive patients undergoing emergent celiotomy with an abdominal trauma index (A.T.I.) greater than 15 were randomized prospectively to a control group (no supplemental nutrition during first 5 days) or enteral-fed group. The enteral patients had a needle catheter jejunostomy (N.C.J.) placed at laparotomy with the constant infusion of an elemental diet (Vivonex HN) begun at 18 hours and advanced to 3,000 ml/day (3,000 kcal, 20 gm N2) within 72 hours. Control and enteral-fed groups were comparable with respect to demographic features, trauma mechanism, shock, colon injury, splenectomy, A.T.I., and initial nutritional assessment. Twenty (63%) of the enteral patients were maintained on the elemental diet greater than 5 days; four (12%) needed total parenteral nutrition (T.P.N.). Nine (29%) of the control patients required T.P.N. Nitrogen balance was markedly improved (p less than 0.001) in the enteral-fed group. Although visceral protein markers and overall complication rate were not significantly different, septic morbidity was greater (p less than 0.025) in the control group (abdominal infection in seven and pneumonia in two) compared to the enteral-fed patients (abdominal abscess in three). Analysis of patients with A.T.I. 15-40 disclosed sepsis in seven (26%) of the control versus one (4%) of the enteral-fed group (p less than 0.01). Our clinical experience demonstrates the feasibility of immediate postoperative enteral feeding via N.C.J. after major abdominal trauma, and suggests this early nutrition reduces septic complications in critically injured patients. PMID:3095557

  13. Traumatismos de veia cava inferior Inferior vena cava injuries

    Cleinaldo de Almeida Costa

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência, o perfil clínico e as estratégias operatórias dos ferimentos de Veia Cava Inferior (VCI. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados retrospectivamente os prontuários de 76 doentes com ferimento de VCI atendidos nos dois prontossocorros de Manaus, no período de janeiro de 1997 a julho de 2002. Mecanismo de lesão, mortalidade, estado hemodinâmico, índice de trauma abdominal penetrante (PATI, achados intra-operatórios e conduta cirúrgica foram estudados. RESULTADOS: Quarenta e nove (65% doentes sofreram lesão por arma branca, 26 (34% por arma de fogo e um por traumatismo abdominal fechado. Quarenta e um (54% doentes sobreviveram. Quase todos chegaram acordados, entretanto 40% estavam hipotensos (pressão arterial sistólica BACKGROUND: Injuries of inferior vena cava (IVC require immediate and definitive action. Our objective is to evaluate the incidence, the clinical findings and the operative approach to IVC injuries. METHODS: We retrospectively studied 76 patients with IVC injuries treated in two Emergency Hospitals of Manaus, AM, Brazil, from January 1997 to July 2002. Mechanisms of injuries, mortality, hemodynamic status, penetrating abdominal trauma index (PATI, intraoperative findings and surgical approach were among assessed data. RESULTS: Fourty-nine patients (65% had stab wounds, 26 (34% gunshot wounds, and one had blunt abdominal trauma. Fourty-one (54% patients survived. Almost all patients entered the emergency room awake, although 40% were hypotensive (systolic blood pressure < 70 mmHg, and the penetrating abdominal trauma index average was above 40. At laparotomy, active retroperitoneal bleeding or an expanding retroperitoneal hematoma were detected in all cases. Caval injury was retro-hepatic in 21 patients, and infrahepatic in the other 55. The prevailing surgical approach was lateral repair in 65 patients. Atrial-caval shunting was tried in six patients, with only three survivals. CONCLUSIONS: We

  14. [Intra-abdominal infection and new quinolones].

    Gnocchi, C A

    1999-01-01

    Intra-abdominal infection is defined as the presence of an infectious process within the peritoneal cavity. It may be local or have a systemic consequence generating multiple organic disfunction. Most of the studies report a mortality of 30% in severe intra-abdominal infection. Secondary peritonitis is caused by the loss of integrity of the gastrointestinal apparatus, which contaminates with pathogens the peritoneal cavity. Invariably they are polymicrobial infections, mostly due to facultative anaerobic and anaerobic Gram negative bacilli. Prognosis of peritonitis depends on the struggle between two forces: local and systemic immunity of the host and the volume, nature and length of the contamination. Microorganisms and their products estimulate cellular defenses in the host and activate numerous inflammatory mediators responsible for sepsis. Antibiotic treatment of secondary peritonitis must act mainly against Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis. The adequate and early empirical administration of antibiotics against these bacteria is well established. It is necessary to consider if the infection is localized or generalized and if it is accompanied or not by organic disfunction. It also has to be taken into account if peritonitis is community or hospital-acquired when choosing the antibiotic scheme. In community-acquired peritonitis with low to moderate infections a combination of metronidazole-ceftriaxone, metronidazole-gentamycin or a monodrug like ampicillin-sulbactam may be used. In severe hospital-acquired peritonitis imipenem or the combination piperacillin-tazobactam are effective. New quinolones such as trovafloxacin or clinafloxacin, with excellent activity against aerobes and anaerobes producing intra-abdominal infections, may be effective. Future clinical trials are needed to determine their utility. Tertiary peritonitis represent a systemic inflammatory response with multiorganic failure due to the uncontrolled activation of the inflammatory

  15. Abdominal irradiation modulates 5-Fluorouracil pharmacokinetics

    Shueng Pei-Wei

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concurrent chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU is widely accepted for treatment of abdominal malignancy. Nonetheless, the interactions between radiation and 5-FU remain unclear. We evaluated the influence of abdominal irradiation on the pharmacokinetics of 5-FU in rats. Methods The radiation dose distributions of cholangiocarcinoma patients were determined for the low dose areas, which are generously deposited around the intrahepatic target volume. Then, corresponding single-fraction radiation was delivered to the whole abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats from a linear accelerator after computerized tomography-based planning. 5-FU at 100 mg/kg was intravenously infused 24 hours after radiation. A high-performance liquid chromatography system equipped with a UV detector was used to measure 5-FU in the blood. Ultrafiltration was used to measure protein-unbound 5-FU. Results Radiation at 2 Gy, simulating the daily human treatment dose, reduced the area under the plasma concentration vs. time curve (AUC of 5-FU by 31.7% compared to non-irradiated controls. This was accompanied by a reduction in mean residence time and incremental total plasma clearance values, and volume of distribution at steady state. Intriguingly, low dose radiation at 0.5 Gy, representing a dose deposited in the generous, off-target area in clinical practice, resulted in a similar pharmacokinetic profile, with a 21.4% reduction in the AUC. This effect was independent of protein binding capacity. Conclusions Abdominal irradiation appears to significantly modulate the systemic pharmacokinetics of 5-FU at both the dose level for target treatment and off-target areas. This unexpected and unwanted influence is worthy of further investigation and might need to be considered in clinical practice.

  16. Late renal function following whole abdominal irradiation

    Sixty patients treated with whole abdominal radiotherapy who had remained disease-free since completion of treatment participated in a study to assess the late clinical and biochemical effects of bilateral renal irradiation. Minimum follow-up was 5 years with a maximum of 20 years and a median of 9 years. Fifty-two patients in the study group were treated for primary ovarian cancer. Seven had non-Hodgkins lymphoma arising in the gastrointestinal tract and one patient had a carcinoid tumour arising in small bowel. None of the patients received chemotherapy. Abdominal radiation was given using an open beam technique to a mean dose of 22.92 Gy (range 6.68-27.54 Gy) in 1.02 to 1.25 Gy fractions treated once daily. Posterior kidney shields were used in order to limit the renal dose to <20 Gy. Mean radiation dose to both kidneys (retrospectively calculated) was 19.28 Gy (range 6.68-22.99 Gy). Patients ranged in age from 32-81 years with a median of 61 years. No patient had clinical evidence of renal impairment. Nine patients were hypertensive prior to radiotherapy and a further five patients became hypertensive after treatment. Serum creatinine values ranged from 44-123 μmol/l, with a mean of 87 μmol/l. Creatinine clearance ranged from 0.61-2.38 ml/s (mean 1.28 ml/s). Tubular function tests revealed one borderline high 24-h protein excretion and normal 24-h phosphorous and uric acid. Using a multiple linear regression analysis with creatinine clearance as the endpoint, age was the only significant variable (P < 0.00001) and renal dose and interval from treatment were not independently significant. There was no evidence of late renal toxicity more than 5 years after whole abdominal radiotherapy delivered with this technique and dose/fractionation schedule, and using the clinical and biochemical endpoints assessed in this study

  17. Late renal function following whole abdominal irradiation.

    Irwin, C; Fyles, A; Wong, C S; Cheung, C M; Zhu, Y

    1996-03-01

    Sixty patients treated with whole abdominal radiotherapy who had remained disease-free since completion of treatment participated in a study to assess the late clinical and biochemical effects of bilateral renal irradiation. Minimum follow-up was 5 years with a maximum of 20 years and a median of 9 years. Fifty-two patients in the study group were treated for primary ovarian cancer. Seven had non-Hodgkins lymphoma arising in the gastrointestinal tract and one patient had a carcinoid tumour arising in small bowel. None of the patients received chemotherapy. Abdominal radiation was given using an open beam technique to a mean dose of 22.92 Gy (range 6.68-27.54 Gy) in 1.02 to 1.25 Gy fractions treated once daily. Posterior kidney shields were used in order to limit the renal dose to creatinine values ranged from 44-123 mumol/l, with a mean of 87 mumol/l. Creatinine clearance ranged from 0.61-2.38 ml/s (mean 1.28 ml/s). Tubular function tests revealed one borderline high 24-h protein excretion and normal 24-h phosphorous and uric acid. Using a multiple linear regression analysis with creatinine clearance as the endpoint, age was the only significant variable (P < 0.00001) and renal dose and interval from treatment were not independently significant. There was no evidence of late renal toxicity more than 5 years after whole abdominal radiotherapy delivered with this technique and dose/fractionation schedule, and using the clinical and biochemical endpoints assessed in this study. PMID:8693108

  18. Functional Abdominal Pain: "Get" the Function, Loose the Pain.

    Draeger-Muenke, Reinhild

    2015-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain is a mind-body, psychosocial, and self-reinforcing experience with significant consequences for the sufferer and the surrounding support network. The occurrence of unpredictable symptoms and their severity add an element of dread and feeling out-of-control to daily life and often reduce overall functioning in a downward spiral. Two clinical presentations of functional abdominal pain are offered in this article (composites to protect confidentiality) dealing with abdominal pain syndrome and abdominal migraines. The treatment demonstrates the use of hypnotic principles for self-regulation, exploration, and meaning-making. Hypnosis treatment is conducted in combination with mindfulness-based interventions and Traditional Chinese Medicine's (TCM) teachings regarding abdominal health and illness. The clinical examples illustrate medical findings that suggest children with early life stress and an early onset of gastrointestinal somatization may not simply outgrow their functional abdominal pain but may suffer into adulthood. PMID:26046716

  19. Chylous complications after abdominal aortic surgery.

    Haug, E S; Saether, O D; Odegaard, A; Johnsen, G; Myhre, H O

    1998-12-01

    Two patients developed chylous complications following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. One patient had chylous ascitis and was successfully treated by a peritoneo-caval shunt. The other patient developed a lymph cyst, which gradually resorbed after puncture. Chylous complications following aortic surgery are rare. Patients in bad a general condition should be treated by initial paracentesis and total parenteral nutrition, supplemented by medium-chain triglyceride and low-fat diet. If no improvement is observed on this regimen, the next step should be implementation of a peritoneo-venous shunt, whereas direct ligation of the leak should be reserved for those who are not responding to this treatment. PMID:10204656

  20. Mycobacterium fortuitum abdominal wall abscesses following liposuction

    Al Soub Hussam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a case of abdominal abscesses due to Mycobacterium fortuitum following liposuction. The abscesses developed three months after the procedure and diagnosis was delayed for five months. The clues for diagnosis were persistent pus discharge in spite of broad spectrum antibiotics and failure to grow any organisms on routine culture. This condition has been rarely reported; however, the increasing number of liposuction procedures done and awareness among physicians will probably result in the identification of more cases. Combination antibiotic therapy with surgical drainage in more extensive diseases is essential for cure.

  1. Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP).

    Morton, Darren; Callister, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP), commonly referred to as 'stitch', is an ailment well known in many sporting activities. It is especially prevalent in activities that involve repetitive torso movement with the torso in an extended position, such as running and horse riding. Approximately 70% of runners report experiencing the pain in the past year and in a single running event approximately one in five participants can be expected to suffer the condition. ETAP is a localized pain that is most common in the lateral aspects of the mid abdomen along the costal border, although it may occur in any region of the abdomen. It may also be related to shoulder tip pain, which is the referred site from tissue innervated by the phrenic nerve. ETAP tends to be sharp or stabbing when severe, and cramping, aching, or pulling when less intense. The condition is exacerbated by the postprandial state, with hypertonic beverages being particularly provocative. ETAP is most common in the young but is unrelated to sex or body type. Well trained athletes are not immune from the condition, although they may experience it less frequently. Several theories have been presented to explain the mechanism responsible for the pain, including ischemia of the diaphragm; stress on the supportive visceral ligaments that attach the abdominal organs to the diaphragm; gastrointestinal ischemia or distension; cramping of the abdominal musculature; ischemic pain resulting from compression of the celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament; aggravation of the spinal nerves; and irritation of the parietal peritoneum. Of these theories, irritation of the parietal peritoneum best explains the features of ETAP; however, further investigations are required. Strategies for managing the pain are largely anecdotal, especially given that its etiology remains to be fully elucidated. Commonly purported prevention strategies include avoiding large volumes of food and beverages for at least 2 hours

  2. Should intensivist do routine abdominal ultrasound?

    Sukhen Samanta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Roundworm infestation is common in tropical climate population with a low socioeconomic status. We describe a case of a young male with polytrauma accident who presented with small bowel dysfunction with a high gastric residual volume during enteral feeding. While searching the etiology, the intensivist performed bedside abdominal ultrasound (USG as a part of whole body USG screening along with clinical examination using different frequency probes to examine bowel movement and ultimately found ascariasis to be the cause. This case report will boost up the wide use of bedside USG by critical care physicians in their patient workup.

  3. Should intensivist do routine abdominal ultrasound?

    Samanta, Sukhen; Samanta, Sujay; Soni, Kapil Dev; Aggarwal, Richa

    2015-09-01

    Roundworm infestation is common in tropical climate population with a low socioeconomic status. We describe a case of a young male with polytrauma accident who presented with small bowel dysfunction with a high gastric residual volume during enteral feeding. While searching the etiology, the intensivist performed bedside abdominal ultrasound (USG) as a part of whole body USG screening along with clinical examination using different frequency probes to examine bowel movement and ultimately found ascariasis to be the cause. This case report will boost up the wide use of bedside USG by critical care physicians in their patient workup. PMID:26430346

  4. Dog with Hydronephrosis Due to Abdominal Trauma

    Talita Mariana Morata Raposo1, Giovanna Rossi Varallo1, Rafael Ricardo Huppes1, Alexandre Martini de Brum2 and Andrigo Barboza De Nardi1*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydronephrosis is a condition that results from complete or partial obstruction of the urinary flow. This paper reports the case of a two-year-old, mixed-breed dog diagnosed with hydronephrosis of the left kidney six months after being kicked in the thoraco-abdominal region. The diagnosis was based on radiographic and ultrasonographic examinations. Percutaneous antegrade pyelography was also performed and allowed the visualization of opacification of the left kidney, which confirmed the diagnosis. Because the exams indicated that the patient had normal renal function, nephrectomy was performed. The patient remained in good health during the postoperative period and in subsequent evaluations.

  5. Report of a Case of Primary Abdominal Pregnancy

    Sh Beigi

    2006-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy (EP) is a potentially life-threatening condition in which the embryo implants outside the uterine endometrial cavity. Abdominal pregnancy is an atypical site wherein the product of conception lies totally outside the reproductive tract. Primary abdominal pregnancy is a very rare condition with a high mortality rate. Diagnosis is often late or misdiagnosed. The aim of introducing this case report is to present a new case of early primary abdominal pregnancy. Despite regular m...

  6. Abdominal Wall Schwannoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Mishra, A.; Hamadto, M.; Azzabi, M.; M. Elfagieh

    2013-01-01

    A 29-year-old female had presented to surgical outpatient's department complaining of lump in the anterior abdominal wall. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solid degenerated tumor in the anterior abdominal wall. It was surgically excised, and histopathology confirmed it to be “ancient” schwannoma. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of an abdominal wall ancient schwannoma in the medical literature.

  7. Abdominal Computed Tomography Findings of Malaria Infection with Plasmodium vivax

    Kim, Eun Mi; Cho, Hyeon Je; Cho, Chong Rae; Kwak, Yee Gyung; Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Yun Ku

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) findings of malaria are not well-known even though malaria is a serious infectious disease. To identify abdominal CT findings, we selected 34 of 405 patients who had a positive peripheral blood smear for Plasmodium vivax and had underwent abdominal CT as the malaria group. We also selected 80 patients who had fever and a negative peripheral blood smear as the control group and 120 healthy people as the normal group. We reviewed and analyzed their medical rec...

  8. Transformation of Abdominal Wall Endometriosis to Clear Cell Carcinoma

    Maria Paula Ruiz; Darryl Lewis Wallace; Matthew Thomas Connell

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell carcinoma is the least common of the malignant transformations reported in nonpelvic sites of endometriosis. Two cases with clear cell carcinoma transformation arising from endometriosis in abdominal wall scars are presented. These patients underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, pelvic washings, and abdominal wall lesion resection. The first case had initial treatment with chemotherapy, while chemotherapy and radiation therapy were given for th...

  9. A prospective study on geriatric abdominal surgical emergencies

    Deepak R. Chavan; Shailesh Kannur; B. B. Metan; Girish Kullolli

    2014-01-01

    Background: Geriatric population is a special subgroup of population undergoing emergency abdominal surgeries. Both higher age group and emergency surgical procedure are considered as high risk factors. In this study, we study the most common cause for geriatric population to undergo an emergency abdominal surgery and the therapeutic outcomes. Methods: All the patients aged more than 60 years coming to surgical department, BLDEU's hospital with acute abdominal conditions. Study period was ...

  10. Computed tomography for the assessment of blunt abdominal trauma

    Computed tomography (CT) was carried out on 70 patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Damage to the abdominal organs was clearly demonstrated by CT. The positive rates of CT in traumatic lesions were higher than those of ultrasound (US). Intraperitoneal hemorrhage was well demonstrated by US. Serum GPT levels were significantly elevated in patients with liver damage (p<0.001). CT proved to be useful for detecting damage to organs in patients with abdominal trauma. (author)

  11. Primary abdominal pregnancy following intra-uterine insemination

    Sujata Kar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary abdominal pregnancy is an extremely rare type of extrauterine pregnancy. It has been reported from many unusual intra-abdominal sites. We report a case of primary abdominal pregnancy following intra-uterine insemination (not reported earlier to our knowledge. Implanted on the anterior surface of the uterus possibly related to an endometriotic foci. Early diagnosis enabled laparoscopic management of this case.

  12. A large abdominal desmoid tumour associated with pregnancy and puerperium

    Setu Rathod; Sunil Kumar Samal; Purna Chandra Mahapatra

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of huge abdominal desmoid tumour first detected during pregnancy. The patient delivered vaginally and the size of the tumour increased during puerperium for which resection was done. Most of these tumours occur in the abdominal muscles particularly right rectus abdominis, perhaps related to trauma from abdominal stretching and movement. These tumours are known to regress spontaneously after delivery which was not in our case. Subsequent pregnancies do not appear to resul...

  13. Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis caused by paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Riccioni, G; Bucciarelli, V; Bisceglia, N; Totaro, G; Scotti, L; Aceto, A; Martini, F; Gallina, S; Bucciarelli, T; Macarini, L

    2013-01-01

    Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis is a rare and potential fatal event, which occurs in adult subjects. We present the case of a 72-year-old-man, who referred to the emergency Department of our hospital because of persistent severe abdominal and perineal pain. Doppler ultrasounds and computerized tomography angiography revealed the acute thrombosis of the abdominal aorta. Immediate revascularization through aortic thrombo-endoarterectomy resolved the disease. PMID:23830410

  14. [Influences of chest deformation by upper abdominal retractor on respiratory system impedance during abdominal surgery].

    Oka, T; Ozawa, Y; Sato, J

    1999-02-01

    The present study was carried out to clarify the effects of chest deformation by upper abdominal retractor on respiratory system impedance during abdominal surgery. We measured the impedances of respiratory system (RS), lung, and chest wall (CW) in nine anesthetized paralyzed subjects employing a pseudorandom noise forced volume oscillation technique. These measurements were performed before and after the lifting chest wall by upper abdominal retractor. The effects of chest deformation was significant on the impedances of RS, lung, while no discernible effect was found in CW impedance. Lifting chest wall decreased RS resistance which was totally accounted for by the decrease in lung resistance, whereas the lifting did not affect reactance in either RS or lung. The mathematical modeling showed the significant lifting effect on the resistance of the parenchyma. In conclusion, change in RS mechanics produced by chest deformation by upper abdominal retractor is dominated in lung but not in CW. Among the lung mechanical components, parenchyma is the primary site of the lifting effect. PMID:10087819

  15. Prevalence of abdominal migraine and recurrent abdominal pain in a Japanese clinic.

    Hikita, Toshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    Prevalence of abdominal migraine (AM) and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) was evaluated in patients who visited Hikita Pediatric Clinic between May 2010 and April 2015. Patient data were collected prospectively using a questionnaire. Out of a total of 3611 cases, observed prevalence was 2.44% for repeated abdominal pain over a period of ≥3 months, 1.47% for RAP, and 0.19% for AM. Duration of abdominal pain was longer for AM than for non-AM RAP. Certain clinical features were significantly different between AM and non-AM RAP. No correlations were found among age at onset, frequency of attack, and duration of attack for various types of RAP. It was difficult to determine useful diagnostic criteria for distinguishing between AM and non-AM RAP. They did not appear to be separate disease entities but, instead, lie on a disease spectrum. The present prevalence of AM (0.19%) was lower than that in many previous studies from countries other than Japan. PMID:27460403

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Full Text Available ... Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Coping with a New Injury Coping with a New Injury Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair ... after an injury? What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? What are the ...

  17. High-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for intra-abdominal desmoid tumors: a report of four cases.

    Shi, Yulan; Huang, Yanqin; Zhou, Meiqi; Ying, Xiao; Hu, Xiaoye

    2016-04-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare clonal fibroblastic proliferations that can arise at abdominal or extra-abdominal sites. Complete surgical resection is the primary treatment for resectable desmoid tumors, but a high rate of local recurrence has been reported even after complete resection. For patients with a recurrent tumor, the goals of treatment are to control the recurrence, maintain quality of life, and prolong survival. Radiofrequency ablation, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and other medical therapies can be used as alternative methods, but there are considerable controversies over the roles of these methods in the management of desmoid tumors. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a minimally invasive and effective method for treatment of solid tumors. We used HIFU to treat four patients with intra-abdominal desmoid tumors from June 2011 to September 2013. Post-procedural pain was seen in all patients. One patient had an intra-abdominal abscess and another suffered a slight injury to the femoral nerve. The patients were followed up for 19-46 months (mean 34 months) until April 2015. The tumor in one patient disappeared, and no tumor progression was observed in the other patients. PMID:27033872

  18. Abdominal alterations in disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis: computed tomography findings

    Objective: to evaluate the incidence and spectrum of abdominal computed tomography imaging findings in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis of abdominal computed tomography images of 26 patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. Results: abnormal abdominal tomographic findings were observed in 18 patients (69.2%), while no significant finding was observed in the other 8 (30.8%) patients. Conclusion: computed tomography has demonstrated to play a relevant role in the screening and detection of abdominal abnormalities in patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. (author)

  19. Diagnostic problems of abdominal desmoid tumors in various locations

    Kreuzberg, B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty Hospital and Medical Faculty of Charles University, Alej Svobody 80, 30460 Pilsen (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: kreuzberg@fnplzen.cz; Koudelova, J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty Hospital and Medical Faculty of Charles University, Alej Svobody 80, 30460 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Ferda, J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty Hospital and Medical Faculty of Charles University, Alej Svobody 80, 30460 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Treska, V. [Department of Surgery, Faculty Hospital and Medical Faculty of Charles University, Alej Svobody 80, 30460 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Spidlen, V. [Department of Surgery, Faculty Hospital and Medical Faculty of Charles University, Alej Svobody 80, 30460 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Mukensnabl, P. [Sikl' s Department of Pathology, Faculty Hospital and Medical Faculty of Charles University, Alej Svobody 80, 30460 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2007-05-15

    Background: Abdominal desmoid tumor is one of the forms of deep (musculoaponeurotic) fibromatosis. It occurs more often as a desmoid tumor in the abdominal wall, less often in various intra-abdominal locations. In this work, we performed retrospective study concerning diagnostic problems of this disease with the use of imaging techniques. Method: Four patients (three females and one male) were examined by postcontrast CT (computed tomography) and one of them also by MR (magnetic resonance). All findings were correlated with the operational findings and histologic examination. Results: The findings were typical only in the case with the lesion located in the abdominal wall, three described cases of the intra-abdominal desmoid provided a broad range of differentially diagnostic possibilities (metastases, GIT tumors, lymphomas, etc.). In particular, the findings in infiltrative processes in intra-abdominal location and retroperitoneal involvement were less typical. Ultimately, the histological findings were decisive. Conclusion: The possibility of the occurrence of intra-abdominal desmoid tumor must be considered particularly in younger individuals with rapidly growing tumorous process, which does not immediately arise from the surrounding organs (digestive tract, internal genitalia, etc.), and is located in the abdominal wall or in the abdominal cavity.

  20. Diagnostic problems of abdominal desmoid tumors in various locations

    Background: Abdominal desmoid tumor is one of the forms of deep (musculoaponeurotic) fibromatosis. It occurs more often as a desmoid tumor in the abdominal wall, less often in various intra-abdominal locations. In this work, we performed retrospective study concerning diagnostic problems of this disease with the use of imaging techniques. Method: Four patients (three females and one male) were examined by postcontrast CT (computed tomography) and one of them also by MR (magnetic resonance). All findings were correlated with the operational findings and histologic examination. Results: The findings were typical only in the case with the lesion located in the abdominal wall, three described cases of the intra-abdominal desmoid provided a broad range of differentially diagnostic possibilities (metastases, GIT tumors, lymphomas, etc.). In particular, the findings in infiltrative processes in intra-abdominal location and retroperitoneal involvement were less typical. Ultimately, the histological findings were decisive. Conclusion: The possibility of the occurrence of intra-abdominal desmoid tumor must be considered particularly in younger individuals with rapidly growing tumorous process, which does not immediately arise from the surrounding organs (digestive tract, internal genitalia, etc.), and is located in the abdominal wall or in the abdominal cavity