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Sample records for abcc8 dna variations

  1. Complex ABCC8 DNA variations in congenital hyperinsulinism: lessons from functional studies

    Muzyamba, Morris; Farzaneh, Tabasum; Behe, Phillip;

    2007-01-01

    singly or in combination led to intracellular retention of the channel complex and loss of function. By contrast, V1572I is trafficked appropriately and is functional, consistent with a mechanism of reduction to hemizygosity of paternal ABCC8 in focal disease. V1572I is likely to be a benign DNA variant...

  2. Hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia and diabetes mellitus due to dominant ABCC8/KCNJ11 mutations.

    Kapoor, R R

    2011-10-01

    Dominantly acting loss-of-function mutations in the ABCC8\\/KCNJ11 genes can cause mild medically responsive hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HH). As controversy exists over whether these mutations predispose to diabetes in adulthood we investigated the prevalence of diabetes in families with dominantly inherited ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel mutations causing HH in the proband.

  3. Familial mild hyperglycemia associated with a novel ABCC8-V84I mutation within three generations

    Gonsorcikova, Lucie; Vaxillaire, Martine; Pruhova, Stepanka;

    2011-01-01

    of the young genes (MODY1-4 and 6), we identified a novel ABCC8 V84I mutation, which segregated with autosomal dominant transmission of mild hyperglycemia within three generations. This mutation that is located in a conserved area of transmembrane domain TMD0 seems to be a rare cause of clinical phenotype...

  4. Permanent Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus Due to an ABCC8 Mutation: A Case Report

    Nithya Abraham

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Neonatal diabetes is a rare disorder with an incidence of about 1 in 100,000 live births. It is defined as diabetesdiagnosed in the first 6 months of life and it is vital to differentiate this entity from type 1 diabetes to enable accuratediagnosis, prognosis, genetic counseling and treatment. Case report We describe a case of permanent neonatal diabetesmellitus due to a novel mutation affecting the ABCC8 gene that encodes the SUR1 subunit of potassium ATP channel (KATP.Conclusion This genetic diagnosis has therapeutic implications as patients can switch from insulin therapy to sulphonylurea,as described in this case report.

  5. ABCC8-Related Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY12): Clinical Features and Treatment Perspective.

    Ovsyannikova, Alla K; Rymar, Oksana D; Shakhtshneider, Elena V; Klimontov, Vadim V; Koroleva, Elena A; Myakina, Natalya E; Voevoda, Mikhail I

    2016-09-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a heterogeneous group of diseases associated with gene mutations leading to dysfunction of pancreatic β-cells. Thirteen identified MODY variants differ from each other by the clinical course and treatment requirement. Currently, MODY subtypes 1-5 are best-studied, descriptions of the other forms are sporadic. This article reports a MODY12 clinical case, caused by a mutation in the gene of the ATP-binding cassette transporter sub-family C member 8 (ABCC8), encoding sulfonylurea receptor 1. Diabetes manifested in a 27-year-old non-obese man with epilepsy in anamnesis. No evidence of ketosis was present, pancreatic antibodies were undetectable, and C-peptide remained within the reference range. During the initial investigation, non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and elevated albumin excretion rate was revealed. After 4 months, diabetes was complicated by pre-proliferative retinopathy and diabetic macular edema. Recurrent hypoglycemia and an increase in body weight was observed on moderate and even small insulin doses. Taking into account the clinical features and the presence of diabetes in four generations on the maternal side, screening for all MODY subtypes was performed. A mutation in the ABCC8 gene was found in proband and in his mother. After the insulin discontinuation, gliclazide modified release combined with sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors was started. This treatment eliminated hypoglycemia and improved glycemic variability parameters. A decrease in the amplitude of glucose excursions was documented by continuous glucose monitoring. After 3 months of treatment, glycemic control was still optimal, and no hypoglycemic episodes were observed. The case report demonstrates the clinical features of ABCC8-associated MODY and the therapeutic potential of a combination of sulfonylurea with SGLT2 inhibitor in this disease. PMID:27538677

  6. Effect of genetic variants in KCNJ11, ABCC8, PPARG and HNF4A loci on the susceptibility of type 2 diabetes in Chinese Han population

    WANG Fang; HAN Xue-yao; REN Qian; ZHANG Xiu-ying; HAN Ling-chuan; LUO Ying-ying; ZHOU Xiang-hai; JI Li-nong

    2009-01-01

    Background KCNJ11, ABCC8, PPARG, and HNF4A have been found to be associated with type 2 diabetes in populations with different genetic backgrounds. The aim of this study was to test, in a Chinese Han population from Beijing, whether the genetic variants in these four genes were associated with genetic predisposition to type 2 diabetes.Methods We studied the association of four representative SNPs in KCNJ11, ABCC8, PPARG and HNF4A by genotyping them using ABI SnaPshot(R) Multiplex System in 400 unrelated type 2 diabetic patients and 400 unrelated normoglycaemic subjects. Results rs5219(E23K) in KCNJ11 was associated with genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (OR=1.400 with 95% Cl 1.117 1.755, P=0.004 under an additive model, OR=-1.652 with 95% Cl 1.086 2.513, P=0.019 under a recessive model,and OR=1.521 with 95% Cl 1.089 2.123, P=0.014 under a dominant model) after adjusting for sex and body mass index (BMI). We did not find evidence of association for ABCC8 rs1799854, PPARG rs1801282 (Pro12Ala) and HNF4A rs2144908. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis revealed that rs1799854 in ABCC8 was associated with 2-hour postprandial insulin secretion (P=0.005) after adjusting for sex, age and BMI. Although no interactions between the four variants on the risk of type 2 diabetes were detected, the multiplicative interaction between PPARG Pro12Ala and HNF4A rs2144908 was found to be associated with 2-hour postprandial insulin (P=-0.004 under an additive model for rs2144908;and P=0.001 under a dominant model for rs2144908) after adjusting for age, sex and BMI, assuming a dominant model for PPARG Pro12Ala.Conclusions Our study replicated the association of rs5219 in KCNJ11 with type 2 diabetes in Chinese Han population in Beijing. And we also observed that ABCC8 as well as the interaction between PPARG and HNF4A may contribute to post-challenge insulin secretion.

  7. Lack of association between KCNJ11 (rs5219 and ABCC8 (rs757110 polymorphisms and sulphonylurea treatment response in type 2 diabetes patients in Novosibirsk region

    Irina Arkadyevna Bondar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AimSulfonylureas (SU are widely used in everyday clinical practice in treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. There is a considerable variability in SU effects, which may be caused by psychological, social, biological and genetic factors. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between rs5219 KCNJ11 gene and rs757110 ABCC8 gene polymorphism and long-term response to SU-drugs of second and third generation in the Novosibirsk region.Materials and Methods326 patients with type 2 diabetes in the Novosibirsk region were examined. Patients were divided into 2 groups, depending on HbA1c level. The first group included patients with target HbA1c levels on SU monotherapy. The second group included patients who did not reach target HbA1c levels on the highest dose of SU. Genotyping of KCNJ11 (rs5219 and ABCC8 (rs757110 was performed by TaqMan real-time PCR (ICBFM SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia.ResultsPatients with type 2 diabetes with a good response to SU-therapy compared to the group of patients with a poor response to SU-therapy were older (65.8±9.1 years vs. 61.6±7.9 years, p<0.01, had later onset of type 2 diabetes (59.7±9.2 years vs. 48.3±9.3 years, p <0.01, shorter duration of type 2 diabetes (6.1±4.8 years vs. 13.2±7.3 years, p<0.01 and weak insulin resistance: fasting insulin 9.7±6.9 mU/ml vs. 13.6±12.7 mU/ml (p<0.05, HOMA-IR 3.1±2.2 vs. 6.2±6.0 (p<0.01, triglycerides 1.76±0.83 mmol/l vs. 2.42±1.97 mmol/l (p <0.01. Statistically significant differences between KCNJ11 (rs5219 and ABCC8 (rs757110 genotypes and response to SU-therapy was not found. The frequency of risk allele T polymorphism rs5219 KCNG11 gene in patients with a good response to SU was 0.38 and in the patients with a poor response to SU -0.38 (χ2=0.02, р=0.89. The frequency of the risk allele G polymorphism rs757110 ABCC8 gene in patients with a good response to SU was 0.40 and in the patients with poor response to SU -0.37 (χ2

  8. Mitochondrial DNA variation analysis in cervical cancer.

    Kabekkodu, Shama Prasada; Bhat, Samatha; Mascarenhas, Roshan; Mallya, Sandeep; Bhat, Manoj; Pandey, Deeksha; Kushtagi, Pralhad; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Gopinath, P M; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2014-05-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in non-malignant and malignant cervical tissue samples. We have identified 229 and 739 variations non-malignant and malignant tissues respectively distributed over 321 locations in the D-loop (50 in non-malignant and 166 in malignant; 216 variations), coding region (139 in non-malignant and 455 in malignant; 594 variations) tRNA and rRNA genes (39 in non-malignant and 119 in malignant; 158 variations). Besides, 77 novel and 34 various other disease associated variations were identified in non-malignant and malignant samples. A total of 236 tumor specific variations in 201 locations representing 30.1% in D-loop, 59.3% in coding regions and 10.6% in RNA genes were also identified. Our study shows that D loop (in 67 locations) is highly altered followed by ND5 (35 locations) region. Moreover, mtDNA alterations were significantly higher in malignant samples by two tailed Fisher's exact test (P≤0.05) with decreased mtDNA copy numbers. Bioinformatic analysis of 59 non-synonymous changes predicted several variations as damaging leading to decreased stability of the proteins. Taken together, mtDNA is highly altered in cervical cancer and functional studies are needed to be investigated to understand the consequence of these variations in cervical carcinogenesis and their potential application as biomarkers. PMID:23851045

  9. DNA fingerprinting and minisatellite variation of swans

    Meng, Anming

    1990-01-01

    Genetic variation in natural populations of four species of swans (Cygnus bewickii, Cygnus olor, Cygnus buccinator and Cygnus cygnus) has been investigated by examining minisatellite loci using human DNA fingerprinting probes pSPT19.6 and pSPT18.15. It has been found that swan minisatellites are highly variable. However, the degree of variation depends on the population structure and species. Bewick's Swans at Slimbridge have the highest degree of minisatellite variation, Whooper Swans at Cae...

  10. Physical activity modifies the effect of SNPs in the SLC2A2 (GLUT2) and ABCC8 (SUR1) genes on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas; Lakka, T A; Laaksonen, D E;

    2007-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two genes regulating insulin secretion, SLC2A2 (encoding GLUT2) and ABCC8 (encoding SUR1), were associated with the conversion from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS). We determined...... interaction of the SNPs with the change in PA on the conversion to T2D was assessed using Cox regression with adjustments for the other components of the intervention (dietary changes, weight reduction). The carriers of the common homozygous genotype of rs5393, rs5394, or rs5404 of SLC2A2 and rs3758947 of...

  11. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and risk of pancreatic cancer

    Lam, Ernest T.; Bracci, Paige M.; Holly, Elizabeth A; Chu, Catherine; Poon, Annie; Wan, Eunice; White, Krystal; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Pawlikowska, Ludmila; Tranah, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    Although the mitochondrial genome exhibits high mutation rates, common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation has not been consistently associated with pancreatic cancer. Here, we comprehensively examined mitochondrial genomic variation by sequencing the mtDNA of participants (cases=286, controls=283) in a San Francisco Bay Area pancreatic cancer case-control study. Five common variants were associated with pancreatic cancer at nominal statistical significance (p

  12. mtDNA Variation and Analysis Using MITOMAP and MITOMASTER

    Lott, Marie T.; Leipzig, Jeremy N.; Derbeneva, Olga; Xie, H. Michael; Chalkia, Dimitra; Sarmady, Mahdi; Procaccio, Vincent; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    The MITOMAP database of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) information has been an important compilation of mtDNA variation for researchers, clinicians and genetic counselors for the past twenty-five years. The MITOMAP protocol shows how users may look up human mitochondrial gene loci, search for public mitochondrial sequences, and browse or search for reported general population nucleotide variants as well as those reported in clinical disease. Within MITOMAP is the powerful s...

  13. Reduced Variation in Drosophila Simulans Mitochondrial DNA

    Ballard, JWO.; Hatzidakis, J.; Karr, T L; Kreitman, M

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the evolutionary dynamics of infection of a Drosophila simulans population by a maternally inherited insect bacterial parasite, Wolbachia, by analyzing nucleotide variability in three regions of the mitochondrial genome in four infected and 35 uninfected lines. Mitochondrial variability is significantly reduced compared to a noncoding region of a nuclear-encoded gene in both uninfected and pooled samples of flies, indicating a sweep of genetic variation. The selective sweep of...

  14. Mitochondrial DNA copy number variation across human cancers.

    Reznik, Ed; Miller, Martin L; Şenbabaoğlu, Yasin; Riaz, Nadeem; Sarungbam, Judy; Tickoo, Satish K; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Lee, William; Seshan, Venkatraman E; Hakimi, A Ari; Sander, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Mutations, deletions, and changes in copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), are observed throughout cancers. Here, we survey mtDNA copy number variation across 22 tumor types profiled by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. We observe a tendency for some cancers, especially of the bladder, breast, and kidney, to be depleted of mtDNA, relative to matched normal tissue. Analysis of genetic context reveals an association between incidence of several somatic alterations, including IDH1 mutations in gliomas, and mtDNA content. In some but not all cancer types, mtDNA content is correlated with the expression of respiratory genes, and anti-correlated to the expression of immune response and cell-cycle genes. In tandem with immunohistochemical evidence, we find that some tumors may compensate for mtDNA depletion to sustain levels of respiratory proteins. Our results highlight the extent of mtDNA copy number variation in tumors and point to related therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26901439

  15. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in single cells from leukemia patients

    Yao, Yong-Gang; Ogasawara, Yoji; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Falcão, Roberto P; Pintão, Maria-Carolina; McCoy, J. Philip; Rizzatti, Edgar Gil; Young, Neal S

    2007-01-01

    A high frequency of mtDNA somatic mutation has been observed in many tumors as well as in aging tissues. In this study, we analyzed the mtDNA control region sequence variation in 3534 single normal cells and individual blasts from 18 patients with leukemia and 10 healthy donors, to address the mutation process in leukemic cells. We found significant differences in mtDNA sequence, as represented by the number of haplotypes and the mean number of cells with each nonaggregate haplotype in a popu...

  16. Microbial antigenic variation mediated by homologous DNA recombination.

    Vink, Cornelis; Rudenko, Gloria; Seifert, H Steven

    2012-09-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms employ numerous molecular strategies in order to delay or circumvent recognition by the immune system of their host. One of the most widely used strategies of immune evasion is antigenic variation, in which immunogenic molecules expressed on the surface of a microorganism are continuously modified. As a consequence, the host is forced to constantly adapt its humoral immune response against this pathogen. An antigenic change thus provides the microorganism with an opportunity to persist and/or replicate within the host (population) for an extended period of time or to effectively infect a previously infected host. In most cases, antigenic variation is caused by genetic processes that lead to the modification of the amino acid sequence of a particular antigen or to alterations in the expression of biosynthesis genes that induce changes in the expression of a variant antigen. Here, we will review antigenic variation systems that rely on homologous DNA recombination and that are found in a wide range of cellular, human pathogens, including bacteria (such as Neisseria spp., Borrelia spp., Treponema pallidum, and Mycoplasma spp.), fungi (such as Pneumocystis carinii) and parasites (such as the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei). Specifically, the various DNA recombination-based antigenic variation systems will be discussed with a focus on the employed mechanisms of recombination, the DNA substrates, and the enzymatic machinery involved. PMID:22212019

  17. Plant genome size variation: bloating and purging DNA.

    Michael, Todd P

    2014-07-01

    Plant genome size variation is a dynamic process of bloating and purging DNA. While it was thought plants were on a path to obesity through continual DNA bloating, recent research supports that most plants activity purge DNA. Plant genome size research has greatly benefited from the cataloguing of genome size estimates at the Kew Plant DNA C-values Database, and the recent availability of over 50 fully sequenced and published plant genomes. The emerging trend is that plant genomes bloat due to the copy-and-paste proliferation of a few long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTRs) and aggressively purge these proliferating LTRs through several mechanisms including illegitimate and incomplete recombination, and double-strand break repair through non-homologous end joining. However, ultra-small genomes such as Utricularia gibba (Bladderwort), which is 82 megabases (Mb), purge excess DNA through genome fractionation and neofunctionalization during multiple rounds of whole genome duplication (WGD). In contrast, the largest published genome, Picea abies (Norway Spruce) at 19 800 Mb, has no detectable WGD but has bloated with diverse and diverged LTRs that either have evaded purging mechanisms or these purging mechanism are absent in gymnosperms. Finally, advances in DNA methylation studies suggest that smaller genomes have a more aggressive epigenomic surveillance system to purge young LTR retrotransposons, which is less active or missing in larger genomes like the bloated gymnosperms. While genome size may not reflect genome complexity, evidence is mounting that genome size may reflect evolutionary status. PMID:24651721

  18. Patterns of DNA Barcode Variation in Canadian Marine Molluscs

    Layton, Kara K.S.; Martel, André L.; Hebert, Paul DN.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molluscs are the most diverse marine phylum and this high diversity has resulted in considerable taxonomic problems. Because the number of species in Canadian oceans remains uncertain, there is a need to incorporate molecular methods into species identifications. A 648 base pair segment of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene has proven useful for the identification and discovery of species in many animal lineages. While the utility of DNA barcoding in molluscs has been demonstrated in other studies, this is the first effort to construct a DNA barcode registry for marine molluscs across such a large geographic area. Methodology/Principal Findings This study examines patterns of DNA barcode variation in 227 species of Canadian marine molluscs. Intraspecific sequence divergences ranged from 0–26.4% and a barcode gap existed for most taxa. Eleven cases of relatively deep (>2%) intraspecific divergence were detected, suggesting the possible presence of overlooked species. Structural variation was detected in COI with indels found in 37 species, mostly bivalves. Some indels were present in divergent lineages, primarily in the region of the first external loop, suggesting certain areas are hotspots for change. Lastly, mean GC content varied substantially among orders (24.5%–46.5%), and showed a significant positive correlation with nearest neighbour distances. Conclusions/Significance DNA barcoding is an effective tool for the identification of Canadian marine molluscs and for revealing possible cases of overlooked species. Some species with deep intraspecific divergence showed a biogeographic partition between lineages on the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific coasts, suggesting the role of Pleistocene glaciations in the subdivision of their populations. Indels were prevalent in the barcode region of the COI gene in bivalves and gastropods. This study highlights the efficacy of DNA barcoding for providing insights into sequence variation across a broad

  19. Variation of DNA Methylome of Zebrafish Cells under Cold Pressure

    Xu, Qiongqiong; Luo, Juntao; Shi, Yingdi; Li, Xiaoxia; Yan, Xiaonan; Zhang, Junfang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mechanism involved in multiple biological processes. However, the relationship between DNA methylation and cold acclimation remains poorly understood. In this study, Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation Sequencing (MeDIP-seq) was performed to reveal a genome-wide methylation profile of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryonic fibroblast cells (ZF4) and its variation under cold pressure. MeDIP-seq assay was conducted with ZF4 cells cultured at appropriate temperature of 28°C and at low temperature of 18°C for 5 (short-term) and 30 (long-term) days, respectively. Our data showed that DNA methylation level of whole genome increased after a short-term cold exposure and decreased after a long-term cold exposure. It is interesting that metabolism of folate pathway is significantly hypomethylated after short-term cold exposure, which is consistent with the increased DNA methylation level. 21% of methylation peaks were significantly altered after cold treatment. About 8% of altered DNA methylation peaks are located in promoter regions, while the majority of them are located in non-coding regions. Methylation of genes involved in multiple cold responsive biological processes were significantly affected, such as anti-oxidant system, apoptosis, development, chromatin modifying and immune system suggesting that those processes are responsive to cold stress through regulation of DNA methylation. Our data indicate the involvement of DNA methylation in cellular response to cold pressure, and put a new insight into the genome-wide epigenetic regulation under cold pressure. PMID:27494266

  20. Nonneutral mitochondrial DNA variation in humans and chimpanzees

    Nachman, M.W.; Aquadro, C.F. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Brown, W.M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    We sequenced the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 (ND3) gene from a sample of 61 humans, five common chimpanzees, and one gorilla to test whether patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation are consistent with a neutral model of molecular evolution. Within humans and within chimpanzees, the ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions was higher than observed in comparisons between species, contrary to neutral expectations. To test the generality of this result, we reanalyzed published human RFLP data from the entire mitochondrial genome. Gains of restriction sites relative to a known human mtDNA sequence were used to infer unambiguous nucleotide substitutions. We also compared the complete mtDNA sequences of three humans. Both the RFLP data and the sequence data reveal a higher ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions within humans than is seen between species. This pattern is observed at most or all human mitochondrial genes and is inconsistent with a strictly neutral model. These data suggest that many mitochondrial protein polymorphisms are slightly deleterious, consistent with studies of human mitochondrial diseases. 59 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Minifish shows high genetic variation in mtDNA size.

    Chen, X-W; Li, Q-L; Hu, X-J; Yuan, Y-M; Wen, M; Peng, L-Y; Liu, S-J; Hong, Y-H

    2014-01-01

    The genus Paedocypris is a newly described taxon of minifish species that are characterized by extensive chromosome evolution and one of the smallest known vertebrate nuclear genomes. Paedocypris features a tiny adult size, a short generation time, low fecundity and fragmented tropical habitats, which are factors that favor rapid speciation. Most recently, we have revealed that P. progenetica (Pp), the type species of the genus Paedocypris, has an unusual mtDNA bearing - within its D-loop - a tandem array of a 34-bp repeat sequence called the minifish repeat, which shows compromised replication efficiency in vitro. Here we report that Pp exhibits high genetic variation in mtDNA size. The efficiency of D-loop amplification was found to depend upon primers. Interestingly, Pp individuals of one and the same population differed drastically in mtDNA size resulting from varying copy numbers of the minifish repeat. We conclude that minifish has a high mutation rate and perhaps represents a rapidly evolving taxon of vertebrates. PMID:25470287

  2. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in the Anatolian Peninsula (Turkey)

    Hatice Mergen; Reyhan Öner; Cihan Öner

    2004-04-01

    Throughout human history, the region known today as the Anatolian peninsula (Turkey) has served as a junction connecting the Middle East, Europe and Central Asia, and, thus, has been subject to major population movements. The present study is undertaken to obtain information about the distribution of the existing mitochondrial D-loop sequence variations in the Turkish population of Anatolia. A few studies have previously reported mtDNA sequences in Turks. We attempted to extend these results by analysing a cohort that is not only larger, but also more representative of the Turkish population living in Anatolia. In order to obtain a descriptive picture for the phylogenetic distribution of the mitochondrial genome within Turkey, we analysed mitochondrial D-loop region sequence variations in 75 individuals from different parts of Anatolia by direct sequencing. Analysis of the two hypervariable segments within the noncoding region of the mitochondrial genome revealed the existence of 81 nucleotide mutations at 79 sites. The neighbour-joining tree of Kimura’s distance matrix has revealed the presence of six main clusters, of which H and U are the most common. The data obtained are also compared with several European and Turkic Central Asian populations.

  3. Thermal adaptation and clinal mitochondrial DNA variation of European anchovy.

    Silva, Gonçalo; Lima, Fernando P; Martel, Paulo; Castilho, Rita

    2014-10-01

    Natural populations of widely distributed organisms often exhibit genetic clinal variation over their geographical ranges. The European anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, illustrates this by displaying a two-clade mitochondrial structure clinally arranged along the eastern Atlantic. One clade has low frequencies at higher latitudes, whereas the other has an anti-tropical distribution, with frequencies decreasing towards the tropics. The distribution pattern of these clades has been explained as a consequence of secondary contact after an ancient geographical isolation. However, it is not unlikely that selection acts on mitochondria whose genes are involved in relevant oxidative phosphorylation processes. In this study, we performed selection tests on a fragment of 1044 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene using 455 individuals from 18 locations. We also tested correlations of six environmental features: temperature, salinity, apparent oxygen utilization and nutrient concentrations of phosphate, nitrate and silicate, on a compilation of mitochondrial clade frequencies from 66 sampling sites comprising 2776 specimens from previously published studies. Positive selection in a single codon was detected predominantly (99%) in the anti-tropical clade and temperature was the most relevant environmental predictor, contributing with 59% of the variance in the geographical distribution of clade frequencies. These findings strongly suggest that temperature is shaping the contemporary distribution of mitochondrial DNA clade frequencies in the European anchovy. PMID:25143035

  4. Molecular detection of genomic dna variation induced by space environment in sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    To study effects of space environment on genomic DNA variation in the offsprings of sweet pepper, the 4th offspring and its ground control were used as materials. The genomic DNA variation was detected by random amplified polymprphic DNA (RAPD), parts of the different fragments were sequenced. The results showed that the genomic DNA of SP4 after space mutation changed compared to the ground control. Eight polymorphic bands were detected. Four polymorphic bands were amplified in the ground control and variant separately. Two special fragments were sequenced and sequence homology was 97%. So space environment could induce the changes of the genomic DNA in the offsprings of sweet pepper. (authors)

  5. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA variations in Indian patients with congenital cataract

    Roshan, Mascarenhas; Kabekkodu, Shama Prasada; Vijaya, Pai H.; Manjunath, Kamath; Graw, Jochen; Gopinath, PM.; Satyamoorthy, Kapeattu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Identification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variations in the inherited cataract patients from south India. Methods Three families with inherited cataract of maternal origin were evaluated. Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed on available affected as well as unaffected family members. Samples of mtDNA were amplified using 24 pairs of overlapping primers to analyze the entire mitochondrial genome to screen for variations and analyzed for both coding and non-coding r...

  6. Association of DNA sequence variation in mitochondrial DNA polymerase with mitochondrial DNA synthesis and risk of oral cancer.

    Datta, Sayantan; Ray, Anindita; Roy, Roshni; Roy, Bidyut

    2016-01-10

    Enzymes responsible for mitochondrial (mt) DNA synthesis and transcription are encoded by nuclear genome and inherited mutations in these genes may play important roles in enhancing risk of precancer and cancer. Here, genetic variations in 23 functionally relevant tagSNPs in 6 genes responsible for mtDNA synthesis and transcription were studied in 522 cancer and 241 precancer (i.e. leukoplakia) patients and 525 healthy controls using Illumina Golden Gate assay to explore association with risk of oral precancer and cancer. Two SNPs, rs41553913 at POLRMT and rs9905016 at POLG2, significantly increased risk of oral leukoplakia and cancer, respectively, at both genotypic and allelic levels. Gene-environment interaction models also revealed that tobacco habits and SNPs at POLG2 and TFAM may modulate risk of both leukoplakia and cancer. In silico analysis of published data-set also revealed that variant heterozygote (TC) significantly increased transcription of POLG2 compared to wild genotype (p=0.03). Cancer tissues having variant allele genotypes (TC+CC) at POLG2 contained 1.6 times (pcancer tissues having wild genotype (TT). In conclusion, polymorphisms at POLG2 and POLRMT increased risk of oral cancer and leukoplakia, respectively, probably modulating synthesis and activity of the enzymes. Enhanced synthesis of mtDNA in cancer tissues may have implication in carcinogenesis, but the mechanism is yet to be explored. PMID:26403317

  7. Genomic profiling of plastid DNA variation in the Mediterranean olive tree

    Dorado Gabriel; Khadari Bouchaib; Hernández Pilar; Besnard Guillaume; Savolainen Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Characterisation of plastid genome (or cpDNA) polymorphisms is commonly used for phylogeographic, population genetic and forensic analyses in plants, but detecting cpDNA variation is sometimes challenging, limiting the applications of such an approach. In the present study, we screened cpDNA polymorphism in the olive tree (Olea europaea L.) by sequencing the complete plastid genome of trees with a distinct cpDNA lineage. Our objective was to develop new markers for a rapid...

  8. Human Papillomavirus-16 and 18 in Penile Carcinomas: DNA Methylation, Chromosomal Recombination, and Genomic Variation

    Kalantari, Mina; Villa, Luisa L.; Calleja-Macias, Itzel E.; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Penile carcinomas are frequently associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types. Since little is known about the molecular biology of this association, we investigated three properties of HPV genomes in penile carcinomas from Brazilian patients: (i) HPV DNA methylation, (ii) junctions between HPV and cellular DNA, and (iii) genomic variation. In cervical carcinogenesis, recombination between HPV and chromosomal DNA is frequent and likely necessary for progression, and DNA hypermet...

  9. Variation of DNA damage levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated in different laboratories

    Godschalk, Roger W L; Ersson, Clara; Stępnik, Maciej;

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the levels of DNA strand breaks and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) sensitive sites, as assessed by the comet assay, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy women from five different countries in Europe. The laboratory in each country (referred to...... as 'centre') collected and cryopreserved PBMC samples from three donors, using a standardised cell isolation protocol. The samples were analysed in 13 different laboratories for DNA damage, which is measured by the comet assay. The study aim was to assess variation in DNA damage in PBMC samples that...... were collected in the same way and processed using the same blood isolation procedure. The inter-laboratory variation was the prominent contributor to the overall variation. The inter-laboratory coefficient of variation decreased for both DNA strand breaks (from 68 to 26%) and FPG sensitive sites (from...

  10. Genomic profiling of plastid DNA variation in the Mediterranean olive tree

    Dorado Gabriel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Characterisation of plastid genome (or cpDNA polymorphisms is commonly used for phylogeographic, population genetic and forensic analyses in plants, but detecting cpDNA variation is sometimes challenging, limiting the applications of such an approach. In the present study, we screened cpDNA polymorphism in the olive tree (Olea europaea L. by sequencing the complete plastid genome of trees with a distinct cpDNA lineage. Our objective was to develop new markers for a rapid genomic profiling (by Multiplex PCRs of cpDNA haplotypes in the Mediterranean olive tree. Results Eight complete cpDNA genomes of Olea were sequenced de novo. The nucleotide divergence between olive cpDNA lineages was low and not exceeding 0.07%. Based on these sequences, markers were developed for studying two single nucleotide substitutions and length polymorphism of 62 regions (with variable microsatellite motifs or other indels. They were then used to genotype the cpDNA variation in cultivated and wild Mediterranean olive trees (315 individuals. Forty polymorphic loci were detected on this sample, allowing the distinction of 22 haplotypes belonging to the three Mediterranean cpDNA lineages known as E1, E2 and E3. The discriminating power of cpDNA variation was particularly low for the cultivated olive tree with one predominating haplotype, but more diversity was detected in wild populations. Conclusions We propose a method for a rapid characterisation of the Mediterranean olive germplasm. The low variation in the cultivated olive tree indicated that the utility of cpDNA variation for forensic analyses is limited to rare haplotypes. In contrast, the high cpDNA variation in wild populations demonstrated that our markers may be useful for phylogeographic and populations genetic studies in O. europaea.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA T4216C and A4917G variations in multiple sclerosis

    Andalib, Sasan; Talebi, Mahnaz; Sakhinia, Ebrahim;

    2015-01-01

    focuses on the neurogenetics of the complex pathogenesis of MS in relation to factors such as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variations. T4216C and A4917G are common mitochondrial gene variations associated with MS. The present study tested whether mtDNA T4216C variation in the NADH Dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) mtDNA...... gene and A4917G variation in the mtDNA NADH Dehydrogenase 2 (ND2) gene are associated with MS in an Iranian population. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 100 patients with MS and 100 unrelated healthy controls, and DNA extraction was performed by salting-out. By means of...... appropriate primers, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was carried out for the mtDNA fragment. Afterwards, the PCR products were digested using Nla III and Acc I restriction endonuclease enzymes for analysis of Restriction Fragment Length polymorphism (RFLP) in mtDNA T4216C and A4917G variations...

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Southeastern Pre-Columbian Canids.

    Brzeski, Kristin E; DeBiasse, Melissa B; Rabon, David R; Chamberlain, Michael J; Taylor, Sabrina S

    2016-05-01

    The taxonomic status of the red wolf (Canis rufus) is heavily debated, but could be clarified by examining historic specimens from the southeastern United States. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from 3 ancient (350-1900 year olds) putative wolf samples excavated from middens and sinkholes within the historic red wolf range. We detected 3 unique mtDNA haplotypes, which grouped with the coyote mtDNA clade, suggesting that the canids inhabiting southeastern North America prior to human colonization from Europe were either coyotes, which would vastly expand historic coyote distributions, an ancient coyote-wolf hybrid, or a North American evolved red wolf lineage related to coyotes. Should the red wolf prove to be a distinct species, our results support the idea of either an ancient hybrid origin for red wolves or a shared common ancestor between coyotes and red wolves. PMID:26774058

  13. DNA content variation and its significance in the evolution of the genus Micrasterias (Desmidiales, Streptophyta.

    Aloisie Poulíčková

    Full Text Available It is now clear that whole genome duplications have occurred in all eukaryotic evolutionary lineages, and that the vast majority of flowering plants have experienced polyploidisation in their evolutionary history. However, study of genome size variation in microalgae lags behind that of higher plants and seaweeds. In this study, we have addressed the question whether microalgal phylogeny is associated with DNA content variation in order to evaluate the evolutionary significance of polyploidy in the model genus Micrasterias. We applied flow-cytometric techniques of DNA quantification to microalgae and mapped the estimated DNA content along the phylogenetic tree. Correlations between DNA content and cell morphometric parameters were also tested using geometric morphometrics. In total, DNA content was successfully determined for 34 strains of the genus Micrasterias. The estimated absolute 2C nuclear DNA amount ranged from 2.1 to 64.7 pg; intraspecific variation being 17.4-30.7 pg in M. truncata and 32.0-64.7 pg in M. rotata. There were significant differences between DNA contents of related species. We found strong correlation between the absolute nuclear DNA content and chromosome numbers and significant positive correlation between the DNA content and both cell size and number of terminal lobes. Moreover, the results showed the importance of cell/life cycle studies for interpretation of DNA content measurements in microalgae.

  14. Fully Streched Single DNA Molecules in a Nanofluidic Chip Show Large-Scale Structural Variation

    Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Marie, Rodolphe; Bauer, D. L.;

    2013-01-01

    When stretching and imaging DNA molecules in nanofluidic devices, it is important to know the relation between the physical length as measured in the lab and the distance along the contour of the DNA. Here a single DNA molecule longer than 1 Mbp is loaded into a nanofluidic device consisting of two...... the contour length of the DNA, and (iii) without having the full DNA molecule inside the field-of-view. The analysis is based on the transverse motion of the DNA due its Brownian motion, i.e. the DNA's response to the thermal fluctuations of the liquid surrounding it. The parameter values obtained by fitting...... reflects the local AT/GC-content. Single molecules are loaded into the chip and imaged. Due to the almost complete stretching of the DNA, structural variations in the size range from kbp to Mbp can be detected and quantified from the melting pattern alone....

  15. Modeling kinetic rate variation in third generation DNA sequencing data to detect putative modifications to DNA bases.

    Schadt, Eric E; Banerjee, Onureena; Fang, Gang; Feng, Zhixing; Wong, Wing H; Zhang, Xuegong; Kislyuk, Andrey; Clark, Tyson A; Luong, Khai; Keren-Paz, Alona; Chess, Andrew; Kumar, Vipin; Chen-Plotkin, Alice; Sondheimer, Neal; Korlach, Jonas; Kasarskis, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Current generation DNA sequencing instruments are moving closer to seamlessly sequencing genomes of entire populations as a routine part of scientific investigation. However, while significant inroads have been made identifying small nucleotide variation and structural variations in DNA that impact phenotypes of interest, progress has not been as dramatic regarding epigenetic changes and base-level damage to DNA, largely due to technological limitations in assaying all known and unknown types of modifications at genome scale. Recently, single-molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing has been reported to identify kinetic variation (KV) events that have been demonstrated to reflect epigenetic changes of every known type, providing a path forward for detecting base modifications as a routine part of sequencing. However, to date no statistical framework has been proposed to enhance the power to detect these events while also controlling for false-positive events. By modeling enzyme kinetics in the neighborhood of an arbitrary location in a genomic region of interest as a conditional random field, we provide a statistical framework for incorporating kinetic information at a test position of interest as well as at neighboring sites that help enhance the power to detect KV events. The performance of this and related models is explored, with the best-performing model applied to plasmid DNA isolated from Escherichia coli and mitochondrial DNA isolated from human brain tissue. We highlight widespread kinetic variation events, some of which strongly associate with known modification events, while others represent putative chemically modified sites of unknown types. PMID:23093720

  16. Length Variation, Heteroplasmy and Sequence Divergence in the Mitochondrial DNA of Four Species of Sturgeon (Acipenser)

    Brown, J R; Beckenbach, K.; Beckenbach, A. T.; Smith, M.J

    1996-01-01

    The extent of mtDNA length variation and heteroplasmy as well as DNA sequences of the control region and two tRNA genes were determined for four North American sturgeon species: Acipenser transmontanus, A. medirostris, A. fulvescens and A. oxyrhnychus. Across the Continental Divide, a division in the occurrence of length variation and heteroplasmy was observed that was concordant with species biogeography as well as with phylogenies inferred from restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFL...

  17. Chloroplast DNA variation of oaks in western Central Europe and genetic consequences of human influences

    König, A.O.; Ziegenhagen, B.; Dam, van B.C.; Csaikl, U.M.; Coart, E.; Degen, B.; Burg, K.; Vries, de S.M.G.; Petit, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Oak chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) variation was studied in a grid-based inventory in western Central Europe, including Belgium, The Netherlands, Luxembourg, Germany, the Czech Republic, and the northern parts of Upper and Lower Austria. A total of 2155 trees representing 426 populations of Quercus robur L

  18. Interindividual variation in binding of benzo[a]pyrene to DNA in cultured human Bronchi

    Harris, C.C.; Autrup, Herman; Connor, R.;

    1976-01-01

    The binding of benzo[a]pyrene to DNA in cultured human bronchus was measured in specimens from 37 patients. The binding values ranged from 2 to 151 picomoles of benzo[a]pyrene per milligram of DNA with an overall mean +/- standard error of 34.2 +/- 5.2. This 75-fold interindividual variation in t...

  19. Genetic variations of East Kalimantan Orangutan based on D-Loop mitochondria DNA

    DIDIK PRASETYO; JITO SUGARDJITO

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of the variation of D-Loop mtDNA of East Kalimantan orangutan was done to provided the genetic information data from endangerd species in order to support their population conservation efforts. The reason using mtDNA in this research is caused by higher level of mutation ( 5 – 10 trimes) when compared with nuclear DNA and it enable to transmited via maternal transmission without experience in recombination. From the analysis conducted on 38 samples resulting eight types of haplotype...

  20. Human longevity and variation in DNA damage response and repair

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike;

    2014-01-01

    others. Data were applied on 592 SNPs from 77 genes involved in nine sub-processes: DNA-damage response, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombinational repair (HRR), RecQ helicase activities (RECQ), telomere functioning...... and mitochondrial DNA processes. The study population was 1089 long-lived and 736 middle-aged Danes. A self-contained set-based test of all SNPs displayed association with longevity (P-value=9.9 × 10-5), supporting that the overall pathway could affect longevity. Investigation of the nine sub-processes using...

  1. Geographic variation of chloroplast DNA in Platycarya strobilacea (Juglandaceae)

    Shi-Chao CHEN; Li ZHANG; Jie ZENG; Fei SHI; Hong YANG; Yun-Rui MAO; Cheng-Xin FU

    2012-01-01

    The monotypic genus Platycarya (Juglandaceae) is one of the most widespread temperate tree species in East Asia.In this research,we implemented a phylogeographical study using chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) (psbA-trnH and atpB-rbcL intergenic spacer) sequences on Platycarya strobilacea,in order to identify the locations of the species' main refugia and migration routes.A total of 180 individuals of P.stobilacea from 27 populations from China and Jeju Island (Korea) were collected.The results revealed that P.strobilacea had 35 haplotypes for the two intergenic spacers and high genetic diversity (hT =0.926).This surprisingly high diversity ofhaplotypes indicates its long evolutionary history,which is in agreement with previous phylogenetic analyses and fossil records.Significant cpDNA population subdivision was detected (GST =0.720; NST =0.862),suggesting low levels of recurrent gene flow through seeds among populations and significant phylogeographical structure (NST > GST,P < 0.05).The construction of phylogenetic relationships of the 35 chlorotypes detected four major cpDNA clades.Divergence dating analyses using BEAST suggest that the divergence of the major cpDNA clades occurred before the Miocene.Demographic analysis indicated that the Eastern clade underwent localized demographic expansions.The molecular phylogenetic data,together with the geographic distribution of the haplotypes,suggest the existence of multiple glacial refugia in most of its current range in China through Quaternary climatic oscillations.

  2. Patterns of DNA Barcode Variation in Canadian Marine Molluscs

    Layton, Kara K. S.; Martel, André L.; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Molluscs are the most diverse marine phylum and this high diversity has resulted in considerable taxonomic problems. Because the number of species in Canadian oceans remains uncertain, there is a need to incorporate molecular methods into species identifications. A 648 base pair segment of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene has proven useful for the identification and discovery of species in many animal lineages. While the utility of DNA barcoding in molluscs has been demonst...

  3. Large scale variation in DNA copy number in chicken breeds

    Background Detecting genetic variation is a critical step in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic diversity. Until recently, such detection has mostly focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) because of the ease in screening complete genomes. Another type of variant, c...

  4. Thermal adaptation and clinal mitochondrial DNA variation of European anchovy

    Silva, Gonçalo; Lima, Fernando P.; Martel, Paulo; Castilho, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations of widely distributed organisms often exhibit genetic clinal variation over their geographical ranges. The European anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, illustrates this by displaying a two-clade mitochondrial structure clinally arranged along the eastern Atlantic. One clade has low frequencies at higher latitudes, whereas the other has an anti-tropical distribution, with frequencies decreasing towards the tropics. The distribution pattern of these clades has been explained as...

  5. Mitochondrial DNA variation of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in Kenya.

    Resende, Adriana; Gonçalves, Joana; Muigai, Anne W T; Pereira, Filipe

    2016-06-01

    The history of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in Africa remains largely unknown. After being first introduced from the Near East, sheep gradually spread through the African continent with pastoral societies. The eastern part of Africa was important either for the first diffusion of sheep southward or for putative secondary introductions from the Arabian Peninsula or southern Asia. We analysed mitochondrial DNA control region sequences of 91 domestic sheep from Kenya and found a high diversity of matrilines from the widespread haplogroup B, whereas only a single individual from haplogroup A was detected. Our phylogeography analyses of more than 500 available mitochondrial DNA sequences also identified ancestral haplotypes that were probably first introduced in Africa and are now widely distributed. Moreover, we found no evidence of an admixture between East and West African sheep. The presence of shared haplotypes in eastern and ancient southern African sheep suggests the possible southward movement of sheep along the eastern part of Africa. Finally, we found no evidence of an extensive introduction of sheep from southern Asia into Africa via the Indian Ocean trade. The overall findings on the phylogeography of East African domestic sheep set the grounds for understanding the origin and subsequent movements of sheep in Africa. The richness of maternal lineages in Kenyan breeds is of prime importance for future conservation and breeding programmes. PMID:26765790

  6. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in Finnish patients with matrilineal diabetes mellitus

    Soini Heidi K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic background of type 2 diabetes is complex involving contribution by both nuclear and mitochondrial genes. There is an excess of maternal inheritance in patients with type 2 diabetes and, furthermore, diabetes is a common symptom in patients with mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. Polymorphisms in mtDNA have been reported to act as risk factors in several complex diseases. Findings We examined the nucleotide variation in complete mtDNA sequences of 64 Finnish patients with matrilineal diabetes. We used conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis and sequencing to detect sequence variation. We analysed the pathogenic potential of nonsynonymous variants detected in the sequences and examined the role of the m.16189 T>C variant. Controls consisted of non-diabetic subjects ascertained in the same population. The frequency of mtDNA haplogroup V was 3-fold higher in patients with diabetes. Patients harboured many nonsynonymous mtDNA substitutions that were predicted to be possibly or probably damaging. Furthermore, a novel m.13762 T>G in MTND5 leading to p.Ser476Ala and several rare mtDNA variants were found. Haplogroup H1b harbouring m.16189 T > C and m.3010 G > A was found to be more frequent in patients with diabetes than in controls. Conclusions Mildly deleterious nonsynonymous mtDNA variants and rare population-specific haplotypes constitute genetic risk factors for maternally inherited diabetes.

  7. Role of mitochondrial DNA variation in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus.

    Kwak, Soo Heon; Park, Kyong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are crucial intracellular organelles where ATP and reactive oxygen species are generated via the electron transport chain. They are also where cellular fate is determined. There is a growing body of evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Mitochondrial dysfunction in pancreatic beta-cells results in impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. It is also associated with decreased oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation in insulin sensitive tissues. Variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) quantity and quality are reported to be associated with the risk of developing diabetes. A rare variant, mtDNA 3243 A>G, is well known to cause maternally inherited diabetes. Common mtDNA variants, such as mtDNA 16189 T>C and several mtDNA haplogroups, are also associated with an increased risk of diabetes, especially in Asians. The variant load, known as heteroplasmy, in a specific tissue is thought to modulate the phenotypic expression of these mtDNA variants. In this article, we review the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of diabetes and the association between mtDNA variations and risk of diabetes. PMID:27100497

  8. Terminal region sequence variations in variola virus DNA.

    Massung, R F; Loparev, V N; Knight, J C; Totmenin, A V; Chizhikov, V E; Parsons, J M; Safronov, P F; Gutorov, V V; Shchelkunov, S N; Esposito, J J

    1996-07-15

    Genome DNA terminal region sequences were determined for a Brazilian alastrim variola minor virus strain Garcia-1966 that was associated with an 0.8% case-fatality rate and African smallpox strains Congo-1970 and Somalia-1977 associated with variola major (9.6%) and minor (0.4%) mortality rates, respectively. A base sequence identity of > or = 98.8% was determined after aligning 30 kb of the left- or right-end region sequences with cognate sequences previously determined for Asian variola major strains India-1967 (31% death rate) and Bangladesh-1975 (18.5% death rate). The deduced amino acid sequences of putative proteins of > or = 65 amino acids also showed relatively high identity, although the Asian and African viruses were clearly more related to each other than to alastrim virus. Alastrim virus contained only 10 of 70 proteins that were 100% identical to homologs in Asian strains, and 7 alastrim-specific proteins were noted. PMID:8661439

  9. Inter-laboratory variation in DNA damage using a standard comet assay protocol

    Forchhammer, Lykke; Ersson, Clara; Loft, Steffen;

    2012-01-01

    There are substantial inter-laboratory variations in the levels of DNA damage measured by the comet assay. The aim of this study was to investigate whether adherence to a standard comet assay protocol would reduce inter-laboratory variation in reported values of DNA damage. Fourteen laboratories......, which were not related to the level of experience. Therefore, the inter-laboratory variation in DNA damage was only analysed using the results from laboratories that had obtained complete data with the standard comet assay protocol. This analysis showed that the differences between reported levels of...... poor results using the standard procedure. This study indicates that future comet assay validation trials should take steps to evaluate the implementation of standard procedures in participating laboratories....

  10. Mitochondrial DNA Length Variation and Heteroplasmy in Populations of White Sturgeon (Acipenser Transmontanus)

    Brown, J R; Beckenbach, A. T.; Smith, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Southern blot analysis was used to quantify the extent of mtDNA D-loop length variation in two populations of white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus. Over 42% of individuals were heteroplasmic for up to six different mtDNA length variants attributable to varying copy numbers of an 82-bp repeat sequence. Chi-square analyses revealed that the frequencies of length genotypes and the incidence of heteroplasmy were significantly different between Fraser and Columbia River sturgeon populations but...

  11. An improved method for detecting genetic variation in DNA using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    We have examined the feasibility of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of RNA:DNA duplexes to detect variations in genomic and cloned DNAs. The result has demonstrated that use of RNA:DNA duplexes makes DGGE much more practical for screening a large number of samples than use of DNA:DNA heteroduplexes, because preparation of RNA probes is easier than that of DNA probes. Three different 32P-labeled RNA probes were produced. Genomic or cloned DNAs were digested with restriction enzymes and hybridized to labeled RNA probes, and resulting RNA:DNA duplexes were examined by DGGE. The presence of a mismatch(es) was detected as a difference in the mobility of bands on the gel. The experimental conditions were determined using DNA segments from cloned normal and three thalassemic human β-globin genes. The results from experiments on the cloned DNAs suggest that DGGE of RNA:DNA duplexes will detect nucleotide substitutions and deletions in DNA. In the course of these studies, a polymorphism due to a single-base substitution at position 666 of IVS2 (IVS2-666) of the human β-globin gene was directly identified using genomic DNA samples. A study of 59 unrelated Japanese from Hiroshima was undertaken in which the frequency of the allele with C at IVS2-666 was 0.48 and that of the allele with T was 0.52. This approach was found to be very effective for detecting heritable variation and should be a powerful tool for detecting fresh mutations in DNA, which occur outside the known restriction sites. (author)

  12. Genetic Variation in DNA of Coho Salmon from the Lower Columbia River : Final Report 1993.

    Fobes, Stephen; Knudsen, Kathy; Allendorf, Fred

    1993-04-01

    The goal of this project was to develop techniques to provide the information needed to determine if Lower Columbia River coho salmon represent a 'species' under the Endangered Species Act. Our report features two new nuclear DNA approaches to the improved detection of genetic variation: (1) Studies of DNA-level genetic variation for two nuclear growth hormone genes; (2) Use of arbitrary DNA primers (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA, or 'RAPD' primers) to detect variation at large numbers of nuclear genes. We used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify variable sections (introns) of two growth hormone genes (GH-I and G/f-Z) in several salmonid species. Coho salmon had three DNA length variants for G/-I intron C. Restriction analysis and sequencing provided valuable information about the mode of evolution of these DNA sequences. We tested segregation of the variants in captive broods of coho salmon, and demonstrated that they are alleles at a single Mendelian locus. Population studies using the GH-1 alleles showed highly significant frequency differences between Lower Columbia River and Oregon Coast coho salmon, and marginal differences among stocks within these regions. These new markers are adequately defined and tested to use in coho salmon population studies of any size. The nature of the variation at GH-1 (Variable Number Tandem Repeats, or 'VNTRs') suggests that more genetic variants will be found in coho salmon from other areas. GH-2 intron C also showed length variation in coho salmon, and this variation was found to be sex-linked. Because PCR methods require minute amounts of tissue, this discovery provides a technique to determine the gender of immature coho salmon without killing them. Chinook salmon had restriction patterns and sequence divergences similar to coho salmon. Thus, we expect that sex linkage of GH-2 alleles predates the evolutionary divergence of Pacific salmon species, and that gender testing with

  13. mtDNA variation among Greenland Eskimos: the edge of the Beringian expansion

    Saillard, J; Forster, P; Lynnerup, N;

    2000-01-01

    characterization of Eskimos in general and Greenlanders in particular, we have sequenced hypervariable segment I (HVS-I) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and typed relevant RFLP sites in the mtDNA of 82 Eskimos from Greenland. A comparison of our data with published sequences demonstrates major mtDNA...... types shared between Na Dene and Eskimo, indicating a common Beringian history within the Holocene. We further confirm the presence of an Eskimo-specific mtDNA subgroup characterized by nucleotide position 16265G within mtDNA group A2. This subgroup is found in all Eskimo groups analyzed so far and is...... estimated to have originated <3,000 years ago. A founder analysis of all Eskimo and Chukchi A2 types indicates that the Siberian and Greenland ancestral mtDNA pools separated around the time when the Neo-Eskimo culture emerged. The Greenland mtDNA types are a subset of the Alaskan mtDNA variation: they lack...

  14. Extensive variation in the density and distribution of DNA polymorphism in sorghum genomes.

    Joseph Evans

    Full Text Available Sorghum genotypes currently used for grain production in the United States were developed from African landraces that were imported starting in the mid-to-late 19(th century. Farmers and plant breeders selected genotypes for grain production with reduced plant height, early flowering, increased grain yield, adaptation to drought, and improved resistance to lodging, diseases and pests. DNA polymorphisms that distinguish three historically important grain sorghum genotypes, BTx623, BTx642 and Tx7000, were characterized by genome sequencing, genotyping by sequencing, genetic mapping, and pedigree-based haplotype analysis. The distribution and density of DNA polymorphisms in the sequenced genomes varied widely, in part because the lines were derived through breeding and selection from diverse Kafir, Durra, and Caudatum race accessions. Genomic DNA spanning dw1 (SBI-09 and dw3 (SBI-07 had identical haplotypes due to selection for reduced height. Lower SNP density in genes located in pericentromeric regions compared with genes located in euchromatic regions is consistent with background selection in these regions of low recombination. SNP density was higher in euchromatic DNA and varied >100-fold in contiguous intervals that spanned up to 300 Kbp. The localized variation in DNA polymorphism density occurred throughout euchromatic regions where recombination is elevated, however, polymorphism density was not correlated with gene density or DNA methylation. Overall, sorghum chromosomes contain distal euchromatic regions characterized by extensive, localized variation in DNA polymorphism density, and large pericentromeric regions of low gene density, diversity, and recombination.

  15. Meta-Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Variation in the Iberian Peninsula.

    Barral-Arca, Ruth; Pischedda, Sara; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Pastoriza, Ana; Mosquera-Miguel, Ana; López-Soto, Manuel; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Salas, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The Iberian Peninsula has been the focus of attention of numerous studies dealing with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation, most of them targeting the control region segment. In the present study we sequenced the control region of 3,024 Spanish individuals from areas where available data were still limited. We also compiled mtDNA haplotypes from the literature involving 4,588 sequences and 28 population groups or small regions. We meta-analyzed all these data in order to shed further light on patterns of geographic variation, taking advantage of the large sample size and geographic coverage, in contrast with the atomized sampling strategy of previous work. The results indicate that the main mtDNA haplogroups show primarily clinal geographic patterns across the Iberian geography, roughly along a North-South axis. Haplogroup HV0 (where haplogroup U is nested) is more prevalent in the Franco Cantabrian region, in good agreement with previous findings that identified this area as a climate refuge during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), prior to a subsequent demographic re-expansion towards Central Europe and the Mediterranean. Typical sub-Saharan and North African lineages are slightly more prevalent in South Iberia, although at low frequencies; this pattern has been shaped mainly by the transatlantic slave trade and the Arab invasion of the Iberian Peninsula. The results also indicate that summary statistics that aim to measure molecular variation, or AMOVA, have limited sensitivity to detect population substructure, in contrast to patterns revealed by phylogeographic analysis. Overall, the results suggest that mtDNA variation in Iberia is substantially stratified. These patterns might be relevant in biomedical studies given that stratification is a common cause of false positives in case-control mtDNA association studies, and should be also considered when weighting the DNA evidence in forensic casework, which is strongly dependent on haplotype frequencies. PMID

  16. Microsatellite DNA and mitochondrial DNA variation in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from the Beaufort and Chukchi seas, Alaska

    Cronin, M.A.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Scribner, K.T.

    2006-01-01

    Radiotelemetry data have shown that polar bears (Ursus maritimus Phipps, 1774) occur in separate subpopulations in the Chukchi Sea and the southern Beaufort Sea. However, segregation is not absolute, and there is overlap of ranges of animals in each subpopulation. We used genetic variation at eight microsatellite DNA loci and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to further assess the degree of spatial structure of polar bears from the Chukchi and southern Beaufort seas. Microsatellite allele frequencies and mtDNA haplotype frequencies of bears from the southern Beaufort and Chukchi seas did not differ significantly. Lack of differentiation at both maternally inherited mtDNA and bi-parentally inherited microsatellite loci suggests that gene flow between the two areas is mediated by both sexes. The genetic data indicate that polar bears in the southern Beaufort and Chukchi seas compose one interbreeding population. However, there is considerable fidelity to ranges in each area, particularly by adult females. The combined genetic and movement data suggest that polar bears could be managed as Beaufort Sea and Chukchi Sea subpopulations of a combined southern Beaufort Sea and Chukchi Sea population. ?? 2006 NRC.

  17. Estimation Of The Proportion Of Variation Accounted For By DNA Tests. II: Phenotypic Variance

    The proportion of phenotypic variation accounted for (Rp2) is an important characteristic of a DNA test. Therefore, several estimators of this quantity were evaluated by simulation of 500 replicates of a population of 1000 progeny of 100 sires (3 levels of narrow sense heritability and 4 levels of ...

  18. Estimation of the Proportion of Variation Accounted for by DNA Tests. I: Genetic Variance

    The proportion of genetic variation accounted for (Rg2) is an important characteristic of a DNA test. For each of 3 levels of narrow sense heritability of the observed trait (h2gy) and 4 levels of Rg2, 500 independent replicates of an observed trait and a molecular breeding value (MBV) for 1000 offs...

  19. Estimation of the Proportion of Genetic Variation Accounted for by DNA Tests

    An increasingly relevant question in evaluating commercial DNA tests is "What proportion of the additive genetic variation in the target trait is accounted for by the test?" Therefore, several estimators of this quantity were evaluated by simulation of a population of 1000 animals with 100 sires, ea...

  20. Comprehensive view of the population history of Arabia as inferred by mtDNA variation

    Černý, Viktor; Čížková, M.; Poloni, E. S.; Al-Meeri, A.; Mulligan, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 159, č. 4 (2016), s. 607-616. ISSN 0002-9483 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-37998S Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : mtDNA variation * Arabian Peninsula * migrations Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 2.379, year: 2014

  1. DNA methylation variations of TVB in ALV-resistant and -susceptible chickens

    Epigenetic variations can convey gene expression patterns critical for neoplastic disease initiation, progression or regression. DNA methylation is one of the main components of epigenetic modification. The tumor virus B (TVB) locus, which encodes the cellular receptors for subgroups B, D, and E of ...

  2. Genetic variation in Phoca vitulina (the harbour seal) revealed by DNA fingerprinting and RAPDs

    Kappe, A.L.; van de Zande, L.; Vedder, E.J.; Bijlsma, R.; van Delden, Wilke

    1995-01-01

    Genetic variation in two harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) populations from the Dutch Wadden Sea and Scotland was examined by RAPD analysis and DNA fingerprinting. For comparison a population of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) was studied. The RAPD method revealed a very low number of polymorphic bands.

  3. Differential DNA mismatch repair underlies mutation rate variation across the human genome

    Supek, Fran; Lehner, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has revealed considerable variation in somatic mutation rates across the human genome, with mutation rates elevated in heterochromatic late replicating regions and reduced in early replicating euchromatin1-5. Multiple mechanisms have been suggested to underlie this2,6-10, but the actual cause is unknown. Here we identify variable DNA mismatch repair (MMR) as the basis of this variation. Analysing ~17 million single nucleotide variants from the genomes of 652 tumours, we show that regional autosomal mutation rates at megabase resolution are largely stable across cancer types, with differences related to changes in replication timing and gene expression. However, mutations arising after the inactivation of MMR are no longer enriched in early replicating euchromatin relative to late replicating heterochromatin. Thus, differential DNA repair and not differential mutation supply is the primary cause of the large-scale regional mutation rate variation across the human genome. PMID:25707793

  4. Temporal stability of epigenetic markers: sequence characteristics and predictors of short-term DNA methylation variations.

    Hyang-Min Byun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that has been increasingly investigated in observational human studies, particularly on blood leukocyte DNA. Characterizing the degree and determinants of DNA methylation stability can provide critical information for the design and conduction of human epigenetic studies. METHODS: We measured DNA methylation in 12 gene-promoter regions (APC, p16, p53, RASSF1A, CDH13, eNOS, ET-1, IFNγ, IL-6, TNFα, iNOS, and hTERT and 2 of non-long terminal repeat elements, i.e., L1 and Alu in blood samples obtained from 63 healthy individuals at baseline (Day 1 and after three days (Day 4. DNA methylation was measured by bisulfite-PCR-Pyrosequencing. We calculated intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs to measure the within-individual stability of DNA methylation between Day 1 and 4, subtracted of pyrosequencing error and adjusted for multiple covariates. RESULTS: Methylation markers showed different temporal behaviors ranging from high (IL-6, ICC = 0.89 to low stability (APC, ICC = 0.08 between Day 1 and 4. Multiple sequence and marker characteristics were associated with the degree of variation. Density of CpG dinucleotides nearby the sequence analyzed (measured as CpG(o/e or G+C content within ±200 bp was positively associated with DNA methylation stability. The 3' proximity to repeat elements and range of DNA methylation on Day 1 were also positively associated with methylation stability. An inverted U-shaped correlation was observed between mean DNA methylation on Day 1 and stability. CONCLUSIONS: The degree of short-term DNA methylation stability is marker-dependent and associated with sequence characteristics and methylation levels.

  5. Varietal tracing of virgin olive oils based on plastid DNA variation profiling.

    Marga Pérez-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Olive oil traceability remains a challenge nowadays. DNA analysis is the preferred approach to an effective varietal identification, without any environmental influence. Specifically, olive organelle genomics is the most promising approach for setting up a suitable set of markers as they would not interfere with the pollinator variety DNA traces. Unfortunately, plastid DNA (cpDNA variation of the cultivated olive has been reported to be low. This feature could be a limitation for the use of cpDNA polymorphisms in forensic analyses or oil traceability, but rare cpDNA haplotypes may be useful as they can help to efficiently discriminate some varieties. Recently, the sequencing of olive plastid genomes has allowed the generation of novel markers. In this study, the performance of cpDNA markers on olive oil matrices, and their applicability on commercial Protected Designation of Origin (PDO oils were assessed. By using a combination of nine plastid loci (including multi-state microsatellites and short indels, it is possible to fingerprint six haplotypes (in 17 Spanish olive varieties, which can discriminate high-value commercialized cultivars with PDO. In particular, a rare haplotype was detected in genotypes used to produce a regional high-value commercial oil. We conclude that plastid haplotypes can help oil traceability in commercial PDO oils and set up an experimental methodology suitable for organelle polymorphism detection in the complex olive oil matrices.

  6. Exploration of methods to identify polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair capacity phenotypes

    Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Xi, T; Mohrenweiser, H W; Nelson, D O

    2006-07-03

    Elucidating the relationship between polymorphic sequences and risk of common disease is a challenge. For example, although it is clear that variation in DNA repair genes is associated with familial cancer, aging and neurological disease, progress toward identifying polymorphisms associated with elevated risk of sporadic disease has been slow. This is partly due to the complexity of the genetic variation, the existence of large numbers of mostly low frequency variants and the contribution of many genes to variation in susceptibility. There has been limited development of methods to find associations between genotypes having many polymorphisms and pathway function or health outcome. We have explored several statistical methods for identifying polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair phenotypes. The model system used was 80 cell lines that had been resequenced to identify variation; 191 single nucleotide substitution polymorphisms (SNPs) are included, of which 172 are in 31 base excision repair pathway genes, 19 in 5 anti-oxidation genes, and DNA repair phenotypes based on single strand breaks measured by the alkaline Comet assay. Univariate analyses were of limited value in identifying SNPs associated with phenotype variation. Of the multivariable model selection methods tested: the easiest that provided reduced error of prediction of phenotype was simple counting of the variant alleles predicted to encode proteins with reduced activity, which led to a genotype including 52 SNPs; the best and most parsimonious model was achieved using a two-step analysis without regard to potential functional relevance: first SNPs were ranked by importance determined by Random Forests Regression (RFR), followed by cross-validation in a second round of RFR modeling that included ever more SNPs in declining order of importance. With this approach 6 SNPs were found to minimize prediction error. The results should encourage research into utilization of multivariate

  7. Epigenetic Switch Driven by DNA Inversions Dictates Phase Variation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Li, Jing; Li, Jing-Wen; Feng, Zhixing; Wang, Juanjuan; An, Haoran; Liu, Yanni; Wang, Yang; Wang, Kailing; Zhang, Xuegong; Miao, Zhun; Liang, Wenbo; Sebra, Robert; Wang, Guilin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Zhang, Jing-Ren

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism for phenotypic diversification in all forms of life. We previously described remarkable cell-to-cell heterogeneity in epigenetic pattern within a clonal population of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a leading human pathogen. We here report that the epigenetic diversity is caused by extensive DNA inversions among hsdSA, hsdSB, and hsdSC, three methyltransferase hsdS genes in the Spn556II type-I restriction modification (R-M) locus. Because hsdSA encodes the sequence recognition subunit of this type-I R-M DNA methyltransferase, these site-specific recombinations generate pneumococcal cells with variable HsdSA alleles and thereby diverse genome methylation patterns. Most importantly, the DNA methylation pattern specified by the HsdSA1 allele leads to the formation of opaque colonies, whereas the pneumococci lacking HsdSA1 produce transparent colonies. Furthermore, this HsdSA1-dependent phase variation requires intact DNA methylase activity encoded by hsdM in the Spn556II (renamed colony opacity determinant or cod) locus. Thus, the DNA inversion-driven ON/OFF switch of the hsdSA1 allele in the cod locus and resulting epigenetic switch dictate the phase variation between the opaque and transparent phenotypes. Phase variation has been well documented for its importance in pneumococcal carriage and invasive infection, but its molecular basis remains unclear. Our work has discovered a novel epigenetic cause for this significant pathobiology phenomenon in S. pneumoniae. Lastly, our findings broadly represents a significant advancement in our understanding of bacterial R-M systems and their potential in shaping epigenetic and phenotypic diversity of the prokaryotic organisms because similar site-specific recombination systems widely exist in many archaeal and bacterial species. PMID:27427949

  8. Epigenetic Switch Driven by DNA Inversions Dictates Phase Variation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Wang, Juanjuan; An, Haoran; Liu, Yanni; Wang, Kailing; Miao, Zhun; Liang, Wenbo; Sebra, Robert; Wang, Guilin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Zhang, Jing-Ren

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism for phenotypic diversification in all forms of life. We previously described remarkable cell-to-cell heterogeneity in epigenetic pattern within a clonal population of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a leading human pathogen. We here report that the epigenetic diversity is caused by extensive DNA inversions among hsdSA, hsdSB, and hsdSC, three methyltransferase hsdS genes in the Spn556II type-I restriction modification (R-M) locus. Because hsdSA encodes the sequence recognition subunit of this type-I R-M DNA methyltransferase, these site-specific recombinations generate pneumococcal cells with variable HsdSA alleles and thereby diverse genome methylation patterns. Most importantly, the DNA methylation pattern specified by the HsdSA1 allele leads to the formation of opaque colonies, whereas the pneumococci lacking HsdSA1 produce transparent colonies. Furthermore, this HsdSA1-dependent phase variation requires intact DNA methylase activity encoded by hsdM in the Spn556II (renamed colony opacity determinant or cod) locus. Thus, the DNA inversion-driven ON/OFF switch of the hsdSA1 allele in the cod locus and resulting epigenetic switch dictate the phase variation between the opaque and transparent phenotypes. Phase variation has been well documented for its importance in pneumococcal carriage and invasive infection, but its molecular basis remains unclear. Our work has discovered a novel epigenetic cause for this significant pathobiology phenomenon in S. pneumoniae. Lastly, our findings broadly represents a significant advancement in our understanding of bacterial R-M systems and their potential in shaping epigenetic and phenotypic diversity of the prokaryotic organisms because similar site-specific recombination systems widely exist in many archaeal and bacterial species. PMID:27427949

  9. Variation in rDNA locus number and position among legume species and detection of 2 linked rDNA loci in the model Medicago truncatula by FISH.

    Abirached-Darmency, Mona; Prado-Vivant, Emilce; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Pouthier, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    Within Fabaceae, legume species have a variable genome size, chromosome number, and ploidy level. The genome distribution of ribosomal genes, easily detectable by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), is a good tool for anchoring physical and genetic comparative maps. The organisation of 45S rDNA and 5S loci was analysed by FISH in the 4 closely related species: Pisum sativum, Medicago truncatula, Medicago sativa (2 diploid taxa), and Lathyrus sativus. The 2 types of rDNA arrays displayed interspecific variation in locus number and location, but little intraspecific variation was detected. In the model legume, M. truncatula, the presence of 2 adjacent 45S rDNA loci was demonstrated, and the location of the rDNA loci was independent of the general evolution of the genome DNA. The different parameters relative to clustering of the rDNA loci in specific chromosome regions and the possible basis of rDNA instability are discussed. PMID:16121252

  10. Evaluating variation in human gut microbiota profiles due to DNA extraction method and inter-subject differences.

    Wagner Mackenzie, Brett; Waite, David W; Taylor, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The human gut contains dense and diverse microbial communities which have profound influences on human health. Gaining meaningful insights into these communities requires provision of high quality microbial nucleic acids from human fecal samples, as well as an understanding of the sources of variation and their impacts on the experimental model. We present here a systematic analysis of commonly used microbial DNA extraction methods, and identify significant sources of variation. Five extraction methods (Human Microbiome Project protocol, MoBio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep, phenol:chloroform-based DNA isolation) were evaluated based on the following criteria: DNA yield, quality and integrity, and microbial community structure based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Our results indicate that the largest portion of variation within the model was attributed to differences between subjects (biological variation), with a smaller proportion of variation associated with DNA extraction method (technical variation) and intra-subject variation. A comprehensive understanding of the potential impact of technical variation on the human gut microbiota will help limit preventable bias, enabling more accurate diversity estimates. PMID:25741335

  11. DNA Conformational Variations Induced by Stretching 3'5'-Termini Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Investigating the interaction between protein and stretched DNA molecules has become a new way to study the protein DNA interaction. The conformations from different stretching methods give us a further understanding of the interaction between protein and DNA. We study the conformational variations of a 22-mer DNA caused by stretching both 3'- and 5'-termini by molecular dynamics simulations. It requires 250 kJ/mol to stretch the DNA molecule by 3'5'-termini for 3.5 nm and the force plateau is at 123.8 pN. The stretching 3'5'-termini leads to large values of the angle opening and the dihedral propeller between bases in one base pair, the double helix untwists from 34° to 20° and the successive base pairs rolls to the side of the DNA major groove. The distances between successive base pairs increases from 3.2 Å to 5.6 Å. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  12. Quality standards for DNA sequence variation databases to improve clinical management under development in Australia

    B. Bennetts

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the routine nature of comparing sequence variations identified during clinical testing to database records, few databases meet quality requirements for clinical diagnostics. To address this issue, The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA in collaboration with the Human Genetics Society of Australasia (HGSA, and the Human Variome Project (HVP is developing standards for DNA sequence variation databases intended for use in the Australian clinical environment. The outputs of this project will be promoted to other health systems and accreditation bodies by the Human Variome Project to support the development of similar frameworks in other jurisdictions.

  13. Application of the adductome approach to assess intertissue DNA damage variations in human lung and esophagus

    Methods for determining the differential susceptibility of human organs to DNA damage have not yet been explored to any large extent due to technical constraints. The development of comprehensive analytical approaches by which to detect intertissue variations in DNA damage susceptibility may advance our understanding of the roles of DNA adducts in cancer etiology and as exposure biomarkers at least. A strategy designed for the detection and comparison of multiple DNA adducts from different tissue samples was applied to assess esophageal and peripherally- and centrally-located lung tissue DNA obtained from the same person. This adductome approach utilized LC/ESI-MS/MS analysis methods designed to detect the neutral loss of 2'-deoxyribose from positively ionized 2'-deoxynucleoside adducts transmitting the [M+H]+ > [M+H-116]+ transition over 374 transitions. In the final analyses, adductome maps were produced which facilitated the visualization of putative DNA adducts and their relative levels of occurrence and allowed for comprehensive comparisons between samples, including a calf thymus DNA negative control. The largest putative adducts were distributed similarly across the samples, however, differences in the relative amounts of putative adducts in lung and esophagus tissue were also revealed. The largest-occurring lung tissue DNA putative adducts were 90% similar (n = 50), while putative adducts in esophagus tissue DNA were shown to be 80 and 84% similar to central and peripheral lung tissue DNA respectively. Seven DNA adducts, N2-ethyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (N2-ethyl-dG), 1,N6-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine (εdA), α-S- and α-R-methyl-γ-hydroxy-1,N2-propano-2'-deoxyguanosine (1,N2-PdG1, 1,N2-PdG2), 3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-8-hydroxy-pyrimido[1,2-a] purine-(3H)-one (8-OH-PdG) and the two stereoisomers of 3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-6-hydroxypyrimido[1,2-a] purine-(3H)-one (6-OH-PdG) were unambiguously detected in all tissue DNA samples by

  14. A genetic basis for the variation in the vulnerability of cancer to DNA damage

    Yard, Brian D.; Adams, Drew J.; Chie, Eui Kyu; Tamayo, Pablo; Battaglia, Jessica S.; Gopal, Priyanka; Rogacki, Kevin; Pearson, Bradley E.; Phillips, James; Raymond, Daniel P.; Pennell, Nathan A.; Almeida, Francisco; Cheah, Jaime H.; Clemons, Paul A.; Shamji, Alykhan

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is not currently informed by the genetic composition of an individual patient's tumour. To identify genetic features regulating survival after DNA damage, here we conduct large-scale profiling of cellular survival after exposure to radiation in a diverse collection of 533 genetically annotated human tumour cell lines. We show that sensitivity to radiation is characterized by significant variation across and within lineages. We combine results from our platform with genomic featur...

  15. Taiwan Y-chromosomal DNA variation and its relationship with Island Southeast Asia

    Trejaut, Jean A; Poloni, Estella S.; Yen, Ju-Chen; Lai, Ying-Hui; Loo, Jun-Hun; Lee, Chien-Liang; He, Chun-Lin; Lin, Marie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Much of the data resolution of the haploid non-recombining Y chromosome (NRY) haplogroup O in East Asia are still rudimentary and could be an explanatory factor for current debates on the settlement history of Island Southeast Asia (ISEA). Here, 81 slowly evolving markers (mostly SNPs) and 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats were used to achieve higher level molecular resolution. Our aim is to investigate if the distribution of NRY DNA variation in Taiwan and ISEA is consistent ...

  16. A genetic basis for the variation in the vulnerability of cancer to DNA damage

    Yard, Brian D.; Adams, Drew J.; Chie, Eui Kyu; Tamayo, Pablo; Battaglia, Jessica S.; Gopal, Priyanka; Rogacki, Kevin; Pearson, Bradley E.; Phillips, James; Raymond, Daniel P.; Pennell, Nathan A.; Almeida, Francisco; Cheah, Jaime H.; Clemons, Paul A.; Shamji, Alykhan; Peacock, Craig D.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Abazeed, Mohamed E.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is not currently informed by the genetic composition of an individual patient's tumour. To identify genetic features regulating survival after DNA damage, here we conduct large-scale profiling of cellular survival after exposure to radiation in a diverse collection of 533 genetically annotated human tumour cell lines. We show that sensitivity to radiation is characterized by significant variation across and within lineages. We combine results from our platform with genomic features to identify parameters that predict radiation sensitivity. We identify somatic copy number alterations, gene mutations and the basal expression of individual genes and gene sets that correlate with the radiation survival, revealing new insights into the genetic basis of tumour cellular response to DNA damage. These results demonstrate the diversity of tumour cellular response to ionizing radiation and establish multiple lines of evidence that new genetic features regulating cellular response after DNA damage can be identified. PMID:27109210

  17. Lack of association between mitochondrial DNA G15257A and G15812A variations and multiple sclerosis

    Andalib, Sasan; Talebi, Mahnaz; Sakhinia, Ebrahim;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease of the central nervous system for which no definitive therapy has yet been developed. The etiology remains uncertain, but there is evidence of genetic susceptibility to the disease, including contributions from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA......) variations to the pathogenesis of MS. G15257A and G15812A are variations of the mtDNA tRNA(Thr) gene in MS sufferers of different populations. The present study tested the hypothesis of an association of the G15257A and G15812A variations of the mtDNA tRNA(Thr) gene to the susceptibility to MS in an Iranian...... population. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two hundred subjects included 100 MS patients and 100 unrelated healthy controls. DNA was extracted from blood samples by means of a salting-out method. The mtDNA fragment was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP...

  18. Variation in blood cell DNA content in fish from Chernobyl-contaminated ponds in Ukraine

    To assess responses of fish to chronic exposure to radionuclides, the authors sampled blood from about 300 crucian carp Carassius carrasius collected from 10 ponds in the Ukraine. The ponds were located 20--30 km from the Chernobyl reactor in areas which received 1--10 Ci 137Cs/km2 as well as other contaminants. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content of whole blood revealed aneuploid-like patterns in some of the fish, as well as hyperdiploid shoulders. The fish populations consisted of both diploid and triploid individuals. Changes in the coefficient of variation (CV) around the G0/G1 peak have been used in previous studies as an indication of abnormal DNA content; the CV was increased in a number of the fish examined. Some fish had uninterpretable DNA histograms, with a typical diploid or triploid cell population present along with a smaller haploid population. Variations in cellular DNA content similar to those reported here have been associated with exposure to radiation and other genotoxic agents in laboratory studies. While further work is needed, these results suggest that the Chernobyl accident may have long term genetic consequences for wild organisms in the contaminated areas

  19. Genetic variations of East Kalimantan Orangutan based on D-Loop mitochondria DNA

    DIDIK PRASETYO

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the variation of D-Loop mtDNA of East Kalimantan orangutan was done to provided the genetic information data from endangerd species in order to support their population conservation efforts. The reason using mtDNA in this research is caused by higher level of mutation ( 5 – 10 trimes when compared with nuclear DNA and it enable to transmited via maternal transmission without experience in recombination. From the analysis conducted on 38 samples resulting eight types of haplotype that is A, B, C, D, E, G, H and I haplotype. Level of variation of the haplotype at East Kutai district was more uniform when compared by variation in Kutai district. From the paternal analysis had been got three cluster with the nearer among cluster IADG and cluster EH compared by cluster BC. Dissociation time between haplotype are 250.000-400.000 years ago, and known the population of East Kalimantan orangutan separated from Sumatran orangutan (X97708 since 1.158.300 years ago.

  20. Detection of genetic variation in Hevea brasiliensis using the DNA amplification fingerprinting technique

    Earlier studies on genetic variation and genome analysis of Hevea brasiliensis were based primarily on restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). Notwithstanding that the RFLP technique is a powerful tool, the technique is slow, laborious and requires highly polymorphic hybridization probes. The multiplex DAF technique was adopted. Pairs of random 10-mer oligonucleotide primers were tested for their ability to elicit DNA polymorphisms. Preliminary results indicated that the number of amplified products varied with the annealing temperature and the primer pairs. Although it was found that the annealing temperatures had to be varied for different primer pairs in order to achieve satisfactory amplification, all DNA amplification was carried out at a fixed annealing temperature in order to increase the efficiency of screening primer pairs for their ability to reveal comprehensive DNA fingerprints. DNA samples loaded in denaturing buffer and separated through denaturing polyacrylamide gels were found to be more informative than samples loaded in non-denaturing buffer. Staining with silver nitrate was much more sensitive than with ethidium bromide. The DAF marker technique has been developed successfully for Hevea studies. Premilinary investigations with the technique demonstrated that DAF can generate very complex and informative DNA fingerprints and promises to be useful for genetic variability, family relationship and population studies. The technique does not require sophisticated equipment, and is also more robust and reproducible than RAPD. 6 refs

  1. Sequence-length variation of mtDNA HVS-IC-stretch in Chinese ethnic groups

    Feng CHEN; Yong-hui DANG; Chun-xia YAN; Yan-ling LIU; Ya-jun DENG; David J. R. FULTON; Teng CHEN

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable segment-I (HVS-I) C-stretch variations and explore the significance of these variations in forensic and population genetics studies. The C-stretch sequence variation was studied in 919 unrelated individuals from 8 Chinese ethnic groups using both direct and clone sequencing ap-proaches. Thirty eight C-stretch haplotypes were identified, and some novel and population specific haplotypes were also detected. The C-stretch genetic diversity (GD) values were relatively high, and probability (P) values were low. Additionally, C-stretch length heteroplasmy was observed in approximately 9% of individuals studied. There was a significant correlation (r=-0.961, P<0.01) between the expansion of the cytosine sequence length in the C-stretch of HVS-I and a reduction in the number of up-stream adenines. These results indicate that the C-stretch could be a useful genetic maker in forensic identification of Chinese populations. The results from the Fst and dA genetic distance matrix, neighbor-joining tree, and principal component map also suggest that C-stretch could be used as a reliable genetic marker in population genetics.

  2. Genetic variation in Opisthorchis viverrini (Trematoda: Opisthorchiidae) from northeast Thailand and Laos PDR based on random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses

    Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Nuchjungreed, Chadaporn; Srisawangwong, Tuanchai; Ando, Katsuhiko; Petney, Trevor N.; Chilton, Neil B.; Andrews, Ross H.

    2006-01-01

    Genetic variation in Opisthorchis viverrini adults originating from different locations in northeast Thailand and Laos, People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), was examined using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. In an initial analysis, the genomic DNA of one fluke from each of ten localities was amplified using 15 random primers (10-mers); however, genetic variation among O. viverrini specimens was detected reliably for only four primers. A more detailed RAPD analysis using these...

  3. Bridging near and remote Oceania: mtDNA and NRY variation in the Solomon Islands.

    Delfin, Frederick; Myles, Sean; Choi, Ying; Hughes, David; Illek, Robert; van Oven, Mannis; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Kayser, Manfred; Stoneking, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Although genetic studies have contributed greatly to our understanding of the colonization of Near and Remote Oceania, important gaps still exist. One such gap is the Solomon Islands, which extend between Bougainville and Vanuatu, thereby bridging Near and Remote Oceania, and include both Austronesian-speaking and Papuan-speaking groups. Here, we describe patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nonrecombining Y chromosome (NRY) variation in over 700 individuals from 18 populations in the Solomons, including 11 Austronesian-speaking groups, 3 Papuan-speaking groups, and 4 Polynesian Outliers (descended via back migration from Polynesia). We find evidence for ancient (pre-Lapita) colonization of the Solomons in old NRY paragroups as well as from M2-M353, which probably arose in the Solomons ∼9,200 years ago and is the most frequent NRY haplogroup there. There are no consistent genetic differences between Austronesian-speaking and Papuan-speaking groups, suggesting extensive genetic contact between them. Santa Cruz, which is located in Remote Oceania, shows unusually low frequencies of mtDNA and NRY haplogroups of recent Asian ancestry. This is in apparent contradiction with expectations based on archaeological and linguistic evidence for an early (∼3,200 years ago), direct colonization of Santa Cruz by Lapita people from the Bismarck Archipelago, via a migration that "leapfrogged" over the rest of the Solomons. Polynesian Outliers show dramatic island-specific founder events involving various NRY haplogroups. We also find that NRY, but not mtDNA, genetic distance is correlated with the geographic distance between Solomons groups and that historically attested spheres of cultural interaction are associated with the recent genetic structure of Solomons groups, as revealed by mtDNA HV1 sequence and Y-STR haplotype diversity. Our results fill an important lacuna in human genetic studies of Oceania and aid in understanding the colonization and genetic history of

  4. Regional Variation in mtDNA of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken

    Hagen, Christian A.; Pitman, James C.; Sandercock, Brett K.; Wolfe, Don H.; Robel, Robel J.; Applegate, Roger D.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.

    2010-01-01

    Cumulative loss of habitat and long-term decline in the populations of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) have led to concerns for the species' viability throughout its range in the southern Great Plains. For more efficient conservation past and present distributions of genetic variation need to be understood. We examined the distribution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in the Lesser Prairie-Chicken across Kansas, Colorado, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. Throughout the range we found little genetic differentiation except for the population in New Mexico, which was significantly different from most other publications. We did, however, find significant isolation by distance at the rangewide scale (r=0.698). We found no relationship between haplotype phylogeny and geography, and our analyses provide evidence for a post-glacial population expansion within the species that is consistent with the idea that speciation within Tympanuchus is recent. Conservation actions that increase the likelihood of genetically viable populations in the future should be evaluated for implementation.

  5. Fluorescent SSCP of overlapping fragments (FSSCP-OF): a highly sensitive method for the screening of mitochondrial DNA variation

    Salas, A; Rasmussen, Erik Michael; Lareu, M V;

    2001-01-01

    The mtDNA analysis (mtDNA) is increasingly being demanded for forensic purposes due to the fact that many times the use of standard nuclear marker fails to analyze degraded samples (such as bones) and specially for the analysis of hair shafts (a common sample in the crime scene). However, analysis...... of mtDNA sequencing implies a great lab effort when a high number of samples must be analyzed.The present work introduces a novel and reliable method for the screening of mtDNA variation in the first and second hypervariables (HV1 and HV2) regions which we have denominated fluorescent single strand...... d-loop mtDNA variation and for this reason, the probability to detect a polymorphic position by SSCP analysis is clearly increased in comparison to conventional SSCP methods due to the fact that the same polymorphic position is usually placed in a different "relative" position in the two overlapped...

  6. Investigation of the effect of ionizing radiation on gene expression variation by the 'DNA chips': feasibility of a biological dosimeter

    After having described the different biological effects of ionizing radiation and the different approaches to biological dosimetry, and introduced 'DNA chips' or DNA micro-arrays, the author reports the characterization of gene expression variations in the response of cells to a gamma irradiation. Both main aspects of the use DNA chips are investigated: fundamental research and diagnosis. This research thesis thus proposes an analysis of the effect of ionizing radiation using DNA chips, notably by comparing gene expression modifications measured in mouse irradiated lung, heart and kidney. It reports a feasibility study of bio-dosimeter based on expression profiles

  7. Population structure of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variation among humpback whales in the North Pacific.

    Baker, C S; Medrano-Gonzalez, L; Calambokidis, J; Perry, A; Pichler, F; Rosenbaum, H; Straley, J M; Urban-Ramirez, J; Yamaguchi, M; von Ziegesar, O

    1998-06-01

    The population structure of variation in a nuclear actin intron and the control region of mitochondrial DNA is described for humpback whales from eight regions in the North Pacific Ocean: central California, Baja Peninsula, nearshore Mexico (Bahia Banderas), offshore Mexico (Socorro Island), southeastern Alaska, central Alaska (Prince Williams Sound), Hawaii and Japan (Ogasawara Islands). Primary mtDNA haplotypes and intron alleles were identified using selected restriction fragment length polymorphisms of target sequences amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR-RFLP). There was little evidence of heterogeneity in the frequencies of mtDNA haplotypes or actin intron alleles due to the year or sex composition of the sample. However, frequencies of four mtDNA haplotypes showed marked regional differences in their distributions (phi ST = 0.277; P < 0.001; n = 205 individuals) while the two alleles showed significant, but less marked, regional differences (phi ST = 0.033; P < 0.013; n = 400 chromosomes). An hierarchical analysis of variance in frequencies of haplotypes and alleles supported the grouping of six regions into a central and eastern stock with further partitioning of variance among regions within stocks for haplotypes but not for alleles. Based on available genetic and demographic evidence, the southeastern Alaska and central California feeding grounds were selected for additional analyses of nuclear differentiation using allelic variation at four microsatellite loci. All four loci showed significant differences in allele frequencies (overall FST = 0.043; P < 0.001; average n = 139 chromosomes per locus), indicating at least partial reproductive isolation between the two regions as well as the segregation of mtDNA lineages. Although the two feeding grounds were not panmictic for nuclear or mitochondrial loci, estimates of long-term migration rates suggested that male-mediated gene flow was several-fold greater than female gene flow. These results

  8. HLA DNA sequence variation among human populations: molecular signatures of demographic and selective events.

    Stéphane Buhler

    Full Text Available Molecular differences between HLA alleles vary up to 57 nucleotides within the peptide binding coding region of human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC genes, but it is still unclear whether this variation results from a stochastic process or from selective constraints related to functional differences among HLA molecules. Although HLA alleles are generally treated as equidistant molecular units in population genetic studies, DNA sequence diversity among populations is also crucial to interpret the observed HLA polymorphism. In this study, we used a large dataset of 2,062 DNA sequences defined for the different HLA alleles to analyze nucleotide diversity of seven HLA genes in 23,500 individuals of about 200 populations spread worldwide. We first analyzed the HLA molecular structure and diversity of these populations in relation to geographic variation and we further investigated possible departures from selective neutrality through Tajima's tests and mismatch distributions. All results were compared to those obtained by classical approaches applied to HLA allele frequencies.Our study shows that the global patterns of HLA nucleotide diversity among populations are significantly correlated to geography, although in some specific cases the molecular information reveals unexpected genetic relationships. At all loci except HLA-DPB1, populations have accumulated a high proportion of very divergent alleles, suggesting an advantage of heterozygotes expressing molecularly distant HLA molecules (asymmetric overdominant selection model. However, both different intensities of selection and unequal levels of gene conversion may explain the heterogeneous mismatch distributions observed among the loci. Also, distinctive patterns of sequence divergence observed at the HLA-DPB1 locus suggest current neutrality but old selective pressures on this gene. We conclude that HLA DNA sequences advantageously complement HLA allele frequencies as a source of data used

  9. Sources of pre-analytical variations in yield of DNA extracted from blood samples: analysis of 50,000 DNA samples in EPIC.

    Elodie Caboux

    Full Text Available The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC is a long-term, multi-centric prospective study in Europe investigating the relationships between cancer and nutrition. This study has served as a basis for a number of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS and other types of genetic analyses. Over a period of 5 years, 52,256 EPIC DNA samples have been extracted using an automated DNA extraction platform. Here we have evaluated the pre-analytical factors affecting DNA yield, including anthropometric, epidemiological and technical factors such as center of subject recruitment, age, gender, body-mass index, disease case or control status, tobacco consumption, number of aliquots of buffy coat used for DNA extraction, extraction machine or procedure, DNA quantification method, degree of haemolysis and variations in the timing of sample processing. We show that the largest significant variations in DNA yield were observed with degree of haemolysis and with center of subject recruitment. Age, gender, body-mass index, cancer case or control status and tobacco consumption also significantly impacted DNA yield. Feedback from laboratories which have analyzed DNA with different SNP genotyping technologies demonstrate that the vast majority of samples (approximately 88% performed adequately in different types of assays. To our knowledge this study is the largest to date to evaluate the sources of pre-analytical variations in DNA extracted from peripheral leucocytes. The results provide a strong evidence-based rationale for standardized recommendations on blood collection and processing protocols for large-scale genetic studies.

  10. Genetic Variation Among Vegetative Compatibility Groups of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Analyzed by DNA Fingerprinting.

    Bentley, S; Pegg, K G; Moore, N Y; Davis, R D; Buddenhagen, I W

    1998-12-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic variation within a worldwide collection of 208 isolates of Fu-sarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense, representing physiological races 1, 2, 3, and 4 and the 20 reported vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs), was analyzed using modified DNA amplification fingerprinting. Also characterized were 133 isolates that did not belong to any of the reported VCGs of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense including race 3 isolates from a Heliconia species and isolates from a symptomatic wild banana species growing in the jungle in peninsular Malaysia. The DNA fingerprint patterns were generally VCG specific, irrespective of geographic or host origin. A total of 33 different genotypes were identified within F. oxysporum f. sp. cu-bense; 19 genotypes were distinguished among the isolates that belonged to the 20 reported VCGs, and 14 new genotypes were identified among the isolates that did not belong to any of the existing VCGs. DNA fingerprinting analysis also allowed differentiation of nine clonal lineages within F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense. Five of these lineages each contained numerous closely related VCGs and genotypes, and the remaining four lineages each contained a single genotype. The genetic diversity and geographic distribution of several of these lineages of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense suggests that they have coevolved with edible bananas and their wild diploid progenitors in Asia. DNA fingerprinting analysis of isolates from the wild pathosystem provides further evidence for the coevolution hypothesis. The genetic isolation and limited geographic distribution of four of the lineages of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense suggests that the pathogen has also arisen independently, both within and outside of the center of origin of the host. PMID:18944830

  11. Variation in morphotype, karyotype and DNA type of fluconazole resistant Candida albicans from an AIDS patient.

    Takasuka, T; Baily, G G; Birch, M; Anderson, M J; Law, D; Denning, D W

    1998-01-01

    Azole-resistant oropharyngeal and oesophageal candidiasis is a recent phenomenon observed in patients with AIDS usually previously treated with fluconazole. Some variation has been observed in antifungal susceptibility testing among separate colonies of Candida albicans from the same patient. This raises the question of whether there are multiple clones present or simply phenotypic variation in expression of azole resistance. To address this question we took 18 isolates grown from multiple swabs taken before and after experimental azole therapy from a single HIV-positive individual with fluconazole-resistant oral candidiasis and compared morphotype, karyotype, PCR-based DNA typing and azole susceptibility. Ten of the isolates were from a single 2-day period. Amongst these 10 there were seven morphotypes, five karyotypes and four polymerase chain reaction (PCR) types. Three further morphotypes, one karyotype and two PCR types were found amongst the eight isolates obtained during the subsequent 4 months. Limited variation in susceptibility to two azoles--fluconazole and D0870--was also seen. This work emphasizes both the large genotype and phenotypic variability of C. albicans isolates in the mouth of AIDS patients with fluconazole resistance, and the difficulties in interpretation of present typing methods. PMID:9515670

  12. Genetic variation in two conserved local Romanian pig breeds using type 1 DNA markers

    Wales Richard

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysis of the genetic variation of an endangered population is an important component for the success of conservation. Animals from two local Romanian pig breeds, the Mangalitsa and Bazna, were analysed for variation at a number of genetic loci using PCR-based DNA tests. Polymorphism was assessed at loci which 1 are known to cause phenotypic variation, 2 are potentially involved in trait differences or 3 are putative candidate genes. The traits considered are disease resistance, growth, coat colour, meat quality and prolificacy. Even though the populations are small and the markers are limited to specific genes, we found significant differences in five of the ten characterised loci. In some cases the observed allele frequencies were interesting in relation to gene function and the phenotype of the breed. These breeds are part of a conservation programme in Romania and marker information may be useful in preserving a representative gene pool in the populations. The use of polymorphisms in type 1 (gene markers may be a useful complement to analysis based on anonymous markers.

  13. Variation in the measurement of DNA damage by comet assay measured by the ECVAG dagger inter-laboratory validation trial

    Forchhammer, Lykke; Johansson, Clara; Loft, Steffen;

    2010-01-01

    The comet assay has become a popular method for the assessment of DNA damage in biomonitoring studies and genetic toxicology. However, few studies have addressed the issue of the noted inter-laboratory variability of DNA damage measured by the comet assay. In this study, 12 laboratories analysed...... by the different laboratories as evidenced by an inter-laboratory coefficient of variation (CV) of 47%. Adjustment of the primary comet assay end points by a calibration curve prepared in each laboratory reduced the CV to 28%, a statistically significant reduction (P <0.05, Levene's test). A large...... fraction of the inter-laboratory variation originated from differences in image analysis, whereas the intra-laboratory variation was considerably smaller than the variation between laboratories. In summary, adjustment of primary comet assay results by reference standards reduces inter-laboratory variation...

  14. Intraspecific Variation in Ribosomal DNA in Populations of the Potato Cyst Nematode Globodera pallida.

    Blok, V C; Malloch, G; Harrower, B; Phillips, M S; Vrain, T C

    1998-06-01

    The relationships among a number of populations of Globodera pallida from Britian, the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, and South America were examined using PCR amplification of the ribosomal cistron between the 18S and 28S genes that include the two intergenic spacer regions (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S gene. Amplifications produced a similar-sized product of 1150 bp from all populations. Digestion of the amplified fragment with a number of restriction enzymes showed differences among the populations. The restriction enzyme RsaI distinguished the most populations. The RFLP patterns revealed by this enzyme were complex and could have arisen from heterogeneity between individuals within populations and from differences between the repeats of an individual. Sequence analysis from six of the populations, together with RFLP analysis of PCR products, shows that there is intraspecific variation in the rDNA of G. pallida. PMID:19274220

  15. The origin of Mosuo people as revealed by mtDNA and Y chromosome variation

    WEN; Bo; SHI; Hong; REN; Ling; XI; Huifeng; LI; Kaiyuan; ZHA

    2004-01-01

    The Mosuo, living in the Lugu Lake area in northwest Yunnan Province, China, is the only matriarchal population in China. The Mosuo was officially identified as Naxi nationality although its relationship with Naxi remains controversial. We studied the genetic relationship between the Mosuo and five other ethnic groups currently residing in northwest Yunnan, i.e. Naxi, Tibetan, Bai, Yi and Pumi, by typing the genetic variations in mtDNA HVS1 and 21 Y chromosome markers (13 SNPs & 8 STR markers). We showed that the maternal lineages of the Mosuo bear the strongest resemblance with those found in Naxi while its paternal lineages are more similar to those that are prevalent in Yunnan Tibetan. The marked difference between paternal and maternal lineages may be attributable to the genetic history, matriarchal structure, and visiting marriage.

  16. Statistical aspects of discerning indel-type structural variation via DNA sequence alignment

    Wilson Richard K

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural variations in the form of DNA insertions and deletions are an important aspect of human genetics and especially relevant to medical disorders. Investigations have shown that such events can be detected via tell-tale discrepancies in the aligned lengths of paired-end DNA sequencing reads. Quantitative aspects underlying this method remain poorly understood, despite its importance and conceptual simplicity. We report the statistical theory characterizing the length-discrepancy scheme for Gaussian libraries, including coverage-related effects that preceding models are unable to account for. Results Deletion and insertion statistics both depend heavily on physical coverage, but otherwise differ dramatically, refuting a commonly held doctrine of symmetry. Specifically, coverage restrictions render insertions much more difficult to capture. Increased read length has the counterintuitive effect of worsening insertion detection characteristics of short inserts. Variance in library insert length is also a critical factor here and should be minimized to the greatest degree possible. Conversely, no significant improvement would be realized in lowering fosmid variances beyond current levels. Detection power is examined under a straightforward alternative hypothesis and found to be generally acceptable. We also consider the proposition of characterizing variation over the entire spectrum of variant sizes under constant risk of false-positive errors. At 1% risk, many designs will leave a significant gap in the 100 to 200 bp neighborhood, requiring unacceptably high redundancies to compensate. We show that a few modifications largely close this gap and we give a few examples of feasible spectrum-covering designs. Conclusion The theory resolves several outstanding issues and furnishes a general methodology for designing future projects from the standpoint of a spectrum-wide constant risk.

  17. Seasonal variations in levels of DNA adducts and X-spots in human populations living in different parts of Poland.

    Grzybowska, E; Hemminki, K; Choraźy, M

    1993-01-01

    White blood cell DNA adducts were measured in coke oven workers, in residents from the area next to the coke oven in Silesia, Poland (highly industrialized region), and in residents from the rural area of Poland using the 32P-postlabeling technique. This method detected aromatic adducts including adducts formed by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Highest levels of adducts in DNA were seen in the group of coke battery workers (6.9 adducts/10(8) nucleotides). Seasonal variations in leve...

  18. Association of mitochondrial DNA variations with lung cancer risk in a Han Chinese population from southwestern China.

    Shizhen Zheng

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA is particularly susceptible to oxidative damage and mutation due to the high rate of reactive oxygen species (ROS production and limited DNA-repair capacity in mitochondrial. Previous studies demonstrated that the increased mtDNA copy number for compensation for damage, which was associated with cigarette smoking, has been found to be associated with lung cancer risk among heavy smokers. Given that the common and "non-pathological" mtDNA variations determine differences in oxidative phosphorylation performance and ROS production, an important determinant of lung cancer risk, we hypothesize that the mtDNA variations may play roles in lung cancer risk. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a case-control study to compare the frequencies of mtDNA haplogroups and an 822 bp mtDNA deletion between 422 lung cancer patients and 504 controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that haplogroups D and F were related to individual lung cancer resistance (OR = 0.465, 95%CI = 0.329-0.656, p<0.001; and OR = 0.622, 95%CI = 0.425-0.909, p = 0.014, respectively, while haplogroups G and M7 might be risk factors for lung cancer (OR = 3.924, 95%CI = 1.757-6.689, p<0.001; and OR = 2.037, 95%CI = 1.253-3.312, p = 0.004, respectively. Additionally, multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that cigarette smoking was a risk factor for the 822 bp mtDNA deletion. Furthermore, the increased frequencies of the mtDNA deletion in male cigarette smoking subjects of combined cases and controls with haplogroup D indicated that the haplogroup D might be susceptible to DNA damage from external ROS caused by heavy cigarette smoking.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA variation within and between two species of neotropical anopheline mosquitoes (Diptera:Culicidae).

    Conn, J E; Mitchell, S E; Cockburn, A F

    1997-01-01

    We analyzed variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of two neotropical mosquitoes, Anopheles rangeli (n = 181) and A. trinkae (n = 45), with very different distribution patterns in Latin America, to assess species boundaries for these putative sister taxa and to examine population genetic structure. Phylogenetic analyses revealed (1) support for the monophyletic origin of each species; (2) diagnostic restriction site differences between the species; (3) geographic partitioning of haplotypes by country in A. rangeli from Bolivia, Ecuador, and Venezuela compared with considerable overlap in haplotypes of A. trinkae from Bolivia and Ecuador; and (4) similar levels of mean haplotype and nucleotide diversity in both species, but lower levels of mean nucleotide divergence in A. trinkae compared with A. rangeli. We hypothesize that higher maternal gene flow and lower divergence in A. trinkae are most likely due either to a distinctive matrilineal history or to a smaller effective population size, which may have been influenced by a smaller, essentially linear geographic range along the eastern flank of the Andes. In the cladistic analysis of A. rangell, the Bolivian haplotypes appear to be more derived than those from Ecuador or Venezuela, yet there is no evidence to support the hypothesis of a recent range expansion from Ecuador into Bolivia. PMID:9099005

  20. Effects of Twelve Germline Missense Variations on DNA Lesion and G-Quadruplex Bypass Activities of Human DNA Polymerase REV1.

    Yeom, Mina; Kim, In-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Kwon; Kang, KyeongJin; Eoff, Robert L; Guengerich, F Peter; Choi, Jeong-Yun

    2016-03-21

    The Y-family DNA polymerase REV1 is involved in replicative bypass of damaged DNA and G-quadruplex (G4) DNA. In addition to a scaffolding role in the replicative bypass, REV1 acts in a catalytic role as a deoxycytidyl transferase opposite some replication stall sites, e.g., apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, N(2)-guanyl lesions, and G4 sites. We characterized the biochemical properties of 12 reported germline missense variants of human REV1, including the N373S variant associated with high risk of cervical cancer, using the recombinant REV1 (residues 330-833) proteins and DNA templates containing a G, AP site, N(2)-CH2(2-naphthyl)G (N(2)-NaphG), or G4. In steady-state kinetic analyses, the F427L, R434Q, M656V, D700N, R704Q, and P831L variants displayed 2- to 8-fold decreases in kcat/Km for dCTP insertion opposite all four templates, compared to that of wild-type, while the N373S, M407L, and N497S showed 2- to 3-fold increases with all four and the former three or two templates, respectively. The F427L, R434Q, M656V, and R704Q variants also had 2- to 3-fold lower binding affinities to DNA substrates containing G, an AP site, and/or N(2)-NaphG than wild-type. Distinctively, the N373S variant had a 3-fold higher binding affinity to G4 DNA than the wild-type, as well as a 2-fold higher catalytic activity opposite the first tetrad G, suggesting a facilitating effect of this variation on replication of G4 DNA sequences in certain human papillomavirus genomes. Our results suggest that the catalytic function of REV1 is moderately or slightly altered by at least nine genetic variations, and the G4 DNA processing function of REV1 is slightly enhanced by the N373S variation, which might provide the possibility that certain germline missense REV1 variations affect the individual susceptibility to carcinogenesis by modifying the capability of REV1 for replicative bypass past DNA lesions and G4 motifs derived from chemical and viral carcinogens. PMID:26914252

  1. Effects of a sex-ratio distorting endosymbiont on mtDNA variation in a global insect pest

    Cook James M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patterns of mtDNA variation within a species reflect long-term population structure, but may also be influenced by maternally inherited endosymbionts, such as Wolbachia. These bacteria often alter host reproductive biology and can drive particular mtDNA haplotypes through populations. We investigated the impacts of Wolbachia infection and geography on mtDNA variation in the diamondback moth, a major global pest whose geographic distribution reflects both natural processes and transport via human agricultural activities. Results The mtDNA phylogeny of 95 individuals sampled from 10 countries on four continents revealed two major clades. One contained only Wolbachia-infected individuals from Malaysia and Kenya, while the other contained only uninfected individuals, from all countries including Malaysia and Kenya. Within the uninfected group was a further clade containing all individuals from Australasia and displaying very limited sequence variation. In contrast, a biparental nuclear gene phylogeny did not have infected and uninfected clades, supporting the notion that maternally-inherited Wolbachia are responsible for the mtDNA pattern. Only about 5% (15/306 of our global sample of individuals was infected with the plutWB1 isolate and even within infected local populations, many insects were uninfected. Comparisons of infected and uninfected isofemale lines revealed that plutWB1 is associated with sex ratio distortion. Uninfected lines have a 1:1 sex ratio, while infected ones show a 2:1 female bias. Conclusion The main correlate of mtDNA variation in P. xylostella is presence or absence of the plutWB1 infection. This is associated with substantial sex ratio distortion and the underlying mechanisms deserve further study. In contrast, geographic origin is a poor predictor of moth mtDNA sequences, reflecting human activity in moving the insects around the globe. The exception is a clade of Australasian individuals, which may

  2. Effects of a sex-ratio distorting endosymbiont on mtDNA variation in a global insect pest

    Delgado, Ana M; Cook, James M

    2009-01-01

    Background Patterns of mtDNA variation within a species reflect long-term population structure, but may also be influenced by maternally inherited endosymbionts, such as Wolbachia. These bacteria often alter host reproductive biology and can drive particular mtDNA haplotypes through populations. We investigated the impacts of Wolbachia infection and geography on mtDNA variation in the diamondback moth, a major global pest whose geographic distribution reflects both natural processes and transport via human agricultural activities. Results The mtDNA phylogeny of 95 individuals sampled from 10 countries on four continents revealed two major clades. One contained only Wolbachia-infected individuals from Malaysia and Kenya, while the other contained only uninfected individuals, from all countries including Malaysia and Kenya. Within the uninfected group was a further clade containing all individuals from Australasia and displaying very limited sequence variation. In contrast, a biparental nuclear gene phylogeny did not have infected and uninfected clades, supporting the notion that maternally-inherited Wolbachia are responsible for the mtDNA pattern. Only about 5% (15/306) of our global sample of individuals was infected with the plutWB1 isolate and even within infected local populations, many insects were uninfected. Comparisons of infected and uninfected isofemale lines revealed that plutWB1 is associated with sex ratio distortion. Uninfected lines have a 1:1 sex ratio, while infected ones show a 2:1 female bias. Conclusion The main correlate of mtDNA variation in P. xylostella is presence or absence of the plutWB1 infection. This is associated with substantial sex ratio distortion and the underlying mechanisms deserve further study. In contrast, geographic origin is a poor predictor of moth mtDNA sequences, reflecting human activity in moving the insects around the globe. The exception is a clade of Australasian individuals, which may reflect a bottleneck during

  3. Comprehensive Analysis of Pan-African Mitochondrial DNA Variation Provides New Insights into Continental Variation and Demography.

    Cerezo, María; Gusmão, Leonor; Černý, Viktor; Uddin, Nabeel; Syndercombe-Court, Denise; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Göbel, Tanja; Schneider, Peter M; Salas, Antonio

    2016-03-20

    Africa is the cradle of all human beings, and although it has been the focus of a number of genetic studies, there are many questions that remain unresolved. We have performed one of the largest and most comprehensive meta-analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages carried out in the African continent to date. We generated high-throughput mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data (230 SNPs) from 2024 Africans, where more than 500 of them were additionally genotyped for the control region. These data were analyzed together with over 12,700 control region profiles collected from the literature, representing more than 300 population samples from Africa. Insights into the African homeland of humans are discussed. Phylogeographic patterns for the African continent are shown at a high phylogeographic resolution as well as at the population and regional levels. The deepest branch of the mtDNA tree, haplogroup L0, shows the highest sub-haplogroup diversity in Southeast and East Africa, suggesting this region as the homeland for modern humans. Several demographic estimates point to the coast as a facilitator of human migration in Africa, but the data indicate complex patterns, perhaps mirroring the effect of recent continental-scaled demographic events in re-shaping African mtDNA variability. PMID:27020033

  4. Population structure of African buffalo inferred from mtDNA sequences and microsatellite loci: high variation but low differentiation

    Simonsen, Bo Thisted; Siegismund, H R; Arctander, P

    1998-01-01

    mtDNA and microsatellite data were found to be congruent, disagreeing with the alleged male-biased dispersal. We propose that the observed pattern of the distribution of genetic variation between buffalo populations at the regional level can be caused by fragmentation of a previous panmictic...

  5. Genetic variation and species identification of Thai Boesenbergia (Zingiberaceae) analyzed by chloroplast DNA polymorphism.

    Techaprasan, Jiranan; Ngamriabsakul, Chatchai; Klinbunga, Sirawut; Chusacultanachai, Sudsanguan; Jenjittikul, Thaya

    2006-07-31

    Genetic variation and molecular phylogeny of 22 taxa representing 14 extant species and 3 unidentified taxa of Boesenbergia in Thailand and four outgroup species (Cornukaempferia aurantiflora, Hedychium biflorum, Kaempferia parviflora, and Scaphochlamys rubescens) were examined by sequencing of 3 chloroplast (cp) DNA regions (matK, psbA-trnH and petA-psbJ). Low interspecific genetic divergence (0.25-1.74%) were observed in these investigated taxa. The 50% majority-rule consensus tree constructed from combined chloroplast DNA sequences allocated Boesenbergia in this study into 3 different groups. Using psbA-1F/psbA-3R primers, an insertion of 491 bp was observed in B. petiolata. Restriction analysis of the amplicon (380-410 bp) from the remaining species with Rsa I further differentiated Boesenbergia to 2 groupings; I (B. basispicata, B. longiflora, B. longipes, B. plicata, B.pulcherrima, B. tenuispicata, B. thorelii, B. xiphostachya, Boesenbergia sp.1 and Boesenbergia sp.3; phylogenetic clade A) that possesses a Rsa I restriction site and II (B.curtisii, B. regalis, B. rotunda and Boesenbergia sp.2; phylogenetic clade B and B. siamensis; phylogenetic clade C) that lacks a restriction site of Rsa I. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and indels found can be unambiguously applied to authenticate specie-origin of all investigated samples and revealed that Boesenbergia sp.1, Boesenbergia sp.2 and B. pulcherrima (Mahidol University, Kanchanaburi), B. cf. pulcherrima1 (Prachuap Khiri Khan) and B. cf. pulcherrima2 (Thong Pha Phum, Kanchanaburi) are B. plicata, B. rotunda and B. pulcherrima, respectively. In addition, molecular data also suggested that Boesenbergia sp.3 should be further differentiated from B. longiflora and regarded as a newly unidentified Boesenbergia species. PMID:16889678

  6. Variation in assessment of oxidatively damaged DNA in mononuclear blood cells by the comet assay with visual scoring

    Forchhammer, Lykke; Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik; Folkmann, Janne Kjaersgaard;

    2008-01-01

    The comet assay is popular for assessments of genotoxicity, but the comparison of results between studies is challenging because of differences in experimental procedures and reports of DNA damage in different units. We investigated the variation of DNA damage in mononuclear blood cells (MNBCs......) measured by the comet assay with focus on the variation related to alkaline unwinding and electrophoresis time, number of cells scored, as well as the putative benefits of transforming the primary end points to common units by the use of reference standards and calibration curves. Eight experienced...... conclusion, our results indicate that inter-investigator difference in scoring is a strong determinant of DNA damage levels measured by the comet assay....

  7. Assessment and reduction of comet assay variation in relation to DNA damage: studies from the European Comet Assay Validation Group

    Møller, Peter; Möller, Lennart; Godschalk, Roger W L;

    2010-01-01

    The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay has become a widely used method for the detection of DNA damage and repair in cells and tissues. Still, it has been difficult to compare results from different investigators because of differences in assay conditions and because the data...... are reported in different units. The European Comet Assay Validation Group (ECVAG) was established for the purpose of validation of the comet assay with respect to measures of DNA damage formation and its repair. The results from this inter-laboratory validation trail showed a large variation in...... substantial reliability for the measurement of DNA damage by the comet assay but there is still a need for further validation to reduce both assay and inter-laboratory variation....

  8. Comprehensive Analysis of Pan-African Mitochondrial DNA Variation Provides New Insights into Continental Variation and Demography

    Cerezo, M.; Gusmão, L.; Černý, Viktor; Uddin, N.; Syndercombe-Court, D.; Gómez-Carballa, A.; Göbel, T.; Schneider, P. M.; Salas, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 3 (2016), s. 133-143. ISSN 1673-8527 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-37998S Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : mtDNA * haplotype * haplogroup * SNP * MALDI-TOF Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 3.585, year: 2014

  9. Mendelian breeding units versus standard sampling strategies: mitochondrial DNA variation in southwest Sardinia

    Daria Sanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a sampling strategy based on Mendelian Breeding Units (MBUs, representing an interbreeding group of individuals sharing a common gene pool. The identification of MBUs is crucial for case-control experimental design in association studies. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possible existence of bias in terms of genetic variability and haplogroup frequencies in the MBU sample, due to severe sample selection. In order to reach this goal, the MBU sampling strategy was compared to a standard selection of individuals according to their surname and place of birth. We analysed mitochondrial DNA variation (first hypervariable segment and coding region in unrelated healthy subjects from two different areas of Sardinia: the area around the town of Cabras and the western Campidano area. No statistically significant differences were observed when the two sampling methods were compared, indicating that the stringent sample selection needed to establish a MBU does not alter original genetic variability and haplogroup distribution. Therefore, the MBU sampling strategy can be considered a useful tool in association studies of complex traits.

  10. Genetic variation and population differentiation of Michelia formosana (Magnoliaceae) based on cpDNA variation and RAPD fingerprints: relevance to post-Pleistocene recolonization.

    Lu, Sheng-You; Hong, Kuo-Hsiang; Liu, Show-Ling; Cheng, Yu-Pin; Wu, Wen-Luan; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh

    2002-06-01

    We used sequence variation of the atpB- rbcL intergenic spacer of cpDNA and nested clade analysis to assess the phylogeographic pattern of Michelia formosana, a species restricted to Taiwan and the Ryukyus. In total, 31 haplotypes were identified and clustered into four major chlorotypes. Genetic composition of nearly all populations was heterogeneous and paraphyletic phylogenetically. Although the apportionment of cpDNA variation hardly revealed a geographic pattern due to the coancestry of dominant sequences, some chlorotypes were restrictedly distributed. According to the patterns of clade dispersion and displacement, a reconstructed minimum spanning network revealed that historical events of past fragmentation and range expansion, associated with glaciation, may have shaped the phylogeographic patterns of M. formosana. Four possible refugia were identified: the Iriomote and Ishigaki Islands (the southern Ryukyus), Wulai (northern Taiwan), and Nanjen (southern Taiwan), on the basis of the interior positions of their haplotypes in the network and the high level of nucleotide diversity. Given insufficient time for coalescence at the cpDNA locus since the late Pleistocene recolonization, lineage sorting led to low levels of genetic differentiation among populations. In contrast, hierarchical examination of the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) data scored from six populations across three geographical regions, using an analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA), indicated high genetic differentiation both among populations (Phi(ST) = 0.471) and among regions (Phi(CT) = 0.368). An unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) tree of the RAPD fingerprints revealed that populations of two offshore islands of eastern Taiwan ( M. formosana var. kotoensis) were clustered with geographically remote populations of the Ryukyus instead of those in southern Taiwan, suggesting some historical division due to geographic barriers of the central mountain range. In

  11. Linearisation of λDNA molecules by instantaneous variation of the trapping electrode voltage inside a micro-channel

    Because long DNA molecules usually exist in random coil states due to the entropic effect, linearisation is required for devices equipped with nanopores where electrical sequencing is necessary during single-file translocation. We present a novel technique for linearising DNA molecules in a micro-channel. In our device, electrodes are embedded in the bottom surface of the channel. The application of a voltage induces the trapping of λDNA molecules on the positive electrode. An instantaneous voltage drop is used to put the λDNA molecules in a partly released state and the hydrodynamic force of the solution induces linearisation. Phenomena were directly observed using an optical microscopy system equipped with a high-speed camera and the linearisation principle was explored in detail. Furthermore, we estimate the tensile characteristics produced by the flow of the solution through a numerical model of a tethered polymer subject to a Poiseuille flow. The mean tensile force is in the range of 0.1–1 pN. This is sufficiently smaller than the structural transition point of λDNA but counterbalances the entropic elasticity that causes the random coil shape of λDNA molecules in solution. We show the important role of thermal fluctuation in the manipulation of molecules in solution and clarify the tensile conditions required for DNA linearisation using a combination of solution flow and voltage variation in a microchannel. (paper)

  12. Application of a Random Walk Model to Geographic Distributions of Animal Mitochondrial DNA Variation

    Neigel, J. E.; Avise, J C

    1993-01-01

    In rapidly evolving molecules, such as animal mitochondrial DNA, mutations that delineate specific lineages may not be dispersed at sufficient rates to attain an equilibrium between genetic drift and gene flow. Here we predict conditions that lead to nonequilibrium geographic distributions of mtDNA lineages, test the robustness of these predictions and examine mtDNA data sets for consistency with our model. Under a simple isolation by distance model, the variance of an mtDNA lineage's geograp...

  13. Study Of Genetic Variation At The Level Of DNA Between Normal And Steriled Potato Tuber Moth Males (Phthorimaea operculella, Zeller)

    The main objective of current study was to determine the genetic variation at the level of DNA between the normal and sterilized potato tuber moth males. The required mating experiments were carried out to obtain partially sterilize males at 150 Gy and their offspring. Some biological factors of these males were estimated and compared to their unirradiated siblings. To acquire good quality and quantity of DNA for the AFLP technique, several methods were undertaken to isolate DNA of potato tuber moth male from different developmental stages especially from adult stage. However, a method called Modified M5 was used. By Modified M5, which required phenol for the isolation of DNA, in some samples 8 to 12 Mg were obtained from one insect with 95-100% purity. In our study, AFLP technique was used to analyze the DNA samples of irradiated and unirradiated males from required mating. The result analysis showed that there was a clear genetic variability between examined individuals. However, the relationship between unirradiated F1 and F2 males was stronger than that between irradiated males. Thus, our result demonstrates that the AFLP could be efficiently utilized for studying genetic variation between insect species or between individuals of the same line which have biological differences induced by several factors such as irradiation. Moreover, this technique could enhance the effectiveness of sterile insect technique by using the AFLP in the monitoring system of released insects. (author)

  14. Study of genetic variation at the level of DNA between normal and sterilized potato tuber moth males (phthorimaea operculella, zeller)

    The main objective of current study was to determine the genetic variation at the level of DNA between the normal and sterilized potato tuber moth males. The required mating experiments were carried out to obtain partially sterilized males at 150 Gy and their offspring. Some biological factors of these males were estimated and compared to their unirradiated siblings. To acquire good quality and quantity of DNA for the AFLP technique, several methods were undertaken to isolate DNA of potato tuber moth male from different developmental stages especially from adult stage. However, a method called Modified M5 was used. By Modified M5, which required phenol for the isolation of DNA, in some samples 8 to 12 μg were obtained from one insect with 95-100% purity. In our study, AFLP technique was used to analyze the DNA samples of irradiated and unirradiated males from required mating. The result analysis showed that there was a clear genetic variability between examined individuals. However, the relationship between unirradiated F1 and F2 males was stronger than that between irradiated males. Thus, our result demonstrates that the AFLP could be efficiently utilized for studying genetic variation between insect species or between individuals of the same line which have biological differences induced by several factors such as irradiation. Moreover, this technique could enhance the effectiveness of sterile insect technique by using the AFLP in the monitoring system of released insects. (author)

  15. Mitochondrial DNA variation within P-type cytoplasmic male sterility of Plantago lanceolata L

    Groenendijk, C.F.M.; Sandbrink, J.M.; Van Brederode, J.; Van Damme, J.M.M.

    1997-01-01

    MtDNA restriction fragment polymorphisms were found between cytoplasmic male-sterility types P and R of Plantago lanceolata with the homologous probe pPl311 and maize mtDNA fragments derived from the regions of atp1, cox1 and cox2. No mtDNA differences were observed between male-sterile and restored

  16. Sequence-dependent Structural Variation in DNA Undergoing Intrahelical Inspection by the DNA glycosylase MutM

    Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Qi, Yan; Verdine, Gregory L. (Harvard-Med); (Harvard)

    2012-08-31

    MutM, a bacterial DNA-glycosylase, plays a critical role in maintaining genome integrity by catalyzing glycosidic bond cleavage of 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) lesions to initiate base excision DNA repair. The task faced by MutM of locating rare oxoG residues embedded in an overwhelming excess of undamaged bases is especially challenging given the close structural similarity between oxoG and its normal progenitor, guanine (G). MutM actively interrogates the DNA to detect the presence of an intrahelical, fully base-paired oxoG, whereupon the enzyme promotes extrusion of the target nucleobase from the DNA duplex and insertion into the extrahelical active site. Recent structural studies have begun to provide the first glimpse into the protein-DNA interactions that enable MutM to distinguish an intrahelical oxoG from G; however, these initial studies left open the important question of how MutM can recognize oxoG residues embedded in 16 different neighboring sequence contexts (considering only the 5'- and 3'-neighboring base pairs). In this study we set out to understand the manner and extent to which intrahelical lesion recognition varies as a function of the 5'-neighbor. Here we report a comprehensive, systematic structural analysis of the effect of the 5'-neighboring base pair on recognition of an intrahelical oxoG lesion. These structures reveal that MutM imposes the same extrusion-prone ('extrudogenic') backbone conformation on the oxoG lesion irrespective of its 5'-neighbor while leaving the rest of the DNA relatively free to adjust to the particular demands of individual sequences.

  17. Molecular DNA variation among Triturus vittatus vittatus (Urodela from different breeding sites at the southern limit of its distribution

    Oren Pearlson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular DNA variation among Triturus vittatus vittatus (striped newt from different breeding sites at the southern limit of the species distribution (where environmental conditions are most extreme was studied by the random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD method that has been found to be appropriate for other Triturus species. Altitudes of the localities ranged between 15-740 m a.s.l. Of the 20 primers employed, OPA-16 was the only one suitable for T. vittatus, revealing a different band pattern for different populations. Genetic similarity was calculated by band sharing, which demonstrated a high similarity among the Israeli populations.

  18. Genetic variation detected by use of the M13 "DNA fingerprint" probe in Malus, Prunus, and Rubus (Rosaceae).

    Nybom, H; Rogstad, S H; Schaal, B A

    1990-02-01

    Recently, "DNA fingerprints" have been reported in a wide array of organisms. We used the M13 repeat probe on several genera and species in the angiosperm family Rosaceae. Four apple cultivars could be differentiated when any one of five restriction enzymes was used to analyze minisatellite DNA. Similarly, four individual trees of Prunus serotina (black cherry) exhibited different "fingerprints" with each of four enyzmes. A total of 14 Rubus (blackberries and raspberries) plants representing four species were investigated with two enzymes. Extensive inter-and intraspecific variation was found. However, some closely growing plants had identical "fingerprints", probably due to their being derived through vegetative propagation. PMID:24226211

  19. Population and forensic genetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA control region variation from six major provinces in the Korean population.

    Hong, Seung Beom; Kim, Ki Cheol; Kim, Wook

    2015-07-01

    We generated complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 704 unrelated individuals residing in six major provinces in Korea. In addition to our earlier survey of the distribution of mtDNA haplogroup variation, a total of 560 different haplotypes characterized by 271 polymorphic sites were identified, of which 473 haplotypes were unique. The gene diversity and random match probability were 0.9989 and 0.0025, respectively. According to the pairwise comparison of the 704 control region sequences, the mean number of pairwise differences between individuals was 13.47±6.06. Based on the result of mtDNA control region sequences, pairwise FST genetic distances revealed genetic homogeneity of the Korean provinces on a peninsular level, except in samples from Jeju Island. This result indicates there may be a need to formulate a local mtDNA database for Jeju Island, to avoid bias in forensic parameter estimates caused by genetic heterogeneity of the population. Thus, the present data may help not only in personal identification but also in determining maternal lineages to provide an expanded and reliable Korean mtDNA database. These data will be available on the EMPOP database via accession number EMP00661. PMID:25900647

  20. MitoLSDB: a comprehensive resource to study genotype to phenotype correlations in human mitochondrial DNA variations.

    Shamnamole K

    Full Text Available Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA encodes a set of 37 genes which are essential structural and functional components of the electron transport chain. Variations in these genes have been implicated in a broad spectrum of diseases and are extensively reported in literature and various databases. In this study, we describe MitoLSDB, an integrated platform to catalogue disease association studies on mtDNA (http://mitolsdb.igib.res.in. The main goal of MitoLSDB is to provide a central platform for direct submissions of novel variants that can be curated by the Mitochondrial Research Community. MitoLSDB provides access to standardized and annotated data from literature and databases encompassing information from 5231 individuals, 675 populations and 27 phenotypes. This platform is developed using the Leiden Open (source Variation Database (LOVD software. MitoLSDB houses information on all 37 genes in each population amounting to 132397 variants, 5147 unique variants. For each variant its genomic location as per the Revised Cambridge Reference Sequence, codon and amino acid change for variations in protein-coding regions, frequency, disease/phenotype, population, reference and remarks are also listed. MitoLSDB curators have also reported errors documented in literature which includes 94 phantom mutations, 10 NUMTs, six documentation errors and one artefactual recombination. MitoLSDB is the largest repository of mtDNA variants systematically standardized and presented using the LOVD platform. We believe that this is a good starting resource to curate mtDNA variants and will facilitate direct submissions enhancing data coverage, annotation in context of pathogenesis and quality control by ensuring non-redundancy in reporting novel disease associated variants.

  1. Ribosomal DNA of Aphidius (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) Nees: Structure and intraspecific variations

    An investigation is being carried out on the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) molecular organization of closely related Arphidiinae species belonging to the genus Aphidius Nees, of relevant interest in biological control, with the aim of evaluating the variability within and between species. After construction of a restriction map of the most represented A. ervi rDNA cistrons, the molecular organization of the rDNA repeating units of single individuals and populations was studied in Southern blot analyses. Heterogeneity within the A. ervi rDNA cistrons and between populations of different geographical origin was identified. This approach allowed the conclusion to be reached that differences in the rDNA cistrons can be diagnostic of species and populations, therefore providing a useful tool in biological control programmes. (author). 18 refs, 4 figs

  2. On the edge of Bantu expansions: mtDNA, Y chromosome and lactase persistence genetic variation in southwestern Angola

    Beleza Sandra; Luiselli Donata; Sequeira Fernando; Coelho Margarida; Rocha Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Current information about the expansion of Bantu-speaking peoples is hampered by the scarcity of genetic data from well identified populations from southern Africa. Here, we fill an important gap in the analysis of the western edge of the Bantu migrations by studying for the first time the patterns of Y-chromosome, mtDNA and lactase persistence genetic variation in four representative groups living around the Namib Desert in southwestern Angola (Ovimbundu, Ganguela, Nyanek...

  3. Analysis of domestic dog mitochondrial DNA sequence variation for forensic investigations

    Angleby, Helen

    2005-01-01

    The first method for DNA analysis in forensics was presented in 1985. Since then, the introduction of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has rendered possible the analysis of small amounts of DNA and automated sequencing and fragment analysis techniques have facilitated the analyses. In most cases short tandemly repeated regions (STRs) of nuclear DNA are analysed in forensic investigations, but all samples cannot be successfully analysed using this method. For samples containing minute amoun...

  4. The use of high-throughput DNA sequencing in the investigation of antigenic variation: application to Neisseria species.

    John K Davies

    Full Text Available Antigenic variation occurs in a broad range of species. This process resembles gene conversion in that variant DNA is unidirectionally transferred from partial gene copies (or silent loci into an expression locus. Previous studies of antigenic variation have involved the amplification and sequencing of individual genes from hundreds of colonies. Using the pilE gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae we have demonstrated that it is possible to use PCR amplification, followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing and a novel assembly process, to detect individual antigenic variation events. The ability to detect these events was much greater than has previously been possible. In N. gonorrhoeae most silent loci contain multiple partial gene copies. Here we show that there is a bias towards using the copy at the 3' end of the silent loci (copy 1 as the donor sequence. The pilE gene of N. gonorrhoeae and some strains of Neisseria meningitidis encode class I pilin, but strains of N. meningitidis from clonal complexes 8 and 11 encode a class II pilin. We have confirmed that the class II pili of meningococcal strain FAM18 (clonal complex 11 are non-variable, and this is also true for the class II pili of strain NMB from clonal complex 8. In addition when a gene encoding class I pilin was moved into the meningococcal strain NMB background there was no evidence of antigenic variation. Finally we investigated several members of the opa gene family of N. gonorrhoeae, where it has been suggested that limited variation occurs. Variation was detected in the opaK gene that is located close to pilE, but not at the opaJ gene located elsewhere on the genome. The approach described here promises to dramatically improve studies of the extent and nature of antigenic variation systems in a variety of species.

  5. Sequence variation in three mitochondrial DNA genes among isolates of Ascaridia galli originating from Guangdong, Hunan and Yunnan provinces, China.

    Li, J Y; Liu, G H; Wang, Y; Song, H Q; Lin, R Q; Zou, F C; Liu, W; Xu, M J; Zhu, X Q

    2013-09-01

    The present study examined sequence variation in three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes, namely cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3 (cox3) and NADH dehydrogenase subunits 1 and 4 (nad1 and nad4), among Ascaridia galli isolates from different geographical localities in China. A portion of cox3 (pcox3), nad1 (pnad1) and nad4 (pnad4) genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) separately from adult A. galli individuals and the amplicons were subjected to sequencing from both directions. The length of the sequences of pcox3, pnad1 and pnad4 were 408 bp, 471 bp and 333 bp, respectively. The intraspecific sequence variations within A. galli were 0-1.7% for pcox3, 0-2.8% for pnad1 and 0-3.4% for pnad4. The A+T contents of the sequences were 67.16-67.65% (pcox3), 67.09-67.94% (pnad1) and 69.91-71.77% (pnad4). The interspecific sequence differences among members of the Ascaridida were significantly higher, being 13.2-30.9%, 12.8-29.0% and 15.1-34.1% for pcox3, pnad1 and pnad4, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses using combined sequences of pcox3, pnad1 and pnad4, with three different computational algorithms (Bayesian analysis, maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony), all revealed distinct groups with high statistical support. These findings demonstrated the existence of intraspecific variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences among A. galli isolates from different geographical regions in China, and have implications for studying molecular epidemiology and population genetics of A. galli. PMID:23046568

  6. Mitochondrial DNA Sequence and Body Size Variations in Turkish Sardine (Sardina pilchardus) Stocks

    SARMAŞIK, Aliye; ÇOLAKOĞLU, Fatma ARIK; Altun, Tülay

    2008-01-01

    Sardine (Sardina pilchardus) is one of the most important species among Turkish fisheries and is broadly distributed along its coastal waters. In the present study, mitochondrial DNA sequences from the cytochrome b (cytb) gene were examined to assess the genetic diversity of sardines inhabiting Turkish coastal waters. A fragment of sardine cytb DNA from each sample collected from 8 representative regions along the coastal zones was amplified by PCR analysis and subsequently sequenced. The res...

  7. Mitochondrial DNA variation and virologic and immunological HIV outcomes in African Americans

    Aissani, Brahim; Shrestha, Sadeep; Wiener, Howard W.; Tang, Jianming; Kaslow, Richard A.; Wilson, Craig M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups on virologic and immunological outcomes of HIV infection. Design HAART-naive African American adolescent participants to the Reaching for Excellence in Adolescent Care and Health study. Methods The mtDNA haplogroups were inferred from sequenced mtDNA hypervariable regions HV1 and HV2 and their predictive value on HIV outcomes were evaluated in linear mixed models, controlled for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27, HLA-B57 and HLA-B35-Px alleles and other covariates. Results We report data showing that the mtDNA L2 lineage, a group composed of L2a, L2b and L2e mtDNA haplogroups in the studied population, is significantly associated (beta=−0.08; Bonferroni-adjusted P=0.004) with decline of CD4+ T cells (median loss of 8 ± 1 cells per month) in HAART-naive HIV-infected individuals of African American descent (n=133). No significant association (PHIV infection, its phylogenetic divergence from J and U5a, two lineages associated with accelerated HIV progression in European Americans, raises the possibility that interactions with common nucleus-encoded variants drive HIV progression. Disentangling the effects of mitochondrial and nuclear gene variants on the outcomes of HIV infection is an important step to be taken toward a better understanding of HIV/AIDS pathogenesis and pharmacogenomics. PMID:24932613

  8. High variation and very low differentiation in wide ranging plains zebra (Equus quagga): insights from mtDNA and microsatellites

    Lorenzen, Eline D; Arctander, Peter; Siegismund, Hans R

    2008-01-01

    Patterns of genetic differentiation in the plains zebra (Equus quagga) were analysed using mitochondrial DNA control region variation and seven microsatellites. The six morphologically defined subspecies of plains zebra lacked the population genetic structure indicative of distinct evolutionary u...

  9. PRIMARILY RESULTS OF PHYTOPLANKTON DNA AND VARIATION TO ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS IN DURRES`S BAY COASTAL WATERS (ALBANIA

    Laura Gjyli

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available After isolation of phytoplankton DNA in coastal waters of Durres Bay, Albania, quantification and analysis of quality were investigated with spectrophotometric analysis. Analysis of UV absorption by the nucleotides provides a simple and accurate estimation of the concentration of nucleic acids in a sample. This method is however limited by the quantity of DNA and the purity of the preparation. Also biotic environment factors as Chlorophyll a and abiotic environment factors as temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, nitrate, phosphate were investigated to assess DNA quantities in different environment conditions. The Chlorophyll a was studied also to access the level of trophy. The sample stations were: Golem Beach (GB, Channel of Plepa (ChP, Hekurudha Beach (HB, Ex-Fuel Quay in Marine Durres Harbour (EFQ, Water Channel of Durres City (WChDC and Currila Beach (CB. Samples are taken in one meter depth from the water surface. Water samples were collected monthly from April to October 2011. The most abundant stations with phytoplankton DNA are Channel of Plepa and Water Channel of Durres City. This confirms that there are spills of fresh waters, sewage or agricultural water spills, often discharge in coastal waters. Referring Mutliple Regression Analysis and single regression analysis, the association between phytoplankton DNA and environment factors was strong (R2 = 0.75. Basing in single correlation and statistically significance (p-value ≤ 0.05, the enviroment factors that correlated to phytoplankton DNA were pH, salinity and phosphate; explaining thus the variation of total phytoplankton in Durres Bay coastal waters.

  10. Variations in the Processing of DNA Double-Strand Breaks Along 60-MeV Therapeutic Proton Beams

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Marshall, Thomas I.; Currell, Frederick J.; Kacperek, Andrzej; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the variations in induction and repair of DNA damage along the proton path, after a previous report on the increasing biological effectiveness along clinically modulated 60-MeV proton beams. Methods and Materials Human skin fibroblast (AG01522) cells were irradiated along a monoenergetic and a modulated spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) proton beam used for treating ocular melanoma at the Douglas Cyclotron, Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Wirral, Liverpool, United Kingdom. The DNA damage response was studied using the 53BP1 foci formation assay. The linear energy transfer (LET) dependence was studied by irradiating the cells at depths corresponding to entrance, proximal, middle, and distal positions of SOBP and the entrance and peak position for the pristine beam. Results A significant amount of persistent foci was observed at the distal end of the SOBP, suggesting complex residual DNA double-strand break damage induction corresponding to the highest LET values achievable by modulated proton beams. Unlike the directly irradiated, medium-sharing bystander cells did not show any significant increase in residual foci. Conclusions The DNA damage response along the proton beam path was similar to the response of X rays, confirming the low-LET quality of the proton exposure. However, at the distal end of SOBP our data indicate an increased complexity of DNA lesions and slower repair kinetics. A lack of significant induction of 53BP1 foci in the bystander cells suggests a minor role of cell signaling for DNA damage under these conditions. PMID:26452569

  11. Sources of variation in small rodent trophic niche: new insights from DNA metabarcoding and stable isotope analysis.

    Soininen, Eeva M; Ehrich, Dorothée; Lecomte, Nicolas; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Tarroux, Arnaud; Berteaux, Dominique; Gauthier, Gilles; Gielly, Ludovic; Brochmann, Christian; Gussarova, Galina; Ims, Rolf A

    2014-01-01

    Intraspecific competition for food is expected to increase the trophic niche width of consumers, defined here as their diet diversity, but this process has been little studied in herbivores. Population densities of small rodents fluctuate greatly, providing a good study model to evaluate effects of competition on trophic niche. We studied resource use in five arctic small rodent populations of four species combining DNA metabarcoding of stomach contents and stable isotope analysis (SIA). Our results suggest that for small rodents, the most pronounced effect of competition on trophic niche is due to increased use of secondary habitats and to habitat-specific diets, rather than an expansion of trophic niche in primary habitat. DNA metabarcoding and SIA provided complementary information about the composition and temporal variation of herbivore diets. Combing these two approaches requires caution, as the underlying processes causing observed patterns may differ between methodologies due to different spatiotemporal scales. PMID:24830842

  12. Evaluating the role of mitochondrial DNA variation to the genetic predisposition to radiation-induced toxicity

    Background and purpose: Mitochondrial DNA common variants have been reported to be associated with the development of radiation-induced toxicity. Using a large cohort of patients, we aimed to validate these findings by investigating the potential role of common European mitochondrial DNA SNPs (mtSNPs) to the development of radio-toxicity. Material and methods: Overall acute and late toxicity data were assessed in a cohort of 606 prostate cancer patients by means of Standardized Total Average Toxicity (STAT) score. We carried out association tests between radiation toxicity and a selection of 15 mtSNPs (and the haplogroups defined by them). Results: Statistically significant association between mtSNPs and haplogroups with toxicity could not be validated in our Spanish cohort. Conclusions: The present study suggests that the mtDNA common variants analyzed are not associated with clinically relevant increases in risk of overall radiation-induced toxicity in prostate cancer patients

  13. On the edge of Bantu expansions: mtDNA, Y chromosome and lactase persistence genetic variation in southwestern Angola

    Beleza Sandra

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current information about the expansion of Bantu-speaking peoples is hampered by the scarcity of genetic data from well identified populations from southern Africa. Here, we fill an important gap in the analysis of the western edge of the Bantu migrations by studying for the first time the patterns of Y-chromosome, mtDNA and lactase persistence genetic variation in four representative groups living around the Namib Desert in southwestern Angola (Ovimbundu, Ganguela, Nyaneka-Nkumbi and Kuvale. We assessed the differentiation between these populations and their levels of admixture with Khoe-San groups, and examined their relationship with other sub-Saharan populations. We further combined our dataset with previously published data on Y-chromosome and mtDNA variation to explore a general isolation with migration model and infer the demographic parameters underlying current genetic diversity in Bantu populations. Results Correspondence analysis, lineage sharing patterns and admixture estimates indicate that the gene pool from southwestern Angola is predominantly derived from West-Central Africa. The pastoralist Herero-speaking Kuvale people were additionally characterized by relatively high frequencies of Y-chromosome (12% and mtDNA (22% Khoe-San lineages, as well as by the presence of the -14010C lactase persistence mutation (6%, which likely originated in non-Bantu pastoralists from East Africa. Inferred demographic parameters show that both male and female populations underwent significant size growth after the split between the western and eastern branches of Bantu expansions occurring 4000 years ago. However, males had lower population sizes and migration rates than females throughout the Bantu dispersals. Conclusion Genetic variation in southwestern Angola essentially results from the encounter of an offshoot of West-Central Africa with autochthonous Khoisan-speaking peoples from the south. Interactions between the Bantus

  14. Methodological variations in the isolation of genomic DNA from Streptococcus bacteria

    Mônica Moreira; Juliana Noschang; Ivana Froede Neiva; Yanê Carvalho; llma Hiroko Higuti; Vânia Aparecida Vicente

    2010-01-01

    In this work, genomic DNA of Streptococcus pyogenes, S. mutans and S. sobrinus was isolated using two methods: either using the detergent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at 65ºC; or by applying ultrasound to a mixture of silica and celite in CTAB. The composite method that used ultrasound was the more efficient, allowing the straightforward extraction of genomic DNA from Gram-positive bacteria with good quality and reproducibility.O gênero Streptococcus encontra-se amplamente distribuíd...

  15. Variations induced to the DNA pattern of the Hump Beetle Gibium Psylloides treated with gamma rays

    This study investigated the effect of gamma rays on the DNA patterns of G. psylloides. The adult males and females were exposed to doses of 30 and 60 Gy. RAPD-PCR patterns showed alterations among the controls and the treated individuals. Exposure to gamma radiation caused very frequently the appearance of some extra bands and the disappearance of others in the RAPD-PCR amplification patterns of the irradiated insects. However, the similarity in DNA patterns between some normal and treated samples was interpreted by supposing that the radiation-induced damage was in regions of the genome other than at the loci under study

  16. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and haplogroup distribution in Chinese patients with LHON and m.14484T>C.

    Dandan Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON, MIM 535000 is one of the most common mitochondrial genetic disorders caused by three primary mtDNA mutations (m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A and m. 14484T>C. The clinical expression of LHON is affected by many additional factors, e.g. mtDNA background, nuclear genes, and environmental factors. Hitherto, there is no comprehensive study of Chinese LHON patients with m.14484T>C. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we analyzed the mtDNA sequence variations and haplogroup distribution pattern of the largest number of Chinese LHON patients with m.14484T>C to date. We first determined the complete mtDNA sequences in eleven LHON probands with m.14484T>C, to discern the potentially pathogenic mutations that co-segregate with m.14484T>C. We then dissected the matrilineal structure of 52 patients with m.14484T>C (including 14 from unrelated families and 38 sporadic cases and compared it with the reported Han Chinese from general populations. Complete mtDNA sequencing showed that the eleven matrilines belonged to nine haplogroups including Y2, C4a, M8a, M10a1a, G1a1, G2a1, G2b2, D5a2a1, and D5c. We did not identify putatively pathogenic mutation that was co-segregated with m.14484T>C in these lineages based on the evolutionary analysis. Compared with the reported Han Chinese from general populations, the LHON patients with m.14484T>C had significantly higher frequency of haplogroups C, G, M10, and Y, but a lower frequency of haplogroup F. Intriguingly, we also observed a lower prevalence of F lineages in LHON subjects with m.11778G>A in our previous study, suggesting that this haplogroup may enact similar role during the onset of LHON in the presence of m.14484T>C or m.11778G>A. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our current study provided a comprehensive profile regarding the mtDNA variation and background of Chinese patients with LHON and m.14484T>C. Matrilineal background might affect the expression of LHON

  17. Discovery and genotyping of existing and induced DNA sequence variation in potato

    Uitdewilligen, J.G.A.M.L.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis natural and induced DNA sequence diversity in potato (Solanum tuberosum) for use in marker-trait analysis and potato breeding is assessed. The study addresses the challenges of reliable, high-throughput identification and genotyping of sequence variants in existing tetraploid potato c

  18. Validation and Estimation of Additive Genetic Variation Associated with DNA Tests for Quantitative Beef Cattle Traits

    The U.S. National Beef Cattle Evaluation Consortium (NBCEC) has been involved in the validation of commercial DNA tests for quantitative beef quality traits since their first appearance on the U.S. market in the early 2000s. The NBCEC Advisory Council initially requested that the NBCEC set up a syst...

  19. Phylogeography of mitochondrial DNA variation in brown bears and polar bears

    Shields, Gerald F.; Adams, Deborah; Garner, Gerald; Labelle, Martine; Pietsch, Jacy; Ramsay, Malcolm; Schwartz, Charles; Titus, Kimberly; Williamson, Scott

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed 286 nucleotides of the middle portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of 61 brown bears from three locations in Alaska and 55 polar bears from Arctic Canada and Arctic Siberia to test our earlier observations of paraphyly between polar bears and brown bears as well as to test the extreme uniqueness of mitochondrial DNA types of brown bears on Admiralty, Baranof, and Chichagof (ABC) islands of southeastern Alaska. We also investigated the phylogeography of brown bears of Alaska's Kenai Peninsula in relation to other Alaskan brown bears because the former are being threatened by increased human development. We predicted that: (1) mtDNA paraphyly between brown bears and polar bears would be upheld, (2) the mtDNA uniqueness of brown bears of the ABC islands would be upheld, and (3) brown bears of the Kenai Peninsula would belong to either clade II or clade III of brown bears of our earlier studies of mtDNA. All of our predictions were upheld through the analysis of these additional samples.

  20. Methodological variations in the isolation of genomic DNA from Streptococcus bacteria

    Mônica Moreira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, genomic DNA of Streptococcus pyogenes, S. mutans and S. sobrinus was isolated using two methods: either using the detergent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB at 65ºC; or by applying ultrasound to a mixture of silica and celite in CTAB. The composite method that used ultrasound was the more efficient, allowing the straightforward extraction of genomic DNA from Gram-positive bacteria with good quality and reproducibility.O gênero Streptococcus encontra-se amplamente distribuído na natureza e algumas espécies constituem a microbiota humana da cavidade bucal, como Streptococcus pyogenes, que pode estar associado a importantes doenças humanas, Streptococcus mutans e Streptococcus sobrinus, relacionados à cárie dental. O DNA genômico destas três espécies foi isolado utilizando-se dois métodos, o primeiro utilizando o detergente brometo de cetiltrimetilamônio (CTAB à 65ºC e outro associando ultra-som a uma mistura de sílica e celite em CTAB. O método que possibilitou a extração do DNA genômico das bactérias Gram positivas, com qualidade, boa reprodutibilidade fácil execução foi aquele que utilizou ultra-som associado à sílica e celite em CTAB.

  1. Influence of ATM-Mediated DNA Damage Response on Genomic Variation in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Lu, Junjie; Li, Hu; Baccei, Anna; Sasaki, Takayo; Gilbert, David M; Lerou, Paul H

    2016-05-01

    Genome instability is a potential limitation to the research and therapeutic application of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Observed genomic variations reflect the combined activities of DNA damage, cellular DNA damage response (DDR), and selection pressure in culture. To understand the contribution of DDR on the distribution of copy number variations (CNVs) in iPSCs, we mapped CNVs of iPSCs with mutations in the central DDR gene ATM onto genome organization landscapes defined by genome-wide replication timing profiles. We show that following reprogramming the early and late replicating genome is differentially affected by CNVs in ATM-deficient iPSCs relative to wild-type iPSCs. Specifically, the early replicating regions had increased CNV losses during retroviral (RV) reprogramming. This differential CNV distribution was not present after later passage or after episomal reprogramming. Comparison of different reprogramming methods in the setting of defective DDR reveals unique vulnerability of early replicating open chromatin to RV vectors. PMID:26935587

  2. Maternal gestational diabetes is associated with genome-wide DNA methylation variation in placenta and cord blood of exposed offspring.

    Finer, Sarah; Mathews, Chris; Lowe, Rob; Smart, Melissa; Hillman, Sara; Foo, Lin; Sinha, Ajay; Williams, David; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Hitman, Graham A

    2015-06-01

    Exposure of a developing foetus to maternal gestational diabetes (GDM) has been shown to programme future risk of diabetes and obesity. Epigenetic variation in foetal tissue may have a mechanistic role in metabolic disease programming through interaction of the pregnancy environment with gene function. We aimed to identify genome-wide DNA methylation variation in cord blood and placenta from offspring born to mothers with and without GDM. Pregnant women of South Asian origin were studied and foetal tissues sampled at term delivery. The Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip was used to assay genome-wide DNA methylation in placenta and cord blood from 27 GDM exposed and 21 unexposed offspring. We identified 1485 cord blood and 1708 placenta methylation variable positions (MVPs) achieving genome-wide significance (adjusted P-value methylation differences of >5%. MVPs were disproportionately located within first exons. A bioinformatic co-methylation algorithm was used to detect consistent directionality of methylation in 1000 bp window around each MVP was observed at 74% of placenta and 59% of cord blood MVPs. KEGG pathway analysis showed enrichment of pathways involved in endocytosis, MAPK signalling and extracellular triggers to intracellular metabolic processes. Replication studies should integrate genomics and transcriptomics with longitudinal sampling to elucidate stability, determine causality for translation into biomarker and prevention studies. PMID:25634562

  3. Variation of karyotype and nuclear DNA content among four species of Plectranthus L’ Héritier, 1788 (Lamiaceae) from Brazil

    Nani, Thaís Furtado; Mesquita, Amanda Teixeira; Bustamante, Fernanda de Oliveira; Barbosa, Sandro; Barbosa, João Vítor Calvelli; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Plectranthus is a genus which includes species of ornamental and medicinal potential. It faces taxonomic problems due to aggregating species previously belonging to the genus Coleus, a fact that has contributed to the existence of various synonymies. The species Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus barbatus, Plectranthus grandis and Plectranthus neochilus are included in this context. Some authors consider Plectranthus barbatus and Plectranthus grandis as synonyms. The present work was carried out with the aim of comparing plants of the above-mentioned species, originating from different localities in Brazil, with regards to chromosome number and karyotypic morphology, correlated to the nuclear DNA content. There was no variation in chromosome number among plants of the same species. Plectranthus amboinicus was the only species to exhibit 2n=34, whereas the others had 2n=30. No karyotypic differences were found among the plants of each species, except for Plectranthus barbatus. The plants of the Plectranthus species revealed little coincidence between chromosome pairs. The nuclear DNA content allowed grouping Plectranthus amboinicus and Plectranthus neochilus, with the highest mean values, and Plectranthus grandis and Plectranthus barbatus with the lowest ones. Differences in DNA amount among the plants were identified only for Plectranthus barbatus. These results allow the inference that the populations of Plectranthus amboinicus and Plectranthus neochilus present coincident karyotypes among their plants, and Plectranthus grandis is probably a synonym of Plectranthus barbatus. PMID:26753074

  4. Variation of karyotype and nuclear DNA content among four species of Plectranthus L' Héritier, 1788 (Lamiaceae) from Brazil.

    Nani, Thaís Furtado; Mesquita, Amanda Teixeira; Bustamante, Fernanda de Oliveira; Barbosa, Sandro; Barbosa, João Vítor Calvelli; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2015-01-01

    Plectranthus is a genus which includes species of ornamental and medicinal potential. It faces taxonomic problems due to aggregating species previously belonging to the genus Coleus, a fact that has contributed to the existence of various synonymies. The species Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus barbatus, Plectranthus grandis and Plectranthus neochilus are included in this context. Some authors consider Plectranthus barbatus and Plectranthus grandis as synonyms. The present work was carried out with the aim of comparing plants of the above-mentioned species, originating from different localities in Brazil, with regards to chromosome number and karyotypic morphology, correlated to the nuclear DNA content. There was no variation in chromosome number among plants of the same species. Plectranthus amboinicus was the only species to exhibit 2n=34, whereas the others had 2n=30. No karyotypic differences were found among the plants of each species, except for Plectranthus barbatus. The plants of the Plectranthus species revealed little coincidence between chromosome pairs. The nuclear DNA content allowed grouping Plectranthus amboinicus and Plectranthus neochilus, with the highest mean values, and Plectranthus grandis and Plectranthus barbatus with the lowest ones. Differences in DNA amount among the plants were identified only for Plectranthus barbatus. These results allow the inference that the populations of Plectranthus amboinicus and Plectranthus neochilus present coincident karyotypes among their plants, and Plectranthus grandis is probably a synonym of Plectranthus barbatus. PMID:26753074

  5. Discovery and genotyping of existing and induced DNA sequence variation in potato

    Uitdewilligen, J.G.A.M.L.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis natural and induced DNA sequence diversity in potato (Solanum tuberosum) for use in marker-trait analysis and potato breeding is assessed. The study addresses the challenges of reliable, high-throughput identification and genotyping of sequence variants in existing tetraploid potato cultivar panels using traditional Sanger sequencing and next-generation massively parallel sequencing (MPS), and the application of this knowledge in the form of genetic markers. Furthermore, it exp...

  6. Searching for the Optimal Sampling Solution: Variation in Invertebrate Communities, Sample Condition and DNA Quality.

    Martin M Gossner

    Full Text Available There is a great demand for standardising biodiversity assessments in order to allow optimal comparison across research groups. For invertebrates, pitfall or flight-interception traps are commonly used, but sampling solution differs widely between studies, which could influence the communities collected and affect sample processing (morphological or genetic. We assessed arthropod communities with flight-interception traps using three commonly used sampling solutions across two forest types and two vertical strata. We first considered the effect of sampling solution and its interaction with forest type, vertical stratum, and position of sampling jar at the trap on sample condition and community composition. We found that samples collected in copper sulphate were more mouldy and fragmented relative to other solutions which might impair morphological identification, but condition depended on forest type, trap type and the position of the jar. Community composition, based on order-level identification, did not differ across sampling solutions and only varied with forest type and vertical stratum. Species richness and species-level community composition, however, differed greatly among sampling solutions. Renner solution was highly attractant for beetles and repellent for true bugs. Secondly, we tested whether sampling solution affects subsequent molecular analyses and found that DNA barcoding success was species-specific. Samples from copper sulphate produced the fewest successful DNA sequences for genetic identification, and since DNA yield or quality was not particularly reduced in these samples additional interactions between the solution and DNA must also be occurring. Our results show that the choice of sampling solution should be an important consideration in biodiversity studies. Due to the potential bias towards or against certain species by Ethanol-containing sampling solution we suggest ethylene glycol as a suitable sampling solution when

  7. Tracking an invasive honey bee pest: mitochondrial DNA variation in North American small hive beetles

    Jay. D. Evans,; Jeff. S. Pettis,; Michael Hood, W.; Shimanuki, Hachiro

    2003-01-01

    International audience We describe the current and past distributions of North American small hive beetles (Aethina tumida) having two distinct mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. A collection of 539 hive beetles showed irregular distributions of these haplotypes across the southeastern US. Beetles from the first collections made in coastal South Carolina showed haplotype NA1, exclusively. This haplotype is less common in Georgia and was not observed in North Carolina. Later collections from thi...

  8. Systematic Localization of Common Disease-Associated Variation in Regulatory DNA

    Maurano, Matthew T.; Humbert, Richard; Rynes, Eric; Thurman, Robert E; Haugen, Eric; Wang, Hao; Reynolds, Alex P.; Sandstrom, Richard; Qu, Hongzhu; Brody, Jennifer; Shafer, Anthony; Neri, Fidencio; Lee, Kristen; Kutyavin, Tanya; Stehling-Sun, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many noncoding variants associated with common diseases and traits. We show that these variants are concentrated in regulatory DNA marked by DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs). 88% of such DHSs are active during fetal development, and are enriched for gestational exposure-related phenotypes. We identify distant gene targets for hundreds of DHSs that may explain phenotype associations. Disease-associated variants systematically perturb tr...

  9. Contrasting cpDNA Variation in Two Indonesian Endemic Lowland Dipterocarp Species and Implications for their Conservation

    Koichi Kamiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shorea javanica (Dipterocarpaceae is an economically important dammar-producing tree, endemic to the tropical lowland forests of Sumatra and Java, Indonesia. However, its total population size is limited and this species is endangered. Shorea selanica is one of the very limited numbers of species in genus Shorea (Dipterocarpaceae that grows in Wallacean. This species can be found only in the central part of the Moluccas, eastern Indonesia. Six populations (77 individuals in total were sampled for S. javanica while three populations (27 individuals in total were sampled for S. selanica. To determine genetic variation and population structure, three non-coding chloroplast DNA regions of trnL-trnF, psbC-trnS, trnS-trnfM and two non-coding chloroplast DNA regions of trnT-trnL, trnL-trnF were sequenced from S. javanica and S. selanica, respectively. There was no variation in the chloroplast DNA regions from S. javanica, except for one unique indel polymorphism. Nucleotide diversity within S. selanica populations ranged from 0 (Seram to 0.00044 (Buru, with a pooled value of 0.00041. S. javanica was determined as having no population structure while high levels of genetic differentiation was found among populations of S. selanica (FST = 0.702. Different pattern of population structure among the two species in this study suggested the need for distinct management and conservation strategies for each species. For S. javanica, connectivity within and among populations, including augmentation of population size across the species range, should be promoted. For S. selanica, an in situ conservation plan that defines core areas completely free from perturbation within each population is necessary.

  10. Analysis of DNA methylation variation in wheat genetic background after alien chromatin introduction based on methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism

    2008-01-01

    During the process of alien germplasm introduced into wheat genome by chromosome engineering,extensive genetic variations of genome structure and gene expression in recipient could be induced.In this study,we performed GISH(genome in situ hybridization)and AFLP(amplified fragment length polymorphism) on wheat-rye chromosome transIocation lines and their parents to detect the identity in genomic structure of different translocation lines.The results showed that the genome primary structure variations were not obviously detected in different translocation lines except the same 1RS chromosome translocation.Methylation sensitive amplification polymorphism(MSAP)analyses on genomic DNA showed that the ratios of fully-methylated sites were significantly increased in translocation lines(CN12,20.15%;CN17,20.91%;CN18,22.42%),but the ratios of hemimethylated sites were significantly lowered(CN12,21.41%;CN17,23.43%;CN18,22.42%),whereas 16.37%were fully-methylated and 25.44%were hemimethylated in case of their wheat parent.Twenty-nine classes of methylation patterns were identified in a comparative assay of cytosine methylation patterns between wheat-rye translocation lines and their wheat parent,including 13 hypermethylation patterns(33.74%),9 demethylation patterns(22.76%)and 7 uncertain patterns(4.07%).In further sequence analysis,the alterations of methylation pattern affected both repetitive DNA sequences,such as retrotransposons and tandem repetitive sequences,and low-copy DNA.

  11. A pedigree-based study of mitochondrial D-loop DNA sequence variation among Arabian horses.

    Bowling, A T; Del Valle, A; Bowling, M

    2000-02-01

    Through DNA sequence comparisons of a mitochondrial D-loop hypervariable region, we investigated matrilineal diversity for Arabian horses in the United States. Sixty-two horses were tested. From published pedigrees they traced in the maternal line to 34 mares acquired primarily in the mid to late 19th century from nomadic Bedouin tribes. Compared with the reference sequence (GenBank X79547), these samples showed 27 haplotypes with altogether 31 base substitution sites within 397 bp of sequence. Based on examination of pedigrees from a random sampling of 200 horses in current studbooks of the Arabian Horse Registry of America, we estimated that this study defined the expected mtDNA haplotypes for at least 89% of Arabian horses registered in the US. The reliability of the studbook recorded maternal lineages of Arabian pedigrees was demonstrated by haplotype concordance among multiple samplings in 14 lines. Single base differences observed within two maternal lines were interpreted as representing alternative fixations of past heteroplasmy. The study also demonstrated the utility of mtDNA sequence studies to resolve historical maternity questions without access to biological material from the horses whose relationship was in question, provided that representatives of the relevant female lines were available for comparison. The data call into question the traditional assumption that Arabian horses of the same strain necessarily share a common maternal ancestry. PMID:10690354

  12. Chloroplast DNA Variations in Wild Brassicas and Their Implication in Breeding and Population Genetics Studies

    Sarin, Bharti; Martín, Juan Pedro; Kaula, Babeeta Chrungu; Mohanty, Aparajita

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) diversity in wild relatives of crop brassicas is important for characterization of cytoplasm and also for population genetics/phylogeographic analyses. The former is useful for breeding programs involving wide hybridization and synthesis of alloplasmic lines, while the latter is important for formulating conservation strategies. Therefore, PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) technique was applied to study cpDNA diversity in 14 wild brassicas (including 31 accessions) which revealed a total of 219 polymorphic fragments. The combination of polymorphisms obtained by using only two primer pair-restriction enzyme combinations was sufficient to distinguish all 14 wild brassicas. Moreover, 11 primer pairs-restriction enzyme combinations revealed intraspecific polymorphisms in eight wild brassicas (including endemic and endangered species, B. cretica and B. insularis, resp.). Thus, even within a small number of accessions that were screened, intraspecific polymorphisms were observed, which is important for population genetics analyses in wild brassicas and consequently for conservation studies. PMID:26347851

  13. Intraspecific DNA variation in nuclear genes of the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    Morlais, I; Severson, D W

    2003-12-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are an abundant source of genetic variation among individual organisms. To assess the usefulness of SNPs for genome analysis in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, we sequenced 25 nuclear genes in each of three strains and analysed nucleotide diversity. The average frequency of nucleotide variation was 12 SNPs per kilobase, indicating that nucleotide variation in Ae. aegypti is similar to that in other organisms, including Drosophila and the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Transition polymorphisms outnumbered transversion polymorphisms, at a ratio of about 2:1. We examined codon usage and confirmed that mutational bias favours G and C ending codons. Codon bias was most pronounced in highly expressed genes. Nucleotide diversity estimates indicated that substitution rates are positively correlated in coding and non-coding regions. Nucleotide diversity varied from one gene to another. The unequal distribution of SNPs among Ae. aegypti nuclear genes suggests that single base variations are non-neutral and are subject to selective constraints. Our analysis showed that ubiquitously expressed genes have lower polymorphism rates and are likely under strong purifying selection, whereas tissue specific genes and genes with a putative role in parasite defence exhibit higher levels of polymorphism that may be associated with diversifying selection. PMID:14986924

  14. [Nucleotide variation in the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase 1 gene in the Siberian sucker (Catostomus catostomus rostratus) from Kolyma River].

    Bachevskaja, L T; Pereverzeva, V V; Ivanova, G D; Agapova, G A

    2014-10-01

    This study presents the data of the first molecular genetic analysis of the Siberian sucker from Kolyma River. Polymorphism of the mtDNA cytochrome oxidase 1 gene was established. Comparative sequence analysis of the gene examined and the GenBank variants characterizing suckers from the rivers of Canada enabled the suggestion that the sucker penetrated to Asia from North America approximately at the end of Early and the beginning of the Middle Pleistocene. It was demonstrated that intrapopulation genetic variation in the Siberian sucker accounted for 11.63% of total variation, while the proportion of the intergroup, component (Fst) constituted 88.37%. It seems likely that a considerable proportion of intergroup variation was caused by the long period of isolation of the Siberian sucker in Kolyma River. The prevalence of one common haplotype, CH-COI 1, in the sample examined indicates that the founder effect played an importaht role in the history of the formation of the Kolyma population. PMID:25720253

  15. Analysis of genetic variation within clonal lineages of grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch) using AFLP fingerprinting and DNA sequencing.

    Vorwerk, S; Forneck, A

    2007-07-01

    Two AFLP fingerprinting methods were employed to estimate the potential of AFLP fingerprints for the detection of genetic diversity within single founder lineages of grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch). Eight clonal lineages, reared under controlled conditions in a greenhouse and reproducing asexually throughout a minimum of 15 generations, were monitored and mutations were scored as polymorphisms between the founder individual and individuals of succeeding generations. Genetic variation was detected within all lineages, from early generations on. Six to 15 polymorphic loci (from a total of 141 loci) were detected within the lineages, making up 4.3% of the total amount of genetic variation. The presence of contaminating extra-genomic sequences (e.g., viral material, bacteria, or ingested chloroplast DNA) was excluded as a source of intraclonal variation. Sequencing of 37 selected polymorphic bands confirmed their origin in mostly noncoding regions of the grape phylloxera genome. AFLP techniques were revealed to be powerful for the identification of reproducible banding patterns within clonal lineages. PMID:17893744

  16. Pleistocene-Holocene boundary in Southern Arabia from the perspective of human mtDNA variation.

    Al-Abri, Abdulrahim; Podgorná, Eliška; Rose, Jeffrey I; Pereira, Luísa; Mulligan, Connie J; Silva, Nuno M; Bayoumi, Riad; Soares, Pedro; Cerný, Viktor

    2012-10-01

    It is now known that several population movements have taken place at different times throughout southern Arabian prehistory. One of the principal questions under debate is if the Early Holocene peopling of southern Arabia was mainly due to input from the Levant during the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B, to the expansion of an autochthonous population, or some combination of these demographic processes. Since previous genetic studies have not been able to include all parts of southern Arabia, we have helped fill this lacuna by collecting new population datasets from Oman (Dhofar) and Yemen (Al-Mahra and Bab el-Mandab). We identified several new haplotypes belonging to haplogroup R2 and generated its whole genome mtDNA tree with age estimates undertaken by different methods. R2, together with other considerably frequent southern Arabian mtDNA haplogroups (R0a, HV1, summing up more than 20% of the South Arabian gene pool) were used to infer the past effective population size through Bayesian skyline plots. These data indicate that the southern Arabian population underwent a large expansion already some 12 ka. A founder analysis of these haplogroups shows that this expansion is largely attributed to demographic input from the Near East. These results support thus the spread of a population coming from the north, but at a significantly earlier date than presently considered by archaeologists. Our data suggest that some of the mtDNA lineages found in southern Arabia have persisted in the region since the end of the Last Ice Age. PMID:22927010

  17. Organization and variation of mitochondrial DNA control region in pleurodiran turtles

    Ling Wang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Three complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA control regions (CRs of Chelodina rugosa (Ogilby, 1890, Chelus fimbriata (Schneider, 1783, and Podocnemis unifilis (Troschel, 1848 were firstly determined using Long-PCR method and the length were 1,016 bp, 1,149 bp, and 985bp, respectively. Together with CRs of Pelomedusa subrufa (Bonnaterre, 1789 and nearly complete CR of Podocnemis expansa (Schweigger, 1812 obtained from GenBank, the structural and evolutionary characteristics of mtDNA CRs in pleurodiran turtle were analyzed in this study. We identified three functional domains (TAS, CD, and CSB domains as well as their conservation sequences (TAS, CSB-F, and CSB-1 according to their homology to those of other turtles. Within the TAS domain, an interrupted poly-C stretch was found in C. rugosa, C. fimbriata, and P. subrufa, which also exists in the published mt DNA CRs of Chrysemys picta (Schneider, 1783, Trachemys scripta (Thunberg in Schoepff, 1792, and Trionyx triunguis (Forskål, 1775. The analysis of the origin for the poly-C sequences in TAS domain from six turtles suggested that the poly-C sequences are more related to "goose hairpin" in birds rather than CSB2 in CSB domain. In the CSB domain, CSB2 and CSB3, which were determined in CRs of Cryptodira, were absent in Pleurodira CRs, indicating the regulative mechanisms of transcription may be varied in both two suborders and the lack of CSB2 and CSB3 could be proposed as one of diagnostic characters between Pleurodira and Cryptodira at molecular level. As for CR of other cryptodiran turtles, variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs in the 3' end of the CRs was found in the five pleurodiran turtles. Interestingly, the long repeated motifs from each species could form stable stem-loop secondary structures, suggesting that the repeated sequences may play an important role in regulating replication of the mitochondrial genome in Pleurodiran, and the secondary structures of VNTRs may provide some

  18. A framework for variation discovery and genotyping using next-generation DNA sequencing data.

    DePristo, Mark A; Banks, Eric; Poplin, Ryan; Garimella, Kiran V; Maguire, Jared R; Hartl, Christopher; Philippakis, Anthony A; del Angel, Guillermo; Rivas, Manuel A; Hanna, Matt; McKenna, Aaron; Fennell, Tim J; Kernytsky, Andrew M; Sivachenko, Andrey Y; Cibulskis, Kristian; Gabriel, Stacey B; Altshuler, David; Daly, Mark J

    2011-05-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technology make it possible to comprehensively catalog genetic variation in population samples, creating a foundation for understanding human disease, ancestry and evolution. The amounts of raw data produced are prodigious, and many computational steps are required to translate this output into high-quality variant calls. We present a unified analytic framework to discover and genotype variation among multiple samples simultaneously that achieves sensitive and specific results across five sequencing technologies and three distinct, canonical experimental designs. Our process includes (i) initial read mapping; (ii) local realignment around indels; (iii) base quality score recalibration; (iv) SNP discovery and genotyping to find all potential variants; and (v) machine learning to separate true segregating variation from machine artifacts common to next-generation sequencing technologies. We here discuss the application of these tools, instantiated in the Genome Analysis Toolkit, to deep whole-genome, whole-exome capture and multi-sample low-pass (∼4×) 1000 Genomes Project datasets. PMID:21478889

  19. DNA variation of the mammalian major histocompatibility complex reflects genomic diversity and population history

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a multigene complex of tightly linked homologous genes that encode cell surface antigens that play a key role in immune regulation and response to foreign antigens. In most species, MHC gene products display extreme antigenic polymorphism, and their variability has been interpreted to reflect an adaptive strategy for accommodating rapidly evolving infectious agents that periodically afflict natural populations. Determination of the extent of MHC variation has been limited to populations in which skin grafting is feasible or for which serological reagents have been developed. The authors present here a quantitative analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of MHC class I genes in several mammalian species (cats, rodents, humans) known to have very different levels of genetic diversity based on functional MHC assays and on allozyme surveys. When homologous class I probes were employed, a notable concordance was observed between the extent of MHC restriction fragment variation and functional MHC variation detected by skin grafts or genome-wide diversity estimated by allozyme screens. These results confirm the genetically depauperate character of the African cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, and the Asiatic lion, Panthera leo persica; further, they support the use of class I MHC molecular reagents in estimating the extent and character of genetic diversity in natural populations

  20. Variation induced by DNA rearrangement in a transgenic Bt+CpTI cotton strain

    2001-01-01

    In the development of transgenic Bt + CpTI cotton cultivars, one male and female sterile mutant has been found in a homozygous T4 strain in our laboratory. The mutant plant, as well as its leaves, buds and flowers, is only 1/2-1/3 as large as that of the wild transgenic Bt + CpTI bivalant cotton plants. Cytological observation found that the chromosome number of the mutant is 2n = 52; however, there are 4 - 8 univalents observed in meiosis Ⅰ of pollen mother cells. Laboratory bioassay indicated that the mutant was highly resistant to bollworm as the wild plants. PCR amplification revealed that Bt and CpTI genes in the mutant were still intactly inserted. However, small deletion of flanked area had been observed in the mutant by Southern blotting analysis. So it is proposed that the mutant phenotype might result from either the DNA deletion or T-DNA trans-ferring in plant genome. No such report has been presented that the rearrangement of chromosome structure in a homo-zygous transgenic line occurred. Further analysis is ongoing.

  1. A Bayesian Analysis for Identifying DNA Copy Number Variations Using a Compound Poisson Process

    Yiğiter Ayten

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To study chromosomal aberrations that may lead to cancer formation or genetic diseases, the array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH technique is often used for detecting DNA copy number variants (CNVs. Various methods have been developed for gaining CNVs information based on aCGH data. However, most of these methods make use of the log-intensity ratios in aCGH data without taking advantage of other information such as the DNA probe (e.g., biomarker positions/distances contained in the data. Motivated by the specific features of aCGH data, we developed a novel method that takes into account the estimation of a change point or locus of the CNV in aCGH data with its associated biomarker position on the chromosome using a compound Poisson process. We used a Bayesian approach to derive the posterior probability for the estimation of the CNV locus. To detect loci of multiple CNVs in the data, a sliding window process combined with our derived Bayesian posterior probability was proposed. To evaluate the performance of the method in the estimation of the CNV locus, we first performed simulation studies. Finally, we applied our approach to real data from aCGH experiments, demonstrating its applicability.

  2. Distribution and functional impact of DNA copy number variation in the rat

    Guryev, V.; Saar, K.; Adamovic, T.; Verheul, M.; Van Heesch, S.A.A.C.; Cook, S.; Pravenec, Michal; Aitman, T.; Jacob, H.; Shull, J.D.; Hubner, N.; Cuppen, E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 5 (2008), s. 538-545. ISSN 1061-4036 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05ME791; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Grant ostatní: HHMI(US) 55005624; -(XE) LSHG-CT-2005-019015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Source of funding: N - neverejné zdroje ; R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : copy number variation * rat * recombinant inbred strains Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 30.259, year: 2008

  3. From DNA to RNA to disease and back: The 'central dogma' of regulatory disease variation

    Stranger Barbara E

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Much of the focus of human disease genetics is directed towards identifying nucleotide variants that contribute to disease phenotypes. This is a complex problem, often involving contributions from multiple loci and their interactions, as well as effects due to environmental factors. Although some diseases with a genetic basis are caused by nucleotide changes that alter an amino acid sequence, in other cases, disease risk is associated with altered gene regulation. This paper focuses on how studies of gene expression variation might complement disease studies and provide crucial links between genotype and phenotype.

  4. Extensive length variation in the ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer of yellow perch (Perca flavescens).

    Kakou, Bidénam; Angers, Bernard; Glémet, Hélène

    2016-03-01

    The intergenic spacer (IGS) is located between ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene copies. Within the IGS, regulatory elements for rRNA gene transcription are found, as well as a varying number of other repetitive elements that are at the root of IGS length heterogeneity. This heterogeneity has been shown to have a functional significance through its effect on growth rate. Here, we present the structural organization of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) IGS based on its entire sequence, as well as the IGS length variation within a natural population. Yellow perch IGS structure has four discrete regions containing tandem repeat elements. For three of these regions, no specific length class was detected as allele size was seemingly normally distributed. However, for one repeat region, PCR amplification uncovered the presence of two distinctive IGS variants representing a length difference of 1116 bp. This repeat region was also devoid of any CpG sites despite a high GC content. Balanced selection may be holding the alleles in the population and would account for the high diversity of length variants observed for adjacent regions. Our study is an important precursor for further work aiming to assess the role of IGS length variation in influencing growth rate in fish. PMID:26841134

  5. Molecular DNA variation among Triturus vittatus vittatus (Urodela) from different breeding sites at the southern limit of its distribution

    Oren Pearlson; Gad Degani

    2007-01-01

    Molecular DNA variation among Triturus vittatus vittatus (striped newt) from different breeding sites at the southern limit of the species distribution (where environmental conditions are most extreme) was studied by the random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method that has been found to be appropriate for other Triturus species. Altitudes of the localities ranged between 15-740 m a.s.l. Of the 20 primers employed, OPA-16 was the only one suitable for T. vittatus, revealing a differe...

  6. mtDNA variation of aboriginal Siberians reveals distinct genetic affinities with Native Americans

    Torroni, A.; Schurr, T.G.; Cabell, M.F.; Wallace, D.C. (Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)); Sukernik, R.I.; Starikovskaya, Y.B. (Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)); Crawford, M.H.; Comuzzie, A.G. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States))

    1993-09-01

    The mtDNA variation of 411 individuals from 10 aboriginal Siberian populations was analyzed in an effort to delineate the relationships between Siberian and Native American populations. All mtDNAs were characterized by PCR amplification and restriction analysis, and a subset of them was characterized by control region sequencing. The resulting data were then compiled with previous mtDNA data from Native Americans and Asians and were used for phylogenetic analysis and sequence divergence estimations. Aboriginal Siberian populations exhibited mtDNAs from three (A, C, and D) of the four haplogroups observed in Native Americans. However, none of the Siberian populations showed mtDNAs from the fourth haplogroup, group B. The presence of group B deletion haplotypes in East Asian and Native American populations but their absence in Siberians raises the possibility that haplogroup B could represent a migratory event distinct from the one(s) which brought group A, C, and D mtDNAs to the Americas. These findings support the hypothesis that the first humans to move from Siberia to the Americas carried with them a limited number of founding mtDNAs and that the initial migration occurred between 17,000-34,000 years before present. 61 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Chloroplast DNA variation and phylogeography of Ligularia tongolensis (Asteraceae), a species endemic to the Hengduan Mountains region of China

    Jin-Feng WANG; Yue-Zhi PAN; Xun GONG; Yu-Chung CHIANG; Chiaki KURODA

    2011-01-01

    In this research, we aimed to study the genetic variation and phylogeographic pattern of Ligularia tongolensis, a perennial herb endemic to the Hengduan Mountains region of China. We sequenced two chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) intergenic spacers (trnQ-5'rps 16, trnL-rpl32) in 140 individuals from 14 populations of three groups (Jinshajiang vs. Yalongjiang vs. Wumeng) within this species range. High levels of haplotype diversity (Hd= 0.814)and total genetic diversity (Ht = 0.862) were detected at the species level, based on a total of 12 haplotypes identified.Low levels of intrapopulation diversity (Hs = 0.349), high levels of genetic divergence (Gst = 0.595, Nst = 0.614,Fst = 0.597), and the absence of isolation by distance tests were also found in L. tongolensis. Furthermore, H2 and H5, the dominant haplotypes that located at internal nodes and deviated from extinct ancestral haplotype in the network, were found to be shared between Jinshajiang and Yalongjiang groups. These results indicate that past fragmentation may be the important factor responsible for the present phylogeographical pattern of L. tongolensis.Meanwhile, the locations occupied by each group might have served as independent refugia for L. tongolensis during the Quaternary glaciation. Unimodal mismatch distribution and star-like genealogies indicated this species underwent past demographic expansion events, with expansion ages of 274 ka BP.

  8. Gene copy number variations in the leukocyte genome of hepatocellular carcinoma patients with integrated hepatitis B virus DNA

    Xu, Guixia; Cheng, Kai; Cao, Guangwen; Wu, Mengchao; Cheng, Shuqun; Liu, Shanrong

    2016-01-01

    Integration of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA into the human liver cell genome is believed to promote HBV-related carcinogenesis. This study aimed to quantify the integration of HBV DNA into the leukocyte genome in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients in order to identify potential biomarkers for HBV-related diseases. Whole-genome comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) chip array analyses were performed to screen gene copy number variations (CNV) in the leukocyte genome, and the results were confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The commonly detected regions included chromosome arms 19p, 5q, 1q and 15p, where 200 copy number gain events and 270 copy number loss events were noted. In particular, gains were observed in 5q35.3 (OR4F3) and 19p13.3 (OR4F17) in 90% of the samples. Successful homologous recombination of OR4F3 and the HBV P gene was demonstrated, and the amplification at 5q35.3 is potentially associated with the integration of HBV P gene into natural killer cells isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that the combination of OR4F3 and OR4F17 a novel potential biomarker of HBV-related diseases. PMID:26769853

  9. Sequence variations of in vitro pUC18 plasmid DNA induced by high energy 7Li ion beams implantation

    High energy heavy ion beams is a new mutagen for crop mutation breeding, but limited data are available on the molecular level induced by this mutagen. The in vitro pUC18 plasmid DNA was implanted by 7Li ion beams by doses of 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100Gy, respectively, with the energy of 42.3Mev. The results showed that the damage effects induced by 7Li ion beams implantation was different from low LET rays, even low doses of 7Li ion beam could induce high damage on hydrogen bonds. Percentage of damages on hydrogen bonds of in vitro DNA induced by 7Li ion beams implantation increased with dosage increase up to 40Gy, then reduced with dosage increase, and higher than those of gamma rays in the same dosage. The relationship of dosage and damage percentage was different from that of gamma rays which was positive-linear correlation. Mutation frequency of 7Li ion beam implantation was 1.6 to 4.3 times to that of spontaneous mutation. The relationship of mutation frequency and dosage was similar with that of damage effects on hydrogen bonds, and showed a peak at 40Gy. The above results were identical with biological effects of wheat implanted by 7Li ion beams. Ten mutants were used for sequence analysis, which indicated that the types of base changes included base transversion, transition and deletion. Among all base changes detected, the frequency of bases transition (60%) was higher than that of bases transversion (30%) and bases deletion (10%). It seemed that thymine was more sensitive to the implantation than any other bases and base changes were mainly T→C and C→T. Bases between T and C were seemed to be easily induced by 7Li ion beams. The high percentage of DNA sequence variations could explain primarily the biological effects caused by 7Li ion beams in the M1 generation of crops. (author)

  10. Variation of DNA Fragmentation Levels During Density Gradient Sperm Selection for Assisted Reproduction Techniques

    Muratori, Monica; Tarozzi, Nicoletta; Cambi, Marta; Boni, Luca; Iorio, Anna Lisa; Passaro, Claudia; Luppino, Benedetta; Nadalini, Marco; Marchiani, Sara; Tamburrino, Lara; Forti, Gianni; Maggi, Mario; Baldi, Elisabetta; Borini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Predicting the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is one main goal of the present research on assisted reproduction. To understand whether density gradient centrifugation (DGC), used to select sperm, can affect sperm DNA integrity and impact pregnancy rate (PR), we prospectively evaluated sperm DNA fragmentation (sDF) by TUNEL/PI, before and after DGC. sDF was studied in a cohort of 90 infertile couples the same day of IVF/ICSI treatment. After DGC, sDF increased in 41 samples (Group A, median sDF value: 29.25% [interquartile range, IQR: 16.01–41.63] in pre- and 60.40% [IQR: 32.92–93.53] in post-DGC) and decreased in 49 (Group B, median sDF value: 18.84% [IQR: 13.70–35.47] in pre- and 8.98% [IQR: 6.24–15.58] in post-DGC). PR was 17.1% and 34.4% in Group A and B, respectively (odds ratio [OR]: 2.58, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95–7.04, P = 0.056). After adjustment for female factor, female and male age and female BMI, the estimated OR increased to 3.12 (95% CI: 1.05–9.27, P = 0.041). According to the subgroup analysis for presence/absence of female factor, heterogeneity in the association between the Group A and B and PR emerged (OR: 4.22, 95% CI: 1.16–15.30 and OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 0.23–10.40, respectively, for couples without, n = 59, and with, n = 31, female factor). This study provides the first evidence that the DGC procedure produces an increase in sDF in about half of the subjects undergoing IVF/ICSI, who then show a much lower probability of pregnancy, raising concerns about the safety of this selection procedure. Evaluation of sDF before and after DGC configures as a possible new prognostic parameter of pregnancy outcome in IVF/ICSI. Alternative sperm selection strategies are recommended for those subjects who undergo the damage after DGC. PMID:27196465

  11. Variation and association to diabetes in 2000 full mtDNA sequences mined from an exome study in a Danish population

    Li, Shengting; Besenbacher, Soren; Li, Yingrui;

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we mine full mtDNA sequences from an exome capture data set of 2000 Danes, showing that it is possible to get high-quality full-genome sequences of the mitochondrion from this resource. The sample includes 1000 individuals with type 2 diabetes and 1000 controls. We characterise the...... variation found in the mtDNA sequence in Danes and relate the variation to diabetes risk as well as to several blood phenotypes of the controls but find no significant associations. We report 2025 polymorphisms, of which 393 have not been reported previously. These 393 mutations are both very rare and...

  12. Investigating the potential role of genetic and epigenetic variation of DNA methyltransferase genes in hyperplastic polyposis syndrome.

    Musa Drini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperplastic Polyposis Syndrome (HPS is a condition associated with multiple serrated polyps, and an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC. At least half of CRCs arising in HPS show a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP, potentially linked to aberrant DNA methyltransferase (DNMT activity. CIMP is associated with methylation of tumor suppressor genes including regulators of DNA mismatch repair (such as MLH1, MGMT, and negative regulators of Wnt signaling (such as WIF1. In this study, we investigated the potential for interaction of genetic and epigenetic variation in DNMT genes, in the aetiology of HPS. METHODS: We utilized high resolution melting (HRM analysis to screen 45 cases with HPS for novel sequence variants in DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and DNMT3L. 21 polyps from 13 patients were screened for BRAF and KRAS mutations, with assessment of promoter methylation in the DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, DNMT3L MLH1, MGMT, and WIF1 gene promoters. RESULTS: No pathologic germline mutations were observed in any DNA-methyltransferase gene. However, the T allele of rs62106244 (intron 10 of DNMT1 gene was over-represented in cases with HPS (p<0.01 compared with population controls. The DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B promoters were unmethylated in all instances. Interestingly, the DNMT3L promoter showed low levels of methylation in polyps and normal colonic mucosa relative to matched disease free cells with methylation level negatively correlated to expression level in normal colonic tissue. DNMT3L promoter hypomethylation was more often found in polyps harbouring KRAS mutations (p = 0.0053. BRAF mutations were common (11 out of 21 polyps, whilst KRAS mutations were identified in 4 of 21 polyps. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic or epigenetic alterations in DNMT genes do not appear to be associated with HPS, but further investigation of genetic variation at rs62106244 is justified given the high frequency of the minor allele in this case series.

  13. Haplogroup Classification of Korean Cattle Breeds Based on Sequence Variations of mtDNA Control Region.

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Seong-Su; Kim, Seung Chang; Choi, Seong-Bok; Kim, Su-Hyun; Lee, Chang Woo; Jung, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Eun Sung; Choi, Young-Sun; Kim, Sung-Bok; Kim, Woo Hyun; Cho, Chang-Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Many studies have reported the frequency and distribution of haplogroups among various cattle breeds for verification of their origins and genetic diversity. In this study, 318 complete sequences of the mtDNA control region from four Korean cattle breeds were used for haplogroup classification. 71 polymorphic sites and 66 haplotypes were found in these sequences. Consistent with the genetic patterns in previous reports, four haplogroups (T1, T2, T3, and T4) were identified in Korean cattle breeds. In addition, T1a, T3a, and T3b sub-haplogroups were classified. In the phylogenetic tree, each haplogroup formed an independent cluster. The frequencies of T3, T4, T1 (containing T1a), and T2 were 66%, 16%, 10%, and 8%, respectively. Especially, the T1 haplogroup contained only one haplotype and a sample. All four haplogroups were found in Chikso, Jeju black and Hanwoo. However, only the T3 and T4 haplogroups appeared in Heugu, and most Chikso populations showed a partial of four haplogroups. These results will be useful for stable conservation and efficient management of Korean cattle breeds. PMID:26954229

  14. Genetic relationship of Chinese and Japanese gamecocks revealed by mtDNA sequence variation.

    Liu, Yi-Ping; Zhu, Qing; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2006-02-01

    Cockfighting has a very long history dating back to as early as 2500 years ago in China. Cockfighting was intertwined with human cultural traditions, helped disperse chickens across the world, and influenced the subsequent breed selection. Therefore, tracing the origin of gamecocks could mirror the distribution of the cockfighting culture. In this study, we compared the available mtDNA control region sequences in Chinese and Japanese gamecocks to test the recently proposed hypothesis behind the dual origin of the Japanese cockfighting culture (from China and Southeast Asia independently). We assigned gamecock mtDNAs to different matrilineal components (or phylogenetic clades) that emerged from the phylogenetic tree and network profile, and compared the frequency differences between Chinese and Japanese gamecocks. Among the six clades (A-F) identified, Japanese gamecocks were most frequently found in clades C and D (74%, 32/43), whereas more than half of the Chinese gamecock samples (69%, 35/51) were grouped in clades A and B. Haplotypes in Japanese gamecocks assigned to clades A, B, and E were either shared with those of the Chinese samples or differed from the close Chinese types by no more than a three-mutation distance. This genetic pattern is in accordance with the proposed dual origin of Japanese gamecocks but has left room for single origin of Japanese gamecocks from China. The genetic structure of gamecocks in China and Japan might also be influenced by subsequent breed selection and conservation after the initial gamecock introduction. PMID:16648993

  15. Sequence variation of Bemisia tabaci Chemosensory Protein 2 in cryptic species B and Q: New DNA markers for whitefly recognition.

    Liu, Guo-Xia; Ma, Hong-Mei; Xie, Hong-Yan; Xuan, Ning; Picimbon, Jean-François

    2016-01-15

    Bemisia tabaci Gennadius biotypes B and Q are two of the most important worldwide agricultural insect pests. Genomic sequences of Type-2 B. tabaci chemosensory protein (BtabCSP2) were cloned and sequenced in B and Q biotypes, revealing key biotype-specific variations in the intron sequence. A Q260 sequence was found specifically in Q-BtabCSP2 and Cucumis melo LN692399, suggesting ancestral horizontal transfer of gene between the insect and the plant through bacteria. A cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS) method was then developed to differentiate B and Q based on the sequence variation in exon of BtabCSP2 gene. The performances of CSP2-based CAPS for whitefly recognition were assessed using B. tabaci field collections from Shandong Province (P.R. China). Our SacII based CAPS method led to the same result compared to mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase-based CAPS method in the field collections. We therefore propose an explanation for CSP origin and a new rapid simple molecular method based on genomic DNA and chemosensory gene to differentiate accurately the B and Q whiteflies of the Bemisia complex around the world. PMID:26481237

  16. Genetic variation in Labeo fimbriatus (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) populations as revealed by partial cytochrome b sequences of mitochondrial DNA.

    Swain, Subrat Kumar; Bej, Dillip; Das, Sofia Priyadarsani; Sahoo, Lakshman; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Das, Pratap Chandra; Das, Paramananda

    2016-05-01

    Labeo fimbriatus, a medium sized carp is assessed as a commercially important aquaculture species in Indian subcontinent. In the present study, the genetic diversity and population structure of four Indian riverine populations of L. fimbriatus have been evaluated using partial cytochrome b sequences of mitochondrial DNA. Sequencing and analysis of this gene from 108 individuals defined 7 distinct haplotypes. Haplotype diversity (Hd) and nucleotide diversity (π) ranged from 0.067 to 0.405 and 0.00023 to 0.03231, respectively. The Mahanadi population had the highest π level. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated that 47.36% of genetic variation contained within population and 53.76% of genetic variation among groups. Pairwise FST analysis indicated that there was little or no genetic differentiation among populations (-0.0018 to 04572) from different geographical regions except Mahanadi population. The Mahanadi population can be considered as a separate stock from rest three riverine populations. Accordingly, the genetic information generated from this study can be implemented while taking decision in formulating base population for the sustainable selective breeding programs of this species. PMID:25329277

  17. Genetic variations of Lansium domesticum Corr. accessions from Java, Sumatra and Ceram based on Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA fingerprints

    KUSUMADEWI SRI YULITA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Yulita KS (2011 Genetic variations of Lansium domesticum Corr. accessions from Java, Bengkulu and Ceram based on Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA fingerprints. Biodiversitas 12: 125-130. Duku (Lansium domesticum Corr. is one of popular tropical fruits in SE Asia. The spesies has three varieties, known as duku, langsat and kokosan; and duku is the most popular one for being the sweetiest fruit. Indonesia has several local varieties of duku, such as duku Condet, duku Sumber and duku Palembang. This present study aimed to assess genetic diversity of 47 accessions of duku from Java, Sumatra, and Ceram based on RAPD fingerprints. Ten RAPD’s primers were initially screened and five were selected for the analysis. These five primers (OPA 7, 13, 18, OPB 7, and OPN 12 generated 53 scorable bands with an average of 10.6 polymorphic fragment per primer. Percentage of polymorphism ranged from 16.89% (OPA 7 and OPN 12 to 24.54% (OPB 7 with an average of 20.16% polymorphism. OPB 7 at 450 bp was exclusively possessed by accession 20 (Java, OPA 18 at 500 bp was by accession 6 (Java, 550 bp by 3 clones from Bengkulu. While OPN 12 at 300 bp and OPA 13 at 450 bp were shared among the accessions. Clustering analysis was performed based on RAPD profiles using the UPGMA method. The range of genetic similarity value among accessions was 0.02-0.65 suggesting high variation of gene pool existed among accessions.

  18. [Genuineness of Morinda officinalis How germplasm inferred from ITS sequences variation of nuclear ribosomal DNA].

    Ding, Ping; Liu, Jin; Qiu, Jin-Ying; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2012-04-01

    PCR sequencing ITS genes methods were used to assess the genetic diversity of Morinda officinalis How different populations. The sequence of Morinda officinalis ITS gene was 567 bp in length, and the content of G/C was 64.5%. In this study, 17 haplotypes were obtained, which were at a high level of branching, and the haplotypes of Guangdong population showed to be the expansion origin. The result of the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) also showed that the percentage of variation among populations (56.65%) was greater than that within a population (43.35%). The F(ST) value was 0.566 5, and the genetic divergence among populations was significant. Mantel test results also indicated that the level of geneflow was positively correlated with geographic distances (R2 = 0.721 1). The result showed a good correlation between genotype and geographic distribution of Morinda officinalis, and ITS gene sequencing could be useful molecular method for the genuineness and phylogeography of Morinda officinalis. PMID:22799040

  19. Mitochondrial DNA variation of indigenous goats in Narok and Isiolo counties of Kenya.

    Kibegwa, F M; Githui, K E; Jung'a, J O; Badamana, M S; Nyamu, M N

    2016-06-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among and genetic variability within 60 goats from two different indigenous breeds in Narok and Isiolo counties in Kenya and 22 published goat samples were analysed using mitochondrial control region sequences. The results showed that there were 54 polymorphic sites in a 481-bp sequence and 29 haplotypes were determined. The mean haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity were 0.981 ± 0.006 and 0.019 ± 0.001, respectively. The phylogenetic analysis in combination with goat haplogroup reference sequences from GenBank showed that all goat sequences were clustered into two haplogroups (A and G), of which haplogroup A was the commonest in the two populations. A very high percentage (99.90%) of the genetic variation was distributed within the regions, and a smaller percentage (0.10%) distributed among regions as revealed by the analysis of molecular variance (amova). This amova results showed that the divergence between regions was not statistically significant. We concluded that the high levels of intrapopulation diversity in Isiolo and Narok goats and the weak phylogeographic structuring suggested that there existed strong gene flow among goat populations probably caused by extensive transportation of goats in history. PMID:26459231

  20. Nuclear DNA content in Sinningia (Gesneriaceae); intraspecific genome size variation and genome characterization in S. speciosa.

    Zaitlin, David; Pierce, Andrew J

    2010-12-01

    The Gesneriaceae (Lamiales) is a family of flowering plants comprising >3000 species of mainly tropical origin, the most familiar of which is the cultivated African violet (Saintpaulia spp.). Species of Gesneriaceae are poorly represented in the lists of taxa sampled for genome size estimation; measurements are available for three species of Ramonda and one each of Haberlea, Saintpaulia, and Streptocarpus, all species of Old World origin. We report here nuclear genome size estimates for 10 species of Sinningia, a neotropical genus largely restricted to Brazil. Flow cytometry of leaf cell nuclei showed that holoploid genome size in Sinningia is very small (approximately two times the size of the Arabidopsis genome), and is small compared to the other six species of Gesneriaceae with genome size estimates. We also documented intraspecific genome size variation of 21%-26% within a group of wild Sinningia speciosa (Lodd.) Hiern collections. In addition, we analyzed 1210 genome survey sequences from S. speciosa to characterize basic features of the nuclear genome such as guanine-cytosine content, types of repetitive elements, numbers of protein-coding sequences, and sequences unique to S. speciosa. We included several other angiosperm species as genome size standards, one of which was the snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.; Veronicaceae, Lamiales). Multiple measurements on three accessions indicated that the genome size of A. majus is ~633 × 10⁶ base pairs, which is approximately 40% of the previously published estimate. PMID:21164539

  1. DNA variation in the phenotypically-diverse brown alga Saccharina japonica

    Balakirev Evgeniy S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saccharina japonica (Areschoug Lane, Mayes, Druehl et Saunders is an economically important and highly morphologically variable brown alga inhabiting the northwest Pacific marine waters. On the basis of nuclear (ITS, plastid (rbcLS and mitochondrial (COI DNA sequence data, we have analyzed the genetic composition of typical Saccharina japonica (TYP and its two common morphological varieties, known as the “longipes” (LON and “shallow-water” (SHA forms seeking to clarify their taxonomical status and to evaluate the possibility of cryptic species within S. japonica. Results The data show that the TYP and LON forms are very similar genetically in spite of drastic differences in morphology, life history traits, and ecological preferences. Both, however, are genetically quite different from the SHA form. The two Saccharina lineages are distinguished by 109 fixed single nucleotide differences as well as by seven fixed length polymorphisms (based on a 4,286 bp concatenated dataset that includes three gene regions. The GenBank database reveals a close affinity of the TYP and LON forms to S. japonica and the SHA form to S. cichorioides. The three gene markers used in the present work have different sensitivity for the algal species identification. COI gene was the most discriminant gene marker. However, we have detected instances of interspecific COI recombination reflecting putative historical hybridization events between distantly related algal lineages. The recombinant sequences show highly contrasted level of divergence in the 5’- and 3’- regions of the gene, leading to significantly different tree topologies depending on the gene segment (5’- or 3’- used for tree reconstruction. Consequently, the 5’-COI “barcoding” region (~ 650 bp can be misleading for identification purposes, at least in the case of algal species that might have experienced historical hybridization events. Conclusion Taking into account

  2. Assessment of Genetic Variation Within Indian Mustard(Brassica juncea) Germplasm Using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Markers

    Muhammad Ayub Khan; Malik Ashiq Rabbani; Muharnmad Munir; Saifullah Khan Ajmal; Muhammad Azim Malik

    2008-01-01

    Genetic diversity among 45 Indian mustard (Brassica Juncea L.) genotypes comprising 37 germplasm collections, five advance breeding lines and three improved cultivars was investigated at the DNA level using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. Fifteen primers used generated a total of 92 RAPD fragments, of which 81 (88%) were polymorphic. Of these, 13 were unique to accession 'Pak85559'. Each primer produced four to nine amplified products with an average of 6.13 bands per primer. Based on pairwise comparisons of RAPD amplification products, Nei and Li's similarity coefficients were calculated to evaluate the relationships among the accessions. Pairwise similarity indices were higher among the oilseed accessions and cultivars showing narrow ranges of 0.77-0.99. An unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages cluster analysis based on these genetic similarities placed most of the collections and oilseed cultivars close to each other, showing a low level of polymorphism between the accessions used. However, the clusters formed by oilseed collections and cultivars were comparatively distinct from that of advanced breeding lines. Genetically, all of the accessions were classified into a few major groups and a number of individual accessions. Advanced breeding lines were relatively divergent from the rest of the accessions and formed independent clusters. Clustering of the accessions did not show any pattern of association between the RAPD markers and the collection sites. A low level of genetic variability of oilseed mustard was attributed to the selection for similar traits and horticultural uses. Perhaps close parentage of these accessions further contributed towards their little diversity. The study demonstrated that RAPD is a simple and fast technique to compare the genetic relationship and pattern of variation among the gene pool of this crop.

  3. mtDNA germ line variation mediated ROS generates retrograde signaling and induces pro-cancerous metabolic features

    Singh, Rajnish Kumar; Srivastava, Archita; Kalaiarasan, Ponnusamy; Manvati, Siddharth; Chopra, Rupali; Bamezai, Rameshwar N. K.

    2014-01-01

    mtDNA non-synonymous germ line variation (G10398A; p.A114T) has remained equivocal with least mechanistic understanding in showing an association with cancer. This has necessitated showing in-vitro how an over-expression within mitochondria of either of the variants produces higher intracellular ROS, resulting in differential anchorage dependent and independent growth. Both these features were observed to be relatively higher in ND3:114T variant. An elevated amount of intracellular carbonylated proteins and a reduced activity of a key glycolytic enzyme, Pyruvate kinase M2, along with high glucose uptake and lactate production were other pro-cancerous features observed. The retrograde signaling through surplus ROS was generated by post-ND3 over-expression regulated nuclear gene expression epigenetically, involving selectively the apoptotic-DDR-pathways. The feature of ND3 over-expression, inducing ROS mediated pro-cancerous features in the cells in in vitro, was replicated in a pilot study in a limited number of sporadic breast tumors, suggesting the importance of mitochondrial germ-line variant(s) in enabling the cells to acquire pro-cancerous features. PMID:25300428

  4. Pressure dissociation of integration host factor–DNA complexes reveals flexibility-dependent structural variation at the protein–DNA interface

    Senear, Donald F.; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Opel, Michael L.; Aeling, Kimberly A.; G Wesley Hatfield; Franklin, Laurie M.; Darlington, Reuben C.; Alexander Ross, J. B.

    2007-01-01

    E. coli Integration host factor (IHF) condenses the bacterial nucleoid by wrapping DNA. Previously, we showed that DNA flexibility compensates for structural characteristics of the four consensus recognition elements associated with specific binding (Aeling et al., J. Biol. Chem. 281, 39236–39248, 2006). If elements are missing, high-affinity binding occurs only if DNA deformation energy is low. In contrast, if all elements are present, net binding energy is unaffected by deformation energy. ...

  5. Assessing genetic variation in natural populations of New World screwworm flies: Evidence from microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA

    Full text: The New World screwworm fly (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel 1858, Diptera Calliphoridae), is an obligate ectoparasite that causes myiasis in warm-blooded vertebrates throughout the Neotropical region responsible for significant economic losses to livestock rearing. Because of the substantial economic losses caused by this pest, an international effort eradicated the NWS from endemic areas of North and Central America and is preventing invasions into screwworm-free areas. There have been conflicting reports about the existence of non-interbreeding populations and their possible effects on the control programme. The identification of such populations and an understanding of the genetic variability of target populations is necessary in order to maximize the effectiveness of an eradication programme. We have been using different molecular markers to investigate genetic variability and population structure of C. hominivorax throughout its current geographical distribution in South America in order to address these questions. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a marker for studying micro-evolutionary processes in animal populations and can be a suitable marker for estimating the genetic variability within populations. One approach for studying population structure of C. hominivorax population from Uruguay was PCR-RFLP of two specific mitochondrial DNA regions (A+T-rich/12S and cox1/cox 2). The aim of this study was to examine the genetic variability among geographically distinct populations of NWS from Brazil and Uruguay, to have a better scenario of the genetic structure of this species distribution. Nine haplotypes were observed among the populations sampled. The mean nucleotide diversity (π= 2.3%) and the haplotype diversity (Hs= 0.6533) indicated high mtDNA variability in this species. The similarity index (96.7%), the average nucleotide divergence (δ= 0.00055) and the AMOVA results showed no evidence of subpopulation differentiation. In this case

  6. Variation in PAH-related DNA adduct levels among non-smokers: the role of multiple genetic polymorphisms and nucleotide excision repair phenotype.

    Etemadi, Arash; Islami, Farhad; Phillips, David H; Godschalk, Roger; Golozar, Asieh; Kamangar, Farin; Malekshah, Akbar Fazel-Tabar; Pourshams, Akram; Elahi, Seerat; Ghojaghi, Farhad; Strickland, Paul T; Taylor, Philip R; Boffetta, Paolo; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M; Malekzadeh, Reza; van Schooten, Frederik J

    2013-06-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) likely play a role in many cancers even in never-smokers. We tried to find a model to explain the relationship between variation in PAH-related DNA adduct levels among people with similar exposures, multiple genetic polymorphisms in genes related to metabolic and repair pathways, and nucleotide excision repair (NER) capacity. In 111 randomly selected female never-smokers from the Golestan Cohort Study in Iran, we evaluated 21 SNPs in 14 genes related to xenobiotic metabolism and 12 SNPs in eight DNA repair genes. NER capacity was evaluated by a modified comet assay, and aromatic DNA adduct levels were measured in blood by32P-postlabeling. Multivariable regression models were compared by Akaike's information criterion (AIC). Aromatic DNA adduct levels ranged between 1.7 and 18.6 per 10(8) nucleotides (mean: 5.8 ± 3.1). DNA adduct level was significantly lower in homozygotes for NAT2 slow alleles and ERCC5 non-risk-allele genotype, and was higher in the MPO homozygote risk-allele genotype. The sum of risk alleles in these genes significantly correlated with the log-adduct level (r = 0.4, p studies, with large inter-individual variation which could best be explained by a combination of Phase I genes and NER capacity. PMID:23175176

  7. Cylindrotheca closterium Is a Species Complex as Was Evidenced by the Variations of rbcL Gene and SSU rDNA

    LI Haitao; YANG Guanpin; SUN Ying; WU Suihan; ZHANG Xiufang

    2007-01-01

    The genus Cylindrotheca consists of a small group of marine diatoms with a few species described. Eleven isolates of diatoms identified as Cylindrotheca closterium morphologically were obtained from Jiaozhou Bay with their nuclear-encoded small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rDNA) and chloroplast-encoded rbcL gene sequences determined in this study. Interestingly, very high sequence divergences of SSU rDNA and rbcL gene were found among these isolates, and numerous nucleotide variation of rbcL gene caused relatively few variation of deduced amino acid sequence. Phylogenetic analyses based on SSU rDNA and rbcL gene, respectively, grouped the isolates into 6 clades. Phylogenetic tree of SSU rDNA placed all the Cylindrotheca isolates together, separating them into two lineages clearly. LineageⅠ was composed of the eleven C. closterium isolates obtained in this study together with another C. closterium isolate, but some clades were not well supported. LineageⅡ contained two C. closterium isolates and one C. fusiformis isolate. Phylogenetic analysis of rbcL gene also separated the Cylindrotheca isolates into two well-defined lineages. The eleven C. closterium isolates formed a lineage and all clades were supported strongly. Statistical comparisons of SSU rDNA indicated that the average distance within lineage Ⅰ was significantly higher than that of other microalgae species (P < 0.01). These results suggested the existence of cryptic species within C. closterium.

  8. Use of sequence variation in three highly variable regions of the mitochondrial DNA for the discrimination of allogeneic platelets

    Warner, JB; Bruin, EJ; Hannig, H; Hellenkamp, F; Horning, A; Mittmann, K; van der Steege, G; de Leij, LFMH; Garritsen, HSP

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms can be used to detect allogeneic transfused platelets. To increase the number of informative polymorphisms we investigated three hypervariable regions (HVR1, HVR2, and HVR3) within the displacement loop (D-loop) region of the mtDNA. STUDY DES

  9. High regional genetic diversity and lack of host-specificity in Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) as revealed by mtDNA variation.

    Piwczyński, M; Pabijan, M; Grzywacz, A; Glinkowski, W; Bereś, P K; Buszko, J

    2016-08-01

    The European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) infests a wide array of host plants and is considered one of the most serious pests of maize in Europe. Recent studies suggest that individuals feeding on maize in Europe should be referred to O. nubilalis (sensu nov.), while those infesting dicots as Ostrinia scapulalis (sensu nov.). We test if the clear genetic distinctiveness among individuals of O. nubilalis living on maize vs. dicots is tracked by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We used fragments of COI and COII genes of 32 individuals traditionally recognized as O. nubilalis collected on three host plants, maize, mugwort and hop, growing in different parts of Poland. In addition, we reconstructed the mtDNA phylogeny of Ostrinia species based on our data and sequences retrieved from GenBank to assess host and/or biogeographic patterns. We also compared haplotype variation found in Poland (east-central Europe) with other regions (Anatolia, Eastern Europe, Balkans, Far East, North America). Our study showed high mtDNA diversity of O. nubilalis in Poland in comparison with other regions and revealed rare haplotypes likely of Asian origin. We did not find distinct mtDNA haplotypes in larvae feeding on maize vs. dicotyledonous plants. Phylogenetic analyses showed an apparent lack of mtDNA divergence among putatively distinct lineages belonging to the O. nubilalis group as identical haplotypes are shared by Asian and European individuals. We argue that human-mediated dispersal, hybridization and sporadic host jumps are likely responsible for the lack of a geographic pattern in mtDNA variation. PMID:27019346

  10. Evaluation of Interindividual Human Variation in Bioactivation and DNA Adduct Formation of Estragole in Liver Predicted by Physiologically Based Kinetic/Dynamic and Monte Carlo Modeling.

    Punt, Ans; Paini, Alicia; Spenkelink, Albertus; Scholz, Gabriele; Schilter, Benoit; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2016-04-18

    Estragole is a known hepatocarcinogen in rodents at high doses following metabolic conversion to the DNA-reactive metabolite 1'-sulfooxyestragole. The aim of the present study was to model possible levels of DNA adduct formation in (individual) humans upon exposure to estragole. This was done by extending a previously defined PBK model for estragole in humans to include (i) new data on interindividual variation in the kinetics for the major PBK model parameters influencing the formation of 1'-sulfooxyestragole, (ii) an equation describing the relationship between 1'-sulfooxyestragole and DNA adduct formation, (iii) Monte Carlo modeling to simulate interindividual human variation in DNA adduct formation in the population, and (iv) a comparison of the predictions made to human data on DNA adduct formation for the related alkenylbenzene methyleugenol. Adequate model predictions could be made, with the predicted DNA adduct levels at the estimated daily intake of estragole of 0.01 mg/kg bw ranging between 1.6 and 8.8 adducts in 10(8) nucleotides (nts) (50th and 99th percentiles, respectively). This is somewhat lower than values reported in the literature for the related alkenylbenzene methyleugenol in surgical human liver samples. The predicted levels seem to be below DNA adduct levels that are linked with tumor formation by alkenylbenzenes in rodents, which were estimated to amount to 188-500 adducts per 10(8) nts at the BMD10 values of estragole and methyleugenol. Although this does not seem to point to a significant health concern for human dietary exposure, drawing firm conclusions may have to await further validation of the model's predictions. PMID:26952143

  11. Mitochondrial DNA variation in a species with two mitochondrial genomes: the case of Mytilus galloprovincialis from the Atlantic, the Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

    Ladoukakis, E D; Saavedra, C; Magoulas, A; Zouros, E

    2002-04-01

    We have examined mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in samples of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis from the Black Sea, the Mediterranean and the Spanish Atlantic coast by scoring for presence or absence of cleavage at 20 restriction sites of a fragment of the COIII gene and at four restriction sites of the 16S RNA gene. This species contains two types of mtDNA genomes, one that is transmitted maternally (the F type) and one that is transmitted paternally (the M type). The M genome evolves at a higher rate than the F genome. Normally, females are homoplasmic for an F type and males are heteroplasmic for an F and an M type. Occasionally molecules from the F lineage invade the paternal transmission route, resulting in males that carry two F-type mtDNA genomes. These features of the mussel mtDNA system give rise to a new set of questions when using mtDNA variation in population studies and phylogeny. We show here that the two mtDNA types provide different information with regard to amounts of variation and genetic distances among populations. The F genome exhibits higher degrees of diversity within populations, while the M genome produces higher degrees of differentiation among populations. There is a strong differentiation between the Atlantic and the Black Sea. The Mediterranean samples have intermediate haplotype frequencies, yet are much closer to the Black Sea than to the Atlantic. We conclude that in this species gene flow among the three Seas is restricted and not enough to erase the combined effect of mutation and random drift. In one sample, that from the Black Sea, the majority of males did not contain an M mtDNA type. This suggests that a molecule of the maternal lineage has recently invaded the paternal route and has increased its frequency in the population to the point that the present pool of paternally transmitted mtDNA molecules is highly heterogeneous and cannot be used to read the population's history. This liability of the paternal route means

  12. Host Plant Mediated Population Variations of Cotton Whitefly Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Aleyrodidae: Homoptera Characterized with Random DNA Markers

    Yasodha Perumal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci is an important sucking pest of field, horticultural and ornamental plants causing feeding injuries besides spreading disease by acting as a vector of Gemini viruses. The polyphagous nature of the pest makes it as a highly complex species. Approach: The influence of host plants utilized by the species on the population differences at molecular level was attempted using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers. Results: Ten RAPD primers out of the total seventeen primers screened produced 236 markers. The total number of bands obtained from each primer ranged from 11-35 with an average of 23.60 bands per primer. Of the pair wise combination among thirteen species, Srivilliputhur population showed the highest similarity index (0.826 while the lowest (0.111 was recorded by Namakkal population. The similarity coefficient based on the 236 RAPD markers generated ranged from 0.111-0.826. Three major clusters were formed from UPGMA dendrogram, which was constructed based on Jaccard’s similarity. PCR screening demarcated the whitefly population based on the host species. The first cluster included population collected from okra and cotton, while second cluster comprised of population from eggplant and cauliflower and the third cluster included population from eggplant. It could be deduced that population from cotton and okra had 50% similarity, while 60-70% similarity was observed for population from eggplant and cauliflower. Conclusion: Our investigation offered the lead that within a narrow geographical region there exits variation based on host plants being utilized by the whitefly population.

  13. Next-Gen phylogeography of rainforest trees: exploring landscape-level cpDNA variation from whole-genome sequencing.

    van der Merwe, M; McPherson, H; Siow, J; Rossetto, M

    2014-01-01

    Standardized phylogeographic studies across codistributed taxa can identify important refugia and biogeographic barriers, and potentially uncover how changes in adaptive constraints through space and time impact on the distribution of genetic diversity. The combination of next-generation sequencing and methodologies that enable uncomplicated analysis of the full chloroplast genome may provide an invaluable resource for such studies. Here, we assess the potential of a shotgun-based method across twelve nonmodel rainforest trees sampled from two evolutionary distinct regions. Whole genomic shotgun sequencing libraries consisting of pooled individuals were used to assemble species-specific chloroplast references (in silicio). For each species, the pooled libraries allowed for the detection of variation within and between data sets (each representing a geographic region). The potential use of nuclear rDNA as an additional marker from the NGS libraries was investigated by mapping reads against available references. We successfully obtained phylogeographically informative sequence data from a range of previously unstudied rainforest trees. Greater levels of diversity were found in northern refugial rainforests than in southern expansion areas. The genetic signatures of varying evolutionary histories were detected, and interesting associative patterns between functional characteristics and genetic diversity were identified. This approach can suit a wide range of landscape-level studies. As the key laboratory-based steps do not require prior species-specific knowledge and can be easily outsourced, the techniques described here are even suitable for researchers without access to wet-laboratory facilities, making evolutionary ecology questions increasingly accessible to the research community. PMID:24119022

  14. Assessing Mitochondrial DNA Variation and Copy Number in Lymphocytes of ~2,000 Sardinians Using Tailored Sequencing Analysis Tools.

    Jun Ding

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequencing identifies common and rare genetic variants for association studies, but studies typically focus on variants in nuclear DNA and ignore the mitochondrial genome. In fact, analyzing variants in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequences presents special problems, which we resolve here with a general solution for the analysis of mtDNA in next-generation sequencing studies. The new program package comprises 1 an algorithm designed to identify mtDNA variants (i.e., homoplasmies and heteroplasmies, incorporating sequencing error rates at each base in a likelihood calculation and allowing allele fractions at a variant site to differ across individuals; and 2 an estimation of mtDNA copy number in a cell directly from whole-genome sequencing data. We also apply the methods to DNA sequence from lymphocytes of ~2,000 SardiNIA Project participants. As expected, mothers and offspring share all homoplasmies but a lesser proportion of heteroplasmies. Both homoplasmies and heteroplasmies show 5-fold higher transition/transversion ratios than variants in nuclear DNA. Also, heteroplasmy increases with age, though on average only ~1 heteroplasmy reaches the 4% level between ages 20 and 90. In addition, we find that mtDNA copy number averages ~110 copies/lymphocyte and is ~54% heritable, implying substantial genetic regulation of the level of mtDNA. Copy numbers also decrease modestly but significantly with age, and females on average have significantly more copies than males. The mtDNA copy numbers are significantly associated with waist circumference (p-value = 0.0031 and waist-hip ratio (p-value = 2.4×10-5, but not with body mass index, indicating an association with central fat distribution. To our knowledge, this is the largest population analysis to date of mtDNA dynamics, revealing the age-imposed increase in heteroplasmy, the relatively high heritability of copy number, and the association of copy number with metabolic traits.

  15. In situ labeling of DNA reveals interindividual variation in nuclear DNA breakdown in hair and may be useful to predict success of forensic genotyping of hair

    Szabo, Sandra; Jaeger, Karin; Fischer, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Parson, Walther; Eckhart, Leopold

    2011-01-01

    Hair fibers are formed by keratinocytes of the hair follicle in a process that involves the breakdown of the nucleus including DNA. Accordingly, DNA can be isolated with high yield from the hair bulb which contains living keratinocytes, whereas it is difficult to prepare from the distal portions of hair fibers and from shed hair. Nevertheless, forensic investigations are successful in a fraction of shed hair samples found at crime scenes. Here, we report that interindividual differences in th...

  16. Limited phylogeographic signal in sex-linked and autosomal loci despite geographically, ecologically, and phenotypically concordant structure of mtDNA variation in the Holarctic avian genus Eremophila.

    Sergei V Drovetski

    Full Text Available Phylogeographic studies of Holarctic birds are challenging because they involve vast geographic scale, complex glacial history, extensive phenotypic variation, and heterogeneous taxonomic treatment across countries, all of which require large sample sizes. Knowledge about the quality of phylogeographic information provided by different loci is crucial for study design. We use sequences of one mtDNA gene, one sex-linked intron, and one autosomal intron to elucidate large scale phylogeographic patterns in the Holarctic lark genus Eremophila. The mtDNA ND2 gene identified six geographically, ecologically, and phenotypically concordant clades in the Palearctic that diverged in the Early-Middle Pleistocene and suggested paraphyly of the horned lark (E. alpestris with respect to the Temminck's lark (E. bilopha. In the Nearctic, ND2 identified five subclades which diverged in the Late Pleistocene. They overlapped geographically and were not concordant phenotypically or ecologically. Nuclear alleles provided little information on geographic structuring of genetic variation in horned larks beyond supporting the monophyly of Eremophila and paraphyly of the horned lark. Multilocus species trees based on two nuclear or all three loci provided poor support for haplogroups identified by mtDNA. The node ages calculated using mtDNA were consistent with the available paleontological data, whereas individual nuclear loci and multilocus species trees appeared to underestimate node ages. We argue that mtDNA is capable of discovering independent evolutionary units within avian taxa and can provide a reasonable phylogeographic hypothesis when geographic scale, geologic history, and phenotypic variation in the study system are too complex for proposing reasonable a priori hypotheses required for multilocus methods. Finally, we suggest splitting the currently recognized horned lark into five Palearctic and one Nearctic species.

  17. A Colony Multiplex Quantitative PCR-Based 3S3DBC Method and Variations of It for Screening DNA Libraries

    An, Yang; Toyoda, Atsushi; Zhao, Chen; Fujiyama, Asao; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    A DNA library is a collection of DNA fragments cloned into vectors and stored individually in host cells, and is a valuable resource for molecular cloning, gene physical mapping, and genome sequencing projects. To take the best advantage of a DNA library, a good screening method is needed. After describing pooling strategies and issues that should be considered in DNA library screening, here we report an efficient colony multiplex quantitative PCR-based 3-step, 3-dimension, and binary-code (3S3DBC) method we used to screen genes from a planarian genomic DNA fosmid library. This method requires only 3 rounds of PCR reactions and only around 6 hours to distinguish one or more desired clones from a large DNA library. According to the particular situations in different research labs, this method can be further modified and simplified to suit their requirements. PMID:25646755

  18. A colony multiplex quantitative PCR-Based 3S3DBC method and variations of it for screening DNA libraries.

    Yang An

    Full Text Available A DNA library is a collection of DNA fragments cloned into vectors and stored individually in host cells, and is a valuable resource for molecular cloning, gene physical mapping, and genome sequencing projects. To take the best advantage of a DNA library, a good screening method is needed. After describing pooling strategies and issues that should be considered in DNA library screening, here we report an efficient colony multiplex quantitative PCR-based 3-step, 3-dimension, and binary-code (3S3DBC method we used to screen genes from a planarian genomic DNA fosmid library. This method requires only 3 rounds of PCR reactions and only around 6 hours to distinguish one or more desired clones from a large DNA library. According to the particular situations in different research labs, this method can be further modified and simplified to suit their requirements.

  19. Variation in PAH-related DNA adduct levels among non-smokers: the role of multiple genetic polymorphisms and nucleotide excision repair phenotype

    Etemadi, Arash; Islami, Farhad; Phillips, David H.; Godschalk, Roger; Golozar, Asieh; Kamangar, Farin; Malekshah, Akbar Fazel-Tabar; Pourshams, Akram; Elahi, Seerat; Ghojaghi, Farhad; Strickland, Paul T.; Taylor, Philip R.; Boffetta, Paolo; Abnet, Christian C.; Dawsey, Sanford M.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) likely play a role in many cancers even in never-smokers. We tried to find a model to explain the relationship between variation in PAH-related DNA adduct levels among people with similar exposures, multiple genetic polymorphisms in genes related to metabolic and repair pathways, and nucleotide excision repair (NER) capacity. In 111 randomly selected female never-smokers from the Golestan Cohort Study in Iran, we evaluated 21 SNPs in 14 genes related to...

  20. Differential binding of Lrp to two sets of pap DNA binding sites mediated by Pap I regulates Pap phase variation in Escherichia coli.

    Nou, X; Braaten, B; Kaltenbach, L; Low, D A

    1995-01-01

    Pyelonephritis-associated pili (Pap) expression in Escherichia coli is subject to a phase variation control mechanism that is regulated by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp), PapI, and deoxyadenosine methylase (Dam). In previous work, we found that the differential Dam methylation of two target sites in pap regulatory DNA, GATC-I and GATC II, is essential for the transition between active and inactive pap transcriptional states. Here, we identify six Lrp binding sites within the ...

  1. mtDNA G10398A variation provides risk to type 2 diabetes in population group from the Jammu region of India

    Varun Sharma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrion plays an integral role in glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Mitochondrial electron-transport chain (ETC is involved in adenosine triphosphate (ATP generation and ATP mediated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. β-cell dysfunction is a critical component in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D. The mtDNA G10398A variation (amino acid change: Alanine → Threonine within the NADH dehydrogenase (ND3 subunit of complex I of mtDNA ETC, has emerged as a variation of clinical significance in various disorders including T2D. This variation is supposed to result in altered complex I function, leading to an increased rate of electron leakage and reactive oxygen species (ROS production, which might cause β-cell damage and impaired insulin secretion. The aim of the study was to explore the association of mtDNA G10398A variation with T2D in a total of 439 samples (196 T2D cases and 243 healthy controls belonging to the Jammu region of Jammu and Kashmir (J&K. The candidate gene association analyses showed significant association of mtDNA G10398A variant with T2D and the estimated odds ratio (OR was 2.83 (1.64–4.90 at 95% CI in the studied population group. The extent of genetic heterogeneity in T2D and diversity of the Indian population groups, make such replication studies pertinent to understand the etiology of T2D in these population groups.

  2. Cytogenetic variation of repetitive DNA elements in Hoplias malabaricus (Characiformes - Erythrinidae from white, black and clear water rivers of the Amazon basin

    Fabíola Araújo dos Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hoplias malabaricus is a common fish species occurring in white, black and clear water rivers of the Amazon basin. Its large distribution across distinct aquatic environments can pose stressful conditions for dispersal and creates possibilities for the emergence of local adaptive profiles. We investigated the chromosomal localization of repetitive DNA markers (constitutive heterochromatin, rDNA and the transposable element REX-3 in populations from the Amazonas river (white water, the Negro river (black water and the Tapajós river (clear water, in order to address the variation/association of cytogenomic features and environmental conditions. We found a conserved karyotypic macrostructure with a diploid number of 40 chromosomes (20 metacentrics + 20 submetacentrics in all the samples. Heteromorphism in pair 14 was detected as evidence for the initial differentiation of an XX/XY system. Minor differences detected in the amount of repetitive DNA markers are interpreted as possible signatures of local adaptations to distinct aquatic environments.

  3. Cytogenetic variation of repetitive DNA elements in Hoplias malabaricus (Characiformes - Erythrinidae) from white, black and clear water rivers of the Amazon basin.

    Santos, Fabíola Araújo Dos; Marques, Diego Ferreira; Terencio, Maria Leandra; Feldberg, Eliana; Rodrigues, Luís Reginaldo R

    2016-03-01

    Hoplias malabaricus is a common fish species occurring in white, black and clear water rivers of the Amazon basin. Its large distribution across distinct aquatic environments can pose stressful conditions for dispersal and creates possibilities for the emergence of local adaptive profiles. We investigated the chromosomal localization of repetitive DNA markers (constitutive heterochromatin, rDNA and the transposable element REX-3) in populations from the Amazonas river (white water), the Negro river (black water) and the Tapajós river (clear water), in order to address the variation/association of cytogenomic features and environmental conditions. We found a conserved karyotypic macrostructure with a diploid number of 40 chromosomes (20 metacentrics + 20 submetacentrics) in all the samples. Heteromorphism in pair 14 was detected as evidence for the initial differentiation of an XX/XY system. Minor differences detected in the amount of repetitive DNA markers are interpreted as possible signatures of local adaptations to distinct aquatic environments. PMID:27007897

  4. A rapidly photo-activatable light-up fluorescent nucleoside and its application in DNA base variation sensing.

    He, Zhiyong; Chen, Yuqi; Wang, Yafen; Wang, Jiaqi; Mo, Jing; Fu, Boshi; Wang, Zijing; Du, Yuhao; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-06-30

    A new DNA building block (d(Tet)U) bearing a tetrazole and allyloxy group at N-phenyl ring linked through an aminopropynyl linker to the 5-position of 2'-deoxyuridine was synthesized. The modified DNA can be lit up via a photoinduced intramolecular tetrazole-alkene cycloaddition reaction, but quenched when the fully-matched double strand is formed. This conspicuous difference in fluorescence could open a door for DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing. PMID:27315545

  5. Congruence of microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA variation in acrobat ants (Crematogaster subgenus Decacrema, Formicidae: Myrmicinae) inhabiting Macaranga (Euphorbiaceae) myrmecophytes.

    Ueda, Shouhei; Nagano, Yusuke; Kataoka, Yowsuke; Komatsu, Takashi; Itioka, Takao; Shimizu-Kaya, Usun; Inui, Yoko; Itino, Takao

    2015-01-01

    A previously reported mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogeny of Crematogaster (subgenus Decacrema) ants inhabiting Macaranga myrmecophytes indicated that the partners diversified synchronously and their specific association has been maintained for 20 million years. However, the mtDNA clades did not exactly match morphological species, probably owing to introgressive hybridization among younger species. In this study, we determined the congruence between nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR, also called microsatellite) genotyping and mtDNA phylogeny to confirm the suitability of the mtDNA phylogeny for inferring the evolutionary history of Decacrema ants. Analyses of ant samples from Lambir Hills National park, northeastern Borneo, showed overall congruence between the SSR and mtDNA groupings, indicating that mtDNA markers are useful for delimiting species, at least at the local level. We also found overall high host-plant specificity of the SSR genotypes of Decacrema ants, consistent with the specificity based on the mtDNA phylogeny. Further, we detected cryptic genetic assemblages exhibiting high specificity toward particular plant species within a single mtDNA clade. This finding, which may be evidence for rapid ecological and genetic differentiation following a host shift, is a new insight into the previously suggested long-term codiversification of Decacrema ants and Macaranga plants. PMID:25692953

  6. Characterization of variation induced by low-energy N+ and cloning of differentially expressed cDNA of a mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana

    2003-01-01

    Using Arabidopsis thaliana as experimental materials, the variations induced by low-energy N+ have been investigated. Germination rate of the treated seeds is lower than that of the control, and it decreases with the intensification of the radiation. The phenotypic variations have been observed in M2 plants irradiated with higher doses, such as chlorisis, semilethality, plant morphology, and changes of blooming habit and fertility. In random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis on M2 seedlings, some differences including band deletions or additions are found in treated plants compared to the control and the differences are associated with the radiation doses. One of the M1 plants from the seeds irradiated with the dose of 80×1015 N+/cm2 is a dwarf variant. Its stable M6 generation, mutant T80II, is used to construct subtractive cDNA library and to clone differentially expressed cDNA. A 721 bp cDNA fragment is partly homologous with GRF7 gene.

  7. Diurnal variations in depth profiles of UV-induced DNA damage and inhibition of bacterioplankton production in tropical coastal waters

    Visser, PM; Poos, JJ; Scheper, BB; Boelen, P; van Duyl, FC

    2002-01-01

    In this study, diurnal changes in bacterial production and DNA damage in bacterio-plankton (measured as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, CPDs) incubated in bags at different depths in tropical coastal waters were investigated. The DNA damage and inhibition of the bacterial production was highest at th

  8. Investigating the Potential Role of Genetic and Epigenetic Variation of DNA Methyltransferase Genes in Hyperplastic Polyposis Syndrome

    Drini, Musa; Nicholas C. Wong; Hamish S Scott; Craig, Jeffrey M; Dobrovic, Alexander; Chelsee A Hewitt; Dow, Christofer; Young, Joanne P; Jenkins, Mark A; Saffery, Richard; Macrae, Finlay A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hyperplastic Polyposis Syndrome (HPS) is a condition associated with multiple serrated polyps, and an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). At least half of CRCs arising in HPS show a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), potentially linked to aberrant DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity. CIMP is associated with methylation of tumor suppressor genes including regulators of DNA mismatch repair (such as MLH1, MGMT), and negative regulators of Wnt signaling (such as WIF1). In...

  9. Assessment and reduction of comet assay variation in relation to DNA damage: studies from the European Comet Assay Validation Group.

    Moller, Peter; Moller, Lennart; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; Jones, George D. D.

    2010-01-01

    The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay has become a widely used method for the detection of DNA damage and repair in cells and tissues. Still, it has been difficult to compare results from different investigators because of differences in assay conditions and because the data are reported in different units. The European Comet Assay Validation Group (ECVAG) was established for the purpose of validation of the comet assay with respect to measures of DNA damage formation and...

  10. New Population and Phylogenetic Features of the Internal Variation within Mitochondrial DNA Macro-Haplogroup R0

    Álvarez Iglesias, Vanesa; Mosquera Miguel, Ana; Cerezo, María; Quintáns, Beatriz; Zarrabeitia Cimiano, María Teresa; Cuscó, Ivon; Lareu, María Victoria; García, Óscar; Pérez Jurado, Luis; Carracedo Álvarez, Ángel; Salas Ellacuriaga, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: R0 embraces the most common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineage in West Eurasia, namely, haplogroup H (approximately 40%). R0 sub-lineages are badly defined in the control region and therefore, the analysis of diagnostic coding region polymorphisms is needed in order to gain resolution in population and medical studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced the first hypervariable segment (HVS-I) of 518 individuals from different North Iberian regions. The mtDNAs belongin...

  11. An ECVAG inter-laboratory validation study of the comet assay: inter-laboratory and intra-laboratory variations of DNA strand breaks and FPG-sensitive sites in human mononuclear cells.

    Ersson, Clara; Møller, Peter; Forchhammer, Lykke; Loft, Steffen; Azqueta, Amaya; Godschalk, Roger W L; van Schooten, Frederik-Jan; Jones, George D D; Higgins, Jennifer A; Cooke, Marcus S; Mistry, Vilas; Karbaschi, Mahsa; Phillips, David H; Sozeri, Osman; Routledge, Michael N; Nelson-Smith, Kirsty; Riso, Patrizia; Porrini, Marisa; Matullo, Giuseppe; Allione, Alessandra; Stepnik, Maciej; Ferlińska, Magdalena; Teixeira, João Paulo; Costa, Solange; Corcuera, Laura-Ana; López de Cerain, Adela; Laffon, Blanca; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Collins, Andrew R; Möller, Lennart

    2013-05-01

    The alkaline comet assay is an established, sensitive method extensively used in biomonitoring studies. This method can be modified to measure a range of different types of DNA damage. However, considerable differences in the protocols used by different research groups affect the inter-laboratory comparisons of results. The aim of this study was to assess the inter-laboratory, intra-laboratory, sample and residual (unexplained) variations in DNA strand breaks and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites measured by the comet assay by using a balanced Latin square design. Fourteen participating laboratories used their own comet assay protocols to measure the level of DNA strand breaks and FPG-sensitive sites in coded samples containing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the level of DNA strand breaks in coded calibration curve samples (cells exposed to different doses of ionising radiation) on three different days of analysis. Eleven laboratories found dose-response relationships in the coded calibration curve samples on two or three days of analysis, whereas three laboratories had technical problems in their assay. In the coded calibration curve samples, the dose of ionising radiation, inter-laboratory variation, intra-laboratory variation and residual variation contributed to 60.9, 19.4, 0.1 and 19.5%, respectively, of the total variation. In the coded PBMC samples, the inter-laboratory variation explained the largest fraction of the overall variation of DNA strand breaks (79.2%) and the residual variation (19.9%) was much larger than the intra-laboratory (0.3%) and inter-subject (0.5%) variation. The same partitioning of the overall variation of FPG-sensitive sites in the PBMC samples indicated that the inter-laboratory variation was the strongest contributor (56.7%), whereas the residual (42.9%), intra-laboratory (0.2%) and inter-subject (0.3%) variations again contributed less to the overall variation. The results suggest that the

  12. Variations in genomic DNA methylation during the long-term in vitro proliferation of oil palm embryogenic suspension cultures.

    Rival, Alain; Ilbert, Pascal; Labeyrie, Axel; Torres, Esperanza; Doulbeau, Sylvie; Personne, Aline; Dussert, Stéphane; Beulé, Thierry; Durand-Gasselin, Tristan; Tregear, James W; Jaligot, Estelle

    2013-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : The long-term proliferation of embryogenic cell suspensions of oil palm is associated with changes in both genomic methylation rates and embryogenic capacities. In the aim of exploring the relationship between epigenetic stability and the long-term in vitro proliferation of plant tissues, we have studied changes in genomic DNA methylation levels in embryogenic suspensions of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.). Five embryogenic callus lines were obtained from selected hybrid seeds and then proliferated as suspension cultures. Each clonal line obtained from a single genotype was subdivided into three independent subclonal lines. Once established, cultures proliferated for 12 months and genomic DNA was sampled at 4 months intervals for the estimation of global DNA methylation rates through high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) quantitation of deoxynucleosides. Our results show that in vitro proliferation induces DNA hypermethylation in a time-dependent fashion. Moreover, this trend is statistically significant in several clonal lines and shared between subclonal lines originating from the same genotype. Interestingly, the only clonal line undergoing loss of genomic methylation in the course of proliferation has been found unable to generate somatic embryos. We discuss the possible implications of genome-wide DNA methylation changes in proliferating cells with a view to the maintenance of genomic and epigenomic stability. PMID:23179461

  13. Evaluation of Genetic Variations in Maize Seedlings Exposed to Electric Field Based on Protein and DNA Markers

    Asma A. AL-Huqail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study analyzed proteins and nuclear DNA of electric fields (ELF exposed and nonexposed maize seedlings for different exposure periods using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, isozymes, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD, and comet assay, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed total of 46 polypeptides bands with different molecular weights ranging from 186.20 to 36.00 KDa. It generated distinctive polymorphism value of 84.62%. Leucine-aminopeptidase, peroxidase, and catalase isozymes showed the highest values of polymorphism (100% based on zymograms number, relative front (Rf, and optical intensity while esterase isozyme generated polymorphism value of 83.33%. Amino acids were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography, which revealed the presence of 17 amino acids of variable contents ranging from 22.65% to 28.09%. RAPD revealed that 78 amplified DNA products had highly polymorphism value (95.08% based on band numbers, with variable sizes ranging from 120 to 992 base pairs and band intensity. Comet assay recorded the highest extent of nuclear DNA damage as percentage of tailed DNA (2.38% and tail moment unit (5.36 at ELF exposure of maize nuclei for 5 days. The current study concluded that the longer ELF exposing periods had genotoxic stress on macromolecules of maize cells and biomarkers used should be augmented for reliable estimates of genotoxicity after exposure of economic plants to ELF stressors.

  14. Instability of chromosome number and DNA methylation variation induced by hybridization and amphidiploid formation between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey

    Wang Yanjie

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distant hybridization can result genome duplication and allopolyploid formation which may play a significant role in the origin and evolution of many plant species. It is unclear how the two or more divergent genomes coordinate in one nucleus with a single parental cytoplasm within allopolyploids. We used cytological and molecular methods to investigate the genetic and epigenetic instabilities associated with the process of distant hybridization and allopolyploid formation, measuring changes in chromosome number and DNA methylation across multiple generations. Results F1 plants from intergeneric hybridization between Raphanus sativus L. (2n = 18, RR and Brassica alboglabra Bailey (2n = 18, CC were obtained by hand crosses and subsequent embryo rescue. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers were used to identify the F1 hybrid plants. The RAPD data indicated that the hybrids produced specific bands similar to those of parents and new bands that were not present in either parent. Chromosome number variation of somatic cells from allotetraploids in the F4 to F10 generations showed that intensive genetic changes occurred in the early generations of distant hybridization, leading to the formation of mixopolyploids with different chromosome numbers. DNA methylation variation was revealed using MSAP (methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism, which showed that cytosine methylation patterns changed markedly in the process of hybridization and amphidiploid formation. Differences in cytosine methylation levels demonstrated an epigenetic instability of the allopolyploid of Raphanobrassica between the genetically stable and unstable generations. Conclusions Our results showed that chromosome instability occurred in the early generations of allopolyploidy and then the plants were reverted to largely euploidy in later generations. During this process, DNA methylation changed markedly. These results suggest that

  15. Genetic variation of Kaempferia (Zingiberaceae) in Thailand based on chloroplast DNA (psbA-trnH and petA-psbJ) sequences.

    Techaprasan, J; Klinbunga, S; Ngamriabsakul, C; Jenjittikul, T

    2010-01-01

    Genetic variation and species authentication of 71 Kaempferia accessions (representing 15 recognized, six new, and four unidentified species) found indigenously in Thailand were examined by determining chloroplast psbA-trnH and partial petA-psbJ spacer sequences. Ten closely related species (Boesenbergia rotunda, Gagnepainia godefroyi, G. thoreliana, Globba substrigosa, Smithatris myanmarensis, S. supraneanae, Scaphochlamys biloba, S. minutiflora, S. rubescens, and Stahlianthus sp) were also included. After sequence alignments, 1010 and 865 bp in length were obtained for the respective chloroplast DNA sequences. Intraspecific sequence variation was not observed in Kaempferia candida, K. angustifolia, K. laotica, K. galanga, K. pardi sp nov., K. bambusetorum sp nov., K. albomaculata sp nov., K. minuta sp nov., Kaempferia sp nov. 1, and G. thoreliana, for which more than one specimen was available. In contrast, intraspecific sequence polymorphisms were observed in various populations of K. fallax, K. filifolia, K. elegans, K. pulchra, K. rotunda, K. marginata, K. parviflora, K. larsenii, K. roscoeana, K. siamensis, and G. godefroyi. A strict consensus tree based on combined psbA-trnH and partial petA-psbJ sequences revealed four major groups of Kaempferia species. We suggest that the genus Kaempferia is a polyphyletic group, as K. candida was distantly related and did not group with other Kaempferia species. Polymorphic sites and indels of psbA-trnH and petA-psbJ can be used as DNA barcodes for species diagnosis of most Kaempferia and outgroup species. Nuclear DNA polymorphism should be examined to determine if there has been interspecific hybridization and chloroplast DNA introgression in these taxa. PMID:20927714

  16. Sequence variations in DNA repair gene XPC is associated with lung cancer risk in a Chinese population: a case-control study

    The nucleotide excision repair (NER) protein, xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC), participates in recognizing DNA lesions and initiating DNA repair in response to DNA damage. Because mutations in XPC cause a high risk of cancer in XP patients, we hypothesized that inherited sequence variations in XPC may alter DNA repair and thus susceptibility to cancer. In this hospital-based case-control study, we investigated five XPC tagging, common single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagging SNPs) in 1,010 patients with newly diagnosed lung cancer and 1,011 matched cancer free controls in a Chinese population. In individual tagging SNP analysis, we found that rs3731055AG+AA variant genotypes were associated with a significantly decreased risk of lung adenocarcinoma [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 0.71; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.56–0.90] but an increased risk of small cell carcinomas [adjusted OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.05–3.07]. Furthermore, we found that haplotype ACCCA was associated with a decreased risk of lung adenocarcinoma [OR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.62–0.97] but an increased risk of small cell carcinomas [OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.04–2.71], which reflected the presence of rs3731055A allele in this haplotype. Further stratified analysis revealed that the protective effect of rs3731055AG+AA on risk of lung adenocarcinoma was more evident among young subjects (age ≤ 60) and never smokers. These results suggest that inherited sequence variations in XPC may modulate risk of lung cancer, especially lung adenocarcinoma, in Chinese populations. However, these findings need to be verified in larger confirmatory studies with more comprehensively selected tagging SNPs

  17. Inter-individual variation in DNA double-strand break repair in human fibroblasts before and after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are generally considered the most critical lesion induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and may initiate carcinogenesis and other disease. Using an immunofluorescence assay to simultaneously detect nuclear foci of the phosphorylated forms of histone H2AX and ATM kinase at sites of DSBs, we examined the response of 25 apparently normal and 10 DNA repair-deficient (ATM, ATR, NBN, LIG1, LIG4, and FANCG) primary fibroblast strains irradiated with low doses of 137Cs γ-rays. Quiescent G0/G1-phase cultures were exposed to 5, 10, and 25 cGy and allowed to repair for 24 h. The maximum level of IR-induced foci (0.15 foci per cGy, at 10 or 30 min) in the normal strains showed much less inter-individual variation (CV ∼ 0.2) than the level of spontaneous foci, which ranged from 0.2-2.6 foci/cell (CV ∼ 0.6; mean ± SD of 1.00 ± 0.57). Significantly slower focus formation post-irradiation was observed in seven normal strains, similar to most mutant strains examined. There was variation in repair efficiency measured by the fraction of IR-induced foci remaining 24 h post-irradiation, curiously with the strains having slower focus formation showing more efficient repair after 25 cGy. Interestingly, the ranges of spontaneous and residual induced foci levels at 24 h in the normal strains were as least as large as those observed for the repair-defective mutant strains. The inter-individual variation in DSB foci parameters observed in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in this small survey of apparently normal people suggests that hypomorphic genetic variants in genomic maintenance and/or DNA damage signaling and repair genes may contribute to differential susceptibility to cancer induced by environmental mutagens.

  18. Heteroplasmy, length and sequence variation in the mtDNA control regions of three percid fish species (Perca fluviatilis, Acerina cernua, Stizostedion lucioperca).

    Nesbø, C. L.; Arab, M O; Jakobsen, K. S.

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the control region and flanking tRNA genes of perch (Perca fluviatilis) mtDNA was determined. The organization of this region is similar to that of other vertebrates. A tandem array of 10-bp repeats, associated with length variation and heteroplasmy was observed in the 5' end. While the location of the array corresponds to that reported in other species, the length of the repeated unit is shorter than previously observed for tandem repeats in this region. The repeat...

  19. [Genetic structure of the Siberian Sucker (Catostomus catostomus rostratus) according to data on sequence variation of the mtDNA cytochrome B gene].

    Bachevskaia, L T; Pereverzeva, V V; Ivanova, G D; Agapova, G A; Primak, A A

    2014-01-01

    Data regarding the structure and variation of the nucleotide sequence of the cytochrome b gene of mitochondrial DNA of the Siberian Sucker from the Kolyma River were obtained. Analysis of the median network revealed that evolutionary lines diverged from a common ancestor. Penetration of the sucker into Asia from Northern America took place between the Early and Middle Pleistocene. Prolonged reproductive isolation of the Siberian and Northern American suckers led to interspecies divergence with the appearance of amino acid substitutions, which, apparently, fixed due to positive selection. The Siberian Sucker appeared to have three modifications of the Cytb protein. PMID:25735175

  20. DNA Sequence Analysis of SLC26A5, Encoding Prestin, in a Patient-Control Cohort: Identification of Fourteen Novel DNA Sequence Variations

    Minor, Jacob S.; Tang, Hsiao-Yuan; Pereira, Fred A.; Alford, Raye Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Background Prestin, encoded by the gene SLC26A5, is a transmembrane protein of the cochlear outer hair cell (OHC). Prestin is required for the somatic electromotile activity of OHCs, which is absent in OHCs and causes severe hearing impairment in mice lacking prestin. In humans, the role of sequence variations in SLC26A5 in hearing loss is less clear. Although prestin is expected to be required for functional human OHCs, the clinical significance of reported putative mutant alleles in humans ...

  1. Genetic variation and relationships in Laetiporus sulphureus s. lat., as determined by ITS rDNA sequences and in vitro growth rate.

    Vasaitis, Rimvydas; Menkis, Audrius; Lim, Young Woon; Seok, Soonja; Tomsovsky, Michal; Jankovsky, Libor; Lygis, Vaidotas; Slippers, Bernard; Stenlid, Jan

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise the genetic variation and molecular relationships of the brown rot polypore, Laetiporus sulphureus s. lat., from Europe, South America, Africa, and Asia, using ITS sequences of the nu-rDNA and by comparing the growth rate in vitro. In a NJ analysis of the sequences of 130 individuals of L. sulphureus s. lat., eight distinct clusters emerged, supported by BS values of 70-100%. Within each cluster, the ITS rDNA sequence variation was below 3%. The sequences were also analysed together with Laetiporus sequences available from GenBank. Results demonstrated the possible presence of L. huroniensis in Europe (invalidly named L. montanus) and L. gilbertsonii in South America, and provided more information on the Pan-American and European distribution of one of the clades, currently known in North America as L. sulphureus. L. conifericola formed a separate distinct clade. Moreover, the analysis revealed two unknown Laetiporus taxa in Korea, one in South Africa, and one in Europe. As L. sulphureus is described from Europe (France), and we show that more than one taxon exist here, it is presently not possible to define L. sulphureus s. str. Certain biological differences between some of the clades (in vitro growth rates, chemical composition, and pigmentation) were demonstrated and discussed. PMID:19073254

  2. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes, radiosensitivity to cancer and susceptibility to acute tissue reactions in radiotherapy-treated cancer patients

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A. (Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh (US)); Voronova, Natalia V. (Dept. of Molecular Diagnostics, National Research Center GosNIIgenetika, Moscow (RU)); Chistiakov, Pavel A. (Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Center, Moscow (RU))

    2008-06-15

    Ionizing radiation is a well established carcinogen for human cells. At low doses, radiation exposure mainly results in generation of double strand breaks (DSBs). Radiation-related DSBs could be directly linked to the formation of chromosomal rearrangements as has been proven for radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Repair of DSBs presumably involves two main pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). A number of known inherited syndromes, such as ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia-telangiectasia like-disorder, radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, and LIG4 deficiency are associated with increased radiosensitivity and/or cancer risk. Many of them are caused by mutations in DNA repair genes. Recent studies also suggest that variations in the DNA repair capacity in the general population may influence cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we summarize the current status of DNA repair proteins as potential targets for radiation-induced cancer risk. We will focus on genetic alterations in genes involved in HR- and NHEJ-mediated repair of DSBs, which could influence predisposition to radiation-related cancer and thereby explain interindividual differences in radiosensitivity or radioresistance in a general population

  3. Variations in genomic DNA methylation during the long-term in vitro proliferation of oil palm embryogenic suspension cultures

    Rival, A.; Ilbert, P.; Labeyrie, A.; E. Torres; Doulbeau, Sylvie; Personne, A.; Dussert, Stéphane; Beulé, T.; Durand-Gasselin, T.; Tregear, James; Jaligot, E.

    2013-01-01

    The long-term proliferation of embryogenic cell suspensions of oil palm is associated with changes in both genomic methylation rates and embryogenic capacities. In the aim of exploring the relationship between epigenetic stability and the long-term in vitro proliferation of plant tissues, we have studied changes in genomic DNA methylation levels in embryogenic suspensions of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.). Five embryogenic callus lines were obtained from selected hybrid seeds and then pro...

  4. Dynamic DNA cytosine methylation in the Populus trichocarpa genome: tissue-level variation and relationship to gene expression

    Vining Kelly J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA cytosine methylation is an epigenetic modification that has been implicated in many biological processes. However, large-scale epigenomic studies have been applied to very few plant species, and variability in methylation among specialized tissues and its relationship to gene expression is poorly understood. Results We surveyed DNA methylation from seven distinct tissue types (vegetative bud, male inflorescence [catkin], female catkin, leaf, root, xylem, phloem in the reference tree species black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa. Using 5-methyl-cytosine DNA immunoprecipitation followed by Illumina sequencing (MeDIP-seq, we mapped a total of 129,360,151 36- or 32-mer reads to the P. trichocarpa reference genome. We validated MeDIP-seq results by bisulfite sequencing, and compared methylation and gene expression using published microarray data. Qualitative DNA methylation differences among tissues were obvious on a chromosome scale. Methylated genes had lower expression than unmethylated genes, but genes with methylation in transcribed regions ("gene body methylation" had even lower expression than genes with promoter methylation. Promoter methylation was more frequent than gene body methylation in all tissues except male catkins. Male catkins differed in demethylation of particular transposable element categories, in level of gene body methylation, and in expression range of genes with methylated transcribed regions. Tissue-specific gene expression patterns were correlated with both gene body and promoter methylation. Conclusions We found striking differences among tissues in methylation, which were apparent at the chromosomal scale and when genes and transposable elements were examined. In contrast to other studies in plants, gene body methylation had a more repressive effect on transcription than promoter methylation.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA confirms low genetic variation of the greater mouse-eared bats, Myotis myotis, in Central Europe

    Bryja, Josef; Uhrin, M.; Kaňuch, P.; Bémová, P.; Martínková, Natália; Zukal, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2010), s. 73-81. ISSN 1508-1109 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/01/1555; GA MŠk LC06073 Grant ostatní: VEGA(SK) 2/0130/08 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : genetic structure * mtDNA * control region * phylogeography * Myotis myotis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.012, year: 2010

  6. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Privately-owned Korean Native Chicken Population Using mtDNA D-loop Variations

    Hoque, M. R.; Choi, N. R.; Sultana, H.; Kang, B. S.; Heo, K. N.; Hong, S K; Jo, C.; Lee, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of Korean native chicken is increasing, and the discovery of new genetic resources is very important from both economic and genetic conservation points of view. In this study, mtDNA D-loop sequences from 272 privately-owned Korean native chickens from a Hyunin farm were investigated. Seventeen nucleotide substitutions were identified from the sequence analysis and they were classified as 6 haplotypes. Previously investigated haplotypes in five Korean native chicken populations have be...

  7. European colonization by the spined loach (Cobitis taenia) from Ponto-Caspian refugia based on mitochondrial DNA variation

    Culling, M.; Janko, Karel; Boron, A.; Vasiljev, V. P.; Cote, I. M.; Hewitt, G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 15, 1 (2006), s. 173-190. ISSN 0962-1083 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/05/P586; GA AV ČR IBS5045111 Grant ostatní: RFBR 02-04-48354 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : colonization * glacial refugia * mitochondrial DNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.825, year: 2006

  8. The historical demography and genetic variation of the endangered Cycas multipinnata (Cycadaceae) in the red river region, examined by chloroplast DNA sequences and microsatellite markers.

    Gong, Yi-Qing; Zhan, Qing-Qing; Nguyen, Khang Sinh; Nguyen, Hiep Tien; Wang, Yue-Hua; Gong, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Cycas multipinnata C.J. Chen & S.Y. Yang is a cycad endemic to the Red River drainage region that occurs under evergreen forest on steep limestone slopes in Southwest China and northern Vietnam. It is listed as endangered due to habitat loss and over-collecting for the ornamental plant trade, and only several populations remain. In this study, we assess the genetic variation, population structure, and phylogeography of C. multipinnata populations to help develop strategies for the conservation of the species. 60 individuals from six populations were used for chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequencing and 100 individuals from five populations were genotyped using 17 nuclear microsatellites. High genetic differentiation among populations was detected, suggesting that pollen or seed dispersal was restricted within populations. Two main genetic clusters were observed in both the cpDNA and microsatellite loci, corresponding to Yunnan China and northern Vietnam. These clusters indicated low levels of gene flow between the regions since their divergence in the late Pleistocene, which was inferred from both Bayesian and coalescent analysis. In addition, the result of a Bayesian skyline plot based on cpDNA portrayed a long history of constant population size followed by a decline in the last 50,000 years of C. multipinnata that was perhaps affected by the Quaternary glaciations, a finding that was also supported by the Garza-Williamson index calculated from the microsatellite data. The genetic consequences produced by climatic oscillations and anthropogenic disturbances are considered key pressures on C. multipinnata. To establish a conservation management plan, each population of C. multipinnata should be recognized as a Management Unit (MU). In situ and ex situ actions, such as controlling overexploitation and creating a germplasm bank with high genetic diversity, should be urgently implemented to preserve this species. PMID:25689828

  9. Variation patterns of mitochondrial DNA of Abies alba Mill. in suture zones of postglacial migration in Europe

    Duśan Gomory

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Thirty silver fir populations originating from the putative suture zones of the postglacial recolonization (Slovenia, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Ukraine were studied using a mitochondrial nad5-4 gene marker. The geographical distribution of mtDNA haplotypes in the Ukrainian Carpathians and their northern foothills indicates a very recent meeting of migration streams arriving from the Romanian Carpathians and Central Europe. In the western part of the Balkan Peninsula, two counterparallel migration streams are the most plausible explanation of the pattern observed. The haplotype typical for the Balkan Peninsula predominates along the Adrian coast, whereas the CentralEuropean haplotype is more represented in the inland.

  10. Evaluation of IGFBP-7 DNA methylation changes and serum protein variation in Swedish subjects with and without type 2 diabetes

    Gu, Harvest F.; Gu, Tianwei; Hilding, Agneta; Zhu, Yiming; Kärvestedt, Lars; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Lai, Maode; Kutsukake, Masahiko; Frystyk, Jan; Tamura, Kazuhiro; Brismar, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7) is able to interact with insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) as well as insulin. Previous studies have suggested that serum IGFBP-7 levels may be associated with insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study aimed to evaluate IGFBP-7 serum protein and IGFBP7 DNA methylation levels in the subjects with and without T2D. Results A total of 340 Swedish subjects including 100 newly diagnosed T2D patients (50 women/50 men)...

  11. Migration and interaction in a contact zone: mtDNA variation among Bantu-speakers in Southern Africa.

    Chiara Barbieri

    Full Text Available Bantu speech communities expanded over large parts of sub-Saharan Africa within the last 4000-5000 years, reaching different parts of southern Africa 1200-2000 years ago. The Bantu languages subdivide in several major branches, with languages belonging to the Eastern and Western Bantu branches spreading over large parts of Central, Eastern, and Southern Africa. There is still debate whether this linguistic divide is correlated with a genetic distinction between Eastern and Western Bantu speakers. During their expansion, Bantu speakers would have come into contact with diverse local populations, such as the Khoisan hunter-gatherers and pastoralists of southern Africa, with whom they may have intermarried. In this study, we analyze complete mtDNA genome sequences from over 900 Bantu-speaking individuals from Angola, Zambia, Namibia, and Botswana to investigate the demographic processes at play during the last stages of the Bantu expansion. Our results show that most of these Bantu-speaking populations are genetically very homogenous, with no genetic division between speakers of Eastern and Western Bantu languages. Most of the mtDNA diversity in our dataset is due to different degrees of admixture with autochthonous populations. Only the pastoralist Himba and Herero stand out due to high frequencies of particular L3f and L3d lineages; the latter are also found in the neighboring Damara, who speak a Khoisan language and were foragers and small-stock herders. In contrast, the close cultural and linguistic relatives of the Herero and Himba, the Kuvale, are genetically similar to other Bantu-speakers. Nevertheless, as demonstrated by resampling tests, the genetic divergence of Herero, Himba, and Kuvale is compatible with a common shared ancestry with high levels of drift, while the similarity of the Herero, Himba, and Damara probably reflects admixture, as also suggested by linguistic analyses.

  12. New population and phylogenetic features of the internal variation within mitochondrial DNA macro-haplogroup R0.

    Vanesa Alvarez-Iglesias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: R0 embraces the most common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA lineage in West Eurasia, namely, haplogroup H (approximately 40%. R0 sub-lineages are badly defined in the control region and therefore, the analysis of diagnostic coding region polymorphisms is needed in order to gain resolution in population and medical studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced the first hypervariable segment (HVS-I of 518 individuals from different North Iberian regions. The mtDNAs belonging to R0 (approximately 57% were further genotyped for a set of 71 coding region SNPs characterizing major and minor branches of R0. We found that the North Iberian Peninsula shows moderate levels of population stratification; for instance, haplogroup V reaches the highest frequency in Cantabria (north-central Iberia, but lower in Galicia (northwest Iberia and Catalonia (northeast Iberia. When compared to other European and Middle East populations, haplogroups H1, H3 and H5a show frequency peaks in the Franco-Cantabrian region, declining from West towards the East and South Europe. In addition, we have characterized, by way of complete genome sequencing, a new autochthonous clade of haplogroup H in the Basque country, named H2a5. Its coalescence age, 15.6+/-8 thousand years ago (kya, dates to the period immediately after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In contrast to other H lineages that experienced re-expansion outside the Franco-Cantabrian refuge after the LGM (e.g. H1 and H3, H2a5 most likely remained confined to this area till present days.

  13. Migration and interaction in a contact zone: mtDNA variation among Bantu-speakers in Southern Africa.

    Barbieri, Chiara; Vicente, Mário; Oliveira, Sandra; Bostoen, Koen; Rocha, Jorge; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Bantu speech communities expanded over large parts of sub-Saharan Africa within the last 4000-5000 years, reaching different parts of southern Africa 1200-2000 years ago. The Bantu languages subdivide in several major branches, with languages belonging to the Eastern and Western Bantu branches spreading over large parts of Central, Eastern, and Southern Africa. There is still debate whether this linguistic divide is correlated with a genetic distinction between Eastern and Western Bantu speakers. During their expansion, Bantu speakers would have come into contact with diverse local populations, such as the Khoisan hunter-gatherers and pastoralists of southern Africa, with whom they may have intermarried. In this study, we analyze complete mtDNA genome sequences from over 900 Bantu-speaking individuals from Angola, Zambia, Namibia, and Botswana to investigate the demographic processes at play during the last stages of the Bantu expansion. Our results show that most of these Bantu-speaking populations are genetically very homogenous, with no genetic division between speakers of Eastern and Western Bantu languages. Most of the mtDNA diversity in our dataset is due to different degrees of admixture with autochthonous populations. Only the pastoralist Himba and Herero stand out due to high frequencies of particular L3f and L3d lineages; the latter are also found in the neighboring Damara, who speak a Khoisan language and were foragers and small-stock herders. In contrast, the close cultural and linguistic relatives of the Herero and Himba, the Kuvale, are genetically similar to other Bantu-speakers. Nevertheless, as demonstrated by resampling tests, the genetic divergence of Herero, Himba, and Kuvale is compatible with a common shared ancestry with high levels of drift, while the similarity of the Herero, Himba, and Damara probably reflects admixture, as also suggested by linguistic analyses. PMID:24901532

  14. Phylogeography of Arabidopsis halleri (Brassicaceae) in mountain regions of Central Europe inferred from cpDNA variation and ecological niche modelling.

    Wasowicz, Pawel; Pauwels, Maxime; Pasierbinski, Andrzej; Przedpelska-Wasowicz, Ewa M; Babst-Kostecka, Alicja A; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Rostanski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate phylogeographical patterns present within A. halleri in Central Europe. 1,281 accessions sampled from 52 populations within the investigated area were used in the study of genetic variation based on chloroplast DNA. Over 500 high-quality species occurrence records were used in ecological niche modelling experiments. We evidenced the presence of a clear phylogeographic structure within A. halleri in Central Europe. Our results showed that two genetically different groups of populations are present in western and eastern part of the Carpathians. The hypothesis of the existence of a glacial refugium in the Western Carpathians adn the Bohemian Forest cannot be rejected from our data. It seems, however, that the evidence collected during the present study is not conclusive. The area of Sudetes was colonised after LGM probably by migrants from the Bohemian Forest. PMID:26835186

  15. Intragenomic sequence variation at the ITS1 - ITS2 region and at the 18S and 28S nuclear ribosomal DNA genes of the New Zealand mud snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Hydrobiidae: mollusca)

    Hoy, Marshal S.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular genetic analysis was conducted on two populations of the invasive non-native New Zealand mud snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum), one from a freshwater ecosystem in Devil's Lake (Oregon, USA) and the other from an ecosystem of higher salinity in the Columbia River estuary (Hammond Harbor, Oregon, USA). To elucidate potential genetic differences between the two populations, three segments of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), the ITS1-ITS2 regions and the 18S and 28S rDNA genes were cloned and sequenced. Variant sequences within each individual were found in all three rDNA segments. Folding models were utilized for secondary structure analysis and results indicated that there were many sequences which contained structure-altering polymorphisms, which suggests they could be nonfunctional pseudogenes. In addition, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) was used for hierarchical analysis of genetic variance to estimate variation within and among populations and within individuals. AMOVA revealed significant variation in the ITS region between the populations and among clones within individuals, while in the 5.8S rDNA significant variation was revealed among individuals within the two populations. High levels of intragenomic variation were found in the ITS regions, which are known to be highly variable in many organisms. More interestingly, intragenomic variation was also found in the 18S and 28S rDNA, which has rarely been observed in animals and is so far unreported in Mollusca. We postulate that in these P. antipodarum populations the effects of concerted evolution are diminished due to the fact that not all of the rDNA genes in their polyploid genome should be essential for sustaining cellular function. This could lead to a lessening of selection pressures, allowing mutations to accumulate in some copies, changing them into variant sequences.                   

  16. Genetic variation of Chinese and Japanese wild Pacific abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) measured by microsatellite DNA markers

    LI Qi; KIJIMA Akihiro

    2006-01-01

    Population differentiation and relationships among three wild populations of the Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai collected from coastal seas around China and Japan were estimated using microsatellite DNA analysis. The results obtained with six microsatellite loci showed a high genetic diversity for China and Japan populations. The mean number of alleles per locus ranged from 11.7 to 23.0, and the average of observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.656 to 0.721, and from 0.721 to 0.793, respectively. The observed genotype frequencies at each locus were mostly in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg expectations with five exceptions. Significant differences were detected between Chinese and Japanese H. discus hannai populations [Weir and Cocker-ham's fixation index(Fst) range: 0.020~0.023; Slatkin's fixation index (Rst) range: 0.016~0.044], and no obvious difference was detected between the samples of Japanese H. discus hannai populations (Fst=0.002; Rst = 0.007). The level of differentiation among populations is further evidenced by the nNeighbor-joining tree topology on which the Japanese samples were closely clustered, and the Chinese population formed a separate cluster. These results suggest that care should be taken in future management of different populations.

  17. Phylogeography of Spiraea alpina (Rosaceae) in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau inferred from chloroplast DNA sequence variations

    Fa-Qi ZHANG; Qing-Bo GAO; De-Jun ZHANG; Yi-Zhong DUAN; Yin-Hu LI; Peng-Cheng FU; Rui XING; Khan GULZAR; Shi-Long CHEN

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the phylogeographic patterns of Spiraea alpina (Rosaceae) and clarify its response to past climatic changes in the climate-sensitive Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP).We sequenced a chloroplast DNA fragment (trnL-trnF) from 528 individuals representing 43 populations.We identified 10 haplotypes,which were tentatively divided into three groups.These haplotypes or groups were distributed in the different regions of the QTP.Only half the populations were fixed by a single haplotype,whereas the others contained two or more.In the central and eastern regions,adjacent populations at the local scale shared the same haplotype.Our phylogeographic analyses suggest that this alpine shrub survived in multiple refugia during the Last Glacial Maximum and that earlier glaciations may have trigged deep intraspecific divergences.Post-glacial expansions occurred only within populations or across multiple populations within a local range.The findings of the present study together with previous phylogeographic reports suggest that evolutionary histories of plants in the QTP are complex and variable depending on the species investigated.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in Drosophilid species (Diptera: Drosophilidae) along altitudinal gradient from Central Himalayan region of India

    MANISHA SARSWAT; SAURABH DEWAN; RAJENDRA SINGH FARTYAL

    2016-06-01

    Central Himalayan region of India encompasses varied ecological habitats ranging from near tropics to the mid-elevation forests dominated by cool-temperate taxa. In past, we have reported several new records and novel species from Uttarakhand state of India. Here, we assessed genetic variations in three mitochondrial genes, namely, 16S rRNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COI and COII) in 26 drosophilid species collected along altitudinal transect from 550 to 2700 m above mean sea level. In the present study, overall 543 sequences were generated, 82 for 16S rRNA, 238 forCOI, 223 for COII with 21, 47 and 45 mitochondrial haplotypes for 16S rRNA, COI and COII genes,respectively. Almost all species were represented by 2–3 unique mitochondrial haplotypes, depicting a significant impact of environmental heterogeneity along altitudinal gradient on genetic diversity. Also for the first time, molecular data of some rare species like Drosophila mukteshwarensis , Liodrosophila nitida, Lordiphosa parantillaria , Lordiphosa ayarpathaensis ,Scaptomyza himalayana,Scaptomyza tistai , Zaprionus grandis and Stegana minuta are provided to public domains through this study.

  19. Variation in the genomic locations and sequence conservation of STAR elements among staphylococcal species provides insight into DNA repeat evolution

    Purves Joanne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus Repeat (STAR elements are a type of interspersed intergenic direct repeat. In this study the conservation and variation in these elements was explored by bioinformatic analyses of published staphylococcal genome sequences and through sequencing of specific STAR element loci from a large set of S. aureus isolates. Results Using bioinformatic analyses, we found that the STAR elements were located in different genomic loci within each staphylococcal species. There was no correlation between the number of STAR elements in each genome and the evolutionary relatedness of staphylococcal species, however higher levels of repeats were observed in both S. aureus and S. lugdunensis compared to other staphylococcal species. Unexpectedly, sequencing of the internal spacer sequences of individual repeat elements from multiple isolates showed conservation at the sequence level within deep evolutionary lineages of S. aureus. Whilst individual STAR element loci were demonstrated to expand and contract, the sequences associated with each locus were stable and distinct from one another. Conclusions The high degree of lineage and locus-specific conservation of these intergenic repeat regions suggests that STAR elements are maintained due to selective or molecular forces with some of these elements having an important role in cell physiology. The high prevalence in two of the more virulent staphylococcal species is indicative of a potential role for STAR elements in pathogenesis.

  20. Nuclear and Chloroplast DNA Variation Provides Insights into Population Structure and Multiple Origin of Native Aromatic Rices of Odisha, India.

    Roy, Pritesh Sundar; Rao, Gundimeda Jwala Narasimha; Jena, Sudipta; Samal, Rashmita; Patnaik, Ashok; Patnaik, Sasank Sekhar Chyau; Jambhulkar, Nitiprasad Namdeorao; Sharma, Srigopal; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2016-01-01

    A large number of short grain aromatic rice suited to the agro-climatic conditions and local preferences are grown in niche areas of different parts of India and their diversity is evolved over centuries as a result of selection by traditional farmers. Systematic characterization of these specialty rices has not been attempted. An effort was made to characterize 126 aromatic short grain rice landraces, collected from 19 different districts in the State of Odisha, from eastern India. High level of variation for grain quality and agronomic traits among these aromatic rices was observed and genotypes having desirable phenotypic traits like erect flag leaf, thick culm, compact and dense panicles, short plant stature, early duration, superior yield and grain quality traits were identified. A total of 24 SSR markers corresponding to the hyper variable regions of rice chromosomes were used to understand the genetic diversity and to establish the genetic relationship among the aromatic short grain rice landraces at nuclear genome level. SSR analysis of 126 genotypes from Odisha and 10 genotypes from other states revealed 110 alleles with an average of 4.583 and the Nei's genetic diversity value (He) was in the range of 0.034-0.880 revealing two sub-populations SP 1 (membership percentage-27.1%) and SP 2 (72.9%). At the organelle genomic level for the C/A repeats in PS1D sequence of chloroplasts, eight different plastid sub types and 33 haplotypes were detected. The japonica (Nipponbare) subtype (6C7A) was detected in 100 genotypes followed by O. rufipogon (KF428978) subtype (6C6A) in 13 genotypes while indica (93-11) sub type (8C8A) was seen in 14 genotypes. The tree constructed based on haplotypes suggests that short grain aromatic landraces might have independent origin of these plastid subtypes. Notably a wide range of diversity was observed among these landraces cultivated in different parts confined to the State of Odisha. PMID:27598392

  1. In search of the genetic footprints of Sumerians: a survey of Y-chromosome and mtDNA variation in the Marsh Arabs of Iraq

    Olivieri Anna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For millennia, the southern part of the Mesopotamia has been a wetland region generated by the Tigris and Euphrates rivers before flowing into the Gulf. This area has been occupied by human communities since ancient times and the present-day inhabitants, the Marsh Arabs, are considered the population with the strongest link to ancient Sumerians. Popular tradition, however, considers the Marsh Arabs as a foreign group, of unknown origin, which arrived in the marshlands when the rearing of water buffalo was introduced to the region. Results To shed some light on the paternal and maternal origin of this population, Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA variation was surveyed in 143 Marsh Arabs and in a large sample of Iraqi controls. Analyses of the haplogroups and sub-haplogroups observed in the Marsh Arabs revealed a prevalent autochthonous Middle Eastern component for both male and female gene pools, with weak South-West Asian and African contributions, more evident in mtDNA. A higher male than female homogeneity is characteristic of the Marsh Arab gene pool, likely due to a strong male genetic drift determined by socio-cultural factors (patrilocality, polygamy, unequal male and female migration rates. Conclusions Evidence of genetic stratification ascribable to the Sumerian development was provided by the Y-chromosome data where the J1-Page08 branch reveals a local expansion, almost contemporary with the Sumerian City State period that characterized Southern Mesopotamia. On the other hand, a more ancient background shared with Northern Mesopotamia is revealed by the less represented Y-chromosome lineage J1-M267*. Overall our results indicate that the introduction of water buffalo breeding and rice farming, most likely from the Indian sub-continent, only marginally affected the gene pool of autochthonous people of the region. Furthermore, a prevalent Middle Eastern ancestry of the modern population of the marshes of

  2. Genetic variation in DNA-repair pathways and response to radiochemotherapy in esophageal adenocarcinoma: a retrospective cohort study of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group

    Wu Xifeng

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent data in esophageal cancer suggests the variant allele of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in XRCC1 may be associated with resistance to radiochemotherapy. However, this SNP has not been assessed in a histologically homogeneous clinical trial cohort that has been treated with a uniform approach. In addition, whether germline DNA may serve as a surrogate for tumor genotype at this locus is unknown in this disease. Our objective was to assess this SNP in relation to the pathologic complete response (pCR rate in subjects with esophageal adenocarcinoma who received cisplatin-based preoperative radiochemotherapy in a multicenter clinical trial (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 1201. As a secondary aim, we investigated the rate of allelic imbalance between germline and tumor DNA. Methods Eighty-one eligible treatment-naïve subjects with newly diagnosed resectable esophageal adenocarcinoma received radiotherapy (45 Gy concurrent with cisplatin-based chemotherapy, with planned subsequent surgical resection. The primary endpoint was pCR, defined as complete absence of tumor in the surgical specimen after radiochemotherapy. Using germline DNA from 60 subjects, we examined the base-excision repair SNP, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, and 4 other SNPs in nucleotide excision (XPD Lys751Gln and Asp312Asn, ERCC1 3' flank and double-stranded break (XRCC2 5' flank repair pathways, and correlated genotype with pCR rate. Paired tumor tissue was used to estimate the frequency of allelic imbalance at the XRCC1 SNP. Results The variant allele of the XRCC1 SNP (399Gln was detected in 52% of subjects. Only 6% of subjects with the variant allele experienced a pCR, compared to 28% of subjects without the variant allele (odds ratio 5.37 for failing to achieve pCR, p = 0.062. Allelic imbalance at this locus was found in only 10% of informative subjects, suggesting that germline genotype may reflect tumor genotype at this locus. No significant association

  3. Genetic variation in DNA-repair pathways and response to radiochemotherapy in esophageal adenocarcinoma: a retrospective cohort study of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group

    Recent data in esophageal cancer suggests the variant allele of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in XRCC1 may be associated with resistance to radiochemotherapy. However, this SNP has not been assessed in a histologically homogeneous clinical trial cohort that has been treated with a uniform approach. In addition, whether germline DNA may serve as a surrogate for tumor genotype at this locus is unknown in this disease. Our objective was to assess this SNP in relation to the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate in subjects with esophageal adenocarcinoma who received cisplatin-based preoperative radiochemotherapy in a multicenter clinical trial (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 1201). As a secondary aim, we investigated the rate of allelic imbalance between germline and tumor DNA. Eighty-one eligible treatment-naïve subjects with newly diagnosed resectable esophageal adenocarcinoma received radiotherapy (45 Gy) concurrent with cisplatin-based chemotherapy, with planned subsequent surgical resection. The primary endpoint was pCR, defined as complete absence of tumor in the surgical specimen after radiochemotherapy. Using germline DNA from 60 subjects, we examined the base-excision repair SNP, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, and 4 other SNPs in nucleotide excision (XPD Lys751Gln and Asp312Asn, ERCC1 3' flank) and double-stranded break (XRCC2 5' flank) repair pathways, and correlated genotype with pCR rate. Paired tumor tissue was used to estimate the frequency of allelic imbalance at the XRCC1 SNP. The variant allele of the XRCC1 SNP (399Gln) was detected in 52% of subjects. Only 6% of subjects with the variant allele experienced a pCR, compared to 28% of subjects without the variant allele (odds ratio 5.37 for failing to achieve pCR, p = 0.062). Allelic imbalance at this locus was found in only 10% of informative subjects, suggesting that germline genotype may reflect tumor genotype at this locus. No significant association with pCR was noted for other SNPs

  4. Use of novel DNA fingerprinting techniques for the detection and characterization of genetic variation in vegetatively propagated crops. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Vegetative propagated crops, such as banana and platain, sweet potato, yam, sugarcane and cassava, represent important sources of food in the developing countries. Although some of these crops may produce seeds, they must for practical purposes be propagated vegetatively. As normal plant breeding strategies based on genetic hybridization are of limited value or not applicable to such crops, it is necessary to assess the genetic diversity already existing in these crops and to design breeding strategies accordingly. If the existing genetic variation is shown to be too narrow for breeding purposes, one promising possibility for the introduction of genetic variability is the use of mutations induced by radiation or chemical mutagens. This CRP focused on: the detection of genetic diversity induced by mutagenic treatment or in vitro culture; the development of crop-specific markers; and increasing co-operation between molecular biologists in advanced laboratories and plant breeders and molecular biologists in the developing countries. The success of this CRP is evidenced by the introduction and application of new molecular methods by laboratories in developing countries, specially for the analysis of local crop genetic diversity. These exciting preliminary results show the potential for applications in crop improvement but much work remains to be done. Many of the vegetatively propagated species are ''orphan crops'', under-investigated on the international level. The development of new uses of transgenesis for the development of edible vaccines should not be overlooked. The challenge that remains is in the application of these new tools for practical end-user oriented improvements in vegetatively propagated crops. The present publication summarizes the third and final Research Co-ordination Meeting on the Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterization of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops

  5. A radioimmunoassay of chicken growth hormone using growth hormone produced by recombinant DNA technology: validation and observations of plasma hormone variations in genetically fat and lean chickens

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) of chicken growth hormone (c-GH) has been developed using growth hormone produced by recombinant DNA technology. The best rabbit antiserum was used at 1/300,000 final dilution. Hormone labelling by iodine-125, achieved by chloramine T, allowed a specific activity of 3.7 MBq/μg. The equilibrium curves show that optimal conditions of incubation were reached at room temperature for 24h. This RIA used a second sheep antibody which precipitated the whole c-GH bound to the first antibody in the presence of polyethylene glycol solution (6%) at room temperature for 30 min. In our conditions, sensitivity was about 30 pg of c-GH per tube. Coefficient of variation was around 10%. No cross reaction was found with avian LH and prolactin. Thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) injection to young chickens induced 20-fold higher plasma c-GH concentrations. Simultaneous injection of somatostatin and TRH slightly reduced these concentrations. Hypoglycemia induced by insulin led to a drop of the plasma c-GH concentration. Conversely, refeeding or glucose load induced slight increases of the c-GH level. Genetically fat chickens tended to exhibit higher plasma c-GH concentrations than lean chickens

  6. Radioimmunoassay of chicken growth hormone using growth hormone produced by recombinant DNA technology: validation and observations of plasma hormone variations in genetically fat and lean chickens

    Picaper, G.; Leclercq, B.; Saadoun, A.; Mongin, P.

    1986-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) of chicken growth hormone (c-GH) has been developed using growth hormone produced by recombinant DNA technology. The best rabbit antiserum was used at 1/300,000 final dilution. Hormone labelling by iodine-125, achieved by chloramine T, allowed a specific activity of 3.7 MBq/..mu..g. The equilibrium curves show that optimal conditions of incubation were reached at room temperature for 24h. This RIA used a second sheep antibody which precipitated the whole c-GH bound to the first antibody in the presence of polyethylene glycol solution (6%) at room temperature for 30 min. In our conditions, sensitivity was about 30 pg of c-GH per tube. Coefficient of variation was around 10%. No cross reaction was found with avian LH and prolactin. Thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) injection to young chickens induced 20-fold higher plasma c-GH concentrations. Simultaneous injection of somatostatin and TRH slightly reduced these concentrations. Hypoglycemia induced by insulin led to a drop of the plasma c-GH concentration. Conversely, refeeding or glucose load induced slight increases of the c-GH level. Genetically fat chickens tended to exhibit higher plasma c-GH concentrations than lean chickens.

  7. Pash 3.0: A versatile software package for read mapping and integrative analysis of genomic and epigenomic variation using massively parallel DNA sequencing

    Chen Zuozhou

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Massively parallel sequencing readouts of epigenomic assays are enabling integrative genome-wide analyses of genomic and epigenomic variation. Pash 3.0 performs sequence comparison and read mapping and can be employed as a module within diverse configurable analysis pipelines, including ChIP-Seq and methylome mapping by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing. Results Pash 3.0 generally matches the accuracy and speed of niche programs for fast mapping of short reads, and exceeds their performance on longer reads generated by a new generation of massively parallel sequencing technologies. By exploiting longer read lengths, Pash 3.0 maps reads onto the large fraction of genomic DNA that contains repetitive elements and polymorphic sites, including indel polymorphisms. Conclusions We demonstrate the versatility of Pash 3.0 by analyzing the interaction between CpG methylation, CpG SNPs, and imprinting based on publicly available whole-genome shotgun bisulfite sequencing data. Pash 3.0 makes use of gapped k-mer alignment, a non-seed based comparison method, which is implemented using multi-positional hash tables. This allows Pash 3.0 to run on diverse hardware platforms, including individual computers with standard RAM capacity, multi-core hardware architectures and large clusters.

  8. Cryptic variation in an ecological indicator organism: mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data confirm distinct lineages of Baetis harrisoni Barnard (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae in southern Africa

    Pereira-da-Conceicoa Lyndall L

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Baetis harrisoni Barnard is a mayfly frequently encountered in river studies across Africa, but the external morphological features used for identifying nymphs have been observed to vary subtly between different geographic locations. It has been associated with a wide range of ecological conditions, including pH extremes of pH 2.9–10.0 in polluted waters. We present a molecular study of the genetic variation within B. harrisoni across 21 rivers in its distribution range in southern Africa. Results Four gene regions were examined, two mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I [COI] and small subunit ribosomal 16S rDNA [16S] and two nuclear (elongation factor 1 alpha [EF1α] and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase [PEPCK]. Bayesian and parsimony approaches to phylogeny reconstruction resulted in five well-supported major lineages, which were confirmed using a general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC model. Results from the EF1α gene were significantly incongruent with both mitochondrial and nuclear (PEPCK results, possibly due to incomplete lineage sorting of the EF1α gene. Mean between-clade distance estimated using the COI and PEPCK data was found to be an order of magnitude greater than the within-clade distance and comparable to that previously reported for other recognised Baetis species. Analysis of the Isolation by Distance (IBD between all samples showed a small but significant effect of IBD. Within each lineage the contribution of IBD was minimal. Tentative dating analyses using an uncorrelated log-normal relaxed clock and two published estimates of COI mutation rates suggest that diversification within the group occurred throughout the Pliocene and mid-Miocene (~2.4–11.5 mya. Conclusions The distinct lineages of B. harrisoni correspond to categorical environmental variation, with two lineages comprising samples from streams that flow through acidic Table Mountain Sandstone and three lineages with samples from

  9. Gene expression profiling of Spodoptera frugiperda hemocytes and fat body using cDNA microarray reveals polydnavirus-associated variations in lepidopteran host genes transcript levels

    Feyereisen R

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic approaches provide unique opportunities to study interactions of insects with their pathogens. We developed a cDNA microarray to analyze the gene transcription profile of the lepidopteran pest Spodoptera frugiperda in response to injection of the polydnavirus HdIV associated with the ichneumonid wasp Hyposoter didymator. Polydnaviruses are associated with parasitic ichneumonoid wasps and are required for their development within the lepidopteran host, in which they act as potent immunosuppressive pathogens. In this study, we analyzed transcriptional variations in the two main effectors of the insect immune response, the hemocytes and the fat body, after injection of filter-purified HdIV. Results Results show that 24 hours post-injection, about 4% of the 1750 arrayed host genes display changes in their transcript levels with a large proportion (76% showing a decrease. As a comparison, in S. frugiperda fat body, after injection of the pathogenic JcDNV densovirus, 8 genes display significant changes in their transcript level. They differ from the 7 affected by HdIV and, as opposed to HdIV injection, are all up-regulated. Interestingly, several of the genes that are modulated by HdIV injection have been shown to be involved in lepidopteran innate immunity. Levels of transcripts related to calreticulin, prophenoloxidase-activating enzyme, immulectin-2 and a novel lepidopteran scavenger receptor are decreased in hemocytes of HdIV-injected caterpillars. This was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis but not observed after injection of heat-inactivated HdIV. Conversely, an increased level of transcripts was found for a galactose-binding lectin and, surprisingly, for the prophenoloxidase subunits. The results obtained suggest that HdIV injection affects transcript levels of genes encoding different components of the host immune response (non-self recognition, humoral and cellular responses. Conclusion This analysis of the

  10. Grapes, galls, and geography: the distribution of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variation across host-plant species and regions in a specialist herbivore.

    Downie, D A; Fisher, J R; Granett, J

    2001-07-01

    Studies of patterns of molecular variation in natural populations can provide important insights into a number of evolutionary problems. Among these, the question of whether geographic factors are more important than ecological factors in promoting population differentiation and ultimately speciation has been an important and contentious area in evolutionary biology. Systems involving herbivorous insects have played a leading role in this discussion. This study examined the distribution of molecular variation in a highly specialized gall-forming insect, grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch), that is found on both sympatric and allopatric host-plant species of the genus Vitis. In addition, the relationship of insects in the introduced range in the United States to ancestral populations in the native range was examined. Evidence for differentiation along host-plant lines from both nuclear (RAPD) and mitochondrial (COI) DNA was confounded with the effect of geography. Differentiation was found where hosts were allopatric or parapatric, but no evidence was found for such differentiation on two hosts, V. vulpina and V. aestivalis, that are broadly sympatric. The question of population differentiation onto these sympatric hosts can be considered to be resolved--it has not occurred in spite of a long history of association. Evidence was equivocal, but suggestive of a period of divergence in allopatry prior to reestablishment of contact, for insects associated with another host plant species, V. cinerea, found in both sympatric and parapatric populations. A low level of diversity and placement of samples collected from the grape species V. riparia at the tip of a phylogenetic tree supports the hypothesis that this host has been recently colonized from populations from the Mississippi Valley. A polyphyletic origin for biotype B grape phylloxera was supported: Although most samples collected from vineyards in the introduced range in California had similar