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Sample records for abdominal computed tomography

  1. Computed tomography of abdominal trauma

    Abdominal lesions following an accident or surgical interventions are becoming more frequently indications for investigations by computed tomography. Changes of spleen, liver, kidneys, pancreas, and of the retroperitoneal space are discussed. Advantages of computed tomography compared to other investigative methods are shown. (orig.)

  2. Computer tomography following blunt abdominal trauma

    The computer tomographic appearances of lesions of parenchymatous organs following blunt abdominal trauma are described in 13 patients (five liver, four renal, two splenic and two pancreatic injuries). The value of abdominal computer tomography is discussed in relation to the interval between injury and time of abdominal examination and compared with the diagnostic value of abdominal angiography. (orig.)

  3. Dose reduction in abdominal computed tomography

    The broad availability and use of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in recent years has increased the radiation dose for patients. Multiphase MDCT protocols are used in abdominal imaging for various indications. Dose reduction though novel technologies, such as dual energy CT or adapted contrast injection protocols (split bolus etc.) for reduction of scans. An optimized dose reduction can be achieved by using strict protocols which are adapted to the clinical situation of the patient. (orig.)

  4. Abdominal alterations in disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis: computed tomography findings

    Objective: to evaluate the incidence and spectrum of abdominal computed tomography imaging findings in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis of abdominal computed tomography images of 26 patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. Results: abnormal abdominal tomographic findings were observed in 18 patients (69.2%), while no significant finding was observed in the other 8 (30.8%) patients. Conclusion: computed tomography has demonstrated to play a relevant role in the screening and detection of abdominal abnormalities in patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. (author)

  5. Abdominal alterations in disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis: computed tomography findings

    Vermelho, Marli Batista Fernandes; Correia, Ademir Silva; Michailowsky, Tania Cibele de Almeida; Suzart, Elizete Kazumi Kuniyoshi; Ibanes, Aline Santos; Almeida, Lanamar Aparecida; Khoury, Zarifa; Barba, Mario Flores, E-mail: marlivermelho@globo.com [Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas (IIER), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Objective: to evaluate the incidence and spectrum of abdominal computed tomography imaging findings in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis of abdominal computed tomography images of 26 patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. Results: abnormal abdominal tomographic findings were observed in 18 patients (69.2%), while no significant finding was observed in the other 8 (30.8%) patients. Conclusion: computed tomography has demonstrated to play a relevant role in the screening and detection of abdominal abnormalities in patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. (author)

  6. Abdominal Computed Tomography Findings of Malaria Infection with Plasmodium vivax

    Kim, Eun Mi; Cho, Hyeon Je; Cho, Chong Rae; Kwak, Yee Gyung; Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Yun Ku

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) findings of malaria are not well-known even though malaria is a serious infectious disease. To identify abdominal CT findings, we selected 34 of 405 patients who had a positive peripheral blood smear for Plasmodium vivax and had underwent abdominal CT as the malaria group. We also selected 80 patients who had fever and a negative peripheral blood smear as the control group and 120 healthy people as the normal group. We reviewed and analyzed their medical rec...

  7. Computed tomography for the assessment of blunt abdominal trauma

    Computed tomography (CT) was carried out on 70 patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Damage to the abdominal organs was clearly demonstrated by CT. The positive rates of CT in traumatic lesions were higher than those of ultrasound (US). Intraperitoneal hemorrhage was well demonstrated by US. Serum GPT levels were significantly elevated in patients with liver damage (p<0.001). CT proved to be useful for detecting damage to organs in patients with abdominal trauma. (author)

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion in Abdominal Cancer

    Hansen, Martin Lundsgaard; Norling, Rikke; Lauridsen, Carsten;

    2013-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion is an evolving method to visualize perfusion in organs and tissue. With the introduction of multidetector CT scanners, it is now possible to cover up to 16 cm in one rotation, and thereby making it possible to scan entire organs such as the liver with a fixed...

  9. Abdominal computed tomography in malignant lymphoma

    The computed tomographic findings of malignant lymphoma in the pelvis and abdomen is described. Characteristic symptoms are lymph node enlargement in the diameter greater than 1,0 cm, obliteration of the contour of the surrounding structures and displacement of the neighbouring organs. In contrast to the conventional lymphography, CT gives information about mesenterial and retrocrural lymph nodes. In patients with involvement of liver and spleen, CT defines only the size of the organs, because of differences in density to normal patients are seldom observed and focal lesions are rare. 71 patients with newly diagnosed, histologically proved and untreated malignant lymphoma are investigated by CT. In 27 patients CT detected pathological findings, the sensitivity was 72%, the specifity 100%. False-negative results has been attributed to the failure to identify not enlarged, but involved lymph nodes and involved liver and spleen without focal lesions or enlargement. CT replaces lymphography in diagnosis and staging of patients with abdominal malignant lymphoma, lymphography is indicated only in patients with expected abdominal disease and normal CT to identify involved, not enlarged lymph nodes. (orig.)

  10. Computed tomography of pediatric abdominal masses

    Ultrasonography is a very useful diagnostic modality for evaluation of the pediatric abdominal masses, due to faster, cheaper, and no radiation hazard than CT. But CT has more advantages in assessing precise anatomic location, and extent of the pathologic process, and also has particular value in defining the size, relation of the mass to surrounding organs and detection of lymphadenopathy. We analyzed CT features of 35 cases of pathologically proven pediatric abdominal masses for recent 2 years at Ewha Woman's University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1.The most common originating site was kidney (20 cases, 57.1%); followed by gastrointestinal (5 cases, 14.3%), nonrenal retroperitoneal (4 cases, 11.4%), hepatobiliary (3 cases, 8.6%), and genital (3 cases, 8.6%) in order of frequency. 2.The most common mass was hydronephrosis (11 cases, 31.4%), Wilms' tumor (7 cases, 20.0%), neuroblastoma, choledochal cyst, periappendiceal abscess (3 cases, 8.6%, respectively), ovarian cyst (2 cases, 5.7%) were next in order of frequency. 3.Male to female ratio was 4:5 and choledochal cyst and ovarian cyst were found only in females. The most prevalent age group was 1-3 year old (12 cases, 34.3%). 4.With CT, the diagnosis of hydronephrosis was easy in all cases and could evaluate of its severity, renal function and obstruction site with high accuracy. 5.Wilms' tumor and neuroblastoma were relatively well differentiated by their characteristic CT features; such as location, shape, margin, middle cross, calyceal appearance and calcification, etc. 6.Ovarian and mensentric cysts had similar CT appearance. 7.In other pediatric abdominal masses, CT provided excellent information about anatomic detail, precise extent of tumor and differential diagnostic findings. So, CT is useful imaging modality for the demonstration and diagnosis of abdominal mass lesions in pediatric patients

  11. Computed tomography in therapy planning: Abdominal region

    The radiotherapy community is continuing to appreciate the significant contribution CBT can make to planning abdominal radiotherapy and is also beginning to appreciate the pitfalls and limitations of the technique. Specific attention should continue to focus on patient registration with the scanner and simulator radiographs, patient position during scanning and treatment, and effects of involuntary patient motion, especially breathing, on organ and tumor localization. Effects of patient positional changes and of involuntary motion during treatment on treatment planning and execution should be quantitated, as should effects of inhomogeneities, especially gut air, on abdominal dose distribution. Radiotherapy planned with CBT data can impact significantly on morbidity and mortality associated with abdominal malignancies. Faster scanners (with a scanning time of 9 sec or less) should be employed where possible to obtain maximum diagnostic information. Multiplanar reconstruction and true three-dimensional treatment planning can enhance significantly the value of CBT in treatment planning. Radiotherapists, radiodiagnosticians, radiation physicists, and oncologists must be continue to meet the challenge of realizing the true potential of CBT for the benefit of the cancer patients entrusted to their care

  12. Computed tomography and nonoperative treatment for blunt abdominal trauma

    Studies were undertaken to determine if computed tomography (CT) could reliably assist physical examination in the initial assessment of blunt abdominal trauma, and also to examine how various abdominal injuries were managed with the guidance of CT. A total of 255 patients underwent emergency abdominal CT following blunt abdominal trauma over a period of seven years. One hundred and fifty two patients had abnormal CT scans, including 58 hepatic, 36 renal, 25 splenic and 9 pancreatic injuries as well as 67 patients with intra-abdominal hemorrhage and 21 patients with free abdominal air. A comparative study on the detection of pneumoperitoneum revealed CT to be far superior to plain radiography. One hundred and three patients had normal CT scans, all of whom were managed nonoperatively, except for three false-negative cases and two nontherapeutic cases. The patients with injury to the parenchymal organs were given nonoperative treatment if they had stable vital signs and no evidence of associated injuries demanding immediate surgery and the majority of these patients were managed well nonoperatively. CT was thus found to be a useful adjunct in the management of victims of blunt abdominal trauma, since in a rapid and noninvasive fashion, CT accurately defined the extent of parenchymal organ injury and also disclosed any other abdominal injuries. (author)

  13. Dosimetry in abdominal imaging by 6-slice computed tomography

    Rodrigues, Sonia Isabel [Hospital de Faro, EPE (Portugal); Abrantes, Antonio Fernando; Ribeiro, Luis Pedro; Almeida, Rui Pedro Pereira [University of Algarve (Portugal). School of Health. Dept. of Radiology

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To determine the effective dose in abdominal computed tomography imaging and to study the influence of patients' characteristics on the received dose. Materials and Methods: Dose values measurements were performed with an ionization chamber on phantoms to check the agreement between dose values and those presented by the computed tomography apparatus, besides their compliance with the recommended reference dose levels. Later, values of dose received by physically able patients submitted to abdominal computed tomography (n = 100) were measured and correlated with their anthropometric characteristics. Finally, the dose to organs was simulated with the Monte Carlo method using the CT-Expo V 1.5 software, and the effect of automatic exposure control on such examinations. Results: The main characteristics directly influencing the dose include the patients' body mass, abdominal perimeter and body mass index, whose correlation is linear and positive. Conclusion: The radiation dose received from abdominal CT scans depends on some patient's characteristics, and it is important to adjust the acquisition parameters to their dimensions (author)

  14. Dosimetry in abdominal imaging by 6-slice computed tomography

    Objective: To determine the effective dose in abdominal computed tomography imaging and to study the influence of patients' characteristics on the received dose. Materials and Methods: Dose values measurements were performed with an ionization chamber on phantoms to check the agreement between dose values and those presented by the computed tomography apparatus, besides their compliance with the recommended reference dose levels. Later, values of dose received by physically able patients submitted to abdominal computed tomography (n = 100) were measured and correlated with their anthropometric characteristics. Finally, the dose to organs was simulated with the Monte Carlo method using the CT-Expo V 1.5 software, and the effect of automatic exposure control on such examinations. Results: The main characteristics directly influencing the dose include the patients' body mass, abdominal perimeter and body mass index, whose correlation is linear and positive. Conclusion: The radiation dose received from abdominal CT scans depends on some patient's characteristics, and it is important to adjust the acquisition parameters to their dimensions (author)

  15. Personalized identification of abdominal wall hernia meshes on computed tomography.

    Pham, Tuan D; Le, Dinh T P; Xu, Jinwei; Nguyen, Duc T; Martindale, Robert G; Deveney, Clifford W

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal wall hernia is a protrusion of the intestine through an opening or area of weakness in the abdominal wall. Correct pre-operative identification of abdominal wall hernia meshes could help surgeons adjust the surgical plan to meet the expected difficulty and morbidity of operating through or removing the previous mesh. First, we present herein for the first time the application of image analysis for automated identification of hernia meshes. Second, we discuss the novel development of a new entropy-based image texture feature using geostatistics and indicator kriging. Third, we seek to enhance the hernia mesh identification by combining the new texture feature with the gray-level co-occurrence matrix feature of the image. The two features can characterize complementary information of anatomic details of the abdominal hernia wall and its mesh on computed tomography. Experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed study. The new computational tool has potential for personalized mesh identification which can assist surgeons in the diagnosis and repair of complex abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24184112

  16. Radiation Exposure of Abdominal Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PurposeTo evaluate patients radiation exposure of abdominal C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).MethodsThis prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; written, informed consent was waived. Radiation exposure of abdominal CBCT was evaluated in 40 patients who underwent CBCT during endovascular interventions. Dose area product (DAP) of CBCT was documented and effective dose (ED) was estimated based on organ doses using dedicated Monte Carlo simulation software with consideration of X-ray field location and patients’ individual body weight and height. Weight-dependent ED per DAP conversion factors were calculated. CBCT radiation dose was compared to radiation dose of procedural fluoroscopy. CBCT dose-related risk for cancer was assessed.ResultsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.9; 4.8 mSv, range 1.1–7.4 mSv). ED was significantly higher in the upper than in the lower abdomen (p = 0.003) and increased with patients’ weight (r = 0.55, slope = 0.045 mSv/kg, p < 0.001). Radiation exposure of CBCT corresponded to the radiation exposure of on average 7.2 fluoroscopy minutes (95 % CI 5.5; 8.8 min) in the same region of interest. Lifetime risk of exposure related cancer death was 0.033 % or less depending on age and weight.ConclusionsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv depending on X-ray field location and body weight

  17. Radiation Exposure of Abdominal Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Sailer, Anna M., E-mail: anni.sailer@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Schurink, Geert Willem H., E-mail: gwh.schurink@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Wildberger, Joachim E., E-mail: j.wildberger@mumc.nl; Graaf, Rick de, E-mail: r.de.graaf@mumc.nl; Zwam, Willem H. van, E-mail: w.van.zwam@mumc.nl; Haan, Michiel W. de, E-mail: m.de.haan@mumc.nl; Kemerink, Gerrit J., E-mail: gerrit.kemerink@mumc.nl; Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N., E-mail: cecile.jeukens@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate patients radiation exposure of abdominal C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).MethodsThis prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; written, informed consent was waived. Radiation exposure of abdominal CBCT was evaluated in 40 patients who underwent CBCT during endovascular interventions. Dose area product (DAP) of CBCT was documented and effective dose (ED) was estimated based on organ doses using dedicated Monte Carlo simulation software with consideration of X-ray field location and patients’ individual body weight and height. Weight-dependent ED per DAP conversion factors were calculated. CBCT radiation dose was compared to radiation dose of procedural fluoroscopy. CBCT dose-related risk for cancer was assessed.ResultsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.9; 4.8 mSv, range 1.1–7.4 mSv). ED was significantly higher in the upper than in the lower abdomen (p = 0.003) and increased with patients’ weight (r = 0.55, slope = 0.045 mSv/kg, p < 0.001). Radiation exposure of CBCT corresponded to the radiation exposure of on average 7.2 fluoroscopy minutes (95 % CI 5.5; 8.8 min) in the same region of interest. Lifetime risk of exposure related cancer death was 0.033 % or less depending on age and weight.ConclusionsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv depending on X-ray field location and body weight.

  18. Value of helical computed tomography in diagnosis abdominal aorta aneurysms

    Civilization progress and achievements of medicine makes the human life longer. The exposure on vessel injuring factors such as smoking and improper diet is still growing. For those reasons the number of abdominal aorta aneurysms also increased. Early detection of this pathology, its therapy and follow up considering the most sophisticated diagnostic methods is very important. In years 2000-2002 2989 helical computed tomography (HCT) examinations of the abdomen were performed in Dolnoslaski Osrodek Diagnostyki Obrazowej. In 173 patients (141 M and 32 F) aneurysms of abdominal aorta have been found. From this group 127 (101 M and 26 F) were patients of Surgical Ward of our hospital. 73 (63 M and 10 F) underwent the surgical operation of prosthesis implantation. 13 persons (11M and 2 F) were primarily qualified for endovascular stent-graft implantation, in 7 male this procedure was performed. In 159 patients AAA was primarily diagnosed in ultrasound (USG) examination (100%). In 10 cases additional MR examination was performed. In 13 patients qualified for stent-grafting we also performed DSA. USG examination revealed high sensitivity in establishing aneurysm diameter. HCT is characterized by significantly higher sensitivity and specificity in evaluation of renal and iliac pervasion, in comparison to USG. HCT allows for detection of concomitant pathologies and complications. HCT is necessary before stent-graft implantation and in the follow-up. There is no significant prevalence of MR over HCT. It should be performed in cases with doubtful renal arteries location, or when HCT is contraindicated. (author)

  19. Adrenal mass in patients who underwent abdominal computed tomography examination

    Hassan Al-Thani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adrenal masses are usually discovered incidentally (IAM during abdominal computed tomography (CT. Aims: We aimed to describe the prevalence, management, and outcome of incidentally discovered adrenal mass on radiological investigation. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted to look for IAM identified by abdominal CT performed for other reasons between 2004 and 2008 and were followed for 4 years. IAM patients with known malignancy or clinically evident adrenal disease or overt disease originally missed due to insufficient clinical examination were excluded. Results: A total of 13,115 patients underwent abdominal CT, of which 136 were identified with adrenal mass (69 males and 67 females. Overall, 84 patients had benign IAM and six had primary adrenal carcinoma (all had tumor size ≥4 cm and five were males. Hormonal evaluation was performed in 80 cases, which revealed hypersecretion in 10 cases (six had Conn′s syndrome and four had pheochromocytoma. Males had higher frequency of right-sided IAMs; whereas, left-sided IAM swere more common among females (P = 0.02. Seven patients underwent surgery and all were males (one Conn′s syndrome, one pheochromocytoma, three primary adrenal adenocarcinoma, one benign nonfunctional adenoma, and one metastatic tumor. Only one patient died due to brain metastasis. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of adrenal incidentaloma is 1% in Qatar. Unfortunately, hormonal evaluation, surgical referral, and follow-up are not appropriate in this study. Moreover, screening of IAM warrants more attention to rule out malignancy. This work could be of value as a local auditing for the current management.

  20. Pediatric Computed Tomography. Radiation Dose in Abdominal Studies

    Computed tomography is one of the most popular medical imaging modalities used in the last years. However, because is one of the techniques that delivered a considerable radiation dose, precautions should be taken into account. Pediatric patients are more radiosensitive than adults, and the probability that no desirable biological effects can occur is greater. To this, also it adds the probability that they will need more radiological studies in the future. The work consisted in determining the received dose by the pediatric patients undergoing abdominal studies in a multislice computed tomograph, according to the dosimetric quantities established by a Code of Practice published by the International Atomic Energy Agency; using a ionization chamber and a phantom that simulates the abdomen of a pediatric patient. The weighted air kerma index (Cw) was 14.3±0.4 mGy, this value is lower than the published by the American College of Radiology, 25 mGy. The multiple scan average dose (MSAD), which is a quantity established by the NOM-229-SSA1-2002 was determined, finding a value of 14.2±0.1 mGy, it is also below the value established, 25 mGy for an adult study

  1. Determination of dosimetric quantities in pediatric abdominal computed tomography scans*

    Jornada, Tiago da Silva; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aiming at contributing to the knowledge on doses in computed tomography (CT), this study has the objective of determining dosimetric quantities associated with pediatric abdominal CT scans, comparing the data with diagnostic reference levels (DRL). Materials and methods The study was developed with a Toshiba Asteion single-slice CT scanner and a GE BrightSpeed multi-slice CT unit in two hospitals. Measurements were performed with a pencil-type ionization chamber and a 16 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate trunk phantom. Results No significant difference was observed in the values for weighted air kerma index (CW), but the differences were relevant in values for volumetric air kerma index (CVOL), air kerma-length product (PKL,CT) and effective dose. Conclusion Only the CW values were lower than the DRL, suggesting that dose optimization might not be necessary. However, PKL,CT and effective dose values stressed that there still is room for reducing pediatric radiation doses. The present study emphasizes the importance of determining all dosimetric quantities associated with CT scans. PMID:25741103

  2. Determination of dosimetric quantities in pediatric abdominal computed tomography scans

    Jornada, Tiago da Silva [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Diagnostipo por Imagem; Silva, Teogenes Augusto da, E-mail: silvata@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: aiming at contributing to the knowledge on doses in computed tomography (CT), this study has the objective of determining dosimetric quantities associated with pediatric abdominal CT scans, comparing the data with diagnostic reference levels (DRL). Materials and methods: the study was developed with a Toshiba Asteion single-slice CT scanner and a GE BrightSpeed multi-slice CT unit in two hospitals. Measurements were performed with a pencil-type ionization chamber and a 16 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate trunk phantom. Results: No significant difference was observed in the values for weighted air kerma index (C{sub W}), but the differences were relevant in values for volumetric air kerma index (C{sub VOL}), air kerma-length product (P{sub KL,CT}) and effective dose. Conclusion: Only the CW values were lower than the DRL, suggesting that dose optimization might not be necessary. However, P{sub KL,CT} and effective dose values stressed that there still is room for reducing pediatric radiation doses. The present study emphasizes the importance of determining all dosimetric quantities associated with CT scans. (author)

  3. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in abdominal diseases.

    Schillaci, Orazio; Filippi, Luca; Danieli, Roberta; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies of the abdominal region are established in conventional nuclear medicine because of their easy and large availability, even in the most peripheral hospitals. It is well known that SPECT imaging demonstrates function, rather than anatomy. It is useful in the diagnosis of various disorders because of its ability to detect changes caused by disease before identifiable anatomic correlates and clinical manifestations exist. However, SPECT data frequently need anatomic landmarks to precisely depict the site of a focus of abnormal tracer uptake and the structures containing normal activity; the fusion with morphological studies can furnish an anatomical map to scintigraphic findings. In the past, software-based fusion of independently performed SPECT and CT or magnetic resonance images have been demonstrated to be time consuming and not useful for routine clinical employment. The recent development of dual-modality integrated imaging systems, which provide SPECT and CT images in the same scanning session, with the acquired images co-registered by means of the hardware, has created a new scenario. The first data have been mainly reported in oncology patients and indicate that SPECT/CT is very useful because it is able to provide further information of clinical value in several cases. In SPECT studies of abdominal diseases, hybrid SPECT/CT can play a role in the differential diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas located near vascular structures, in precisely detecting and localizing active splenic tissue caused by splenosis in splenectomy patients, in providing important information for therapy optimization in patients submitted to hepatic arterial perfusion scintigraphy, in accurately identifying the involved bowel segments in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, and in correctly localizing the bleeding sites in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:17161039

  4. The value of ultrasonography and computed tomography in the blunt abdominal trauma: a prospective study

    From August to December 1988, eleven patients with abdominal trauma, hemodynamically stable, were studied at Souza Aguiar Municipal Hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. After physical evaluation and initial resuscitation, these patients underwent abdominal paracentesis, basic roentgenographic examination and computed tomography. Either a conservative treatment or an exploratory laparotomy was carried out regarding the results of the examination. The use of ultrasound and computed tomography examination in patients with doubtful diagnosis proved to be effective and enable us to identify not only intra-abdominal and retroperitoneal lesions but also the presence of liquid collections in the peritoneal cavity. (author)

  5. Diagnosis of abdominal abscesses in patients with major trauma: the use of computed tomography

    The usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in diagnosing abdominal abscesses was evaluated prospectively in 69 septic patients who had suffered massive trauma. For the 82 abdominal CT scans obtained, the accuracy rate was 84%, the sensitivity was 92%, and the specificity was 79%. With the use of abdominal CT, 32 patients were spared a ''blind'' laparotomy in the search for the focus of infection. It is concluded that CT is of significant value in the diagnosis of abdominal abscess in the septic trauma patient

  6. Computer tomography in the diagnosis of disease of the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space

    It is ascertained that computer tomography of abdominal cavity organs is a promising diagnostics technique in cases when conventional radiography does not provide required information, especially for the diseases of liver parenchyma. The application of contrast substances enhances the detection of pathological changes. New contrast substances should be seeked for to enhance diagnostic capabilities of the computer tomography and to increase the difference between radiation absorption coefficient

  7. Evaluation of abdominal trauma by computed tomography and ultrasonography

    Out of 75 patients who were admitted to our hospital because of abdominal trauma and were undergone the procedures such as ultrasonography and/or CT scan within 24 hours of abdominal trauma due to suspected abdominal organ injury. We analyzed the results of 38 patients who were confirmed of diagnosis by operation, follow-up CT scan or ultrasonography. We analyzed the results of 38 patients who were confirmed of diagnosis by operation, follow-up CT scan or ultrasonography. 1. In the abdominal organ injury, solid organ injury consists of 8 cases of spleen laceration, 1 of splenic subcapsular hematoma, 7 of hepatic laceration, 7 of pancreas laceration, 3 of renal laceration, and 3 of subcapsular hematoma of kidney. 2. In addition, there were 7 bowel and/or mesenteric laceration, 2 diaphragmatic hernia, and 1 urethral rupture. 3. 2 cases of retroperitoneal hematoma and 1 case in which hemo peritoneum occurred without abdominal organ injury were confirmed by follow-up CT or ultrasonography. 4. In all of the 4 patients with multiple organ injury, pancreatic laceration was associated. 5. In abdominal trauma patients, ultrasonography or CT can be used to survey rapidly the entire abdomen for possible associated injury, and be of great help to clinicians in identifying the patients who need immediate surgery or in minimizing the incidence of unnecessary emergency abdominal exploration.

  8. A proposal for standardizing computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Objective: to propose a model to standardize computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms. Materials and methods: interviews were carried out with members of the Vascular Surgery Division of our institution, in the period between April and October 2004, aiming at developing a standardized model of computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms. Based on this model, a questionnaire was elaborated and sent to other nine surgeons, all of them experienced in the field of abdominal aortic surgery. The questionnaires response rate was 55.5% (5/9). Results: the most frequently mentioned parameters of interest for evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms were: maximum diameter of proximal aortic neck, proximal aortic neck length to lower renal arteries, shape of proximal aortic neck, maximum diameter of the aneurysm and diameter of the common iliac arteries. These data allowed the development of a proposal for a model to standardize computed tomography reports. Conclusion: a model for standardized tomographic analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms has met vascular surgeons' needs for following-up patients and planning their treatment. (author)

  9. Multidetector computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2016-06-01

    The accurate diagnosis of pediatric acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department (ED) due to its unclear clinical presentation and non-specific findings in physical examinations, laboratory data, and plain radiographs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) performed in the ED on pediatric patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective chart review of children aged abdominal pain who visited the emergency department and underwent MDCT between September 2004 and June 2007 was conducted. Patients with a history of trauma were excluded. A total of 156 patients with acute abdominal pain (85 males and 71 females, age 1-17 years; mean age 10.9 ± 4.6 years) who underwent abdominal MDCT in the pediatric ED during this 3-year period were enrolled in the study. One hundred and eighteen patients with suspected appendicitis underwent abdominal MDCT. Sixty four (54.2%) of them had appendicitis, which was proven by histopathology. The sensitivity of abdominal MDCT for appendicitis was found to be 98.5% and the specificity was 84.9%. In this study, the other two common causes of nontraumatic abdominal emergencies were gastrointestinal tract (GI) infections and ovarian cysts. The most common etiology of abdominal pain in children that requires imaging with abdominal MDCT is appendicitis. MDCT has become a preferred and invaluable imaging modality in evaluating uncertain cases of pediatric acute abdominal pain in ED, in particular for suspected appendicitis, neoplasms, and gastrointestinal abnormalities. PMID:27154197

  10. Diagnosis of hepatic steatosis by contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography

    Objective: to evaluate the diagnostic capacity of abdominal computed tomography in the assessment of hepatic steatosis using the portal phase with a simplified calculation method as compared with the non-contrast-enhanced phase. Materials and methods: in the present study, 150 patients were retrospectively evaluated by means of non-contrast-enhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography. One hundred patients had hepatic steatosis and 50 were control subjects. For the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis in the portal phase, the authors considered a result of < 104 HU calculated by the formula [L - 0.3 × (0.75 × P + 0.25 × A)] / 0.7, where L, P and A represent the attenuation of the liver, of the main portal vein and abdominal aorta, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated, using non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography as the reference standard. Results: the simplified calculation method with portal phase for the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis showed 100% sensitivity, 36% specificity, negative predictive value of 100% and positive predictive value of 75.8%. The rate of false positive results was 64%. False negative results were not observed. Conclusion: The portal phase presents an excellent sensitivity in the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis, as compared with the non-contrast-enhanced phase of abdominal computed tomography. However, the method has low specificity. (author)

  11. Diagnosis of hepatic steatosis by contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography

    Rodrigo da Fonseca Monjardim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the diagnostic capacity of abdominal computed tomography in the assessment of hepatic steatosis using the portal phase with a simplified calculation method as compared with the non-contrast-enhanced phase. Materials and Methods In the present study, 150 patients were retrospectively evaluated by means of non-contrast-enhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography. One hundred patients had hepatic steatosis and 50 were control subjects. For the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis in the portal phase, the authors considered a result of < 104 HU calculated by the formula [L - 0.3 × (0.75 × P + 0.25 × A] / 0.7, where L, P and A represent the attenuation of the liver, of the main portal vein and abdominal aorta, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated, using non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography as the reference standard. Results The simplified calculation method with portal phase for the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis showed 100% sensitivity, 36% specificity, negative predictive value of 100% and positive predictive value of 75.8%. The rate of false positive results was 64%. False negative results were not observed. Conclusion The portal phase presents an excellent sensitivity in the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis, as compared with the non-contrast-enhanced phase of abdominal computed tomography. However, the method has low specificity.

  12. Abdominal computed tomography scan as a screening tool in blunt trauma

    Background. One of the most difficult problems in blunt trauma is evaluation for potential intraabdominal injury. Admission for serial abdominal exams remains the standard of care after intraabdominal injury has been initially excluded. We hypothesized a normal abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan in a subgroup of minimally injured patients would obviate admission for serial abdominal examinations, allowing safe discharge from the emergency department (ED). Methods. We reviewed our blunt trauma experience with patients admitted solely for serial abdominal examinations after a normal CT. Patients were identified from the trauma registry at a Level 1 trauma center from July 1991 through June 1995. Patients with abnormal CTs, extra-abdominal injuries necessitating admission, hemodynamic abnormalities, a Glasgow Coma Scale less than 13, or injury severity scores (ISSs) greater than 15 were excluded. Records of 238 patients remained; we reviewed them to determine the presence of missed abdominal injury. Results. None of the 238 patients had a missed abdominal injury. Average ISS of these patients was 3.2 (range, 0 to 10). Discharging these patients from the ED would result in a yearly cost savings of $32,874 to our medical system. Conclusions. Abdominal CT scan is a safe and cost-effective screening tool in patients with blunt trauma. A normal CT scan in minimally injured patients allows safe discharge from the ED. (authors)

  13. Readjustment of abdominal computed tomography protocols in a university hospital: impact on radiation dose

    Romano, Ricardo Francisco Tavares; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Torres, Lucas Rios; Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Bekhor, Daniel; Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: ricardo.romano@unifesp.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi [Fleury Medicina e Saude, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    Objective: To assess the reduction of estimated radiation dose in abdominal computed tomography following the implementation of new scan protocols on the basis of clinical suspicion and of adjusted images acquisition parameters. Materials and Methods: Retrospective and prospective review of reports on radiation dose from abdominal CT scans performed three months before (group A - 551 studies) and three months after (group B - 788 studies) implementation of new scan protocols proposed as a function of clinical indications. Also, the images acquisition parameters were adjusted to reduce the radiation dose at each scan phase. The groups were compared for mean number of acquisition phases, mean CTDI{sub vol} per phase, mean DLP per phase, and mean DLP per scan. Results: A significant reduction was observed for group B as regards all the analyzed aspects, as follows: 33.9%, 25.0%, 27.0% and 52.5%, respectively for number of acquisition phases, CTDI{sub vol} per phase, DLP per phase and DLP per scan (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The rational use of abdominal computed tomography scan phases based on the clinical suspicion in conjunction with the adjusted images acquisition parameters allows for a 50% reduction in the radiation dose from abdominal computed tomography scans. (author)

  14. Collateral abdominal circulation in patient with Leriche's syndrome diagnosed with 64-row multislice computed tomography (MSCT)

    Leriche's syndrome results from slowly developing occlusion of the abdominal aorta. It affects mainly middle-aged males. The blood flow distal to the occlusion site is secured by collateral circulation. Signs of Leriche's syndrome include claudication, gluteal pain and impotence. The paper presents a patient with Leriche's syndrome, in whom a detailed visualization of collateral circulation was obtained with multislice computed tomography angiography. Patient underwent surgical recanalization of the aorta with an excellent result. To our knowledge, the presented case is the first description of collateral circulation in Leriche's syndrome obtained with 64-row computed tomography. (author)

  15. Lymphography and abdominal computed tomography in staging Hodgkin's disease

    Lymphography and abdominal CT were performed in 78 patients staged for Hodgkin's disease. In 82% of all patients, both examinations agreed on the presence or absence of lymph node involvement. In the group of 39 patients undergoing lymphography prior to CT, the agreement was 90%. In the group of 39 patients with lymphography following CT, the agreement was 74%. In 50% of the patients with discrepant findings, lymphography revealed abnormal nodes compared with CT. Lymphography was abnormal in 26% of patients with a normal CT scan as the second examination. It is concluded that lymphography is more reliable than CT in the examination of the abdomen. CT performed after a normal or an abnormal lymphogram adds little additional information. When CT is preferred as the initial investigation in staging Hodgkin's disease, lymphography only adds significant information if the CT scan is normal or equivocal. (orig.)

  16. Many unexpected abdominal findings on staging computed tomography in patients with colorectal cancer

    Holmsted, Kim; Nørring, Keld; Laustrup, Lene Collatz;

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was proven to be superior to preoperative abdominal ultrasound in the preoperative setting for detection of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC). The higher sensitivity of CT has resulted in a number of unexpected abdominal findings of varying importance; an...... issue that was previously studied in relation to CT colonography, but not in relation to staging CT with intravenous contrast in CRC patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the number and significance of such unexpected findings on staging CTs in CRC patients....

  17. Hypodense oral intestinal contrasting images for diagnostic improvement of abdominal computed tomography in children

    37 children were examined for diagnostic improvement of the oral intestinal contrasting images in abdominal computed tomography with a hypodense solution of mannitol (n = 23) in comparison with a suspension of BaSO4 (n = 14). Because of the hypodense intestinal contrasting images the artifacts of the images induced by the bordering surface could be reduced, the condition of fullness of the intestine and the judgement of the intestinal wall improved. The parenchymatous organs and points of abdominal lymph nodes could be defined and judged more easily through the hypodense contrasting images. On the whole the picture quality of the computed tomography of the young child could be increased with the hypodense solution of mannitol. (orig.)

  18. Respiratory gated multidetector computed tomography: Applicable for diagnostic abdominal imaging?

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability and accuracy of a respiratory gated technique used with contrast enhanced MDCT of the upper abdomen with focus on diagnostic image quality and depiction of organs and major vessels. Materials and methods: Forty-five adult patients who were referred to our institution for follow-up dynamic contrast enhanced abdominal CT imaging were included in this study. Respiratory gated CT scans were performed with the use of a dedicated hardware. A multiphasic CT scan was performed for each patient. Respiratory gated images were obtained between early arterial and portal venous phases during free breathing. Images of respiratory gated (RG) and breathhold (BH) phases were compared qualitatively and quantitatively by two radiologists. Definitive statistical methods were used for evaluating the scoring data, while Mann Whitney U test was used for comparison. Statistical significance was accepted for p values <0.05. Results: Statistical significant difference was found for comparison of scores regarding luminal opacification and contoural integrity of intrahepatic vascular structures with scores of RG scans rated poor to moderate (e.g. 2.86 ± 1.07 for luminal opacification of intrahepatic portal veins as well as border detectability) in comparison to scores of BH scans rated good to excellent (e.g. 1.37 ± 1.31 for luminal opacification, 1.35 ± 1.28 for border detectability of intrahepatic portal veins, p < 0.001). Furthermore, statistical significant differences were found for general image noise levels (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Further technical advances of RG technique could enable routine use of this technique for selected patient groups.

  19. Ultrasonography or computed tomography for diagnosis in hemodynamically stable patients with recent blunt abdominal trauma? Critically appraised topic

    We were unsure whether the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in hemodynamically stable patients in the emergency department with recent blunt abdominal trauma was sufficient to enable us to avoid performing computed tomography (CT) in selected patients. (author)

  20. MULTI - DETECTOR COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND INTRA - OPERATIVE CORRELATION IN BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA

    Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : With the change in the pace of life fast , faster , fastest being the motto of the present day , the incidence of trauma and the associated mortality and morbidities is on a continuous rise.Imaging plays a very important role in the management of these injuries in deciding which injuries , in trauma the final verdict of organ injury in abdomen is intra - ope rative findings. AIMS : In view of the above said we considered to study to determine diagnostic accuracy of MDCT (Multi - Detector Computed Tomography in detection of intra - abdominal solid organ injury in blunt abdominal trauma and to highlight the importance of MDCT in evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma. METHODS AND MATERIALS : This was a prospective study done between over a period of 2 years from between January 2011 to February 2013 on patients who presented with blun t abdominal trauma after excluding patients who were managed conservatively and normal on imaging , the data we compared had 32 patients and the analysis was as follows. RESULTS : Blunt abdominal trauma was common in males , the male to female ratio was 9:1 , road traffic accident is the most common mode of injury in blunt abdominal trauma with 60% of the patients in this mode of injury , single organ injury is 22 patients (76% spleen is the most commonly injured organ 15(47% patients having splenic injury , wi th grade 3 being the commonest splenic injury 8 out of the 15 patients had splenic injury bowel injury was the second common organ injured in blunt trauma abdomen. In this study computed tomography grading correlated well with intra - operative grading with a PPV of= 95.45 % (95% ci: 84.50 % to 99.31 % Asensitivityof 76.36 % (95% ci: 62.98 % to 86.76 % . CONCLUSION : Computed tomography is an important imaging technique for diagnosis of organ injuries in patients with abdominal trauma. It helps in grading of the type of injury and accordingly deciding the management of patient. It is a highly

  1. Detection of abdominal lymph node metastases from esophageal and cardia cancer by computed tomography

    Shima, S.; Sugiura, Y.; Yonekawa, H.; Ogata, T. (National Defence Medical Coll., Tokorosawa, Saitama (Japan))

    1982-03-01

    In order to evaluate the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) scan in detecting the abdominal lymph node metastases, preoperative CT scan was performed in 16 patients with carcinoma of the esophagus and gastric cardia. Ten patients (62.5%) had pathological evidence of lymph node metastases in the abdominal cavity and 4 of them were identified to involve the para-aortic nodes. CT scan correctly demonstrated the lymph node metastases in the para-aortic and celiac axisis areas, but failed to detect other abdominal lymph node involvements, which were small enough to be excised by operation. The para-aortic nodes on the CT scan showed the following two features; one was nodular mass in shape, which did not obscure the aorta or inferior vena cava, and the other was conglomerated mass, which was difficult to be distinguished from the aorta. The former was resectable and the latter was not.

  2. Anomalies of abdominal organs in polysplenia syndrome: Multidetector computed tomography findings

    Kim, Sung Won; Lee, Yong Seok; Jung, Jin Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University School of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Polysplenia syndrome is a rare situs ambiguous anomaly associated with multiple spleens and anomalies of abdominal organs. Because most of the minor anomalies do not cause clinical symptoms, polysplenia syndrome is detected incidentally in the adults. Anomalies of abdominal organs may include multiple spleens of variable size or right-sided spleen, large midline or left-sided liver, midline gallbladder, biliary tract anomalies, short pancreas, right-sided stomach, intestinal malrotation, inferior vena cava interruption with azygos or hemiazygos continuation, and a preduodenal portal vein. As the multidetector computed tomography is increasingly used, situs anomalies will likely to be found with greater frequency in the adults. Therefore, radiologists should become familiar with these rare and peculiar anomalies of abdominal organs in polysplenia syndrome.

  3. Added value of lung window in detecting drug mules on non-contrast abdominal computed tomography.

    Bahrami-Motlagh, Hooman; Vakilian, Fatemeh; Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hossein; Pourghorban, Ramin

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the added value of lung window in non-contrast computed tomography (CT) of suspected body packers or stuffers. Forty suspected drug mules who were referred to our tertiary toxicology center were included. The final diagnosis of drug mule was based on the detection of packs in stool examination or surgery. Non-contrast CT scans were retrospectively interpreted by two blinded radiologists in consensus before and after reviewing the lung window images. The diagnostic performance of abdominal window scans alone and scans in both abdominal and lung windows were subsequently compared. Seven body packers and 21 body stuffers were identified. The sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), and diagnostic accuracy of scans in detection of drug mules (either drug packers or stuffers) raised from 60.7, 52.1, and 72.5 to 64.2, 54.5, and 75.0 %, respectively, with a more number of packs being detected (114 vs. 105 packs). In the body packers group, the diagnostic performance of both abdominal windows scans and combined abdominal and lung windows scans were 100 %. In the body stuffers group, the sensitivity, NPV, and diagnostic accuracy of scans increased from 47.6, 52.1, and 55.0 to 52.3, 54.5, and 57.5 %, respectively, after the addition of lung windows. Reviewing the lung window on non-contrast abdominal CT can be helpful in detection of drug mules. PMID:26830789

  4. Abdominal fat distribution on computed tomography predicts ureteric calculus fragmentation by shock wave lithotripsy

    To assess the effects of abdominal fat on shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). We used pre-SWL unenhanced computed tomography (CT) to evaluate the impact of abdominal fat distribution and calculus characteristics on the outcome of SWL. One hundred and eighty-five patients with a solitary ureteric calculus treated with SWL were retrospectively reviewed. Each patient underwent unenhanced CT within 1 month before SWL treatment. Treatment outcomes were evaluated 1 month later. Unenhanced CT parameters, including calculus surface area, Hounsfield unit (HU) density, abdominal fat area and skin to calculus distance (SSD) were analysed. One hundred and twenty-eight of the 185 patients were found to be calculus-free following treatment. HU density, total fat area, visceral fat area and SSD were identified as significant variables on multivariate logistic regression analysis. The receiver-operating characteristic analyses showed that total fat area, para/perirenal fat area and visceral fat area were sensitive predictors of SWL outcomes. This study revealed that higher quantities of abdominal fat, especially visceral fat, are associated with a lower calculus-free rate following SWL treatment. Unenhanced CT is a convenient technique for diagnosing the presence of a calculus, assessing the intra-abdominal fat distribution and thereby helping to predict the outcome of SWL. (orig.)

  5. The role of the unenhanced phase in the routine abdominal computed tomography

    Leite, Ana Paula Klautau; Mattos, Leandro Accardo de; Pinto, Gustavo Alfredo Duarte Henriques; Scaciota, Andrea Puchnick; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: scoposl@uol.com.br; Franco, Rita Maria Aparecida Monteiro Moura [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Gastroclinica; Andreoni, Cassio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Urologia

    2008-09-15

    Objective: To determine the role of the unenhanced phase of abdominal computed tomography in patients without a definite diagnosis or undergoing tumor staging. Materials and methods: A prospective and transversal study was developed with 100 consecutive patients submitted to unenhanced and contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography. Two observers evaluated all the computed tomography images in the contrast-enhanced phase (first analysis) and, later, in the unenhanced phase (second analysis) in an attempt to establish the primary and secondary diagnoses as a function of the clinical indication for the study. The frequency of changes in the diagnoses resulting from a combined analysis of the images in the pre- and post-contrast phases was evaluated. Cases with changes in the diagnosis were reviewed by clinical specialists for determining possible changes in the therapeutic approach. Results: Primary and secondary diagnoses were changed in respectively 1 and 18 cases (p = 1.000; p = 0.143) as follows: steatosis, adrenal nodules, nephrolithiasis, renal cysts and hepatic calcification. In the cases where the unenhanced phase changed the diagnosis, the specialists changed the therapeutic approach in 14 of the 19 patients (73%) (p = 0.038). Conclusion: No significant change was observed in the primary or secondary diagnosis as a result of the findings in the unenhanced phase. However, changes in secondary diagnoses affected the therapeutic approach adopted by the specialists. (author)

  6. The role of the unenhanced phase in the routine abdominal computed tomography

    Objective: To determine the role of the unenhanced phase of abdominal computed tomography in patients without a definite diagnosis or undergoing tumor staging. Materials and methods: A prospective and transversal study was developed with 100 consecutive patients submitted to unenhanced and contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography. Two observers evaluated all the computed tomography images in the contrast-enhanced phase (first analysis) and, later, in the unenhanced phase (second analysis) in an attempt to establish the primary and secondary diagnoses as a function of the clinical indication for the study. The frequency of changes in the diagnoses resulting from a combined analysis of the images in the pre- and post-contrast phases was evaluated. Cases with changes in the diagnosis were reviewed by clinical specialists for determining possible changes in the therapeutic approach. Results: Primary and secondary diagnoses were changed in respectively 1 and 18 cases (p = 1.000; p = 0.143) as follows: steatosis, adrenal nodules, nephrolithiasis, renal cysts and hepatic calcification. In the cases where the unenhanced phase changed the diagnosis, the specialists changed the therapeutic approach in 14 of the 19 patients (73%) (p = 0.038). Conclusion: No significant change was observed in the primary or secondary diagnosis as a result of the findings in the unenhanced phase. However, changes in secondary diagnoses affected the therapeutic approach adopted by the specialists. (author)

  7. What is the real role of the equilibrium phase in abdominal computed tomography?

    Salvadori, Priscila Silveira [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM-Unifesp), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Costa, Danilo Manuel Cerqueira; Romano, Ricardo Francisco Tavares; Galvao, Breno Vitor Tomaz; Monjardim, Rodrigo da Fonseca; Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Rios, Lucas Torres; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM-Unifesp), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Department of Diagnostic Imaging

    2013-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate the role of the equilibrium phase in abdominal computed tomography. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study reviewed 219 consecutive contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography images acquired in a three-month period, for different clinical indications. For each study, two reports were issued - one based on the initial analysis of non-contrast-enhanced, arterial and portal phases only (first analysis), and a second reading of these phases added to the equilibrium phase (second analysis). At the end of both readings, differences between primary and secondary diagnoses were pointed out and recorded, in order to measure the impact of suppressing the equilibrium phase on the clinical outcome for each of the patients. The extension of the exact Fisher's test was utilized to evaluate the changes in the primary diagnosis (p < 0.05 as significant). Results: Among the 219 cases reviewed, the absence of the equilibrium phase determined change in the primary diagnosis in only one case (0.46%; p > 0.999). As regards secondary diagnoses, changes after the second analysis were observed in five cases (2.3%). Conclusion: For clinical scenarios such as cancer staging, acute abdomen and investigation for abdominal collections, the equilibrium phase is dispensable and does not offer any significant diagnostic contribution. (author)

  8. Effect of oral contrast administration for abdominal computed tomography in the evaluation of acute blunt trauma

    The objective of this study was to determine how frequently oral contrast medium (OC) is essential for computed tomography (CT) diagnosis of blunt abdominal injury and to quantify delay associated with OC administration and the incidence of adverse effects. In conclusion, OC is rarely essential for CT diagnostic of intraabdominal injury. It may improve sensitivity for pancreatic injury, but it does not help identify injuries requiring surgical treatment. Even with OC, CT is insensitive for intestinal injury. Vomiting and aspiration are significant risks. Use of OC adds a significant amount of time to ED evaluation. Adverse effects of OC administration, in this setting, mays outweigh its benefits. (N.C.)

  9. A Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Analysis of Multiorgan Abdominal Motion

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify multiorgan respiration-induced motion in the abdomen in liver and pancreatic cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography scans were acquired for 18 patients treated for abdominal tumors. Contours of multiple abdominal organs were drawn by the radiation oncologist at one respiratory phase; these contours were propagated to other respiratory phases by deformable registration. Three-dimensional organ models were generated from the resulting contours at each phase. Motions of the bounding box and center of mass were extracted and analyzed for the clinical target volume and organs at risk. Results: On average, the center of mass motion for liver clinical target volumes was 9.7 mm (SD 5 mm) in the superior–inferior direction, with a range of 3 to 18 mm; for pancreatic tumors, the average was 5 mm (SD 1 mm) m with a range of 3 to 7 mm. Abdominal organs move in unison, but with varying amplitudes. Gating near exhale (T40–T60) reduces the range of motion by a factor of ∼10. Conclusion: We have used deformable registration to calculate the trajectories of abdominal organs in four dimensions, based on center of mass and bounding box motion metrics. Our results are compared with previously reported studies. Possible reasons for differences are discussed.

  10. Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) interpretation: discrepancy rates among experienced radiologists

    Abujudeh, Hani H.; Boland, Giles W.; Kaewlai, Rathachai; Rabiner, Pavel; Thrall, James H. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Halpern, Elkarn F.; Gazelle, G.S. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Institute for Technology Assessment, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    To assess the discrepancy rate for the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) examinations among experienced radiologists. Ninety abdominal and pelvic CT examinations reported by three experienced radiologists who specialize in abdominal imaging were randomly selected from the radiological database. The same radiologists, blinded to previous interpretation, were asked to re-interpret 60 examinations: 30 of their previous interpretations and 30 interpreted by others. All reports were assessed for the degree of discrepancy between initial and repeat interpretations according to a three-level scoring system: no discrepancy, minor, or major discrepancy. Inter- and intrareader discrepancy rates and causes were evaluated. CT examinations included in the investigation were performed on 90 patients (43 men, mean age 59 years, SD 14, range 19-88) for the following indications: follow-up/evaluation of malignancy (69/90, 77%), pancreatitis (5/90, 6%), urinary tract stone (4/90, 4%) or other (12/90, 13%). Interobserver and intraobserver major discrepancy rates were 26 and 32%, respectively. Major discrepancies were due to missed findings, different opinions regarding interval change of clinically significant findings, and the presence of recommendation. Major discrepancy of between 26 and 32% was observed in the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic CT examinations. (orig.)

  11. Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) interpretation: discrepancy rates among experienced radiologists

    To assess the discrepancy rate for the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) examinations among experienced radiologists. Ninety abdominal and pelvic CT examinations reported by three experienced radiologists who specialize in abdominal imaging were randomly selected from the radiological database. The same radiologists, blinded to previous interpretation, were asked to re-interpret 60 examinations: 30 of their previous interpretations and 30 interpreted by others. All reports were assessed for the degree of discrepancy between initial and repeat interpretations according to a three-level scoring system: no discrepancy, minor, or major discrepancy. Inter- and intrareader discrepancy rates and causes were evaluated. CT examinations included in the investigation were performed on 90 patients (43 men, mean age 59 years, SD 14, range 19-88) for the following indications: follow-up/evaluation of malignancy (69/90, 77%), pancreatitis (5/90, 6%), urinary tract stone (4/90, 4%) or other (12/90, 13%). Interobserver and intraobserver major discrepancy rates were 26 and 32%, respectively. Major discrepancies were due to missed findings, different opinions regarding interval change of clinically significant findings, and the presence of recommendation. Major discrepancy of between 26 and 32% was observed in the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic CT examinations. (orig.)

  12. The contribution of ultrasonography and computed tomography in the evaluation of abdominal involvement in paracoccidioidomycosis

    Paula, Ivie Braga de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Pedroso, Enio Roberto Pietra; Ferreira, Cid Sergio, E-mail: enio@medicina.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina

    2014-01-15

    Introduction: paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a polymorphic systemic granulomatous inflammatory disease determined by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, one of the 10 leading causes of morbidity and mortality among the parasitic diseases endemic in Brazil. Objective: To identify the following aspects of PCM by ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT): abdominal changes, intensity and characteristics of the observed images, frequency of changes depending on clinical presentation, differences from other nosological entities. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study carried out with 35 patients with PCM treated at the Hospital das Clinicas (HC) at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG). Patients with tuberculosis, bronchial asthma, generalized chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or in contact with silica or mines, as well as those with granulomatous diseases at any point in their current or past clinical history and detected through serology, anatomopathology or microbiological exams were excluded. Collected data were transcribed into SPSS for Windows® for statistical analysis. The study was approved by the UFMG Ethics Committee (082/00). Results and conclusion: CT and U.S. showed involvement of abdominal organs in all forms of PCM, including lymphadenopathy (40%), hepatomegaly (37%), splenomegaly (37%) and adrenal involvement (17%). Gallbladder and retroperitoneal musculature involvement were also observed, along with ascites and pleural effusion. Lymph node calcification, adrenal involvement and ascites constituted evidence of high probability of PCM even though these findings are not enough to differentiate PCM from tuberculosis. Chronic and sequelae forms, abdominal involvement is more frequent than indicated by the clinical manifestations. (author)

  13. A proposal for standardizing computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms; Proposta para padronizacao do relatorio de tomografia computadorizada nos aneurismas da aorta abdominal

    Torlai, Fabiola Goda; Meirelles, Gustavo S. Portes [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil); Miranda Junior, Fausto; Fonseca, Jose Honorio A.P. da [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia; Ajzen, Sergio; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br

    2006-07-15

    Objective: to propose a model to standardize computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms. Materials and methods: interviews were carried out with members of the Vascular Surgery Division of our institution, in the period between April and October 2004, aiming at developing a standardized model of computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms. Based on this model, a questionnaire was elaborated and sent to other nine surgeons, all of them experienced in the field of abdominal aortic surgery. The questionnaires response rate was 55.5% (5/9). Results: the most frequently mentioned parameters of interest for evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms were: maximum diameter of proximal aortic neck, proximal aortic neck length to lower renal arteries, shape of proximal aortic neck, maximum diameter of the aneurysm and diameter of the common iliac arteries. These data allowed the development of a proposal for a model to standardize computed tomography reports. Conclusion: a model for standardized tomographic analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms has met vascular surgeons' needs for following-up patients and planning their treatment. (author)

  14. Abdominal tuberculosis: a radiological review with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Rocha, Eduardo Lima da; Pedrassa, Bruno Cheregati; Bormann, Renata Lilian; Kierszenbaum, Marcelo Longo; Torres, Lucas Rios; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    2015-05-15

    Tuberculosis is a disease whose incidence has increased principally as a consequence of HIV infection and use of immunosuppressive drugs. The abdomen is the most common site of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It may be confused with several different conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, cancer and other infectious diseases. Delay in the diagnosis may result in significantly increased morbidity, and therefore an early recognition of the condition is essential for proper treatment. In the present essay, cases with confirmed diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis were assessed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, demonstrating the involvement of different organs and systems, and presentations which frequently lead radiologists to a diagnostic dilemma. A brief literature review was focused on imaging findings and their respective prevalence. (author)

  15. Abdominal tuberculosis: a radiological review with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Tuberculosis is a disease whose incidence has increased principally as a consequence of HIV infection and use of immunosuppressive drugs. The abdomen is the most common site of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It may be confused with several different conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, cancer and other infectious diseases. Delay in the diagnosis may result in significantly increased morbidity, and therefore an early recognition of the condition is essential for proper treatment. In the present essay, cases with confirmed diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis were assessed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, demonstrating the involvement of different organs and systems, and presentations which frequently lead radiologists to a diagnostic dilemma. A brief literature review was focused on imaging findings and their respective prevalence. (author)

  16. Abdominal tuberculosis: a radiological review with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Eduardo Lima da Rocha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tuberculosis is a disease whose incidence has increased principally as a consequence of HIV infection and use of immunosuppressive drugs. The abdomen is the most common site of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It may be confused with several different conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, cancer and other infectious diseases. Delay in the diagnosis may result in significantly increased morbidity, and therefore an early recognition of the condition is essential for proper treatment. In the present essay, cases with confirmed diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis were assessed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, demonstrating the involvement of different organs and systems, and presentations which frequently lead radiologists to a diagnostic dilemma. A brief literature review was focused on imaging findings and their respective prevalence.

  17. Abdominal fat-evaluation by use of single scan computed tomography

    Purpose: Several studies emphasised the importance of the relationship between intraabdominal and total body adipose tissue as a risk factor for the development of metabolic or cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine whether a single scan computed tomography is able to determine the whole intraabdominal fat volume with high accuracy and reproducibility. Materials and methods: Regions of interests (ROIs) were drawn manually for measuring intraabdominal fat in 51 unsuspicious abdominal CT. Results: The sexual differentiation of adipose tissue already described in a lot of studies could be confirmed in this study. Fat still predominates in females in lower half of the body (gynoid obesity). In men it predominates in the upper half (android obesity). Significant correlation concerning measuring the whole intraabdominal fat volume could be found in L1-level in women (r=0.992) and in L2-level in men (r=0.992). Measurement of a single scan enables us to assess whole intraabdominal fat volume due to a special formula. Conclusion: The determination of intraabdominal fat measured by a single scan computed tomography is a procedure associated with high accuracy and reproducibility. (orig.)

  18. Optimization of contrast-enhanced multidetector abdominal computed tomography in sedated canine patients.

    Fields, Erica L; Robertson, Ian D; Brown, James C

    2012-01-01

    A major disadvantage of computed tomography for abdominal screening in dogs has been the need for general anesthesia to prevent motion artifacts. With multidetector helical CT, it is possible to decrease examination time, allowing patients to be scanned under sedation. It is also desirable to decrease tube loading to prolong x-ray tube life. To develop a protocol that will allow for examination of sedated patients with minimal image artifacts, milliamperage (mA) and helical pitch were varied, providing 16 experimental scan protocols. A standard clinical protocol was also tested, providing 17 protocols for evaluation. These protocols were tested, using a standard CT phantom, canine tissues in a water bath, and a canine cadaver. The cadaver images were scored semiquantitatively by three reviewers to determine the protocol with the best combination of speed and minimal image artifact. The optimized protocol was then applied to 27 sedated canine patients of three body weight categories. The images obtained were compared to the standard protocol by two reviewers for presence of motion, streak, and quantum mottle artifacts. There was significantly more streak artifact noted by one observer using the optimized study protocol, but no significant difference in any other category. Scanning under sedation was well tolerated in all patients, and sedated CT examination is a promising tool for screening abdominal disease in dogs. PMID:22612282

  19. ASSESSMENT AND COMPARISON OF ABDOMINAL MASSES BY SONOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Suman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To study the role of ultrasonography and computed tomography in the evaluation of abdominal masses , to compare their diagnostic accuracies , to evaluate the imaging features of lesions and to know the exact site of origin and extension into surrounding structures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective study of 104 patients with abdominal masses. USG was done with Toshiba SSA and Philips Envisor C machine and CT - Scan examination was performed in all patients on Philips brilliance 6 - slice whole body CT scanner. RESULTS: There were 35(30.62% cases of hepatobilliary masses , renal15(14.40%cases , pancreatic 7(6.72% cases , 5(4.80% cases of splenic masses and 30 ( 28.82% cases of pelvic masses.8 cases with other abdominal masses. Hepatic SOL were detected in 6(5.76% and 8(7.69% , 5(4.80%cases o f gall bladder masses and 4(3.85% , Omental caking was seen in 2(1.92% cases and 4(3.85% , calcification was seen in 2(1.92% cases and 4(3.85% cases , renal calculi were seen in 4(3.84% cases and6(5.77% cases , on sonography and CT examination. Peritone al deposits were seen in 3 ( 2.88% cases of ovarian carcinoma and unknown malignancy on US and in 5(4.88% cases on CT. Ascites and lymphadenopathy was more accurately detected on CT as compared to US.CT detected splenicinfarct s which were missed on ultrasonography. CONCLUSION : CT is more sensitive in evaluation of site and size of lesion , detection of calcification , adjacent organ infiltration and regional lymphadenopathy. The limitations of CT are ionizing radiation , high cost and contras t administration. Hence ultrasound should be the primary screening modality and CT should be used for further characterizing the masses.

  20. When the non-contrast-enhanced phase is unnecessary in abdominal computed tomography scans? A retrospective analysis of 244 cases

    Costa, Danilo Manuel Cerqueira; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Monjardim, Rodrigo da Fonseca; Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Torres, Lucas Rios; Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; D' ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Departamento de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2013-06-15

    Objective: to evaluate the necessity of the non contrast-enhanced phase in abdominal computed tomography scans. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study was developed, evaluating 244 consecutive abdominal computed tomography scans both with and without contrast injection. Initially, the contrast-enhanced images were analyzed (first analysis). Subsequently, the observers had access to the non-contrast-enhanced images for a second analysis. The primary and secondary diagnoses were established as a function of the clinical indications for each study (such as tumor staging, acute abdomen, investigation for abdominal collection and hepatocellular carcinoma, among others). Finally, the changes in the diagnoses resulting from the addition of the non-contrast-enhanced phase were evaluated. Results: Only one (0.4%; p > 0.999; non-statistically significant) out of the 244 reviewed cases had the diagnosis changed after the reading of non-contrast-enhanced images. As the secondary diagnoses are considered, 35 (14%) cases presented changes after the second analysis, as follows: nephrolithiasis (10%), steatosis (3%), adrenal nodule (0.7%) and cholelithiasis (0.3%). Conclusion: For the clinical indications of tumor staging, acute abdomen, investigation of abdominal collections and hepatocellular carcinoma, the non-contrast-enhanced phase can be excluded from abdominal computed tomography studies with no significant impact on the diagnosis. (author)

  1. When the non-contrast-enhanced phase is unnecessary in abdominal computed tomography scans? A retrospective analysis of 244 cases

    Objective: to evaluate the necessity of the non contrast-enhanced phase in abdominal computed tomography scans. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study was developed, evaluating 244 consecutive abdominal computed tomography scans both with and without contrast injection. Initially, the contrast-enhanced images were analyzed (first analysis). Subsequently, the observers had access to the non-contrast-enhanced images for a second analysis. The primary and secondary diagnoses were established as a function of the clinical indications for each study (such as tumor staging, acute abdomen, investigation for abdominal collection and hepatocellular carcinoma, among others). Finally, the changes in the diagnoses resulting from the addition of the non-contrast-enhanced phase were evaluated. Results: Only one (0.4%; p > 0.999; non-statistically significant) out of the 244 reviewed cases had the diagnosis changed after the reading of non-contrast-enhanced images. As the secondary diagnoses are considered, 35 (14%) cases presented changes after the second analysis, as follows: nephrolithiasis (10%), steatosis (3%), adrenal nodule (0.7%) and cholelithiasis (0.3%). Conclusion: For the clinical indications of tumor staging, acute abdomen, investigation of abdominal collections and hepatocellular carcinoma, the non-contrast-enhanced phase can be excluded from abdominal computed tomography studies with no significant impact on the diagnosis. (author)

  2. When the non-contrast-enhanced phase is unnecessary in abdominal computed tomography scans? A retrospective analysis of 244 cases

    Danilo Manuel Cerqueira Costa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the necessity of the non contrast-enhanced phase in abdominal computed tomography scans. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study was developed, evaluating 244 consecutive abdominal computed tomography scans both with and without contrast injection. Initially, the contrast-enhanced images were analyzed (first analysis. Subsequently, the observers had access to the non-contrast-enhanced images for a second analysis. The primary and secondary diagnoses were established as a function of the clinical indications for each study (such as tumor staging, acute abdomen, investigation for abdominal collection and hepatocellular carcinoma, among others. Finally, the changes in the diagnoses resulting from the addition of the non-contrast-enhanced phase were evaluated. Results: Only one (0.4%; p > 0.999; non-statistically significant out of the 244 reviewed cases had the diagnosis changed after the reading of non-contrast-enhanced images. As the secondary diagnoses are considered, 35 (14% cases presented changes after the second analysis, as follows: nephrolithiasis (10%, steatosis (3%, adrenal nodule (0.7% and cholelithiasis (0.3%. Conclusion: For the clinical indications of tumor staging, acute abdomen, investigation of abdominal collections and hepatocellular carcinoma, the non-contrast-enhanced phase can be excluded from abdominal computed tomography studies with no significant impact on the diagnosis.

  3. Relationship between abdominal fat distribution assessed by computed tomography and serum lipids in the elderly

    Imamura, Toshiharu; Kano, Hiroko; Shin, Kouichi; Konjiki, Ou; Ohsawa, Yoko; Takasaki, Masaru (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1993-02-01

    A nutritional assessment is necessary to evaluate the pathophysiological state of patients, and serum lipids are one of the factors which must be evaluated. Body fat distribution is considered to be associated with cardiac diseases, metabolic diseases and hypertension. In this study, we performed quantitative measurements of fat distribution by X-ray computed tomography (CT) in 31 elderly outpatients. Thirteen men (mean age 74.8 years) and 18 women (mean age 75.4 years) were examined by abdominal CT. All subjects had body mass indices within the normal range and did not have malignant disease, hyperlipidemia, liver dysfunction or diabetes mellitus. CT scans were carried out at the level of the middle abdomen, these scan slices included intraabdominal fat which consisted of omental retroperitoneal and perirenal adipose tissues. Subcutaneous fat areas and intraabdoinal fat areas were measured from six 10-mm-thick slice films using a 2-dimensional computerized calculator. The relationship between serum lipids and fat distribution was also examined. The ratio of intraabdominal adipose tissue area to subcutaneous adipose tissue area (V/S) was higher in men than women. V/S correlated positively with serum triacylgycerol and correlated negatively with serum HDL-Ch. These results suggest that the measurement of body fat distribution is important to evaluate lipid metabolism and nutritional states in the elderly. (author).

  4. Comparison of Colour Duplex Ultrasound with Computed Tomography to Measure the Maximum Abdominal Aortic Aneurysmal Diameter

    C. Gray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Maximum diameter of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is the main indication for surgery. This study compared colour duplex ultrasound (CDU and computed tomography (CT in assessing AAA diameter. Patients and Methods. Patients were included if they had both scans performed within 90 days. Pearson’s correlation coefficient, paired t-test, and limits of agreement (LOA were calculated for the whole group. Subgroup analysis of small (6.5 cm aneurysms was performed. A P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. 389 patients were included, giving 130 pairs of tests for comparison. Excellent correlation was in the whole group (r = 0.95 and in the subgroups (r = 0.94; 0.69; 0.96, resp.. Small LOA between the two imaging modalities was found in all subgroups. Conclusion. Small aneurysms can be accurately measured using CDU. CDU is preferable for small AAAs, but cannot supplant CT for planning aortic intervention.

  5. Contrast medium usage reduction in abdominal computed tomography by using high-iodinated concentration contrast medium

    Suwannasri, A.; Kaewlai, R.; Asavaphatiboon, S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was to determine if administration of a low volume high-concentration iodinated contrast medium can preserve image quality in comparison with regular-concentration intravenous contrast medium in patient undergoing contrast-enhancement abdominal computed tomography (CT). Eighty-four patients were randomly divided into 3 groups of similar iodine delivery rate; A: 1.2 cc/kg of iomeprol-400, B: 1.0 cc/kg of iomeprol-400 and C: 1.5 cc/kg of ioversol-350. Contrast enhancement of the liver parenchyma, pancreas and aorta was quantitatively measured in Hounsfield units and qualitative assessed by a radiologist. T-test was used to evaluate contrast enhancement, and Chi-square test was used to evaluate qualitative image assessment, at significance level of 0.05 with 95% confidence intervals. There were no statistically significant differences in contrast enhancement of liver parenchyma and pancreas between group A and group C in both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Group C showed superior vascular enhancement to group A and B on quantitative analysis.

  6. Relationship between abdominal fat distribution assessed by computed tomography and serum lipids in the elderly

    A nutritional assessment is necessary to evaluate the pathophysiological state of patients, and serum lipids are one of the factors which must be evaluated. Body fat distribution is considered to be associated with cardiac diseases, metabolic diseases and hypertension. In this study, we performed quantitative measurements of fat distribution by X-ray computed tomography (CT) in 31 elderly outpatients. Thirteen men (mean age 74.8 years) and 18 women (mean age 75.4 years) were examined by abdominal CT. All subjects had body mass indices within the normal range and did not have malignant disease, hyperlipidemia, liver dysfunction or diabetes mellitus. CT scans were carried out at the level of the middle abdomen, these scan slices included intraabdominal fat which consisted of omental retroperitoneal and perirenal adipose tissues. Subcutaneous fat areas and intraabdoinal fat areas were measured from six 10-mm-thick slice films using a 2-dimensional computerized calculator. The relationship between serum lipids and fat distribution was also examined. The ratio of intraabdominal adipose tissue area to subcutaneous adipose tissue area (V/S) was higher in men than women. V/S correlated positively with serum triacylgycerol and correlated negatively with serum HDL-Ch. These results suggest that the measurement of body fat distribution is important to evaluate lipid metabolism and nutritional states in the elderly. (author)

  7. 3D SPIRAL COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF AN ABDOMINAL TUMOUR

    R.C. Tiutiuca; Iuliana Eva

    2006-01-01

    Patients with digestive illnesses requires a full exploration, cases where imagistic assets support (echographic examination, radiological data, computed tomography, magnetic resonance) are very usefully. Computed tomography, in this process, has a special value. The results from axial images are sustained by the informations supplied from three-dimensional reconstruction processes (3D reconstruction) with relevant importance in establishment of diagnosis and therapeutic plan.

  8. Abdominal Computed tomography of 25 patients with AIDS or lymphadenopathy Syndrome

    Arrive, L.; Frija, J.; Couderc, L.J.; Clauvel, J.P.; Laval-Jeantet, M.

    1986-03-01

    An abdominal computed tomographic examination was performed to 20 patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and to 5 patients with Lymphadenopathy Syndrome (LAS). Intraabdominal lymph nodes were seen in 18 out of 20 cases of AIDS and in 5 cases of LAS. Lymph nodes have a normal size or are slightly enlarged but they are too numerous. Splenomegaly was found in 17 patients. Rectal modifications secondary to a proctitis were seen in the homosexual patients.

  9. Abdominal Computed tomography of 25 patients with AIDS or lymphadenopathy Syndrome

    An abdominal computed tomographic examination was performed to 20 patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and to 5 patients with Lymphadenopathy Syndrome (LAS). Intraabdominal lymph nodes were seen in 18 out of 20 cases of AIDS and in 5 cases of LAS. Lymph nodes have a normal size or are slightly enlarged but they are too numerous. Splenomegaly was found in 17 patients. Rectal modifications secondary to a proctitis were seen in the homosexual patients

  10. Abdominal body composition measured by quantitative computed tomography and risk of non-spine fractures

    Sheu, Y; Marshall, L M; Holton, K F;

    2013-01-01

    The effect of abdominal adiposity and muscle on fracture is unclear in older men; therefore, we examined the association among 749 men aged 65+. Among various adipose tissues and muscle groups, lower psoas muscle volume and higher fatty infiltration of abdominal muscle contribute to higher fractu...

  11. Improvement of distension and mural visualization of bowel loops using neutral oral contrasts in abdominal computed tomography

    Jahanbakhsh; Hashemi; Yasmin; Davoudi; Mina; Taghavi; Masoud; Pezeshki; Rad; Amien; Mahajeri; Moghadam

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess and compare the image quality of 4% sorbitol and diluted iodine 2%(positive oral contrast agent) in abdomino-pelvic multi-detector computed tomography.METHODS: Two-hundred patients, referred to the Radiology Department of a central educational hospital for multi-detector row abdominal-pelvic computed tomography, were randomly divided into two groups: the first group received 1500 m L of 4% sorbitol solution as a neutral contrast agent, while in the second group 1500 m L of meglumin solution as a positive contrast agent was administered in a one-way randomized prospective study. The results were independently reviewed by two radiologists. Luminal distension and mural thickness and mucosal enhancement were compared between the two groups. Statistical analysis of the results was performed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software version 16 and the Mann-Whitney test at a confidence level of 95%. RESULTS: Use of neutral oral contrast agent significantly improved visualization of the small bowel wall thickness and mural appearance in comparison with administration of positive contrast agent(P < 0.01). In patients who received sorbitol, the small bowel showed better distention compared with those who received iodine solution as a positive contrast agent(P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The results of the study demonstrated that oral administration of sorbitol solution allows better luminal distention and visualization of mural features than iodine solution as a positive contrast agent.

  12. The efficacy of ultrasonography in hemodynamically stable children with blunt abdominal trauma: a prospective comparison with computed tomography

    Purpose: In this prospective study we aimed to investigate the diagnostic value of ultrasonography (US) in hemodynamically stable children after blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) using computed tomography (CT) as the gold standard. Materials and methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 96 children with BAT were evaluated prospectively. CT was performed first, followed by US. US and CT examinations were independently evaluated by two radiologists for free fluid and organ injury. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and overall accuracy of US were assessed regarding CT as the gold standard. Results: Overall 128 organ injuries were determined in 96 patients with CT; however, 20 (15.6%) of them could not be seen with US. Free intraabdominal fluid (FIF) was seen in 82 of 96 patients by CT (85.4%) and eight of them (9.7%) could not be seen by US. We found that sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and overall accuracy of the US for free intra-abdominal fluid were 90.2, 100, 100, 63.6 and 91.7%, respectively. Conclusions: US for BAT in children is highly accurate and specific. It is highly sensitive in detecting liver, spleen and kidney injuries whereas its sensitivity is moderate for the detection of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and pancreatic injuries

  13. Usefulness of computed tomography in patients with right inferior abdominal quadrant pain: acute appendicitis and its alternative diagnosis

    Purpose: To review the tomography findings of the acute appendicitis, their complications and alternative diagnosis. To value the use of helicoidal computed tomography (HCT) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and in the study of patients with right inferior abdominal quadrant (RIQ) pain and acute abdomen, for diagnosis and eventual complications, in order to decide treatment. Materials and method: For five months, the populations included in this retrospectively study were all patients delivered for presenting with RIQ pain for a HCT exam. These exams were made with oral and intravenous contrasts, when there were not contraindications. The HCT results were correlated with clinical follow up, surgery and histopathologic exams. Results: Over a total of 100 patients studied, 53 presented tomographic diagnosis of appendicitis, 22 of which presented perforation signs; 27 showed an alternative diagnosis (ovaries follicles, ureteral litiasis, tiphlitis, diverticulitis, colitis, salpingitis), 18 patients did not present tomographic findings to support the clinical symptoms and 2 presented indeterminated results. These data represented a sensibility of 100%, specificity of 95,7%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 96,2% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% for the tomography diagnosis of acute appendicitis and a sensibility of 100%, specificity of 81,8%, PPV of 95,1% and NPV of 100% for the tomography diagnosis of the different etiology in patient with right inferior acute abdomen. Conclusion: HCT is extremely useful in the study of patients with acute abdomen with origin in the RIQ, not only to make a diagnosis, but also to evaluate the complications, so as to decide proper treatment. (authors)

  14. Quality of abdominal computed tomography angiography: hand versus mechanical intravenous contrast administration in children

    Abdominal CT angiography has been increasingly used for evaluation of various conditions related to abdominal vasculature in the pediatric population. However, no direct comparison has evaluated the quality of abdominal CT angiography in children using hand versus mechanical administration of intravenous (IV) contrast agent. To compare hand versus mechanical administration of IV contrast agent in the quality of abdominal CT angiography in the pediatric population. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical record to identify pediatric patients (≤18 years) who had abdominal CT angiography between August 2012 and August 2013. The information obtained includes: (1) type of administration of IV contrast agent (hand [group 1] versus mechanical [group 2]), (2) size (gauge) of IV catheter, (3) amount of contrast agent administered and (4) rate of contrast agent administration (ml/s). Two reviewers independently performed qualitative and quantitative evaluation of abdominal CT angiography image quality. Qualitative evaluation of abdominal CT angiography image quality was performed by visual assessment of the degree of contrast enhancement in the region of interest (ROI) based on a 4-point scale. Quantitative evaluation of each CT angiography examination was performed by measuring the Hounsfield unit (HU) using an ROI within the abdominal aorta at two levels (celiac axis and the inferior mesenteric artery) for each child. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) using the F-test was applied to compare contrast enhancement within the abdominal aorta at two levels (celiac axis and inferior mesenteric artery) between hand administration and mechanical administration of IV contrast methods with adjustment for age. We identified 46 pediatric patients (24 male, 22 female; mean age 7.3 ± 5.5 years; range 5 weeks to 18 years) with abdominal CT angiography performed during the study period. Of these patients, 16 (35%; 1.7 ± 2.2 years; range 5 weeks to 5 years) had hand

  15. Quality of abdominal computed tomography angiography: hand versus mechanical intravenous contrast administration in children

    Ayyala, Rama S.; Lee, Edward Y. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Departments of Anesthesiology and Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Abdominal CT angiography has been increasingly used for evaluation of various conditions related to abdominal vasculature in the pediatric population. However, no direct comparison has evaluated the quality of abdominal CT angiography in children using hand versus mechanical administration of intravenous (IV) contrast agent. To compare hand versus mechanical administration of IV contrast agent in the quality of abdominal CT angiography in the pediatric population. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical record to identify pediatric patients (≤18 years) who had abdominal CT angiography between August 2012 and August 2013. The information obtained includes: (1) type of administration of IV contrast agent (hand [group 1] versus mechanical [group 2]), (2) size (gauge) of IV catheter, (3) amount of contrast agent administered and (4) rate of contrast agent administration (ml/s). Two reviewers independently performed qualitative and quantitative evaluation of abdominal CT angiography image quality. Qualitative evaluation of abdominal CT angiography image quality was performed by visual assessment of the degree of contrast enhancement in the region of interest (ROI) based on a 4-point scale. Quantitative evaluation of each CT angiography examination was performed by measuring the Hounsfield unit (HU) using an ROI within the abdominal aorta at two levels (celiac axis and the inferior mesenteric artery) for each child. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) using the F-test was applied to compare contrast enhancement within the abdominal aorta at two levels (celiac axis and inferior mesenteric artery) between hand administration and mechanical administration of IV contrast methods with adjustment for age. We identified 46 pediatric patients (24 male, 22 female; mean age 7.3 ± 5.5 years; range 5 weeks to 18 years) with abdominal CT angiography performed during the study period. Of these patients, 16 (35%; 1.7 ± 2.2 years; range 5 weeks to 5 years) had hand

  16. A study of preoperative diagnosis using abdominal computed tomography in acute appendicitis

    To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in differential diagnosis and decisions for operative indications in patients with acute appendicitis, CT was done in 45 patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis. CT was retrospectively analyzed for the following findings: enlarged appendix, hazy periappendiceal density, increased enhancement of the appendiceal wall, deficiency of the appendiceal wall, appendiceal stones, abscess, and ascites. Surgery was conducted 28 patients, of whom 25 were pathologically diagnosed with gangrenous or phlegmonous appendicitis. Seventeen improved without surgery, i.e., 9 with acute appendicitis, 7 with diverticulitis of the colon, and 1 with pelvic peritonitis. Except for 3 with severe abscess, enlarged appendix, hazy periappendiceal density, and increased enhancement of the appendiceal wall were observed in 22 with phlegmonous or gangrenous appendicitis. In 25 with phlegmonous or gangrenous appendicitis, appendiceal stones were observed in 32% and abscess or ascites in 60%. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in CT diagnosis images were 100%, 80%, and 96%. CT findings thus provide useful information in differential diagnosis and decisions on operative indication in patients with acute appendicitis. (author)

  17. Abdominal computed tomography during pregnancy for suspected appendicitis: a 5-year experience at a maternity hospital.

    Shetty, Mahesh K; Garrett, Nan M; Carpenter, Wendy S; Shah, Yogesh P; Roberts, Candace

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this article is to evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) in a pregnant patient with right lower quadrant pain in whom there was a clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis. During a 5-year period the clinical records of all pregnant women who underwent imaging examination for clinically suspected appendicitis were reviewed. The imaging findings were correlated with patient management and final outcome. Thirty-nine pregnant patients were referred for imaging, of which 35 underwent initial evaluation with sonography, 23 of these women underwent a computed tomographic examination, and an additional 4 patients were directly imaged with CT without earlier sonographic assessment. Surgery confirmed appendicitis in all 5 patients who were operated on on the basis of findings of appendicitis on a CT scan. Two patients underwent surgery based on an alternate diagnosis suggested preoperatively (tubal torsion = 1, ovarian torsion = 1). All patients with negative findings at CT had an uneventful clinical course. In those patients who were evaluated only with ultrasound, a diagnosis of appendicitis was missed in 5 patients. The sensitivity of CT in the diagnosis of appendicitis in our study group was 100%, compared with a sensitivity of 46.1% for ultrasound. CT provides an accurate diagnosis in patients suspected to have acute appendicitis and is of value in avoiding false negative exploratory laparatomy with its consequent risk of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Although sonography is the preferred initial imaging modality as its lack of ionizing radiation, CT is more accurate in providing a timely diagnosis and its use is justified to reduce maternal mortality and mortality in patients with appendicitis. PMID:20102691

  18. Comparison of spirometry and abdominal height as four-dimensional computed tomography metrics in lung

    An important consideration in four-dimensional CT scanning is the selection of a breathing metric for sorting the CT data and modeling internal motion. This study compared two noninvasive breathing metrics, spirometry and abdominal height, against internal air content, used as a surrogate for internal motion. Both metrics were shown to be accurate, but the spirometry showed a stronger and more reproducible relationship than the abdominal height in the lung. The abdominal height was known to be affected by sensor placement and patient positioning while the spirometer exhibited signal drift. By combining these two, a normalization of the drift-free metric to tidal volume may be generated and the overall metric precision may be improved

  19. The Relationship of Abdominal Obesity and Lipid Profiles by Computed Tomography in Adult Women

    Abdominal obesity, especially, visceral obesity is thought to be a risk factor of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease. Based on previous studies visceral fat accumulation is highly related to these diseases compared to subcutaneous fat accumulation. The purpose of this study was to see the relation between abdominal obesity and lipid profiles in adult women. The included subjects were 25 adult women(BMI > 23 kg/m2 ), who visited the obesity clinic in a general hospital from April 2006 to September 2007. Blood pressure, fasting glucose and lipid profiles were measured. The abdominal fat distribution had been assessed by CT scan at the level of L4-L5. From bivariate analyses, the visceral fat accumulation showed negative correlations with TC and TC/HDL. The BMI, total abdominal fat and Visceral fat/Subcutaneous fat ratio showed significant correlations with visceral fat accumulation. From linear regression analyses of all the study subjects, TC, TG and HDL were found to be determinants of the visceral fat accumulation (R2=0.474).

  20. The diagnosis and management of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a comparison of computed tomography, ultrasound and aortography

    It is suggested that all clinically significant abdominal aneurysms can be shown by infusion C.T. or ultrasound and routine aortography is no longer indicated. These methods give more information about wall thickness and wall thrombus but do not give detailed information about the extent of an aneurysm and its exact relationship to important aortic branches. They should complement rather than replace aortography

  1. Diagnosis of hepatic steatosis by contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography; Diagnostico da esteatose hepatica pela tomografia computadorizada de abdome com meio de contraste intravenoso

    Monjardim, Rodrigo da Fonseca; Costa, Danilo Manuel Cerqueira; Romano, Ricardo Francisco Tavares; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Santos, Jaime de Vargas Conde dos; Atzingen, Augusto Castelli Von; Shigueoka, David Carlos; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2013-05-15

    Objective: to evaluate the diagnostic capacity of abdominal computed tomography in the assessment of hepatic steatosis using the portal phase with a simplified calculation method as compared with the non-contrast-enhanced phase. Materials and methods: in the present study, 150 patients were retrospectively evaluated by means of non-contrast-enhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography. One hundred patients had hepatic steatosis and 50 were control subjects. For the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis in the portal phase, the authors considered a result of < 104 HU calculated by the formula [L - 0.3 Multiplication-Sign (0.75 Multiplication-Sign P + 0.25 Multiplication-Sign A)] / 0.7, where L, P and A represent the attenuation of the liver, of the main portal vein and abdominal aorta, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated, using non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography as the reference standard. Results: the simplified calculation method with portal phase for the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis showed 100% sensitivity, 36% specificity, negative predictive value of 100% and positive predictive value of 75.8%. The rate of false positive results was 64%. False negative results were not observed. Conclusion: The portal phase presents an excellent sensitivity in the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis, as compared with the non-contrast-enhanced phase of abdominal computed tomography. However, the method has low specificity. (author)

  2. Multidetector computed tomography in abdominal emergencies; Multidetektor-CT bei abdominellen Notfaellen

    Zorger, N.; Schreyer, A.G. [Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany). Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2009-06-15

    Abdominal emergencies encompass traumatic events in the region of the abdomen as well as the clinical term acute abdomen. Multidetector CT (MDCT) represents one of the most important imaging modalities for detection and correct diagnosis in such abdominal emergencies. Based on the acquired data MDCT allows a stable imaging of the abdomen in an extremely short time even in critically ill patients. Multiplanar reconstructions can be created based on the high resolution data allowing an impressive visualization of the pathology. In this review article the most important abdominal pathologies of the abdomen diagnosed by MDCT are presented with special emphasis on the liver, bile ducts, spleen and kidneys as well as the gastro-intestinal tract. Additionally, MDCT imaging of the individual organ regions will be dealt with in detail. (orig.) [German] Abdominelle Notfaelle beinhalten sowohl traumatische Ereignisse im Bereich des Bauchraums als auch den klinischen Begriff des ''akuten Abdomens''. Die Darstellung solcher Notfaelle mittels Multidetektor-Computertomographie (MDCT) ist eine leistungsfaehige Methode zur Detektion und richtigen Diagnosefindung der abdominellen Notfaelle. Die MDCT erlaubt eine stabile Bildgebung des Abdomens in extrem kurzer Zeit bei schwerkranken Patienten und zudem multiplanare Rekonstruktionen, basierend auf den akquirierten Rohdatensaetzen mit der Moeglichkeit, zusaetzlich Befunde anschaulicher zu visualisieren. In diesem Uebersichtsartikel werden die MDCT-Charakteristika verschiedener abdomineller Notfaelle der wichtigsten Organregionen des Abdomens, wie der Leber und der Gallenwege, des Pankreas, der Milz und der Niere sowie des Gastrointestinaltrakts erlaeutert. Dabei wird speziell auf die Multidetektor-CT-Technik der einzelnen Organregionen eingegangen. (orig.)

  3. Abdominal lymph node metastases of hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed by computed tomography and angiography

    Nakamura, Hironobu; Oi, Hiromichi (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Microbial Diseases); Tanaka, Takeshi; Sai, Soomi; Hori, Shinichi

    1984-04-01

    CT scans of 164 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were studied, and abdominal lymph node metastases were detected in 13 cases. Most of these lymph node metastases occured in periportal, peripancreatic and paraaortic lymph nodes. Ten instances of each these metastases were identified by CT. Six of the patients had metastases in all three sites. In 9 of 13 cases, lymph node metastases were demonstrated by angiography and various degrees of contrast material stain were seen. Lymph node metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma is apt to be hypervascular. Most of hepatocellular carcinoma with lymph node metastasis showed infiltrative growth, and tumor thrombosis in the portal vein was commonly complicated.

  4. An Incidentally Found Inflamed Uterine Myoma Causing Low Abdominal Pain, Using Tc-99m-Tektrotyd Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography-CT Hybrid Imaging

    Zandieh, Shahin; Schütz, Matthias; Bernt, Reinhard; Zwerina, Jochen; Haller, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old woman presented with a history of right hemicolectomy due to an ileocecal neuroendocrine tumor and left breast metastasis. Owing to a slightly elevated chromogranin A-level and lower abdominal pain, single photon emission computed tomography-computer tomography (SPECT-CT) was performed. There were no signs of recurrence on the SPECT-CT scan, but the patient was incidentally found to have an inflamed intramural myoma. We believe that the slightly elevated ch...

  5. 10% low density corn-oil emulsion oral contrast agent for abdominal computed tomography

    CT of the gastrointestinal tract is commonly performed after administration of a high-density diluted iodinated oral contrast material. However, because if inadequate mixing of the contrast material with the gastrointestinal contents, pseudotumor and poor mucosal visualization are frequently shown on abdominal CT. To overcome these problem, 10% corn oil emulsion (COE) is tested as an alternative oral contrast agent in 40 patients. We analyse patients tolerance, gastric mucosal visualization and discrimination of pancreas from the duodenal C-loop to 10% COE in 40 patients compared with those obtained from 35 patients, who was received high-density diluted iodinated oral contrast agent (gastrografin). The results are as follows : 1. Patients' tolerance to 10% COE is similar to that to conventional oral contrast agent. 2. Image of the gastric mucosa from patients receiving 10% COE is superior to that receiving oral contrast agent. 3. The discrimination between pancreatic head from duodenal C-loop is better in patients receiving 10% COE than in patients receiving conventional oral contrast agent. 4. In patients receiving 10% COE, differentiation of cystic masses from intestinal loops is sometimes difficult. The results of this study indicate that 10% COE may be useful oral contrast agent for optimal visualization of gastric mucosa and pancreatico-duodenal discrimination on abdominal CT

  6. Quantitative evaluation of rigid and elastic registrations for abdominal perfusion imaging with X-ray computed tomography

    Objectives. Dynamic X-ray computed tomography with contrast agent injection allows quantifying the tumor response to an anti-angiogenic treatment. For hepatic tumors, it is crucial to correct for respiratory movements to ensure a good quantification of perfusion parameters. Material and Methods. Two registration models were tested on eight dynamic exams: 1) rigid model and 2) elastic model based on Free Form Deformation. Each exam included about 50 volumes acquired under free-breathing conditions. The registration methods were quantitatively and automatically evaluated by defining a global score. This score was based on a Dice index and measured the superimposition rate between corresponding bony structures of different frames of the temporal exam. Results. Before registration, the mean value of the score was 0.78. After rigid registration, these values were globally lower with an average of 0.73. After elastic registration, a mean score of 0.90 was reached which was much higher than before registration. Conclusion. This automatic evaluation showed its interest for controlling the quality of dynamic CT registrations. It also helped proving that elastic methods are much more efficient than rigid methods for registering abdominal dynamic volumes, when considering the whole field of view. (authors)

  7. The usefulness of computed tomography in evaluating patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    During the past 28 months since the opening of our critical care medical center, a total of 31 patients with blunt abdominal trauma underwent CT scanning. CT findings were analyzed and compared for intraoperative findings and clinical courses. Parenchymal organ trauma is easily able to be diagnosed by CT scan, which provides definite information about the site, shape and bleeding condition of the traumatic lesion. A high-density hematoma in the mesenterium indicating the site of trauma, following bowel ischemia should be carefully observed. For assessment of bowel trauma with any modality, careful observation is also needed, because there are almost no findings in the early stage. Contrast CT was valuable in that we could obtain definite information on the site of bleeding, roughly know the vascular injury, and examine the urinary tract by additional plain film. (author)

  8. A comparative study to validate the use of ultrasonography and computed tomography in patients with post-operative intra-abdominal sepsis

    Purpose: To validate abdominal ultrasonography and helical computed tomography in detecting causes for sepsis in patients after abdominal surgery and to determine improved criteria for its use. Materials and methods: Eighty-five consecutive surgical patients primarily operated for non-infectious disease were included in this prospective study. Forty-one patients were admitted to the intensive care unit. All patients were suspected of an intra-abdominal sepsis after abdominal surgery. Both ultrasonography (US) and helical abdominal computed tomography (CT) were performed to investigate the origin of an intra-abdominal sepsis. The images of both US and CT were interpreted on a four-point scale by different radiologists or residents in radiology, the investigators were blinded of each other's test. Interpretations of US and CT were compared with a reference standard which was defined by the result of diagnostic aspiration of suspected fluid collections (re)laparotomy, clinical course or the opinion of an independent panel. Likelihood ratios and post-test probabilities were calculated and interobserver agreement was determined using κ statistics. Results: The overall prevalence of an abdominal infection was 0.49. The likelihood ratio (LR) of a positive test-result for US was 1.33 (95% CI: 0.8-2.5) and for CT scan 2.53 (95% CI: 1.4-5.0); corresponding post-test probabilities for US 0.57 (95% CI: 0.42-0.70) and for CT 0.71 (95% CI: 0.57-0.83). The LR of a negative test-result was, respectively, 0.60 (95% CI: 0.3-1.3) and 0.18 (95% CI: 0.06-0.5); corresponding post-test probabilities for US 0.37 (95% CI: 0.20-0.57) and for CT 0.15 (95% CI: 0.06-0.32) were calculated. Conclusion: Computed tomography can be used as the imaging modality of choice in patients suspected of intra-abdominal sepsis after abdominal surgery. Because of the low discriminatory power ultrasonography should not be performed as initial diagnostic test

  9. Reproducibility of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Diameter Measurement and Growth Evaluation on Axial and Multiplanar Computed Tomography Reformations

    Purpose: To compare different methods measuring abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximal diameter (Dmax) and its progression on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scan. Materials and Methods: Forty AAA patients with two MDCT scans acquired at different times (baseline and follow-up) were included. Three observers measured AAA diameters by seven different methods: on axial images (anteroposterior, transverse, maximal, and short-axis views) and on multiplanar reformation (MPR) images (coronal, sagittal, and orthogonal views). Diameter measurement and progression were compared over time for the seven methods. Reproducibility of measurement methods was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland–Altman analysis. Results: Dmax, as measured on axial slices at baseline and follow-up (FU) MDCTs, was greater than that measured using the orthogonal method (p = 0.046 for baseline and 0.028 for FU), whereas Dmax measured with the orthogonal method was greater those using all other measurement methods (p-value range: <0.0001–0.03) but anteroposterior diameter (p = 0.18 baseline and 0.10 FU). The greatest interobserver ICCs were obtained for the orthogonal and transverse methods (0.972) at baseline and for the orthogonal and sagittal MPR images at FU (0.973 and 0.977). Interobserver ICC of the orthogonal method to document AAA progression was greater (ICC = 0.833) than measurements taken on axial images (ICC = 0.662–0.780) and single-plane MPR images (0.772–0.817). Conclusion: AAA Dmax measured on MDCT axial slices overestimates aneurysm size. Diameter as measured by the orthogonal method is more reproducible, especially to document AAA progression.

  10. Both pelvic radiography and lateral abdominal radiography correlate well with coronary artery calcification measured by computed tomography in hemodialysis patients: A cross-sectional study.

    Hong, Daqing; Ruan, Yizhe; Pu, Lei; Zhong, Xiang; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Yue; Deng, Fei; Yang, Hongling; Li, Guisen; Wang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Lateral abdominal radiograph is suggested as an alternative to coronary artery computed tomography (CT) in evaluating vascular calcification. Simple scoring systems including pelvic radiograph scoring and abdominal scoring system were utilized to study their correlation with coronary artery calcification. Methods In 106 MHD patients, coronary artery CT, lateral abdominal, and pelvic radiograph were taken. The Agatston scoring system was applied to evaluate the degree of coronary artery calcification which was categorized according to Agatston coronary artery calcification score (CACS) ≥ 30, ≥100, ≥400, and ≥1000. Abdominal aortic calcification was scored by 4-scored and 24-scored systems. Pelvic artery calcification was scored by a 4-scored system. Sensitivities and specificities of abdominal aortic calcification scores and pelvic artery calcification scores to predict different categories of coronary artery calcification were analyzed. We studied the diagnostic capability of abdominal aorta calcification and pelvic artery calcification to predict different CACS categories by calculating likelihood ratios. Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to determine the area under the curve for each of these testing procedures. Findings The prevalence was 48(45.3%), 15 (14.2%), 11 (10.4%), 11 (10.4%), and 11 (10.4%) for CACs > 0, ≥30, ≥100, ≥400, and ≥1000, respectively. The degree of CACs was positively correlated with patient age, prevalence of diabetes, abdominal aorta scores, and pelvic calcification scores. The areas under the curves for different CACS by all X-ray scoring systems were above 0.70 except pelvic 4-scored system for diagnosing CACS ≥30, without significant difference (P > 0.05). Discussion Both lateral abdominal and pelvic plain radiographs were demonstrated as acceptable alternatives to CT in evaluating vascular calcification. PMID:26932162

  11. Successful treatment of a free-moving abdominal mass with radiation therapy guided by cone-beam computed tomography: a case report

    Shihadeh Ferial

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Because tumors in the abdomen can change position, targeting these tumors for radiation therapy should be done with caution; use of daily image-guided radiation therapy is advised. Case presentation We report the case of a 72-year-old Caucasian man with recurrent mantle cell lymphoma who was referred for palliative radiation therapy for an abdominopelvic tumor. Computed tomography was used to generate images for radiation treatment planning. Comparison of those planning images with a positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan ordered during the planning period revealed that the tumor had moved from one side of the abdomen to the other during the three-day interval between scans. To account for this unusual tumor movement, we obtained a second set of planning computed tomography scans and used a Varian cone-beam computed tomography scanner with on-board imaging capability to target the tumor before each daily treatment session, leading to successful treatment and complete resolution of the mass. Conclusion Abdominal masses associated with the mesentery should be considered highly mobile; thus, radiation therapy for such masses should be used with the utmost caution. Modern radiation therapy techniques offer the ability to verify the tumor location in real time and shift the treatment ports accordingly over the course of treatment.

  12. A prospective study assessing the efficacy of abdominal computed tomography scan without bowel preparation in diagnosing intestinal wall and luminal lesions in patients presenting to the emergency room with abdominal complaints

    Michal Mizrahi; Yoav Mintz; Avraham Rivkind; David Kisselgoff; Eugene Libson; Mayer Brezis; Eran Goldin; Oren Shibolet

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the positive predictive value of abdominal non-prepared computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing intestinal lumen or wall lesions in patients presenting to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal complaints.METHODS: For 1-year we prospectively evaluated all ER patients hospitalized after abdominal CT scan detected either intraluminal or intestinal wall lesions. These patients underwent colonoscopy serving as gold standard. Patients with prior abdominal pathology or CT findings of appendicitis or diverticulitis were excluded.RESULTS: Five hundred and sixty-eight abdominopelvic CT scans were performed in the ER, 96 had positive colonic findings. Sixty-two patients were excluded, 46 because of diverticulitis or appendicitis, 16 because of prior abdominal pathology. Of the remaining 34 patients, 14 did not undergo colonoscopy during hospitalization.Twenty eligible patients were included in the study. The positive predictive value of the CT scans performed in the ER was calculated to be 45% (95% CI 25-67).CONCLUSION: CT findings correlated with colonoscopic findings only in approximately half of the cases. Relying on non-prepared CT scan findings in planning patient management and colonoscopy may lead to unnecessary diagnostic work-ups.

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses What is CT (Computed Tomography) of ... of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  16. Discrepancies in determination of abdominal aortic aneurysms maximum diameter and growth rate, using axial and orhtogonal computed tomography measurements

    Purpose: Maximum diameter and growth rate of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) which are currently used as the only variables to set the indication for elective repair are recorded through computed tomography (CT) measurements on an axial plane or on an orthogonal plane that is perpendicular to vessel centerline, interchangeably. We will attempt to record possible discrepancies between the two methods, identify whether such differences could influence therapeutic decisions and determine in which cases this should be expected. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed sixty CT-scans performed in thirty-nine patients. Three-dimensional reconstruction of AAAs has been performed and differences in maximum diameter measured on axial and orthogonal planes were recorded. A measure for asymmetry was introduced termed ShapeIndex defined as the value of section minor over major axis and was related with differences in maximum diameter recordings. Growth rates were also determined using both axial and orthogonal measurements. Results: Axial measurements overestimate maximum diameter by 2 ± 2.7 mm (P < 0.001) with a range of 0–12.3 mm. Overall, 20% of the CTs had an axial maximum diameter >5.5 cm indicating the need for intervention whereas, orthogonal diameter was below that threshold. Asymmetry of the axial sections with ShapeIndex ≤ 0.8 was found to be related to an overestimation of maximum diameter by >5 mm. There were no significant differences in growth rates when determined using orthogonal or axial measurements in both examinations (median growth rate: 2.3 mm and 3.3 mm respectively P = 0.2). However there were significant differences when orthogonal measurements were used at initial and axial measurements used at follow-up examination or vice versa (median growth rate: 4.9 mm and 0.9 mm respectively P < 0.001). Conclusions: Although the mean difference between measurements is low there is a wide range among cases, mainly observed in asymmetrical AAAs

  17. Discrepancies in determination of abdominal aortic aneurysms maximum diameter and growth rate, using axial and orhtogonal computed tomography measurements

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos, E-mail: kontopodisn@yahoo.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion (Greece); Metaxa, Eleni, E-mail: emmetaxa@gmail.com [Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Gionis, Michalis, E-mail: gkionismichalis@yahoo.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion (Greece); Papaharilaou, Yannis, E-mail: yannisp@iacm.forth.gr [Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Ioannou, Christos V., E-mail: ioannou@med.uoc.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion (Greece)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Maximum diameter and growth rate of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) which are currently used as the only variables to set the indication for elective repair are recorded through computed tomography (CT) measurements on an axial plane or on an orthogonal plane that is perpendicular to vessel centerline, interchangeably. We will attempt to record possible discrepancies between the two methods, identify whether such differences could influence therapeutic decisions and determine in which cases this should be expected. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed sixty CT-scans performed in thirty-nine patients. Three-dimensional reconstruction of AAAs has been performed and differences in maximum diameter measured on axial and orthogonal planes were recorded. A measure for asymmetry was introduced termed ShapeIndex defined as the value of section minor over major axis and was related with differences in maximum diameter recordings. Growth rates were also determined using both axial and orthogonal measurements. Results: Axial measurements overestimate maximum diameter by 2 ± 2.7 mm (P < 0.001) with a range of 0–12.3 mm. Overall, 20% of the CTs had an axial maximum diameter >5.5 cm indicating the need for intervention whereas, orthogonal diameter was below that threshold. Asymmetry of the axial sections with ShapeIndex ≤ 0.8 was found to be related to an overestimation of maximum diameter by >5 mm. There were no significant differences in growth rates when determined using orthogonal or axial measurements in both examinations (median growth rate: 2.3 mm and 3.3 mm respectively P = 0.2). However there were significant differences when orthogonal measurements were used at initial and axial measurements used at follow-up examination or vice versa (median growth rate: 4.9 mm and 0.9 mm respectively P < 0.001). Conclusions: Although the mean difference between measurements is low there is a wide range among cases, mainly observed in asymmetrical AAAs

  18. The role of computed tomography in evaluating body composition and the influence of reduced muscle mass on clinical outcome in abdominal malignancy: a systematic review.

    Gibson, D J; Burden, S T; Strauss, B J; Todd, C; Lal, S

    2015-10-01

    It is estimated that there were 3.45 million new cases and 1.75 million deaths from cancer in Europe in 2012. Colorectal cancer was one of the most common cancers, accounting for 13% of new cases and 12.2% of all deaths. Conditions causing reduced muscle mass, such as sarcopenia, can increase the morbidity and mortality of people with cancer. Computed tomography (CT) scans can provide accurate, high-quality information on body composition, including muscle mass. To date, there has been no systematic review on the role of CT scans in identifying sarcopenia in abdominal cancer. This review aimed to examine the role of CT scans in determining the influence of reduced muscle mass on clinical outcome in abdominal cancer. A systematic review of English-language articles published in 2000 or later was conducted. Articles included cohort, randomised controlled trials and validation studies. Participants were people diagnosed with abdominal cancer who had undergone a CT scan. Data extraction and critical appraisal were undertaken. Ten cohort studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies demonstrated that low muscle mass was significantly associated with poor clinical outcome, with six specifically demonstrating reduced survival rates. Eight studies demonstrated that a greater number of patients (27.3-66.7%) were identified as sarcopenic using CT scans compared with numbers identified as malnourished using body mass index. CT scans can identify reduced muscle mass and predict negative cancer outcomes in people with abdominal malignancies, where traditional methods of assessment are less effective. PMID:25782424

  19. Comparison of diagnostic performance between single- and multiphasic contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic computed tomography in patients admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain: potential radiation dose reduction

    Hwang, Shin Hye; You, Je Sung; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Mi Kyong [Yonsei University, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate feasibility of radiation dose reduction by optimal phase selection of computed tomography (CT) in patients who visited the emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain. We included 253 patients who visited the ED for abdominal pain. They underwent multiphasic CT including precontrast, late arterial phase (LAP), and hepatic venous phase (HVP). Three image sets (HVP, precontrast + HVP, and precontrast + LAP + HVP) were reviewed. Two reviewers determined the most appropriate diagnosis with five-point confidence scale. Diagnostic performances were compared among image sets by weighted-least-squares method or DeLong's method. Linear mixed model was used to assess changes of diagnostic confidence and radiation dose. There was no difference in diagnostic performance among three image sets, although diagnostic confidence level was significantly improved after review of triphasic images compared with both HVP images only or HVP with precontrast images (confidence scale, 4.64 ± 0.05, 4.66 ± 0.05, and 4.76 ± 0.04 in the order of the sets; overall P = 0.0008). Similar trends were observed in the subgroup analysis for diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease and cholecystitis. There is no difference between HVP-CT alone and multiphasic CT for the diagnosis of causes of abdominal pain in patients admitted to the ED without prior chronic disease or neoplasia. (orig.)

  20. Quantitative assessment of relationships between abdominal aortic calcification and bone mineral content of lumbar vertebrae in the elderly by computed tomography

    The relationship between abdominal aortic calcification and osteoporosis in 224 elderly patients (82 men, 142 women, age ranging from 60 to 94 yrs [77.8±7.6]) was investigated by computed tomography. We calculated the aortic calcification index (ACI;%) of calcification volume to aortic volume within 10 slices in the lower abdominal aorta, and measured the bone mineral content (BMC; mg/cm3) of three lumbar vertebral bodies (the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th) using a calibrated phantom. ACI increased, but BMC decreased gradually with aging. ACIs in women were significantly less in the 60s decade of age (p<0.01), but higher in the 80s and 90s (NS) than those in men. BMCs in women were significantly less than those in men in the 70s and 80s (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). In both the 70s and 80s, there were significant negative correlations between ACIs and BMCs in women (70s: n=61, r=-0.371, p<0.01; 80s: n=55, r=-0.334, p<0.01), but was no relation between them in men. These results suggested that in the elderly women, abdominal aortic calcification is closely related to the bone loss caused by postmenopausal osteoporosis. (author)

  1. Differentiation between tuberculosis and leukemia in abdominal and pelvic lymph nodes: evaluation with contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography

    Ge Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the characteristics of tubercular vs. leukemic involvement of abdominopelvic lymph nodes using multidetector computed tomography (CT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed multidetector computed tomography features including lymph node size, shape, enhancement patterns, and anatomical distribution, in 106 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed, untreated tuberculosis (55 patients; 52% or leukemia (51 patients; 48%. In patients with leukemia, 32 (62.7% had chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and 19 (37.3% had acute leukemias; of these, 10 (19.6% had acute myeloid leukemia, and 9 (17.6% had acute lymphocytic leukemia. RESULTS: The lower para-aortic (30.9% for tuberculosis, 63.2% for acute leukemias and 87.5% for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and inguinal (9.1% for tuberculosis, 57.9% for acute leukemias and 53.1% for chronic lymphocytic leukemia lymph nodes were involved more frequently in the three types of leukemia than in tuberculosis (both with p <0.017. Tuberculosis showed peripheral enhancement, frequently with a multilocular appearance, in 43 (78.2% patients, whereas patients with leukemia (78.9% for acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, 87.5% for chronic lymphocytic leukemia demonstrated predominantly homogeneous enhancement (both with p <0.017. For the diagnosis of tuberculosis, the analysis showed that a peripheral enhancement pattern had a sensitivity of 78.2%, a specificity of 100%, and an accuracy of 88.7%. For the diagnosis of leukemia, the analysis showed that a homogeneous enhancement pattern was associated with a sensitivity of 84.3%, a specificity of 94.5%, and an accuracy of 89.6%. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the anatomical distribution and enhancement patterns of lymphadenopathy seen on multidetector computed tomography are useful for differentiating between untreated tuberculosis and leukemia of the abdominopelvic lymph nodes.

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  3. Can lab data be used to reduce abdominal computed tomography (CT) usage in young adults presenting to the emergency department with nontraumatic abdominal pain?

    Scheinfeld, Meir H; Mahadevia, Soham; Stein, Evan G; Freeman, Katherine; Rozenblit, Alla M

    2010-09-01

    We sought to determine whether laboratory parameters could be found, predictive of a negative abdominal CT scan in young adults with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Following institutional review board approval, we evaluated CT reports of 522 patients, aged 21-35 years old, who presented to the Emergency Department with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Bivariate analyses relating ten laboratory parameters to whether the CT detected a cause for abdominal pain were conducted. A multivariate logistic regression model was then derived, with all variables in the final model significant at p meeting inclusion criteria, 45% had a cause for pain demonstrated by CT. Predictors of a negative CT in men were normal hematocrit and negative urine blood (p = 0.045, p = 0.016, respectively), and in women normal hematocrit, granulocyte percent, and alkaline phosphatase (p = 0.023, p = 0.039, p sufficient to offer reassurance that a CT is not necessary in a young adult patient with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Alternative strategies should be considered to decrease the use of CT, and its associated radiation exposure, in young adults with nontraumatic abdominal pain. PMID:20306104

  4. COMPARATIVE ROLE AND EVALUATION OF ULTRASOUND AND MULTISLICE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN THE GRADING OF HEMOPERITONEUM IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA AND ITS CORRELATION WITH THE GRADING OF ORGAN INJURY

    Kunwarpal; Sukhdeep; Thukral; Amandeep; Harmeet; Sonali

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: 1. To assess the role of Ultrasound (US) and Multislice Computed Tomography (MSCT) in detecting hemoperitoneum in patients with acute blunt abdominal trauma. 2. To study the use of US and MSCT in grading of hemoperitoneum in blunt abdominal trauma patients. 3. To compare the US and MSCT grading of hemoperitoneum with the grading of organ injury. 4. To compare and statistically analyze the spectrum of findings observed in each moda...

  5. The use of fat emulsion ingested into alimentary tract in abdominal computed tomography for the detection of extracanal infiltration of cancer

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) was performed with 200 - 500 ml of fat emulsion (FM) ingested per os or per anus in 30 patients suspected of having infiltration of advanced gastrointestinal cancer into the other organs. FM was useful for distinguishing the alimentary tract from the abdominal cavity tissues and for clearly delineating the relation between the tumor and the other organs. CT showed the disappearance of the fat tissues surrounding the lesion and the boundary between the mass and its adjacent organs in 10 patients with surgically-proven cancer infiltration into the other organs. This is thus considered specific to cancer infiltration. Furry images of the wall were not seen in 14 patients with negative or questionable infiltration into the serous membrane (SM), but seen in 14 (78 %) of 18 patients with positive SM infiltration. The CT appearance seems to be related to SM infiltration. Similarly, this was seen in 11 (92 %) of 12 patients with gastrointestinal stricture, which suggests the possibility of reflecting inflammation and edema of the alimentary tract due to stricture. (Namekawa, K.)

  6. Usefulness of measurement of the outer appendiceal diameter on abdominal computer tomography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of our computer tomography (CT)-based protocol and the usefulness of measurement of the outer appendiceal diameter on CT in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Two-hundred thirty-nine consecutive patients with clinical diagnoses of acute appendicitis during the period from January 2002 to Jun 2004 were evaluated. The CT criterion of acute appendicitis was the outer appendiceal diameter of 6 mm or more, and/or other associated inflammatory changes. The histological criterion of acute appendicitis was the presentation of polymorphic granulocytes throughout the appendiceal wall. Of 239 patients, 235 underwent CT examination. Among 222 patients with appendectomy, 205 had histologically proven acute appendicitis. Of 200 patients who had the outer appendiceal diameter of 6 mm or more on CT, 193 had histologically proven acute appendicitis. The positive predictive value for diagnosing acute appendicitis was 92.3% in the surgery group, and 96.5% in the group that the outer appendiceal diameter was 6 mm or more on CT. The recurrence rate of acute appendicitis diagnosed by CT following conservative therapy was 35.3%, and was high (50%) in the group with the appendiceal diameter of at least 10 mm. CT is useful in the diagnosis for acute appendicitis. (author)

  7. Practical human abdominal fat imaging utilizing electrical impedance tomography

    The fundamental cause of metabolic syndrome is thought to be abdominal obesity. Accurate diagnosis of abdominal obesity can be done by an x-ray computed tomography (CT) scan. But CT is expensive, bulky and entails the risks involved with radiation. To overcome such disadvantages, we attempted to develop a measuring device that could apply electrical impedance tomography to abdominal fat imaging. The device has 32 electrodes that can be attached to a subject's abdomen by a pneumatic mechanism. That way, electrode position data can be acquired simultaneously. An applied alternating current of 1.0 mArms was used at a frequency of 500 kHz. Sensed voltage data were carefully filtered to remove noise and processed to satisfy the reciprocal theorem. The image reconstruction software was developed concurrently, applying standard finite element methods and the Marquardt method to solve the mathematical inverse problem. The results of preliminary experiments showed that abdominal subcutaneous fat and the muscle surrounding the viscera could be imaged in humans. While our imaging of visceral fat was not of sufficient quality, it was suggested that we will be able to develop a safe and practical abdominal fat scanner through future improvements

  8. O valor da fase sem contraste na tomografia computadorizada do abdome The role of the unenhanced phase in the routine abdominal computed tomography

    Ana Paula Klautau Leite

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar o valor agregado da fase sem meio de contraste da tomografia computadorizada do abdome em pacientes sem diagnóstico determinado ou em estadiamento tumoral. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo e transversal em 100 pacientes consecutivos submetidos a tomografia computadorizada abdominal sem e com meio de contraste intravenoso. Dois examinadores avaliaram todos os exames, procurando estabelecer, através da fase com meio de contraste intravenoso (primeira análise e posteriormente através da fase sem contraste (segunda análise, o diagnóstico principal e os secundários em função da indicação clínica do exame. Mediu-se a freqüência de mudança diagnóstica decorrente da análise combinada das fases pré- e pós-contraste intravenoso. Casos que tiveram mudança diagnóstica foram avaliados por especialistas clínicos para determinar se implicaria mudanças de conduta. RESULTADOS: Diagnósticos principal e secundário foram modificados em 1 e 18 casos, respectivamente (p = 1,000; p = 0,143. Os diagnósticos modificados foram: esteatose, definição de nódulo em adrenal, nefrolitíase, classificação de cistos renais e calcificação hepática. Nos casos em que a fase sem contraste modificou o diagnóstico, os especialistas mudaram sua conduta em 14/19 (73% dos pacientes (p = 0,038. CONCLUSÃO: A fase sem contraste não modificou significativamente o diagnóstico principal ou secundário. Porém, as mudanças nos diagnósticos secundários influenciaram na conduta adotada pelos especialistas.OBJECTIVE: To determine the role of the unenhanced phase of abdominal computed tomography in patients without a definite diagnosis or undergoing tumor staging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective and transversal study was developed with 100 consecutive patients submitted to unenhanced and contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography. Two observers evaluated all the computed tomography images in the contrast-enhanced phase

  9. Low-dose Computed Tomography in a Pregnant Woman with a Ruptured Pseudoaneurysm of the Abdominal Aorta.

    Ramac, Jelena Popić; Vidjak, Vinko; Skegro, Dinko; Duić, Zeljko; Blasković, Darko; Erdelez, Lidija; Skopljanac-Macina, Andrija; Suknaić, Slaven; Slavica, Marko; Leder, Nikola Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Imaging the pregnant patient presents a unique challenge to radiologist due to the risk of radiation to the conceptus (embryo/fetus). A rare case of a successfully recognized and treated pseudoaneurysm (PA) of the abdominal aorta is to be presented. The pseudoaneurysm occurred in the third trimester and had a favorable outcome for the mother and the baby. Emergent abdominal ultrasound (US) is the first modality in diagnostic algorithm for the rupture of aortic aneurysm in a pregnant woman. It provides the most rapid diagnostic information, although intestinal gas and abdominal tenderness may limit its accuracy. To confirm the findings, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or CT angiography (CTA) can be used. In our case, the diagnosis was established using a color Doppler ultrasonography of the abdomen and was later confirmed by a low dose CT scan of the abdominal aorta. MRA in such cases have some disadvantages. At many health centers, the monitoring of patients with acute ruptures is more difficult in the MR suite than at the CT scanner. MRA angiographic images are also subject to degradation by multiple artifacts and the visualization of the distal vasculature is suboptimal and inferior to the one done by CTA. Due to fetal movements, a small quantity of fresh blood can be overlooked by MR. MRA is often not available on a 24-hours basis, and the time required for making a diagnosis can preclude the use of MRA in an unstable patient. For this reason, we used a low dose CTA protocol to confirm the diagnosis. Low dose scanning protocols in CT can obtain sufficient diagnostic information while reducing the risk of radiation. A particular focus is put on the outline of new concepts for dose management and optimization. We used new approaches based on tube current modulation. The birth was induced by an urgent Caesarean section followed by a resection of a pseudoaneurysm and a reconstruction of the aorta with an end-to-end vascular prosthesis. PMID:26898082

  10. A comparison of the accuracy of ultrasound and computed tomography in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain

    Randen, Adrienne van; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (suite G1-227), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lameris, Wytze; Boermeester, Marja A. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Es, H.W. van; Heesewijk, Hans P.M. van [St Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Ramshorst, Bert van [St Antonius Hospital, Department of Surgery, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Hove, Wim ten [Gelre Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Bouma, Willem H. [Gelre Hospitals, Department of Surgery, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Leeuwen, Maarten S. van [University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keulen, Esteban M. van [Tergooi Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Hilversum (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-07-15

    Head-to-head comparison of ultrasound and CT accuracy in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Consecutive patients with abdominal pain for >2 h and <5 days referred for imaging underwent both US and CT by different radiologists/radiological residents. An expert panel assigned a final diagnosis. Ultrasound and CT sensitivity and predictive values were calculated for frequent final diagnoses. Effect of patient characteristics and observer experience on ultrasound sensitivity was studied. Frequent final diagnoses in the 1,021 patients (mean age 47; 55% female) were appendicitis (284; 28%), diverticulitis (118; 12%) and cholecystitis (52; 5%). The sensitivity of CT in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was significantly higher than that of ultrasound: 94% versus 76% (p < 0.01) and 81% versus 61% (p = 0.048), respectively. For cholecystitis, the sensitivity of both was 73% (p = 1.00). Positive predictive values did not differ significantly between ultrasound and CT for these conditions. Ultrasound sensitivity in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was not significantly negatively affected by patient characteristics or reader experience. CT misses fewer cases than ultrasound, but both ultrasound and CT can reliably detect common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Ultrasound sensitivity was largely not influenced by patient characteristics and reader experience. (orig.)

  11. A comparison of the accuracy of ultrasound and computed tomography in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain

    Head-to-head comparison of ultrasound and CT accuracy in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Consecutive patients with abdominal pain for >2 h and <5 days referred for imaging underwent both US and CT by different radiologists/radiological residents. An expert panel assigned a final diagnosis. Ultrasound and CT sensitivity and predictive values were calculated for frequent final diagnoses. Effect of patient characteristics and observer experience on ultrasound sensitivity was studied. Frequent final diagnoses in the 1,021 patients (mean age 47; 55% female) were appendicitis (284; 28%), diverticulitis (118; 12%) and cholecystitis (52; 5%). The sensitivity of CT in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was significantly higher than that of ultrasound: 94% versus 76% (p < 0.01) and 81% versus 61% (p = 0.048), respectively. For cholecystitis, the sensitivity of both was 73% (p = 1.00). Positive predictive values did not differ significantly between ultrasound and CT for these conditions. Ultrasound sensitivity in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was not significantly negatively affected by patient characteristics or reader experience. CT misses fewer cases than ultrasound, but both ultrasound and CT can reliably detect common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Ultrasound sensitivity was largely not influenced by patient characteristics and reader experience. (orig.)

  12. Jejunal diverticulitis: an unusual cause of an intra-abdominal abscess - coronal Computed Tomography reconstruction can aid the diagnosis

    Jim Virjee

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Jejunal diverticulitis is a rare condition that can present with an acute abdomen and be referred for imaging.  We present the case of an elderly patient who at CT was diagnosed with an intra-abdominal abscess involving both jejunum and transverse colon. However, the underlying eitiology was not initially clear until small bowel barium follow-through.Pertinent points regarding CT findings in jejunal diverticulitis are discussed, and practical recommendations in small bowel diverticulum recognition and diagnosis are made. 

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head What is CT Scanning of the ... Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  15. Diagnostic investigation of the abdominal vasculature by means of electron-beam computed tomography; Diagnostik des abdominellen Gefaesssystems mit der Elektronenstrahlcomputertomographie (EBT)

    Vogl, T.J.; Diebold, T. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Hammerstingl, R.; Balzer, J.O.; Hidajat, N.; Beier, J.; Felix, R. [Strahlen- und Poliklinik, Humboldt Univ. Berlin Charite, Campus Virchow (Germany); Zipfel, B. [Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin (Germany). Abt. fuer Herz-, Thorax und Gefaesschirurgie; Scheinert, D.; Vogt, A. [Abt. fuer Innere Medizin, Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Charite, Campus Virchow, Berlin Univ. (Germany)

    1998-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of electron-beam computed tomography (EBT) in the pre- and postinterventional assessment of vascular abdominal pathologies. Results: In 30 to 40 TIPS patients, identical results were found with EBT, Doppler sonography and/or DSA. Reduced perfusions of the TIPS, which were subsequently confirmed by DSA, could not be shown with EBT in 3 patients. Nine of 12 patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease and angiographically proven stenosis (>75%) showed a reduced and delayed peak density of the time-density curves. The quantification of arterial stenosis, however, did not follow the angiographic values. In all patients with the implanted bifurcation stents, EBT could correctly exclude a leakage of the stent. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Fragestellung: Die vorliegende Studie untersucht die Wertigkeit der Elektronenstrahlcomputertomographie (EBT) bei der prae- und postinterventionellen Abklaerung von Pathologien des arteriellen und portalvenoesen Gefaesssystems. Ergebnisse: Bei 30/40 TIPS-Patienten stimmte die EBT mit der Dopplersonographie bzw. der DSA ueberein, bei 3 Patienten konnte eine dopplersonographisch nachgewiesene und interventionell bestaetigte Minderperfusion des TIPS im EBT nicht diagnostiziert werden. Bei 9/12 Patienten mit angiographisch nachgewiesenen Gefaessstenosen (>75%) konnte eine Abflachung und ein verzoegerter Anstieg der Zeit-Dichte-Kurven nachgewiesen werden. Die Quantifizierung der Stenose mit den Zeit-Dichte-Kurven zeigte jedoch nur eine eingeschraenkte Korrelation mit der i.a.-DSA. Bei den Patienten mit endovaskulaer implantierter Aortenprothese konnte in allen Faellen eine komplette Ausschaltung des Aortenaneurysmas nachgewiesen werden. (orig./AJ)

  16. Quantification of aortic distensibility in abdominal aortic aneurysm using ECG-gated multi-detector computed tomography

    To detect distensibility changes that might be an indicator for an increased risk of rupture, cross-sectional area changes of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) have been determined using ECG-gated CT. Distensibility measurements of the aorta were performed in 67 patients with AAA. Time-resolved images were acquired with a four detector-row CT system using a modified CT-angiography protocol. Pulsatility-related cross-sectional area changes were calculated above and at AAA level by semiautomatic segmentation; distensibility values were obtained using additional systemic blood pressure measurements. Values were compared for small Oe 5 cm (n = 23) aneurysms. The aorta could be segmented successfully in all patients. Upstream AAA distensibility D was significantly higher than at AAA level for both groups: means above AAA (at AAA) Dabove = (1.3 ±0.8) .10 -5 Pa -1 (DAAA (0.6 ±0.5) .10 -5 Pa -1) t-test pD<0.0001. Differences of the distensibility between smaller and larger aneurysms were not found to be significant. Distensibility can be measured non-invasively with ECG-gated CT. The reduction of distensibility within aneurysms compared to normal proximal aorta is subtle; the lack of difference between both small and large aneurysms suggests that this reduction occurs early in the aneurysm's development. Hence, reduced distensibility might be a predictive parameter in patients with high risk of aortic disease. (orig.)

  17. Computer tomographic findings in pelvic and abdominal trauma

    Twenty-two patients with trauma to the pelvis and abdomen were examined by computer tomography. Subcapsular haematomas, haematomas and rupture of organs, intra- and retroperitoneal haematomas and pelvic fractures could be reliably diagnosed in this way. Serial observations on the tissue density of an haematoma allows one to judge its age. Lack of contrast enhancement of an haematoma makes the injection of contrast a useful test. Computer tomography has reduced the indications for angiography in blunt abdominal trauma. (orig.)

  18. Relationships between abdominal fat distribution assessed by computer tomography, body composition, serum lipids, plasma glucose and cardiorespiratory functions in obese children

    Visceral abdominal fat to subcutaneous abdominal fat ratio (V/S ratio) is a predictor for cardiac disease, metabolic disease, and hypertension in obese adults. This study determined the histopathological value of V/S ratio in obese children using computed tomography (CT). The subjects were 37 boys and 26 girls with overweight by more than 20%, whose ages ranged from 3 to 16 years. Although the percentage of standard body weight (SBW), percentage of body fat (BF), and body mass index (BMI) were correlated with each other, there was no correlation between the V/S ratio and the three predictors. Thus, the V/S ratio is completely different from the other obesity predictors in children. The V/S ratio in children of 20% or more overweight of SBW was 0.28±0.11. The V/S ratio of 0.4, used as an obesity predictor in adults, was not considered suitable in the case of children. Liver function, serum lipid levels, and serum glucose correlated with the percentage of SBW, BMI, and the percentage of BF, but not correlated with the V/S ratio. According to the V/S ratio, the patients were divided into the group of V/S ratio of less than 0.28 (group I, n=34) and the group of V/S ratio of 0.28 or more (group II, n=27). There was no significant difference in age, percentage of SBW, BMI, and percentage of BF. Triglyceride was significantly higher in group II than group I, but there was no significant difference in plasma glucose and other lipids, body composition, blood pressure or respiratory function. Of note, the V/S ratio of 0.4 or more was seen in only 9 of the 61 children (14.7%). These findings suggest that the V/S ratio for children is a predictor different from that in the case of adults. (N.K.)

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? What are ...

  20. Computed tomography prospective study of pleural-pulmonary changes after abdominal surgery : assessment of associated risk factors; Estudo prospectivo por tomografia computadorizada das alteracoes pleuro-pulmonares apos cirurgia abdominal: avaliacao dos fatores de risco associados

    Rossi, Luis Antonio [Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Medicas e Biologicas]. E-mail: luizrossimd@uol.com.br; Bromberg, Sansom Henrique [Instituto de Assistencia Medica ao Servidor Publico Estadual de Sao Paulo (IAMSPE), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Curso de Pos-graduacao em Gastroenterologia Cirurgica

    2005-07-01

    Postoperative pleural-pulmonary changes (PPC) are very common following elective abdominal surgery, resolving without clinical manifestations in most patients. The incidence and risk factors associated are unknown. Objective: to determine the incidence of PPC and possible association with risk factors using computerized tomography (CT). Material and method: thirty seven patients submitted to elective abdominal surgery were prospectively analyzed using CT performed in the preoperative period and 48 hours after surgery. The PPC was scored from 0 to III. The risk factors evaluated were: age, sex, obesity, smoking history, alcoholism, comorbid conditions, cancer, ASA classification, duration of surgery, surgical incision type and number of days of hospitalization. Results: Pleura effusion was detected by CT in 70.3% (26/37) of the patients and pulmonary atelectasis in 75.5% (28/37). Grade I and II PPC was found in 59.5% (22/37) of the patients and grade III in 21.6% (8/37). Two (5.4%) of these patients developed serious pulmonary complications whereas one patient died. Surgery due to cancer, class ASA >2, longitudinal incision and > 15 cm showed statistical significance and were associated with pleural effusion. The hospitalization was over 2.4 longer for patients with PPC. Conclusion: PPC is frequently seen in patients submitted to abdominal surgery. The use of the CT for the detection of pulmonary atelectasis and pleural effusion proved to be effective. Most cases of PPC are self-limited, resolving without symptoms. (author)

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    ... Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  2. Measuring Abdominal Circumference and Skeletal Muscle From a Single Cross-Sectional Computed Tomography Image: A Step-by-Step Guide for Clinicians Using National Institutes of Health ImageJ.

    Gomez-Perez, Sandra L; Haus, Jacob M; Sheean, Patricia; Patel, Bimal; Mar, Winnie; Chaudhry, Vivek; McKeever, Liam; Braunschweig, Carol

    2016-03-01

    Diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans provide numerous opportunities for body composition analysis, including quantification of abdominal circumference, abdominal adipose tissues (subcutaneous, visceral, and intermuscular), and skeletal muscle (SM). CT scans are commonly performed for diagnostic purposes in clinical settings, and methods for estimating abdominal circumference and whole-body SM mass from them have been reported. A supine abdominal circumference is a valid measure of waist circumference (WC). The valid correlation between a single cross-sectional CT image (slice) at third lumbar (L3) for abdominal SM and whole-body SM is also well established. Sarcopenia refers to the age-associated decreased in muscle mass and function. A single dimensional definition of sarcopenia using CT images that includes only assessment of low whole-body SM has been validated in clinical populations and significantly associated with negative outcomes. However, despite the availability and precision of SM data from CT scans and the relationship between these measurements and clinical outcomes, they have not become a routine component of clinical nutrition assessment. Lack of time, training, and expense are potential barriers that prevent clinicians from fully embracing this technique. This tutorial presents a systematic, step-by-step guide to quickly quantify abdominal circumference as a proxy for WC and SM using a cross-sectional CT image from a regional diagnostic CT scan for clinical identification of sarcopenia. Multiple software options are available, but this tutorial uses ImageJ, a free public-domain software developed by the National Institutes of Health. PMID:26392166

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Please note ... you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Please note ... you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ...

  7. Tomografia computadorizada de abdome normal: estudo retrospectivo das angulações dos hilos renais Normal abdominal computed tomography: a retrospective study of renal hila angles

    Makoto Sakate

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Obter valores da angulação média dos hilos renais em relação ao plano horizontal, traçado sobre músculos eretores da espinha direito e esquerdo, considerando como parâmetro de referência para as medidas das angulações o centro da coluna vertebral lombar. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram analisados 250 exames de tomografia computadorizada de abdomes considerados normais de indivíduos de ambos os sexos, sendo 128 masculinos (idade média de 52,45 ± 17,42 anos e 122 femininos (idade média de 54,39 ± 18,27 anos, totalizando 500 hilos renais estudados. A angulação média de cada hilo renal em relação ao plano horizontal foi obtida, sendo considerados sempre os ângulos agudos. RESULTADOS: O estudo comparativo entre os sexos mostrou que não houve diferença estatisticamente significante em relação aos ângulos agudos dos hilos renais. A análise estatística mostrou, com intervalo de confiança de 95%, para média do ângulo direito os limites de 40,40° e 44,54° e para o hilo renal esquerdo os limites de 39,91° e 43,23°. CONCLUSÃO: Os hilos renais, independentemente do sexo, apresentam angulações semelhantes. Valores angulares maiores terão anomalia de hiper-rotação ou hiper-rotação exagerada e valores menores terão anomalia de rotação incompleta ou rotação invertida.OBJECTIVE: To obtain mean angulation values for renal hila in relation to the horizontal plane traced over the right and left spinal erector muscles, considering the center of the lumbar vertebral spine as a parameter for measuring the renal hila angles. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors have analyzed 250 abdominal computed tomography studies of both male and female healthy individuals (128 men with mean age 52.45 ± 17.42 years, and 122 women with mean age 54.39 ± 18.27 years, corresponding to 500 renal hila evaluated. The mean angulation of each hilum in relation to the horizontal plane was obtained taking acute angles into consideration

  8. Systematic review: Use of ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis, assessment of activity and abdominal complications of Crohn?s disease

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Backgroud: Cross-sectional imaging techniques, including ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are increasingly used for evaluation of Crohn?s disease (CD). Aim: To perform an assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of cross-sectional imaging techniques for diagnosis of CD, evaluation of disease extension and activity, and diagnosis of complications, and to provide recommendations for their optimal use. Methods: Relevant ...

  9. Cervical computed tomography

    This book describes the possibilities of cervical computed tomography with the apparatus available at present. The normal anatomy of the cervical region as it appears in computed tomography is described with special regard to its compartimental structure and functional aspects; this is supplemented by anatomically normal measures obtained from cervical computed tomograms of 60 healthy individuals of different age and both sexes. The morphology of cervical anomalies obtained via CT and of the various acquired cervical disease processes is discussed and illustrated by means of the authors' own observations; the diagnostic value of the findings obtained by CT is discussed, a diagnosis is set up. (orig./MG)

  10. The Different Volume Effects of Small-Bowel Toxicity During Pelvic Irradiation Between Gynecologic Patients With and Without Abdominal Surgery: A Prospective Study With Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of abdominal surgery on the volume effects of small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation in patients with gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: From May 2003 through November 2006, 80 gynecologic patients without (Group I) or with (Group II) prior abdominal surgery were analyzed. We used a computed tomography (CT) planning system to measure the small-bowel volume and dosimetry. We acquired the range of small-bowel volume in 10% (V10) to 100% (V100) of dose, at 10% intervals. The onset and grade of diarrhea during whole-pelvic irradiation were recorded as small-bowel toxicity up to 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions. Results: The volume effect of Grade 2-3 diarrhea existed from V10 to V100 in Group I patients and from V60 to V100 in Group II patients on univariate analyses. The V40 of Group I and the V100 of Group II achieved most statistical significance. The mean V40 was 281 ± 27 cm3 and 489 ± 34 cm3 (p 3 and 132 ± 19 cm3 (p = 0.003). Multivariate analyses revealed that V40 (p = 0.001) and V100 (p = 0.027) were independent factors for the development of Grade 2-3 diarrhea in Groups I and II, respectively. Conclusions: Gynecologic patients without and with abdominal surgery have different volume effects on small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation. Low-dose volume can be used as a predictive index of Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients without abdominal surgery. Full-dose volume is more important than low-dose volume for Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients with abdominal surgery

  11. Neutron Computed Tomography

    Computed tomography is a non-destructive testing method which can visualize cross-section of materials based on their nuclear characteristics. In the previous work, X-ray was used as its radiation media. The aim of this experiment was to improve the computed tomography technique using neutron beam. For reconstructing the cross-section image of materials, a filtered back projection was used. Result indicated that a minimum hole shown was 3 mm in diameter using a black and white presentation. While using eight colour levels, a hole of 2 mm in diameter could be seen clearly. It is expected that neutron computed tomography can improve the results of non-destructive testing. (author). 5 refs., 6 figs

  12. The ACTIVE trial: Comparison of the effects on renal function of lomeprol-400 and lodixanol-320 in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing abdominal computed tomography

    Morcos, S.K.; Erley, C.M.; Grazioli, L.;

    2008-01-01

    forty-eight patients with moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease, ie, serum creatinine (SCr) >= 1.5 mg/dL (132.6 mu mol/L) and/or calculated creatinine clearance (CrCl) < 60 mL/min, undergoing contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography of the liver were randomized to equi-iodine doses (40 gI...... assessed. A Renal Safety Review Board comprised 3 medical experts reviewed the renal safety data, demographics, medical history, CIN risk factors, concomitant medications, and hydration status of each subject in a blinded manner. Results: The 2 study groups were comparable with regard to age, gender...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head What is CT Scanning of the Head? What are some ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ... used in your exam. You should inform your physician of all medications you are taking and if ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ... used in your exam. You should inform your physician of all medications you are taking and if ...

  16. Chest computed tomography

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret;

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ... CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses ... visibility of certain tissues or blood vessels. A nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) line ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  1. Epiploic appendicitis - ultrasonography and computed tomography findings

    Epiploic appendicitis is an uncommon inflammatory condition, which is presently better diagnosed by current imaging methods such as computed tomography and ultrasonography that allow a non-invasive and efficient diagnostic approach. The author studied 6 patients with epiploic appendicitis. The patients were submitted to computed tomography that showed paracolic oval lesions of 1 to 2 cm of diameter, fat attenuation and a thin peripheral hyperdense rim associated with adjacent fat stranding. Ultrasound examination performed in two patients showed hyperechoic ovoid noncompressible masses at the site of maximum abdominal tenderness. (author)

  2. Quando a fase de equilíbrio pode ser suprimida nos exames de tomografia computadorizada de abdome? What is the real role of the equilibrium phase in abdominal computed tomography?

    Priscila Silveira Salvadori

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a necessidade de realização da fase de equilíbrio nos exames de tomografia computadorizada de abdome. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Realizou-se estudo retrospectivo, transversal e observacional, avaliando 219 exames consecutivos de tomografia computadorizada de abdome com contraste intravenoso, realizados num período de três meses, com diversas indicações clínicas. Para cada exame foram emitidos dois pareceres, um avaliando o exame sem a fase de equilíbrio (primeira análise e o outro avaliando todas as fases em conjunto (segunda análise. Ao final de cada avaliação, foi estabelecido se houve mudança nos diagnósticos principais e secundários, entre a primeira e a segunda análise. Foi utilizada a extensão do teste exato de Fisher para avaliar a modificação dos diagnósticos principais (p 0,999. Com relação aos diagnósticos secundários, cinco exames (2,3% foram modificados. CONCLUSÃO: Para indicações clínicas como estadiamento tumoral, abdome agudo e pesquisa de coleção abdominal, a fase de equilíbrio não acrescenta contribuição diagnóstica expressiva, podendo ser suprimida dos protocolos de exame.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role of the equilibrium phase in abdominal computed tomography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study reviewed 219 consecutive contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography images acquired in a three-month period, for different clinical indications. For each study, two reports were issued - one based on the initial analysis of non-contrast-enhanced, arterial and portal phases only (first analysis, and a second reading of these phases added to the equilibrium phase (second analysis. At the end of both readings, differences between primary and secondary diagnoses were pointed out and recorded, in order to measure the impact of suppressing the equilibrium phase on the clinical outcome for each of the patients. The extension of the exact Fisher

  3. Computed tomography in hepatic trauma

    Twenty-five patients with hepatic injury from blunt upper abdominal trauma were examined by computed tomography (CT). The spectrum of CT findings was recorded, and the size of the hepatic laceration and the associated hemoperitoneum were correlated with the mode of therapy used in each case (operative vs nonoperative). While the need for surgery correlated roughly with the size of the hepatic laceration, the size of the associated hemoperitoneum was an important modifying factor. Fifteen patients with hepatic lacerations but little or no hemoperitoneum were managed nonoperatively. CT seems to have significant advantages over hepatic scintigraphy, angiography, and diagnostic peritoneal lavage. By combining inforamtion on the clinical state of the patient and CT findings, therapy of hepatic injury can be individualized and the incidence of nontherapeutic laparotomies decreased

  4. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY PERITONEAL CANCER INDEX

    Tiutiuca RC

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal surface malignancy results from seeding of gastrointestinal cancer or abdomino-pelvic sarcoma, or it can occur as a primary disease, such as peritoneal mesothelioma. In the past, this clinical situation was treated only with palliative intent. Actual treatment options for surgical management uses cytoreductive surgery which combines peritonectomy and visceral resection in an effort to remove all visible cancer within the abdomen and pelvis. Then the peritoneal cavity is flooded with chemotherapy solution. To select patients for this agressive approach quantitative prognostic indicators for carcinomatosis must be evaluated. The peritoneal cancer index (PCI is a synthesis of the distribution of tumor and a lesion size score. In such conditions abdominal medium contrast computed-tomography it is very helpful in identification of neoplasic implants.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  6. Abdominal anatomy in computer tomograms

    Computerized tomography leads to exact visualization for it adds the third dimension to the ordinary two-dimensional X-ray picture. This applies in particular to the visualization of the liver, the spleen, and the kidneys; it does not require the additional use of drugs or contrast media. In the case of the pancreas, however, we must take into consideration that possible variations in its position might call for additional examination methods such as the oblique positioning of the patient. The stomach, the small intestine, and the large intestine can be visualized by using a solution fo contrast medium in low concentration. Intravenous injection lead to visualization of the gallbladder, the bile duct, the ureters, and the urinary bladder; the retroperitoneal lymphnodes can be demonstrated by lymphography. The use of these additional methods is of particular value in the case of nonobese patients. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MB

  7. Computed Tomography Status

    Hansche, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  8. Computed Tomography. Chapter 11

    After its clinical introduction in 1971, computed tomography (CT) developed from an X ray modality that was limited to axial imaging of the brain in neuroradiology into a versatile 3-D whole body imaging modality for a wide range of applications, including oncology, vascular radiology, cardiology, traumatology and interventional radiology. CT is applied for diagnosis and follow-up studies of patients, for planning of radiotherapy, and even for screening of healthy subpopulations with specific risk factors

  9. Computed tomography of intussusception in adult

    Intussusception is rare in adult and usually caused by organic lesions, although there is a significant number of so-called idiopathic cases. The diagnosis of intussusception have been made by plain abdomen, barium enema and small bowel series. But recently ultrasound and computed tomography make a contribution to diagnose intussusception. Computed tomography is not the primary means for evaluating a gastrointestinal tract abnormality but also provides valuable information in evaluating disorders affecting the hollow viscera of the alimentary tract. Computed tomography image of intussusception demonstrates a whirl like pattern of bowel loops separated by fatty stripe correlating of the intestinal walls. Abdominal ultrasonogram was used as the initial diagnostic test in 2 cases out of total 4 cases, with abdominal mass of unknown cause. It revealed a typical pattern, composed of a round or oval mass with central dense echoes and peripheral poor echoes. We report 4 all cases of intussusception in adult who were performed by computed tomography and/or ultrasound. All cases were correlated with barium enema examination and/or surgical reports.

  10. Computed tomography of intussusception in adult

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Ahn, Byeong Yeob; Cha, Soon Joo; Seol, Hae Young; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-12-15

    Intussusception is rare in adult and usually caused by organic lesions, although there is a significant number of so-called idiopathic cases. The diagnosis of intussusception have been made by plain abdomen, barium enema and small bowel series. But recently ultrasound and computed tomography make a contribution to diagnose intussusception. Computed tomography is not the primary means for evaluating a gastrointestinal tract abnormality but also provides valuable information in evaluating disorders affecting the hollow viscera of the alimentary tract. Computed tomography image of intussusception demonstrates a whirl like pattern of bowel loops separated by fatty stripe correlating of the intestinal walls. Abdominal ultrasonogram was used as the initial diagnostic test in 2 cases out of total 4 cases, with abdominal mass of unknown cause. It revealed a typical pattern, composed of a round or oval mass with central dense echoes and peripheral poor echoes. We report 4 all cases of intussusception in adult who were performed by computed tomography and/or ultrasound. All cases were correlated with barium enema examination and/or surgical reports.

  11. Lymphography and computed tomography of abdominal nodes in newly diagnosed patients with Hodgkin's disease in clinical stage I-III

    Neumann, C.H.

    1986-10-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, 80 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) in clinical Stage I-III had computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis and lymphography (LAG) prior to staging laparatomy with multiple lymph node biopsies at Stanford University Medical Center. There were 224 biopsied nodal sites. The sensitivity and specificity for CT to determine the status of biopsied paraortic and iliac nodes was .61 and .91 vs. .94 and .90 for LAG. CT appeared of even lower sensitivity (.13) in evaluating splenic hilar, celiac axis and portal nodes. Including all biopsy proven subdiaphragmatic nodal sites, CT's sensitivity to diagnose the presence of subdiaphragmatic adenopathy was .38 vs. .52 in LAG. Assessment of the final pathological stage was more successful by LAG (.61) than by CT (.49). Positive and negative predictive values of both tests indicate higher reliability of LAG results as regards individual intraabdominal nodes (LAG .71, .98 vs. CT .58, .86), the entire subdiaphragmatic nodal area (LAG .79, .77 vs. CT .61, .71) and prediction of final pathological stage. LAG appeared to be the more useful test during initial staging of newly diagnosed and untreated patients with HD. None of the test for itself or in combination can replace laparatomy when exact information is necessary for further clinical decisions.

  12. Usefulness of the Bolus-Tracking Baseline Scan for the Diagnosis of Hepatic Steatosis in Abdominal Computed Tomography: A Feasibility Study

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common pathology in western societies. Unenhanced computed tomography (CT) of the liver is a valuable tool in determining the presence of steatosis hepatis, but in most departments standard CT protocols of abdomen often do not include unenhanced scans anymore. In a small series of 22 patients the liver density was measured in the acquired low-dose baseline scan for bolus tracking and was compared to the measurement in a regular unenhanced CT scan of the upper abdomen. The mean difference between the unenhanced CT scan and the low-dose baseline scan was 3.4 HU (range 0.2–8.6 HU); the difference between these two scans was 5 HU or smaller in 82% of the patients. There was a significant difference between the two used CT scanners; this has to be kept in mind before implementing this approach into daily practice. All but one patient with fatty liver disease on unenhanced CT were diagnosed using the baseline scan. The baseline scan for bolus tracking may be useful for the diagnosis or in the followup of fatty liver disease

  13. Positron emission tomography (PET) evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)

    SakalihasanN, Natzi; Van Damme, Hendrik; Gomez, P.; RIGO, PIERRE; Lapiere, C. M.; Nusgens, Betty; Limet, Raymond

    2002-01-01

    Background: aneurysmal disease is associated with all inflammatory Cell infiltrate and enzymatic degradation of the vessel wall. Aim of the study: to detect increased metabolic activity in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) by means of positron emission tomography (PET-imaging). Study design: twenty-six patients with AAA underwent PET-imaging Results: in tell patients, PET-imaging revealed increased, fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18-FDG) uptake at the level of the aneurysm. Patients with positive PET-i...

  14. Quantitative Computed Tomography

    Balda, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a wide-spread medical imaging modality. Traditional CT yields information on a patient's anatomy in form of slice images or volume data. Hounsfield Units (HU) are used to quantify the imaged tissue properties. Due to the polychromatic nature of X-rays in CT, the HU values for a specific tissue depend on its density and composition but also on CT system parameters and settings and the surrounding materials. The main objective of Quantitative CT (QCT) is measuring ch...

  15. Stored Luminescence Computed Tomography

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The phosphor nanoparticles made of doped semiconductors, pre-excited by well-collimated X-ray radiation, were recently reported for their light emission upon NIR light stimulation. The characteristics of X-ray energy storage and NIR stimulated emission is highly desirable to design targeting probes and improve molecular and cellular imaging. Here we propose stored luminescence computed tomography (SLCT), perform realistic numerical simulation, and demonstrate a much-improved spatial resolution in a preclinical research context. The future opportunities are also discussed along this direction.

  16. Computed tomography device

    A computed tomography device comprising a subtraction unit which obtains differential data strings representing the difference between each time-serial projection data string of a group of projection data strings corresponding to a prospective reconstruction image generated by projection data strings acquired by a data acquisition system, a convolution unit which convolves each time-serial projection data string of the group of projection data strings corresponding to the prospective reconstruction image, and a back-projection unit which back-projects the convolved data strings

  17. Proposta para padronização do relatório de tomografia computadorizada nos aneurismas da aorta abdominal A proposal for standardizing computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Fabiola Goda Torlai; Gustavo S. Portes Meirelles; Fausto Miranda Jr; José Honório A.P. da Fonseca; Sérgio Ajzen; Giuseppe D'Ippolito

    2006-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Propor um modelo de padronização de relatório para aneurisma da aorta abdominal na tomografia computadorizada. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram realizadas, no período de abril a outubro de 2004, entrevistas com integrantes da Disciplina de Cirurgia Vascular da nossa instituição, para elaboração de um modelo de padronização de relatório de tomografia computadorizada para o estudo do aneurisma da aorta abdominal. A partir deste modelo foi elaborado um questionário, enviado a nove outros cir...

  18. Computed tomography of electronics

    Bossi, Richard H.; Kruse, Robert J.; Knutson, Benjamin W.

    1989-12-01

    The application of Computed Tomography (CT) and laminography was tested on a variety of electronic components. The effort was performed as a preliminary testing task assignment in the Advanced Development of X ray Computed Tomography Application program. A key area for testing was printed circuit boards for the inspection of solder bonds and in particular for leadless chip carrier devices. During the course of the task assignment several other categories of electronic devices were examined including transformers, connectors, switches from solution and contrast sensitivity phantoms developed for the programs were used to establish quantitative measures of capability used to generate images. This preliminary testing of electronics lead to the conclusion that higher resolution CT scanning is needed to resolve details of interest. CT testing on commercially available system could resolve high contrast details in the range of 2 to 4 lp/mm; however, in many electronic components finer resolution is needed to detect microcracking, voiding and other features. Further testing on high resolution system is recommended. Two areas of immediate potential economic payback for electronics inspection were identified; the inspection of high volume printed circuit board production using high speed laminography and nondestructive failure analysis studies components using high-resolution CT.

  19. Radiation dose and imaging quality of abdominal computed tomography before and scan protocol adjustment: Single-institution experience in three years

    To compare radiation dose and image quality of abdominal CT for patients who underwent repeated CT examinations before and after adjustment of scan protocol. We compared radiation dose and image quality of repeated abdominal CT scans (at three-year-interval) of 50 patients with chronic liver disease, 50 patients with early gastric cancer, and 50 patients with uterine cancer. To reduce radiation dose, we optimized CT protocols by omitting unnecessary pre-contrast phase, reducing kVp, and setting higher noise index. Data of dose reports were collected. Objective image quality was evaluated for noise level, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and contrast noise ratio (CNR). For subjective image quality, we evaluated image noise, contrast, and overall diagnostic acceptability. The mean values of dose length product of 2011 CT scans compared to those of 2008 CT scans were 27.6% to 45.7%. The image noise level, SNR, and CNR were significantly (p < 0.05) worse in 2011 CT scans compared to 2008 CT scans. For subjective image quality, image noise was also significantly (p < 0.05) worse in 2011. However, CNR and diagnostic acceptability showed variable results. No CT scans were considered as unacceptable image.We modified abdominal CT protocols to reduce radiation exposure while trying to maintain diagnostic acceptability.

  20. 小儿腹部Burkitt淋巴瘤结外侵犯的MSCT表现%Multislice spiral computed tomography manifestations of extranodal involvement in pediatric abdominal Burkitt lymphoma

    霍爱华; 彭芸; 路娣; 程华; 于彤; 宋蕾; 刘玥; 温洋; 孙国强

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the multislice spiral CT (MSCT) manifestations of extra-nodal involvement in pediatric abdominal Burkitt lymphoma. Methods: The MSCT materials of pathology proved abdominal Burkitt lymphoma in 22 cases were retrospectively analyzed. Results : Multiple extranodal organs of abdomen and pelvis were frequently invloved in Burkitt lymphoma, including solid organs (n=8) and hollow organs of the gastrointestinal tract (n= 21). The imaging manifestations were mostly presented as homogeneous and mildly enhanced solid mass, but hemorrhage and necrosis were seldom assessed, calcification was rare. Diffuse omental thickening and ascites were frequently revealed with infiltration of distal ileum and multiple nodular lesions of pancreas as the most common. Conclusion : Multiple intra-abdominal and pelvic extranodal organs are commonly involved in pediatric abdominal Burkitt lymphoma with certain imaging characteristics.%目的:探讨儿童腹部Burkitt淋巴瘤结外侵犯的MSCT表现及其诊断价值.方法:回顾性分析本院22例经病理证实的Burkitt琳巴瘸的腹部MSCT资料,对其结外病变进行分类和影像学表现分析.结果:Burkitt淋巴瘤可侵犯腹盆腔的多个结外脏器,包括腹部实质脏嚣(8/22)和胃肠道(21/22).痛变多表现为轻度强化的密度均匀的实性肿物,出血、坏死少见,钙化罕见;常伴肠系膜及腹膜后多个肿大淋巴蛄、大网膜广泛增厚或腹腔积液,以回肠远端浸润型和胰腺多发结节型曩多见.结论:Burkitt淋巴瘤常同时侵犯腹盆腔多个结外脏嚣,儿童Burkitt淋巴瘤腹部结外侵犯的MSCT表现有一定特征性.

  1. Computed tomography in neurocysticercosis

    Three hundred and fifty seven computed tomography (CT) from 100 different patients with neurocysticercosis (NC) were studied between 1979 and 1988. All patients were treated with praziquantel (PZQ). A new classification attempting to recognize the CT evolution profile in NC as well as assigning a possible link between CT findings and biological conditions of cysts is evaluated. It was possible to conclude that: intact cysts remain unchanged in consecutive CTs by 11 months and exhibit signs of degeneration in about 18 months after PZQ drug therapy; degenerating cysts can be detected by 10.5 months, disappear in 11 months and become nodular calcifications in about 25 months. Therefore, a time period of at least 36 months can be estimated for the complete evolution profile of cysts in the brain parenchyma. (author)

  2. Multislice computed tomography coronary angiography

    Cademartiri, Filippo

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Computed Tomography (CT) imaging is also known as "CAT scanning" (Computed Axial Tomography). Tomography is from the Greek word "tomos" meaning "slice" or "section" and "graphia" meaning "describing". CT was invented in 1972 by British engineer Godfrey Hounsfield of EMI Laboratories, England, and independently by South Mrican born physicist Allan Cormack of Tufts University, Massachusetts.1 • 2 Hounsfield was later awarded the Nobel Peace Prize and honoured with K...

  3. Computed Tomography Measuring Inside Machines

    Wozniak, James F.; Scudder, Henry J.; Anders, Jeffrey E.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomography applied to obtain approximate measurements of radial distances from centerline of turbopump to leading edges of diffuser vanes in turbopump. Use of computed tomography has significance beyond turbopump application: example of general concept of measuring internal dimensions of assembly of parts without having to perform time-consuming task of taking assembly apart and measuring internal parts on coordinate-measuring machine.

  4. COMPARATIVE ROLE AND EVALUATION OF ULTRASOUND AND MULTISLICE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN THE GRADING OF HEMOPERITONEUM IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA AND ITS CORRELATION WITH THE GRADING OF ORGAN INJURY

    Kunwarpal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: 1. To assess the role of Ultrasound (US and Multislice Computed Tomography (MSCT in detecting hemoperitoneum in patients with acute blunt abdominal trauma. 2. To study the use of US and MSCT in grading of hemoperitoneum in blunt abdominal trauma patients. 3. To compare the US and MSCT grading of hemoperitoneum with the grading of organ injury. 4. To compare and statistically analyze the spectrum of findings observed in each modality. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted at advanced diagnostics and institute of imaging , Amritsar. The study comprised of 50 patients who were stable enough to undergo both US and CT scans.US was preceded by MSCT in most of the patients and the time gap between the imaging modalities was less than 1 hour to make the study comparable. TECHNIQUES ADOPTED : 1. US was performed on Versa plus (Siemens and Xario (Toshiba with Cardiac , 3.5 - 5 Mhz - Convex and 5 - 7.5 Mhz - Line ar probes. Particular attention was paid to the amount of free fluid in the abdomen and pelvis. 2. MSCT was performed with MSCT Volume Zoom (Siemens Forchheim Germany AG. 500 - 1000cc of water orally or through nasogastric tube was given 15 - 20 minutes before the study , followed by 120cc I/V contrast at the rate of 2 - 3ml/second using power injector. Parameters used: Single breath hold ; A. 165 mAs . B. 120 kvp . C. Scan delay - 40 seconds . D. Collimation - 4x2.5mm . E. Pitch - 5mm . Following findings were observed : a. Presence of peritoneal fluid. B. Any tear or hematoma in the solid abdominal organs like spleen and liver. C. Status of hollow viscera like small bowel , large bowel and urinary bladder. Hemoperitoneum was scored on both US and MSCT. Visceral injuries were graded according to O.I.S grading system. Score was correlated with the underlying organ injury and the management of the patient. US scoring (Table A and MSCT quantification of hemoperitoneum was done. (Table B Location of hemoperitoneum . A

  5. Local diagnostic reference level based on size-specific dose estimates: Assessment of pediatric abdominal/pelvic computed tomography at a Japanese national children's hospital

    Imai, Rumi; Miyazaki, Osamu; Kurosawa, Hideo; Nosaka, Shunsuke [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Horiuchi, Tetsuya [Osaka University, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Course of Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-03-01

    A child's body size is not accurately reflected by volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and dose-length product (DLP). Size-specific dose estimation (SSDE) was introduced recently as a new index of radiation dose. However, it has not yet been established as a diagnostic reference level (DRL). To calculate the SSDE of abdominal/pelvic CT and compare the SSDE with CTDI{sub vol}. To calculate the DRLs of CTDI{sub vol} and SSDE. Our hypotheses are: SSDE values will be greater than CTDI{sub vol}, and our DRL will be smaller than the known DRLs of other countries. The CTDI{sub vol} and DLP of 117 children who underwent abdominal/pelvic CT were collected retrospectively. The SSDE was calculated from the sum of the lateral and anteroposterior diameters. The relationships between body weight and effective diameter and between effective diameter and CTDI{sub vol}/SSDE were compared. Further, the local DRL was compared with the DRLs of other countries. Body weight and effective diameter and effective diameter and SSDE were positively correlated. In children ages 1, 5 and 10 years, the SSDE is closer to the exposure dose of CTDI{sub vol} for the 16-cm phantom, while in children ages 15 years, the SSDE falls between CTDI{sub vol} for the 16-cm phantom and that for the 32-cm phantom. The local DRL was lower than those of other countries. With SSDE, the radiation dose increased with increasing body weight. Since SSDE takes body size into account, it proved to be a useful indicator for estimating the exposure dose. (orig.)

  6. Impact of contrast injection and stent-graft implantation on reproducibility of volume measurements in semiautomated segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysm on computed tomography

    Morin-Roy, Florence; Hadjadj, Sofiane; Thomas, Olivier; Yang, Dan Yang [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CHUM), Hopital Notre-Dame, Department of Radiology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kauffmann, Claude [University of Montreal, Centre de Recherche, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CRCHUM), Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Tang, An [University of Montreal, Centre de Recherche, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CRCHUM), Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CHUM), Hopital Saint-Luc, Department of Radiology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Piche, Nicolas [Object Research System, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Elkouri, Stephane [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CHUM), Hopital Hotel-Dieu, Department of Vascular surgery, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Therasse, Eric [University of Montreal, Centre de Recherche, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CRCHUM), Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CHUM), Hopital Hotel-Dieu, Department of Radiology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Soulez, Gilles [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CHUM), Hopital Notre-Dame, Department of Radiology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); University of Montreal, Centre de Recherche, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal (CRCHUM), Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    To assess the impact of contrast injection and stent-graft implantation on feasibility, accuracy, and reproducibility of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) volume and maximal diameter (D-max) measurements using segmentation software. CT images of 80 subjects presenting AAA were divided into four equal groups: with or without contrast enhancement, and with or without stent-graft implantation. Semiautomated software was used to segment the aortic wall, once by an expert and twice by three readers. Volume and D-max reproducibility was estimated by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), and accuracy was estimated between the expert and the readers by mean relative errors. All segmentations were technically successful. The mean AAA volume was 167.0 ± 82.8 mL and the mean D-max 55.0 ± 10.6 mm. Inter- and intraobserver ICCs for volume and D-max measurements were greater than 0.99. Mean relative errors between readers varied between -1.8 ± 4.6 and 0.0 ± 3.6 mL. Mean relative errors in volume and D-max measurements between readers showed no significant difference between the four groups (P ≥ 0.2). The feasibility, accuracy, and reproducibility of AAA volume and D-max measurements using segmentation software were not affected by the absence of contrast injection or the presence of stent-graft. (orig.)

  7. Evolution of Computed Tomography Findings in Secondary Aortoenteric Fistula

    Aortoenteric fistula is a rare but significant clinical entity associated with high morbidity and mortality if remain untreated. Clinical presentation and imaging findings may be subtle and prompt diagnosis can be difficult. Herein, we present a patient who initially presented with abdominal pain and computed tomography showed an aortic aneurysm compressing duodenum without any air bubbles. One month later, the patient presented with gastrointestinal bleeding and computed tomography revealed air bubbles within aneurysm. With a diagnosis of aortoenteric fistula, endovascular aneurysm repair was carried out. This case uniquely presented the computed tomography findings in progression of an aneurysm to an aortoenteric fistula

  8. Spinal computed tomography

    Sartor, K.

    1980-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the spine and spinal cord is gaining more and more importance as a valuable investigative method in neuroradiology. Performed as a noninvasive procedure, with or without intravenous contrast enhancement, it can be used to diagnose paravertebral soft tissue lesions, constrictive lesions of the bony spinal canal, structure changes of the vertebral column or of individual vertebrae, vascular intraspinal lesions, and intraspinal tumors with abnormally high or abnormally low attenuation values. Performed as an invasive procedure, after intrathecal introduction of metrizamide, spinal CT can in selected cases be used in conjunction with conventional metrizamide myelography as an additional procedure (secondary CT-myelography) or even as initial procedure ( primary CT-myelography), taking advantage of its unique properties, namely to provide a transverse axial image of the spine and related soft tissue structures and to detect even small differences in density. Further improvement of spinal CT, particularly the routine non-invasive demonstration of the intraspinal soft tissues, is to be expected.

  9. Computed tomography apparatus

    In fan-beam computed tomography apparatus, timing reference pulses, normally occurring at intervals t, for data transfer and reset of approx. 500 integrators in the signal path from the detector array, are generated from the scan displacement, e.g. using a graticule and optical sensor to relate the measurement paths geometrically to the body section. Sometimes, a slow scan rate is required to provide a time-averaged density image, e.g. for planning irradiation therapy, and then the sensed impulses will occur at extended intervals and can cause integrator overload. An improvement is described which provides a pulse generator which responds to a reduced scan rate by generating a succession of further transfer and reset pulses at intervals approximately equal to t starting a time t after each timing reference pulse. Then, using an adding device and RAM, all the transferred signals integrated in the interval t' between two successive slow scan reference pulses are accumulated in order to form a corresponding measurement signal. (author)

  10. Quantitative computed tomography

    Adams, Judith E. [Royal Infirmary and University, Manchester (United Kingdom)], E-mail: judith.adams@manchester.ac.uk

    2009-09-15

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) was introduced in the mid 1970s. The technique is most commonly applied to 2D slices in the lumbar spine to measure trabecular bone mineral density (BMD; mg/cm{sup 3}). Although not as widely utilized as dual-energy X-ray absortiometry (DXA) QCT has some advantages when studying the skeleton (separate measures of cortical and trabecular BMD; measurement of volumetric, as opposed to 'areal' DXA-BMDa, so not size dependent; geometric and structural parameters obtained which contribute to bone strength). A limitation is that the World Health Organisation (WHO) definition of osteoporosis in terms of bone densitometry (T score -2.5 or below using DXA) is not applicable. QCT can be performed on conventional body CT scanners, or at peripheral sites (radius, tibia) using smaller, less expensive dedicated peripheral CT scanners (pQCT). Although the ionising radiation dose of spinal QCT is higher than for DXA, the dose compares favorably with those of other radiographic procedures (spinal radiographs) performed in patients suspected of having osteoporosis. The radiation dose from peripheral QCT scanners is negligible. Technical developments in CT (spiral multi-detector CT; improved spatial resolution) allow rapid acquisition of 3D volume images which enable QCT to be applied to the clinically important site of the proximal femur, more sophisticated analysis of cortical and trabecular bone, the imaging of trabecular structure and the application of finite element analysis (FEA). Such research studies contribute importantly to the understanding of bone growth and development, the effect of disease and treatment on the skeleton and the biomechanics of bone strength and fracture.

  11. [Computed tomography of the heart

    Kristensen, T.S.; Kofoed, K.F.; der, Recke P. von;

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of the coronary arteries by multi-detector row computed tomography is a promising new alternative to conventional invasive coronary angiography. This article describes the technical background, methods, limitations and clinical applications and reviews current literature th...

  12. Computed Tomography Features of Spontaneously Perforated Pyometra: A Case Report

    Chan, K.S.; Tan, C.K.; Mak, C.W.; Chia, C.C.; Kuo, C.Y.; Yu, W.L. [Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan (China). Depts. of Intensive Care Medicine, Radiology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Surgery

    2006-03-15

    Spontaneous perforation of pyometra is an extremely rare emergent gynecologic disease. We report a 73-year-old woman with a spontaneously perforated pyometra presenting with acute abdomen in the emergency department. A dedicated computed tomography examination of the abdominal and pelvic regions revealed the diagnosis. The patient recovered well after surgical intervention and antibiotic treatment.

  13. What is Computed Tomography?

    ... word "tomography" is from the Greek word "tomos" meaning "slice" or "section" and "graphe" meaning "drawing." A CT imaging system produces cross-sectional ... The patient may receive an injection of a "contrast material" to facilitate visualization of vascular structure. Detectors ...

  14. Neuroanatomy of cranial computed tomography

    Based on the fundamental structures visualized by means of computed tomography, the authors present the functional systems which are relevant in neurology by means of axial cross-sections. All drawings were prepared from original preparations by means of a new technique which is similar to the grey values of X-ray CT and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography. A detailed description is given of the topics of neurofunctional lesions

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two- ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two- ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  19. Computer tomography in acute pyelonephritis

    Triller, J.; Scheidegger, J.; Terrier, F.

    1983-07-01

    Computer tomography of the kidneys was performed on 30 patients with acute renal infections (acute suppurative pyelonephritis, acute renal abscess, infected cyst, pyelonephrosis, calculus perforation, retroperitoneal abscess). Computer tomography provided more accurate information concerning the extent of the renal and extra-renal inflammatory process than did the urogram or sonogram. This may significantly affect the choice of treatment, particularly concerning the use of drugs or of surgery. Angiography and retrograde pyelography may be used in selected cases, especially where there is a suspicion of acute bacterial nephritis, renal vein thrombosis or ureteric obstruction.

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a ... by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a ... by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional ...

  2. Emission computed tomography

    Although there are many common aspects to x-ray transmission and radionuclide emission (ECT) computerized tomography, there are added difficulties and a number of particular factors which form the basis of ECT. The relationship between the physical factors, system design, methodologic approach and assumptions of ECT is discussed. The instrumentation design and application strategies in ECT at this time are diverse and in a rapid stage of development. The approaches are divided into two major categories of Single Photon Counting (SPC) employing scanner and camera concepts with radionuclides of 99/sup m/Tc, 201Tl, 123I etc., and Annihilation Coincidence Detection (ACD) of positron-emitting radionuclides. Six systems in the former and ten systems in the latter category, with examples of typical studies, illustrate the different approaches

  3. Reproducibility in the assessment of acute pancreatitis with computed tomography

    Freire Filho, Edison de Oliveira; Vieira, Renata La Rocca; Yamada, Andre Fukunishi; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Bekhor, Daniel; Freire, Maxime Figueiredo de Oliveira; Ajzen, Sergio; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis]. E-mail: eofilho@ig.com.br; eoffilho@uol.com.br

    2007-11-15

    Objective: To evaluate the reproducibility of unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography in the assessment of patients with acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Fifty-one unenhanced and contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography studies of patients with acute pancreatitis were blindly reviewed by two radiologists (observers 1 and 2). The morphological index was separately calculated for unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography and the disease severity index was established. Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility of computed tomography was measured by means of the kappa index ({kappa}). Results: Interobserver agreement was {kappa} 0.666, 0.705, 0.648, 0.547 and 0.631, respectively for unenhanced and contrast-enhanced morphological index, presence of pancreatic necrosis, pancreatic necrosis extension, and disease severity index. Intraobserver agreement (observers 1 and 2, respectively) was {kappa} = 0.796 and 0.732 for unenhanced morphological index; {kappa} 0.725 and 0.802 for contrast- enhanced morphological index; {kappa} = 0.674 and 0.849 for presence of pancreatic necrosis; {kappa} = 0.606 and 0.770 for pancreatic necrosis extension; and {kappa} = 0.801 and 0.687 for disease severity index at computed tomography. Conclusion: Computed tomography for determination of morphological index and disease severity index in the staging of acute pancreatitis is a quite reproducible method. The absence of contrast- enhancement does not affect the computed tomography morphological index reproducibility. (author)

  4. Reproducibility in the assessment of acute pancreatitis with computed tomography

    Objective: To evaluate the reproducibility of unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography in the assessment of patients with acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Fifty-one unenhanced and contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography studies of patients with acute pancreatitis were blindly reviewed by two radiologists (observers 1 and 2). The morphological index was separately calculated for unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography and the disease severity index was established. Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility of computed tomography was measured by means of the kappa index (κ). Results: Interobserver agreement was κ 0.666, 0.705, 0.648, 0.547 and 0.631, respectively for unenhanced and contrast-enhanced morphological index, presence of pancreatic necrosis, pancreatic necrosis extension, and disease severity index. Intraobserver agreement (observers 1 and 2, respectively) was κ = 0.796 and 0.732 for unenhanced morphological index; κ 0.725 and 0.802 for contrast- enhanced morphological index; κ = 0.674 and 0.849 for presence of pancreatic necrosis; κ = 0.606 and 0.770 for pancreatic necrosis extension; and κ = 0.801 and 0.687 for disease severity index at computed tomography. Conclusion: Computed tomography for determination of morphological index and disease severity index in the staging of acute pancreatitis is a quite reproducible method. The absence of contrast- enhancement does not affect the computed tomography morphological index reproducibility. (author)

  5. Anatomic radiological study of transverse diameter of abdominal aorta by computerized tomography

    The transverse diameter of abdominal aorta by computerized tomography is studied. The purpose is establish the frequent standard diameters and then diagnose early pathologies, mainly aneurisms. (M.A.C.)

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... look like? The CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short ... spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross- ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... look like? The CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short ... spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross- ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, ... to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. These medications generally need to be taken 12 hours ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, ... to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. These medications generally need to be taken 12 hours ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate control room, ... which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into a loaf ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate control room, ... which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into a loaf ...

  16. Computed tomography of intramuscular myxoma

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in seven patients with intramuscular myxoma. All lesions were well demarcated, of homogeneous appearance and attenuation values ranging from 10 to 60 (HU). The tumor size, as estimated at CT, correlated well with the size of the surgical specimen, which is in contrast to the findings in some high grade malignant sarcomas. (orig.)

  17. X-ray Computed Tomography.

    Michael, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Describes computed tomography (CT), a medical imaging technique that produces images of transaxial planes through the human body. A CT image is reconstructed mathematically from a large number of one-dimensional projections of a plane. The technique is used in radiological examinations and radiotherapy treatment planning. (Author/MM)

  18. Industrial applications of computed tomography

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Carmignato, S.; Kruth, J. -P.;

    2014-01-01

    The number of industrial applications of Computed Tomography(CT) is large and rapidly increasing. After a brief market overview, the paper gives a survey of state of the art and upcoming CT technologies, covering types of CT systems, scanning capabilities, and technological advances. The paper...

  19. Computed tomography for dimensional metrology

    Kruth, J.P.; Bartscher, M.; Carmignato, S.;

    2011-01-01

    The paper gives a survey of the upcoming use of X-ray computed tomography (CT) for dimensional quality control purposes: i.e. for traceable measurement of dimensions of technical (mechanical) components and for tolerance verification of such components. It describes the basic principles of CT...

  20. Facility for positron computed tomography

    The positron computed tomography facility has got scintillator detector rings simultaneously recording more than one tomogrphic image of different cross-sections of the patient. The detectors in neighboring rings are staggered and can be rotated with respect to each other in order to increase the count rate without loss of efficiency. (DG)

  1. Computed tomography:the details.

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ... in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ... in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Full Text Available ... Rotating around you, the x-ray tube and electronic x-ray detectors are located opposite each other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate control room, where ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Rotating around you, the x-ray tube and electronic x-ray detectors are located opposite each other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate control room, where ...

  6. Computed Tomography findings in Fournier's gangrene

    To assess the utility of computed tomography (CT) as an imaging technique in the diagnosis and determination of the extension of Fournier's gangrene (FG). We report the cases of six patients who had been clinically diagnosed as having FG, CT, enhanced by oral and intravenous contrast media, was performed in all the patients. All six patients presented soft tissue masses and gas in the scrotal region, which were also detected in the perineal region in five. In two patients, the gas extended toward anterior abdominal wall and in one of them, it also observed in anterior and posterior para renal space. The major predisposing factors were diabetes and alcoholism and the most common triggering factor was urologic disease. CT confirms the existence of FG and aids in assessing its extension and, in some cases, in identifying the underlying cause. (Author) 15 refs

  7. Pediatric cranial computed tomography

    The introduction of CT in the investigation of intercranial pathology has revolutionized the approach to clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. This book applies the advances of cranial CT to the pediatric patient. The test is divided into two sections. The first portion describes the practical methodology, anatomy and normal and abnormal CT scan appearance, including high or low density lesions, cystic lesions and ventricular or subarachnoid space dilation. The characteristic scans for various neurological diseases are presented and discussed. The author has given special attention to the CT diagnosis of congenital malformations and cerebral neoplasms. Partial Contents: Normal Computed Tomographic Anatomy/ High Density Lesions/Low Density Lesions/Cystic Lesions; Supratentorial/Cystic Lesions; Infratentorial/Increased Head Circumference/Increased Ventricular Size/Small Ventricular Size/Cranial Lesions/Spinal Lesions/CT Cisternography/Part II CT in Neonates/Congenital Craniocerebral Malformations/Hydrocephalus/Craniosynostosis/Head Trauma/Cerebrovascular Lesions/Intracranial Lesions/Seizure Disorders/Intracranial and Other Chronic Neurological Disorders

  8. Intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess: computed tomography features

    Peng; Dong; Jing-Jing; Chen; Xi-Zhen; Wang; Ya-Qin; Wang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the computed tomography(CT) features of intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess(IPTA). METHODS: Eight patients with IPTA confirmed by pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The clinical symptoms, medical images, and surgical findings were evaluated. Involvement of the intestine, peritoneum, viscera, and lymph nodes was also assessed. RESULTS: All 8 patients had a history of abdominal discomfort for 1 to 6 mo. Physical examination revealed a palpable abdominal mass in 6 patients. Three patients had no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis(TB). All IPTAs(11 abscesses) were seen as a multiseptated, peripherally enhanced, hypodense mass with enlarged, rim-enhanced lymph nodes. The largest abscess diameter ranged from 4.5 cm to 12.2 cm. CT showed 2 types of IPTA: Lymph node fusion and encapsulation. Of the 8 patients, one had liver tuberculosis and one had splenic and ovarian tuberculosis. Two cases showed involvement of the terminal ileum and ileocecal junction. Ascites were found in 4 cases. Three patients had peritonitis and mesenteritis. Three patients showed involvement of the omentum. Three patients had histological evidence of caseating granuloma, and 5 had histological evidence of acid-fast bacilli. CONCLUSION: CT is crucial in the detection and characterization of IPTA. Certain CT findings are necessary for correct diagnosis.

  9. Relevance of computed tomography in gynecological tumors

    Hagemann, J.R.; Hagemann, J.

    1983-11-01

    1. Abdominal CT examination is the method of choice when examining ovarial tumours. 2. Abdominal CT is redundant in the early stages of carcinoma of the collum and if the carcinoma has penetrated into the vagina. 3. In advanced stages of carcinoma of the collum, CT enables accurate staging. CT is at least equal in relevance to gynecological examination in respect of assessment of parametraneous infiltration. Distant metastases, as well as complications of the efferent urinary tract can be visualized. In view of this, the following procedure appears meaningful in advanced carcinoma of the collum: First of all, gynecological examination is performed without anaesthesia to confirm the findings in the regions of the portio and vagina; as far as possible, the existence of the central parametraneous infiltrations is confirmed. For the purpose of further staging of the parametraneous infiltration, as well as of the paraaortal lymphomas and possible metastases, as well as for the purpose of excluding hydronephrosis, computed tomography is performed. This avoids burdening the patient with an examination under anaesthesia, and it also avoids invasive examination methods, such as urography and lymphography.

  10. Relevance of computed tomography in gynaecological tumors

    1. Abdominal CT examination is the method of choice when examining ovarial tumours. 2. Abdominal CT is redundant in the early stages of carcinoma of the collum and if the carcinoma has penetrated into the vagina. 3. In advanced stages of carcinoma of the collum, CT enables accurate staging. CT is at least equal in relevance to gynaecological examination in respect of assessment of parametraneous infiltration. Distant metastases, as well as complications of the efferent urinary tract can be visualized. In view of this, the following procedure appears meaningful in advanced carcinoma of the collum: First of all, gynaecological examination is performed without anaesthesia to confirm the findings in the regions of the portio and vagina; as far as possible, the existence of the central parametraneous infiltrations is confirmed. For the purpose of further staging of the parametraneous infiltration, as well as of the paraaortal lymphomas and possible metastases, as well as for the purpose of excluding hydronephrosis, computed tomography is performed. This avoids burdening the patient with an examination under anaesthesia, and it also avoids invasive examination methods, such as urography and lymphography. (orig.)

  11. Ruptured ectopic pregnancy diagnosed with computed tomography

    The rupture of ectopic pregnancy (EP) still remains the primary and direct cause of death in the first trimester of pregnancy. Ultrasonography is known to be a modality of choice in EP diagnostics. We found a severe discrepancy between the frequency of ectopic pregnancies (EP) and the number of available computed tomography (CT) examinations. A 29-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with a history of abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and collapse. Sonographic findings of a suspected EP were unclear. Moreover, not all features of intrauterine pregnancy were present. Due to the patient’s life-threatening condition, an emergency multi-slice CT with MPR and VRT reconstructions was performed, revealing symptoms of a ruptured EP. In the right adnexal area, a well-vascularized, solid-cystic abnormal mass lesion was found. Intraperitoneal hemorrhage was confirmed intraoperatively, and the right fallopian tube with a tubal EP was resected. In the surgery in situ, as well as in the pathological examination of the tumor mass, a human embryo of approximately 1.5 cm in length (beginning of the 8th week of gestation) was found. Although ultrasonography still remains the first-line imaging examination in EP diagnostics, sometimes the findings of suspected EPs are unclear and not sufficient. The rupture of EP, with serious bleeding and symptoms of shock, may require an emergent pelvic and abdominal CT inspection. A clear correlation was found between the macroscopic CT images and the intraoperatively sampled material

  12. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    Townsend, David W

    2008-05-01

    Accurate anatomical localization of functional abnormalities obtained with the use of positron emission tomography (PET) is known to be problematic. Although tracers such as (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) visualize certain normal anatomical structures, the spatial resolution is generally inadequate for accurate anatomic localization of pathology. Combining PET with a high-resolution anatomical imaging modality such as computed tomography (CT) can resolve the localization issue as long as the images from the two modalities are accurately coregistered. However, software-based registration techniques have difficulty accounting for differences in patient positioning and involuntary movement of internal organs, often necessitating labor-intensive nonlinear mapping that may not converge to a satisfactory result. Acquiring both CT and PET images in the same scanner obviates the need for software registration and routinely provides accurately aligned images of anatomy and function in a single scan. A CT scanner positioned in line with a PET scanner and with a common patient couch and operating console has provided a practical solution to anatomical and functional image registration. Axial translation of the couch between the 2 modalities enables both CT and PET data to be acquired during a single imaging session. In addition, the CT images can be used to generate essentially noiseless attenuation correction factors for the PET emission data. By minimizing patient movement between the CT and PET scans and accounting for the axial separation of the two modalities, accurately registered anatomical and functional images can be obtained. Since the introduction of the first PET/CT prototype more than 6 years ago, numerous patients with cancer have been scanned on commercial PET/CT devices worldwide. The commercial designs feature multidetector spiral CT and high-performance PET components. Experience has demonstrated an increased level of accuracy and confidence in the

  13. Computed tomography of gynecologic diseases

    Although computed tomography (CT) provides superb images of all areas of the body, sonography, because of its lack of ionizing radiation and its real-time and multiplanar capacities, has become the preferred initial method of evaluating the female pelvis. This has resulted in a relative paucity of information in the literature concerning CT features of benign pelvic disorders in particular and prompted the authors to review our experience with third-generation CT scanning of the uterus and ovaries

  14. Hermaphroditism demonstrated by computed tomography

    The categorization of disorders of gender differentiation is based on chromosome analysis, physical examination, gonadal histology, and endocrine evaluation. In most cases of hermaphroditism, radiologic studies have been limited to assessment of associated urinary tract anomalies before surgical revconstruction. Noninvasive evaluation with computed tomography (CT) or sonography is potentially useful for investigation of internal pelvic anatomy in these cases. A case report of a 65-year-old man is reported

  15. Hermaphroditism demonstrated by computed tomography

    Gale, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    The categorization of disorders of gender differentiation is based on chromosome analysis, physical examination, gonadal histology, and endocrine evaluation. In most cases of hermaphroditism, radiologic studies have been limited to assessment of associated urinary tract anomalies before surgical revconstruction. Noninvasive evaluation with computed tomography (CT) or sonography is potentially useful for investigation of internal pelvic anatomy in these cases. A case report of a 65-year-old man is reported. (KRM)

  16. Cranial computed tomography in paediatrics

    This paper deals mainly with methodical aspects (such as sedation, intravenous and intrathecal application of contrast media) and with common difficulties in interpretation of computed tomography images. The indications for cranial CT are discussed in respect probable therapeutic consequences and expected diagnostic yield. In view of the author CT is, as a rule, not required in assessing chronic headache, generalised epileptic convulsions, non-specific mental retardation and cerebral palsy. (Author)

  17. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Updated:Sep 11,2015 What is a ... Heart Attack Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Radionuclide Ventriculography, Radionuclide Angiography, MUGA Scan Heart ...

  18. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 3,2015 What is Computerized Tomography (CT)? CT is a noninvasive test that uses ...

  19. The history of computed tomography

    New scientific discoveries are often made by the synthetising of other discoveries. Computed tomography is such an example. The three necessary elements were: 1/ the fact that certain simple crystals scintillate when exposed to X-rays, 2/ the advent of electronics and 3/ that of computers. The fact that X-rays cause crystals to scintillate was learnt very shortly after Roentgen's discovery, electronics and computers coming very much later. To put all these together and apply them to diagnostic radiology, and at the same time dismiss the concept so firmly ingrained in everyone's mind that an X-ray picture must be produced on photographic film, required a genius. (orig./VJ)

  20. Window manipulation in diagnosis of body packing using computed tomography.

    Sengupta, Anshuman; Page, Patrick

    2008-05-01

    Body packing refers to the internal concealment of narcotics, usually within the gastrointestinal tract. This is important to recognise for clinical and forensic reasons. Imaging is often helpful, particularly because an accurate history is unusual. Furthermore, clinical examination and urine screens are often unreliable. Plain abdominal radiography and ultrasonography have been used with limited success. Thus, the use of alternative modalities, such as computed tomography (CT), is becoming more widespread. Although there have been no large trials, one false-negative has been reported. We report the case of a body packer whose CT appeared normal with standard abdominal windowing (level 40/width 400). However, on manipulation of the windowing (level -175/width 600), paraffin and heroin packages became conspicuous within the colon. We suggest that the simple step of reviewing images on wider than standard abdominal windows may be helpful in the detection of ingested illicit packages of fatty density within the bowel. PMID:17713799

  1. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic. (orig.)

  2. Facility for positron computed tomography

    For positron computed tomography two or more rings of scintillation detectors are used by which three or more sections of the object may be determined at a time. The rings are placed in parallel planes having got some distance from each other, axially movable collimator rings being provided for. Each collimator can be moved towards the opposite collimator and towards a central collimator which also is ring-shaped and is placed between the rows of detectors. The external and internal collimator are used for data selection and image-forming. (DG)

  3. Computed Tomography in Forensic Medicine

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    2015-01-01

    Modern diagnostic imagining techniques are gaining popularity in forensic medicine. Denmark has been involved in the development of this use of imaging techniques from the beginning. The Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Southern Denmark acquired a helical computed tomography (CT...... AND METHODS: This thesis investigated 900 forensic cases that were CT-scanned and autopsied at the Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, from 2006-2011. The scanner was a Siemens Somatom Spirit dual-slice CT-scanner with a Siemens Syngo MultiModality workstation. Contrast enhancement...

  4. Utility of screening computed tomography of chest, abdomen and pelvis in patients after heart transplantation

    Introduction: Malignancy is a late cause of mortality in heart transplant recipients. It is unknown if screening computed tomography scan would lead to early detection of such malignancies or serious vascular anomalies post heart transplantation. Methods: This is a single center observational study of patients undergoing surveillance computed tomography of chest, abdomen and pelvis atleast 5 years after transplantation. Abnormal findings, included pulmonary nodules, lymphadenopathy and intra-thoracic and intra-abdominal masses and vascular anomalies such as abdominal aortic aneurysm. The clinical follow up of each of these major abnormal findings is summarized. Results: A total of 63 patients underwent computed tomography scan of chest, abdomen and pelvis at least 5 years after transplantation. Of these, 54 (86%) were male and 9 (14%) were female. Mean age was 52 ± 9.2 years. Computed tomography revealed 1 lung cancer (squamous cell) only. Non specific pulmonary nodules were seen in 6 patients (9.5%). The most common incidental finding was abdominal aortic aneurysms (N = 6 (9.5%)), which necessitated follow up computed tomography (N = 5) or surgery (N = 1). Mean time to detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms from transplantation was 14.6 ± 4.2 years. Mean age at the time of detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms was 74.5 ± 3.2 years. Conclusion: Screening computed tomography scan in patients 5 years from transplantation revealed only one malignancy but lead to increased detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Thus the utility is low in terms of detection of malignancy. Based on this study we do not recommend routine computed tomography post heart transplantation.

  5. Computed tomography of the spine

    Until the advent of Computed Tomography (CT), axial studies of the spine were limited in the main to gross bony anatomy and to conventional transaxial tomography (TAT). Others studied the upper cervical cord in transverse section during gas myelography and encephalography. The potential role of CT in the evaluation of spinal anatomy and disease was recognized, however, at an early stage in the development of the general purpose CT scanner. CT is not organ specific and therefore provides a uniformly thin (1.5-13 mm) axial section displaying detailed spinal topographical anatomy against a background of paravertebral muscles, vascular structures and body cavity organs. The relationships of the apophyseal joints to the spinal canal and intervertebral foramina are particularly well displayed. The study of neural tissue and pathology within the spinal canal is facilitated by the use of a non-ionic water-soluble contrast medium (viz. metrizamide) in the subarachnoid spaces. The high sensitivity of CT to very small changes in X-ray attenuation permits studies to be continued over several hours. The digital derivation of the sequential CT transaxial sections enables not only interrogation of data and quantitative studies to be made but also makes possible computer-generated reconstructions in other planes

  6. Adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The present proposal describes the development of an adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), or "Snapshot" spectrometer which can...

  7. Noninvasive coronary angioscopy using electron beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography

    van Ooijen, PMA; Nieman, K; de Feyter, PJ; Oudkerk, M

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of noninvasive coronary imaging techniques like multidetector computed tomography and electron beam computed tomography, new representation methods such as intracoronary visualization. have been introduced. We explore the possibilities of these novel visualization techniques and comp

  8. Computed tomographic findings of abdominal complications of Crohn's disease - pictorial essay

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, transmural, inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract (CIT) most often affecting the terminal ileum and colon. Diarrhea, abdominal pain, anorexia, nausea, and weight loss are the most common clinical symptoms. Abdominal complications of CD, both intestinal and extraintestinal, are frequent and variable. The most common intestinal complications include ileocolitis with external or internal fistulas and abscess formation, strictures, and bowel obstruction. Less common are free perforation, intussusception, and malignancy. The extraintestinal complications include nephrolithiasis, cholelithiasis, fatty liver, portal vein gas, and thromboembolic events. Nowadays, computed tomography (CT) provides superb anatomic detail and diagnostic accuracy of various intra-abdominal pathological processes, and it thus has become an essential diagnostic tool in the evaluation and management of patients wit known CD for the assessment of bowel wall involvement, the mesenteric extent of the disease, and inn-abdominal complications. In addition, as CT is frequently performed to evaluate patients with acute abdomen, it may encounter clinically unsuspected complications in patients with CD. This article reviews the CT features of various intra-abdominal complications of CD. (author)

  9. Computed tomographic findings of abdominal complications of Crohn's disease - pictorial essay

    Zissin, R. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel)]. E-mail: zisinrivka@clalit.org.il; Hertz, M. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Osadchy, A. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Novis, B. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Gastroenterology, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Gayer, G. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Assaf Harode Medical Center, Zrifin, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2005-02-15

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, transmural, inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract (CIT) most often affecting the terminal ileum and colon. Diarrhea, abdominal pain, anorexia, nausea, and weight loss are the most common clinical symptoms. Abdominal complications of CD, both intestinal and extraintestinal, are frequent and variable. The most common intestinal complications include ileocolitis with external or internal fistulas and abscess formation, strictures, and bowel obstruction. Less common are free perforation, intussusception, and malignancy. The extraintestinal complications include nephrolithiasis, cholelithiasis, fatty liver, portal vein gas, and thromboembolic events. Nowadays, computed tomography (CT) provides superb anatomic detail and diagnostic accuracy of various intra-abdominal pathological processes, and it thus has become an essential diagnostic tool in the evaluation and management of patients wit known CD for the assessment of bowel wall involvement, the mesenteric extent of the disease, and inn-abdominal complications. In addition, as CT is frequently performed to evaluate patients with acute abdomen, it may encounter clinically unsuspected complications in patients with CD. This article reviews the CT features of various intra-abdominal complications of CD. (author)

  10. Abdominal CT scan

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CAT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... An abdominal CT scan makes detailed pictures of the structures inside your belly (abdomen) very quickly. This test may be used to ...

  11. 急性肾绞痛患者B超联合腹部X线平片与平扫CT诊断尿路结石的比较研究%Comparison between ultrasonography with plain abdominal radiography and unenhanced computed tomography in the diagnosis of urinary calculi with renal colic

    曾筱江; 刘丽华; 涂响安

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To compare the effect between ultrasonography and plain abdominal radiography with unenhanced computed tomography ( CT) for the diagnosis of urinary calculi in patients with renal colic . Methods; Sixty-iiine patients with renal colic were diagnosed with ultrasonography ; plain abdominal radiography and unenhanced computed tomography. The findings of two methods were compared. Results: 59 of 69 patients were confirmed to have urinary calculi by follow -up. Ultrasonography with plain abdominal radiography detected 44 of the 59 patients with calculi (sensitivity 74. 6% and specificity 100% ). Unenhanced CT detected 55 of 59 patients, (sensitivity 93. 2% and specificity 100% ). Sensitivity of the two methods is of statistical differences in the diagnosis of acute renal colic urolithiasis patients. Conclusion: Unenhanced CT is more sensitive for detecting urolithiasis than ultrasonography with plain abdominal radiography.%目的:比较B超联合腹部X线平片(KUB)和平扫CT在诊断急性肾绞痛患者尿路结石的效能.方法:对69例因急性肾绞痛在我院泌尿外科门诊或者急诊的患者进行B超联合KUB和平扫CT检查,并对两种诊断方法的诊断效能进行对比研究.结果:经过3个月的随访,69例中确诊患有尿路结石59例.B超联合KUB诊断急性肾绞痛患者尿路结石的敏感度为74.6%(44/59),特异度为100%(10/10).CT平扫诊断急性肾绞痛患者尿路结石的敏感度为93.2%(55/59),特异度为100%(10/10).两种影像学方法诊断急性肾绞痛患者尿路结石的敏感度比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:平扫CT用于诊断急性肾绞痛患者尿路结石的敏感度优于B超联合KUB.

  12. Computed tomography in sport injuries

    Computed tomography (CT) provides axial slices plane and shows excellent details of bones and different soft tissues, favoring its use in traumatic lesions caused by sporting activities. Complex anatomical structures such as the shoulder, the vertebral column, the pelvis, the knee, the tarsal and carpal bones are often better recognized in detail than by conventional radiography. Fracture lines, localization of bone fragments and involvement of soft tissues are clearly demonstrated. Luxations and bone changes leading to luxations can be shown. CT arthrography provides for the first time a direct visualization of joint cartilage and of cruciate ligaments in the knee joint, so traumatic lesions such as chondropathia patellae or rupture of the cruciate ligaments are shown with a high degree of reliability. (orig.)

  13. Diagnostic usefulness of computed tomography

    Suzuki, K.; Tsugawa, R.; Yamakawa, Y. (Kanazawa Medical Univ., Uchinada, Ishikawa (Japan))

    1981-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used as a diagnostic technique in various urological diseases. Here demonstrated is a case of ureteral incontinence with double renal pelvis whose upper one has ectopic ureteral orifice. Also a case of ureteral stricture in transplanted kidney and three cases of uric acid calculi are demonstrated. CT provides accurate information in each diagnostic procedure. The use of CT in the diagnosis of urinary stones is estimated. CT number of 75 stones with single component shows specific distribution in relation to the component; ex. calcium stones: 900 - 1000, cystine: 700 - 800, struvite: 600 - 700, uric acid: 400 - 500. Structure and component of the stone is easily demonstrated by CT, especially about nonopaque calculi, whose image is positively displayed only by CT.

  14. Diagnostic usefulness of computed tomography

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used as a diagnostic technique in various urological diseases. Here demonstrated is a case of ureteral incontinence with double renal pelvis whose upper one has ectopic ureteral orifice. Also a case of ureteral stricture in transplanted kidney and three cases of uric acid calculi are demonstrated. CT provides the accurate information in each diagnostic procedure. The use of CT in the diagnosis of urinary stones is estimated. CT number of 75 stones with single component shows specific distribution in relation to the component; ex. calcium stones: 900 - 1000, cystine: 700 - 800, struvite: 600 - 700, uric acid: 400 - 500. Structure and component of the stone is easily demonstrated by CT, especially about nonopaque calculi, whose image is positively displayed only by CT. (author)

  15. Computed tomography findings in pancreas divisum

    In 29 patients with abdominal pain the diagnosis of pancreas divisum (PD) was verified by endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (EPR) via both the major and the minor papilla. Computed tomography (CT) was done in all patients to evaluate contour, volume, antero-posterior diameters and attenuation values of the gland in comparison with a normal reference series. Also, the validity of the CT grading of pancreatitis was assessed in comparison with ERP grading. Patients with PD had an increased cranio-caudal diameter of the pancreatic head (p<0.001). Further, the main pancreatic duct was visualized more often in patients with PD (p<0.01), who also had an increasing frequency of pancreatic calcifications (p<0.05). Otherwise there were no differences compared with the normal series. The observed reduction in the volume of the gland in patients with marked pancreatitis at ERP seemingly reflected the severity of inflammation. No cleavage between the dorsal and ventral anlage was identified. CT was found to be too unspecific to be of any use in grading of pancreatitis. In conclusion, CT findings in patients with PD are sparse, unspecific and preferably a reflection of pancreatitis, if present. ERP remains the ''gold standard'' for the diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. The Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Tilsted, Hans Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a subregistry to the Western Denmark Heart Registry (WDHR), the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry (WDHR-CCTR) is a clinical database established in 2008 to monitor and improve the quality of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in Western Denmark. OBJECTIVE: We...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, bones, soft tissues and blood vessels. It may be used to help diagnose abdominal pain ... evaluate blood vessels throughout the body. With CT, it is possible to obtain very detailed pictures of ...

  18. Computed tomography and three-dimensional imaging

    Presented here is a brief introduction to two-, three-, and four-dimensional computed tomography. More detailed descriptions of the mathematics of reconstruction and of CT scanner operation are presented elsewhere. The complementary tomographic imaging methods of single-photon-emission tomography (SPECT) positron-emission tomography (PET), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, ulltrasound sector scanning, and ulltrasound computer-assisted tomography [UCAT] are only named here. Each imaging modality ''probes'' the body with a different energy form, yielding unique and useful information about tomographic sections through the body

  19. Acute appendicitis: computed tomography findings - an iconographic essay

    Acute appendicitis is the most important cause of abdominal pain requiring surgical intervention in the Western world. The early diagnosis of this disease is of paramount relevance for minimizing its morbidity. Imaging methods have represented a huge progress in the diagnosis of this entity, which used to be based essentially on clinical history, physical examination and laboratory tests results, considering that 20% to 33% of patients present with atypical symptoms. Diagnostic difficulty is higher in children, the elderly, and women in childbearing age. The main imaging methods for evaluation of acute appendicitis are ultrasound and computed tomography. The present study is aimed at describing the disease physiopathology, commenting main computed tomography technical aspects, demonstrating and illustrating tomographic findings, and describing main differential diagnoses. (author)

  20. Fracture of the orbit: computed tomography appearance

    The main mechanisms of orbital fractures and their clinical symptoms are exposed. The computed tomographic appearance is described and the implication of computed tomography for therapeutic indications is evaluated as a function of clinical symptoms: visual impairment, anomaly of pupillary reaction to light, ophthalmoplegia, exophthalmos and associated injuries such as intracranial hematomas. The role of computed tomography for the follow-up of these patients is considered

  1. Computed tomography of obstructive jaundice

    It is well known that the computed tomography (CT) is very useful in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice. We have studied 55 cases of obstructive jaundice with whole body scanner from Jun.1980 to Jun. 1981. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution was 36 males and 19 females, and 40 cases of obstructive jaundice were seen in fifth, sixth, and seventh decades. 2. Causes of obstructive jaundice were 25 cases of pancreas cancer, 8 cases of common duct cancer, 4 cases of gallbladder cancer, 4 cases of ampulla vater cancer, 12 cases of common duct stone, and 2 cases of common duct stricture. 3. Levels of obstruction were 8 cases of hepatic portion, 15 cases of suprapancreatic portion, 28 cases of pancreatic portion, and 4 cases of ampullary portion. 4. In tumorous condition, CT demonstrated metastasis of other organs, 9 cases of the liver, 1 case of the lung, 3 cases of the pancreas, 3 cases of the common bile duct, 1 case of the stomach, and 12 cases of adjacent lymph nodes. 5. Associated diseases were 12 cases of intrahepatic stone, 4 cases of clonorchiasis, 2 cases of pancreas pseudocyst, 1 cases of hydronephrosis, and 1 case of renal cyst

  2. Computed tomography of obstructive jaundice

    Suh, Jung Hek; Lee, Joong Suk; Chun, Beung He; Suh, Soo Jhi [Kosin Medical College, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-09-15

    It is well known that the computed tomography (CT) is very useful in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice. We have studied 55 cases of obstructive jaundice with whole body scanner from Jun.1980 to Jun. 1981. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution was 36 males and 19 females, and 40 cases of obstructive jaundice were seen in fifth, sixth, and seventh decades. 2. Causes of obstructive jaundice were 25 cases of pancreas cancer, 8 cases of common duct cancer, 4 cases of gallbladder cancer, 4 cases of ampulla vater cancer, 12 cases of common duct stone, and 2 cases of common duct stricture. 3. Levels of obstruction were 8 cases of hepatic portion, 15 cases of suprapancreatic portion, 28 cases of pancreatic portion, and 4 cases of ampullary portion. 4. In tumorous condition, CT demonstrated metastasis of other organs, 9 cases of the liver, 1 case of the lung, 3 cases of the pancreas, 3 cases of the common bile duct, 1 case of the stomach, and 12 cases of adjacent lymph nodes. 5. Associated diseases were 12 cases of intrahepatic stone, 4 cases of clonorchiasis, 2 cases of pancreas pseudocyst, 1 cases of hydronephrosis, and 1 case of renal cyst.

  3. Computed tomography using synchrotron radiation

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a widely used method of obtaining cross-sectional views of objects. The high intensity, natural collimation, monochromaticity and energy tunability of synchrotron x-ray sources could potentially be used to provide CT images of improved quality. The advantages of these systems would be that images could be produced more rapidly with better spatial resolution and reduced beam artifacts. In addition, images, in some cases, could be acquired with elemental sensitivity. As a demonstration of the capability of such a system, CT images were obtained of four slices of an excised pig heart in which the arteries and the cardiac chambers were filled with an iodinated medium. Images were taken with incident x-rays tuned successively to energies just above and below the iodine K edge. Iodine specific images were obtained by logarithmically subtracting the low energy image data from the high energy data and then reconstructing the image. CT imaging using synchrotron radiation may become a convenient and non-destructive method of imaging samples difficult to study by other methods

  4. The protocol of dose reduction in liver perfusion computed tomography

    Cerebral perfusion computed tomography (CT) has been widespread, but abdominal perfusion CT has not been very popular because there has been a problem with regard to the limit of irradiation range and respiratory effects. Recently, it became easy to perform perfusion of abdominal organs because the use of multi detector row CT (MDCT) has been extensive. Along with it, the number of hospitals that perform liver perfusion CT has increased. However, patient dose of the liver perfusion CT is very high, making it very important to reduce patient dose. We created the virtual data that reduced the number of irradiation by partly reducing the data obtained on the liver perfusion CT. We compared the analysis results of all data with that of the partly reduced. It is possible to reduce the patient dose by reducing the number of irradiation because there was no significant difference in the analysis results. (author)

  5. Unusual computed tomography findings and complications in acute appendicitis

    The objective of this article is to describe and illustrate unusual computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with acute appendicitis. We reviewed the charts of 200 patients with clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis who were submitted to abdominal CT before surgery. Patients with unusual presentation or complications were selected for illustrating the main CT findings. Unusual complications of acute appendicitis were related to anomalous position of the appendix, contiguity to intraperitoneal organs such as the liver, gall bladder, annexes and the bladder and continuous use of anti inflammatory or antibiotics during the diagnostic process. We concluded that CT is a useful diagnostic tool in patients with complicated or unusual presentation acute appendicitis. The first step towards diagnosis in these cases i to have in mind the hypothesis of appendicitis in patients with acute abdominal pain. (author)

  6. Imaging in abdominal trauma

    Imaging in abdominal trauma with special regard to the value of abdominal X-ray, ultrasound and computed tomography is described. The introduction to each organ focusses on the clinical situation, special mechanism of trauma, symptoms and the pathological staging of trauma. (orig.)

  7. Recent Developments in Computed Tomography

    Computerized Tomography. has become, during the past few years, one of the mostly used apparatus in X-ray diagnosis. Its clinical applications has penetrated to various fields, like operational guidance, cardiac imaging, computer aided surgery etc. The first second-generation CT scanners consisted of a rotate-rotate system detectors array and an X-ray tube. These scanners were capable of acquiring individual single slices, the duration of each being several seconds. The slow scanning rate, and the then poor computers power, limited the application range of these scanners, to relatively stable organs, short body coverage at given resolutions. Further drawbacks of these machines were weak X-ray sources and low efficiency gas detectors. In the late 80's the first helical scanners were introduced by Siemens. Based on a continuous patient couch movement during gantry rotation, much faster scans could be obtained, increasing significantly the volume coverage at a given time. In 1992 the first dual-slice scanners, equipped with high efficiency solid state detectors were introduced by Elscint. The acquisition of data simultaneously from two detector arrays doubled the efficiency of the scan. Faster computers and stronger X-ray sources further improved the performance, allowing for a new range of clinical applications. Yet, the need for even faster machines and bigger volume coverage led to further R and D efforts by the leading CT manufacturers. In order to accomplish the most demanding clinical needs, innovative 2 dimensional 4-rows solid-state detector arrays were developed, together with faster rotating machines and bigger X-ray tubes, all demanding extremely accurate and robust mechanical constructions. Parallel, multi-processor custom computers were made, in order to allow the on-line reconstruction of the growing amounts of raw data. Four-slice helical scanners, rotating at 0.5 sec per cycle are being tested nowadays in several clinics all over the world. This talk

  8. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Full Text Available ... to help diagnose abdominal pain or evaluate for injury after trauma. Tell your doctor about your child’s medications and ... diagnose a wide range of conditions due to injury or illness. In children, CT is typically used ...

  9. Evaluation of the normal thoracic and abdominal aorta diameters by computerized tomography

    The study was undertaken to evaluate, through computerized tomography, the diameters of the normal thoracic and abdominal aorta, as well as they are connected to gender, age and body surface area; and the ratio between measurements obtained at the ascending and descending limbs of the thoracic aorta, and between the abdominal aortic diameters. For that reason, we measured the widest anteroposterior diameters of the thoracic aortas at the levels of the arch, the root, the pulmonary artery, and the thoracic-abdominal transition, as well as the level of the emergence of the superior mesenteric artery, of the renal hila and just cephalad to the bifurcation of the abdominal aortas of 350 patients without cardiovascular diseases who had undergone computerized tomography of the thorax and/or abdomen for any other reasons. Observation and statistic analyses led us to conclude that: 1) both the thoracic and abdominal aortic diameters are reduced from their proximal to their distal portions; 2) the body surface influences the size of the aorta, although only extreme variations alter the vessel's caliber; 3) vessel diameter was observed to gradually increase with age; 4) men were found to have larger diameters than age matched women; 5) the ratio between the ascending and descending aortic diameters varies according to gender and age; 6) the relations between abdominal aortic diameters measured at the level of renal hila and cephalad to the bifurcation are independent from gender and age. But the relation between those measured at the level of the superior mesenteric artery and cephalad to the bifurcation are linked to gender, but not to age. (author)

  10. Computed tomography in abnormalities of the hip

    The value of computed tomography in the assessment of abnormalities of the hip is demonstrated with the aid of an anatomical preparation and in patients with, respectively, congenital dislocation of a hip, dislocation of the hip in spina bifida, an acetabular fracture and a Ewing tumour. The anteversion of the acetabulum and femur and the instability index of the hip join can be measured by means of computed tomography. (Auth.)

  11. Computed tomography in abnormalities of the hip

    Visser, J.D.; Jonkers, A.; Klasen, H.J. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Hillen, B. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Lab. voor Anatomie en Embryologie)

    1982-06-26

    The value of computed tomography in the assessment of abnormalities of the hip is demonstrated with the aid of an anatomical preparation and in patients with, respectively, congenital dislocation of a hip, dislocation of the hip in spina bifida, an acetabular fracture and a Ewing tumour. The anteversion of the acetabulum and femur and the instability index of the hip joint can be measured by means of computed tomography.

  12. Computed Tomography For Internal Inspection Of Castings

    Hanna, Timothy L.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomography used to detect internal flaws in metal castings before machining and otherwise processing them into finished parts. Saves time and money otherwise wasted on machining and other processing of castings eventually rejected because of internal defects. Knowledge of internal defects gained by use of computed tomography also provides guidance for changes in foundry techniques, procedures, and equipment to minimize defects and reduce costs.

  13. Quantitative computed tomography evaluation of pulmonary disease

    McEvoy, Fintan; Buelund, Lene Elisabeth; Strathe, Anders Bjerring;

    2009-01-01

    Objective assessment of pulmonary disease from computed tomography (CT) examinations is desirable but difficult. When such assessments can be made, it is important that they are related to some part of the pathophysiologic process present.......Objective assessment of pulmonary disease from computed tomography (CT) examinations is desirable but difficult. When such assessments can be made, it is important that they are related to some part of the pathophysiologic process present....

  14. Computer tomography of posterior cranial fossa

    Sobota, J.; Dutka, J. (Ustredni Vojenska Nemocnice, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1982-11-01

    The problems and possibilities are presented of computer tomography examinations of the posterior cranial fossa. The apparatus used was Somatom 2 by Siemens. Such examinations make it possible to introduce specific measurements and evaluations of pathological processes. Computer tomography in itself, however, may not always be successful in this respect and in the examination of the posterior cranial fossa invasive methods, suitably used, will make the diagnosis more accurate and adequate therapy possible.

  15. Computer tomography of posterior cranial fossa

    The problems and possibilities are presented of computer tomography examinations of the posterior cranial fossa. The apparatus used was Somatom 2 by Siemens. Such examinations make it possible to introduce specific measurements and evaluations of pathological processes. Computer tomography in itself, however, may not always be successful in this respect and in the examination of the posterior cranial fossa invasive methods, suitably used, will make the diagnosis more accurate and adequate therapy possible. (J.O.)

  16. Examination of weld defects by computed tomography

    M. Jovanović

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Defects in metal arc gas (MAG welds made in S235JR low carbon steel of 6 mm thickness were examined. A sample containing lack of fusion (LOF and pores was examined by computed tomography – CT. The computed tomography examination was performed in order to define LOF size and position as well as dimensions and distribution of accompanying pores in the weld metal.

  17. Computed Tomography Imaging of the Topographical Anatomy of Canine Prostate

    AIM: To investigate the topographical anatomy of canine prostate gland by computed tomography (CT) for diagnostic imaging purposes. ÐœATERIAL AND METHODS: Seven clinically healthy mongrel male dogs at the age of 3−4 years and body weight of 10−15 kg were submitted to transverse computerized axial tomography (CAT) with cross section thickness of 5 mm. RESULTS: The CT image of canine prostate is visualized throughout the scans of the pelvis in the planes through the first sacral vertebra (S1) dorsally; the bodies of iliac bones laterally and cranially to the pelvic brim (ventrally). The body of prostate appears as an oval homogenous relatively hypo dense finding with soft tissue density. The gland is well differentiated from the adjacent soft tissues. CONCLUSION: By means of CT, the cranial part of prostate gland in adult dogs aged 3−4 years exhibited an abdominal localization. (author)

  18. Isolated Tubal Torsion: Specific Signs on Preoperative Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Park, B.K.; Kim, C.K.; Kim, B. (Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (KR))

    2008-03-15

    Isolated torsion of the fallopian tube is a rare cause of lower abdominal pain and commonly occurs after menarche. Prompt identification of this entity can prevent irreversible vascular damage, but the diagnosis is rarely made before surgery due to nonspecific clinical and imaging features. We report a case of isolated tubal torsion with specific imaging features on preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

  19. Computed tomography of intraventricular hemorrhage

    Computed tomography (CT) is a new non-invasive diagnostic imaging method, which has ability to differentiate C.S.F., hematoma, and even edematous brain from normal brain tissue. Prior to the introduction of the CT, the diagnosis of the intraventricular hemorrhage in living patients was difficult and was confirmed by surgery of autopsy. Intracranial hemorrhages are visible on the CT with density higher than brain tissue in acute phase. CT is an accurate method for detecting of intraventricular hemorrhage including detection of nature, location, amount, and associated changes. CT is also useful as a guidance and in the evaluation of fate of the hematomas by easily performable follow up studies. The causes of the intraventricular hemorrhages are hypertension, rupture of aneurysm, arteriovenous malformation, head trauma, brain tumor, and others. This study included evaluation of CT of 69 patients who show the high density in cerebral ventricular system during the period of 31 months from Feb. 1979 to Aug. 1981 in the Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of the total 69 patient was broad ranging from 1 month to 80 years. 28% of patients were in the 6th decade. The mate to female ratio was 2 : 1. 2. The consciousness of patients at CT study: Those were conscious in 11 cases, stuporous in 41 cases and unconscious in 17 cases. 3. The causes of intraventricular hemorrhages were hypertension in 28 cases, head trauma in 12 cases, aneurysm in 4 cases, tumor in 2 cases and others in 23 cases. 4. 9 cases showed intraventricular hematomas only, other 60 cases showed associated intracranial hematomas: Those were intracerebral hematomas in 53 cases including 30 cases of basal ganglial and thalamic hematomas, subarachnoid hemorrhage in 17 cases, epidural hematomas in 3 cases, and subdural hematomas in 2 cases. 5. All cases of the intraventricular hematomas except one sowed hematoma in the lateral

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm demonstrated on renal scintigraphy.

    Phisitkul, Sorot; Brian, Susan; Rakvit, Ariwan; Jenkins, Leigh A; Bohannon, W Todd; Harris, Jennifer; Tsikouris, James; Silva, Michael B; Meyerrose, Gary E

    2003-08-01

    A 74-year-old hypertensive woman presented with abdominal discomfort and a pulsatile abdominal mass. Anterior abdominal angiography during cardiac blood pool, and renal scintigraphic imaging demonstrated a large abdominal aortic aneurysm. 1, 2 Before endovascular repair with an aortoiliac endograft, the abdominal aneurysm measured 7.5 x 7.0 cm on abdominal computed tomography. This study demonstrates that a suspected abdominal aortic aneurysm can be confirmed using the addition of anterior abdominal imaging with normal posterior imaging at the time of renal scintigraphy. PMID:12897671

  1. Acute pelvic inflammatory disease: pictorial essay focused on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Febronio, Eduardo Miguel; Rosas, George de Queiroz; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br [Department of Imaging Diagnosis, Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPMUnifesp), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    The present study was aimed at describing key computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with acute abdominal pain derived from pelvic inflammatory disease. Two radiologists consensually selected and analyzed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies performed between January 2010 and December 2011 in patients with proven pelvic inflammatory disease leading to presentation of acute abdomen. Main findings included presence of intracavitary fluid collections, anomalous enhancement of the pelvic excavation and densification of adnexal fat planes. Pelvic inflammatory disease is one of the leading causes of abdominal pain in women of childbearing age and it has been increasingly been diagnosed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging supplementing the role of ultrasonography. It is crucial that radiologists become familiar with the main sectional imaging findings in the diagnosis of this common cause of acute abdomen (author)

  2. Ectopic pregnancy: pictorial essay focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    The objective of the present study is to describe key computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with acute abdominal pain caused by ectopic pregnancy. For this purpose, two radiologists consensually selected and analyzed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies performed in female patients with acute abdominal pain caused by proven ectopic pregnancy in the period between January 2010 and December 2011. The imaging diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy is usually obtained by ultrasonography, however, with the increasing use of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of patients with acute abdomen of gynecological origin it is necessary that the radiologist becomes familiar with the main findings observed at these diagnostic methods. (author)

  3. Acute pelvic inflammatory disease: pictorial essay focused on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    The present study was aimed at describing key computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with acute abdominal pain derived from pelvic inflammatory disease. Two radiologists consensually selected and analyzed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies performed between January 2010 and December 2011 in patients with proven pelvic inflammatory disease leading to presentation of acute abdomen. Main findings included presence of intracavitary fluid collections, anomalous enhancement of the pelvic excavation and densification of adnexal fat planes. Pelvic inflammatory disease is one of the leading causes of abdominal pain in women of childbearing age and it has been increasingly been diagnosed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging supplementing the role of ultrasonography. It is crucial that radiologists become familiar with the main sectional imaging findings in the diagnosis of this common cause of acute abdomen (author)

  4. Ectopic pregnancy: pictorial essay focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Febronio, Eduardo Miguel; Rosas, George de Queiroz; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM-Unifesp), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis; Cardia, Patricia Prando, E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br [Centro Radiologico Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    The objective of the present study is to describe key computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with acute abdominal pain caused by ectopic pregnancy. For this purpose, two radiologists consensually selected and analyzed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies performed in female patients with acute abdominal pain caused by proven ectopic pregnancy in the period between January 2010 and December 2011. The imaging diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy is usually obtained by ultrasonography, however, with the increasing use of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of patients with acute abdomen of gynecological origin it is necessary that the radiologist becomes familiar with the main findings observed at these diagnostic methods. (author)

  5. Abdominal trauma

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  6. Role of 18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of Askin's tumor

    A primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of the thoraco-abdominal region is one of a group of small round cell tumors usually found in children and young adults, originally described by Askin et al. Most cases arise in the soft-tissues of the thorax, but may rarely occur within the lung with the symptoms of chest wall pain, pleural effusion and dyspnea. The authors present two cases demonstrating the utility of 18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography in the staging and prognosis of PNET of the chest wall. (author)

  7. Nonoperative treatment of splenic trauma: usefulness of computed tomography

    Objective: to report the results of use of conservative treatment in patients with splenic trauma and to emphasize the usefulness of computed tomography in these cases. Material and method: sixty-nine cases of pediatric patients with blunt abdominal trauma seen from from January 2001 to June 2004 at the level I trauma center were retrospectively studied. Forty-four of these patients were submitted to nonoperative treatment and the clinical follow-up was performed by computerized tomography. All patients had been diagnosed with splenic injury by computerized tomography.Results: the causes of the injuries were motor vehicle accident in 12 (27.2%) patients, bicycle accident in nine (20.4%) patients, and falls in 23 (52.2%) patients. Two (3.7%) patients died from associated injuries. The mean duration of hospital stay was six days. The mean age of the patients was nine years. Conclusion: conservative treatment for blunt splenic trauma is performed with the aim of reducing costs and risks for the patients, and computerized tomography should be routinely used. No posterior complications were observed in this approach. (author)

  8. The role of computed tomography in blunt hepatic injury

    Computed tomography (CT) images and medical records of 283 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were reviewed. There were 67 patients with hepatic injury. Liver was the most frequently injured organ in blunt abdominal trauma. Most hepatic injuries occurred in the right lobe of the liver. Of the 67 patients with hepatic injury, 60 patients had associated other injuries. There was a high incidence of associated lung injuries (35.8 %). Of importance is the high incidence of associated head injuries (22.4 %), because, in some patients such as those with concomitant head trauma, abdominal symptom is not obvious. The associated hemoperitoneum were correlated with the mode of therapy used in each case (operative vs. nonoperative). 32 patients with hepatic injury but no hemoperitoneum were managed nonoperatively. 9 patients with hepatic injury and little hemoperitoneum were also managed conservatively. 22 patients with high density hemoperitoneum were surgically treated. By combining information on the clinical state of the patient and CT finding, therapy of hepatic injury can be individualized and the incidence of nontherapeutic laparotomies decreased. (author)

  9. Computer axial tomography in geosciences

    Computer Axial Tomography (CAT) is one of the most adequate non-invasive techniques for the investigation of the internal structure of a large category of objects. Initially designed for medical investigations, this technique, based on the attenuation of X- or gamma-ray (and in some cases neutrons), generates digital images which map the numerical values of the linear attenuation coefficient of a section or of the entire volume of the investigated sample. Shortly after its application in medicine, CAT has been successfully used in archaeology, life sciences, and geosciences as well as for the industrial materials non-destructive testing. Depending on the energy of the utilized radiation as well as on the effective atomic number of the sample, CAT can provide with a spatial resolution of 0.01 - 0.5 mm, quantitative as well as qualitative information concerning local density, porosity or chemical composition of the sample. At present two types of axial Computer Tomographs (CT) are in use. One category, consisting of medical as well as industrial CT is equipped with X-ray tubes while the other uses isotopic gamma-ray sources. CT provided with intense X-ray sources (equivalent to 12-15 kCi or 450-550 TBq) has the advantage of an extremely short running time (a few seconds and even less) but presents some disadvantages known as beam hardening and absorption edge effects. These effects, intrinsically related to the polychromatic nature of the X-rays generated by classical tubes, need special mathematical or physical corrections. A polychromatic X-ray beam can be made almost monochromatic by means of crystal diffraction or by using adequate multicomponent filters, but these devices are costly and considerably diminish the output of X-ray generators. In the case of CT of the second type, monochromatic gamma-rays generated by radioisotopic sources, such as 169 Yb (50.4 keV), 241 Am (59 keV), 192 Ir (310.5 and 469.1 keV ) or 137 Cs (662.7 keV), are used in combination with

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... a gantry, which rotates around the patient. The computer that processes the imaging information and monitor are ...

  11. Computed tomography of pancreatic trauma

    Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Crass, R.A.

    1983-05-01

    In a review of over 300 CT scans of abdominal trauma, we encountered 13 patients with surgically proved pancreatic injuries. CT correctly diagnosed pancreatic fractures, contusions, or posttraumatic pseudocysts in 11 of these patients. There were two false positive and two false negative diagnoses. The CT diagnosis of pancreatic trauma may be difficult in selected patients who are scanned soon after injury. Acutely, the actual plane of a pancreatic fracture may be difficult to identify with CT, and the peripancreatic soft-tissue changes of traumatic pancreatitis are often subtle. Eight of 11 correctly diagnosed pancreatic injuries showed thickening of the left anterior renal fascia on CT scans. This sign should prompt a critical evaluation of the pancreas of the traumatized patient.

  12. A review of computerized tomography in blunt abdominal trauma at Christchurch Hospital

    A review was undertaken of computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen, performed between March 1993 and December 1994 for blunt abdominal trauma at Christchurch Hospital. CT findings were correlated with the clinical outcome. The outcome was either recovery from an abdominal point of view with or without laparotomy, or post mortem. A total of 116 CTs were reviewed, of which 76 were normal. CT was highly sensitive and specific for a variety of abdominal traumatic lesions. there were 1 false positive and 4 false negatives (only 2 of these significant). There was 1 non-therapeutic laparotomy based on CT findings. There was only 1 case of delayed treatment based on CT results. Three patients had unexplained findings of pneumoperitoneum. Care should be taken when interpreting the presence of free intraperitoneal air on CT scan. The possibility of missed bowel perforation should be considered, especially in the presence of free intra-abdominal fluid and no solid organ injury to account for it. CT scans are useful in the conservative management of solid organ injuries. 15 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  13. Indication for dental computed tomography. Case reports

    Based on case reports, common indications for dental computed tomography are demonstrated and typical findings are analysed. From a group of 110 patients who had a reformatted computed tomography of the maxilla and mandibula, 10 typical cases were chosen as examples and are presented with a detailed description of the findings. The most important indication was the analysis of the morphology of the alveolar ridge needed in presurgical planning for osseointegrated implants as well as in special cases of postsurgical control. Apart from implantology, the method could be used in cases of mandibular cysts and bony destructions. In conclusion, dental computed tomography has become established mainly in implantology. It can provide valuable results in cases where a demonstration of the bone in all dimensions and free of overlappings and distortions is needed. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of laryngeal carcinoma by computed tomography

    The limitation of direct or indirect laryngoscopy and laryngogram in determining the exact site and anatomic location of laryngeal carcinoma were well documented by many authors. As compared with laryngoscopy and laryngogram, computed tomographic study for laryngeal cancer is more exact and accurate method demonstrating anatomic sites of involvement, invasion into deep soft tissue spaces of endolarynx, destruction of laryngeal cartilages and cervical metastasis. Fourteen laryngeal cancer patients proven by laryngoscopic biopsy were further examined by computed tomography for staging. The authors compared laryngoscopic findings with those of computed tomography, and their clinical, surgical and computed tomographic findings were analysed. The results were as follows; 1. All patients were proved as squamous cell carcinoma. They were 12 males and 2 females aged over 50 yr. 2. Common clinical symptoms were hoarsense, dysphagia and swallowing difficulty. The primary anatomic sites determined by CT were 8 transglottic, 2 glottic, 2 supraglottic and 1 pyriform sinus respectively. They were 2 T1, 7 T2,1 T3, 3 T4 by TNM systems, respectively. (One case was difficult to evaluate exactly). 3. Invasion into deep soft tissue spaces of endolarynx, cartilage destruction, and neck metastasis were relatively predominant in transglottic carcinomas. 4. Compute tomography was superior in evaluating tumor invasion, especially into deep sift tissue spaces of endolarynx, laryngeal cartilages and metastasis to soft tissue and lymph nodes of neck. However computed tomography had some limitation in determining primary site of laryngeal cancer.

  15. Usefulness of computed tomography in recurrent nephrolithiasis

    For five cases of recurrent stone formers we performed Computed Tomography, which revealed non-visualized small stones on KUB and uric acid stones. Case 1 was primary hyperparathyroidism. Case 2 had several episodes of spontaneous stone passage without any stone shadow on routine X-ray examination. Case 3 had single ureteral stone on X-ray film. Case 4 had several episodes of spontaneous passage of mixed stones (uric acid and calcium oxalate). Case 5 had bilateral radiolucent large renal stones. We emphasized the superiority of Computed Tomography in search and prophylactic therapy of the stone formation. (author)

  16. Computed tomography in spinal canal diagnosis

    Sobota, J.; Dutka, J. (Ustredni Vojenska Nemocnice, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1983-09-01

    On a sample of 128 patients examined for suspected disorders of the spinal canal by computed tomography, the experience with the diagnostic possibilities of this quick, accurate and noninvasive imaging technique is demonstrated. The methodology of the examination and the range of obtained information in diagnosing congenital anomalies, traumas and degenerative changes are briefly described. Certain problems and limitations of this method for the diagnosis of tumors are presented. For the assessment of vascular changes and inflammatory processes, computed tomography cannot be expected to be used on a wider scale.

  17. Computed tomography in spinal canal diagnosis

    On a sample of 128 patients examined for suspected disorders of the spinal canal by computed tomography, the experience with the diagnostic possibilities of this quick, accurate and noninvasive imaging technique is demonstrated. The methodology of the examination and the range of obtained information in diagnosing congenital anomalies, traumas and degenerative changes are briefly described. Certain problems and limitations of this method for the diagnosis of tumors are presented. For the assessment of vascular changes and inflammatory processes, computed tomography cannot be expected to be used on a wider scale

  18. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the abdomen

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography has provided excellent opportunities for advancement of computed tomography (CT) technology and clinical applications. It has a wide range of applications in the abdomen including vascular pathologies either occlusive or aneurysmal; enables the radiologist to produce vascular mapping that clearly show tumor invasion of vasculature and the relationship of vessels to mass lesions. MDCTA can be used in preoperative planning for hepatic resection, preoperative evaluation and planning for liver transplantation. MDCTA can also provide extremely valuable information in the evaluation of ischemic bowel disease, active Crohn disease, the extent and location of collateral vessels in cirrhosis

  19. Computed tomography in malignant primary bone tumours

    The importance of computed tomography is examined in malignant primary bone tumours using a strongly defined examination group of 13 Patients (six Ewing's-sarcomas, five osteosarcomas, one chondrosarcoma and one spindle-shaped cell sarcoma). Computed tomography is judged superior compared to plain radiographs in recognition of bone marrow infiltration and presentation of parosteal tumour parts as well as in analysis of tissue components of tumours, CT is especially suitable for therapy planning and evaluating response to therapy. CT does not provide sufficient diagnostic information to determine dignity and exact diagnosis of bone tumours. (orig.)

  20. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Full Text Available ... a gantry, which rotates around the patient. The computer that processes the imaging information and monitor are located in ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this series of pictures, or slices of the ...

  1. Human herpes virus 8-unrelated primary effusion lymphoma-like lymphoma diagnosed by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography and laparoscopy

    Wu, Wenzhi; Liu, Jingyun; Hong, Wandong

    2013-01-01

    Human herpes virus 8-unrelated primary effusion lymphoma (PEL)-like lymphoma is a rare type of large B cell lymphoma. This report presents the case of a male with abdominal pain and distension who was found to have massive ascites and enhanced peritoneum, mesenterium and greater omentum on enhanced computer tomography (CT) scan with negative ascitic cytology. The diagnosis of PEL-like lymphoma was established by fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and laparoscopic b...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Full Text Available ... which are then displayed on a monitor. Special software can also generate three-dimensional (3-D) images ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed ...

  4. Coordinate Metrology by Traceable Computed Tomography

    Müller, Pavel

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a measuring technique which has become an important technology in the production environment over the last years. Due to a number of advantages of CT compared to, e.g., coordinate measuring machines (CMMs), CT has been recently spread in the field of manufacturin...

  5. Computed Tomography For Inspection Of Thermistors

    Schaefer, Lloyd A.

    1991-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) enables identification of cracked thermistors without disassembly of equipment containing them. CT unit used to scan equipment and locate thermistors. Further scans made in various radial orientations perpendicular to plane of devices to find cracks. Cracks invisible in conventional x-radiographs seen.

  6. Analysis of airways in computed tomography

    Petersen, Jens

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is major cause of death and disability world-wide. It affects lung function through destruction of lung tissue known as emphysema and inflammation of airways, leading to thickened airway walls and narrowed airway lumen. Computed Tomography (CT) imaging...

  7. Comparison on Computed Tomography using industrial items

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    In a comparison involving 27 laboratories from 8 countries, measurements on two common industrial items, a polymer part and a metal part, were carried out using X-ray Computed Tomography. All items were measured using coordinate measuring machines before and after circulation, with reference...

  8. Computed Tomography in the Modern Slaughterhouse

    Mosbech, Thomas Hammershaimb

    technology. Recently, the use of X-ray computed tomography (CT) coupled with methods from image analysis has been introduced as a powerful means to optimise production, by providing detailed information on the raw materials. This thesis covers two aspects of the application of CT in the modern abattoir. In...

  9. Inter laboratory comparison on Industrial Computed Tomography

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    An interlaboratory comparison on industrial X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) was organized by the Centre for Geometrical Metrology (CGM), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and carried out within the project “Centre for Industrial Application of CT scanning...

  10. Investigation of measuring strategies in computed tomography

    Müller, Pavel; Hiller, Jochen; Cantatore, Angela;

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography has entered the industrial world in 1980’s as a technique for non-destructive testing and has nowadays become a revolutionary tool for dimensional metrology, suitable for actual/nominal comparison and verification of geometrical and dimensional tolerances. This paper evaluates...

  11. Neutron computed tomography of rat lungs

    Metzke, R W; Wall, W A [Institute for Computational Mechanics at Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Runck, H; Stahl, C A; Schneider, M; Guttmann, J [Department of Anesthesiology, Section for Experimental Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Schillinger, B; Calzada, E; Muehlbauer, M; Schulz, M [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) and Fakultaet fuer Physik E21 at Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Priebe, H-J, E-mail: metzke@lnm.mw.tum.d [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, 79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-01-07

    Using conventional methods, three-dimensional imaging of the lung is challenging because of the low contrast between air and tissue and the large differences in dimensions between various pulmonary structures. The small distal airway structures and the high air-to-tissue ratio of lung tissue require an imaging technique which reliably discriminates between air and water. The objective of this study was to assess whether neutron computed tomography would satisfy such a requirement. This method utilizes the unique characteristic of neutrons of directly interacting with the atomic nucleus rather than being scattered by the atomic shell. Neutron computed tomography was tested in rats and allowed differentiation of larger lung structures (e.g., lobes) and distal airways. Airways could be identified reliably down to the sixth bronchial generation, in some cases even down to the tenth generation. The lung could be stabilized for sufficiently long exposure times to achieve an image resolution of 50-60 {mu}m, which is the current physical resolution limit of the neutron computed tomography facility. Neutron computed tomography allowed excellent lung imaging without the need for additional tissue preparation or contrast media. The enhanced structural resolution obtained by applying this new research technique may improve understanding of lung physiology and respiratory therapy. (note)

  12. Sparse Image Reconstruction in Computed Tomography

    Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer

    In recent years, increased focus on the potentially harmful effects of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans, such as radiation-induced cancer, has motivated research on new low-dose imaging techniques. Sparse image reconstruction methods, as studied for instance in the field of compressed sensing...

  13. Computed tomography scanning during a traumatic resuscitation

    L.F.M. Beenen; R. Adams; R.W. Koster; T. Otto

    2011-01-01

    In cardiopulmonary resuscitation, computed tomography (CT) imaging could be of decisive importance to therapeutic strategy making but is yet unavailable because of incompatibility of CT scanning and manual chest compressions. In this report, we describe a case in which CT scanning was performed on a

  14. Neutron computed tomography of rat lungs

    Using conventional methods, three-dimensional imaging of the lung is challenging because of the low contrast between air and tissue and the large differences in dimensions between various pulmonary structures. The small distal airway structures and the high air-to-tissue ratio of lung tissue require an imaging technique which reliably discriminates between air and water. The objective of this study was to assess whether neutron computed tomography would satisfy such a requirement. This method utilizes the unique characteristic of neutrons of directly interacting with the atomic nucleus rather than being scattered by the atomic shell. Neutron computed tomography was tested in rats and allowed differentiation of larger lung structures (e.g., lobes) and distal airways. Airways could be identified reliably down to the sixth bronchial generation, in some cases even down to the tenth generation. The lung could be stabilized for sufficiently long exposure times to achieve an image resolution of 50-60 μm, which is the current physical resolution limit of the neutron computed tomography facility. Neutron computed tomography allowed excellent lung imaging without the need for additional tissue preparation or contrast media. The enhanced structural resolution obtained by applying this new research technique may improve understanding of lung physiology and respiratory therapy. (note)

  15. Computed tomography in severe protein energy malnutrition.

    Househam, K C; Villiers, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography of the brain was performed on eight children aged 1 to 4 years with severe protein energy malnutrition. Clinical features typical of kwashiorkor were present in all the children studied. Severe cerebral atrophy or brain shrinkage according to standard radiological criteria was present in every case. The findings of this study suggest considerable cerebral insult associated with severe protein energy malnutrition.

  16. Relationship between radiation dose estimation in patients submitted to abdominal tomography examination and the body mass index

    Because of the radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) is relatively high, it is important to have an estimate of the dose to which the patient is submitted, considering parameters and correction factors, so that the value is closer to the real. The objective of this study is to relate the estimated dose in patients undergoing abdominal CT with BMI (Body Mass Index) groups, considering the specific size of the anatomical region. The work developed in a hospital in Porto Alegre, Brazil, using 16 Siemens Somatom Emotion equipment. We selected 30 adult that underwent to CT of the abdomen in January 2014. Of these, 13 using dose reduction mechanism (Care Dose), (Sample 1) and the rest without this mechanism (Sample 2). Registered weight, height, CTDIvol (Computed Tomography Dose Index) and anteroposterior and lateral diameter at the umbilicus. BMI and the correction factor for the dose estimates were calculated, according to the specific size of the abdomen. It was determined the percentage change between the CTDIvol values provided by CT and the value of CTDIvol after application of the correction factor, plus the average percentage change for each BMI group. The mean percentage change was between 54% and 19% for sample 1 and between 35% and 10% for sample 2, the lowest to highest BMI group. There was a reduction in the medium average percent with the increasing of the BMI groups in both samples. A larger sample of individuals for verification of results is required

  17. Parallel Computing for the Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer

    Lee, Seungwon

    2008-01-01

    This software computes the tomographic reconstruction of spatial-spectral data from raw detector images of the Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), which enables transient-level, multi-spectral imaging by capturing spatial and spectral information in a single snapshot.

  18. Lung Nodule Detection in Screening Computed Tomography

    Gori, I; Cerello, P; Cheran, S C; De Nunzio, G; Fantacci, M E; Kasae, P; Masala, G L; Pérez-Martínez, A; Retico, A

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical Computed Tomography (CT) images with 1.25 mm slice thickness is presented. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, a dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The results obtained on the collected database of lung CT scans are discussed.

  19. Computed tomography of tuberculous meningitis

    Recently, tuberculous meningitis has become rather rare except in areas where tuberculosis is still endemic. Six adolescents and young adults with tuberculous meningitis were evaluated by means of serial computerized tomography (CT), and the results were correlated with the findings of surgical specimens or autopsies. All cases showed meningeal irritation and fever at onset. CSF cultures revealed the presence of tuberculous bacilli. Four cases advanced rapidly to the clinical stage III and expired in a short period-between two weeks to one month from onset. On initial CT scanning, the disappearance of the basal cistern was a characteristic finding in all these cases. With the progression, an enhancement of the basal cistern on contrast injection, a localized hypodensity in adjacent parenchyma, and symmetrical ventricular dilatation appeared. Two autopsied cases showed tuberculous granulomas with purulent materials, thickened meninges, and caseous necrosis in the parenchyma around the basal cistern. The other two cases progressed rather slowly. CT findings at Stage II showed multiple enhanced spots in the basal subcortical area following contrast injection. Tuberculous granulomas were identified in these parts by means of explorative craniotomy. The authors point out the pathognomonic CT findings of tuberculous meningitis and emphasize the necessity of serial CT for the early detection and management of tuberculous meningitis. (author)

  20. Traumatic Lumbar Artery Arteriovenous Fistula: Preclinically Detected by 16-Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography and Post-processing Techniques

    Chou, C.P.; Pan, H.B.; Wu, T.H.; Huang, F.D.; Wu, M.T. [Dept. of Radiology, Dept. of Vascular Surgery, and Dept. of Emergency, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); National Yang-Ming Univ. School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2007-04-15

    We report a 21-year-old woman with a penetrating abdominal wound. Injuries of the abdominal aorta and alimentary tract were found during emergency surgery. The patient had a follow-up computed tomography (CT) scan 3 months after surgery. Arterial-phase 16-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) showed a suspicious dilated vessel adjacent to the repaired aorta on 5-mm transverse images. A fistula between a lumbar artery and the inferior vena cava was clearly demonstrated on images reformatted with two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) techniques. The patient suffered from symptoms of high-output heart failure 8 months after surgery.

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Full Text Available ... child may have, and if there is a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... the patient. The computer that processes the imaging information and monitor are ... in detector technology allow new CT scanners to obtain multiple slices ...

  2. Computed tomography and pancreatic trauma. Report of seventeen cases

    A retrospectives study of 17 cases of pancreatic trauma investigated by computed tomography is presented. These cases of trauma, all closed, occurred after a motor vehicle accident (63%) or after direct trauma (37%). They appeared to be isolated in 47% of cases and associated with abdominal lesions in 29% of cases, in which case the clinical diagnosis was more difficult and established secondarily following the development of complications. The initial computed tomograpy was delayed by failure to recognise the pancreatic lesions (in 52.9% of cases) or was not even performed because of organ failure requiring immediate laparotomy (in 11.8% of cases). Precise evaluation of the lesions by computed tomography revealed six isthmic fractures and one caudal fracture, three of which were not diagnosed at the first laparotomy. It also revealed a haematoma of the pancreas without capsular rupture, while the clinical presentation was not at all suggestive of pancreatic trauma. It demonstrated a pseudocyst communicating with a parenchymal rupture, establishing the diagnosis of fracture. In contrast, there were two false negatives in the series: two known cephalic fractures not seen on repeated CT scans and a false positive of fracture in a case of localized necrotising pancreatitis. This series stresses the value of computed tomography in pancreatic trauma. This imaging technique appears to be necessary early after trauma, even if the clinical features are not very suggestive or even when surgical operation appears to eliminate the presence of any pancreatic problems. A precise diagnosis of the lesion allows an appropriate therapeutic strategy avoiding subsequent complications

  3. Clinical evaluation of image quality and radiation dose reduction in upper abdominal computed tomography using model-based iterative reconstruction; comparison with filtered back projection and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    Highlights: • MBIR significantly improves objective image quality. • MBIR reduces the radiation dose by 87.5% without increasing objective image noise. • A half dose will be needed to maintain the subjective image quality. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of upper abdominal CT images reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in comparison with filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on scans acquired with various radiation exposure dose protocols. Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from all 90 patients who underwent both control-dose (CD) and reduced-dose (RD) CT of the upper abdomen (unenhanced: n = 45, contrast-enhanced: n = 45). The RD scan protocol was randomly selected from three protocols; Protocol A: 12.5% dose, Protocol B: 25% dose, Protocol C: 50% dose. Objective image noise, signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio for the liver parenchyma, visual image score and lesion conspicuity were compared among CD images of FBP and RD images of FBP, ASIR and MBIR. Results: RD images of MBIR yielded significantly lower objective image noise and higher SNR compared with RD images of FBP and ASIR for all protocols (P < .01) and CD images of FBP for Protocol C (P < .05). Although the subjective image quality of RD images of MBIR was almost acceptable for Protocol C, it was inferior to that of CD images of FBP for Protocols A and B (P < .0083). The conspicuity of the small lesions in RD images of MBIR tended to be superior to that in RD images of FBP and ASIR and inferior to that in CD images for Protocols A and B, although the differences were not significant (P > .0083). Conclusion: Although 12.5%-dose MBIR images (mean size-specific dose estimates [SSDE] of 1.13 mGy) yielded objective image noise and SNR comparable to CD-FBP images, at least a 50% dose (mean SSDE of 4.63 mGy) would be needed to

  4. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-05-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis.

  5. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.)

  6. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-07-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.).

  7. Acute pancreatitis: diagnostic value of ultrasonography and computed tomography

    Blery, M.; Hautefeuille, P.; Jacquenod, P. and others

    1987-09-01

    The value of ultrasonography and computed tomography for the diagnosis, extension, pronostic, complications and etiology of acute pancreatitis is discussed. Ultrasonography and computed tomography guided interventional radiology techniques are valuable in the management of pancreatitis complications such as abscesses.

  8. Acute pancreatitis: diagnostic value of ultrasonography and computed tomography

    The value of ultrasonography and computed tomography for the diagnosis, extension, pronostic, complications and etiology of acute pancreatitis is discussed. Ultrasonography and computed tomography guided interventional radiology techniques are valuable in the management of pancreatitis complications such as abscesses

  9. Real-time computed optical interferometric tomography

    Shemonski, Nathan D.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Ahmad, Adeel; Adie, Steven G.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-03-01

    High-resolution tomography is of great importance to many areas of biomedical imaging, but with it comes several apparent tradeoffs such as a narrowing depth-of-field and increasing optical aberrations. Overcoming these challenges has attracted many hardware and computational solutions. Hardware solutions, though, can become bulky or expensive and computational approaches can require high computing power or large processing times. This study demonstrates memory efficient implementations of interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) and computational adaptive optics (CAO) - two computational approaches for overcoming the depthof- field limitation and the effect of optical aberrations in optical coherence tomography (OCT). Traditionally requiring lengthy post processing, here we report implementations of ISAM and CAO on a single GPU for real-time in vivo imaging. Real-time, camera-limited ISAM processing enabled reliable acquisition of stable data for in vivo imaging, and CAO processing on the same GPU is shown to quickly correct static aberrations. These algorithmic advances hold the promise for high-resolution volumetric imaging in time-sensitive situations as well as enabling aberrationfree cellular-level volumetric tomography.

  10. ROLE OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN EVALUATION OF ASCITES

    Ramesh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ascites result from variety of medical & surgical causes , and ultrasonography ( US or computed tomography ( CT of abdomen is advisable for its detection , and the different CT signs depend on amount and distribution of fluid . OBJECTIVES: To evalua te ascitic fluid collections , their etiologies in relation to CT scan findings , evaluating the role of CT scan to differentiate ascites from other space - occupying masses and to evaluate the role of CT scan in determining the etiology of ascites of unknown origin . MATERIAL AND METHODS: Hundred patients with an age range of 18 - 88 years had ascites , been referred for CT scan of abdomen as a further diagnostic step to confirm &identify the possible underlying cause of ascites . Abdominal CT scan had been done us ing 6mm slice thickness ( oral diluted gastrografin 1 . 5 - 2hrs prior to examination & two sets of CT examinations had been done with 350mg/ml IV omnipaque ( in indicated patients only or without contrast . Results : 100 patients with ascites underwent CT scan . The study showed that CT was very sensitive in detection of ascites , with sensitivity of 100% and the different signs of ascites on CT images depended on the amount of ascetic fluid producing either ( early or ( late signs . The frequency of the underlyin g causes of ascites was - 54% cases of neoplasm , 17% liver cirrhosis , 14% acute pancreatitis , 6% abdominal tuberculosis , 5% intestinal obstruction and 4 % chronic renal failure . DISCUSSION: Associated organ involvement was seen in 98 cases ( 98% . Isolated A scites was seen in 2 cases ( 2% . CONCLUSION: CT was very sensitive in detection of ascites , and most useful in identifying the underlying cause of it , but still some of the patients require further investigative steps . KEYWORDS : Ascites ; etiology ; Computed Tomography .

  11. Computed tomography of tibial plateau fractures

    Twenty patients with tibial plateau fractures were studied by conventional tomography and computed tomography (CT) in order to determine the role and feasibility of CT in management of such patients. CT resulted in less discomfort to the patient and provided optimal visualization of the plateau defect and the split fragments. It proved more accurate than conventional tomography in assessing depressed and split fractures when they involved the anterior or posterior border of the plateau and in demonstrating the extent of fracture comminution. Split fragments with an oblique plane of fracture also were seen better by CT. The degree of fracture depression and separation as measured by the computerized technique was often more accurate than measurements obtained from conventional tomograms

  12. Computed tomography of the medulla

    The medulla was studied in cadavers and in 100 patients both with and without the intrathecal administration of contrast material. The computed tomographic (CT) anatomy was correlated with the appearance on anatomic dissections. The pyramids, olives, and inferior cerebellar peduncles produced characteristic contours on cross sections of the medulla. The hypoglossal nerve by its location and course in the medullary cistern could be distinguished from the glossopharyngeal, vagal, and spinal accessory nerves. For optimal evaluation of the medulla, intrathecal administration of metrizamide and 5- and/or 1.5-mm-thick axial and coronal sections are recommended

  13. Introducing Seismic Tomography with Computational Modeling

    Neves, R.; Neves, M. L.; Teodoro, V.

    2011-12-01

    Learning seismic tomography principles and techniques involves advanced physical and computational knowledge. In depth learning of such computational skills is a difficult cognitive process that requires a strong background in physics, mathematics and computer programming. The corresponding learning environments and pedagogic methodologies should then involve sets of computational modelling activities with computer software systems which allow students the possibility to improve their mathematical or programming knowledge and simultaneously focus on the learning of seismic wave propagation and inverse theory. To reduce the level of cognitive opacity associated with mathematical or programming knowledge, several computer modelling systems have already been developed (Neves & Teodoro, 2010). Among such systems, Modellus is particularly well suited to achieve this goal because it is a domain general environment for explorative and expressive modelling with the following main advantages: 1) an easy and intuitive creation of mathematical models using just standard mathematical notation; 2) the simultaneous exploration of images, tables, graphs and object animations; 3) the attribution of mathematical properties expressed in the models to animated objects; and finally 4) the computation and display of mathematical quantities obtained from the analysis of images and graphs. Here we describe virtual simulations and educational exercises which enable students an easy grasp of the fundamental of seismic tomography. The simulations make the lecture more interactive and allow students the possibility to overcome their lack of advanced mathematical or programming knowledge and focus on the learning of seismological concepts and processes taking advantage of basic scientific computation methods and tools.

  14. Evaluation of the normal thoracic and abdominal aorta diameters by computerized tomography; Avaliacao dos diametros normais da aorta toracica e abdominal pela tomografia computadorizada

    Lucarelli, Claudio Luiz

    1995-07-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate, through computerized tomography, the diameters of the normal thoracic and abdominal aorta, as well as they are connected to gender, age and body surface area; and the ratio between measurements obtained at the ascending and descending limbs of the thoracic aorta, and between the abdominal aortic diameters. For that reason, we measured the widest anteroposterior diameters of the thoracic aortas at the levels of the arch, the root, the pulmonary artery, and the thoracic-abdominal transition, as well as the level of the emergence of the superior mesenteric artery, of the renal hila and just cephalad to the bifurcation of the abdominal aortas of 350 patients without cardiovascular diseases who had undergone computerized tomography of the thorax and/or abdomen for any other reasons. Observation and statistic analyses led us to conclude that: 1) both the thoracic and abdominal aortic diameters are reduced from their proximal to their distal portions; 2) the body surface influences the size of the aorta, although only extreme variations alter the vessel's caliber; 3) vessel diameter was observed to gradually increase with age; 4) men were found to have larger diameters than age matched women; 5) the ratio between the ascending and descending aortic diameters varies according to gender and age; 6) the relations between abdominal aortic diameters measured at the level of renal hila and cephalad to the bifurcation are independent from gender and age. But the relation between those measured at the level of the superior mesenteric artery and cephalad to the bifurcation are linked to gender, but not to age. (author)

  15. Measurement of spleen by computed tomography in normal Korean adults

    Computed tomography potentially offers the most accurate noninvasive method of estimating volume of a solid organ in vivo. The study was undertaken to obtain standard values of size, volume and mass of normal spleen in Korean adults. The authors analysed 109 cases of abdominal computed tomography of normal Korean adults. The results were as follows; 1. The average splenic volume in adults was 173.17 ± 59.02 cm3 in male, 160.43 ± 61.72 cm3 in female and total average, 160.98 ± 60.41 cm3. 2. The average splenic mass in adults were 181.20 ± 61.16 gm in male, 166.44 ± 64.68 gm in female and total average, 174 ± 63.0 gm. 3. The average size of the spleen in adult males was 9.39 ± 1.33 cm in breath, 3.8 ± 0.69 cm in thickness, and 7.97 ± 1.43 cm in height; in adult females, 9.25 ± 1.46 cm,3.51 ± 0.65 cm, 8.05 ± 1.35 cm,respectively; total average, 9.32 ± 1.39 cm, 3.70 ± 0.60 cm, 8.01 ± 1.39 cm, respectively. 4. There was no statistical difference of volume, mass and size between sex and age

  16. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1200 Emission computed tomography system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect...

  17. Practical management of computed tomography

    For examinations of the spinal canal is used computed myelography as an adjunct to water-soluble conventional myelography. For CT alone about 3.5 g. of metrizamide in isotonic solution is adequate for all investigations. If the constrast medium has to be run into the head by gravity, as in the detection of cerebrospinal fluid fistula or empty sella, or for detailed examination of the basal cisterns, phenobarbitone 100 mg. t.d.s. is commenced on the eve of the examination and continued for 48 hours. A similar dose is also administered to epileptic subject. If fits should occur they are treated with intravenous diazepam and prophylactic phenobarbitone is administered. (orig./AJ)

  18. Diagnostic results of adbominal computed tomography in HIV-infected patients

    The exact frequency of pathologic findings in abdominal computed tomograms of HIV-infected patients is not yet known. To analyse such findings, CT scans of 339 HIV-infected patients were reviewed. While over four fifths of patients displayed abnormal findings; hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, pathologically enlarged lymph nodes, and bowel wall thickening were the most common signs of disease. Only for enlarged lymph nodes could a dependency on clinical stage of the infection be demonstrated. As a conclusion, abdominal computed tomography reveals pathologic findings in the vast majority of HIV-infected patients, almost independent of clinical stage. Specifically, CT provides well documented lymph node staging. There are practically no age- or sex-dependent disease patterns in abdominal CT scans. (orig.)

  19. Imaging in Tuberculosis abdominal

    In this article we illustrate and discuss imaging features resulting from Tuberculosis abdominal affectation. We present patients evaluated with several imaging modalities who had abdominal symptoms and findings suggestive of granulomatous disease. Diagnosis was confirm including hystopatology and clinical outgoing. Cases involved presented many affected organs such as lymphatic system, peritoneum, liver, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, ureters, adrenal glands and pelvic organs Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis renal, Tuberculosis hepatic, Tuberculosis splenic Tomography, x-ray, computed

  20. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon, E-mail: conordurack1@hotmail.com [Unit of Endodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  1. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  2. Possibilities of computer tomography in multiple sclerosis

    Computer tomography was performed in 41 patients with multiple sclerosis, the average age of patients being 40.8 years. Native examinations were made of 17 patients, examinations with contrast medium of 19, both methods were used in the examination of 5 patients. In 26 patients, i.e. in almost two-thirds, cerebral atrophy was found, in 11 of a severe type. In 9 patients atrophy affected only the hemispheres, in 16 also the stem and cerebellum. The stem and cerebellum only were affected in 1 patient. Hypodense foci were found in 21 patients, i.e. more than half of those examined. In 9 there were multiple foci. In most of the 19 examined patients the hypodense changes were in the hemispheres and only in 2 in the cerebellum and brain stem. No hyperdense changes were detected. The value and possibilities are discussed of examinations by computer tomography multiple sclerosis. (author)

  3. Biliary obstruction: Helical computed tomography cholangiography evaluation

    Helical computed tomography cholangiography (HCTC) takes advantage of the improvement in the quality of multiplanar and three-dimensional reconstructions resulting from the volumetric acquisition of data achieved with helical computed tomography and the indirect opacification of the bile ducts provided by cholangiographic contrast media. This method was used to evaluate 31 patients with suspected biliary obstruction over a one-year period and the findings were compared with those of direct cholangiography and/or surgery. Biliary opacification was sufficient to allow three-dimensional reconstructions in 90,3% of cases. Sensitivity was 81% for the diagnosis of choledochoolithiasis and 100% for ascariasis, choledochal cysts and anatomic variants of the biliary tree. Our results indicate that HCTC is a valuable alternative as a diagnostic method prior to direct cholangiography. Direct cholangiography should be reserved for those patients who require it as part of a therapeutic procedure

  4. Spontaneous cerebral intraparenchymatous hematoma: computed tomography findings

    The objective of this study was to identify the most frequent aspects of spontaneous cerebral intraparenchymatous hematoma found at computed tomography examinations. We reviewed, retrospectively, the computed tomography studies of 250 patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage carried out in three hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The results showed deep intracerebral hematomas showed the highest incidence and were observed in 54.4% of the cases (136 patients) followed by lobar hemorrhage in 34.8% of the cases (87 patients). Cerebellar hemorrhage and brainstem bleeding were more rarely observed, occurring in 8.4% (21 patients) and 2.4% (six patients) of the cases, respectively. Chronic headache was the most frequent symptom whereas hypertension was observed in the majority of the cases. Blood draining into the ventricular system occurred more frequently in patients with deep hematomas. (author)

  5. Optimizing of preoperative computed tomography for diagnosis in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis

    Duhr Carolin D

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objective This study evaluates whether Computer Tomography is an effective procedure for preoperative staging of patients with Peritoneal Carcinomatosis. Method A sample of 37 patients was analyzed with contrast enhanced abdominal Computer Tomography, followed by surgical staging. All Computer Tomography scans were evaluated 3 times by 2 radiologists with one radiologist reviewing 2 times. The efficacy of Computer Tomography was evaluated using the Spearman correlation coefficient. Correlations were analyzed by abdominopelvic region to assess results of the Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Index (PCI aggregating the 13 regions. Surgical findings were compared to radiological findings. Results Results indicate high correlations between the surgical and radiological Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Indices. Analyses of the intra-class correlation between the first and second reading of one radiologist suggest high intra-observer reliability. Correlations by abdominopelvic region show higher values in the upper and middle regions and relatively lower values in the lower regions and the small bowel (correlation coefficients range between 0.418 and 0.726, p Conclusion Computer Tomography represents an effective procedure in the preoperative staging of patients with PC. However, results by abdominopelvic region show lower correlation, therefore suggest lower efficacy. These results are supported by analyses of sensitivity and accuracy by lesion size. This suggests that Computer Tomography is an effective procedure for pre-operative staging but less for determining a tumor's accurate extent.

  6. Radiological management of blunt polytrauma with computed tomography and angiography: an integrated approach

    Kurdziel, J.C.; Dondelinger, R.F.; Hemmer, M.

    1987-01-01

    107 polytraumatized patients, who had experienced blunt trauma have been worked up at admission with computed tomography of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis following computed tomography study of the brain: significant lesions were revealed in 98 (90%) patients. 79 (74%) patients showed trauma to the thorax, in 69 (64%) patients abdominal or pelvic trauma was evidenced. No false positive diagnosis was established. 5 traumatic findings were missed. Emergency angiography was indicated in 3 (3%) patients, following computed tomography examination. 3 other trauma patients were submitted directly to angiography without computed tomography examination during the time period this study was completed. Embolization was carried out in 5/6 patients. No thoracotomy was needed. 13 (12%) patients underwent laparotomy following computed tomography. Overall mortality during hospital stay was 14% (15/107). No patient died from visceral bleeding. Conservative management of blunt polytrauma patients can be advocated in almost 90% of visceral lesions. Computed tomography coupled with angiography and embolization represent an adequate integrated approach to the management of blunt polytrauma patients.

  7. Radiological management of blunt polytrauma with computed tomography and angiography: an integrated approach

    107 polytraumatized patients, who had experienced blunt trauma have been worked up at admission with computed tomography of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis following computed tomography study of the brain: significant lesions were revealed in 98 (90%) patients. 79 (74%) patients showed trauma to the thorax, in 69 (64%) patients abdominal or pelvic trauma was evidenced. No false positive diagnosis was established. 5 traumatic findings were missed. Emergency angiography was indicated in 3 (3%) patients, following computed tomography examination. 3 other trauma patients were submitted directly to angiography without computed tomography examination during the time period this study was completed. Embolization was carried out in 5/6 patients. No thoracotomy was needed. 13 (12%) patients underwent laparotomy following computed tomography. Overall mortality during hospital stay was 14% (15/107). No patient died from visceral bleeding. Conservative management of blunt polytrauma patients can be advocated in almost 90% of visceral lesions. Computed tomography coupled with angiography and embolization represent an adequate integrated approach to the management of blunt polytrauma patients

  8. Computed tomography after radical pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple's procedure)

    Whipple's procedure (radical pancreaticoduodenectomy) is currently the only curative option for patients with periampullary malignancy. The surgery is highly complex and involves multiple anastomoses. Complications are common and can lead to significant postoperative morbidity. Early detection and treatment of complications is vital, and high-quality multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is currently the best method of investigation. This review outlines the surgical technique and illustrates the range of normal postoperative appearances together with the common complications

  9. Computed tomography of ano-rectal anomalies

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 9 patients with faecal incontinence more than 8 years after rectoplasty for high imperforate anus. The radiologic findings were correlated with the clinical evaluation of faecal incontinence. No statistically significant correlation was found between function and anatomic findings as demonstrated by CT. Thus, although CT demonstrates the post-operative anatomy in a detailed way, the information does not seem to be directly applicable when selecting the type of reoperation for faecal incontinence. (orig.)

  10. Computed tomography diagnostic of chronic rhino sinusitis

    Ordinary conventional roentgenological examinations of paranasal sinuses does not satisfy the latest needs of otorinolaringologysta, especially for functional endoscopic surgery. Computed tomography of paranasal sinuses because more important for diagnostics of chronic rhino sinusitis and for choosing the appropriate therapy of it. The examination enables to localize pathology precisely, to exactly evaluate anatomic structures, ostiomeatalic complex, the status of mucous membrane of paranasal sinuses and the effectiveness of surgical treatment of chronic rhino sinusitis. (author)

  11. Encapsulating peritonitis: computed tomography and surgical correlation

    Kadow, Juliana Santos; Fingerhut, Carla Jeronimo Peres; Fernandes, Vinicius de Barros; Coradazzi, Klaus Rizk Stuhr; Silva, Lucas Marciel Soares; Penachim, Thiago Jose, E-mail: vinicius.barros.fernandes@gmail.com [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Campinas (PUC-Campinas), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Hospital e Maternidade Celso Pierro

    2014-07-15

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis is a rare and frequently severe entity characterized by total or partial involvement of small bowel loops by a membrane of fibrous tissue. The disease presents with nonspecific clinical features of intestinal obstruction, requiring precise imaging diagnosis to guide the treatment. The present report emphasizes the importance of computed tomography in the diagnosis of this condition and its confirmation by surgical correlation. (author)

  12. Computed Tomography Findings in Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis

    Arumugam Rajesh; George Jakanani; Nick Mayer; Kevin Mulcahy

    2011-01-01

    Background: Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGN) is an uncommon condition characterized by chronic suppurative renal inflammation that leads to progressive parenchymal destruction. Purpose: To review the computed tomography (CT) findings of patients diagnosed with XGN. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of CT findings in patients with histologically proven XGN was carried out. Results: Thirteen CT examinations of 11 patients were analyzed. Renal enlargement was demonstrable on ...

  13. Computed tomography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    The aim of this study was to define the imaging characteristics of primary and recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in computed tomography with respect to the tumor size. Computed tomography was performed in 35 patients with histologically confirmed gastrointestinal stromal tumors and analyzed retrospectively by two experienced and independent radiologist. The following morphologic tumor characteristics of primary (n=20) and (n=16) recurrent tumors were evaluated according to tumor size, shape, homogeneity, density compared with liver, contrast enhancement, presence of calcifications, ulcerations, fistula or distant metastases and the anatomical relationship to the intestinal wall, and the infiltration of adjacent visceral organs. Small GIST (5-10 cm) demonstrated an irregular shape, inhomogeneous density on unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images, a combined intra- and extraluminal tumor growth with aggressive findings, and infiltration of adjacent organs in 9 primary diagnosed and 2 recurrent tumors. Large GIST (>10 cm), which were observed in 8 primary tumors and 11 recurrent tumors, showed an irregular margin with inhomogeneous density and aggressive findings, and were characterized by signs of malignancy such as distant and peritoneal metastases. Small recurrent tumors had a similar appearance as compared with large primary tumors. Computed tomography gives additional information with respect to the relationship of gastrointestinal stromal tumor to the gastrointestinal wall and surrounding organs, and it detects distant metastasis. Primary and recurrent GIST demonstrate characteristic CT imaging features which are related to tumor size. Aggressive findings and signs of malignancy are found in larger tumors and in recurrent disease. Computed tomography is useful in detection and characterization of primary and recurrent tumors with regard to tumor growth pattern, tumor size, and varied appearances of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and indirectly

  14. Computed tomography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Ghanem, Nadir; Altehoefer, Carsten; Winterer, Jan; Schaefer, Oliver; Springer, Oliver; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, 79106, Freiburg (Germany); Furtwaengler, Alex [Department of Abdominal Surgery, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, 79106, Freiburg (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to define the imaging characteristics of primary and recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in computed tomography with respect to the tumor size. Computed tomography was performed in 35 patients with histologically confirmed gastrointestinal stromal tumors and analyzed retrospectively by two experienced and independent radiologist. The following morphologic tumor characteristics of primary (n=20) and (n=16) recurrent tumors were evaluated according to tumor size, shape, homogeneity, density compared with liver, contrast enhancement, presence of calcifications, ulcerations, fistula or distant metastases and the anatomical relationship to the intestinal wall, and the infiltration of adjacent visceral organs. Small GIST (<5 cm) showed a sharp tumor margin with homogeneous density and structure on unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images, and were characterized by an intraluminal tumor growth. Intermediate sized GIST (>5-10 cm) demonstrated an irregular shape, inhomogeneous density on unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images, a combined intra- and extraluminal tumor growth with aggressive findings, and infiltration of adjacent organs in 9 primary diagnosed and 2 recurrent tumors. Large GIST (>10 cm), which were observed in 8 primary tumors and 11 recurrent tumors, showed an irregular margin with inhomogeneous density and aggressive findings, and were characterized by signs of malignancy such as distant and peritoneal metastases. Small recurrent tumors had a similar appearance as compared with large primary tumors. Computed tomography gives additional information with respect to the relationship of gastrointestinal stromal tumor to the gastrointestinal wall and surrounding organs, and it detects distant metastasis. Primary and recurrent GIST demonstrate characteristic CT imaging features which are related to tumor size. Aggressive findings and signs of malignancy are found in larger tumors and in recurrent disease. Computed tomography

  15. Analysis of computed tomography of ovarian tumor

    Omura, Makoto; Taniike, Keiko; Nishiguchi, Hiroyasu

    1987-07-01

    One hundred and twenty six patients with ovarian mass were studied with computed tomography (CT) and classified into five groups according to its margin and inner structure. The incidence of malignancy of cystic ovarian mass with smooth margin was low and that of solid ovarian mass with irreglar margin was high. Three cases (6.7 %) of malignant ovarian tumor demonstrated completely cystic pattern. Ovarian teratomas contained well defined component of fat density.

  16. Dynamic computed tomography of the brain

    Dynamic computed tomography (CT) studies of the brain are based on a rapid intravenous bolus injection of radiographic contrast material immediately followed by serial CT scans. The recycling times for this technique are 1 sec or less. Dynamic studies, which are relatively non-invasive, add considerable information to the static cerebral scan as it is presently performed. The resulting time-density patterns are described and typical examples of each are shown. (orig.)

  17. Improvement in computed tomography spatial resolution

    One of the most important recent developments in transmission computed tomography is the improvement in spatial resolution. Applications of this technical advance to the neuroradiographic exploration of such structures as spinal cord, nerve roots and pituitary gland - as well as the orbits and inner and middle ear - is still limited to a few centers. Increased spatial resolution appears to be an effective means to increase our diagnostic capabilities. The higher dosimetry connected with this modality needs to be emphasized. (orig.)

  18. Computed tomography in opportunistic lung infections

    Chest radiography in two teenage boys, one with Wiscott-Aldrich's syndrome and one with acute lymphatic leucemia in remission showed increased interstitial pattern. In both computed tomography (CT) of the lungs showed heavy interstitial pneumonia, rather different in appearance but in both cases equal to the CT findings in opportunistic lung infections known from immunoincompetent patients with for instance pneumocystis carinii and/or cytomegalo virus infections. In both patients the CT findings led to lung biopsy establishing the etiologic agent. (orig.)

  19. HORSESHOE KIDNEY: A MULTIDETECTOR COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY STUDY

    Sharma V

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Horseshoe kidney is the most common renal fusion anomaly with a reported prevalence of 1 in 400 persons with a male to female ratio of 2:1. In many cases its presence may go unnoticed and undiagnosed because the patient may remain asymptomatic throughout life. The objective of our study is to report radiological and anatomical features of horseshoe kidney detected incidentally during retrospective evaluation of multidetector computed tomography scans. Materials and Methods: Contrast enhanced multidetector computed tomography scans of 682 patients, 355 males and 327 females, were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Seven cases of horseshoe kidney were detected incidentally, six males and one female, with an incidence of 1.02 %. In all cases, malrotation of the kidneys were observed with the hilum facing anteriorly or anterolaterally. The isthmus was made up of parenchymal tissue in all the cases and the fusion was midline in four cases and lateral in three cases. Horseshoe kidney in all cases was supplied by multiple renal arteries, varying from 3 to 6. In three cases symmetrical arterial supply and in the rest asymmetrical supply was observed. Nephrolithiasis and hydronephrosis were noted in two patients. No other associated congenital anomaly was observed in all seven patients. Conclusion: Contrast enhanced multidetector computed tomography evaluation of patients with horseshoe kidney provide excellent information about its vascularity, collecting system and other associated conditions.

  20. EVALUATION OF THE LIVER METASTASIS BY 3D-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Iuliana Eva; R.C. Tiutiuca

    2005-01-01

    Abdominal spiral computed tomography is the method of choice for the diagnosis of hepatic metastasis, evaluating lesions even under 10 mm. Treatment depends of the hepatic and extrahepatic spread of disease. Therapeutical options include surgical ablation (resection, enucleation, crioablation, radiofrequency, liver transplant) or non-surgical (embolization or chemoembolization, therapeutic aproach through the hepatic artery). Precise diagnostic and evaluation of the extension of the disease...

  1. Management algorithm for images of hepatic incidentalomas, renal and adrenal detected by computed tomography

    A literature review has been carried out in the diagnostic and monitoring algorithms for image of incidentalomas of solid abdominal organs (liver, kidney and adrenal glands) detected by computed tomography (CT). The criteria have been unified and updated for a effective diagnosis. Posed algorithms have been made in simplified form. The imaging techniques have been specified for each pathology, showing the advantages and disadvantages of using it and justifying the application in daily practice

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography using lower doses of radiation for patients with Crohn's disease.

    Craig, Orla

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic resonance and ultrasonography have increasing roles in the initial diagnosis of Crohn\\'s disease, but computed tomography (CT) with positive oral contrast agents is most frequently used to identify those with acute extramural complications. However, CT involves exposure of patients to radiation. We prospectively compared the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT (at a dose comparable to that used to obtain an abdominal radiograph) with conventional-dose CT in patients with active Crohn\\'s disease.

  3. Inter laboratory comparison on Industrial Computed Tomography

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Larsen, Erik;

    The ‘CIA-CT comparison - Inter laboratory comparison on industrial Computed Tomography” is organized by DTU Department of Mechanical Engineering within the Danish project “Centre for Industrial Application of CT scanning - CIA-CT”. The project is co-financed by the Danish Ministry of Science......, Technology and Innovation. The comparison aims to collect information about measurement performance in state-of the-art industrial CT (Computed Tomography) scanning. Since CT scanning has entered the field of manufacturing and coordinate metrology, evaluation of uncertainty of measurement with assessment of...

  4. Single photon emission computed tomography-guided Cerenkov luminescence tomography

    Hu, Zhenhua; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Qu, Xiaochao; Chen, Duofang; Yang, Weidong; Wang, Jing; Cao, Feng; Tian, Jie

    2012-07-01

    Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) has become a valuable tool for preclinical imaging because of its ability of reconstructing the three-dimensional distribution and activity of the radiopharmaceuticals. However, it is still far from a mature technology and suffers from relatively low spatial resolution due to the ill-posed inverse problem for the tomographic reconstruction. In this paper, we presented a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-guided reconstruction method for CLT, in which a priori information of the permissible source region (PSR) from SPECT imaging results was incorporated to effectively reduce the ill-posedness of the inverse reconstruction problem. The performance of the method was first validated with the experimental reconstruction of an adult athymic nude mouse implanted with a Na131I radioactive source and an adult athymic nude mouse received an intravenous tail injection of Na131I. A tissue-mimic phantom based experiment was then conducted to illustrate the ability of the proposed method in resolving double sources. Compared with the traditional PSR strategy in which the PSR was determined by the surface flux distribution, the proposed method obtained much more accurate and encouraging localization and resolution results. Preliminary results showed that the proposed SPECT-guided reconstruction method was insensitive to the regularization methods and ignored the heterogeneity of tissues which can avoid the segmentation procedure of the organs.

  5. Electrical Impedance Tomography-guided PEEP Titration in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Abdominal Surgery.

    He, Xingying; Jiang, Jingjing; Liu, Yuli; Xu, Haitao; Zhou, Shuangqiong; Yang, Shibo; Shi, Xueyin; Yuan, Hongbin

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study is to utilize electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to guide positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and to optimize oxygenation in patients undergoing laparoscopic abdominal surgery.Fifty patients were randomly assigned to the control (C) group and the EIT (E) group (n = 25 each). We set the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) at 0.30. The PEEP was titrated and increased in a 2-cm H2O stepwise manner, from 6 to 14 cm H2O. Hemodynamic variables, respiratory mechanics, EIT images, analysis of blood gas, and regional cerebral oxygen saturation were recorded. The postoperative pulmonary complications within the first 5 days were also observed.We chose 10 cm H2O and 8 cm H2O as the "ideal" PEEP for the C and the E groups, respectively. EIT-guided PEEP titration led to a more dorsal shift of ventilation. The PaO2/FiO2 ratio in the E group was superior to that in the C group in the pneumoperitoneum period, though the difference was not significant (330 ± 10 vs 305.56 ± 4 mm Hg; P = 0.09). The C group patients experienced 8.7% postoperative pulmonary complications versus 5.3% among the E group patients (relative risk 1.27, 95% confidence interval 0.31-5.3, P = 0.75).Electrical impedance tomography represents a new promising technique that could enable anesthesiologists to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and optimize global oxygenation for patients undergoing laparoscopic abdominal surgery. PMID:27057904

  6. Computed tomography to quantify tooth abrasion

    Kofmehl, Lukas; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Filippi, Andreas; Hotz, Gerhard; Berndt-Dagassan, Dorothea; Kramis, Simon; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography, also termed digital volume tomography, has become a standard technique in dentistry, allowing for fast 3D jaw imaging including denture at moderate spatial resolution. More detailed X-ray images of restricted volumes for post-mortem studies in dental anthropology are obtained by means of micro computed tomography. The present study evaluates the impact of the pipe smoking wear on teeth morphology comparing the abraded tooth with its contra-lateral counterpart. A set of 60 teeth, loose or anchored in the jaw, from 12 dentitions have been analyzed. After the two contra-lateral teeth were scanned, one dataset has been mirrored before the two datasets were registered using affine and rigid registration algorithms. Rigid registration provides three translational and three rotational parameters to maximize the overlap of two rigid bodies. For the affine registration, three scaling factors are incorporated. Within the present investigation, affine and rigid registrations yield comparable values. The restriction to the six parameters of the rigid registration is not a limitation. The differences in size and shape between the tooth and its contra-lateral counterpart generally exhibit only a few percent in the non-abraded volume, validating that the contralateral tooth is a reasonable approximation to quantify, for example, the volume loss as the result of long-term clay pipe smoking. Therefore, this approach allows quantifying the impact of the pipe abrasion on the internal tooth morphology including root canal, dentin, and enamel volumes.

  7. Mathematics in computed tomography and related techniques

    The mathematical basis of computed tomography (CT) was formulated in 1917 by Radon. His theorem states that the 2-D function f(x,y) can be determined at all points from a complete set of its line integrals. Modern methods of image reconstruction include three approaches: algebraic reconstruction techniques with simultaneous iterative reconstruction or simultaneous algebraic reconstruction; convolution back projection; and the Fourier transform method. There is no one best approach. Because the experimental data do not strictly satisfy theoretical models, a number of effects have to be taken into account; in particular, the problems of beam geometry, finite beam dimensions and distribution, beam scattering, and the radiation source spectrum. Tomography with truncated data is of interest, employing mathematical approximations to compensate for the unmeasured projection data. Mathematical techniques in image processing and data analysis are also extensively used. 13 refs

  8. Fluorescence Computed Tomography with Polychromatic Source Data

    Fluorescence computed tomography is a synchrotron imaging technique aiming at reconstructing the fluorescence emission within a sample object. For a polychromatic source hitting the object, the amount of fluorescence detected is defined by a linear equation. For the monochromatic case, the operator is a Generalized Attenuated Radon Transform (GART). The main goal is to reconstruct the density function, given the sinogram data and the weight function. An eficient iterative algorithm for the inversion of the GART was presented recently by the authors. This inversion can only be performed if the weight function is previously known, which means that μ = μ(·, ε) and λ are also known. For monochromatic XFCT (acronym for x-rays fluorescence computed tomography), the determination of λ is a dificult task, and we have considered the approximation λ ≈ μ, which is valid for low energies ranging from 3Kev to 10Kev. So, for solving our problem, the first step is to find μ given the polychromatic sinogram. There are different approaches for this in the literature. Recently, an elegant and efficient method for solving this problem was introduced, using a fixed point algorithm. Opposite to this, where μ(·, ε) needs to be computed for all ε element of E, we claim that the integral of μ(·, ε) for all ε has a physical meaning and provides a good aproximation for the solution. Also we present fast algorithm for computations.

  9. Positron computed tomography: current state, clinical results and future trends

    An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends

  10. Diagnostic value for extrahepatic metastases of hepatocellular carcinoma in positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluated the value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan in diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and extrahepatic metastases.

  11. Computed tomography in staging of oesophageal carcinoma

    Salonen, O.; Kivisaari, L.; Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G.; Somer, K.; Virkkunen, P.

    1987-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 45 patients with histologically proved oesophageal carcinoma are reviewed. In 20 of these patients the CT findings were correlated with findings at surgery (19 patients) or autopsy (1 patient). Correlation analysis showed that the accuracy of CT in assessing both invasion of adjacent organs and mediastinal and abdominal lymph node involvement is limited. 25 patients were considered inoperable. In 15 of these conclusion was based on CT findings of distant metastases (14 patients) or definite local invasion (1 patient). 10 patients were inoperable for other reasons (general health condition). The value of CT was found to be in detecting distant metastases, thus avoiding unnecessary radical surgery. It is not a reliable way of defining the primary tumour.

  12. Computed tomography of infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed on five infants with hepatic hemangioendothelioma. Precontrast scans showed solitary or multiple, homogeneous, circumscribed areas with reduced attenuation values. Tiny tumoral calcifications were identified in two patients. Serial scans, after injection of a bolus of contrast material, showed early massive enhancement, which was either diffuse or peripheral. On delayed scans, multinocular tumors became isodense with surrounding liver, while all solitary ones showed varied degrees of centripetal enhancement and persistent central cleftlike unenhanced areas. The authors believe that these CT features are characteristic and obviate arteriographic confirmation

  13. Multidetector Computed Tomography in Acute Joint Fractures

    Haapamaeki, V.V.; Kiuru, M.J.; Mustonen, A.O.; Koskinen, S.K. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Helsinki Medical Imaging Center

    2005-10-01

    Conventional radiography plays an essential diagnostic role in the primary evaluation of acute joint trauma. In complex fractures, however, computed tomography (CT) is an imaging modality often used second to radiography. As a result of technical breakthroughs in the field, multidetector CT (MDCT) allows faster imaging and better temporal, spatial, and contrast resolution compared with conventional single-slice spiral CT. MDCT with multiplanar reformation is helpful in disclosing fracture patterns, particularly in complex joint fractures, where they reveal occult fractures and show the exact number of fracture components and their degree of displacement.

  14. Quantitative computed tomography in assessment of osteoporosis

    Osteoporosis is a common disorder with considerable health risk and medical care cost. Recent advances in technology have provided new opportunities for evaluating bone mass noninvasively that may impact substantially on the detection and course of osteoporotic conditions. The laboratory and clinical results presented herein indicate that quantitative computed tomography provides a reliable means to evaluate and monitor the many forms of osteoporosis and the various interventions aimed at ameliorating this condition. The greatest advantages of spinal QCT for noninvasive bone mineral measurement lie in the high precision of the technique, the high sensitivity of the vertebral spongiosa measurement site, and the potential for widespread application

  15. Multidetector Computed Tomography in Acute Joint Fractures

    Conventional radiography plays an essential diagnostic role in the primary evaluation of acute joint trauma. In complex fractures, however, computed tomography (CT) is an imaging modality often used second to radiography. As a result of technical breakthroughs in the field, multidetector CT (MDCT) allows faster imaging and better temporal, spatial, and contrast resolution compared with conventional single-slice spiral CT. MDCT with multiplanar reformation is helpful in disclosing fracture patterns, particularly in complex joint fractures, where they reveal occult fractures and show the exact number of fracture components and their degree of displacement

  16. Computed tomography of cardiac pseudotumors and neoplasms.

    Anavekar, Nandan S; Bonnichsen, Crystal R; Foley, Thomas A; Morris, Michael F; Martinez, Matthew W; Williamson, Eric E; Glockner, James F; Miller, Dylan V; Breen, Jerome F; Araoz, Philip A

    2010-07-01

    Important features of cardiac masses can be clearly delineated on cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging. This modality is useful in identifying the presence of a mass, its relationship with cardiac and extracardiac structures, and the features that distinguish one type of mass from another. A multimodality approach to the evaluation of cardiac tumors is advocated, with the use of echocardiography, CT imaging and magnetic resonance imaging as appropriately indicated. In this article, various cardiac masses are described, including pseudotumors and true cardiac neoplasms, and the CT imaging findings that may be useful in distinguishing these rare entities are presented. PMID:20705174

  17. Computed tomography after percutaneous renal stone extraction

    Eighty patients were examined with computed tomography (CT) of the kidney and the retroperitoneal space after percutaneous stone extraction. Most examinations were done within a week after the operation. The morphologic changes were usually small or none. In 7 patients minor renal or perirenal fluid collections were found. Their operations had been complicated by bleeding or leakage. In 66 patients CT was compared with conventional radiographs. Residual stones were more often detected by CT. They were usually small. Percutaneous renal stone extraction is considered a safe and efficient method. (orig.)

  18. Computed tomography studies of human brain movements

    Rhythmic brain movements have been revealed by sets of sequential computed tomography scans of human brains (seen retrospectively to be normal). These scans have shown that both (unenhanced) brain parenchymal density and the shapes of the elements of the supratentorial ventricular/cisternal system are subject to wave motions having similar periods - ranging from 26 s through 56 s, 77-96 s, 109 s and 224 s to 224 X 2 s (or even longer), with good correlation between peak values. These motions, as well as phase variations between the waves, suggest a peristaltic movement of cerebrospinal fluid through the ventricular/cisternal system with progressive axial damping

  19. Calculation of profitability in computer tomography (CT)

    The comments do not refer to a specific type of whole body computer tomography which made it necessary to base the calculations on mean values with regard to both initial costs and operating costs. The calculation of the receipts was based on the resulting costs, mean long-term utilization of the unit and on a reasonable period of amortization. The model calculation indicates that the break-even point is reached with 1,920 annual examinations and a five-year amortization period. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MB

  20. Importance of defect detectability in Positron Emission Tomography imaging of abdominal lesions

    Shozo Yamashita

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: This study was designed to assess defect detectability in positron emission tomography (PET imaging of abdominal lesions. Methods: A National Electrical Manufactures Association International Electrotechnical Commission phantom was used. The simulated abdominal lesion was scanned for 10 min using dynamic list-mode acquisition method. Images, acquired with scan duration of 1-10 min, were reconstructed using VUE point HD and a 4.7 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM Gaussian filter. Iteration-subset combinations of 2-16 and 2-32 were used. Visual and physical analyses were performed using the acquired images. To sequentially evaluate defect detectability in clinical settings, we examined two middle-aged male subjects. One had a liver cyst (approximately 10 mm in diameter and the other suffered from pancreatic cancer with an inner defect region (approximately 9 mm in diameter. Results: In the phantom study, at least 6 and 3 min acquisition durations were required to visualize 10 and 13 mm defect spheres, respectively. On the other hand, spheres with diameters ≥17 mm could be detected even if the acquisition duration was only 1 min. The visual scores were significantly correlated with background (BG variability. In clinical settings, the liver cyst could be slightly visualized with an acquisition duration of 6 min, although image quality was suboptimal. For pancreatic cancer, the acquisition duration of 3 min was insufficient to clearly describe the defect region. Conclusion: The improvement of BG variability is the most important factor for enhancing lesion detection. Our clinical scan duration (3 min/bed may not be suitable for the detection of small lesions or accurate tumor delineation since an acquisition duration of at least 6 min is required to visualize 10 mm lesions, regardless of reconstruction parameters. Improvements in defect detectability are important for radiation treatment planning and accurate PET-based diagnosis.

  1. Emerging clinical applications of computed tomography

    Liguori C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Carlo Liguori,1 Giulia Frauenfelder,2 Carlo Massaroni,3 Paola Saccomandi,3 Francesco Giurazza,4 Francesca Pitocco,4 Riccardo Marano,5 Emiliano Schena,3 1Radiology Unit, AORN A Cardarelli, 2Radiology Unit, AOU Federico II, Naples, 3Measurement and Biomedical Instrumentation Unit, 4Radiology Unit, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, 5Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of Rome, A Gemelli University Hospital, Rome, Italy Abstract: X-ray computed tomography (CT has recently been experiencing remarkable growth as a result of technological advances and new clinical applications. This paper reviews the essential physics of X-ray CT and its major components. Also reviewed are recent promising applications of CT, ie, CT-guided procedures, CT-based thermometry, photon-counting technology, hybrid PET-CT, use of ultrafast-high pitch scanners, and potential use of dual-energy CT for material differentiations. These promising solutions and a better knowledge of their potentialities should allow CT to be used in a safe and effective manner in several clinical applications. Keywords: computed tomography, X-ray, thermometry, dual-energy, ultrafast scanner, guidance, photon-counting technology

  2. Microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Zhang, Kun; Li, Changqing

    2015-03-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) was emerged as a new hybrid imaging modality, in which the x-rays are used to excite phosphors emitting optical photons to be measured for imaging. In this paper, we reported a microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography (microXLCT) with a spatial resolution up to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets. We use a superfine x-ray pencil beam to scan the phosphor targets. The superfine x-ray pencil beam is generated by a small collimator mounted in front of a powerful x-ray tube (93212, Oxford Instrument). A CT detector is used to image the x-ray beam. We have generated an x-ray beam with a diameter of 192 micrometers with a collimator of 100 micrometers in diameter. The emitted optical photons on the top surface of phantom are reflected by a mirror and acquired by an electron multiplier charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera (C9100-13, Hamamatsu Photonics). The microXLCT imaging system is built inside an x-ray shielding and light tight cabinet. The EMCCD camera is placed in a lead box. All the imaging components are controlled by a VC++ program. The optical photon propagation is modeled with the diffusion equation solved by the finite element method. We have applied different regularization methods including L2 and L1 in the microXLCT reconstruction algorithms. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments are used to validate the microXLCT imaging system.

  3. Computed tomography colonography (virtual colonoscopy): review

    Computed tomography examination of the colon performed after bowel cleansing and distension of the lumen with gas goes by several different names-CT colonography (CTC) and CT colography perhaps being the most common. Strictly, the term 'virtual colonoscopy' (VC), should be reserved for the process of examining 3-D, simulated endo-luminal images with a capability to navigate through the bowel using appropriate software. Computed tomography colonography appears to be the name that has gained favour among radiologists, although it is suspected that 'virtual colonoscopy' will persist as a generic term due to its attractive 'high-tech' connotations for non-radiological medical and lay persons. Whatever the name, the technique has been made possible through the advent of fast helical CT scanners which allow acquisition of a volume of data, and of proprietary software which enables multiplanar reformatting and 3-D endoluminal reconstructions. It is evident that if CTC/VC can be shown to be acceptable to patients, safe, affordable and accurate, it has enormous potential as a diagnostic and screening tool for colorectal neoplasia. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  4. Computed tomography of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

    It is well known that computed tomography (CT) is useful in detecting accurately the location, extent, erosion and relationship of angiofibroma to surrounding structures such as pterygopalation fossa. It is well known that computed tomography (CT) is useful in detecting accurately the location, sphenoid sinus, and etc. CT of 20 patients with juvenile angiofibroma, which were examined for 5 yeas from February, 1979 to May, 1984 at Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, were retrospectively analyzed. The results were as follows: 1. All 20 patients of juvenile angiofibroma had tumors in nasopharynx and posterior nasal cavity showing homogeneously dense-enhancing soft tissue mass on CT. There was extension of the tumor from nasopharynx and posterior nasal cavity into paranasal sinus (60%, 12/20), pterygopalatine fossa (55%, 11/20), infratemporal fossa (30%, 6/20), posterior orbit (10%, 2/20) and cranial cavity (15%, 3/20). 2. Angiogrpahy usually adds little diagnostic information, but is still needed to identify the precise source of blood supply to the tumor, and to perform the pre-operative embolization. The use of CT has deferred angiography until just before surgery, permitting embolization at optimal time. 3. CT is almost always necessary to reveal accurately the full extent of the tumor, especially intracranial space in the axial and coronal planes with contrast enhancement. CT is useful both in diagnosis as a guide to angiography and in planning the adequate therapy of juvenile angiofibroma

  5. Salmonellosis mimicking abdominal lymphoma in a young boy

    We report on a child with intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly due to salmonellosis, whose initial diagnosis was erroneously based on computed tomography (CT) findings suggestive of abdominal lymphoma. Awareness that salmonellosis can produce large abdominal masses should assist in ruling out neoplastic disease in the differential diagnosis, thus avoiding unnecessary laparotomy. (orig.)

  6. Computed tomography of post-traumatic orbito-palpebral emphysema

    Nose, H.; Kohno, K. (Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1981-11-01

    Two cases of orbito-palpebral emphysema are described. Both having a history of recent facial trauma, emphysema occurred after blowing the nose. They were studied by computed tomography and plain x-ray film, including tomograms of the orbit. The emphysema was revealed by computed tomography and x-ray film, but more clearly by the former technique. The fracture lines of the orbit were revealed in only one case by x-ray film, but in both cases by computed tomography. The authors stress that computed tomography is the best technique for the study of orbital emphysema.

  7. Computed tomography of post-traumatic orbito-palpebral emphysema

    Two cases of orbito-palpebral emphysema are described. Both having a history of recent facial trauma, emphysema occurred after blowing the nose. They were studied by computed tomography and plain x-ray film, including tomograms of the orbit. The emphysema was revealed by computed tomography and x-ray film, but more clearly by the former technique. The fracture lines of the orbit were revealed in only one case by x-ray film, but in both cases by computed tomography. The authors stress that computed tomography is the best technique for the study of orbital emphysema. (author)

  8. Computed tomography of the vesicular glands: anatomical animal model (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    Spiral CT is a non-invasive imaging method of choice for animal anatomical studies. The aim of the study was to establish the imaging anatomical features of the vesicular glands in the rabbit. Eight sexually mature healthy clinically male New Zealand rabbits of 18 months of age with body weight from 2.8 kg to 3.2 kg were used. The animals were anesthetized. As contrast medium Opti-ray350 was administrated. The computed tomography scan was complied with certain bone and soft tissue markers. For this purpose, a whole body multi-slice spiral computed tomography scanner was used. The both soft tissue glands were heterogeneous and relatively hyperdense structures, and defined in detail from the adjacent soft tissues. The urinary bladder neck was ventrally to the glands. Both vesicular glands were better differentiated each other when the rabbit is examined in abdominal recumbence. In dorsal recumbence the shape of the transversal image of the glandular finding was oval. In abdominal recumbence both the left and right soft tissue vesicular gland were defined. Transversal anatomical computed tomographic investigation of the rabbit vesicular gland is a detailed and definitive method, to study the normal morphology of these glands. Key words: Vesicular Gland. Helical Computed Tomography. Anatomy. Rabbit

  9. A case of splenic abscess diagnosed by computed tomography

    A 71-year-old man became febrile with transient pain of left upper quadrant for one or two days and admitted to prior hospital. He was treated with various antibiotics during about two months in prior hospital, but his fever continued and small amount of left pleural effusions were occasionally observed at his chest X-ray film. He was removed to Suibarago Hospital on July 17, 1980 introduced by prior hospital. On admission his temperature was 38.7 0C, abdominal pain and jaundice were not present, liver, spleen and kidneys were not palpable. The WBC count was 19800/mm3 with 76 % neutrophils and CRP reaction was 6+. No abnormality was found in his hepatic- and renal-function. Blood cultures were negative. A computed tomography (CT) of upper abdominal region showed irregular shaped multiple (maximum size: 2.5 x 3.5 cm in diameter) low density areas in enlarged spleen at the left upper side of left kidney. The diagnosis of multiple spleenic abscess was made and chemotherapy was instituted with clindamycin, dibekacin and cefotetan. Clinical symptomes were not changed and CT findings after three weeks were stationary. Splenectomy was performed on August 21. The spleen was covered with adherent surroundings organs namely stomach, diaphragm, colon and omentum. Abscesses were present in various sized yellowish granulomatous lesions. Aerobic and anaerobic culture of purulent materials yielded no growth. The patient recovered and discharged on November 9. CT is a non-invasive and valuable technique in diagnosis of splenic abscess. (author)

  10. A case report with Weber-Christian disease which recognized interesting abdominal lesions by abdominal ultrasonography and computerized tomography

    A 59-year-old woman who had Weber-Christian disease associated with typical histological findings such as panniculitis was reported. The patient had painful subcutaneous nodules as the first symptom. She had diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis, which are reported to be rare complications of this disease. Abdominal ultrasonography and CT scanning revealed various sized cystic lesions and masses in the tail of pancreas. These findings have not yet been reported and seems to be rare in this disease. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Computed tomographic appearance of the abdominal lymphadenopathy due to tuberculosis

    CT appearances of two cases of abdominal tuberculous lymphadenopathy were reported. Enlarged lymph nodes with thick, irregular enhanced rim are characteristic findings of tuberculous lymphadenopathy. Non-enhanded center of the tuberculous lymph nodes is compatible with caseous necrosis. With CT tuberculous lymph nodes could be differentiated from lymph nodous and metastatic lymph nodes which show no contrast enhancement or thin rim-like enhancement. (author)

  12. Diagnostic role of fluorine-18 (18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography in detecting recurrent disease in patients with colorectal cancer and elevated carcinoembryonic antigen

    Matovina Emil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Early detection of recurrence is an important factor for long term survival of patients with colorectal cancer. Measurement of serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen has been commonly used in the postoperative surveillance of colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of positron emission tomography-computed tomography to detect pathological substrate of elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen in patients with colorectal cancer. Material and Methods. The patients with colorectal cancer who underwent curative surgical resection and/ or chemotherapy, who were found in our database, were analyzed retrospectively. Forty-eight 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography studies including 45 patients (14 women, 31 men; mean age: 62.93 years with elevated serum, carcinoembryonic antigen levels, which had been performed between January 2011 and January 2014, were evaluated. Serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen were measured within 3 months after positron emission tomography-computed tomography examination. Final diagnosis of recurrence was made by histopathological findings, radiology studies or clinical follow-up. Results. Recurrences were diagnosed in 37 patients, the prevalence being 77.1%. Liver metastases were found in 18 patients, abdominal, pelvic and/or mediastinal lymph nodes were positive in 19 patients, 11 patients had loco regional recurrences and 4 patients had pulmonary metastasis, and bone metastases were found in one patient. One patient was diagnosed with metastasis in scar tissue. The overall sensitivity and specificity of positron emission tomography-computed tomography was 90.24% and 71.42%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 94.87% and 55.56%, respectively. Conclusion. 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography is a powerful tool that could be used in determining colorectal cancer recurrence in

  13. Technological Evolution on Computed Tomography and Radioprotection

    Computed Tomography (CT) has been available since the 70s and has experienced a dramatic technical evolution. Multi-detector technology is our current standard, offering capabilities unthinkable only a decade ago. Yet, we must nor forget the ionizing nature of CT's scanning energy (X-rays). It represents the most important cause of medical-associated radiation exposure to the general public, with a trend to increase. It is compulsory to intervene with the objective of dose reduction, following ALARA policies. Currently there are some technical advances that allow dose reduction, without sacrificing diagnostic image capabilities. However, human intervention is also essential. We must keep investment on education so that CT exams are don when they are really useful in clinical decision. Alternative techniques should also be considered. Image quality must not be searched disregarding the biological effects of radiation. Generally, it is possible to obtain clinically acceptable images with lower dose protocols. (author)

  14. Computed tomography of primary intrahepatic biliary malignancy

    Fifteen patients with primary intrahepatic biliary malignancy (cholangiocarcinoma in 13, biliary cystadenocarcinoma in two) were examined by computed tomography (CT). The CT features were classified into three types: (A) a well-defined round cystic mass with internal papillary projections, (B) a localized intrahepatic biliary dilatation without a definite mass lesion, and (C) miscellaneous low-density masses. Intraphepatic biliary dilatation was noted in all cases of Types A and B and half of those of Type C; dilatation of extrahepatic bile ducts occurred in 4/4, 1/3, and 0/8, respectively. CT patterns, such as a well-defined round cystic mass with papillary projections or dilatation of intra- and extrahepatic ducts, give important clues leading to a correct diagnosis of primary intrahepatic biliary malignancy

  15. Radiation Protection in Paediatric Computed Tomography

    The number of examinations with radiation exposure has been increasing mainly due to advances in computed tomography (CT) technology, with a rapid expansion of CT utilization. Annually, 3.6 billion diagnostic and medical and dental examinations involving radiation are performed worldwide. The contribution of CT to collective dose due to medical X rays is up to 47–59%. A 2009 report of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) estimates that 8–10% of CT examinations in the United States of America are performed on children; the growth in CT utilization is higher in the paediatric than adult population in the USA; and there is a particularly pronounced rise in adolescents undergoing chest CT in the emergency department setting for suspected pulmonary embolism or trauma. The reasons for the growing incidence of CT are new indications for CT with the advent of multidetector CT, overcautious ordering related to medico-legal problems and probably financial incentive systems

  16. Radiation Protection of Patients in Computed Tomography

    The use of radiation for medical diagnostic examinations contributes over 95% of human-made radiation exposure and is only exceeded by natural background as a source of exposure to the world’s population. In fact, for several developed countries, the increased use of high dose X ray technology, in particular, computed tomography (CT), has resulted in a situation in which the annual collective and per capita doses of ionizing radiation due to diagnostic radiology have exceeded those from natural background radiation. In light of this marked increase in worldwide collective effective dose from medical diagnostic procedures, and with CT scans accounting for half of this, there is great emphasis on the subject of radiation protection of patients in CT

  17. Quality assessment of clinical computed tomography

    Berndt, Dorothea; Luckow, Marlen; Lambrecht, J. Thomas; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2008-08-01

    Three-dimensional images are vital for the diagnosis in dentistry and cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Artifacts caused by highly absorbing components such as metallic implants, however, limit the value of the tomograms. The dominant artifacts observed are blowout and streaks. Investigating the artifacts generated by metallic implants in a pig jaw, the data acquisition for the patients in dentistry should be optimized in a quantitative manner. A freshly explanted pig jaw including related soft-tissues served as a model system. Images were recorded varying the accelerating voltage and the beam current. The comparison with multi-slice and micro computed tomography (CT) helps to validate the approach with the dental CT system (3D-Accuitomo, Morita, Japan). The data are rigidly registered to comparatively quantify their quality. The micro CT data provide a reasonable standard for quantitative data assessment of clinical CT.

  18. Polychromatic phase-contrast computed tomography

    Polychromatic phase-contrast radiography differs from traditional (absorption-only) radiography in that the method requires at least a partially coherent x-ray source and the resulting images contain information about the phase shifts of x-rays in addition to the traditional absorption information. In a typical embodiment, this effect results in a measurable enhancement in image contrast at the edges of objects. In this study, a phase-contrast imaging system was adapted to allow an object to be imaged at multiple projections, and these projections were used to generate phase-contrast computed tomography images. The images obtained with this technique show edge enhancements surrounding the objects within the image

  19. Data processing device for computed tomography system

    A data processing device applied to a computed tomography system which examines a living body utilizing radiation of X-rays is disclosed. The X-rays which have penetrated the living body are converted into electric signals in a detecting section. The electric signals are acquired and converted from an analog form into a digital form in a data acquisition section, and then supplied to a matrix data-generating section included in the data processing device. By this matrix data-generating section are generated matrix data which correspond to a plurality of projection data. These matrix data are supplied to a partial sum-producing section. The partial sums respectively corresponding to groups of the matrix data are calculated in this partial sum-producing section and then supplied to an accumulation section. In this accumulation section, the final value corresponding to the total sum of the matrix data is calculated, whereby the calculation for image reconstruction is performed

  20. Computed tomography findings in convergent strabismus fixus

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) of the eyeball and orbit revealed the cause of eye movement disorder in convergent strabismus fixus. The findings suggest that the disease can be diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Twelve cases of progressive esotropia with high myopia and 20 cases with normal visual acuity served as subjects in this study. The CT slice was parallel to the German horizontal plane, and the lens and medial and lateral rectus muscles were scanned. The average axial length of the affected eyes was significantly longer than in normal eyes. In progressive esotropia, the characteristic CT findings are an elongated eyeball, mechanical contact between the eyeball and lateral wall of the orbit, and a downward displacement of the lateral rectus muscle. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that eye movement disorder in convergent strabismus fixus results from weakness of the lateral rectus muscle which has been displaced downward due to compression of the eyeball against the orbital wall. (author)

  1. PRIMA+: a proton computed tomography apparatus

    The proton Computed Tomography (pCT) is a medical imaging method, based on the use of proton beams with kinetic energy of the order of 250 MeV, aimed to directly measure the stopping power distribution of tissues thus improving the present accuracy of treatment planning in hadron therapy. A pCT system should be capable to measure tissue electron density with an accuracy better than 1% and a spatial resolution better than 1 mm. The blurring effect due to multiple Coulomb scattering can be mitigated by single proton tracking technique. As a first step towards pCT the PRIMA+ Collaboration built a prototype capable to carry out a single radiography and a tomographic image of a rotating object. This apparatus includes a silicon microstrip tracker to identify the proton trajectory and a YAG:Ce calorimeter to measure the particle residual energy.

  2. Interpolation method in simple computed tomography scanner

    Wiguna, Gede A.

    2015-03-01

    A method for sinogram data interpolation based on a sinusoidal pattern in computed tomography has been developed. Sampled sinograms were acquired based on angular interval scanning of 5o, 10o, and 20o. Then each resulted sinogram was interpolated following sinusoidal pattern to make a complete full scanning sinogram as if they were sampled at 1o. After that, a formal summation convolved filtered back projection was applied to each sinogram to yield a crosssectional image. This method was successfully interpolated limited number of projections data to obtained complete sinogram. It works for simple and homogenous object. However, for high variation of physical properties, e.g. linear attenuation coefficient values, this method needs more consideration on interpolation strategies to produce good image.

  3. Reporting of Dose in Computed Tomography

    Meaningful measurement and reporting of dose is an ongoing quest in computed tomography (CT). Expressions such as CTDIvol and dose length product are frequently used, but they describe machine output rather than dose to the patient. Further, they can be misleading when certain dose sparing technologies are employed. Size specific dose estimate has been proposed by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine as a more meaningful measure, but it approximates the mean dose to the patient centre rather than the dose to any specific organ. For estimates of patient risk, doses to specific organs are needed, but these are difficult to obtain. Medical physicists continue to try to resolve these issues, so that more meaningful estimates of dose from CT can be acquired. In the meantime, authors of scientific articles should be dissuaded from using meaningless expressions such as ‘low dose’ and ‘ultra-low dose’ in their descriptions of CT procedures. (author)

  4. Advanced proton imaging in computed tomography

    Mattiazzo, S; Giubilato, P; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Snoeys, W; Wyss, J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. Proton computed tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, provide the ultimate 3D imaging for hadrons treatment guidance. A key component of a pCT scanner is the detector used to track the protons, which has great impact on the scanner performances and ultimately limits its maximum speed. In this article, a novel proton-tracking detector was presented that would have higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. This advancement in performances is achieved by employing the very latest development in monolithic active pixel detectors (to build high granularity, low material budget, ...

  5. Computed tomography of the abnormal thymus

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.; Levitt, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) should be the imaging method of choice following plain chest radiographs when a suspected thymic abnormality requires further evaluation. Based upon a six-year experience, including the evaluation of 25 patients with thymic pathology, CT was found useful in suggesting or excluding a diagnosis of thymoma and in distinguishing thymic hyperplasis from thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis. The thickness of the thymic lobes determined by CT was found to be a more accurate indicator of infiltrative disease (thymic hyperplasia and lymphoma) than the width. CT was helpful in differentiating benign thymic cysts from solid tumors, and in defining the extent of a thymic neoplasms. On occasion, CT may suggest the specific histologic nature of a thymic lesion.

  6. Computer tomography of intracranial tumours and hematomas

    The value of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of intracranial tumors and hematomas was investigated in a retrospective study comprising 220 patients. All C.T.scans are reviewed and described in detail. To assess the diagnostic accuracy, the original interpretation of the C.T.scans was compared with that of conventional neuroradiological and neurophysiological examinations. The aspect on C.T. of the various types of tumors and hematomas proved to vary widely and specific features were seldom seen. This holds particularly for the malignant tumors. Benign tumors such as meningeomas, adenomas and neurilemmomas showed a rather easily identifiable and almost identical picture of the C.T.scan, and diagnosis had to be based mainly on differences in localization. The hematomas, with the exception of the older intracerebral ones, showed the most characteristic C.T.abnormalities. (Auth.)

  7. Computed tomography findings of malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Computed tomography (CT) findings were assessed in 7 patients with malignant mesothelioma. CT findings were also reviewed in 9 patients with lung cancer and pleuritis carcinomatosa and in 11 patients with tuberculous pleuritis. Five patients with malignant mesothelioma underwent CT scans twice, on admission and from 1 to 7 months after admission. Tuberculous pleuritis could be distinguished from pleuritis carcinomatosa and malignant mesothelioma by the presence or absence of pleural nodularity and chest wall invasion. Although it was difficult to identify specific CT features clearly distinguishing malignant mesothelioma from pleuritis carcinomatosa, characteristic findings of malignant mesothelioma appeared to include the rapid development and progression of pleural rind and a tendency to spread directly into the chest wall. We divided the pleural into the four regions; upper anterior, upper posterior, lower anterior and lower posterior regions. Pleural changes were more frequently seen in the lower pleural regions than in the upper pleural regions in malignant mesothelioma. (author)

  8. Computed tomography findings in convergent strabismus fixus

    Ohta, Michitaka; Iwashige, Hiroyasu; Hayashi, Takao; Maruo, Toshio [Teikyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-08-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) of the eyeball and orbit revealed the cause of eye movement disorder in convergent strabismus fixus. The findings suggest that the disease can be diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Twelve cases of progressive esotropia with high myopia and 20 cases with normal visual acuity served as subjects in this study. The CT slice was parallel to the German horizontal plane, and the lens and medial and lateral rectus muscles were scanned. The average axial length of the affected eyes was significantly longer than in normal eyes. In progressive esotropia, the characteristic CT findings are an elongated eyeball, mechanical contact between the eyeball and lateral wall of the orbit, and a downward displacement of the lateral rectus muscle. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that eye movement disorder in convergent strabismus fixus results from weakness of the lateral rectus muscle which has been displaced downward due to compression of the eyeball against the orbital wall. (author).

  9. [Spontaneous intraparenchymatous hemorrhage: findings at computed tomography].

    Soares, Celso Monteiro; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Rodrigues, Andréa de Jesus

    2004-09-01

    Computed tomography studies of 250 patients with spontaneous hemorrhage were examined in three hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The goal of this study was to identify the aspects of this disease that appear most frequently in this type of exam. Deep intracerebral hematomas have had the highest incidence followed by lobar hemorrhage, with thalamus being more frequently affected. Cerebellar hemorrhage was much rarer, with brainstem bleeding observed in few patients. The age group with a peak incidence was at 61 to 70 years. Headache was the most frequently related symptom and elevated levels of blood pressure were found in most of the cases. There was no pronounced difference as to predominance in either sex or side most affected but it was observed that the onset of this disease occurs at an earlier age in men than in women. Blood draining into the ventricular system occurred more frequently in deep hematomas. PMID:15334231

  10. Myocardial hypoperfusion on conventional contrast computed tomography.

    Ching, Shing; Chung, Tak Shun

    2015-10-01

    Non–electrocardiogram (ECG)–gated contrast computed tomography (CT) is commonly performed to exclude aortic dissection in chest pain patients. Besides evaluating the aorta for dissection flap, attention should be paid to the myocardium for areas of hypoenhancement that may suggest ischemia. Current models of multidetector CT enable assessment of myocardial perfusion with minimal motion artifact even without ECG gating. Transmural hypoenhancement with preserved wall thickness in a coronary distribution is highly specific for acute myocardial infarction. We report 2 cases of acute chest pain with initial nondiagnostic studies that underwent CT aortogram to exclude dissection. Instead, the CT showed myocardial hypoenhancement in left anterior descending artery territory. Myocardial hypoenhancement occurred before ST-segment elevation on ECG, suggesting that recognition of this important finding may lead to earlier revascularization decisions. PMID:26321167

  11. Perfusion computed tomography imaging of autoimmune pancreatitis

    Perfusion computed tomography (P-CT) is now available for the analysis of pancreatic blood flow. The aim of this study was to clarify pancreatic blood perfusion in AIP patients and the changes after steroid treatment. Color map imaging of P-CT and pancreatic time CT density curve (TDC) demonstrated that the pancreatic blood flow was attenuated in AIP patients. Pancreatic volumetric blood flow FV values of 11 AIP patients (82.7/min) were significantly lower than those of 12 normal controls (163.5/min, p=0.0006). AIP patients received steroid treatment and were re-examined, of these, 9 patients showed significantly elevated FV values after treatment (76.2/min and 109.8/min, p=0.0391, respectively). However, the changes of the values after the treatment differed in varying degrees among the individuals. P-CT is a useful method for the analysis of the blood flow in pancreatic diseases. (author)

  12. Computed tomography of the pituitary gland

    This book is written entirely to include the imaging of the pituitary gland by computed tomography (CT). The first three chapters illustrated technical aspects of scanning, anatomic depiction of the gland by CT, and the use of dynamic CT scanning for detecting and displaying abnormalities. The chapters discuss and illustrate various types of pathologic processes in and around the pituitary gland. One short but very helpful chapter demonstrates potential pitfalls due to the combination of anatomic variants and the geometry of CT sections. Some illustrations of disease processed are depicted by magnetic resonance imaging. All major types of pituitary diseases are illustrated. Lists of readily available English-language references are available. A small subject index is provided at the end of the book in which the illustrations are identified by use of a special numeric front

  13. Computed Tomography and Ultrasound of Omental Infarction in Children: Differential Diagnoses of Right Lower Quadrant Pain

    Omental infarction in children occurs rarely and is often confused with other diseases that cause right lower quadrant (RLQ) pain. This study evaluates ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of omental infarction in children with abdominal pain. The CT and US findings and clinical presentations of nine children diagnosed with omental infarction between 2005 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Distributions of abdominal pain in the patients included RLQ (n = 6), right upper quadrant (RUQ, n = 1), periumbilical (n = 1), and the epigastric (n = 1) region. All patients underwent abdominal CT, and three underwent abdominal US. On CT scan, a typical triangular, heterogeneous fatty mass was seen between the abdominal wall and ascending colon (n = 6) or hepatic flexure (n = 1). A fatty mass with an enhanced rim that mimicked acute appendagitis was present in two patients. The other two patients had diffuse fat infiltration without mass. On US, a heterogeneously hyperechoic omental mass was seen in the RLQ (n = 2) or RUQ (n = 1). Three patients underwent appendectomy and partial omentectomy, and pathology confirmed omental infarction. Knowledge of the typical imaging features of omental infarction and application for diagnosis are important for its differentiation from other conditions that also present with RLQ pain and can avoid unnecessary surgery.

  14. Utilidad de la tomografía computada en pacientes con dolor en fosa iliaca derecha: Apendicitis aguda y su diagnóstico diferencial Usefulness of computed tomography in patients with right inferior abdominal quadrant pain: acute appendicitis and its alternative diagnosis

    Sebastián Atilio Rossini

    2009-03-01

    fosa iliaca derecha. Conclusión: La TCH posee una elevada sensibilidad y especificidad para el diagnóstico de apendicitis aguda y para la evaluación y manejo de los pacientes con un cuadro de abdomen agudo de fosa iliaca derecha.Purpose: To review the tomography findings of the acute appendicitis, their complications and alternative diagnosis. To value the use of helicoidal computed tomography (HCT in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and in the study of patients with right inferior abdominal quadrant (RIQ pain and acute abdomen, for diagnosis and eventual complications, in order to decide treatment. Materials and method: For five months, the populations included in this retrospectively study were all patients delivered for presenting with RIQ pain for a HCT exam. These exams were made with oral and intravenous contrasts, when there were not contraindications. The HCT results were correlated with clinical follow up, surgery and histopathologic exams. Results: Over a total of 100 patients studied, 53 presented tomographic diagnosis of appendicitis, 22 of which presented perforation signs; 27 showed an alternative diagnosis (ovaries follicles, uretheral litiasis, tiphlitis, diverticulitis, colitis, salpingitis, 18 patients did not present tomographic findings to support the clinical symptoms and 2 presented indetermined results. These data represented a sensibility of 100%, specifity of 95,7%, positive predictiv value (PPV of 96,2% and negative predictiv value (NPV of 100% for the tomography diagnosis of acute appendicitis and a sensibility of 100%, specificity of 81,8%, PPV of 95,1% and NPV of 100% for the tomography diagnosis of the different etiology in patient with right inferior acute abdomen. Conclusion: HCT is extremely useful in the study of patients with acute abdomen with origin in the RIQ, not only to make a diagnosis, but also to evaluate the complications, so as to decide proper treatment.

  15. Effects of computed tomography contrast medium factors on contrast enhancement

    The various nonionic iodinated contrast media used in contrast computed tomography (CT) studies differ in terms of their composition, characteristics, and iodine concentration (mgI/ml), as well as the volume injected (ml). Compared with ionic iodinated contrast media, nonionic iodinated contrast media are low-osmolar agents, with different agents having different osmotic pressures. Using a custom-made phantom incorporating a semipermeable membrane, the osmotic flow rate (hounsfield unit (HU)/s) could easily be measured based on the observed increase in CT numbers, and the relationship between the osmotic pressure and the osmotic flow rate could be obtained (r2=0.84). In addition, taking the effects of patient size into consideration, the levels of contrast enhancement in the abdominal aorta (AA) and inferior vena cava (IVC) were compared among four types of CT contrast medium. The results showed differences in contrast enhancement in the IVC during the equilibrium phase depending on the type of contrast medium used. It was found that the factors responsible for the differences observed in enhancement in the IVC were the osmotic flow rate and the volume of the blood flow pathways in the circulatory system. It is therefore considered that the reproducibility of contrast enhancement is likely to be reduced in the examination of parenchymal organs, in which scanning must be performed during the equilibrium phase, even if the amount of iodine injected per unit body weight (mgI/kg) is maintained at a specified level. (author)

  16. Accuracy of computed tomography attenuation measurements for diagnosing anemia

    The purpose of this study was to determine which computed tomography (CT) attenuation parameter was the most appropriate to predict the presence or severity of anemia. The subjects of the study were 500 patients who had undergone a peripheral blood examination within 24 h of an unenhanced CT scan. Regions of interest were placed in the left ventricular (LV) cavity, thoracic and abdominal aortic lumens, inferior vena cava, and interventricular septum. The CT attenuation difference between the LV cavity and interventricular septum was also calculated. The relation between these measurements and the blood hemoglobin level was analyzed. In addition, using several selected parameters, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was also performed. The difference in CT attenuation between the LV cavity and interventricular septum revealed the greatest correlation. ROC analyses also revealed the greatest area under the ROC curve in the differences between CT attenuation. The best quantitative method for the diagnosis of anemia was the difference in CT attenuation between the left ventricle and interventricular septum. (author)

  17. Computed-Tomography-Guided Punctures Using a New Guidance Device

    PURPOSE: To evaluate a new adjunctive guidance device, a puncture guide, constructed to simplify computed tomography (CT)-guided punctures and to make the procedure more accurate and safe. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 17 patients referred for CT-guided punctures were included in the study. There were 10 thoracic and 7 abdominal or pelvic lesions with a mean maximum diameter of 29 ± 18 mm. All punctures were performed using a laser guide combined with the new device. The needle guide created a streak artefact in the image, indicating the needle path. RESULTS: The puncture was successful at the first attempt in 15 of the 17 patients. The artefact was visible in all patients, and in the majority there was a distinct artefact reaching from the entry point to the lesion. The deviation between the angle of the streak artefact and the final angle of the needle was 1.1 degrees. CONCLUSION: The benefits of the puncture guide were the artefact pointing at the target, the needle support, and accuracy when performing CT-guided punctures

  18. IMPLICATIONS OF PATIENT CENTRING ON ORGAN DOSE IN COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY.

    Kataria, Bharti; Sandborg, Michael; Althén, Jonas Nilsson

    2016-06-01

    Automatic exposure control (AEC) in computed tomography (CT) facilitates optimisation of dose absorbed by the patient. The use of AEC requires appropriate 'patient centring' within the gantry, since positioning the patient off-centre may affect both image quality and absorbed dose. The aim of this experimental study was to measure the variation in organ and abdominal surface dose during CT examinations of the head, neck/thorax and abdomen. The dose was compared at the isocenter with two off-centre positions-ventral and dorsal to the isocenter. Measurements were made with an anthropomorphic adult phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters. Organs and surfaces for ventral regions received lesser dose (5.6-39.0 %) than the isocenter when the phantom was positioned +3 cm off-centre. Similarly, organ and surface doses for dorsal regions were reduced by 5.0-21.0 % at -5 cm off-centre. Therefore, correct vertical positioning of the patient at the gantry isocenter is important to maintain optimal imaging conditions. PMID:26743256

  19. Percutaneous biopsy and drainage guided by computed tomography

    As well as ultrasonography and fluoroscopy, computed tomography has been used to guide percutaneous interventional procedures. As a major advantage of CT over other imaging technique is its exellent spatial resolution, most frequently used to guide for biopsy of lesions not easily demonstrated by other imaging techniques and for percutaneous drainage of intra-abdominal fluid collections to avoid the adjacent visceras. We utilized CT to guide percutaneous histologic and cytologic biopsies for 29 tumors and catheter drainage of 14 fluid collections. Among biopsy cases, both success rates and accuracy rates were higher in histologic biopsies than in cytologic aspirations. In additions, no major complication has occured in histologic biopsies using transgluteal or transretroperitoneal approaches. In drainage cases, high success rate was obtained with no significant complication, whereas in most cases ultrasonographic or fluoroscopic guidances were thought to be difficult. We conclude that CT guided percutaneous interventional procedures are useful and safe, and ought to be utilized more frequently in adequetly selected cases. (author)

  20. Role of computed tomography in pancreatic trauma

    At Yonsei University Hospital from January 1984 to August 1990, computed tomographic (CT) scans of 13 patients with surgically proven pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma, including 6 pancreatic lacerations or contusions, 6 pancreatic fractures, and one post-traumatic pseudocyst, were retrospectively reviewed to determine the role and accuracy of the CT in evaluating pancreatic injury. CT can document gross pancreatic injury by showing focal or diffuse enlargement (1), area of diminished attenuation (3), separation (5), focal hematoma (2), and peripancreatic change, including peripancreatic hematoma (2), fluid collection (11), perirenal fascial thickening (10), omental and mesenteric change (5), and bowel change (2). CT correctly diagnosed pancreatic fracture in 5 cases, post-raumatic pseudocyst in 1 case, and pancreatic laceration in 3 cases in 9 of these patients. There were 4 false negative diagnoses, including 3 pancreatic lacerations and 1 pancreatic fracture. A CT is of pancreatic trauma could be difficult to diagnosis in patients who are scanned within 24 hrs after an injury or to distinguish a motion or streak artifact caused by a nasogastric tube or air-oral contrast fluid level in the stomach

  1. Role of computed tomography in pancreatic trauma

    Kim, Sun Hee; Kim, Ki Whang; Lee, Jong Tae; Oh, Sei Jung [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-03-15

    At Yonsei University Hospital from January 1984 to August 1990, computed tomographic (CT) scans of 13 patients with surgically proven pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma, including 6 pancreatic lacerations or contusions, 6 pancreatic fractures, and one post-traumatic pseudocyst, were retrospectively reviewed to determine the role and accuracy of the CT in evaluating pancreatic injury. CT can document gross pancreatic injury by showing focal or diffuse enlargement (1), area of diminished attenuation (3), separation (5), focal hematoma (2), and peripancreatic change, including peripancreatic hematoma (2), fluid collection (11), perirenal fascial thickening (10), omental and mesenteric change (5), and bowel change (2). CT correctly diagnosed pancreatic fracture in 5 cases, post-raumatic pseudocyst in 1 case, and pancreatic laceration in 3 cases in 9 of these patients. There were 4 false negative diagnoses, including 3 pancreatic lacerations and 1 pancreatic fracture. A CT is of pancreatic trauma could be difficult to diagnosis in patients who are scanned within 24 hrs after an injury or to distinguish a motion or streak artifact caused by a nasogastric tube or air-oral contrast fluid level in the stomach.

  2. Diagnosis of lumbar disc hernia with computed tomography

    Yoshizumi, Atsuro; Ohira, Nobuhiro; Ojima, Tadashi; Oshida, Midori; Horaguchi, Mitsuru (Tohoku Rosai Hospital, Sendai (Japan))

    1982-07-01

    Results of computed tomography performed on patients with clinically diagnosed hernia were compared with those of myelography and operative findings. This comparative study suggested that computed tomography is quite different from other methods and very useful in diagnosis of hernia. Some cases of hernia were shown, and the characteristics of CT were reviewed.

  3. 21 CFR 1020.33 - Computed tomography (CT) equipment.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computed tomography (CT) equipment. 1020.33... Computed tomography (CT) equipment. (a) Applicability. (1) The provisions of this section, except for paragraphs (b), (c)(1), and (c)(2) are applicable as specified herein to CT x-ray systems manufactured...

  4. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings in lipoid pneumonia.

    Bréchot, J M; Buy, J N; Laaban, J P; Rochemaure, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia was documented by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Although strongly suggesting the presence of fat on T1 weighted images, magnetic resonance does not produce images specific for this condition. Computed tomography is the best imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  5. Diagnosis of lumbar disc hernia with computed tomography

    Results of computed tomography performed on patients with clinically diagnosed hernia were compared with those of myelography and operative findings. This comparative study suggested that computed tomography is quite different from other methods and very useful in diagnosis of hernia. Some cases of hernia were shown, and the characteristics of CT were reviewed. (Ueda, J.)

  6. Computed tomography of the central nervous system in small animals

    With computed tomography in 44 small animals some well defined anatomical structures and pathological processes of the central nervous system are described. Computed tomography is not only necessary for the diagnosis of tumors; malformations, inflammatory, degenerative and vascular diseases and traumas are also visible

  7. Effective dose estimates for cone beam computed tomography in interventional radiology

    To compare radiation doses in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with those of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) using manufacturers' standard protocols. Dose-levels in head and abdominal imaging were evaluated using a dosimetric phantom. Effective dose estimates were performed by placing thermoluminescent dosimeters in the phantom. Selected protocols for two CBCT systems and comparable protocols for one MDCT system were evaluated. Organ doses were measured and effective doses derived by applying the International Commission on Radiological Protection 2007 tissue weighting factors. Effective doses estimated for the head protocol were 4.4 and 5.4 mSv for the two CBCT systems respectively and 4.3 mSv for MDCT. Eye doses for one CBCT system and MDCT were comparable (173.6 and 148.4 mGy respectively) but significantly higher compared with the second CBCT (44.6 mGy). Two abdominal protocols were evaluated for each system; the effective doses estimated were 15.0 and 18.6 mSv, 25.4 and 37.0 mSv, and 9.8 and 13.5 mSv, respectively, for each of the CBCT and MDCT systems. The study demonstrated comparable dose-levels for CBCT and MDCT systems in head studies, but higher dose levels for CBCT in abdominal studies. There was a significant difference in eye doses observed between the CBCT systems. (orig.)

  8. The role of computed tomography in the laryngeal injury

    Bae, Hoon Sik [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-03-15

    Computed tomography of the larynx represents a major advance in laryngology. Even in severe injury the larynx can be examined easily and conveniently by CT at the same time as the brain and facial structures without moving the patient, who need only lie down and breathe quietly during the study. Computed tomography permitted a much more detailed appraisal of laryngeal dysfunction in patients with blunt laryngeal trauma (3 cases) and strangulation injury (2 cases). Computed tomography of the larynx undoubtedly played a determinant role in patient management. Computed tomography was helpful in evaluating the laryngeal cartilages and deep spaces of the larynx which was difficult to examine by the laryngoscope. Follow-up computed tomography made it possible to evaluate the postoperative results.

  9. The role of computed tomography in the laryngeal injury

    Computed tomography of the larynx represents a major advance in laryngology. Even in severe injury the larynx can be examined easily and conveniently by CT at the same time as the brain and facial structures without moving the patient, who need only lie down and breathe quietly during the study. Computed tomography permitted a much more detailed appraisal of laryngeal dysfunction in patients with blunt laryngeal trauma (3 cases) and strangulation injury (2 cases). Computed tomography of the larynx undoubtedly played a determinant role in patient management. Computed tomography was helpful in evaluating the laryngeal cartilages and deep spaces of the larynx which was difficult to examine by the laryngoscope. Follow-up computed tomography made it possible to evaluate the postoperative results

  10. Terahertz Computed Tomography of NASA Thermal Protection System Materials

    Roth, D. J.; Reyes-Rodriguez, S.; Zimdars, D. A.; Rauser, R. W.; Ussery, W. W.

    2011-01-01

    A terahertz axial computed tomography system has been developed that uses time domain measurements in order to form cross-sectional image slices and three-dimensional volume renderings of terahertz-transparent materials. The system can inspect samples as large as 0.0283 cubic meters (1 cubic foot) with no safety concerns as for x-ray computed tomography. In this study, the system is evaluated for its ability to detect and characterize flat bottom holes, drilled holes, and embedded voids in foam materials utilized as thermal protection on the external fuel tanks for the Space Shuttle. X-ray micro-computed tomography was also performed on the samples to compare against the terahertz computed tomography results and better define embedded voids. Limits of detectability based on depth and size for the samples used in this study are loosely defined. Image sharpness and morphology characterization ability for terahertz computed tomography are qualitatively described.

  11. Computed tomography of normal distal tibiofibular syndesmosis

    The purpose of this study was to determine the shape and measurements of the normal distal tibiofibular syndesmosis on computed tomographic scans and to identify features that could aid in the diagnosis of syndesmotic diastasis using computed tomography (CT). CT scans of 100 patients with normal distal tibiofibular syndesmoses were reviewed retrospectively. In 67% the incisura fibularis was deep, giving the syndesmosis a crescent shape. In 33% the incisura fibularis was shallow, giving the syndesmosis a rectangular shape. The measurements of both types were taken using the same reference points. The mean age of the patients was 40 years, and there were 53 men and 47 women. The mean width of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis anteriorly between the tip of the anterior tibial tubercle and the nearest point of the fibula was 2 mm. The mean width of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis posteriorly between the medial border of the fibula and the nearest point of the lateral border of the posterior tibial tubercle was 4 mm. In men the mean width of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis, anterior and posterior, was 2 mm and 5 mm, respectively, and in women it was 2 mm and 4 mm, respectively. This study provides measurements of the normal tibiofibular syndesmosis to aid in the diagnosis of occult diastasis. (orig.)

  12. Computed tomography of normal distal tibiofibular syndesmosis

    Elgafy, Hossein; Semaan, Hassan B.; Blessinger, Brian; Wassef, Andrew; Ebraheim, Nabil A. [University of Toledo Medical Center, Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Radiology, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the shape and measurements of the normal distal tibiofibular syndesmosis on computed tomographic scans and to identify features that could aid in the diagnosis of syndesmotic diastasis using computed tomography (CT). CT scans of 100 patients with normal distal tibiofibular syndesmoses were reviewed retrospectively. In 67% the incisura fibularis was deep, giving the syndesmosis a crescent shape. In 33% the incisura fibularis was shallow, giving the syndesmosis a rectangular shape. The measurements of both types were taken using the same reference points. The mean age of the patients was 40 years, and there were 53 men and 47 women. The mean width of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis anteriorly between the tip of the anterior tibial tubercle and the nearest point of the fibula was 2 mm. The mean width of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis posteriorly between the medial border of the fibula and the nearest point of the lateral border of the posterior tibial tubercle was 4 mm. In men the mean width of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis, anterior and posterior, was 2 mm and 5 mm, respectively, and in women it was 2 mm and 4 mm, respectively. This study provides measurements of the normal tibiofibular syndesmosis to aid in the diagnosis of occult diastasis. (orig.)

  13. Texture classification of lung computed tomography images

    Pheng, Hang See; Shamsuddin, Siti M.

    2013-03-01

    Current development of algorithms in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme is growing rapidly to assist the radiologist in medical image interpretation. Texture analysis of computed tomography (CT) scans is one of important preliminary stage in the computerized detection system and classification for lung cancer. Among different types of images features analysis, Haralick texture with variety of statistical measures has been used widely in image texture description. The extraction of texture feature values is essential to be used by a CAD especially in classification of the normal and abnormal tissue on the cross sectional CT images. This paper aims to compare experimental results using texture extraction and different machine leaning methods in the classification normal and abnormal tissues through lung CT images. The machine learning methods involve in this assessment are Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS), Naive Bayes, Decision Tree (J48) and Backpropagation Neural Network. AIRS is found to provide high accuracy (99.2%) and sensitivity (98.0%) in the assessment. For experiments and testing purpose, publicly available datasets in the Reference Image Database to Evaluate Therapy Response (RIDER) are used as study cases.

  14. Epiploic appendicitis - ultrasonography and computed tomography findings; Apendicite epiploica - aspectos na ultra-sonografia e na tomografia computadorizada

    Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de

    2002-06-01

    Epiploic appendicitis is an uncommon inflammatory condition, which is presently better diagnosed by current imaging methods such as computed tomography and ultrasonography that allow a non-invasive and efficient diagnostic approach. The author studied 6 patients with epiploic appendicitis. The patients were submitted to computed tomography that showed paracolic oval lesions of 1 to 2 cm of diameter, fat attenuation and a thin peripheral hyperdense rim associated with adjacent fat stranding. Ultrasound examination performed in two patients showed hyperechoic ovoid noncompressible masses at the site of maximum abdominal tenderness. (author)

  15. Positron emission tomography alone, positron emission tomography-computed tomography and computed tomography in diagnosing recurrent cervical carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Xiao, Yi; Wei, Jia; Zhang, Yicheng; Xiong, Weining

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to assess systematically the accuracies of positron emission tomography (PET), PET/computed tomography (CT), and CT in diagnosing recurrent cervical cancer. Material and methods We searched for articles published from January 1980 to June 2013 using the following inclusion criteria: articles were reported in English; the use of PET, interpreted with or without the use of CT; use of CT to detect recurrent cervical cancer; and histopathologic analysis and/o...

  16. Computed tomography of traumatic intracranial lesions

    The cranial computed tomography (CT) is a new radiological technique with which, for the first time, minimal differences an attenuation by intracranial soft tissue can be measured exactly. The basic physical principles of computed tomography have been extensively presented by Hounsfield (1973). It is well established that the attenuation of extravasated blood measures between 35 and 45 Hounsfield units. Therefore no difficulty should be encountered in the recognition and diagnosis of extra-axial hematoma and cerebral contusion since the density of the brain parenchyma never measures more than 25 units. As the constant increase in high velocity accidents and violence, the problem of acute head injury is one of the matters of great importance in today's medical practice. Therefore it is very important to figure out the method that would allow us to diagnose easily and precisely the effects of trauma upon the brain in order to institute the proper treatment at the earliest possible moment. Computed tomography allows us to make a diagnosis quickly and in a non-invasive manner. The CT scan was carried out on 310 head trauma cases in the department of radiology, St. Mary's and Kang Nam St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Medical College, for 16 months from June 1979 to October 1980. All the scans were obtained with the Hitachi CT-H2 scanner and the scans were repeated following intravenous injection of high dose of contrast media (roughly 1.8 cc per kg body weight of 60% Conray). We have reviewed the CT scans of 310 patients got acute head injury in order to assess the location of brain lesions, the relationship between the CT densities of hematomas and their stage, the shape and mass effect of the extra-axial hematomas, and the effect of contrast enhancement. The results were as follows: 1. Of all 310 cases of the head injuries, epidural hematoma was 13.5%, subdural hematoma was 8.7%, subdural hygroma was 10%, cerebral contusion was 39%, hydrocephalus and atrophy was 3.9% and

  17. Giant hepatic cavernous hemangioma. Findings on computed helical tomography

    Objective: To describe computed helical tomography characteristics of the giant hepatic cavernous hemangioma. Method: During five years, we evaluated 21 patients with 21 giant hepatic cavernous hemangiomas with computed helical and multislice tomography. We included 18 women (86%) and 3 men (14%) with a mean age of 45 years. Results: The mean size of hemangiomas was 10.4 cm. Non enhanced computed tomography Showed 21 hemangiomas with lower density than adjacent hepatic parenchyma , all hemangiomas showed a central cleft area with low density. None hemangioma showed calcifications neither internal septa. In enhanced helical tomography all lesions demonstrated a globular, peripheral enhancing pattern with centripetal filling that begin in the arterial phase and continued in portal and delayed phases. None of the lesions showed complete filling. Conclusion: giant hepatic cavernous hemangiomas showed low attenuation in non enhanced computed tomography. central cleft area was very frequently seen. The enhancement pattern is characteristic, starting at the periphery with centripetal filling but it was never complete.

  18. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  19. Use of computed tomography to evaluate the intestinal tract of adult llamas

    In the llama, signs of colic are obscure and may be exhibited as persistent sternal recumbency and anorexia even in the presence of a surgical lesion. Diagnostic methods for evaluation of abdominal disorders are limited. As a result, surgical intervention may be prolonged and increase the risk of mortality and postoperative complications. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of computed tomography to evaluate the llama intestinal tract. Eighteen hours prior to the computed tomography scan, six llamas were given barium sulfate (15%) via an orogastric tube. Following induction of general anesthesia, the llamas were positioned in sternal recumbency, and 10 mm contiguous slices were obtained from the diaphragm to the tuber ischiadicum. Structures that were consistently identified included the first, second, and third compartments (C1, 2, and 3), small intestine, spiral colon, and ascending colon. C1 was easily identified in the cranial aspect of the abdomen due to its large size relative to the other compartments and characteristic saccules. C2 was located cranial, ventral, and to the right of C1, while C3 was visualized as a tubular structure to the right and ventral to C1 and C2, C3 was traced caudally until it turned dorsally and continued cranially to a dilated ampulla in the right cranial abdomen delineating the entrance to the small intestine. The spiral colon was identified consistently in the left ventral caudal abdomen. Structures that could not be conclusively identified included the cecum and mesenteric lymph nodes. Computed tomography allowed a consistent evaluation of the major intestinal structures associated with colic in the llama. Thus, computed tomography is a potentially valuable noninvasive diagnostic tool to effectively evaluate the abdominal cavity and differentiate medical from surgical lesions in the llama

  20. Analysis of the computed tomography in the acute abdomen

    Introduction: This study tends to test the capacity of the computed tomography in assist in the diagnosis and the approach of the acute abdomen. Material and method: This is a longitudinal and prospective study, in which were analyzed the patients with the diagnosis of acute abdomen. There were obtained 105 cases of acute abdomen and after the application of the exclusions criteria were included 28 patients in the study. Results: Computed tomography changed the diagnostic hypothesis of the physicians in 50% of the cases (p 0.05), where 78.57% of the patients had surgical indication before computed tomography and 67.86% after computed tomography (p = 0.0546). The index of accurate diagnosis of computed tomography, when compared to the anatomopathologic examination and the final diagnosis, was observed in 82.14% of the cases (p = 0.013). When the analysis was done dividing the patients in surgical and nonsurgical group, were obtained an accuracy of 89.28% (p 0.0001). The difference of 7.2 days of hospitalization (p = 0.003) was obtained compared with the mean of the acute abdomen without use the computed tomography. Conclusion: The computed tomography is correlative with the anatomopathology and has great accuracy in the surgical indication, associated with the capacity of increase the confident index of the physicians, reduces the hospitalization time, reduces the number of surgeries and is cost-effective. (author)

  1. Computed tomography of the spleen and liver in sickle cell disease

    The spleen was assessed in 10 patients with sickle cell disease studied with computed tomography (CT) for abdominal pain and/or unexplained fever. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were found to have small, densely calcified spleens with occasional low-density infarcts. Five of six had hepatomegaly, and there was one case each of hepatic abscess, infarcts, and hemochromatosis. All patients with heterozygous sickle cell disease were found to have splenomegaly, with a variety of findings including acute hemorrhage, acute and chronic infarcts, rupture, and possible sequestration. It was concluded that CT is useful for evaluating the status of the spleen and liver in symptomatic patients with sickle cell disease

  2. Bilateral spontaneous urinary extravasation shown by computed tomography urography in a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Haopeng Pang, MD, PhD

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous extravasation of urine (SUE is a rare urologic manifestation. Predisposing conditions of SUE include ureteric calculus, retrograde pyelography, pregnancy, abdominal aorta aneurysm, tumors, or enlargement of the prostate gland. Usually, SUE is a self-limiting condition that mandates differentiaton from other catastrophic conditions of pelviureteric ruptures. Most reported cases of SUE based on urograms are unilateral in presentation. Herein, we report a case of bilateral SUE evident on computed tomography urography in a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia. We also review the literature briefly.

  3. Computed tomography studies on patients with mucopolysaccharidoses

    The appearances on computed tomography (CT) in eight patients with mucopolysaccharidosis Type I, two with mucopolysaccharidosis Type II and two with mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB are presented. Reference is also made to two further cases in which the CT showed special features. Follow-up scans were obtained to assess the evolution of the changes. The place of CT in the diagnosis of complications due to thecal involvement is examined. The density of grey matter on the CT scans was similar to that of normal brain. Inhaled xenon did not produce any special enhancement which could be helpful in assessing the degree of the mucopolysaccharide deposition within cerebral cells. Symmetrical low attenuation in the white matter was a very common finding. This work has shown that the stage in the evolution of the mucopolysaccharidoses at which hydrocephalus develops as a complication is highly variable and CSF diversion procedures are sometimes indicated to improve the quality of the patients' lives. These indications are briefly discussed. We consider that CT is essential for the adequate appraisal of these patients and to identify some treatable complications. (orig./MG)

  4. Radiation Doses from Computed tomography in Iraq

    Radiation doses to Patient during CT scanner and the radiological risk are significant. Patient dose survey has been conducted to investigate the Iraq patient radiation doses received in CT scanners in order to established reference dose levels. These doses are Entrance Surface Dose (ESD),computed tomography dose index(CTDI)), and dose length product (DLP). Two CT scanner were investigated in this study were, Siemens Somatom Plus 4, located in at medical city of Baghdad, and Philips, Optimus located in privet hospital at Baghdad. ESD were measured by TLD and Dosimax ionization chamber for head, chest, and abdomen for both sex and different weights. The TLD results were higher than that measured with Dosimax due to scattered radiation .The scattering factor which is the ratio between dose measured by TLD and that measured by ionization chamber range between (1.14-1.34) compare to international measurement which is range between (1.1-1.5).The (ESD) measured by the two methods were agree well after the subtraction of scattering dose, and have compered with original research. Dose profile were measured using array of TLD chips shows that its full width at half maximum is(7.99 mm) approximately equal the slice thickness(8 mm). Our results compare with reference level at U.K, European Guidelines and

  5. Cranial computed tomography in infantile spasms

    Out of 109 children with infantile spasms (IS), prospectively tested during the years 1976 to 1979 in Denmark, 52 children were examined by cranial computed tomography (CT). The classification of IS into cryptogenic (CR), symptomatic (SY) and doubtful (DO) was done clinically without considering the CT-finding. Sixty per cent of the scannings were abnormal. Only 6/30 (20%) of the children in ACTH treatment were found to develop cerebral atrophy which means that this finding is not an obligatory side-effect of ACTH treatment of children with IS. Normal CT-findings were found in 50% of the CR and 50% of the SY + DO-groups, and could not be used as a prognostic tool for estimating the mental development. This was also the case for children with cerebral atrophy. Abnormal CT-findings (minus atrophy) were highly correlated to the group with clinical symptoms and indicate an extremely unsatisfying long-term mental prognosis. CT-scanning is a valuable tool for the examination of clearing children with infantile spasms. (authors)

  6. Radiation doses from computed tomography in Australia

    Recent surveys in various countries have shown that computed tomography (CT) is a significant and growing contributor to the radiation dose from diagnostic radiology. Australia, with 332 CT scanners (18 per million people), is well endowed with CT equipment compared to European countries (6 to 13 per million people). Only Japan, with 8500 units (78 per million people), has a significantly higher proportion of CT scanners. In view of this, a survey of CT facilities, frequency of examinations, techniques and patient doses has been performed in Australia. It is estimated that there are 1 million CT examinations in Australia each year, resulting in a collective effective dose of 7000 Sv and a per caput dose of 0.39 mSv. This per caput dose is much larger than found in earlier studies in the UK and New Zealand but is less than 0.48 mSv in Japan. Using the ICRP risk factors, radiation doses from CT could be inducing about 280 fatal cancers per year in Australia. CT is therefore a significant, if not the major, single contributor to radiation doses and possible risk from diagnostic radiology. (authors)

  7. Quantitative investigations of megavoltage computed tomography

    Rogers, Myron; Kerr, Andrew; Salomons, Greg; Schreiner, L. John

    2005-04-01

    Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) has been an active area of research and development in image guided radiation therapy. We have been investigating a particular implementation of MVCT in conjunction with studies of the potential for tomotherapy with a Cobalt-60 radiation source. In this paper, we present results comparing MVCT using a Co-60 source and a 4 MV linear accelerator to conventional kVCT imaging. The Co-60 and linac MVCT measurements were obtained with a first generation benchtop CT imager; the KVCT measurements were obtained using a Philips AcQSim CT Simulator). Phantoms containing various inserts ranging in density from air, through lung, soft tissue and bone equivalent materials and extending to high atomic number metals were imaged with the three modalities. The results enable characterization of image artifacts, CT number linearity and beam hardening. The MVCT images have sufficient contrast that soft tissue regions with 2.8% difference in electron density can be visualized. In MVCT, a linear relationship between CT numbers and electron densities extends to materials with Z ~ 60. In the 4MV CT imaging there is a position dependence of the CT numbers within a uniform water phantom, which is absent in Co-60 CT images, indicating the presence of beam hardening artifacts in the linac MVCT images. The differences between kVCT and MVCT will be discussed considering the variation of the photon interactions dominating the images. Our investigations indicate that MVCT has properties that may potentially extend its utility beyond radiation therapy.

  8. Computed Tomography Following Body Stuffing Heroin

    Sean P. Nordt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED in police custody for “medical clearance” before being taken to jail. The patient was approached by police officers for suspicion of selling illicit drugs. When approached by police he ran away and was witnessed to swallow several small plastic baggies suspected to contain heroin. He was apprehended and brought to the ED. On arrival, he was asymptomatic with a blood pressure 144/83mmHg, heart rate 67bpm, respiratory rate of 19bpm, oxygen saturation of 99% on room air and afebrile. A Glasgow coma score was 15 and he was alert and oriented to person, place and time. Patient had a negative review of systems. On physical examination pupils were 4mm and reactive to light, lungs clear to auscultation and had normal respiratory rate with normal cardiovascular exam. Abdomen was soft, non-tender and non-distended with present bowel sounds. The patient admitted to ingesting approximately 20 packets of heroin to avoid being charged with possession. The patient declined activated charcoal and whole bowel irrigation (WBI with polyethylene glycol-electrolyte solution (PEG-ELS. The patient declined a urine toxicology immunoassay screen. A computed tomography (CT of his abdomen with contrast was obtained and read as normal except for a cluster of foreign bodies within the distal stomach likely contained within a plastic bag.

  9. Computed tomography findings in fibrosing mediastinitis

    Devaraj, A. [Departments of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: a.devaraj@rbht.nhs.uk; Griffin, N. [Department of Radiology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Nicholson, A.G. [Department of Histopathology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Padley, S.P.G. [Departments of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    Aim: To describe the CT features of fibrosing mediastinitis. Materials and methods: The clinical notes, histology, and CT images from 12 patients with fibrosing mediastinitis were reviewed. Clinical data regarding the presentation and suspected aetiology were correlated with location of mediastinal disease, calcification, effect on mediastinal structures, and additional pulmonary findings on computed tomography (CT). Results: The mean age was 40.5 years, with seven female and five male patients. The most common presenting symptom was shortness of breath. Fibrosing mediastinitis diffusely infiltrated the mediastinum in five patients and was localized in seven. Calcification was present in two cases. Eleven of 12 cases had narrowing of mediastinal structures, including five with pulmonary artery narrowing, five with superior vena cava obstruction, four with bronchial narrowing, three with tracheal narrowing, and one with narrowing of the pulmonary vein. The disease was considered idiopathic in seven cases with a demonstrable aetiology in five cases. Eight out of 12 patients had additional pulmonary findings, including all patients with a known aetiology. Conclusions: In the present series of patients, fibrosing mediastinitis more commonly presented as a localized mediastinal mass than as diffuse mediastinal disease, with the anterior mediastinal compartment most frequently involved. Most cases were idiopathic compared with the majority of previous cases at this institution being ascribed to tuberculosis. There is a high incidence of concomitant pulmonary findings, in particular when an identifiable aetiology is present. Obstruction of vital structures frequently gives rise to complications.

  10. Computed tomography phantom for radiochromic film dosimetry

    To evaluate in detail the dose distribution during computed tomography (CT), a sheet roll CT dosimetry phantom (SRCT-P) with a radiochromic film (RF) was experimentally developed. The SRCT-P was made by rolling up a vinyl chloride sheet in a cylindrical shape to arbitrarily select the SRCT-P diameter, dose measurement position, and depth. The SRCT-P centre core consisted of a plastic hose in which a 10 mm acrylic bar with a RF was inserted. To determine the availability of the SRCT-P, the surface and centre doses (at a 5 mm radius) at each SRCT-P diameter (6-16 cm; every 2 cm) were measured. The ratios of the centre-to-surface doses (Dcentre/Dsuface) systematically increased, from 80 to 111%, for decreasing SRCT-P diameters, between 16 and 6 cm, respectively. The centre dose approached the surface dose as the SRCT-P diameter decreased. To use a RF for a CT dose measurement, further detailed research and analysis is necessary. However, this study has shown that a SRCT-P is useful and beneficial for the measurement of the dose distribution during a CT examination

  11. Computed tomography imaging and angiography - principles.

    Kamalian, Shervin; Lev, Michael H; Gupta, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of patients with diverse neurologic disorders was forever changed in the summer of 1973, when the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanners were introduced. Until then, the detection and characterization of intracranial or spinal lesions could only be inferred by limited spatial resolution radioisotope scans, or by the patterns of tissue and vascular displacement on invasive pneumoencaphalography and direct carotid puncture catheter arteriography. Even the earliest-generation CT scanners - which required tens of minutes for the acquisition and reconstruction of low-resolution images (128×128 matrix) - could, based on density, noninvasively distinguish infarct, hemorrhage, and other mass lesions with unprecedented accuracy. Iodinated, intravenous contrast added further sensitivity and specificity in regions of blood-brain barrier breakdown. The advent of rapid multidetector row CT scanning in the early 1990s created renewed enthusiasm for CT, with CT angiography largely replacing direct catheter angiography. More recently, iterative reconstruction postprocessing techniques have made possible high spatial resolution, reduced noise, very low radiation dose CT scanning. The speed, spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and low radiation dose capability of present-day scanners have also facilitated dual-energy imaging which, like magnetic resonance imaging, for the first time, has allowed tissue-specific CT imaging characterization of intracranial pathology. PMID:27432657

  12. Industrial computed tomography image size measurement

    As one of the most useful modern detection technologies, Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) image size measurement can correctly non-destructively measure the size of workpieces' inner construction, and it is considered as the standard for quality assurance and reverse engineering. In view of the advantages and disadvantages compared to conventional methods, this paper improves the precision of image size measurement with a new algorithm that uses an approximate function to describe edge degradation. First, this algorithm constructs the approximate function and determines the optimal point of edge detection, based on image intensity and inflexions. Then, in order to accurately extract the image edge, this algorithm is used to revise the primary image, completing construction of the CT image. Excellent results are obtained from simulations and experiments. The experimental results indicate that the relative error is 2% for the CT image when the step evolution of the image edge is pooled. The relative error of this method is decreased by as much as 1.5% compared to wavelet transformation and ridgelet transformation. Therefore, this new algorithm demonstrates increased effectiveness in extracting an accurate measurement of the CT image edge.

  13. Dedicated breast computed tomography: Basic aspects

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.it; Russo, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Cintia, Napoli I-80126, Italy and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli I-80126 (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    X-ray mammography of the compressed breast is well recognized as the “gold standard” for early detection of breast cancer, but its performance is not ideal. One limitation of screening mammography is tissue superposition, particularly for dense breasts. Since 2001, several research groups in the USA and in the European Union have developed computed tomography (CT) systems with digital detector technology dedicated to x-ray imaging of the uncompressed breast (breast CT or BCT) for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. This CT technology—tracing back to initial studies in the 1970s—allows some of the limitations of mammography to be overcome, keeping the levels of radiation dose to the radiosensitive breast glandular tissue similar to that of two-view mammography for the same breast size and composition. This paper presents an evaluation of the research efforts carried out in the invention, development, and improvement of BCT with dedicated scanners with state-of-the-art technology, including initial steps toward commercialization, after more than a decade of R and D in the laboratory and/or in the clinic. The intended focus here is on the technological/engineering aspects of BCT and on outlining advantages and limitations as reported in the related literature. Prospects for future research in this field are discussed.

  14. Computed tomography of the ovarian tumors

    Computed tomography (CT) provides valuable informations in the diagnosis of the female pelvic masses. CT findings of 109 cases of surgically proved ovarian masses were reviewed regarding number, size, contour, and internal consistency (cystic, solid, and mixed masses). Differentiation between malignant and benign ovarian tumors depended on number and internal consistency of the mass. Most of malignant tumors showed bilateral mixed or solid masses and contained solid components. Most of metastatic ovarian cancer were demonstrated as bilateral mixed or solid masses. They were able to be differentiated from primary ovarian cancer because metastatic tumors contained more solid components than primary ones did and had ill-defined margins between cystic and solid components in mixed masses. In benign ovarian tumors, differentiation between mucinous cystadenomas, endometrial cysts, and dermoid cysts were possible. Mucinous cystadenomas showed the largest mulilocular cystic masses with band like septal thickening and their each locule demonstrated different densities. Endometrial cysts showed uni- or bilocular cystic masses with thick wall. Dermoid cysts were characterized by the presence of fatty component. It was concluded that CT is very useful in the tissue characterization of the ovarian masses by specific CT findings. (author)

  15. Perfusion computed tomography in renal cell carcinoma

    Chandan; J; Das; Usha; Thingujam; Ananya; Panda; Sanjay; Sharma; Arun; Kumar; Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Various imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis, staging and response evaluation of patients with renal cell carcinoma(RCC). While contrast enhanced computed tomography(CT) is used as the standard of imaging for size, morphological evaluation and response assessment in RCC, a new functional imaging technique like perfusion CT(p CT), goes down to the molecular level and provides new perspectives in imaging of RCC. p CT depicts regional tumor perfusion and vascular permeability which are indirect parameters of tumor angiogenesis and thereby provides vital information regarding tumor microenvironment. Also response evaluation using p CT may predate the size criteria used in Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, as changes in the perfusion occurs earlier following tissue kinase inhibitors before any actual change in size. This may potentially help in predicting prognosis, better selection of therapy and more accurate and better response evaluation in patients with RCC. This article describes the techniques and role of p CT in staging and response assessment in patients with RCCs.

  16. Dose profile in computed tomography chest scan

    For the optimization of the patient dose in computed tomography (CT), the Brazilian legislation only established the diagnostic reference levels (DRL's) in terms of Multiple Scan Average Dose (MSAD) in a typical adult as a parameter of quality control of CT scanners. Conformity to the DRL's can be verified by measuring the dose distribution in CT scans and MSAD determination. An analysis of the quality of CT scans of the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte is necessary by conducting pertinent tests to the study that are presented in the ANVISA (National Agency of Sanitary Vigilance) Guide. The purpose of this study is to investigate, in a chest scan, the variation of dose in CT. To measure the dose profile are used lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100 Rod) distributed in cylinders positioned in peripheral and central regions of a phantom of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The data obtained allow us to observe the variation of the dose profile inside the phantom. The peripheral region shows higher dose values than the central region. The longitudinal variation can be observed and the maximum dose was recorded at the edges of the phantom (41,58±5,10) mGy at the midpoint of the longitudinal axis. The results will contribute to disseminate the proper procedure and optimize the dosimetry and the tests of quality control in CT, as well as make a critical analysis of the DRL's. (author)

  17. Computed tomography findings in middle ear anomaly

    The efficacy of computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone was studied in 45 ears with a middle ear anomaly but whose tympanic membranes were normal. The plane of the film was 30 degrees oblique to the orbito-meatal line. Four otorhinolaryngologists made radiological diagnoses of the CT film without having any information about the patients. CT films of 40 normal ears were also evaluated and served as controls. The incudo-stapedial joint (I-S joint) and the stapes were visualized in all control group subjects. The percentage of correct diagnoses was 77.8% for separation of the I-S joint, and 75.6% for fixation of the stapes. The monopedal stapes was not visualized. Fixation of the malleus and the incus could not be diagnosed correctly. Abnormalities in the location of the facial nerve were visualized in a few ears. CT of the temporal bone was clinically useful for differentiating I-S joint separation and fixation of the stapes. (author)

  18. Computed tomography of the alveolar bone

    In addition to the conventional radiological methods used in odontology, computed tomography (CT) provides superposition-free images of the mandible and maxilla. Its value has been proved not only in cases of malignancy but also in many other problems. If an examination is performed with a slice thickness of less than 1.5 mm, the form and position of retained teeth in the alveolar bone, as well as subsequent lesions of neighboring permanent teeth, can be visualized so that early treatment can be planned. If the parodontal space of a retained tooth is visible, orthodontic intervention is possible. Precise assessment of horizontal or vertical bone loss is essential in inflammatory dental diseases. The morphology and extent of benign cystic lesions are also shown by CT. With CT surgical strategy of an intended implant therapy can take into account the remaining bone substance and the exact position of nerves and foramina. If such therapy is possible, the location, form and number of implants are easily defined. (orig.)

  19. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance colonography

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the western world. Adenomatous colorectal polyps, which are found in 30-50% of Americans more than 50 years old, are recognized as important precursors of malignancy. Probably most of the invasive colon carcinomas arise from polyps. For this reason an early detection of these polyps and their complete removal is a recognized strategy for the prevention of colon cancer. So far no single method for an early diagnois of colon polyps or colon cancer offers high sensitivity and specificity along with low cost and good patient accccf Endo-opic colonoscopy allows the accurate detection of very small lesions and has since almost completely replaced fluooscopy. Cross-sectional imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), are increasingly being considered imaging modalities for the detection of colorectal polyps. CT and MR colonography are new techniques for imaging of the colon. In symptomatic patients, these new techniques show promising results for the detection of polyps equal to or larger than 1 cm in diameter. (author)

  20. Computed tomography experiments of Pantex high explosives

    Perkins, D. E.; Martz, H. E.; Hester, L. O.; Sobczak, G.; Pratt, C. L.

    1992-04-01

    X-ray computed tomography is an advanced imaging technique which provide three-dimensional nondestructive characterization of materials, components and assemblies. The CT Project group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Pantex Plant are cooperating to examine the use of CT technology to inspect and characterize high-explosives pressings (e.g., PBX-9502, LX-10-2). High-explosives pressings manufactured by Pantex must be characterized prior to assembling into weapons systems; a nondestructive examination of all assembly parts would be preferable to the current sampling and destructive testing. The earlier in the processing cycle this can be done the more cost effective it will be. We have performed experiments that show that this characterization can be performed at the pressed billet stage using CT. We have detected 2-mm inclusions in a 15-cm diameter billet and 3.5-mm voids in a 20-cm diameter billet. Based on these results we show calculations that can be used to design production CT systems for characterization of high-explosives.

  1. Nano-computed tomography. Technique and applications

    Nano-computed tomography (nano-CT) is an emerging, high-resolution cross-sectional imaging technique and represents a technical advancement of the established micro-CT technology. Based on the application of a transmission target X-ray tube, the focal spot size can be decreased down to diameters less than 400 nanometers (nm). Together with specific detectors and examination protocols, a superior spatial resolution up to 400 nm (10 % MTF) can be achieved, thereby exceeding the resolution capacity of typical micro-CT systems. The technical concept of nano-CT imaging as well as the basics of specimen preparation are demonstrated exemplarily. Characteristics of atherosclerotic plaques (intraplaque hemorrhage and calcifications) in a murine model of atherosclerosis (ApoE(-/-)/LDLR(-/-) double knockout mouse) are demonstrated in the context of superior spatial resolution in comparison to micro-CT. Furthermore, this article presents the application of nano-CT for imaging cerebral microcirculation (murine), lung structures (porcine), and trabecular microstructure (ovine) in contrast to micro-CT imaging. This review shows the potential of nano-CT as a radiological method in biomedical basic research and discusses the application of experimental, high resolution CT techniques in consideration of other high resolution cross-sectional imaging techniques.

  2. Computed Tomography Findings in Xanthogranulomatous Pyelonephritis

    Arumugam Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGN is an uncommon condition characterized by chronic suppurative renal inflammation that leads to progressive parenchymal destruction. Purpose: To review the computed tomography (CT findings of patients diagnosed with XGN. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of CT findings in patients with histologically proven XGN was carried out. Results: Thirteen CT examinations of 11 patients were analyzed. Renal enlargement was demonstrable on the affected side in all patients. Nine patients (82% had multiple dilated calyces and abnormal parenchyma. Six patients (55% had a renal pelvis or upper ureteric calculus causing obstruction. Three patients (27% had focal fat deposits identifiable within the inflamed renal parenchyma. Two patients had renal abscesses. Ten patients (91% had extrarenal extension of the inflammatory changes. Three patients (27% demonstrated extensive retroperitoneal inflammation. Conclusion: Unilateral renal enlargement and inflammation were the most consistent findings of XGN on CT. Perinephric inflammation and collections or abscess should also alert the radiologist to the possibility of this diagnosis.

  3. Dynamic X-ray computed tomography

    Paper Dynamic computed tomography (CT) imaging aims at reconstructing image sequences where the dynamic nature of the living human body is of primary interest. Main concerned applications are image-guided interventional procedures, functional studies and cardiac imaging. The introduction of ultra-fast rotating gantries along with multi-row detectors and in near future area detectors allows a huge progress toward the imaging of moving organs with low-contrast resolution. This paper gives an overview of the different concepts used in dynamic CT. A new reconstruction algorithm based on a voxel-specific dynamic evolution compensation is also presented. It provides four-dimensional image sequences with accurate spatio-temporal information, where each frame is reconstructed using a long-scan acquisition mode on several half-turns. In the same time, this technique permits to reduce the dose delivered per rotation while keeping the same signal to noise ratio for every frame using an adaptive motion-compensated temporal averaging. Results are illustrated on simulated data. (authors)

  4. Variations in measured computed tomography number values

    Computed Tomography (CT) scans of a water phantom have been performed on a number of different CT scanners, and variations in the measured mean pixel value for a central region have been observed. In addition, a positional variation of mean CT number was noted. In particular, the head rest on an EMI CT1010 scanner had a significant effect on the pixel values. To simulate head scanning, a phantom with a Teflon annulus surrounding a water bath was used. This annulus affected both the mean and standard deviation of the pixels in a central area of the scan. Both an mAS and beam width dependence on CT numbers was noted. The effect of calibration on the measured CT numbers for each reconstruction filter was examined on one machine. The variation of CT number with reconstruction matrix and compensation filter was also investigated. These measurements suggest caution must be exercised when interpreting actual CT number values. This will be particularly relevant when the numbers are used to differentiate between tissue types for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. (author)

  5. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    The functional state of organs can be imaged by their accumulation of single photon emitter like 99mTc (γ-ray energy 140 keV), 201Tl (73 keV) and 201I (159 keV) with computed tomography. The emitted γ-ray is collimated to reach the NaI (Tl) detector for specifying its direction, which is called as the scintillation camera or gamma camera. The camera rotating around the patient gives the SPECT images. The NaI (Tl) detector is suitable for converting 60-300 keV γ-ray to fluorescence through the photoelectric effect. Photomultiplier receiving the fluorescence outputs X/Y signals for the emitting position and Z signal (energy) separately, giving imaging data. 3D images can be re-constructed by either method of the filtered back projection or maximum likelihood-expectation maximization. For quantitative reconstruction, correction of γ-ray absorption in water, of scattering and of collimator opening is necessary. Recently, semiconductor-detectors like CdZnTe and CdTe are being utilized in place of NaI for better resolution, which will reduce the size of the camera. Further, a camera with coincidence circuit for positron has appeared and will be applicable for both SPECT and PET. Compton camera having 2-step detectors without collimator is now under development. (N.I.)

  6. Perfusion computed tomography in renal cell carcinoma.

    Das, Chandan J; Thingujam, Usha; Panda, Ananya; Sharma, Sanjay; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2015-07-28

    Various imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis, staging and response evaluation of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). While contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) is used as the standard of imaging for size, morphological evaluation and response assessment in RCC, a new functional imaging technique like perfusion CT (pCT), goes down to the molecular level and provides new perspectives in imaging of RCC. pCT depicts regional tumor perfusion and vascular permeability which are indirect parameters of tumor angiogenesis and thereby provides vital information regarding tumor microenvironment. Also response evaluation using pCT may predate the size criteria used in Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, as changes in the perfusion occurs earlier following tissue kinase inhibitors before any actual change in size. This may potentially help in predicting prognosis, better selection of therapy and more accurate and better response evaluation in patients with RCC. This article describes the techniques and role of pCT in staging and response assessment in patients with RCCs. PMID:26217456

  7. Dedicated breast computed tomography: Basic aspects

    X-ray mammography of the compressed breast is well recognized as the “gold standard” for early detection of breast cancer, but its performance is not ideal. One limitation of screening mammography is tissue superposition, particularly for dense breasts. Since 2001, several research groups in the USA and in the European Union have developed computed tomography (CT) systems with digital detector technology dedicated to x-ray imaging of the uncompressed breast (breast CT or BCT) for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. This CT technology—tracing back to initial studies in the 1970s—allows some of the limitations of mammography to be overcome, keeping the levels of radiation dose to the radiosensitive breast glandular tissue similar to that of two-view mammography for the same breast size and composition. This paper presents an evaluation of the research efforts carried out in the invention, development, and improvement of BCT with dedicated scanners with state-of-the-art technology, including initial steps toward commercialization, after more than a decade of R and D in the laboratory and/or in the clinic. The intended focus here is on the technological/engineering aspects of BCT and on outlining advantages and limitations as reported in the related literature. Prospects for future research in this field are discussed

  8. Patient doses for computed tomography in Hungary

    The latest initiative of the National Patient Dose Evaluation Program was an overall evaluation of patient doses for computed tomography. The aim of the survey was to collect data from which the patient doses of the CT examination of different body parts can be estimated and the most important technical parameters affecting on the patient exposures can be evaluated. The 54 CT scanners in clinical use in Hungary can be categorized into 31 different models from 8 manufacturers. Per caput frequency for CT is about 62.3 examinations per 1000 inhabitants. 59% of all examinations are connected to the head imaging. The highest mean effective dose arising from the chest and pelvis examinations, 6.98 mSv and 6.64 mSv, respectively. The yearly collective effective dose has been estimated at about 1700 manSv. This total dose is as much as the figure of 1785 manSv previously assessed for photofluorography applied in mass chest screening in Hungary. (author)

  9. Computed tomography with selectable image resolution

    A computed tomography system x-ray detector has a central group of half-width detector elements and groups of full-width elements on each side of the central group. To obtain x-ray attenuation data for whole body layers, the half-width elements are switched effectively into paralleled pairs so all elements act like full-width elements and an image of normal resolution is obtained. For narrower head layers, the elements in the central group are used as half-width elements so resolution which is twice as great as normal is obtained. The central group is also used in the half-width mode and the outside groups are used in the full-width mode to obtain a high resolution image of a body zone within a full body layer. In one embodiment data signals from the detector are switched by electronic multiplexing and in another embodiment a processor chooses the signals for the various kinds of images that are to be reconstructed. (author)

  10. Computed tomography guidance. Fluoroscopy and more

    Although ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are competitive imaging modalities for the guidance of needle-based interventions, computed tomography (CT) is the only modality suitable for image-guided interventions in all regions of the body, including the lungs and bone. The ongoing technical development of CT involves accelerated image acquisition, significantly improved spatial resolution, CT scanners with an extended gantry diameter, acceleration of the procedure through joystick control of relevant functions of interventional CT by the interventional radiologist and tube current modulation to protect the hands of the examiner and radiosensitive organs of the patient. CT fluoroscopy can be used as a real-time method (the intervention is monitored under continuous CT fluoroscopy) or as a quick check method (repeated acquisitions of individual CT fluoroscopic images after each change of needle or table position). For the two approaches, multislice CT fluoroscopy (MSCTF) technique with wide detectors is particularly useful because even in the case of needle deviation from the center slice the needle tip is simultaneously visualised in the neighboring slices. With the aid of this technique a precise placement of interventional devices is possible even in angled access routes and in the presence of pronounced respiratory organ movements. As the reduction of CT fluoroscopy time significantly reduces radiation exposure for the patient and staff, the combination of a quick check technique and a low milliampere technique with multislice CT fluoroscopy devices is advantageous. (orig.)

  11. Revisiting the potential signs of colorectal cancer on contrast-enhanced computed tomography without bowel preparation.

    Naqvi, Jawad; Hosmane, Sharath; Lapsia, Snehal

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer death in the US. Earlier detection can allow treatment with curative intent and improve prognosis. Optical and virtual colonoscopy are widely used in screening for colonic polyps and in the investigation of suspected CRC. However, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is still performed to investigate various non-specific abdominal complaints. Hence, a significant number of CRC are identified on contrast-enhanced CT without bowel preparation. We describe several signs, which when present in tandem, raise suspicion of CRC, and may warrant further investigation with optical colonoscopy. These include an intraluminal mass, eccentric or circumferential wall thickening >3 mm, focal wall enhancement, pericolic fat stranding, a cluster of >3 local lymph nodes, and enlarged lymph nodes >10 mm in short axis. Multiplanar evaluation of the bowel should be performed on all CT abdominal studies, including those without bowel preparation, to identify subtle features of CRC. PMID:26194811

  12. Estimation of MSAD values in computed tomography scans using radiochromic films

    Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; Teogenes Augusto da, E-mail: bbo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mourao, Arnaldo Prata [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of using radiochromic films as an alternative dosimeter to estimate the multiple scan average dose on the basis on kerma profiles. Materials and Methods: The radiochromic films were distributed in cylinders positioned in the center and in four peripheral bores of a standard abdominal phantom utilized for computed tomography dosimetry. Results: Values for multiple scan average dose values corresponded to 13.6 {+-} 0.7, 13.5 {+-} 0.7 and 18.7 {+-} 1.0 mGy for pitch of 0.75, 1.00 and 1.50, respectively. Conclusion: In spite of results showing lower values than the reference level for radiodiagnosis (25 mGy) established by the Brazilian regulations for abdominal studies, it is suggested that there is room to optimize procedures and review the reference level for radiodiagnosis in Brazil. (author)

  13. Imaging studies of excretory urography and computed tomography scan for patients suffering from renal colic

    Shimizu, Hirofumi [Yashio Chuo General Hospital, Saitama (Japan); Hariu, Kyouichi; Tohyama, Yuichi; Kamiyama, Yutaka; Iiyama, Tetsuro; Tomomasa, Hiroshi; Yazaki, Tsunetada; Umeda, Takashi

    1998-02-01

    Renal colic mainly due to urolithiasis is one of the most common morbid conditions in urology and commonly seen in the urology emergency clinic. Imaging studies were performed to evaluate the upper urinary tract of 29 patients suffering from renal colic in the 2 years between November, 1994 and October, 1996. After intramuscular injection of the analgesic (pentazocine, 15 mg), all 29 patients were examined by excretory urography (IVP) at the time of the first visit. In some patients abdominal plain computed tomography (CT) scan was performed consecutively even when extravasation of the contrast medium was not seen. Spontaneous peripelvic extravasation was seen in 14 patients (11 males and 3 females) with urolithiasis; 7 of them were diagnosed by IVP, 5 by IVP plus CT scan and 2 with CT scan only. IVP imaging study followed by plain abdominal CT scan is useful even when the contrast medium is not extravasated on IVP in patients suffering from renal colic. (author)

  14. Computed tomography of the llama head: technique and normal anatomy

    Computed tomography was performed on the head of 6 normal adult llamas. The animals were under general anesthesia and positioned in dorsal recumbency on the scanning table. The area scanned was from the external occipital protuberance to the rostral portion of the nasal passage, and the images are presented in both a bone window and a soft tissue window to allow evaluation and identification of the anatomy of the head. Computed tomography of the llama head can be accomplished by most computed tomography scanners utilizing a technique similar to that used in small animals with minor modification of the scanning table

  15. Diagnosis of hoof disease in horses using computed tomography

    Kovač Milomir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes findings of computed tomography investigations at the Bergische Equine Clinic (Germany of 39 horses with hoof diseaseas. The most frequently findings were the navicular syndrome (eight horses, laminitis (seven horses, keratnoma (six horses and ossification of collateral cartilages in the distal phalanx (four horses. The special value of the computed tomography is in evaluating the size and courses fracture/fissure of the navicular and koffin bones, which were diagnose in five horses. In four of horses no pathologic changes of the hoof were determined by computed tomography.

  16. Diagnosis of sacral perineural cysts by computed tomography.

    Tabas, J H; Deeb, Z L

    1986-07-01

    Three cases of sacral perineural cysts associated with chronic low-back pain are described with their myelography, computed tomography, and plain film findings. Significant findings include multiple cystic dilatations of lumbosacral nerve root sheaths, enlargement of the sacral foramina by masses isodense with cerebrospinal fluid, and asymmetric epidural fat distribution. Recognition of these findings on unenhanced computed tomography scans should preclude further evaluation by myelography and intrathecal metrizamide (Amipaque) computed tomography. These cysts are usually not the primary cause of back and leg pain. PMID:2942338

  17. Diagnosis of hoof diseases in horses using computed tomography

    This study describes findings of computed tomography investigations at the Bergische Equine Clinic (Bergische Tierklinik), Germany, of 39 horses with hoof diseases. The most frequently findings were the navicular syndrome (eight horses), laminitis (seven horses), keratnoma (six horses) and ossification of collateral cartilages in the distal phalanx (four horses). The special value of the computed tomography is in evaluating the size and courses fracture/fissure of the navicular and koffin bones, which were diagnose in five horses. In four of horses no pathologic changes of the hoof were determined by computed tomography

  18. Calcium score of small coronary calcifications on multidetector computed tomography

    Groen, J M; Kofoed, K F; Zacho, M;

    2013-01-01

    Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) underestimates the coronary calcium score as compared to electron beam tomography (EBT). Therefore clinical risk stratification based on MDCT calcium scoring may be inaccurate. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a new phantom which...

  19. Recurrent ovarian endodermal sinus tumor: demonstration by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography

    We report a case of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor of the ovary that was identified and/or clearly depicted by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. The potential roles of various imaging modalities in the detection of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in evaluation of residual intramuscular myxoma

    Intramuscular myxoma (IM) is a rare benign neoplasm. In a patient diagnosed with IM of left thigh, we report the utility of a postoperative fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan in assessing the efficacy of surgical excision

  1. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle Westergren;

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...

  2. The Use of GPUs for Solving the Computed Tomography Problem

    A.E. Kovtanyuk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT is a widespread method used to study the internal structure of objects. The method has applications in medicine, industry and other fields of human activity. In particular, Electronic Imaging, as a species CT, can be used to restore the structure of nanosized objects. Accurate and rapid results are in high demand in modern science. However, there are computational limitations that bound the possible usefulness of CT. On the other hand, the introduction of high-performance calculations using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs provides improving quality and performance of computed tomography investigations. Moreover, parallel computing with GPUs gives significantly higher computation speeds when compared with (Central Processing Units CPUs, because of architectural advantages of the former. In this paper a computed tomography method of recovering the image using parallel computations powered by NVIDIA CUDA technology is considered. The implementation of this approach significantly reduces the required time for solving the CT problem.

  3. Computed Tomography diagnosis of skeletal involvement in multiple myeloma

    The authors assess the role of Computed Topography in the diagnosis and management of multiple myeloma (MM) and investigate if Computed Tomography findings can influence the clinical approach, prognosis and treatment. 273 multiple myeloma patients submitted to Computed Tomography June 1994, to December, 1996. The patients were 143 men and 130 women (mean age: 65 years): 143 were stage I, 38 stage II and 92 stage III according to Durie and Salomon's clinical classification. All patients were submitted to blood tests, spinal radiography and Computed Tomography, the latter with serial 5-mm scans on several vertebral bodies. Computed Tomography despicted vertebral arch and process involvement in 3 cases with the vertebral pedicle sign. Moreover, Computed Tomography proved superior to radiography in showing the spread of myelomatous masses into the soft tissues in a case with solitary permeative lesion in the left public bone, which facilitated subsequent biopsy. As for extraosseous localizations, Computed Tomography demonstrated thoracic soft tissue (1 woman) and pelvic (1 man) involvement by myelomtous masses penetrating into surrounding tissues. In our series, only a case of osteosclerotic bone myeloma was observed in the pelvis, associated with lytic abnormalities. Computed Tomography findings do not seem to improve the clinical approach and therapeutic management of the disease. Nevertheless, the authors reccommend Computed Tomography for some myelomatous conditions, namely: a) in the patients with focal bone pain but normal skeletal radiographs; b) in the patients with M protein, bone marrow plasmocytosis and back pain, but with an incoclusive multiple myeloma diagnosis; c) to asses bone spread in the regions which are anatomically complex or difficult to study with radiography and to depict soft tissue involvement; d) for bone biopsy

  4. Dose modulated computed tomography automated dosimetry

    Full text: Computed Tomography (CT) scans contribute a significant portion of the effective radiation dose from medical procedures and generally large effective radiation doses per diagnostic examination. With the advent of Multislice CT, the potential for large radiation exposures increased. This combined with the appeal of the resultant isotropic imaging and the increasing number of applications for which CT could be utilised (including screening procedures) has further increased the need for vigilant monitoring of CT protocols and use with respect to radiation dose. The introduction of dose modulated Computed Tomography has proven an effective method for reducing patient dose and is now widely used by CT manufacturers. This involves lowering the mA when scanning through anatomical regions which do not require a large mA. Many CT investigations now utilise dose modulation. Some of these studies will include over 900 images for which the mA and occasionally other factors could vary. In order to utilise the existing software to perform CT dosimetry a program has been written to automatically extract scan parameters from CT dicom image files and apply the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator, for slices with differing factors. Matlab has been used to write and compile a program which sorts through a folder of dicom images and extracts the appropriate dicom header information. Some manufacturers store different series and reformatted images all within the same folder. The images of the CT study for which the dosimetry is to be performed must be stored within the one folder and must be in a dicom format. The program has been written to accommodate several manufacturers, which all contain different information in their dicom headers. The Matlab program groups the various study/image types, extracting the relevant dicom header information, which is written to an Excel worksheet. An Excel file uses this information to run the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator with

  5. Radiological protection in paediatric computed tomography

    It is well known that paediatric patients are generally at greater risk for the development of cancer per unit of radiation dose compared with adults, due both to the longer life expectancy for any harmful effects of radiation to manifest, and the fact that developing organs and tissues are more sensitive to the effects of radiation. Multiple computed tomography (CT) examinations may cumulatively involve absorbed doses to organs and tissues that can sometimes approach or exceed the levels known from epidemiological studies to significantly increase the probability of cancer development. Radiation protection strategies include rigorous justification of CT examinations and the use of imaging techniques that are non-ionising, followed by optimisation of radiation dose exposure (according to the ‘as low as reasonably achievable’ principle). Special consideration should be given to the availability of dose reduction technology when acquiring CT scanners. Dose reduction should be optimised by adjustment of scan parameters (such as mAs, kVp, and pitch) according to patient weight or age, region scanned, and study indication (e.g. images with greater noise should be accepted if they are of sufficient diagnostic quality). Other strategies include restricting multiphase examination protocols, avoiding overlapping of scan regions, and only scanning the area in question. Newer technologies such as tube current modulation, organ-based dose modulation, and iterative reconstruction should be used when appropriate. Attention should also be paid to optimising study quality (e.g. by image post-processing to facilitate radiological diagnoses and interpretation). Finally, improving awareness through education and advocacy, and further research in paediatric radiological protection are important to help reduce patient dose.

  6. Computed tomography of diffuse pulmonary diseases

    This article summarizes our preliminary results on high resolution computed tomography of 101 patients with various diffuse lung diseases. Instead of pattern recognition routinely done on chest radiogram (nodular, reticular or reticulo-nodular) we emphasized the relation of the lesions with inherent structures of the lung seen on the CT images. For this purpose our ten years radiologic-pathologic correlation on inflated and fixed lung specimens proved quite useful. 1) Centrilobular inflammatory nodules. This was seen in diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB), allergic broncho-pulmonary aspergillosis, tuberculosis, pneumoconiosis and lobular pneumonia. DPB and bronchogenic spread of tuberculosis were most representative. The nodules produced by these diseases were located at the extreme end of bronchial branchings and separated by 2 to 3 mm from the pleura and pulmonary vein which constitute the edge of the secondary pulmonary lobule. 2) The lesions extending along bronchoarterial sheath and pulmonary vein. The contours of the pulmonary vessels were irregular and their calibers enlarged. These findings were seen in sarcoidosis and lymphangiosis carcinomatosa. 3) Lobular and multilobular lesions. This was seen in diffuse interstitial pneumonia and in alveolar filling diseases. The margins of the lesions were straight or curved slightly suggesting that disease is blocked by the lobular septa. Fine air bronchogram within the lesions was characteristic in chronic interstitial pneumonia. 4) Slight to moderate increase of lung density with multilobular distribution. This was seen in interstitial pneumonia, sarcoidosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. We supposed that this finding corresponds to cellular or fibrous thickening of alveolar septa, but direct proof was not available. (J.P.N.)

  7. Computed tomography in Duchenne type muscular dystrophy

    The computed tomography (CT) scan was performed on 91 Duchenne type muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients on the following four levels; (1) at the level of L3 vertebra, (2) 2-3cm above the symphysis pubica, (3) midposition of the thigh, (4) largest-diameter section of the lower leg. The CT of muscles common to most of the DMD patients were as follows: 1. Muscle atrophy: Muscle atrophy was shown as a reduction in the cross-sectional area of the muscles. Very mild muscle atrophy could be detected either by the clearly identified muscle border or by scattered low-density areas of so-called ''moth-eaten'' appearance within muscles. 2. Fat infiltration: The decrease in radio-density of muscles was interpreted as infiltration of fatty tissue. This type of density change was further classified into diffuse, streaked, cobblestone and salt-and-pepper patterns according to the spacial distribution of low-density areas. 3. Selectivity pattern: As the chronological sequence of DMD muscle degeneration is usually different among individual muscles, it may be seen, in some stages, that some of the synergistic muscles are still only slightly involved, while the others are quite severely atrophied with evident fat infiltration. In certain stages of the disease, most of the patients show relative preservation of particular muscles although they assumed a rounded shape. The most resistent muscle was musculus gracilis, followed by the musculus sartorius, musculus semitendinosus (and/or musculus semimembranosus) in that order. According to the severity of the CT changes, 86 of the 91 patients were classed into five stages from A1 to A5. Morphological stages (A1-A5) were well correlated to the functional disability stages by Ueda with a correlation factor of r=0.88. (J.P.N.)

  8. Dose in x-ray computed tomography.

    Kalender, Willi A

    2014-02-01

    Radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a topic of high interest due to the increasing numbers of CT examinations performed worldwide. This review aims to present an overview of current concepts for both scanner output metrics and for patient dosimetry and will comment on their strengths and weaknesses. Controversial issues such as the appropriateness of the CT dose index (CTDI) are discussed in detail. A review of approaches to patient dose assessment presently in practice, of the dose levels encountered and options for further dose optimization are also given and discussed. Patient dose assessment remains a topic for further improvement and for international consensus. All approaches presently in use are based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Estimates for effective dose are established, but they are crude and not patient-specific; organ dose estimates are rarely available. Patient- and organ-specific dose estimates can be provided with adequate accuracy and independent of CTDI phantom measurements by fast MC simulations. Such information, in particular on 3D dose distributions, is important and helpful in optimization efforts. Dose optimization has been performed very successfully in recent years and even resulted in applications with effective dose values of below 1 mSv. In general, a trend towards lower dose values based on technical innovations has to be acknowledged. Effective dose values are down to clearly below 10 mSv on average, and there are a number of applications such as cardiac and pediatric CT which are performed routinely below 1 mSv on modern equipment. PMID:24434792

  9. The petromastoid canal on computed tomography

    Krombach, G.A.; Schmitz-Rode, T.; Weidner, J.; Guenther, R.W. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Prescher, A. [Department of Anatomy, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); DiMartino, E. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany)

    2002-11-01

    The objective was to assess visibility and anatomy of the petromastoid canal in high-resolution CT. Computed tomography images of 188 patients were reviewed for delineation of the petromastoid canal. This bony canal connects the mastoid antrum with the cranial cavity and houses the subarcuate artery and vein. The diameter, obtained in the middle portion of the canal, was compared with the diameter of the vestibular and cochlear aqueduct in all patients, and absolute values measured in 20 cases. Collimation was 1 mm in 164 and 2 mm in 24 examinations. Additionally, temporal bone of a cadaver was imaged and microdissected. The petromastoid canal was identified bilaterally in all 164 scans that were obtained with a slice thickness of 1 mm. In 5 of the 24 patients imaged with a collimation of 2 mm, the canal was not visible, most probably due to partial-volume effects. The petromastoid canal had the same diameter as the cochlear aqueduct in 42/44 (right/left), exceeded it in 66/61 and was smaller in 75/78 cases. In comparison to the vestibular aqueduct it had an equal diameter in 38/41 (right/left), exceeded it in 63/61, and was rated as smaller in 82/81 temporal bones. Diameters for the canals were: petromastoid canal 0.51{+-}0.04 mm; cochlear aqueduct 0.57{+-}0.03; and vestibular aqueduct 0.63{+-}0.06 mm. Microdissection of the specimen revealed the entire course of the canal and demonstrated a similar appearance of the structure as in the images. The petromastoid canal can easily be identified on high-resolution, thin-slice CT images. Knowledge of the anatomy of this bony canal prevents misinterpretation as pathological structure, such as fracture line, which might occur if this structure is not known. (orig.)

  10. Time Domain Terahertz Axial Computed Tomography Non Destructive Evaluation Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to demonstrate key elements of feasibility for a high speed automated time domain terahertz computed axial tomography (TD-THz CT) non destructive...

  11. Time Domain Terahertz Axial Computed Tomography Non Destructive Evaluation Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase 2 project, we propose to develop, construct, and deliver to NASA a computed axial tomography time-domain terahertz (CT TD-THz) non destructive...

  12. The value of computed tomography in tuberous sclerosis

    The computed tomography (CT) findings in 5 patients with tuberous sclerosis are presented. CT is recommended as a rapid, non-invasive, easily repeated investigative procedure for patients with clinically suspected tuberous sclerosis and epilepsy of unknown origin

  13. Helical x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography

    Qi, Zhihua; Thériault-Lauzier, Pascal; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    Helical computed tomography revolutionized the field of x-ray computed tomography two decades ago. The simultaneous translation of an image object with a standard computed tomography acquisition allows for fast volumetric scan for long image objects. X-ray phase sensitive imaging methods have been studied over the past few decades to provide new contrast mechanisms for imaging an object. A Talbot-Lau grating interferometer based differential phase contrast imaging method has recently demonstrated its potential for implementation in clinical and industrial applications. In this work, the principles of helical computed tomography are extended to differential phase contrast imaging to produce volumetric reconstructions based on fan-beam data. The method demonstrates the potential for helical differential phase contrast CT to scan long objects with relatively small detector coverage in the axial direction.

  14. Use of computed tomography in nondestructive testing of polymeric materials

    Computed tomography has been used to detect imperfections and to measure cross-link density gradients in polymeric products, such as airplane tires, rubber shock absorbers, and filament-wound high-pressure tanks

  15. Evaluation of left renal vein entrapment using multidetector computed tomography

    Poyraz, Ahmet K.; Onur, Mehmet R. [Dept. of Radiology, Firat Univ. School of Medicine, Elazig (Turkey)], e-mail: akursadpoyraz@yahoo.com.tr; Firdolas, Fatih [Dept. of Urology, Firat Univ. School of Medicine, Elazig (Turkey); Kocakoc, Ercan [Dept. of Radiology, Bezmialem Vakif Univ., School of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-03-15

    Background: Nutcracker syndrome, also called left renal vein entrapment syndrome, is a cause of non-glomerular hematuria with difficulties in diagnosis. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is a powerful tool to prevent unnecessary diagnostic procedures. Purpose: To retrospectively determine the prevalence of nutcracker phenomenon and nutcracker syndrome seen in MDCT in consecutive patients. Material and Methods: The institutional review board approved the study and waived the requirement for informed consent. Abdominal contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were reviewed from 1000 consecutive patients. MDCT scan assessment included renal vein diameter measurements and evaluation for the presence of anterior or posterior left renal vein entrapment. Electronic medical records and urine analysis reports of patients with left renal vein entrapment were reviewed. Student's t test was used to assess differences in renal vein diameter in patients with left renal vein entrapment. Results: Left renal vein entrapment was observed in 10.9% (109), retroaortic left renal vein in 6.5% (65), entrapment of left renal vein between superior mesenteric artery and aorta in 4.1% (41), and circumaortic left renal vein in 0.3% (3) of patients. Mean diameters of right (8.8 {+-} 1.9 mm) and unentrapped left (8.9 {+-} 1.8 mm) renal veins were not significantly different (P = 0.1). The mean diameter of anterior entrapped left renal veins (10.3 {+-} 2 mm) was significantly greater (P = 0.04) than contralateral renal veins (8.6 {+-} 2.1 mm) in their widest portion. In 8.8% of patients with the left renal vein entrapment, urine analysis showed isomorphic hematuria or proteinuria with no other known cause. Varicocele and pelvic congestion were seen in 5.5% of patients with the left renal vein entrapment. Conclusion: Left renal vein entrapment is not a rare entity and renal nutcracker phenomenon might be underdiagnosed.

  16. Myocardial perfusion with multi-detector computed tomography: quantitative evaluation

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the skill of multidetector computer tomography, to quantify the different patterns of intensification during the evaluation of the myocardial perfusion. 45 patients were studied with suspicion of cardiovascular disease. Multi-detector computed tomography was utilized on patients at rest and in effort with pharmacological stress, after the administration of dipyridamole. Also they were evaluated using nuclear medicine

  17. Diagnosis of hoof disease in horses using computed tomography

    Kovač Milomir; Nowak Michael; Kaufels Nikola; Tambur Zoran

    2002-01-01

    This study describes findings of computed tomography investigations at the Bergische Equine Clinic (Germany) of 39 horses with hoof diseaseas. The most frequently findings were the navicular syndrome (eight horses), laminitis (seven horses), keratnoma (six horses) and ossification of collateral cartilages in the distal phalanx (four horses). The special value of the computed tomography is in evaluating the size and courses fracture/fissure of the navicular and koffin bones, which were diagnos...

  18. Dual energy computed tomography: Physical principles and methods

    Κοντογιάννη, Λουκία

    2013-01-01

    The current thesis concerns Dual Energy Computed Tomography and specifically the physical principles and methods it is based on. Dual Energy CT offers the potential of not only anatomical, but also functional information from Computed Tomography (CT) exams. This is achieved by utilizing the energy dependence of X-rays’ attenuation within matter. In this way, materials are divided into those that are characterized by energy-dependent attenuation (strong spectral behavior), due t...

  19. Computed tomography of the mediastinum in myasthenia gravis

    Computed tomography of the mediastinum was performed in 45 patients with myasthenia gravis. Surgery was carried out in fourteen. Amongst these, there were four thymomas, one thymolipoma, eight thymic hyperplasias and one normal thymus gland. A further patient, who did not have surgery, probably also had a thymic tumour. The normal thymus and thymic hyperplasia cannot be distinguished on computed tomography. Differentiation of small thymomas from normal thymus is not always possible. Invasion by thymomas can only be appreciated with large tumours. (orig.)

  20. Computed tomography of the mediastinum in myasthenia gravis

    Guertler, K.F.; Janzen, R.W.C.; Hagemann, J.; Otto, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography of the mediastinum was performed in 45 patients with myasthenia gravis. Surgery was carried out in fourteen. Amongst these, there were four thymomas, one thymolipoma, eight thymic hyperplasias and one normal thymus gland. A further patient, who did not have surgery, probably also had a thymic tumour. The normal thymus and thymic hyperplasia cannot be distinguished on computed tomography. Differentiation of small thymomas from normal thymus is not always possible. Invasion by thymomas can only be appreciated with large tumours.

  1. Non-infectious complications of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: evaluation with peritoneal computed tomography

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the non-infectious complications of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) using peritoneal computed tomography (PCT). Twenty symptomatic patients were included in the study. Initially 2000 ml of dialysate fluid was infused into the peritoneal cavity and standard peritoneal computed cavity and standard peritoneal computed tomography (SPCT) serial scans with 10 mm thickness were performed from the mid-thoracic region to the genital organs. Afterwards, 100 ml of non-ionic contrast material containing 300 mg/ml iodine was injected through the catheter and was distributed homogeneously in the intra-abdominal dialysate fluid by changing the positions of the patients; after waiting for 2-4 h, the CT scan was repeated as peritoneal contrast computed tomography (PCCT). In patients (n = 20) both SPCT and PCCT revealed 90 % (n = 18) pathological findings. But PCCT showed 60 % (n = 12) additional pathological findings. We believe that PCT is beneficial for evaluation of non-infectious complications of CAPD. But PCCT is superior to SPCT in evaluating non-infectious complications encountered in patients on CAPD treatment. (author)

  2. CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma

    Computed tomography (CT) findings from 95 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were evaluated. Among them, there was no false negative case. It can thus be said that if CT is negative the patient can be treated conservatively. The efficacy of CT in diagnosing injuries of various organs was also evaluated. (author)

  3. Value of positron emission tomography and computer tomography (PET/CT) for urologic malignancies

    Positron emission tomography is a functional imaging technique that allows the detection of the regional metabolic rate, and is often coupled with other morphological imaging technique such as computed tomography. The rationale for its use is based on the clearly demonstrated fact that functional changes in tumor processes happen before morphological changes. Its introduction to the clinical practice added a new dimension in conventional imaging techniques. This review presents the current and proposed indications of the use of positron emission/computed tomography for prostate, bladder and testes, and the potential role of this exam in radiotherapy planning. (authors)

  4. [Value of positron emission tomography and computer tomography (PET/CT) for urologic malignancies].

    Boujelbene, N; Prior, J O; Boubaker, A; Azria, D; Schaffer, M; Gez, E; Jichlinski, P; Meuwly, J-Y; Mirimanoff, R O; Ozsahin, M; Zouhair, A

    2011-07-01

    Positron emission tomography is a functional imaging technique that allows the detection of the regional metabolic rate, and is often coupled with other morphological imaging technique such as computed tomography. The rationale for its use is based on the clearly demonstrated fact that functional changes in tumor processes happen before morphological changes. Its introduction to the clinical practice added a new dimension in conventional imaging techniques. This review presents the current and proposed indications of the use of positron emission/computed tomography for prostate, bladder and testes, and the potential role of this exam in radiotherapy planning. PMID:21507695

  5. Computer aided diagnosis of acute abdominal pain at Middlesbrough General Hospital.

    Scarlett, P. Y.; Cooke, W M; Clarke, D.; Bates, C.; Chan, M.

    1986-01-01

    This presentation reports the experience of the surgical house staff and registrars at Middlesbrough General Hospital who used a desk-top computer system to support their clinical diagnosis of acute abdominal pain. The results cover a two year period and are compared with a baseline period of one year. Substantial benefits followed the introduction of the computer-aided diagnostic support system; increased diagnostic accuracy of the whole surgical team, reduction in negative laparotomy rates,...

  6. Challenges for computed tomography of overweight patients

    In morbidly obese patients, computed tomography frequently represents the only viable option for non-invasive imaging diagnostics. The aim of this study was to analyze the weight limits, dose and image quality with standard CT scanners and to determine the diagnostic value and dose with a dual source XXL mode. A total of 15 patients (average body weight 189.6±42 kg) were retrospectively identified who had been examined with the XXL mode. Of these patients 7 (average body weight 176.4±56 kg) had been examined using both the XXL and standard protocols allowing for an intraindividual comparison in this subcollective. Additionally 14 patients weighing between 90 and 150 kg (average 106.1±19 kg) examined with standard protocols were included as references. Dose, image noise and subjectively assessed image quality (rating scale 1-4) were determined. Additionally, a large abdomen phantom of 48 cm diameter was examined with both protocols at equivalent tube current-time product in order to compare the dose efficiency. The patient groups differed significantly in dose (CTDIvol XXL 72.9±23 versus standard 16.7±11 mGy; intraindividual 64.1±20 versus 27.0±15 mGy). The image noise was generally somewhat higher in the XXL group but significantly lower in the intraindividual comparison (liver 24.2±14 HU versus 36.3±20 HU; p=0.03; fat 15.5±8 HU versus 26.2±12 HU; p=0.02). With ratings of 1.9±0.7 and 1.8±0.7 image quality did not differ significantly in general, whereas there was a clear difference in the intraindividual comparison (1.8±0.8 versus 3.0±1.2) and only the XXL protocol achieved diagnostic quality in all cases, while 43% of the examinations with the standard protocol were rated as non-diagnostic. The quantification of dose efficiency in the phantom scans yielded no significant difference between the protocols. Up to 150 kg body weight, CT can be performed with the standard technique at 120 kVp with tube current modulation. In larger patients diagnostic

  7. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography

    Walters, B. R. B.; Ding, G. X.; Kramer, R.; Kawrakow, I. [Ionizing Radiation Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa K1A OR6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-5671 (United States); Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Luiz Freire 1000, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 50740-540, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Ionizing Radiation Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa K1A OR6 (Canada)

    2009-07-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12x0.12x0.12 cm{sup 3}, with 17x17x17 {mu}m{sup 3} microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens ({approx}8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only {approx}50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment.

  8. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography.

    Walters, B R B; Ding, G X; Kramer, R; Kawrakow, I

    2009-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12 x 0.12 x 0.12 cm3, with 17 x 17 x 17 microm3 microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/ MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens (approximately 8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only approximately 50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment. PMID:19673190

  9. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12x0.12x0.12 cm3, with 17x17x17 μm3 microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens (∼8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only ∼50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment.

  10. Computed tomography of the orbital tumors

    Choi, Jai Korl; Lee, Hwang Bok; Kang, Eun Young; Seol, Hae Young; Suh, Won Hyuck [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byeong Yeob [Han Mi Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-04-15

    The development of computed tomography (CT) provided a noninvasive safe technique for imaging the orbit in any plane exquisitely demonstrating its normal anatomy as well as its pathologic process. The orbit is an ideal structure to be examined by CT because of large difference of absorption values between the intraorbital fat, muscle, optic nerve and vessels. In this study, the authors reviewed CT findings of 66 pathologically proven orbital tumors and tumorous conditions among the total of 98 cases who had taken orbital CT scan because if exophthalmos, ocular pain, diplopia and other ophthalmologic symptoms suggesting orbital masses during the period of 3 years. For the analysis of characteristic CT findings of the orbital lesions, all lesions are divided into 4 groups according to the site of origin, i.e., tumors arising in the eyeball (group 1); from intraconal space (group 2); from extraconal space (group 3); and from extraorbital regions (group 4). The results are as follows; 1.Extra tumor detection and localization was possible in 63 cases. Thus the detection rate was 95% with CT scan. 2.Among 36 males and 30 females, their age ranged from 10 months to 72 years. 3.Intraocular tumors (group 1) were 10 cases. Retinoblastoma occurred wholly in the young children under 5 years and combined with calcification in 57%. Choroidal melanoma occurred wholly in adults. 4.Intraconal tumors (group 2) were 9 cases. Vascular tumors (7 cases) were the most frequent and well enhancing mass. 5.The tumors arising in the extraconal region (group 3) were pseudotumor (12 cases), lymphoma (3 cases), dermoid cyst (4 cases), metastasis (2 cases), adenoid cystic carcinoma (1 case) and teratoma (1 case). A case of lymphoma demonstrating retrobulbar ill defined mass with scleral l thickening could not be differentiated from the pseudotumor which showing similar finding. 6.The lesions arising from extraorbital region (group 4) were PNS cancer (9 cases), mucocele (3 cases), lid cancer (4

  11. Computed tomography of the orbital tumors

    The development of computed tomography (CT) provided a noninvasive safe technique for imaging the orbit in any plane exquisitely demonstrating its normal anatomy as well as its pathologic process. The orbit is an ideal structure to be examined by CT because of large difference of absorption values between the intraorbital fat, muscle, optic nerve and vessels. In this study, the authors reviewed CT findings of 66 pathologically proven orbital tumors and tumorous conditions among the total of 98 cases who had taken orbital CT scan because if exophthalmos, ocular pain, diplopia and other ophthalmologic symptoms suggesting orbital masses during the period of 3 years. For the analysis of characteristic CT findings of the orbital lesions, all lesions are divided into 4 groups according to the site of origin, i.e., tumors arising in the eyeball (group 1); from intraconal space (group 2); from extraconal space (group 3); and from extraorbital regions (group 4). The results are as follows; 1.Extra tumor detection and localization was possible in 63 cases. Thus the detection rate was 95% with CT scan. 2.Among 36 males and 30 females, their age ranged from 10 months to 72 years. 3.Intraocular tumors (group 1) were 10 cases. Retinoblastoma occurred wholly in the young children under 5 years and combined with calcification in 57%. Choroidal melanoma occurred wholly in adults. 4.Intraconal tumors (group 2) were 9 cases. Vascular tumors (7 cases) were the most frequent and well enhancing mass. 5.The tumors arising in the extraconal region (group 3) were pseudotumor (12 cases), lymphoma (3 cases), dermoid cyst (4 cases), metastasis (2 cases), adenoid cystic carcinoma (1 case) and teratoma (1 case). A case of lymphoma demonstrating retrobulbar ill defined mass with scleral l thickening could not be differentiated from the pseudotumor which showing similar finding. 6.The lesions arising from extraorbital region (group 4) were PNS cancer (9 cases), mucocele (3 cases), lid cancer (4

  12. Computed tomography of orbital diseases in childhood

    We analyzed computed tomography (CT) of 29 cases of various orbital diseases in pediatric age group. Diagnosis were confirmed by either operation or direct ophthalmoscope. The patients were examined during the period of last 3 years. The results were as follows: 1. Of 29 cases, 21 were male and 8 were female, and the age ranged from 20 days to 15 years. 2. Intraorbital tumors were 13 cases consisting of 7 retinoblastoma, 3 pseudotumor, and 1 each of congenital teratoma, cavernous lymphangioma, and optic glioma. Of remaining 16 cases, 6 had orbital fracture, 5 persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), 3 vitreous opacity, and 2 primary glaucoma. 3. The CT findings of the retinoblastoma were a lobulated or oval soft tissue mass density (40-60 HU) extending into the vitreous without significant enhancement on postcontrast scan. Of 7 cases, 4 had calcifications within the tumors. The extraglobal extension of the tumor was shown in 2 patients demonstrating markedly thickened sclera with enhancement and dilated optic nerve. 4. There were 5 patients with PHPV having a history of white pupil since birth, and all were affected unilateraly. Four patients had vitreous opacity and 3 of those showed either liner or branching tree-like densities within the vitreous on the postcontrast scan. Another one had a lobulated increased density protruding into the vitreous which was difficult to differenciate from the similar finding of retinoblastoma. Remaining one case demonstrated a deformed and decreased density in the lesional lens without change in the density of the vitreous. This was confirmed to be caused by persistence of the embryonic hyaloid artery attached to the posterior capsule of he lens. 5. There were 3 patients with vitreous opacity and 2 of them were due to retinal detachment and 1 was caused by retrolental fibroplasia. The CT findings of retinal detachment were homogeneous or heterogenous opacities in the vitreous. In a case of retrolental fibroplasia

  13. Preoperative diagnosis of gastric cancer using plain computed tomography and dynamic computed tomography

    The accuracy of preoperative diagnosis using computed tomography with or without contrast enhancement in detecting the depth of tumor invasion in the gastric wall and the presence or absence of lymph node metastasis was compared based on histological findings in 94 gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy. The diagnostic accuracy rate of plain CT for gastric wall invasion was less than dynamic CT. Particularly in the evaluation of invasion to another organ, the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic CT was higher (84%) than plain CT (56%). The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of dynamic CT for lymph node metastasis was significantly higher than that of plain CT. With respect to the detection of metastasis to group 2 lymph nodes (especially No. 7, 8, 9, and 11), the sensitivity of dynamic CT was higher than that of plain CT. We conclude that dynamic CT is an available preoperative diagnostic procedure for detecting lymph node metastasis and serosal invasion. (author)

  14. An unusual cause of the acute abdomen: computed tomography angiography findings of the intestinal intramural hematoma

    Full text: Introduction: The intestinal intramural hematoma is a rare abdominal emergency condition resulting from submucosal or subserosal hemorrhage. The various causes of this condition are anticoagulant therapy, trauma, surgery, biopsy and spontaneous. The most common cause of this condition is blunt abdominal trauma. Objectives and tasks: In this report we aimed to present computed tomography (CT) angiography findings of the intestinal wall hematoma which is an unusual cause of acute abdomen. Materials and methods: A 67-year-old man presented to our emergency department complaining of severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The physical examination revealed right upper quadrant and epigastric abdominal tenderness. Sonographic examination revealed free fluid in the right paracolic area and minor pelvis. Due to these findings, the patient underwent CT angiography examination with suspicion of acute intestinal ischemia. Results: Diffuse atherosclerotic calcified plaques in the abdominal aorta and moderate degree stenosis proximal celiac truncus were determined on CT angiography images. Mesenteric arterial system was patent. On CT images most remarkable finding was diffuse wall thickening reaching up to 1.5 cm at the widest part in small intestinal segments. These findings were seen in the right half of abdomen and pelvis, approximately 12 cm and 20 cm small intestinal segment, respectively. The patient was using warfarin and acetylsalicylic acid medication due to heart valve replacement surgery. This history and CT angiography findings were consistent with intestinal mural hematoma. Conclusion: In the differential diagnosis of the acute abdomen, intestinal intramural hematoma must be kept in mind, especially in patients using anticoagulant drugs. In such cases, CT angiographic examination is rapid, effective and reliable method in both determination of the vascular abnormality and evaluation of the intestinal wall pathologies

  15. Low-dose computed tomography to detect body-packing in an animal model

    Maurer, M.H., E-mail: martin.maurer@charite.de [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Niehues, S.M.; Schnapauff, D.; Grieser, C.; Rothe, J.H. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Waldmueller, D. [Bildungs- und Wissenschaftszentrum der Bundesfinanzverwaltung, Berlin (Germany); Chopra, S.S. [Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, B.; Denecke, T. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Objective: To assess the possible extent of dose reduction for low-dose computed tomography (CT) in the detection of body-packing (ingested drug packets) as an alternative to plain radiographs in an animal model. Materials and methods: Twelve packets containing cocaine (purity >80%) were introduced into the intestine of an experimental animal (crossbred pig), which was then repeatedly examined by abdominal CT with stepwise dose reduction (tube voltage, 80 kV; tube current, 10-350 mA). Three blinded readers independently evaluated the CT datasets starting with the lowest tube current and noted the numbers of packets detected at the different tube currents used. In addition, 1 experienced reader determined the number of packets detectable on plain abdominal radiographs and ultrasound. Results: The threshold for correct identification of all 12 drug packets was 100 mA for reader 1 and 125 mA for readers 2 and 3. Above these thresholds all 3 readers consistently identified all 12 packets. The effective dose of a low-dose CT scan with 125 mA (including scout view) was 1.0 mSv, which was below that of 2 conventional abdominal radiographs (1.2 mSv). The reader interpreting the conventional radiographs identified a total of 9 drug packets and detected 8 packets by abdominal ultrasound. Conclusions: Extensive dose reduction makes low-dose CT a valuable alternative imaging modality for the examination of suspected body-packers and might replace conventional abdominal radiographs as the first-line imaging modality.

  16. Low-dose computed tomography to detect body-packing in an animal model

    Objective: To assess the possible extent of dose reduction for low-dose computed tomography (CT) in the detection of body-packing (ingested drug packets) as an alternative to plain radiographs in an animal model. Materials and methods: Twelve packets containing cocaine (purity >80%) were introduced into the intestine of an experimental animal (crossbred pig), which was then repeatedly examined by abdominal CT with stepwise dose reduction (tube voltage, 80 kV; tube current, 10-350 mA). Three blinded readers independently evaluated the CT datasets starting with the lowest tube current and noted the numbers of packets detected at the different tube currents used. In addition, 1 experienced reader determined the number of packets detectable on plain abdominal radiographs and ultrasound. Results: The threshold for correct identification of all 12 drug packets was 100 mA for reader 1 and 125 mA for readers 2 and 3. Above these thresholds all 3 readers consistently identified all 12 packets. The effective dose of a low-dose CT scan with 125 mA (including scout view) was 1.0 mSv, which was below that of 2 conventional abdominal radiographs (1.2 mSv). The reader interpreting the conventional radiographs identified a total of 9 drug packets and detected 8 packets by abdominal ultrasound. Conclusions: Extensive dose reduction makes low-dose CT a valuable alternative imaging modality for the examination of suspected body-packers and might replace conventional abdominal radiographs as the first-line imaging modality.

  17. Abdominal trauma

    Radiologic evaluation of abdominal trauma must provide a quick and accurate assessment of the lesions in order to improve the management of the patient. The technique used varies depending on the mechanism of the trauma (blunt trauma or stab wounds) and the hemodynamic status. Radiologic evaluation is usually performed in blunt trauma whereas stab wound trauma is usually explored surgically. The various techniques available are standard radiographs, ultrasonography, computed tomography and arteriography. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the immediate evaluation is still not well defined. It appears to be useful method in the delayed evaluation of diaphragmatic trauma. Computed tomography is the method most commonly performed in trauma patients. This technique is accurate and allows correct assessment of the lesions. The disadvantages are the radiation induced and the need for a hemo-dynamically stable patient. The aim of the radiologic evaluation is to provide the clinicians with an accurate description of the lesions. It can help in the management of the patient usually in association with clinical and laboratory data. It can also guide interventional procedures (drainage, embolization...). Finally, it allows radiographic follow-up when conservative treatment is performed. (authors). 26 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  18. Tuberous sclerosis diagnosed by incidental computed tomography findings of multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia: a case report

    Ishii Makoto

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The majority of multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia associated with tuberous sclerosis complex is diagnosed with the classical clinical triad of seizures, mental retardation, and skin lesions. We report a rare case of tuberous sclerosis complex with no classical clinical findings, which was diagnosed through incidental computed tomography findings of multiple nodular lesions of multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia. Case presentation A chest computed tomography scan of a 51-year-old Japanese woman showed multiple nodular ground-glass opacities that were not seen on chest X-ray. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was performed. A histological examination demonstrated type II pneumocyte hyperplasia with thickened fibrotic alveolar septa, which was consistent with multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging displayed multiple cortical tubers, and abdominal computed tomography showed bilateral renal angiomyolipoma. Our patient was finally diagnosed as having tuberous sclerosis complex with multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia, although she had no episodes of epilepsy, no skin lesions, and no family history. Conclusions Multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia with latent tuberous sclerosis complex should be considered in the differential diagnosis of multiple ground-glass opacities.

  19. Endocrine radionuclide scintigraphy with fusion single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    Wong, Ka-Kit; Gandhi, Arpit; Viglianti, Benjamin L; Fig, Lorraine M; Rubello, Domenico; Gross, Milton D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the benefits of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) hybrid imaging for diagnosis of various endocrine disorders. METHODS: We performed MEDLINE and PubMed searches using the terms: “SPECT/CT”; “functional anatomic mapping”; “transmission emission tomography”; “parathyroid adenoma”; “thyroid cancer”; “neuroendocrine tumor”; “adrenal”; “pheochromocytoma”; “paraganglioma”; in order to identify relevant articles published in English during the years 2003 to 2015. Reference lists from the articles were reviewed to identify additional pertinent articles. Retrieved manuscripts (case reports, reviews, meta-analyses and abstracts) concerning the application of SPECT/CT to endocrine imaging were analyzed to provide a descriptive synthesis of the utility of this technology. RESULTS: The emergence of hybrid SPECT/CT camera technology now allows simultaneous acquisition of combined multi-modality imaging, with seamless fusion of three-dimensional volume datasets. The usefulness of combining functional information to depict the bio-distribution of radiotracers that map cellular processes of the endocrine system and tumors of endocrine origin, with anatomy derived from CT, has improved the diagnostic capability of scintigraphy for a range of disorders of endocrine gland function. The literature describes benefits of SPECT/CT for 99mTc-sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy and 99mTc-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy, 123I- or 131I-radioiodine for staging of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, 111In- and 99mTc- labeled somatostatin receptor analogues for detection of neuroendocrine tumors, 131I-norcholesterol (NP-59) scans for assessment of adrenal cortical hyperfunction, and 123I- or 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging for evaluation of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. CONCLUSION: SPECT/CT exploits the synergism between the functional information from radiopharmaceutical imaging and anatomy

  20. Finger fractures imaging: accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography and multislice computed tomography

    Faccioli, Niccolo; Foti, Giovanni; Barillari, Marco; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi [University of Verona, Department of Radiology, G.B. Rossi Hospital, Verona (Italy); Atzei, Andrea [University of Verona, Department of Hand Surgery, G.B. Rossi Hospital, Verona (Italy)

    2010-11-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy and radiation exposure of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and multislice computed tomography (MSCT) in the evaluation of finger fractures. In a 3-year period, 57 consecutive patients with post-traumatic fractures of the metacarpal-phalangeal (MCP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints with involvement of the articular surface were studied by means of CBCT and MSCT. Student's t test was used to compare CBCT and MSCT accuracy in evaluating the percentage of joint surface involvement and in detecting bone fragments. The average tissue-absorbed doses of CBCT and MSCT were also compared. A value of p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Inter-observer agreement was calculated. In all cases, CBCT allowed the percentage of articular involvement to be correctly depicted compared with MSCT, showing 100% sensitivity and specificity (p < 0.001). A total of 103 bone fragments were depicted on MSCT (mean 3.8 per patient, range 1-23). CBCT indicated 92 out of 103 fragments (89.3%) compared with MSCT (mean diameter of missed fragments 0.9 mm, range 0.6-1.3 mm), with no statistically significant difference between CBCT and MSCT (p < 0.025). Multislice CT radiation exposure was significantly higher than that of CBCT (0.18 mSv vs 0.06 mSv, p < 0.0025). Inter-observer agreement was good (overall {kappa} = 0.89-0.96). Cone beam CT may be considered a valuable imaging tool in the preoperative assessment of finger fractures, when MSCT is not available. (orig.)