WorldWideScience

Sample records for abc protein superfamilies

  1. Evolutionary Pattern of N-Glycosylation Sequon Numbers  in Eukaryotic ABC Protein Superfamilies

    R. Shyama Prasad Rao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins contain a large number of NXS/T sequences (where X is any amino acid except proline which are the potential sites of asparagine (N linked glycosylation. However, the patterns of occurrence of these N-glycosylation sequons in related proteins or groups of proteins and their underlying causes have largely been unexplored. We computed the actual and probabilistic occurrence of NXS/T sequons in ABC protein superfamilies from eight diverse eukaryotic organisms. The ABC proteins contained significantly higher NXS/T sequon numbers compared to respective genome-wide average, but the sequon density was significantly lower owing to the increase in protein size and decrease in sequon specific amino acids. However, mammalian ABC proteins have significantly higher sequon density, and both serine and threonine containing sequons (NXS and NXT have been positively selected—against the recent findings of only threonine specific Darwinian selection of sequons in proteins. The occurrence of sequons was positively correlated with the frequency of sequon specific amino acids and negatively correlated with proline and the NPS/T sequences. Further, the NPS/T sequences were significantly higher than expected in plant ABC proteins which have the lowest number of NXS/T sequons. Accord- ingly, compared to overall proteins, N-glycosylation sequons in ABC protein superfamilies have a distinct pattern of occurrence, and the results are discussed in an evolutionary perspective.

  2. Evolution of the extended LHC protein superfamily in photosynthesis

    Engelken, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    In photosynthesis, sunlight interacts with colorful photosynthetic pigments like the chlorophylls, carotenoids and phycobilines. The first two of these pigments can be bound by members of the extended light-harvesting complex (LHC) protein superfamily and are organised in order to take on functions in the collection of or in the defense against sunlight. The extended LHC superfamily comprises several protein families, like the LHCs, the photosystem II subunit S (PSBS), the red algal lineage c...

  3. The Villin/Gelsolin/Fragmin Superfamily Proteins in Plants

    2007-01-01

    The villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily is a conserved Ca2+ -dependent family of actin-regulating proteins that is widely present both in mammalian and non-mammalian organisms. They have traditionally been characterized by the same core of three or six tandem gelsolin subdomains. The study in vertebrates and lower eukaryotic cells has revealed that the villinlgelsolin/fragmin superfamily of proteins has versatile functions including severing, capping, nucleating or bundling actin filaments. In plants, encouraging progress has been made in this field of research in recent years. This review will summarize the identified plant homologs of villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily, thus providing a basis for reflection on their biochemical activities and functions in plants.

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase protein superfamily in maize.

    Zhou, Mei-Liang; Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Ming; Qi, Lei-Peng; Yang, Xiong-Bang; Zhang, Kai-Xuan; Pang, Jun-Feng; Zhu, Xue-Mei; Shao, Ji-Rong; Tang, Yi-Xiong; Wu, Yan-Min

    2012-11-01

    Maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.) is an important model organism for fundamental research in the agro-biotechnology field. Aldehydes were generated in response to a suite of environmental stresses that perturb metabolism including salinity, dehydration, desiccation, and cold and heat shock. Many biologically important aldehydes are metabolized by the superfamily of NAD(P)(+)-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here, starting from the database of Z. mays, we identified 28 aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes and 48 transcripts by the in silico cloning method using the ALDH-conserved domain amino acid sequence of Arabidopsis and rice as a probe. Phylogenetic analysis shows that all 28 members of the ALDH gene families were classified to ten distinct subfamilies. Microarray data and quantitative real-time PCR analysis reveal that ZmALDH9, ZmALDH13, and ZmALDH17 genes involve the function of drought stress, acid tolerance, and pathogens infection. These results suggested that these three ZmALDH genes might be potentially useful in maize genetic improvement. PMID:22983498

  5. Abc1: a new ABC transporter from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Christensen, P U; Davis, K; Nielsen, O; Davey, William John; Nielsen, Olaf

    1997-01-01

    We have isolated the abc1 gene from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Sequence analysis suggests that the Abc1 protein is a member of the ABC superfamily of transporters and is composed of two structurally homologous halves, each consisting of a hydrophobic region of six transmembrane...

  6. Structural Evolution of the Protein Kinase-Like Superfamily.

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The protein kinase family is large and important, but it is only one family in a larger superfamily of homologous kinases that phosphorylate a variety of substrates and play important roles in all three superkingdoms of life. We used a carefully constructed structural alignment of selected kinases as the basis for a study of the structural evolution of the protein kinase-like superfamily. The comparison of structures revealed a "universal core" domain consisting only of regions required for ATP binding and the phosphotransfer reaction. Remarkably, even within the universal core some kinase structures display notable changes, while still retaining essential activity. Hence, the protein kinase-like superfamily has undergone substantial structural and sequence revision over long evolutionary timescales. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for the superfamily using a novel approach that allowed for the combination of sequence and structure information into a unified quantitative analysis. When considered against the backdrop of species distribution and other metrics, our tree provides a compelling scenario for the development of the various kinase families from a shared common ancestor. We propose that most of the so-called "atypical kinases" are not intermittently derived from protein kinases, but rather diverged early in evolution to form a distinct phyletic group. Within the atypical kinases, the aminoglycoside and choline kinase families appear to share the closest relationship. These two families in turn appear to be the most closely related to the protein kinase family. In addition, our analysis suggests that the actin-fragmin kinase, an atypical protein kinase, is more closely related to the phosphoinositide-3 kinase family than to the protein kinase family. The two most divergent families, alpha-kinases and phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs, appear to have distinct evolutionary histories. While the PIPKs probably have an

  7. Identification of protein superfamily from structure- based sequence motif

    2002-01-01

    The structure-based sequence motif of the distant proteins in evolution, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) Ⅰ and Ⅱ superfamilies, as an example, has been defined by the structural comparison, structure-based sequence alignment and analyses on substitution patterns of residues in common sequence conserved regions. And the phosphatases Ⅰ and Ⅱ can be correctly identified together by the structure-based PTP sequence motif from SWISS-PROT and TrEBML databases. The results show that the correct rates of identification are over 98%. This is the first time to identify PTP Ⅰ and Ⅱ together by this motif.

  8. The Defensins Consist of Two Independent, Convergent Protein Superfamilies.

    Shafee, Thomas M A; Lay, Fung T; Hulett, Mark D; Anderson, Marilyn A

    2016-09-01

    The defensin and defensin-like proteins are an extensive group of small, cationic, disulfide-rich proteins found in animals, plants, and fungi and mostly perform roles in host defense. The term defensin was originally used for small mammalian proteins found in neutrophils and was subsequently applied to insect proteins and plant γ-thionins based on their perceived sequence and structural similarity. Defensins are often described as ancient innate immunity molecules and classified as a single superfamily and both sequence alignments and phylogenies have been constructed. Here, we present evidence that the defensins have not all evolved from a single ancestor. Instead, they consist of two analogous superfamilies, and extensive convergent evolution is the source of their similarities. Evidence of common origin necessarily gets weaker for distantly related genes, as is the case for defensins, which are both divergent and small. We show that similarities that have been used as evidence for common origin are all expected by chance in short, constrained, disulfide-rich proteins. Differences in tertiary structure, secondary structure order, and disulfide bond connectivity indicate convergence as the likely source of the similarity. We refer to the two evolutionarily independent groups as the cis-defensins and trans-defensins based on the orientation of the most conserved pair of disulfides. PMID:27297472

  9. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  10. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    Marc Lenoir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH and Tec homology (TH domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  11. Phylogenetic Characterization of Transport Protein Superfamilies: Superiority of SuperfamilyTree Programs over Those Based on Multiple Alignments

    Chen, Jonathan S.; Reddy, Vamsee; Chen, Joshua H.; Shlykov, Maksim A; Zheng, Wei Hao; Cho, Jaehoon; Yen, Ming Ren; Saier, Milton H.

    2012-01-01

    Transport proteins function in the translocation of ions, solutes and macromolecules across cellular and organellar membranes. These integral membrane proteins fall into >600 families as tabulated in the Transporter Classification Database (www.tcdb.org). Recent studies, some of which are reported here, define distant phylogenetic relationships between families with the creation of superfamilies. Several of these are analyzed using a novel set of programs designed to allow reliable prediction...

  12. A burst of ABC genes in the genome of the polyphagous spider mite Tetranychus urticae

    Dermauw, W.; Osborne, E.J.; Clark, R.M.; Grbić, M.; Tirry, L.; Van Leeuwen, T

    2013-01-01

    Background: The ABC (ATP-binding cassette) gene superfamily is widespread across all living species. The majority of ABC genes encode ABC transporters, which are membrane-spanning proteins capable of transferring substrates across biological membranes by hydrolyzing ATP. Although ABC transporters have often been associated with resistance to drugs and toxic compounds, within the Arthropoda ABC gene families have only been characterized in detail in several insects and a crustacean. In this st...

  13. Export of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli using ABC transporter with an attached lipase ABC transporter recognition domain (LARD

    Moon Yuseok

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter secretes the protein through inner and outer membranes simultaneously in gram negative bacteria. Thermostable lipase (TliA of Pseudomonas fluorescens SIK W1 is secreted through the ABC transporter. TliA has four glycine-rich repeats (GGXGXD in its C-terminus, which appear in many ABC transporter-secreted proteins. From a homology model of TliA derived from the structure of P. aeruginosa alkaline protease (AprA, lipase ABC transporter domains (LARDs were designed for the secretion of fusion proteins. Results The LARDs included four glycine-rich repeats comprising a β-roll structure, and were added to the C-terminus of test proteins. Either Pro-Gly linker or Factor Xa site was added between fusion proteins and LARDs. We attached different length of LARDs such as LARD0, LARD1 or whole TliA (the longest LARD to three types of proteins; green fluorescent protein (GFP, epidermal growth factor (EGF and cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP. These fusion proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli together with ABC transporter of either P. fluorescens or Erwinia chrysanthemi. Export of fusion proteins with the whole TliA through the ABC transporter was evident on the basis of lipase enzymatic activity. Upon supplementation of E. coli with ABC transporter, GFP-LARDs and EGF-LARDs were excreted into the culture supernatant. Conclusion The LARDs or whole TliA were attached to C-termini of model proteins and enabled the export of the model proteins such as GFP and EGF in E. coli supplemented with ABC transporter. These results open the possibility for the extracellular production of recombinant proteins in Pseudomonas using LARDs or TliA as a C-terminal signal sequence.

  14. Tumor metastatic promoter ABCE1 interacts with the cytoskeleton protein actin and increases cell motility.

    Han, Xu; Tian, Ye; Tian, Dali

    2016-06-01

    ABCE1, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family, is a candidate tumor metastatic promoter in lung cancer. Overexpression of ABCE1 is correlated with aggressive growth and metastasis in lung cancer cells. However, the exact mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, GST pull-down assay provided evidence of the possible interaction between ABCE1 and β-actin using GST-ABCE1 as a bait protein. Co-immunoprecipitation manifested ABCE1 formed complexes with β-actin in vivo. ABCE1 overexpression significantly increased the migration of lung cancer cells which may be attributed to the promotion of F-actin rearrangements. Taken together, these data suggest that overexpression of ABCE1 produces an obvious effect on the motility of lung cancer cells through cytoskeleton rearrangement. PMID:27109616

  15. Genetic variation in the proximal promoter of ABC and SLC superfamilies: liver and kidney specific expression and promoter activity predict variation.

    Stephanie E Hesselson

    Full Text Available Membrane transporters play crucial roles in the cellular uptake and efflux of an array of small molecules including nutrients, environmental toxins, and many clinically used drugs. We hypothesized that common genetic variation in the proximal promoter regions of transporter genes contribute to observed variation in drug response. A total of 579 polymorphisms were identified in the proximal promoters (-250 to +50 bp and flanking 5' sequence of 107 transporters in the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC and Solute Carrier (SLC superfamilies in 272 DNA samples from ethnically diverse populations. Many transporter promoters contained multiple common polymorphisms. Using a sliding window analysis, we observed that, on average, nucleotide diversity (pi was lowest at approximately 300 bp upstream of the transcription start site, suggesting that this region may harbor important functional elements. The proximal promoters of transporters that were highly expressed in the liver had greater nucleotide diversity than those that were highly expressed in the kidney consistent with greater negative selective pressure on the promoters of kidney transporters. Twenty-one promoters were evaluated for activity using reporter assays. Greater nucleotide diversity was observed in promoters with strong activity compared to promoters with weak activity, suggesting that weak promoters are under more negative selective pressure than promoters with high activity. Collectively, these results suggest that the proximal promoter region of membrane transporters is rich in variation and that variants in these regions may play a role in interindividual variation in drug disposition and response.

  16. Inhibition of ABC transport proteins by oil sands process affected water.

    Alharbi, Hattan A; Saunders, David M V; Al-Mousa, Ahmed; Alcorn, Jane; Pereira, Alberto S; Martin, Jonathan W; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve B

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporter proteins is important for detoxification of xenobiotics. For example, ABC transporters from the multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) subfamily are important for excretion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their metabolites. Effects of chemicals in the water soluble organic fraction of relatively fresh oil sands process affected water (OSPW) from Base Mine Lake (BML-OSPW) and aged OSPW from Pond 9 (P9-OSPW) on the activity of MRP transporters were investigated in vivo by use of Japanese medaka at the fry stage of development. Activities of MRPs were monitored by use of the lipophilic dye calcein, which is transported from cells by ABC proteins, including MRPs. To begin to identify chemicals that might inhibit activity of MRPs, BML-OSPW and P9-OSPW were fractionated into acidic, basic, and neutral fractions by use of mixed-mode sorbents. Chemical compositions of fractions were determined by use of ultrahigh resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry in ESI(+) and ESI(-) mode. Greater amounts of calcein were retained in fry exposed to BML-OSPW at concentration equivalents greater than 1× (i.e., full strength). The neutral and basic fractions of BML-OSPW, but not the acidic fraction, caused greater retention of calcein. Exposure to P9-OSPW did not affect the amount of calcein in fry. Neutral and basic fractions of BML-OSPW contained relatively greater amounts of several oxygen-, sulfur, and nitrogen-containing chemical species that might inhibit MRPs, such as O(+), SO(+), and NO(+) chemical species, although secondary fractionation will be required to conclusively identify the most potent inhibitors. Naphthenic acids (O2(-)), which were dominant in the acidic fraction, did not appear to be the cause of the inhibition. This is the first study to demonstrate that chemicals in the water soluble organic fraction of OSPW inhibit activity of this important class of proteins. However, aging of OSPW attenuates

  17. Diversity and evolution of ABC proteins in mycorrhiza-forming fungi

    Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis; Asiegbu, Fred O

    2015-01-01

    Background Transporter proteins are predicted to have an important role in the mycorrhizal symbiosis, due to the fact that this type of an interaction between plants and fungi requires a continuous nutrient and signalling exchange. ABC transporters are one of the large groups of transporter proteins found both in plants and in fungi. The crucial role of plant ABC transporters in the formation of the mycorrhizal symbiosis has been demonstrated recently. Some of the fungal ABC transporter-encod...

  18. Taxonomic distribution and origins of the extended LHC (light-harvesting complex antenna protein superfamily

    Brinkmann Henner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extended light-harvesting complex (LHC protein superfamily is a centerpiece of eukaryotic photosynthesis, comprising the LHC family and several families involved in photoprotection, like the LHC-like and the photosystem II subunit S (PSBS. The evolution of this complex superfamily has long remained elusive, partially due to previously missing families. Results In this study we present a meticulous search for LHC-like sequences in public genome and expressed sequence tag databases covering twelve representative photosynthetic eukaryotes from the three primary lineages of plants (Plantae: glaucophytes, red algae and green plants (Viridiplantae. By introducing a coherent classification of the different protein families based on both, hidden Markov model analyses and structural predictions, numerous new LHC-like sequences were identified and several new families were described, including the red lineage chlorophyll a/b-binding-like protein (RedCAP family from red algae and diatoms. The test of alternative topologies of sequences of the highly conserved chlorophyll-binding core structure of LHC and PSBS proteins significantly supports the independent origins of LHC and PSBS families via two unrelated internal gene duplication events. This result was confirmed by the application of cluster likelihood mapping. Conclusions The independent evolution of LHC and PSBS families is supported by strong phylogenetic evidence. In addition, a possible origin of LHC and PSBS families from different homologous members of the stress-enhanced protein subfamily, a diverse and anciently paralogous group of two-helix proteins, seems likely. The new hypothesis for the evolution of the extended LHC protein superfamily proposed here is in agreement with the character evolution analysis that incorporates the distribution of families and subfamilies across taxonomic lineages. Intriguingly, stress-enhanced proteins, which are universally found in the

  19. Exploring fold space preferences of new-born and ancient protein superfamilies.

    Hannah Edwards

    Full Text Available The evolution of proteins is one of the fundamental processes that has delivered the diversity and complexity of life we see around ourselves today. While we tend to define protein evolution in terms of sequence level mutations, insertions and deletions, it is hard to translate these processes to a more complete picture incorporating a polypeptide's structure and function. By considering how protein structures change over time we can gain an entirely new appreciation of their long-term evolutionary dynamics. In this work we seek to identify how populations of proteins at different stages of evolution explore their possible structure space. We use an annotation of superfamily age to this space and explore the relationship between these ages and a diverse set of properties pertaining to a superfamily's sequence, structure and function. We note several marked differences between the populations of newly evolved and ancient structures, such as in their length distributions, secondary structure content and tertiary packing arrangements. In particular, many of these differences suggest a less elaborate structure for newly evolved superfamilies when compared with their ancient counterparts. We show that the structural preferences we report are not a residual effect of a more fundamental relationship with function. Furthermore, we demonstrate the robustness of our results, using significant variation in the algorithm used to estimate the ages. We present these age estimates as a useful tool to analyse protein populations. In particularly, we apply this in a comparison of domains containing greek key or jelly roll motifs.

  20. FLORA: A Novel Method to Predict Protein Function from Structure in Diverse Superfamilies

    Redfern, O. C.; Dessailly, B. H.; Dallman, T. J.; Sillitoe, I.; Orengo, C A

    2009-01-01

    Predicting protein function from structure remains an active area of interest, particularly for the structural genomics initiatives where a substantial number of structures are initially solved with little or no functional characterisation. Although global structure comparison methods can be used to transfer functional annotations, the relationship between fold and function is complex, particularly in functionally diverse superfamilies that have evolved through different secondary structure e...

  1. Expanding the nitrogen regulatory protein superfamily: Homology detection at below random sequence identity.

    Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2002-07-01

    Nitrogen regulatory (PII) proteins are signal transduction molecules involved in controlling nitrogen metabolism in prokaryots. PII proteins integrate the signals of intracellular nitrogen and carbon status into the control of enzymes involved in nitrogen assimilation. Using elaborate sequence similarity detection schemes, we show that five clusters of orthologs (COGs) and several small divergent protein groups belong to the PII superfamily and predict their structure to be a (betaalphabeta)(2) ferredoxin-like fold. Proteins from the newly emerged PII superfamily are present in all major phylogenetic lineages. The PII homologs are quite diverse, with below random (as low as 1%) pairwise sequence identities between some members of distant groups. Despite this sequence diversity, evidence suggests that the different subfamilies retain the PII trimeric structure important for ligand-binding site formation and maintain a conservation of conservations at residue positions important for PII function. Because most of the orthologous groups within the PII superfamily are composed entirely of hypothetical proteins, our remote homology-based structure prediction provides the only information about them. Analogous to structural genomics efforts, such prediction gives clues to the biological roles of these proteins and allows us to hypothesize about locations of functional sites on model structures or rationalize about available experimental information. For instance, conserved residues in one of the families map in close proximity to each other on PII structure, allowing for a possible metal-binding site in the proteins coded by the locus known to affect sensitivity to divalent metal ions. Presented analysis pushes the limits of sequence similarity searches and exemplifies one of the extreme cases of reliable sequence-based structure prediction. In conjunction with structural genomics efforts to shed light on protein function, our strategies make it possible to detect

  2. fastSCOP: a fast web server for recognizing protein structural domains and SCOP superfamilies.

    Tung, Chi-Hua; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2007-07-01

    The fastSCOP is a web server that rapidly identifies the structural domains and determines the evolutionary superfamilies of a query protein structure. This server uses 3D-BLAST to scan quickly a large structural classification database (SCOP1.71 with structural alignment tool, is adopted to align these top 10 structures to refine domain boundaries and to identify evolutionary superfamilies. Our previous works demonstrated that 3D-BLAST is as fast as BLAST, and has the characteristics of BLAST (e.g. a robust statistical basis, effective search and reliable database search capabilities) in large structural database searches based on a structural alphabet database and a structural alphabet substitution matrix. The classification accuracy of this server is approximately 98% for 586 query structures and the average execution time is approximately 5. This server was also evaluated on 8700 structures, which have no annotations in the SCOP; the server can automatically assign 7311 (84%) proteins (9420 domains) to the SCOP superfamilies in 9.6 h. These results suggest that the fastSCOP is robust and can be a useful server for recognizing the evolutionary classifications and the protein functions of novel structures. The server is accessible at http://fastSCOP.life.nctu.edu.tw. PMID:17485476

  3. Novel insights into the function of the conserved domain of the CAP superfamily of proteins

    Nick K. Olrichs

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5, and Pathogenesis-related 1 proteins (CAP superfamily are found in a remarkable variety of biological species. The presence of a highly conserved CAP domain defines the CAP family members, which in many cases is linked to other functional protein domains. As a result, this superfamily of proteins is involved in a large variety of biological processes such as reproduction, tumor suppression, and immune regulation. The role of the CAP domain and its conserved structure throughout evolution in relation to the diverse functions of CAP proteins is, however, poorly understood. Recent studies on the mammalian Golgi-Associated plant Pathogenesis Related protein 1 (GAPR-1, which consists almost exclusively of a CAP domain, may shed new light on the function of the CAP domain. GAPR-1 was shown to form amyloid fibrils but also to possess anti-amyloidogenic properties against other amyloid forming peptides. Amyloid prediction analysis reveals the presence of potentially amyloidogenic sequences within the highly conserved sequence motifs of the CAP domain. This review will address the structural properties of GAPR-1 in combination with existing knowledge on CAP protein structure-function relationships. We propose that the CAP domain is a structural domain, which can regulate protein-protein interactions of CAP family members using its amyloidogenic properties.

  4. Protein secretion by hybrid bacterial ABC-transporters: specific functions of the membrane ATPase and the membrane fusion protein.

    Binet, R; Wandersman, C

    1995-01-01

    The Erwinia chrysanthemi metalloprotease C and the Serratia marcescens haem acquisition protein HasA are both secreted from Gram-negative bacteria by a signal peptide-independent pathway which requires a C-terminal secretion signal and a specific ABC-transporter made up of three proteins: a membrane ATPase (the ABC-protein), a second inner membrane component belonging to the membrane fusion protein family and an outer membrane polypeptide. HasA and protease C transporters are homologous altho...

  5. The N-terminal extension domain of the C. elegans half-molecule ABC transporter, HMT-1, is required for protein-protein interactions and function.

    Sungjin Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Members of the HMT-1 (heavy metal tolerance factor 1 subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter superfamily detoxify heavy metals and have unique topology: they are half-molecule ABC transporters that, in addition to a single transmembrane domain (TMD1 and a single nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1, possess a hydrophobic NH2-terminal extension (NTE. These structural features distinguish HMTs from other ABC transporters in different species including Drosophila and humans. Functional ABC transporters, however, are comprised of at least four-domains (two TMDs and two NDBs formed from either a single polypeptide or by the association of two or four separate subunits. Whether HMTs act as oligomers and what role the NTE domain plays in their function have not been determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we examined the oligomeric status of Caenorhabditis elegans HMT-1 and the functional significance of its NTE using gel-filtration chromatography in combination with the mating-based split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid system (mbSUS and functional in vivo assays. We found that HMT-1 exists in a protein complex in C. elegans. Studies in S. cerevisiae showed that HMT-1 at a minimum homodimerizes and that oligomerization is essential for HMT-1 to confer cadmium tolerance. We also established that the NTE domain plays an important structural and functional role: it is essential for HMT-1 oligomerization and Cd-detoxification function. However, the NTE itself was not sufficient for oligomerization suggesting that multiple structural features of HMT-1 must associate to form a functional transporter. CONCLUSIONS: The prominence of heavy metals as environmental toxins and the remarkable conservation of HMT-1 structural architecture and function in different species reinforce the value of continued studies of HMT-1 in model systems for identifying functional domains in HMT1 of humans.

  6. FLORA: a novel method to predict protein function from structure in diverse superfamilies.

    Oliver C Redfern

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Predicting protein function from structure remains an active area of interest, particularly for the structural genomics initiatives where a substantial number of structures are initially solved with little or no functional characterisation. Although global structure comparison methods can be used to transfer functional annotations, the relationship between fold and function is complex, particularly in functionally diverse superfamilies that have evolved through different secondary structure embellishments to a common structural core. The majority of prediction algorithms employ local templates built on known or predicted functional residues. Here, we present a novel method (FLORA that automatically generates structural motifs associated with different functional sub-families (FSGs within functionally diverse domain superfamilies. Templates are created purely on the basis of their specificity for a given FSG, and the method makes no prior prediction of functional sites, nor assumes specific physico-chemical properties of residues. FLORA is able to accurately discriminate between homologous domains with different functions and substantially outperforms (a 2-3 fold increase in coverage at low error rates popular structure comparison methods and a leading function prediction method. We benchmark FLORA on a large data set of enzyme superfamilies from all three major protein classes (alpha, beta, alphabeta and demonstrate the functional relevance of the motifs it identifies. We also provide novel predictions of enzymatic activity for a large number of structures solved by the Protein Structure Initiative. Overall, we show that FLORA is able to effectively detect functionally similar protein domain structures by purely using patterns of structural conservation of all residues.

  7. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P.; Paterson, Neil G.; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-01-01

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel co...

  8. Interaction of ABC multidrug transporters with anticancer protein kinase inhibitors: substrates and/or inhibitors?

    Hegedus, Csilla; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Szakács, Gergely; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2009-05-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors (PKI) are becoming key agents in modern cancer chemotherapy, and combination of PKIs with classical chemotherapeutic drugs may help to overcome currently untreatable metastatic cancers. Since chemotherapy resistance is a recurrent problem, mechanisms of resistance should be clarified in order to help further drug development. Here we suggest that in addition to PKI resistance based on altered target structures, the active removal of these therapeutic agents by the MDR-ABC transporters should also be considered as a major cause of clinical resistance. We discuss the occurring systemic and cellular mechanisms, which may hamper PKI efficiency, and document the role of selected MDR-ABC transporters in these phenomena through their interactions with these anticancer agents. Moreover, we suggest that PKI interactions with ABC transporters may modulate overall drug metabolism, including the fate of diverse, chemically or target-wise unrelated drugs. These effects are based on multiple forms of MDR-ABC transporter interaction with PKIs, as these compounds may be both substrates and/or inhibitors of an ABC transporter. We propose that these interactions should be carefully considered in clinical application, and a combined MDR-ABC transporter and PKI effect may bring a major advantage in future drug development. PMID:19442047

  9. Homology between O-linked GlcNAc transferases and proteins of the glycogen phosphorylase superfamily.

    Wrabl, J O; Grishin, N V

    2001-11-30

    The O-linked GlcNAc transferases (OGTs) are a recently characterized group of largely eukaryotic enzymes that add a single beta-N-acetylglucosamine moiety to specific serine or threonine hydroxyls. In humans, this process may be part of a sugar regulation mechanism or cellular signaling pathway that is involved in many important diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, and neurodegeneration. However, no structural information about the human OGT exists, except for the identification of tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) at the N terminus. The locations of substrate binding sites are unknown and the structural basis for this enzyme's function is not clear. Here, remote homology is reported between the OGTs and a large group of diverse sugar processing enzymes, including proteins with known structure such as glycogen phosphorylase, UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase, and the glycosyl transferase MurG. This relationship, in conjunction with amino acid similarity spanning the entire length of the sequence, implies that the fold of the human OGT consists of two Rossmann-like domains C-terminal to the TPR region. A conserved motif in the second Rossmann domain points to the UDP-GlcNAc donor binding site. This conclusion is supported by a combination of statistically significant PSI-BLAST hits, consensus secondary structure predictions, and a fold recognition hit to MurG. Additionally, iterative PSI-BLAST database searches reveal that proteins homologous to the OGTs form a large and diverse superfamily that is termed GPGTF (glycogen phosphorylase/glycosyl transferase). Up to one-third of the 51 functional families in the CAZY database, a glycosyl transferase classification scheme based on catalytic residue and sequence homology considerations, can be unified through this common predicted fold. GPGTF homologs constitute a substantial fraction of known proteins: 0.4% of all non-redundant sequences and about 1% of proteins in the Escherichia coli genome are found to belong to the GPGTF

  10. Radiation Damage and Racemic Protein Crystallography Reveal the Unique Structure of the GASA/Snakin Protein Superfamily.

    Yeung, Ho; Squire, Christopher J; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Panjikar, Santosh; López, Gemma; Molina, Antonio; Baker, Edward N; Harris, Paul W R; Brimble, Margaret A

    2016-07-01

    Proteins from the GASA/snakin superfamily are common in plant proteomes and have diverse functions, including hormonal crosstalk, development, and defense. One 63-residue member of this family, snakin-1, an antimicrobial protein from potatoes, has previously been chemically synthesized in a fully active form. Herein the 1.5 Å structure of snakin-1, determined by a novel combination of racemic protein crystallization and radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP), is reported. Racemic crystals of snakin-1 and quasi-racemic crystals incorporating an unnatural 4-iodophenylalanine residue were prepared from chemically synthesized d- and l-proteins. Breakage of the C-I bonds in the quasi-racemic crystals facilitated structure determination by RIP. The crystal structure reveals a unique protein fold with six disulfide crosslinks, presenting a distinct electrostatic surface that may target the protein to microbial cell surfaces. PMID:27145301

  11. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump.

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P; Paterson, Neil G; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-08-25

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel contains a conserved disordered loop. The structure extends the view of adaptors as flexible, modular components that mediate diverse pump assembly, and suggests that in MFS tripartite pumps a hexamer of adaptors could provide a periplasmic seal. PMID:24996185

  12. Identification of proteins targeted by the thioredoxin superfamily in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Nicole Sturm

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum possesses a functional thioredoxin and glutathione system comprising the dithiol-containing redox proteins thioredoxin (Trx and glutaredoxin (Grx, as well as plasmoredoxin (Plrx, which is exclusively found in Plasmodium species. All three proteins belong to the thioredoxin superfamily and share a conserved Cys-X-X-Cys motif at the active site. Only a few of their target proteins, which are likely to be involved in redox reactions, are currently known. The aim of the present study was to extend our knowledge of the Trx-, Grx-, and Plrx-interactome in Plasmodium. Based on the reaction mechanism, we generated active site mutants of Trx and Grx lacking the resolving cysteine residue. These mutants were bound to affinity columns to trap target proteins from P. falciparum cell extracts after formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds. Covalently linked proteins were eluted with dithiothreitol and analyzed by mass spectrometry. For Trx and Grx, we were able to isolate 17 putatively redox-regulated proteins each. Furthermore, the approach was successfully established for Plrx, leading to the identification of 21 potential target proteins. In addition to confirming known interaction partners, we captured potential target proteins involved in various processes including protein biosynthesis, energy metabolism, and signal transduction. The identification of three enzymes involved in S-adenosylmethionine (SAM metabolism furthermore suggests that redox control is required to balance the metabolic fluxes of SAM between methyl-group transfer reactions and polyamine synthesis. To substantiate our data, the binding of the redoxins to S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase and ornithine aminotransferase (OAT were verified using BIAcore surface plasmon resonance. In enzymatic assays, Trx was furthermore shown to enhance the activity of OAT. Our approach led to the discovery of several putatively redox-regulated proteins

  13. Pathogenic Leptospira species express surface-exposed proteins belonging to the bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily.

    Matsunaga, James; Barocchi, Michele A; Croda, Julio; Young, Tracy A; Sanchez, Yolanda; Siqueira, Isadora; Bolin, Carole A; Reis, Mitermayer G; Riley, Lee W; Haake, David A; Ko, Albert I

    2003-08-01

    Proteins with bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains, such as the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis invasin and Escherichia coli intimin, are surface-expressed proteins that mediate host mammalian cell invasion or attachment. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a new family of Big domain proteins, referred to as Lig (leptospiral Ig-like) proteins, in pathogenic Leptospira. Screening of L. interrogans and L. kirschneri expression libraries with sera from leptospirosis patients identified 13 lambda phage clones that encode tandem repeats of the 90 amino acid Big domain. Two lig genes, designated ligA and ligB, and one pseudogene, ligC, were identified. The ligA and ligB genes encode amino-terminal lipoprotein signal peptides followed by 10 or 11 Big domain repeats and, in the case of ligB, a unique carboxy-terminal non-repeat domain. The organization of ligC is similar to that of ligB but contains mutations that disrupt the reading frame. The lig sequences are present in pathogenic but not saprophytic Leptospira species. LigA and LigB are expressed by a variety of virulent leptospiral strains. Loss of Lig protein and RNA transcript expression is correlated with the observed loss of virulence during culture attenuation of pathogenic strains. High-pressure freeze substitution followed by immunocytochemical electron microscopy confirmed that the Lig proteins were localized to the bacterial surface. Immunoblot studies with patient sera found that the Lig proteins are a major antigen recognized during the acute host infection. These observations demonstrate that the Lig proteins are a newly identified surface protein of pathogenic Leptospira, which by analogy to other bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily virulence factors, may play a role in host cell attachment and invasion during leptospiral pathogenesis. PMID:12890019

  14. New insights into potential functions for the protein 4.1superfamily of proteins in kidney epithelium

    Calinisan, Venice; Gravem, Dana; Chen, Ray Ping-Hsu; Brittin,Sachi; Mohandas, Narla; Lecomte, Marie-Christine; Gascard, Philippe

    2005-06-17

    Members of the protein 4.1 family of adapter proteins are expressed in a broad panel of tissues including various epithelia where they likely play an important role in maintenance of cell architecture and polarity and in control of cell proliferation. We have recently characterized the structure and distribution of three members of the protein 4.1 family, 4.1B, 4.1R and 4.1N, in mouse kidney. We describe here binding partners for renal 4.1 proteins, identified through the screening of a rat kidney yeast two-hybrid system cDNA library. The identification of putative protein 4.1-based complexes enables us to envision potential functions for 4.1 proteins in kidney: organization of signaling complexes, response to osmotic stress, protein trafficking, and control of cell proliferation. We discuss the relevance of these protein 4.1-based interactions in kidney physio-pathology in the context of their previously identified functions in other cells and tissues. Specifically, we will focus on renal 4.1 protein interactions with beta amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP), 14-3-3 proteins, and the cell swelling-activated chloride channel pICln. We also discuss the functional relevance of another member of the protein 4.1 superfamily, ezrin, in kidney physiopathology.

  15. Cloning, crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of XC1258, a CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from Xanthomonas campestris

    A CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from the plant pathogen X. campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. CN-hydrolase superfamily proteins are involved in a wide variety of non-peptide carbon–nitrogen hydrolysis reactions, producing some important natural products such as auxin, biotin, precursors of antibiotics etc. These reactions all involve attack on a cyano or carbonyl carbon by a conserved novel catalytic triad Glu-Lys-Cys through a thiol acylenzyme intermediate. However, classification into the CN-hydrolase superfamily based on sequence similarity alone is not straightforward and further structural data are necessary to improve this categorization. Here, the cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XC1258, a CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (Xcc), are reported. The SeMet-substituted XC1258 crystals diffracted to a resolution of 1.73 Å. They are orthorhombic and belong to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 143.8, b = 154.63, c = 51.3 Å, respectively

  16. Complement system proteins which interact with C3b or C4b A superfamily of structurally related proteins

    Reid, K B M; Bentley, D R; Campbell, R D;

    1986-01-01

    Recent cDNA sequencing data has allowed the prediction of the entire amino acid sequences of complement components factor B and C2, the complement control proteins factor H and C4b-binding protein and a partial sequence for the Cab/C4b receptor CR1. These proteins all contain internal repeating u......-glycoprotein 1, blood clotting factor XIII and interleukin-2 receptor. In this review Ken Reid and his colleagues propose that this could be a general feature of a superfamily of structurally related proteins.......Recent cDNA sequencing data has allowed the prediction of the entire amino acid sequences of complement components factor B and C2, the complement control proteins factor H and C4b-binding protein and a partial sequence for the Cab/C4b receptor CR1. These proteins all contain internal repeating......, while the precise number of units in CR1 is not known yet. These structurally homologous complement proteins are also functionally related as they all interact with C3b and C4b during activation of the cascade. The repeating units also occur in the functionally unrelated proteins subcomponent C1r, β2...

  17. DUF538 protein superfamily is predicted to be chlorophyll hydrolyzing enzymes in plants.

    Gholizadeh, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    The possible hydrolytic activity towards chlorophyll molecules was predicted for DUF538 protein superfamily in plants. It was examined by using computational as well as experimental tools including in vitro chlorophyll degradation, antioxidant compounds production and in vivo real-time gene expression tests. Comparison of the computational data with the experimental results indicated that DUF538 proteins might be chlorophyll hydrolyzing enzyme (most probably carboxyesterase) which degrade chlorophyll molecules (66 % per 12 hrs) to produce new compounds (1.8 fold per 12 hrs) with antioxidant properties. The relevance of DUF538 gene expression level with the chlorophyll contents (2.8 fold increase per chlorophyll content of 50 %) of the drought-stressed leaves showed that chlorophyll degradation by DUF538 is most probably induced in response to stress stimuli. Despite membranous chlorophyll catabolic pathways, DUF538-dependent reactions is predicted to be occurred in the cytosol of the under stressed plants. We addressed as to whether chlorophyll breakdown to antioxidant compounds by DUF538 is a defense mechanism of plants against stress stimuli, in vivo? This question is going to be investigated in our next research project. PMID:27186021

  18. Functional analysis of candidate ABC transporter proteins for sitosterol transport

    Albrecht, C; Elliott, J I; Sardini, A;

    2002-01-01

    protein (Bcrp; Abcg2) and the bile salt export pump (Bsep; Abcb11) was assessed using several assays. Unexpectedly, none of the candidate proteins mediated significant sitosterol transport. This has implications for the pathology of sitosterolemia. In addition, the data suggest that otherwise broad...

  19. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mam1 gene encodes an ABC transporter mediating secretion of M-factor

    Christensen, P U; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O;

    1997-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cells of opposite mating type communicate via diffusible peptide pheromones prior to mating. We have cloned the S. pombe mam1 gene, which encodes a 1336-amino acid protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The mam1 gene is onl...

  20. Molecular phylogeny of the kelch-repeat superfamily reveals an expansion of BTB/kelch proteins in animals

    Adams Josephine C

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kelch motif is an ancient and evolutionarily-widespread sequence motif of 44–56 amino acids in length. It occurs as five to seven repeats that form a β-propeller tertiary structure. Over 28 kelch-repeat proteins have been sequenced and functionally characterised from diverse organisms spanning from viruses, plants and fungi to mammals and it is evident from expressed sequence tag, domain and genome databases that many additional hypothetical proteins contain kelch-repeats. In general, kelch-repeat β-propellers are involved in protein-protein interactions, however the modest sequence identity between kelch motifs, the diversity of domain architectures, and the partial information on this protein family in any single species, all present difficulties to developing a coherent view of the kelch-repeat domain and the kelch-repeat protein superfamily. To understand the complexity of this superfamily of proteins, we have analysed by bioinformatics the complement of kelch-repeat proteins encoded in the human genome and have made comparisons to the kelch-repeat proteins encoded in other sequenced genomes. Results We identified 71 kelch-repeat proteins encoded in the human genome, whereas 5 or 8 members were identified in yeasts and around 18 in C. elegans, D. melanogaster and A. gambiae. Multiple domain architectures were identified in each organism, including previously unrecognised forms. The vast majority of kelch-repeat domains are predicted to form six-bladed β-propellers. The most prevalent domain architecture in the metazoan animal genomes studied was the BTB/kelch domain organisation and we uncovered 3 subgroups of human BTB/kelch proteins. Sequence analysis of the kelch-repeat domains of the most robustly-related subgroups identified differences in β-propeller organisation that could provide direction for experimental study of protein-binding characteristics. Conclusion The kelch-repeat superfamily constitutes a

  1. Structure of TTHA1623, a novel metallo-β-lactamase superfamily protein from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    The crystal structures of TTHA1623 from T. thermophilus HB8 in an iron-bound and a zinc-bound form have been determined to 2.8 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. TTHA1623 is a metallo-β-lactamase superfamily protein from the extremely thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB8. Homologues of TTHA1623 exist in a wide range of bacteria and archaea and one eukaryote, Giardia lamblia, but their function remains unknown. To analyze the structural properties of TTHA1623, the crystal structures of its iron-bound and zinc-bound forms have been determined to 2.8 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. TTHA1623 possesses an αββα-fold similar to that of other metallo-β-lactamase superfamily proteins with glyoxalase II-type metal coordination. However, TTHA1623 exhibits a putative substrate-binding pocket with a unique shape

  2. Molekulare Charakterisierung der neuroprotektiven Wirkung transmembraner Proteine der TM9-Superfamilie und der TMEFF-Proteine

    Wiegand, Anne Katharina Gisela

    2013-01-01

    Im Rahmen dieser Dissertation sollte die neuroprotektive Wirkung der transmembranen Proteine TM9SF1 und TMEFF1 untersucht werden. Es wurden relative Expressionsanalysen der beiden Proteine an SHSY5Y-Zellen und humanen Gewebeproben im Vergleich zu house-keeping-Genen sowie Klonierungsversuche von TM9SF1 durchgeführt. Im Ergebnis wurden die neuroprotektiven, antiapoptotischen und wachstumsregulierenden Eigenschaften von TM9SF1 und TMEFF1 bestätigt. The experiments within the framework of...

  3. A histone-like protein of mycobacteria possesses ferritin superfamily protein-like activity and protects against DNA damage by Fenton reaction.

    Takatsuka, Masaki; Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Satoh, Eisuke F; Kitadokoro, Kengo; Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Niki, Mamiko; Inoue, Masayasu; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Ogura, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Rambukkana, Anura; Matsumoto, Sohkichi

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential metal for living organisms but its level must be strictly controlled in cells, because ferrous ion induces toxicity by generating highly active reactive oxygen, hydroxyl radicals, through the Fenton reaction. In addition, ferric ion shows low solubility under physiological conditions. To overcome these obstacles living organisms possess Ferritin superfamily proteins that are distributed in all three domains of life: bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. These proteins minimize hydroxyl radical formation by ferroxidase activity that converts Fe(2+) into Fe(3+) and sequesters iron by storing it as a mineral inside a protein cage. In this study, we discovered that mycobacterial DNA-binding protein 1 (MDP1), a histone-like protein, has similar activity to ferritin superfamily proteins. MDP1 prevented the Fenton reaction and protects DNA by the ferroxidase activity. The K(m) values of the ferroxidase activity by MDP1 of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG-3007c), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv2986c), and Mycobacterium leprae (ML1683; ML-LBP) were 0.292, 0.252, and 0.129 mM, respectively. Furthermore, one MDP1 molecule directly captured 81.4±19.1 iron atoms, suggesting the role of this protein in iron storage. This study describes for the first time a ferroxidase-iron storage protein outside of the ferritin superfamily proteins and the protective role of this bacterial protein from DNA damage. PMID:21698192

  4. Stimulation of the UvrABC enzyme-catalyzed repair reactions by the UvrD protein (DNA helicase II).

    Kumura, K; Sekiguchi, M.; Steinum, A L; Seeberg, E

    1985-01-01

    An in vitro assay system was constructed using highly purified preparations of UvrA, UvrB, UvrC, UvrD proteins and DNA polymerase I, the objective being to analyse the role of UvrD protein in excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage. UvrABC enzyme-initiated repair synthesis was greatly enhanced by the addition of UvrD protein to the reaction mixture. Further analysis revealed that UvrD protein stimulated introduction of strand breaks in irradiated DNA by UvrABC enzyme but had no effect on the...

  5. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts. - Highlights: • Sequence region shared by plant virus “30K” movement proteins has an all-beta fold. • Most euphyllophyte genomes contain integrated copies of pararetroviruses. • These integrated virus genomes often include intact movement protein genes. • Molecular evidence suggests that these “30K” genes may be selected for function

  6. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes

    Mushegian, Arcady R., E-mail: mushegian2@gmail.com [Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22230 (United States); Elena, Santiago F., E-mail: sfelena@ibmcp.upv.es [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, CSIC-UPV, 46022 València (Spain); The Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts. - Highlights: • Sequence region shared by plant virus “30K” movement proteins has an all-beta fold. • Most euphyllophyte genomes contain integrated copies of pararetroviruses. • These integrated virus genomes often include intact movement protein genes. • Molecular evidence suggests that these “30K” genes may be selected for function.

  7. Computational modeling of protein interactions and phosphoform kinetics in the KaiABC cyanobacterial circadian clock

    Byrne, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The KaiABC circadian clock from cyanobacteria is the only known three-protein oscillatory system which can be reconstituted outside the cell and which displays sustained periodic dynamics in various molecular state variables. Despite many recent experimental and theoretical studies there are several open questions regarding the central mechanism(s) responsible for creating this ~24 hour clock in terms of molecular assembly/disassembly of the proteins and site-dependent phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of KaiC monomers. Simulations of protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation reactions constrained by analytical fits to partial reaction experimental data support the central mechanism of oscillation as KaiB-induced KaiA sequestration in KaiABC complexes associated with the extent of Ser431 phosphorylation in KaiC hexamers. A simple two-state deterministic model in terms of the degree of phosphorylation of Ser431 and Thr432 sites alone can reproduce the previously observed circadian oscillation in the...

  8. The TULIP superfamily of eukaryotic lipid-binding proteins as a mediator of lipid sensing and transport.

    Alva, Vikram; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-08-01

    The tubular lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily has emerged in recent years as a major mediator of lipid sensing and transport in eukaryotes. It currently encompasses three protein families, SMP-like, BPI-like, and Takeout-like, which share a common fold. This fold consists of a long helix wrapped in a highly curved anti-parallel β-sheet, enclosing a central, lipophilic cavity. The SMP-like proteins, which include subunits of the ERMES complex and the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), appear to be mainly located at membrane contacts sites (MCSs) between organelles, mediating inter-organelle lipid exchange. The BPI-like proteins, which include the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), the LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-binding protein (LBP), the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), are either involved in innate immunity against bacteria through their ability to sense lipopolysaccharides, as is the case for BPI and LBP, or in lipid exchange between lipoprotein particles, as is the case for CETP and PLTP. The Takeout-like proteins, which are comprised of insect juvenile hormone-binding proteins and arthropod allergens, transport, where known, lipid hormones to target tissues during insect development. In all cases, the activity of these proteins is underpinned by their ability to bind large, hydrophobic ligands in their central cavity and segregate them away from the aqueous environment. Furthermore, where they are involved in lipid exchange, recent structural studies have highlighted their ability to establish lipophilic, tubular channels, either between organelles in the case of SMP domains or between lipoprotein particles in the case of CETP. Here, we review the current knowledge on the structure, versatile functions, and evolution of the TULIP superfamily. We propose a deep evolutionary split in this superfamily, predating the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor, between the SMP-like proteins, which act on

  9. Integrated analysis of residue coevolution and protein structure in ABC transporters.

    Attila Gulyás-Kovács

    Full Text Available Intraprotein side chain contacts can couple the evolutionary process of amino acid substitution at one position to that at another. This coupling, known as residue coevolution, may vary in strength. Conserved contacts thus not only define 3-dimensional protein structure, but also indicate which residue-residue interactions are crucial to a protein's function. Therefore, prediction of strongly coevolving residue-pairs helps clarify molecular mechanisms underlying function. Previously, various coevolution detectors have been employed separately to predict these pairs purely from multiple sequence alignments, while disregarding available structural information. This study introduces an integrative framework that improves the accuracy of such predictions, relative to previous approaches, by combining multiple coevolution detectors and incorporating structural contact information. This framework is applied to the ABC-B and ABC-C transporter families, which include the drug exporter P-glycoprotein involved in multidrug resistance of cancer cells, as well as the CFTR chloride channel linked to cystic fibrosis disease. The predicted coevolving pairs are further analyzed based on conformational changes inferred from outward- and inward-facing transporter structures. The analysis suggests that some pairs coevolved to directly regulate conformational changes of the alternating-access transport mechanism, while others to stabilize rigid-body-like components of the protein structure. Moreover, some identified pairs correspond to residues previously implicated in cystic fibrosis.

  10. A Histone-Like Protein of Mycobacteria Possesses Ferritin Superfamily Protein-Like Activity and Protects against DNA Damage by Fenton Reaction

    Takatsuka, Masaki; Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Satoh, Eisuke F.; Kitadokoro, Kengo; Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Niki, Mamiko; Inoue, Masayasu; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo; SHIMOJI, Yoshihiro; Ogura, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Rambukkana, Anura; Matsumoto, Sohkichi

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential metal for living organisms but its level must be strictly controlled in cells, because ferrous ion induces toxicity by generating highly active reactive oxygen, hydroxyl radicals, through the Fenton reaction. In addition, ferric ion shows low solubility under physiological conditions. To overcome these obstacles living organisms possess Ferritin superfamily proteins that are distributed in all three domains of life: bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. These proteins minimi...

  11. Effects of the L511P and D512G Mutations on the Escherichia coli ABC Transporter MsbA

    Schultz, Kathryn M.; Merten, Jacqueline A.; Klug, Candice S.

    2011-01-01

    MsbA is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily and is homologous to ABC transporters linked to multidrug resistance. The nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of these proteins include conserved motifs that are involved in ATP binding, including conserved SALD residues (D-loop) that are diagnostic in identifying ABC transporters but whose roles have not been identified. Within the D-loop, single point mutations L511P and D512G were discovered by random mutational analysis of MsbA to disrupt ...

  12. Etude structure/fonction d'une proteine ABC : SUR, le récepteur des sulfonylurées

    Gally, Fabienne

    2005-01-01

    ATP-sensitive K+ channels (KATP channels) are metabolic sensors formed by the association of an ATP-inhibited inwardlyrectifying K+ channel (Kir6.2) and a regulatory subunit, SUR, of the ABC protein family. SUR adjusts channel gating as afunction of internal ATP and ADP. It is also the target of pharmaceutical KATP channel openers (KCO) or blockers.We have worked on several structure/function relationships of SUR as a model of eucaryotic ABC protein. The naturalassociation of SUR with an ion ...

  13. A single intact ATPase site of the ABC transporter BtuCD drives 5% transport activity yet supports full in vivo vitamin B12 utilization

    Tal, Nir; Ovcharenko, Elena; Lewinson, Oded

    2013-01-01

    In all kingdoms of life, ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters are essential to many cellular functions. In this large superfamily of proteins, two catalytic sites hydrolyze ATP to power uphill substrate translocation. A central question in the field concerns the relationship between the two ATPase catalytic sites: Are the sites independent of one another? Are both needed for function? Do they function cooperatively? These issues have been resolved for type I ABC transporters but never for ...

  14. 1.55 Å Structure of the Ectoine Binding Protein TeaA of the Osmoregulated TRAP-Transporter TeaABC from Halomonas elongata

    Kuhlmann, Sonja I.; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C; Bienert, Ralf; Kunte, Hans-Jörg; Ziegler, Christine

    2008-01-01

    TeaABC from the moderate halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata belongs to the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters (TRAP-T), a family of secondary transporters functioning in conjunction with periplasmic substrate binding proteins. TeaABC facilitates the uptake of the compatible solutes ectoine and hydroxyectoine that are accumulated in the cytoplasm under hyperosmotic stress to protect the cell from dehydration. TeaABC is the only known TRAP-T activated by osmotic stress. Cu...

  15. Comparative genomic analysis of mitochondrial protein-coding genes in Veneroida clams: Analysis of superfamily-specific genomic and evolutionary features.

    Hwang, Jae Yeon; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Heebal; Nam, Bo-Hye; An, Cheul Min; Park, Jung Youn; Park, Kyu-Hyun; Huh, Chul-Sung; Kim, Eun Bae

    2015-12-01

    Veneroida is the largest order of bivalves, and these clams are commercially important in Asian countries. Although numerous studies have focused on the genomic characters of individual species or genera in Veneroida, superfamily-specific genomic characters have not been determined. In this study, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of 12 mitochondrial protein coding genes (PCGs) from 25 clams in six Veneroida superfamilies to determine genomic and evolutionary features of each superfamily. Length and distribution of nucleotides encoding the PCGs were too variable to define superfamily-specific genomic characters. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PCGs are suitable for classification of species in three superfamilies: Cardioidea, Mactroidea, and Veneroidea. However, one species classified in Tellinoidea, Sinonovacula constricta, was evolutionarily closer to Solenoidea clams than Tellinoidea clams. dN/dS analysis showed that positively selected sites in NADH dehydrogenase subunit, nd4 and subunit of ATP synthase, atp6 were present in Mactroidea. Differences in selected sites in the nd4 and atp6 could be caused by superfamily-level differences in sodium transport or ATP synthesis functions, respectively. These differences in selected sites in NADH may have conferred these animals, which have low motility and do not generally move, with increased flexibility to maintain homeostasis in the face of osmotic pressure. Our study provides insight into evolutionary traits as well as facilitates identification of veneroids. PMID:26343338

  16. 1.55 Å Structure of the Ectoine Binding Protein TeaA of the Osmoregulated TRAP-Transporter TeaABC from Halomonas elongata

    Kuhlmann, Sonja I.; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C.; Bienert, Ralf; Kunte, Hans-Jörg; Ziegler, Christine

    2008-01-01

    TeaABC from the moderate halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata belongs to the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters (TRAP-T), a family of secondary transporters functioning in conjunction with periplasmic substrate binding proteins. TeaABC facilitates the uptake of the compatible sol

  17. Proteome scale census of major facilitator superfamily transporters in Trichoderma reesei using protein sequence and structure based classification enhanced ranking.

    Chaudhary, Nitika; Kumari, Indu; Sandhu, Padmani; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-07-01

    Trichoderma spp. have been acknowledged as potent bio-control agents against microbial pathogens and also as plant growth promoters. Various secondary metabolites are attributed for these beneficial activities. Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) includes the large proportion of efflux-pumps which are linked with membrane transport of these secondary metabolites. We have carried out a proteome-wide identification of MFS transporters using protein sequence and structure based hierarchical method in Trichoderma reesei. 448 proteins out of 9115 were detected to carry transmembrane helices. MFS specific intragenic gene duplication and its context with transport function have been presented. Finally, using homology based techniques, domains and motifs of MFS families have been identified and utilized to classify them. From query dataset of 448 transmembrane proteins, 148 proteins are identified as potential MFS transporters. Sugar porter, drug: H(+) antiporter-1, monocarboxylate porter and anion: cation symporter emerged as major MFS families with 51, 35, 17 and 11 members respectively. Representative protein tertiary structures of these families are homology modeled for structure-function analysis. This study may help to understand the molecular basis of secretion and transport of agriculturally valuable secondary metabolites produced by these bio-control fungal agents which may be exploited in future for enhancing its biotechnological applications in eco-friendly sustainable development. PMID:27041239

  18. Functional analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter gene family of Tribolium castaneum

    Broehan Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters belong to a large superfamily of proteins that have important physiological functions in all living organisms. Most are integral membrane proteins that transport a broad spectrum of substrates across lipid membranes. In insects, ABC transporters are of special interest because of their role in insecticide resistance. Results We have identified 73 ABC transporter genes in the genome of T. castaneum, which group into eight subfamilies (ABCA-H. This coleopteran ABC family is significantly larger than those reported for insects in other taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this increase is due to gene expansion within a single clade of subfamily ABCC. We performed an RNA interference (RNAi screen to study the function of ABC transporters during development. In ten cases, injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA into larvae caused developmental phenotypes, which included growth arrest and localized melanization, eye pigmentation defects, abnormal cuticle formation, egg-laying and egg-hatching defects, and mortality due to abortive molting and desiccation. Some of the ABC transporters we studied in closer detail to examine their role in lipid, ecdysteroid and eye pigment transport. Conclusions The results from our study provide new insights into the physiological function of ABC transporters in T. castaneum, and may help to establish new target sites for insect control.

  19. Lysophosphatidylinositol: a novel link between ABC transporters and G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Ruban, Emily L; Ferro, Riccardo; Arifin, Syamsul Ahmad; Falasca, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) is a well-known bioactive lipid that is able to activate signalling cascades relevant to cell proliferation, migration, survival and tumorigenesis. Our previous work suggested that LPI is involved in cancer progression since it can be released in the medium of Ras-transformed fibroblasts and can function as an autocrine modulator of cell growth. Different research groups have established that LPI is the specific and functional ligand for G-protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) and that this GPR55-LPI axis is able to activate signalling cascades that are relevant for different cell functions. Work in our laboratory has recently unravelled an autocrine loop, by which LPI synthesized by cytosolic phospholipase A₂ (cPLA₂) is pumped out of the cell by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter C1 (ABCC1)/multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), initiating a signalling cascade downstream of GPR55. Our current work suggests that blockade of this pathway may represent a novel strategy to inhibit cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25233417

  20. Cementogenesis and the induction of periodontal tissue regeneration by the osteogenic proteins of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily.

    Ripamonti, U; Petit, J-C; Teare, J

    2009-04-01

    The antiquity and severity of periodontal diseases are demonstrated by the hard evidence of alveolar bone loss in gnathic remains of the Pliocene/Pleistocene deposits of the Bloubank Valley at Sterkfontein, Swartkrans and Kromdrai in South Africa. Extant Homo has characterized and cloned a superfamily of proteins which include the bone morphogenetic proteins that regulate tooth morphogenesis at different stages of development as temporally and spatially connected events. The induction of cementogenesis, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone regeneration are regulated by the co-ordinated expression of bone morphogenetic proteins. Naturally derived and recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins induce periodontal tissue regeneration in mammals. Morphological analyses on undecalcified sections cut at 3-6 mum on a series of mandibular molar Class II and III furcation defects induced in the non-human primate Papio ursinus show the induction of cementogenesis. Sharpey's fibers nucleate as a series of composite collagen bundles within the cementoid matrix in close relation to embedded cementocytes. Osteogenic protein-1 and bone morphogenetic protein-2 possess a structure-activity profile, as shown by the morphology of tissue regeneration, preferentially cementogenic and osteogenic, respectively. In Papio ursinus, transforming growth factor-beta(3) also induces cementogenesis, with Sharpey's fibers inserting into newly formed alveolar bone. Capillary sprouting and invasion determine the sequential insertion and alignment of individual collagenic bundles. The addition of responding stem cells prepared by finely mincing fragments of autogenous rectus abdominis muscle significantly enhances the induction of periodontal tissue regeneration when combined with transforming growth factor-beta(3) implanted in Class II and III furcation defects of Papio ursinus. PMID:18842117

  1. Crystal structure of the phosphate-binding protein (PBP-1) of an ABC-type phosphate transporter from Clostridium perfringens

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Richez, Magali; Bergonzi, Celine; Chabriere, Eric; Elias, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate limitation is an important environmental stress that affects the metabolism of various organisms and, in particular, can trigger the virulence of numerous bacterial pathogens. Clostridium perfringens, a human pathogen, is one of the most common causes of enteritis necroticans, gas gangrene and food poisoning. Here, we focused on the high affinity phosphate-binding protein (PBP-1) of an ABC-type transporter, responsible for cellular phosphate uptake. We report the crystal structure (...

  2. Two molybdate/tungstate ABC transporters that interact very differently with their substrate binding proteins

    Vigonsky, Elena; Ovcharenko, Elena; Lewinson, Oded

    2013-01-01

    In all kingdoms of life, ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters participate in many physiological and pathological processes. Despite the diversity of their functions, they have been considered to operate by a largely conserved mechanism. One deviant is the vitamin B12 transporter BtuCD that has been shown to operate by a distinct mechanism. However, it is unknown if this deviation is an exotic example, perhaps arising from the nature of the transported moiety. Here we compared two ABC impor...

  3. Heme Transfer from Streptococcal Cell Surface Protein Shp to HtsA of Transporter HtsABC

    Liu, Mengyao; Lei, Benfang

    2005-01-01

    Human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS) can take up heme from host heme-containing proteins as a source of iron. Little is known about the heme acquisition mechanism in GAS. We recently identified a streptococcal cell surface protein (designated Shp) and the lipoprotein component (designated HtsA) of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter made by GAS as heme-binding proteins. In an effort to delineate the molecular mechanism involved in heme acquisition by GAS, heme-free Shp (apo-Shp) a...

  4. Molecular Evolution of the Rab-Escort-Protein/Guanine-Nucleotide-Dissociation-Inhibitor Superfamily

    Alory, Christelle; Balch, William E.

    2003-01-01

    Prenylation of Rab GTPases regulating vesicle traffic by Rab geranylgeranyltransferase (RabGGTase) requires a complex formed by the association of newly synthesized Rab proteins with Rab-escort-protein (REP), the choroideremia-gene-product that is mutated in disease, leading to loss of vision. After delivery to the membrane by the REP–Rab complex, subsequent recycling to the cytosol requires the REP-related guanine-nucleotide-dissociation-inhibitor (GDI). Although REP and GDI share common Rab...

  5. Function of the ABC transporters, P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance protein and breast cancer resistance protein, in minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Pol, van der M.A.; Broxterman, H.J.; Pater, JM; Feller, N.; Maas, M.; Weijers, GW; Scheffer, G.L.; Allen, JD; Scheper, R.J.; Loevezijn, van A; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Schuurhuis, G.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Relapse is common in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) because of persistence of minimal residual disease (MRD). ABC-transporters P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance protein (MRP), are thought to contribute to treatment failure, while it is unknown whether breast canc

  6. Comparative analyses of quaternary arrangements in homo-oligomeric proteins in superfamilies: Functional implications.

    Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the quaternary features of distantly related homo-oligomeric proteins is the focus of the current study. This study has been performed at the levels of quaternary state, symmetry, and quaternary structure. Quaternary state and quaternary structure refers to the number of subunits and spatial arrangements of subunits, respectively. Using a large dataset of available 3D structures of biologically relevant assemblies, we show that only 53% of the distantly related homo-oligomeric proteins have the same quaternary state. Considering these homologous homo-oligomers with the same quaternary state, conservation of quaternary structures is observed only in 38% of the pairs. In 36% of the pairs of distantly related homo-oligomers with different quaternary states the larger assembly in a pair shows high structural similarity with the entire quaternary structure of the related protein with lower quaternary state and it is referred as "Russian doll effect." The differences in quaternary state and structure have been suggested to contribute to the functional diversity. Detailed investigations show that even though the gross functions of many distantly related homo-oligomers are the same, finer level differences in molecular functions are manifested by differences in quaternary states and structures. Comparison of structures of biological assemblies in distantly and closely related homo-oligomeric proteins throughout the study differentiates the effects of sequence divergence on the quaternary structures and function. Knowledge inferred from this study can provide insights for improved protein structure classification and function prediction of homo-oligomers. Proteins 2016; 84:1190-1202. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27177429

  7. The superfamily of C3b/C4b-binding proteins

    Kristensen, Torsten; D'Eustachio, P; Ogata, R T;

    1987-01-01

    The determination of primary structures by amino acid and nucleotide sequencing for the C3b-and/or C4b-binding proteins H, C4BP, CR1, B, and C2 has revealed the presence of a common structural element. This element is approximately 60 amino acids long and is repeated in a tandem fashion, commenci...

  8. The Caulobacter crescentus Paracrystalline S-Layer Protein Is Secreted by an ABC Transporter (Type I) Secretion Apparatus

    Awram, Peter; Smit, John

    1998-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is a gram-negative bacterium that produces a two-dimensional crystalline array on its surface composed of a single 98-kDa protein, RsaA. Secretion of RsaA to the cell surface relies on an uncleaved C-terminal secretion signal. In this report, we identify two genes encoding components of the RsaA secretion apparatus. These components are part of a type I secretion system involving an ABC transporter protein. These genes, lying immediately 3′ of rsaA, were found by screen...

  9. Update of the human secretoglobin (SCGB) gene superfamily and an example of 'evolutionary bloom' of androgen-binding protein genes within the mouse Scgb gene superfamily

    Jackson Brian C; Thompson David C; Wright Mathew W; McAndrews Monica; Bernard Alfred; Nebert Daniel W; Vasiliou Vasilis

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The secretoglobins (SCGBs) comprise a family of small, secreted proteins found in animals exclusively of mammalian lineage. There are 11 human SCGB genes and five pseudogenes. Interestingly, mice have 68 Scgb genes, four of which are highly orthologous to human SCGB genes; the remainder represent an 'evolutionary bloom' and make up a large gene family represented by only six counterparts in humans. SCGBs are found in high concentrations in many mammalian secretions, including fluids ...

  10. Update of the human secretoglobin (SCGB gene superfamily and an example of 'evolutionary bloom' of androgen-binding protein genes within the mouse Scgb gene superfamily

    Jackson Brian C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The secretoglobins (SCGBs comprise a family of small, secreted proteins found in animals exclusively of mammalian lineage. There are 11 human SCGB genes and five pseudogenes. Interestingly, mice have 68 Scgb genes, four of which are highly orthologous to human SCGB genes; the remainder represent an 'evolutionary bloom' and make up a large gene family represented by only six counterparts in humans. SCGBs are found in high concentrations in many mammalian secretions, including fluids of the lung, lacrimal gland, salivary gland, prostate and uterus. Whereas the biological activities of most individual SCGBs have not been fully characterised, what already has been discovered suggests that this family has an important role in the modulation of inflammation, tissue repair and tumorigenesis. In mice, the large Scgb1b and Scgb2b gene families encode the androgen-binding proteins, which have been shown to play a role in mate selection. Although much has been learned about SCGBs in recent years, clearly more research remains to be done to allow a better understanding of the roles of these proteins in human health and disease. Such information is predicted to reveal valuable novel drug targets for the treatment of inflammation, as well as designing biomarkers that might identify tissue damage or cancer.

  11. Secretoglobin Superfamily Protein SCGB3A2 Deficiency Potentiates Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Pulmonary Inflammation

    Taketomo Kido

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretoglobin (SCGB 3A2, a cytokine-like secretory protein of small molecular weight, which may play a role in lung inflammation, is predominantly expressed in airway epithelial cells. In order to understand the physiological role of SCGB3A2, Scgb3a2−/− mice were generated and characterized. Scgb3a2−/− mice did not exhibit any overt phenotypes. In ovalbumin- (OVA- induced airway allergy inflammation model, Scgb3a2−/− mice in mixed background showed a decreased OVA-induced airway inflammation, while six times C57BL/6NCr backcrossed congenic Scgb3a2−/− mice showed a slight exacerbation of OVA-induced airway inflammation as compared to wild-type littermates. These results indicate that the loss of SCGB3A2 function was influenced by a modifier gene(s in mixed genetic background and suggest that SCGB3A2 has anti-inflammatory property. The results further suggest the possible use of recombinant human SCGB3A2 as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  12. A Novel Two Domain-Fusion Protein in Cyanobacteria with Similarity to the CAB/ELIP/HLIP Superfamily: Evolutionary Implications and Regulation

    Oliver Kilian; Anne Soisig Steunou; Arthur R.Grossman; Devaki Bhaya

    2008-01-01

    Vascular plants contain abundant, light-harvesting complexes in the thylakoid membrane that are non-covalently associated with chlorophylls and carotenoids. These light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding (LHC) proteins are members of an extended CAB/ELIP/HLIP superfamily of distantly related polypeptides, which have between one and four transmembrane helices (TMH). This superfamily includes the single TMH, high-light-inducible proteins (Hlips), found in cyanobacteria that are induced by various stress conditions, including high light, and are considered ancestral to the LHC proteins. The roles of, and evolutionary relationships between, these superfamily members are of particular interest,since they function in both light harvesting and photoprotection and may have evolved through tandem gene duplication and fusion events. We have investigated the Hlips (hli gene family) in the thermophilic unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus OS-B'. The five hli genes present on the genome of Synechococcus OS-B' are relatively similar, but transcript analyses indicate that there are different patterns of transcript accumulation when the cells are exposed to various growth conditions, suggesting that different Hlips may have specific functions. Hlip5 has an additional TMH at the N-terminus as a result of a novel fusion event. This additional TMH is very similar to a conserved hypothetical, single membrane-spanning polypeptide present in most cyanobacteria. The evolutionary significance of these results is discussed.

  13. The ABCs of Candida albicans Multidrug Transporter Cdr1.

    Prasad, Rajendra; Banerjee, Atanu; Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni

    2015-12-01

    In the light of multidrug resistance (MDR) among pathogenic microbes and cancer cells, membrane transporters have gained profound clinical significance. Chemotherapeutic failure, by far, has been attributed mainly to the robust and diverse array of these proteins, which are omnipresent in every stratum of the living world. Candida albicans, one of the major fungal pathogens affecting immunocompromised patients, also develops MDR during the course of chemotherapy. The pivotal membrane transporters that C. albicans has exploited as one of the strategies to develop MDR belongs to either the ATP binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) class of proteins. The ABC transporter Candida drug resistance 1 protein (Cdr1p) is a major player among these transporters that enables the pathogen to outplay the battery of antifungals encountered by it. The promiscuous Cdr1 protein fulfills the quintessential need of a model to study molecular mechanisms of multidrug transporter regulation and structure-function analyses of asymmetric ABC transporters. In this review, we cover the highlights of two decades of research on Cdr1p that has provided a platform to study its structure-function relationships and regulatory circuitry for a better understanding of MDR not only in yeast but also in other organisms. PMID:26407965

  14. The PD-(D/EXK superfamily revisited: identification of new members among proteins involved in DNA metabolism and functional predictions for domains of (hitherto unknown function

    Bujnicki Janusz M

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PD-(D/EXK nuclease superfamily, initially identified in type II restriction endonucleases and later in many enzymes involved in DNA recombination and repair, is one of the most challenging targets for protein sequence analysis and structure prediction. Typically, the sequence similarity between these proteins is so low, that most of the relationships between known members of the PD-(D/EXK superfamily were identified only after the corresponding structures were determined experimentally. Thus, it is tempting to speculate that among the uncharacterized protein families, there are potential nucleases that remain to be discovered, but their identification requires more sensitive tools than traditional PSI-BLAST searches. Results The low degree of amino acid conservation hampers the possibility of identification of new members of the PD-(D/EXK superfamily based solely on sequence comparisons to known members. Therefore, we used a recently developed method HHsearch for sensitive detection of remote similarities between protein families represented as profile Hidden Markov Models enhanced by secondary structure. We carried out a comparison of known families of PD-(D/EXK nucleases to the database comprising the COG and PFAM profiles corresponding to both functionally characterized as well as uncharacterized protein families to detect significant similarities. The initial candidates for new nucleases were subsequently verified by sequence-structure threading, comparative modeling, and identification of potential active site residues. Conclusion In this article, we report identification of the PD-(D/EXK nuclease domain in numerous proteins implicated in interactions with DNA but with unknown structure and mechanism of action (such as putative recombinase RmuC, DNA competence factor CoiA, a DNA-binding protein SfsA, a large human protein predicted to be a DNA repair enzyme, predicted archaeal transcription regulators, and the head

  15. Involvement of helicase II (uvrD gene product) and DNA polymerase I in excision mediated by the uvrABC protein complex.

    Caron, P R; Kushner, S R; Grossman, L

    1985-01-01

    The bimodal-incision nature of the reaction of UV-irradiated DNA catalyzed by the Escherichia coli uvrABC protein complex potentially leads to excision of a 12- to 13-nucleotide-long damaged fragment. However, the oligonucleotide fragment containing the UV-induced pyrimidine dimer is not released under nondenaturing in vitro reaction conditions. Also, the uvrABC proteins are stably bound to the incised DNA and do not turn over after the incision event. In this communication it is shown that r...

  16. Alleviation of temperature-sensitive secretion defect of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, TliDEF, by a change of single amino acid in the ABC protein, TliD.

    Eom, Gyeong Tae; Oh, Joon Young; Park, Ji Hyun; Lim, Hye Jin; Lee, So Jeong; Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Ji-Eun; Jegal, Jonggeon; Song, Bong Keun; Yu, Ju-Hyun; Song, Jae Kwang

    2016-09-01

    An ABC transporter, TliDEF, from Pseudomonas fluorescens SIK W1, mediates the secretion of its cognate lipase, TliA, in a temperature-dependent secretion manner; the TliDEF-mediated secretion of TliA was impossible at the temperatures over 33°C. To isolate a mutant TliDEF capable of secreting TliA at 35°C, the mutagenesis of ABC protein (TliD) was performed. The mutated tliD library where a random point mutation was introduced by error-prone PCR was coexpressed with the wild-type tliE, tliF and tliA in Escherichia coli. Among approximately 10,000 colonies of the tliD library, we selected one colony that formed transparent halo on LB-tributyrin plates at 35°C. At the growth temperature of 35°C, the selected mutant TliD showed 1.75 U/ml of the extracellular lipase activity, while the wild-type TliDEF did not show any detectable lipase activity in the culture supernatant of E. coli. Moreover, the mutant TliD also showed higher level of TliA secretion than the wild-type TliDEF at other culture temperatures, 20°C, 25°C and 30°C. The mutant TliD had a single amino acid change (Ser287Pro) in the predicted transmembrane region in the membrane domain of TliD, implying that the corresponding region of TliD was important for causing the temperature-dependent secretion of TliDEF. These results suggested that the property of ABC transporter could be changed by the change of amino acid in the ABC protein. PMID:27033673

  17. Involvement of helicase II (uvrD gene product) and DNA polymerase I in excision mediated by the uvrABC protein complex

    Caron, P.R.; Kushner, S.R.; Grossman, L.

    1985-08-01

    The bimodal-incision nature of the reaction of UV-irradiated DNA catalyzed by the Escherichia coli uvrABC protein complex potentially leads to excision of a 12- to 13-nucleotide-long damaged fragment. However, the oligonucleotide fragment containing the UV-induced pyrimidine dimer is not released under nondenaturing in vitro reaction conditions. Also, the uvrABC proteins are stably bound to the incised DNA and do not turn over after the incision event. In this communication it is shown that release of the damaged fragment from the parental uvrABC-incised DNA is dependent upon either chelating conditions or the simultaneous addition of the uvrD gene product (helicase II) and the polA gene product (DNA polymerase I) when polymerization of deoxynucleoside triphosphate substrates is concomitantly catalyzed. The product of this multiprotein-catalyzed series of reactions serves as a substrate for polynucleotide ligase, resulting in the restoration of the integrity of the strands of DNA. The addition of the uvrD protein to the incised DNA-uvrABC complex also results in turnover of the uvrC protein. It is suggested that the repair processes of incision, excision, resynthesis, and ligation are coordinately catalyzed by a complex of proteins in a ''repairosome'' configuration.

  18. Involvement of helicase II (uvrD gene product) and DNA polymerase I in excision mediated by the uvrABC protein complex

    The bimodal-incision nature of the reaction of UV-irradiated DNA catalyzed by the Escherichia coli uvrABC protein complex potentially leads to excision of a 12- to 13-nucleotide-long damaged fragment. However, the oligonucleotide fragment containing the UV-induced pyrimidine dimer is not released under nondenaturing in vitro reaction conditions. Also, the uvrABC proteins are stably bound to the incised DNA and do not turn over after the incision event. In this communication it is shown that release of the damaged fragment from the parental uvrABC-incised DNA is dependent upon either chelating conditions or the simultaneous addition of the uvrD gene product (helicase II) and the polA gene product (DNA polymerase I) when polymerization of deoxynucleoside triphosphate substrates is concomitantly catalyzed. The product of this multiprotein-catalyzed series of reactions serves as a substrate for polynucleotide ligase, resulting in the restoration of the integrity of the strands of DNA. The addition of the uvrD protein to the incised DNA-uvrABC complex also results in turnover of the uvrC protein. It is suggested that the repair processes of incision, excision, resynthesis, and ligation are coordinately catalyzed by a complex of proteins in a ''repairosome'' configuration

  19. Genome-wide analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene family in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Xie, Xiaodong; Cheng, Tingcai; Wang, Genhong; Duan, Jun; Niu, Weihuan; Xia, Qingyou

    2012-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily is a larger protein family with diverse physiological functions in all kingdoms of life. We identified 53 ABC transporters in the silkworm genome, and classified them into eight subfamilies (A-H). Comparative genome analysis revealed that the silkworm has an expanded ABCC subfamily with more members than Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, or Homo sapiens. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the ABCE and ABCF genes were highly conserved in the silkworm, indicating possible involvement in fundamental biological processes. Five multidrug resistance-related genes in the ABCB subfamily and two multidrug resistance-associated-related genes in the ABCC subfamily indicated involvement in biochemical defense. Genetic variation analysis revealed four ABC genes that might be evolving under positive selection. Moreover, the silkworm ABCC4 gene might be important for silkworm domestication. Microarray analysis showed that the silkworm ABC genes had distinct expression patterns in different tissues on day 3 of the fifth instar. These results might provide new insights for further functional studies on the ABC genes in the silkworm genome. PMID:22311044

  20. Mapping the functional yeast ABC transporter interactome

    Snider, Jamie; Hanif, Asad; Lee, Mid Eum; Jin, Ke; Yu, Analyn R.; Graham, Chris; Chuk, Matthew; Damjanovic, Dunja; Wierzbicka, Marta; Tang, Priscilla; Balderes, Dina; Wong, Victoria; Jessulat, Matthew; Darowski, Katelyn D.; Luis, Bryan-Joseph San

    2013-01-01

    ABC transporters are a ubiquitous class of integral membrane proteins of immense clinical interest because of their strong association with human disease and pharmacology. To improve our understanding of these proteins, we used Membrane Yeast Two-Hybrid (MYTH) technology to map the protein interactome of all non-mitochondrial ABC transporters in the model organism Saccharomy cescerevisiae, and combined this data with previously reported yeast ABC transporter interactions in the BioGRID databa...

  1. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC Transporter HI1470/71 through Its Cognate Molybdate Periplasmic Binding Protein, MolA

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C.; Pinkett, Heather W. (CIT); (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    molA (HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB{sub 2}C{sub 2} (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The MolA-binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate, but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate-binding protein structurally solved. The {approx}100 {mu}M binding affinity for tungstate and molybdate is significantly lower than observed for the class II ModA molybdate-binding proteins that have nanomolar to low micromolar affinity for molybdate. The presence of two molybdate loci in H. influenzae suggests multiple transport systems for one substrate, with molABC constituting a low-affinity molybdate locus.

  2. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC transporter HI1470/71 through its cognate molybdate periplasmic binding protein, MolA.

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C; Pinkett, Heather W

    2011-11-01

    molA (HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB(2)C(2) (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7 Å resolution, respectively. The MolA-binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate, but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate-binding protein structurally solved. The ∼100 μM binding affinity for tungstate and molybdate is significantly lower than observed for the class II ModA molybdate-binding proteins that have nanomolar to low micromolar affinity for molybdate. The presence of two molybdate loci in H. influenzae suggests multiple transport systems for one substrate, with molABC constituting a low-affinity molybdate locus. PMID:22078568

  3. Mapping the functional yeast ABC transporter interactome.

    Snider, Jamie; Hanif, Asad; Lee, Mid Eum; Jin, Ke; Yu, Analyn R; Graham, Chris; Chuk, Matthew; Damjanovic, Dunja; Wierzbicka, Marta; Tang, Priscilla; Balderes, Dina; Wong, Victoria; Jessulat, Matthew; Darowski, Katelyn D; San Luis, Bryan-Joseph; Shevelev, Igor; Sturley, Stephen L; Boone, Charles; Greenblatt, Jack F; Zhang, Zhaolei; Paumi, Christian M; Babu, Mohan; Park, Hay-Oak; Michaelis, Susan; Stagljar, Igor

    2013-09-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a ubiquitous class of integral membrane proteins of immense clinical interest because of their strong association with human disease and pharmacology. To improve our understanding of these proteins, we used membrane yeast two-hybrid technology to map the protein interactome of all of the nonmitochondrial ABC transporters in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and combined this data with previously reported yeast ABC transporter interactions in the BioGRID database to generate a comprehensive, integrated 'interactome'. We show that ABC transporters physically associate with proteins involved in an unexpectedly diverse range of functions. We specifically examine the importance of the physical interactions of ABC transporters in both the regulation of one another and in the modulation of proteins involved in zinc homeostasis. The interaction network presented here will be a powerful resource for increasing our fundamental understanding of the cellular role and regulation of ABC transporters. PMID:23831759

  4. TaABC1, a member of the activity of bc 1 complex protein kinase family from common wheat, confers enhanced tolerance to abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis

    Wang, Caixiang; Jing, Ruilian; Mao, Xinguo; Chang, Xiaoping; Li, Ang

    2010-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, and low temperature have drastic effects on plant growth and development. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating biochemical and physiological changes in response to stresses are not well understood. Protein kinases are major signal transduction factors among the reported molecular mechanisms mediating acclimation to environmental changes. Protein kinase ABC1 (activity of bc 1 complex) is involved in regulating coenzyme Q biosynthesis in mitoc...

  5. Solution structure and phylogenetics of Prod1, a member of the three-finger protein superfamily implicated in salamander limb regeneration.

    Acely Garza-Garcia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Following the amputation of a limb, newts and salamanders have the capability to regenerate the lost tissues via a complex process that takes place at the site of injury. Initially these cells undergo dedifferentiation to a state competent to regenerate the missing limb structures. Crucially, dedifferentiated cells have memory of their level of origin along the proximodistal (PD axis of the limb, a property known as positional identity. Notophthalmus viridescens Prod1 is a cell-surface molecule of the three-finger protein (TFP superfamily involved in the specification of newt limb PD identity. The TFP superfamily is a highly diverse group of metazoan proteins that includes snake venom toxins, mammalian transmembrane receptors and miscellaneous signaling molecules. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With the aim of identifying potential orthologs of Prod1, we have solved its 3D structure and compared it to other known TFPs using phylogenetic techniques. The analysis shows that TFP 3D structures group in different categories according to function. Prod1 clusters with other cell surface protein TFP domains including the complement regulator CD59 and the C-terminal domain of urokinase-type plasminogen activator. To infer orthology, a structure-based multiple sequence alignment of representative TFP family members was built and analyzed by phylogenetic methods. Prod1 has been proposed to be the salamander CD59 but our analysis fails to support this association. Prod1 is not a good match for any of the TFP families present in mammals and this result was further supported by the identification of the putative orthologs of both CD59 and N. viridescens Prod1 in sequence data for the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The available data suggest that Prod1, and thereby its role in encoding PD identity, is restricted to salamanders. The lack of comparable limb-regenerative capability in other adult vertebrates could be

  6. Superfamilies of Evolved and Designed Networks

    Milo, Ron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Kashtan, Nadav; Levitt, Reuven; Shen-Orr, Shai; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Sheffer, Michal; Alon, Uri

    2004-03-01

    Complex biological, technological, and sociological networks can be of very different sizes and connectivities, making it difficult to compare their structures. Here we present an approach to systematically study similarity in the local structure of networks, based on the significance profile (SP) of small subgraphs in the network compared to randomized networks. We find several superfamilies of previously unrelated networks with very similar SPs. One superfamily, including transcription networks of microorganisms, represents ``rate-limited'' information-processing networks strongly constrained by the response time of their components. A distinct superfamily includes protein signaling, developmental genetic networks, and neuronal wiring. Additional superfamilies include power grids, protein-structure networks and geometric networks, World Wide Web links and social networks, and word-adjacency networks from different languages.

  7. Pleiotropic effects of the vacuolar ABC transporter MLT1 of Candida albicans on cell function and virulence.

    Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Kaemmer, Philipp; Förster, Toni M; Singh, Ashutosh; Coste, Alix T; Andes, David R; Hube, Bernhard; Sanglard, Dominique; Chauhan, Neeraj; Kaur, Rupinder; d'Enfert, Christophe; Mondal, Alok Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-06-01

    Among the several mechanisms that contribute to MDR (multidrug resistance), the overexpression of drug-efflux pumps belonging to the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) superfamily is the most frequent cause of resistance to antifungal agents. The multidrug transporter proteins Cdr1p and Cdr2p of the ABCG subfamily are major players in the development of MDR in Candida albicans Because several genes coding for ABC proteins exist in the genome of C. albicans, but only Cdr1p and Cdr2p have established roles in MDR, it is implicit that the other members of the ABC family also have alternative physiological roles. The present study focuses on an ABC transporter of C. albicans, Mlt1p, which is localized in the vacuolar membrane and specifically transports PC (phosphatidylcholine) into the vacuolar lumen. Transcriptional profiling of the mlt1∆/∆ mutant revealed a down-regulation of the genes involved in endocytosis, oxidoreductase activity, virulence and hyphal development. High-throughput MS-based lipidome analysis revealed that the Mlt1p levels affect lipid homoeostasis and thus lead to a plethora of physiological perturbations. These include a delay in endocytosis, inefficient sequestering of reactive oxygen species (ROS), defects in hyphal development and attenuated virulence. The present study is an emerging example where new and unconventional roles of an ABC transporter are being identified. PMID:27026051

  8. The RNase H-like superfamily: new members, comparative structural analysis and evolutionary classification

    Majorek, Karolina A; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Steczkiewicz, Kamil; Muszewska, Anna; Nowotny, Marcin; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease H-like (RNHL) superfamily, also called the retroviral integrase superfamily, groups together numerous enzymes involved in nucleic acid metabolism and implicated in many biological processes, including replication, homologous recombination, DNA repair, transposition and RNA interference. The RNHL superfamily proteins show extensive divergence of sequences and structures. We conducted database searches to identify members of the RNHL superfamily (including those previously unknown)...

  9. Interaptin, an Actin-binding Protein of the α-Actinin Superfamily in Dictyostelium discoideum, Is Developmentally and cAMP-regulated and Associates with Intracellular Membrane Compartments

    Rivero, Francisco; Kuspa, Adam; Brokamp, Regine; Matzner, Monika; Noegel, Angelika A.

    1998-01-01

    In a search for novel members of the α-actinin superfamily, a Dictyostelium discoideum genomic library in yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC) was screened under low stringency conditions using the acting-binding domain of the gelation factor as probe. A new locus was identified and 8.6 kb of genomic DNA were sequenced that encompassed the whole abpD gene. The DNA sequence predicts a protein, interaptin, with a calculated molecular mass of 204,300 D that is constituted by an actin-binding domain, a central coiled-coil rod domain and a membrane-associated domain. In Northern blot analyses a cAMP-stimulated transcript of 5.8 kb is expressed at the stage when cell differentiation occurs. Monoclonal antibodies raised against bacterially expressed interaptin polypeptides recognized a 200-kD developmentally and cAMP-regulated protein and a 160-kD constitutively expressed protein in Western blots. In multicellular structures, interaptin appears to be enriched in anterior-like cells which sort to the upper and lower cups during culmination. The protein is located at the nuclear envelope and ER. In mutants deficient in interaptin development is delayed, but the morphology of the mature fruiting bodies appears normal. When starved in suspension abpD− cells form EDTA-stable aggregates, which, in contrast to wild type, dissociate. Based on its domains and location, interaptin constitutes a potential link between intracellular membrane compartments and the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:9700162

  10. Characterization of a novel domain ‘GATE’ in the ABC protein DrrA and its role in drug efflux by the DrrAB complex

    Zhang, Han; Rahman, Sadia; Li, Wen; Fu, Guoxing; Kaur, Parjit, E-mail: pkaur@gsu.edu

    2015-03-27

    A novel domain, GATE (Glycine-loop And Transducer Element), is identified in the ABC protein DrrA. This domain shows sequence and structural conservation among close homologs of DrrA as well as distantly-related ABC proteins. Among the highly conserved residues in this domain are three glycines, G215, G221 and G231, of which G215 was found to be critical for stable expression of the DrrAB complex. Other conserved residues, including E201, G221, K227 and G231, were found to be critical for the catalytic and transport functions of the DrrAB transporter. Structural analysis of both the previously published crystal structure of the DrrA homolog MalK and the modeled structure of DrrA showed that G215 makes close contacts with residues in and around the Walker A motif, suggesting that these interactions may be critical for maintaining the integrity of the ATP binding pocket as well as the complex. It is also shown that G215A or K227R mutation diminishes some of the atomic interactions essential for ATP catalysis and overall transport function. Therefore, based on both the biochemical and structural analyses, it is proposed that the GATE domain, located outside of the previously identified ATP binding and hydrolysis motifs, is an additional element involved in ATP catalysis. - Highlights: • A novel domain ‘GATE’ is identified in the ABC protein DrrA. • GATE shows high sequence and structural conservation among diverse ABC proteins. • GATE is located outside of the previously studied ATP binding and hydrolysis motifs. • Conserved GATE residues are critical for stability of DrrAB and for ATP catalysis.

  11. Characterization of a novel domain ‘GATE’ in the ABC protein DrrA and its role in drug efflux by the DrrAB complex

    A novel domain, GATE (Glycine-loop And Transducer Element), is identified in the ABC protein DrrA. This domain shows sequence and structural conservation among close homologs of DrrA as well as distantly-related ABC proteins. Among the highly conserved residues in this domain are three glycines, G215, G221 and G231, of which G215 was found to be critical for stable expression of the DrrAB complex. Other conserved residues, including E201, G221, K227 and G231, were found to be critical for the catalytic and transport functions of the DrrAB transporter. Structural analysis of both the previously published crystal structure of the DrrA homolog MalK and the modeled structure of DrrA showed that G215 makes close contacts with residues in and around the Walker A motif, suggesting that these interactions may be critical for maintaining the integrity of the ATP binding pocket as well as the complex. It is also shown that G215A or K227R mutation diminishes some of the atomic interactions essential for ATP catalysis and overall transport function. Therefore, based on both the biochemical and structural analyses, it is proposed that the GATE domain, located outside of the previously identified ATP binding and hydrolysis motifs, is an additional element involved in ATP catalysis. - Highlights: • A novel domain ‘GATE’ is identified in the ABC protein DrrA. • GATE shows high sequence and structural conservation among diverse ABC proteins. • GATE is located outside of the previously studied ATP binding and hydrolysis motifs. • Conserved GATE residues are critical for stability of DrrAB and for ATP catalysis

  12. SELECTED PURIFIED PLANT COMPOUNDS AS POSSIBLE INHIBITORS OF RV1819C A DRUG EFFLUX PUMP (ABC PROTEIN FROM MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS

    Sungai Mazando*, M Zimba, C Zimudzi, N Kunonga and M Gundidza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is among the most worrisome aspects of the pandemic of antibiotic resistance because TB patients that fail treatment have a high risk of death.  The active multidrug efflux pump (EP has been described as one of the mechanisms involved in the natural drug resistance of bacteria, such as mycobacteria. Rv1819c a putative efflux pump ATP binding cassette (ABC protein gene from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was cloned and transformed into Corynebacterium glutamicum. Susceptibility to standard anti-TB drugs and purified plant compounds, in the presence or absence of standard efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP, reserpine and verapamil was determined. A fluorometric method was used to assess the ability of the purified plant compounds to inhibit efflux pumps in comparison with three standard EPIs: reserpine, verapamil, and CCCP. Three of the plant compounds coded Ma8, IXLE1B and IXLE2FA were found to have potent antibacterial activity with the extract from Mammea africana (Ma8 being the most potent with an MIC of 4 mg/L. The three purified plant extracts were also shown to reduce the efflux of ciprofloxacin from the mycobacteria cells.  The plant extracts have the potential to augment conventional drugs in the treatment of drug resistant M. tuberculosis upon further studies.

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the putative ABC transporter ATP-binding protein from Thermotoga maritima

    The putative ABC transporter ATP-binding protein TM0222 from T. maritima was cloned, overproduced, purified and crystallized. A complete MAD diffraction data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters) are ATP hydrolysis-dependent transmembrane transporters. Here, the overproduction, purification and crystallization of the putative ABC transporter ATP-binding protein TM0222 from Thermotoga maritima are reported. The protein was crystallized in the hexagonal space group P6422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 148.49, c = 106.96 Å, γ = 120.0°. Assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit, the calculated VM is 2.84 Å3 Da−1, which corresponds to a solvent content of 56.6%. A three-wavelength MAD data set was collected to 2.3 Å resolution from SeMet-substituted TM0222 crystals. Data sets were collected on the BL38B1 beamline at SPring-8, Japan

  14. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC transporter HI1470/71 through its cognate molybdate periplasmic binding protein, MolA

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C.; Pinkett, Heather W.

    2011-01-01

    molA(HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB2C2 (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7-Å resolution, respectively. The MolA binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate binding protein structurally solved. The ~100 μM binding affinity...

  15. The structure of BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus reveals a superfamily of bacterial periplasmic proteins with possible inhibitory function

    The crystal structure of the BVU2987 gene product from B. vulgatus (UniProt A6L4L1) reveals that members of the new Pfam family PF11396 (domain of unknown function; DUF2874) are similar to β-lactamase inhibitor protein and YpmB. Proteins that contain the DUF2874 domain constitute a new Pfam family PF11396. Members of this family have predominantly been identified in microbes found in the human gut and oral cavity. The crystal structure of one member of this family, BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus, has been determined, revealing a β-lactamase inhibitor protein-like structure with a tandem repeat of domains. Sequence analysis and structural comparisons reveal that BVU2987 and other DUF2874 proteins are related to β-lactamase inhibitor protein, PepSY and SmpA-OmlA proteins and hence are likely to function as inhibitory proteins

  16. Smed-SmB, a member of the LSm protein superfamily, is essential for chromatoid body organization and planarian stem cell proliferation.

    Fernandéz-Taboada, Enrique; Moritz, Sören; Zeuschner, Dagmar; Stehling, Martin; Schöler, Hans R; Saló, Emili; Gentile, Luca

    2010-04-01

    Planarians are an ideal model system to study in vivo the dynamics of adult pluripotent stem cells. However, our knowledge of the factors necessary for regulating the 'stemness' of the neoblasts, the adult stem cells of planarians, is sparse. Here, we report on the characterization of the first planarian member of the LSm protein superfamily, Smed-SmB, which is expressed in stem cells and neurons in Schmidtea mediterranea. LSm proteins are highly conserved key players of the splicing machinery. Our study shows that Smed-SmB protein, which is localized in the nucleus and the chromatoid body of stem cells, is required to safeguard the proliferative ability of the neoblasts. The chromatoid body, a cytoplasmatic ribonucleoprotein complex, is an essential regulator of the RNA metabolism required for the maintenance of metazoan germ cells. However, planarian neoblasts and neurons also rely on its functions. Remarkably, Smed-SmB dsRNA-mediated knockdown results in a rapid loss of organization of the chromatoid body, an impairment of the ability to post-transcriptionally process the transcripts of Smed-CycB, and a severe proliferative failure of the neoblasts. This chain of events leads to a quick depletion of the neoblast pool, resulting in a lethal phenotype for both regenerating and intact animals. In summary, our results suggest that Smed-SmB is an essential component of the chromatoid body, crucial to ensure a proper RNA metabolism and essential for stem cell proliferation. PMID:20215344

  17. A stress-regulated protein, GRP58, a member of thioredoxin superfamily, is a carnitine palmitoyltransferase isoenzyme.

    Murthy, M S; Pande, S V

    1994-01-01

    We recently noted the association of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) activity with a 54 kDa microsomal protein [Murthy and Pande (1993) Mol. Cell Biochem. 122, 133-138] that, based on amino-acid-sequence identity, seemed to be the protein previously described as a 'glucose-regulated protein-58' (GRP58), phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, hormone-induced protein-70, endoplasmic-reticulum protein-61 (ERp61), protein disulphide-isomerase, thiol protease, a protein affected in halothane anaesthesia and one that affects renal-tubular functions and the transcriptional activation of the interferon-alpha inducible genes. To ascertain the catalytic identity of this protein unambiguously, we have expressed the corresponding cDNA transiently and stably in human kidney 293 cells as well as in HeLa cells. In each case we found that expression led to an increase in assayable and immunoreactive 54 kDa CPT activity, whereas the protein disulphide-isomerase activity was not increased. In vitro expression in a cell-free transcription and translation system led to the synthesis of a approximately 57 kDa (precursor) protein that was processed to a approximately 54 kDa (mature) protein when microsomes were present; in both these experiments again a large increase in CPT activity was seen. Thus the present data provide compelling evidence that the 54 kDa protein in question is a CPT isoenzyme. It remains to be seen now how the ability of this protein to interconvert acyl-CoA and acylcarnitine would relate to the diverse functions indicated for this protein in vivo. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7998951

  18. Structure of the D-alanylgriseoluteic acid biosynthetic protein EhpF, an atypical member of the ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes

    Bera, A.K.; Robinson, H.; Atanasova, V.; Gamage, S.; Parsons, J. F.

    2010-06-01

    The structure of EhpF, a 41 kDa protein that functions in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound D-alanylgriseoluteic acid (AGA), is reported. A cluster of approximately 16 genes, including ehpF, located on a 200 kbp plasmid native to certain strains of Pantoea agglomerans encodes the proteins that are required for the conversion of chorismic acid to AGA. Phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate has been identified as an intermediate in AGA biosynthesis and deletion of ehpF results in accumulation of this compound in vivo. The crystallographic data presented here reveal that EhpF is an atypical member of the acyl-CoA synthase or ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes. These enzymes typically catalyze two-step reactions involving adenylation of a carboxylate substrate followed by transfer of the substrate from AMP to coenzyme A or another phosphopantetheine. EhpF is distinguished by the absence of the C-terminal domain that is characteristic of enzymes from this family and is involved in phosphopantetheine binding and in the second half of the canonical two-step reaction that is typically observed. Based on the structure of EhpF and a bioinformatic analysis, it is proposed that EhpF and EhpG convert phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate to 6-formylphenazine-1-carboxylate via an adenylyl intermediate.

  19. DIM-1, a novel immunoglobulin superfamily protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, is necessary for maintaining bodywall muscle integrity.

    Rogalski, Teresa M.; Gilbert, Mary M.; Devenport, Danelle; Norman, Kenneth R.; Moerman, Donald G.

    2003-01-01

    The UNC-112 protein is required during initial muscle assembly in C. elegans to form dense bodies and M-lines. Loss of this protein results in arrest at the twofold stage of embryogenesis. In contrast, a missense mutation in unc-112 results in viable animals that have disorganized bodywall muscle and are paralyzed as adults. Loss or reduction of dim-1 gene function can suppress the severe muscle disruption and paralysis exhibited by these mutant hermaphrodites. The overall muscle structure in...

  20. Human tetraspanin transmembrane 4 superfamily member 4 or intestinal and liver tetraspan membrane protein is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and accelerates tumor cell growth

    Ying Li; Leiming Wang; Jie Qiu; Liang Da; Pierre Tiollais; Zaiping Li; Mujun Zhao

    2012-01-01

    The human transmembrane 4 superfamily member 4 or intestinal and liver tetraspan membrane protein (TM4SF4/il-TMP) was originally cloned as an intestinal and liver tetraspan membrane protein and mediates density-dependent cell proliferation.The rat homolog of TM4SF4 was found to be up-regulated in regenerating liver after two-thirds hepatectomy and overexpression of TM4SF4 could enhance liver injury induced by CCl4.However,the expression and significance of TM4SF4/il-TMP in liver cancer remain unknown.Here,we report that TM4SF4/il-TMP is frequently and significantly overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis showed that TM4SF4/il-TMP mRNA and protein levels were upregulated in ~80% of HCC tissues,Immunohistochemical analysis of a 75 paired HCC tissue microarray revealed that TM4SF4/il-TMP was significantly overexpressed in HCC tissues (P < 0.001),and high immunointensity of TM4SF4/iI-TMP tended to be in well-to-moderately differentiated HCC compared with poorly differentiated tumors.Functional studies showed that overexpression of TM4SF4/il-TMP in QGY-7701 and BEL-7404 HCC cell lines through stable transfection of TM4SF4 expression plasmid significantly promoted both cell growth and colony formation of HCC cells.Reduction of TM4SF4/il-TMP expression in QGY-7701 and BEL-7404 cells by stably transfecting TM4SF4 antisense plasmid caused great inhibition of cell proliferation.Our findings suggest that TM4SF4/il-TMP has the potential to be biomarker in HCC and plays a crucial role in promotion of cancer cell proliferation.

  1. Evolutionary and functional relationships within the DJ1 superfamily

    Cookson Mark R; Bandyopadhyay Sourav

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Inferences about protein function are often made based on sequence homology to other gene products of known activities. This approach is valuable for small families of conserved proteins but can be difficult to apply to large superfamilies of proteins with diverse function. In this study we looked at sequence homology between members of the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily, which includes a human protein of unclear function, DJ-1, associated with inherited Parkinson's disease. R...

  2. Effect of the deletion of qmoABC and the promoter distal gene encoding a hypothetical protein on sulfate-reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Zane, Grant M.; Yen, Huei-chi Bill; Wall, Judy D.

    2010-03-18

    The pathway of electrons required for the reduction of sulfate in sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is not yet fully characterized. In order to determine the role of a transmembrane protein complex suggested to be involved in this process, a deletion of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was created by marker exchange mutagenesis that eliminated four genes putatively encoding the QmoABC complex and a hypothetical protein (DVU0851). The Qmo complex (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase) is proposed to be responsible for transporting electrons to the dissimilatory adenosine-5?phosphosulfate (APS) reductase in SRB. In support of the predicted role of this complex, the deletion mutant was unable to grow using sulfate as its sole electron acceptor with a range of electron donors. To explore a possible role for the hypothetical protein in sulfate reduction, a second mutant was constructed that had lost only the gene that codes for DVU0851. The second constructed mutant grew with sulfate as the sole electron acceptor; however, there was a lag that was not present with the wild-type or complemented strain. Neither deletion strain was significantly impaired for growth with sulfite or thiosulfate as terminal electron acceptor. Complementation of the D(qmoABC-DVU0851) mutant with all four genes or only the qmoABC genes restored its ability to grow by sulfate respiration. These results confirmed the prediction that the Qmo complex is in the electron pathway for sulfate-reduction and revealed that no other transmembrane complex could compensate when Qmo was lacking.

  3. Structure of the d-alanylgriseoluteic acid biosynthetic protein EhpF, an atypical member of the ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes

    Bera, Asim K.; Atanasova, Vesna [Center for Advanced Research in Biotechnology, The University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, 9600 Gudelsky Drive, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Gamage, Swarna [Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Robinson, Howard [Biology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Parsons, James F., E-mail: parsonsj@umbi.umd.edu [Center for Advanced Research in Biotechnology, The University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, 9600 Gudelsky Drive, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The structure of EhpF from P. agglomerans has been solved alone and in complex with phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate. Apo EhpF was solved and refined in two different space groups at 1.95 and 2.3 Å resolution and the EhpF–phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate complex structure was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure of EhpF, a 41 kDa protein that functions in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound d-alanylgriseoluteic acid (AGA), is reported. A cluster of approximately 16 genes, including ehpF, located on a 200 kbp plasmid native to certain strains of Pantoea agglomerans encodes the proteins that are required for the conversion of chorismic acid to AGA. Phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate has been identified as an intermediate in AGA biosynthesis and deletion of ehpF results in accumulation of this compound in vivo. The crystallographic data presented here reveal that EhpF is an atypical member of the acyl-CoA synthase or ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes. These enzymes typically catalyze two-step reactions involving adenylation of a carboxylate substrate followed by transfer of the substrate from AMP to coenzyme A or another phosphopantetheine. EhpF is distinguished by the absence of the C-terminal domain that is characteristic of enzymes from this family and is involved in phosphopantetheine binding and in the second half of the canonical two-step reaction that is typically observed. Based on the structure of EhpF and a bioinformatic analysis, it is proposed that EhpF and EhpG convert phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate to 6-formylphenazine-1-carboxylate via an adenylyl intermediate.

  4. Structure of the d-alanylgriseoluteic acid biosynthetic protein EhpF, an atypical member of the ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes

    The structure of EhpF from P. agglomerans has been solved alone and in complex with phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate. Apo EhpF was solved and refined in two different space groups at 1.95 and 2.3 Å resolution and the EhpF–phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate complex structure was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure of EhpF, a 41 kDa protein that functions in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound d-alanylgriseoluteic acid (AGA), is reported. A cluster of approximately 16 genes, including ehpF, located on a 200 kbp plasmid native to certain strains of Pantoea agglomerans encodes the proteins that are required for the conversion of chorismic acid to AGA. Phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate has been identified as an intermediate in AGA biosynthesis and deletion of ehpF results in accumulation of this compound in vivo. The crystallographic data presented here reveal that EhpF is an atypical member of the acyl-CoA synthase or ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes. These enzymes typically catalyze two-step reactions involving adenylation of a carboxylate substrate followed by transfer of the substrate from AMP to coenzyme A or another phosphopantetheine. EhpF is distinguished by the absence of the C-terminal domain that is characteristic of enzymes from this family and is involved in phosphopantetheine binding and in the second half of the canonical two-step reaction that is typically observed. Based on the structure of EhpF and a bioinformatic analysis, it is proposed that EhpF and EhpG convert phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate to 6-formylphenazine-1-carboxylate via an adenylyl intermediate

  5. KinMutRF: a random forest classifier of sequence variants in the human protein kinase superfamily

    Pons, Tirso; Vazquez, Miguel; Matey-Hernandez, María Luisa;

    2016-01-01

    kinase variants in UniProt that remained unclassified. A public implementation of KinMutRF, including documentation and examples, is available online (http://kinmut2.bioinfo.cnio.es). The source code for local installation is released under a GPL version 3 license, and can be downloaded from https......://github.com/Rbbt-Workflows/KinMut2. Conclusions: KinMutRF is capable of classifying kinase variation with good performance. Predictions by KinMutRF compare favorably in a benchmark with other state-of-the-art methods (i.e. SIFT, Polyphen-2, MutationAssesor, MutationTaster, LRT, CADD, FATHMM, and VEST). Kinase-specific features rank...... as the most elucidatory in terms of information gain and are likely the improvement in prediction performance. This advocates for the development of family-specific classifiers able to exploit the discriminatory power of features unique to individual protein families....

  6. The ABC exporter MsbA probed by solid state NMR – challenges and opportunities.

    Kaur, Hundeep; Lakatos, Andrea; Spadaccini, Roberta; Vogel, Ramona; Hoffmann, Christian; Becker-Baldus, Johanna; Ouari, Olivier; Tordo, Paul; Mchaourab, Hassane; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2015-09-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters form a superfamily of integral membrane proteins involved in translocation of substrates across the membrane driven by ATP hydrolysis. Despite available crystal structures and extensive biochemical data, many open questions regarding their transport mechanisms remain. Therefore, there is a need to explore spectroscopic techniques such as solid state NMR in order to bridge the gap between structural and mechanistic data. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using Escherichia coli MsbA as a model ABC transporter for solid state NMR studies. We show that optimised solubilisation and reconstitution procedures enable preparing stable and homogenous protein samples. Depending on the duration of solubilisation, MsbA can be obtained in either an apo- or in a native lipid A bound form. Building onto these optimisations, the first promising MAS-NMR spectra with narrow lines have been recorded. However, further sensitivity improvements are required so that complex NMR experiments can be recorded within a reasonable amount of time. We therefore demonstrate the usability of paramagnetic doping for rapid data acquisition and explore dynamic nuclear polarisation as a method for general signal enhancement. Our results demonstrate that solid state NMR provides an opportunity to address important biological questions related to complex mechanisms of ABC transporters. PMID:25849794

  7. A reciprocating twin-channel model for ABC transporters.

    Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2014-08-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large, diverse, and ubiquitous superfamily of membrane active transporters. Their core architecture is a dimer of dimers, comprising two transmembrane (TM) domains that bind substrate, and two ATP-binding cassettes, which use the cell's energy currency to couple substrate translocation to ATP hydrolysis. Despite the availability of over a dozen resolved structures and a wealth of biochemical and biophysical data, this field is bedeviled by controversy and long-standing mechanistic questions remain unresolved. The prevailing paradigm for the ABC transport mechanism is the Switch Model, in which the ATP-binding cassettes dimerize upon binding two ATP molecules, and thence dissociate upon sequential ATP hydrolysis. This cycle of nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) dimerization and dissociation is coupled to a switch between inward- or outward facing conformations of a single TM channel; this alternating access enables substrate binding on one face of the membrane and its release at the other. Notwithstanding widespread acceptance of the Switch Model, there is substantial evidence that the NBDs do not separate very much, if at all, and thus physical separation of the ATP cassettes observed in crystallographic structures may be an artefact. An alternative Constant Contact Model has been proposed, in which ATP hydrolysis occurs alternately at the two ATP-binding sites, with one of the sites remaining closed and containing occluded nucleotide at all times. In this model, the cassettes remain in contact and the active sites swing open in an alternately seesawing motion. Whilst the concept of NBD association/dissociation in the Switch Model is naturally compatible with a single alternating-access channel, the asymmetric functioning proposed by the Constant Contact model suggests an alternating or reciprocating function in the TMDs. Here, a new model for the function of ABC transporters is proposed in which the sequence of ATP binding, hydrolysis, and

  8. Expression of the RND-Type Efflux Pump AdeABC in Acinetobacter baumannii Is Regulated by the AdeRS Two-Component System

    Marchand, Isabelle; Damier-Piolle, Laurence; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    The AdeABC pump of Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454, which confers resistance to various antibiotic classes including aminoglycosides, is composed of the AdeA, AdeB, and AdeC proteins; AdeB is a member of the RND superfamily. The adeA, adeB, and adeC genes are contiguous and adjacent to adeS and adeR, which are transcribed in the opposite direction and which specify proteins homologous to sensors and regulators of two-component systems, respectively (S. Magnet, P. Courvalin, and T. Lambert, Ant...

  9. Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) and Cancer Therapy.

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Gupta, Pranav; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are members of a protein superfamily that are known to translocate various substrates across membranes, including metabolic products, lipids and sterols, and xenobiotic drugs. Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) belong to the subfamily C in the ABC transporter superfamily. MRPs have been implicated in mediating multidrug resistance by actively extruding chemotherapeutic substrates. Moreover, some MRPs are known to be essential in physiological excretory or regulatory pathways. The importance of MRPs in cancer therapy is also implied by their clinical insights. Modulating the function of MRPs to re-sensitize chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy shows great promise in cancer therapy; thus, multiple MRP inhibitors have been developed recently. This review article summarizes the structure, distribution, and physiological as well as pharmacological function of MRP1-MRP9 in cancer chemotherapy. Several novel modulators targeting MRPs in cancer therapy are also discussed. PMID:25840885

  10. Identification of the minimal region in lipase ABC transporter recognition domain of Pseudomonas fluorescens for secretion and fluorescence of green fluorescent protein

    Park Yeonwoo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TliA is a thermostable lipase secreted by the type 1 secretion system (T1SS of Pseudomonas fluorescens. The secretion is promoted by its secretion/chaperone domain located near the C-terminus, which is composed mainly of four Repeat-in-Toxin (RTX repeats. In order to identify the minimal region of TliA responsible for its secretion, five different copies of the secretion/chaperone domain, each involving truncated N-terminal residues and a common C-terminus, were acquired and named as lipase ABC transporter recognition domains (LARDs. Each LARD was fused to epidermal growth factor (EGF or green fluorescent protein (GFP, and the secretion of EGF-LARD or GFP-LARD fusion proteins was assessed in Escherichia coli with ABC transporter. Results Among the fusion proteins, GFP or EGF with 105-residue LARD3 was most efficiently secreted. In addition, GFP-LARD3 emitted wild type GFP fluorescence. Structurally, LARD3 had the 4 RTX repeats exposed at the N-terminus, while other LARDs had additional residues prior to them or missed some of the RTX repeats. LARD3 was both necessary and sufficient for efficient secretion and maintenance of GFP fluorescence in E. coli, which was also confirmed in P. fluorescens and P. fluorescens ▵tliA, a knock-out mutant of tliA. Conclusion LARD3 was a potent secretion signal in T1SS for its fusion flanking RTX motif, which enhanced secretion and preserved the fluorescence of GFP. LARD3-mediated secretion in E. coli or P. fluorescens will enable the development of enhanced protein manufacturing factory and recombinant microbe secreting protein of interest in situ.

  11. Functionally Relevant Residues of Cdr1p: A Multidrug ABC Transporter of Human Pathogenic Candida albicans

    Rajendra Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduced intracellular accumulation of drugs (due to rapid efflux mediated by the efflux pump proteins belonging to ABC (ATP Binding Cassette and MFS (Major Facilitators superfamily is one of the most common strategies adopted by multidrug resistance (MDR pathogenic yeasts. To combat MDR, it is essential to understand the structure and function of these transporters so that inhibitors/modulators to these can be developed. The sequence alignments of the ABC transporters reveal selective divergence within much conserved domains of Nucleotide-Binding Domains (NBDs which is unique to all fungal transporters. Recently, the role of conserved but divergent residues of Candida Drug Resistance 1 (CDR1, an ABC drug transporter of human pathogenic Candida albicans, has been examined with regard to ATP binding and hydrolysis. In this paper, we focus on some of the recent advances on the relevance of divergent and conserved amino acids of CaCdr1p and also discuss as to how drug interacts with Trans Membrane Domains (TMDs residues for its extrusion from MDR cells.

  12. Differentiation of infection from vaccination in foot-and-mouth disease by the detection of antibodies to the non-structural proteins 3D, 3AB and 3ABC in ELISA using antigens expressed in baculovirus

    Sørensen, K.J.; Madsen, K.G.; Madsen, E.S.;

    1998-01-01

    The baculovirus expression system was found to be efficient at expressing the 3D, the 3AB and the 3ABC non-structural proteins (NSP) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) as antigens recognised by immune sera in ELISA. ELISA's using 3D, 3AB and 3ABC detected antibodies from day 8 and 10 after...... experimental infection of susceptible cattle and sheep and cattle remained seropositive for more than 395 days. The ELISA's detected antibodies against any of the seven serotypes of FMDV. The 3D ELISA was specific and precise and as sensitive as established ELISA's which measure antibody to structural proteins....... The assay may be used as a resource saving alternative to established ELISA's for the detection of antibodies against any of the seven serotypes. The 3AB and the 3ABC ELISA were also specific and precise. FMDV infected cattle could be differentiated from those that had been merely vaccinated as they gave...

  13. Subtle Structural Differences Trigger Inhibitory Activity of Propafenone Analogues at the Two Polyspecific ABC Transporters: P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP).

    Schwarz, Theresa; Montanari, Floriane; Cseke, Anna; Wlcek, Katrin; Visvader, Lene; Palme, Sarah; Chiba, Peter; Kuchler, Karl; Urban, Ernst; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2016-06-20

    The transmembrane ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are widely recognized for their role in cancer multidrug resistance and absorption and distribution of compounds. Furthermore, they are linked to drug-drug interactions and toxicity. Nevertheless, due to their polyspecificity, a molecular understanding of the ligand-transporter interaction, which allows designing of both selective and dual inhibitors, is still in its infancy. This study comprises a combined approach of synthesis, in silico prediction, and in vitro testing to identify molecular features triggering transporter selectivity. Synthesis and testing of a series of 15 propafenone analogues with varied rigidity and basicity of substituents provide first trends for selective and dual inhibitors. Results indicate that both the flexibility of the substituent at the nitrogen atom, as well as the basicity of the nitrogen atom, trigger transporter selectivity. Furthermore, inhibitory activity of compounds at P-gp seems to be much more influenced by logP than those at BCRP. Exploiting these differences further should thus allow designing specific inhibitors for these two polyspecific ABC-transporters. PMID:26970257

  14. Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Innate Immunity and Inflammation

    Šedý, John; Bekiaris, Vasileios; Ware, Carl F.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) and its corresponding receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) form communication pathways required for developmental, homeostatic, and stimulus-responsive processes in vivo. Although this receptor–ligand system operates between many different cell types and organ systems, many of these proteins play specific roles in immune system function. The TNFSF and TNFRSF proteins lymphotoxins, LIGHT (homologous to lymphotoxins, exhibits inducible expression, and comp...

  15. Isolation and Characterization of the Colletotrichum acutatum ABC Transporter CaABC1

    Suyoung Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungi tolerate exposure to various abiotic stresses, including cytotoxic compounds and fungicides, via their ATP-driven efflux pumps belonging to ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. To clarify the molecular basis of interaction between the fungus and various abiotic stresses including fungicides, we constructed a cDNA library from germinated conidia of Colletotrichum acutatum, a major anthracnose pathogen of pepper (Capsicum annum L.. Over 1,000 cDNA clones were sequenced, of which single clone exhibited significant nucleotide sequence homology to ABC transporter genes. We isolated three fosmid clones containing the C. acutatum ABC1 (CaABC1 gene in full-length from genomic DNA library screening. The CaABC1 gene consists of 4,059 bp transcript, predicting a 1,353-aa protein. The gene contains the typical ABC signature and Walker A and B motifs. The 5′-flanking region contains a CAAT motif, a TATA box, and a Kozak region. Phylogenetic and structural analysis suggested that the CaABC1 is a typical ABC transporter gene highly conserved in various fungal species, as well as in Chromista, Metazoans, and Viridiplantae. We also found that CaABC1 was up-regulated during conidiation and a minimal medium condition. Moreover, CaABC1 was induced in iprobenfos, kresoxim-methyl, thiophanate-methyl, and hygromycin B. These results demonstrate that CaABC1 is necessary for conidiation, abiotic stress, and various fungicide resistances. These results will provide the basis for further study on the function of ABC transporter genes in C. acutatum.

  16. ABC Kinga kauplused = ABC King shoe stores

    2011-01-01

    Tallinnas Kristiine keskuses, Tartu Kaubamajas ja Pärnus Port Artur 2 asuvate ABC Kinga kaupluste sisekujundusest. Sisearhitekid Andres Labi ja Janno Roos (Ruumilabor OÜ), loetletud nende ühiselt tehtud töid

  17. The lipopolysaccharide-binding protein participating in hemocyte nodule formation in the silkworm Bombyx mori is a novel member of the C-type lectin superfamily with two different tandem carbohydrate-recognition domains.

    Koizumi, N; Imamura, M; Kadotani, T; Yaoi, K; Iwahana, H; Sato, R

    1999-01-25

    We recently isolated and characterized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, BmLBP, from the larval hemolymph of the silkworm Bombyx mori. BmLBP is a pattern recognition molecule that recognizes the lipid A portion of LPS and participates in a cellular defense reaction. This paper describes the cDNA cloning of BmLBP. The deduced amino acid sequence of BmLBP revealed that BmLBP is a novel member of the C-type lectin superfamily with a unique structural feature that consists of two different carbohydrate-recognition domains in tandem, a short and a long form. PMID:9989592

  18. Increased expression of the yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter Pdr18 leads to increased ethanol tolerance and ethanol production in high gravity alcoholic fermentation

    Teixeira Miguel C; Godinho Cláudia P; Cabrito Tânia R; Mira Nuno P; Sá-Correia Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The understanding of the molecular basis of yeast tolerance to ethanol may guide the design of rational strategies to increase process performance in industrial alcoholic fermentations. A set of 21 genes encoding multidrug transporters from the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Superfamily and Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) in S. cerevisiae were scrutinized for a role in ethanol stress resistance. Results A yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter encoded by the PDR18 gene...

  19. Development of Fourth Generation ABC Inhibitors from Natural Products: A Novel Approach to Overcome Cancer Multidrug Resistance.

    Karthikeyan, Subburayan; Hoti, Sugeerappa Laxmanappa

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer caused due to overexpression of ABC drug transporters is a major problem in modern chemotherapy. Molecular investigations on MDR have revealed that the resistance is due to various transport proteins of the ABC superfamily which include Phosphoglycoprotein (P-gp/MDR1/ ABCB1), multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1), and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). They have been characterized functionally and are considered as major players in the development of MDR in cancer cells. These ATP-dependent transporter proteins cause MDR either by decreased uptake of the drug or increased efflux of the drug from the target organelles. Several MDR-reversing agents are being developed and are in various stages of clinical trials. The first three generations of ABC modulators such as quinine, verapamil, cyclosporine-A, tariquitor, PSC 833, LY335979, and GF120918 required to be administered in high doses to reverse MDR and were associated with adverse effects. Additionally, these modulators non-selectively inhibit ABC and adversely accumulate chemotherapeutic drugs in brain and kidney. Currently, research has stepped up towards reversing MDR by using natural products which exhibitted potential as chemosensitizers. Globally, there is a rich biodiversity of natural products which can be sourced for developing drugs. These products may provide more lead compounds with superior activity, foremost to the development of more effective therapies for MDR cancer cells. Here, we briefly review the status of natural products for reversing MDR modulators, and discuss the long term goal of MDR strategies in current clinical settings. PMID:25584696

  20. A SNARE-Like Superfamily Protein SbSLSP from the Halophyte Salicornia brachiata Confers Salt and Drought Tolerance by Maintaining Membrane Stability, K+/Na+ Ratio, and Antioxidant Machinery

    Singh, Dinkar; Yadav, Narendra Singh; Tiwari, Vivekanand; Agarwal, Pradeep K.; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    About 1000 salt-responsive ESTs were identified from an extreme halophyte Salicornia brachiata. Among these, a novel salt-inducible gene SbSLSP (Salicornia brachiata SNARE-like superfamily protein), showed up-regulation upon salinity and dehydration stress. The presence of cis-regulatory motifs related to abiotic stress in the putative promoter region supports our finding that SbSLSP gene is inducible by abiotic stress. The SbSLSP protein showed a high sequence identity to hypothetical/uncharacterized proteins from Beta vulgaris, Spinacia oleracea, Eucalyptus grandis, and Prunus persica and with SNARE-like superfamily proteins from Zostera marina and Arabidopsis thaliana. Bioinformatics analysis predicted a clathrin adaptor complex small-chain domain and N-myristoylation site in the SbSLSP protein. Subcellular localization studies indicated that the SbSLSP protein is mainly localized in the plasma membrane. Using transgenic tobacco lines, we establish that overexpression of SbSLSP resulted in elevated tolerance to salt and drought stress. The improved tolerance was confirmed by alterations in a range of physiological parameters, including high germination and survival rate, higher leaf chlorophyll contents, and reduced accumulation of Na+ ion and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, overexpressing lines also showed lower water loss, higher cell membrane stability, and increased accumulation of proline and ROS-scavenging enzymes. Overexpression of SbSLSP also enhanced the transcript levels of ROS-scavenging and signaling enzyme genes. This study is the first investigation of the function of the SbSLSP gene as a novel determinant of salinity/drought tolerance. The results suggest that SbSLSP could be a potential candidate to increase salinity and drought tolerance in crop plants for sustainable agriculture in semi-arid saline soil. PMID:27313584

  1. A SNARE-like superfamily protein SbSLSP from the halophyte Salicornia brachiata confers salt and drought tolerance by maintaining membrane stability, K+/Na+ ratio, and antioxidant machinery

    Dinkar eSingh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available About 1000 salt-responsive ESTs were identified from an extreme halophyte Salicornia brachiata. Among these, a novel salt-inducible gene SbSLSP, (Salicornia brachiata SNARE-like superfamily protein showed up-regulation upon salinity and dehydration stress. The presence of cis-regulatory motifs related to abiotic stress in the putative promoter region supports our finding that SbSLSP gene is inducible by abiotic stress. The SbSLSP protein showed a high sequence identity to hypothetical/uncharacterised proteins from Beta vulgaris, Spinacia oleracea, Eucalyptus grandis and Prunus persica and with SNARE-like superfamily proteins from Zostera marina and Arabidopsis thaliana. Bioinformatics analysis predicted a clathrin adaptor complex small-chain domain and N-myristoylation site in the SbSLSP protein. Subcellular localisation studies indicated that the SbSLSP protein is mainly localised in the plasma membrane. Using transgenic tobacco lines, we establish that overexpression of SbSLSP resulted in elevated tolerance to salt and drought stress. The improved tolerance was confirmed by alterations in a range of physiological parameters, including high germination and survival rate, higher leaf chlorophyll contents, and reduced accumulation of Na+ ion and reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, overexpressing lines also showed lower water loss, higher cell membrane stability and increased accumulation of proline and ROS-scavenging enzymes. Overexpression of SbSLSP also enhanced the transcript levels of ROS-scavenging and signalling enzyme genes. This study is the first investigation of the function of the SbSLSP gene as a novel determinant of salinity/drought tolerance. The results suggest that SbSLSP could be a potential candidate to increase salinity and drought tolerance in crop plants for sustainable agriculture in semi-arid saline soil.

  2. A SNARE-Like Superfamily Protein SbSLSP from the Halophyte Salicornia brachiata Confers Salt and Drought Tolerance by Maintaining Membrane Stability, K(+)/Na(+) Ratio, and Antioxidant Machinery.

    Singh, Dinkar; Yadav, Narendra Singh; Tiwari, Vivekanand; Agarwal, Pradeep K; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    About 1000 salt-responsive ESTs were identified from an extreme halophyte Salicornia brachiata. Among these, a novel salt-inducible gene SbSLSP (Salicornia brachiata SNARE-like superfamily protein), showed up-regulation upon salinity and dehydration stress. The presence of cis-regulatory motifs related to abiotic stress in the putative promoter region supports our finding that SbSLSP gene is inducible by abiotic stress. The SbSLSP protein showed a high sequence identity to hypothetical/uncharacterized proteins from Beta vulgaris, Spinacia oleracea, Eucalyptus grandis, and Prunus persica and with SNARE-like superfamily proteins from Zostera marina and Arabidopsis thaliana. Bioinformatics analysis predicted a clathrin adaptor complex small-chain domain and N-myristoylation site in the SbSLSP protein. Subcellular localization studies indicated that the SbSLSP protein is mainly localized in the plasma membrane. Using transgenic tobacco lines, we establish that overexpression of SbSLSP resulted in elevated tolerance to salt and drought stress. The improved tolerance was confirmed by alterations in a range of physiological parameters, including high germination and survival rate, higher leaf chlorophyll contents, and reduced accumulation of Na(+) ion and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, overexpressing lines also showed lower water loss, higher cell membrane stability, and increased accumulation of proline and ROS-scavenging enzymes. Overexpression of SbSLSP also enhanced the transcript levels of ROS-scavenging and signaling enzyme genes. This study is the first investigation of the function of the SbSLSP gene as a novel determinant of salinity/drought tolerance. The results suggest that SbSLSP could be a potential candidate to increase salinity and drought tolerance in crop plants for sustainable agriculture in semi-arid saline soil. PMID:27313584

  3. Designer TGFβ superfamily ligands with diversified functionality.

    George P Allendorph

    Full Text Available Transforming Growth Factor--beta (TGFβ superfamily ligands, including Activins, Growth and Differentiation Factors (GDFs, and Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs, are excellent targets for protein-based therapeutics because of their pervasiveness in numerous developmental and cellular processes. We developed a strategy termed RASCH (Random Assembly of Segmental Chimera and Heteromer, to engineer chemically-refoldable TGFβ superfamily ligands with unique signaling properties. One of these engineered ligands, AB208, created from Activin-βA and BMP-2 sequences, exhibits the refolding characteristics of BMP-2 while possessing Activin-like signaling attributes. Further, we find several additional ligands, AB204, AB211, and AB215, which initiate the intracellular Smad1-mediated signaling pathways more strongly than BMP-2 but show no sensitivity to the natural BMP antagonist Noggin unlike natural BMP-2. In another design, incorporation of a short N-terminal segment from BMP-2 was sufficient to enable chemical refolding of BMP-9, without which was never produced nor refolded. Our studies show that the RASCH strategy enables us to expand the functional repertoire of TGFβ superfamily ligands through development of novel chimeric TGFβ ligands with diverse biological and clinical values.

  4. ABC transporters in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma synoviae: insights into evolution and pathogenicity

    Marisa Fabiana Nicolás

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available ABC transporters represent one of the largest superfamilies of active membrane transport proteins (MTPs with a highly conserved ATPase domain that binds and hydrolyzes ATP, supplying energy for the uptake of a variety of nutrients and for the extrusion of drugs and metabolic wastes. The complete genomes of a non-pathogenic (J and pathogenic (7448 strain of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, as well as of a pathogenic (53 strain of Mycoplasma synoviae have been recently sequenced. A detailed study revealed a high percentage of CDSs encoding MTPs in M. hyopneumoniae strains J (13.4%, 7448 (13.8%, and in M. synoviae 53 (11.2%, and the ABC systems represented from 85.0 to 88.6% of those CDSs. Uptake systems are mainly involved in cell nutrition and some might be associated with virulence. Exporter systems include both drug and multidrug resistant systems (MDR, which may represent mechanisms of resistance to toxic molecules. No relation was found between the phylogeny of the ATPase domains and the lifestyle or pathogenicity of Mycoplasma, but several proteins, potentially useful as targets for the control of infections, were identified.

  5. Structure and Function of the LmbE-like Superfamily

    Shane Viars

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The LmbE-like superfamily is comprised of a series of enzymes that use a single catalytic metal ion to catalyze the hydrolysis of various substrates. These substrates are often key metabolites for eukaryotes and prokaryotes, which makes the LmbE-like enzymes important targets for drug development. Herein we review the structure and function of the LmbE-like proteins identified to date. While this is the newest superfamily of metallohydrolases, a growing number of functionally interesting proteins from this superfamily have been characterized. Available crystal structures of LmbE-like proteins reveal a Rossmann fold similar to lactate dehydrogenase, which represented a novel fold for (zinc metallohydrolases at the time the initial structure was solved. The structural diversity of the N-acetylglucosamine containing substrates affords functional diversity for the LmbE-like enzyme superfamily. The majority of enzymes identified to date are metal-dependent deacetylases that catalyze the hydrolysis of a N-acetylglucosamine moiety on substrate using a combination of amino acid side chains and a single bound metal ion, predominantly zinc. The catalytic zinc is coordinated to proteins via His2-Asp-solvent binding site. Additionally, studies indicate that protein dynamics play important roles in regulating access to the active site and facilitating catalysis for at least two members of this protein superfamily.

  6. The role of a conserved acidic residue in calcium-dependent protein folding for a low density lipoprotein (LDL)-A module: implications in structure and function for the LDL receptor superfamily.

    Guo, Ying; Yu, Xuemei; Rihani, Kayla; Wang, Qing-Yin; Rong, Lijun

    2004-04-16

    One common feature of the more than 1,000 complement-type repeats (or low density lipoprotein (LDL)-A modules) found in LDL receptor and the other members of the LDL receptor superfamily is a cluster of five highly conserved acidic residues in the C-terminal region, DXXXDXXDXXDE. However, the role of the third conserved aspartate of these LDL-A modules in protein folding and ligand recognition has not been elucidated. In this report, using a model LDL-A module and several experimental approaches, we demonstrate that this acidic residue, like the other four conserved acidic residues, is involved in calcium-dependent protein folding. These results suggest an alternative calcium coordination conformation for the LDL-A modules. The proposed model provides a plausible explanation for the conservation of this acidic residue among the LDL-A modules. Furthermore, the model can explain why mutations of this residue in human LDL receptor cause familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:14749324

  7. The quorum-sensing molecule farnesol is a modulator of drug efflux mediated by ABC multidrug transporters and synergizes with drugs in Candida albicans.

    Sharma, Monika; Prasad, Rajendra

    2011-10-01

    Overexpression of the CaCDR1-encoded multidrug efflux pump protein CaCdr1p (Candida drug resistance protein 1), belonging to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters, is one of the most prominent contributors of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Candida albicans. Thus, blocking or modulating the function of the drug efflux pumps represents an attractive approach in combating MDR. In the present study, we provide first evidence that the quorum-sensing molecule farnesol (FAR) is a specific modulator of efflux mediated by ABC multidrug transporters, such as CaCdr1p and CaCdr2p of C. albicans and ScPdr5p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Interestingly, FAR did not modulate the efflux mediated by the multidrug extrusion pump protein CaMdr1p, belonging to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Kinetic data revealed that FAR competitively inhibited rhodamine 6G efflux in CaCdr1p-overexpressing cells, with a simultaneous increase in an apparent K(m) without affecting the V(max) values and the ATPase activity. We also observed that when used in combination, FAR at a nontoxic concentration synergized with the drugs at their respective nonlethal concentrations, as was evident from their resistant clinical isolates of C. albicans. Our biochemical experiments revealed that the synergistic interaction of FAR with the drugs led to reactive oxygen species accumulation, which triggered early apoptosis, and that both could be partly reversed by the addition of an antioxidant. Collectively, FAR modulates drug extrusion mediated exclusively by ABC proteins and is synergistic to fluconazole (FLC), ketoconazole (KTC), miconazole (MCZ), and amphotericin (AMB). PMID:21768514

  8. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Full Text Available ... among people with diabetes. Judith Fradkin, M.D.: We call this approach "the ABCs of diabetes." A ... the importance of all three of these and we know that controlling the three can dramatically reduce ...

  9. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Full Text Available ... just live to survive. Announcer: People with diabetes should work with their doctors to monitor the ABCs ... my A1C, my blood pressure, my cholesterol, what should it be" "and what can I do to ...

  10. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Full Text Available ... Announcer: People with diabetes should work with their doctors to monitor the ABCs of diabetes. Judith Fradkin, ... want patients who have diabetes to ask their doctors, "What is my A1C, my blood pressure, my ...

  11. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Full Text Available ... the importance of blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes management to prevent heart attacks and strokes. Sharon Boykin: ... Knowing your ABCs will help you reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke to live a ...

  12. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Full Text Available ... between diabetes and heart disease. Judith Fradkin, M.D.: What most people don't know is that ... stroke among people with diabetes. Judith Fradkin, M.D.: We call this approach "the ABCs of diabetes." ...

  13. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Full Text Available ... prevent two of the disease's most serious complications. John Buse, M.D.: As the population ages, we ... of living -- your living conditions will be better. John Buse, M.D.: Knowing your ABCs will help ...

  14. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Full Text Available ... As the population ages, we would expect some increase in the proportion of people with diabetes and ... ABC numbers are, you'll be able to help save your own life -- the lower they are, ...

  15. Ancestry and diversity of the HMG box superfamily

    Laudet, V; Stehelin, D.; Clevers, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The HMG box is a novel type of DNA-binding domain found in a diverse group of proteins. The HMG box superfamily comprises a.o. the High Mobility Group proteins HMG1 and HMG2, the nucleolar transcription factor UBF, the lymphoid transcription factors TCF-1 and LEF-1, the fungal mating-type genes mat-Mc and MATA1, and the mammalian sex-determining gene SRY. The superfamily dates back to at least 1,000 million years ago, as its members appear in animals, plants and yeast. Alignment of all known ...

  16. Purification and crystallization of the ABC-type transport substrate-binding protein OppA from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis

    Highlights: ► We truncated the signal peptide of OppATTE0054 to make it express in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein. ► Crystals of OppATTE0054 were grown by sitting-drop vapor diffusion method. ► The crystal of OppATTE0054 diffracted to 2.25 Å. -- Abstract: Di- and oligopeptide- binding protein OppAs play important roles in solute and nutrient uptake, sporulation, biofilm formation, cell wall muropeptides recycling, peptide-dependent quorum-sensing responses, adherence to host cells, and a variety of other biological processes. Soluble OppA from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis was expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was found to be >95% pure with SDS–PAGE after a series of purification steps and the purity was further verified by mass spectrometry. The protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 400 as the precipitant. Crystal diffraction extended to 2.25 Å. The crystal belonged to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters of a = 69.395, b = 199.572, c = 131.673 Å, and α = β = γ = 90°.

  17. Purification and crystallization of the ABC-type transport substrate-binding protein OppA from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis

    Gao, Jinlan; Li, Xiaolu [State Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100005, People' s Republic of China (China); Tsinghua-Peking Joint Center for Life Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People' s Republic of China (China); Feng, Yue; Zhang, Bo [Tsinghua-Peking Joint Center for Life Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People' s Republic of China (China); Miao, Shiying [State Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100005, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Linfang, E-mail: lfwangz@yahoo.com [State Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100005, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Na, E-mail: nawang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua-Peking Joint Center for Life Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We truncated the signal peptide of OppA{sub TTE0054} to make it express in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystals of OppA{sub TTE0054} were grown by sitting-drop vapor diffusion method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal of OppA{sub TTE0054} diffracted to 2.25 A. -- Abstract: Di- and oligopeptide- binding protein OppAs play important roles in solute and nutrient uptake, sporulation, biofilm formation, cell wall muropeptides recycling, peptide-dependent quorum-sensing responses, adherence to host cells, and a variety of other biological processes. Soluble OppA from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis was expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was found to be >95% pure with SDS-PAGE after a series of purification steps and the purity was further verified by mass spectrometry. The protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 400 as the precipitant. Crystal diffraction extended to 2.25 A. The crystal belonged to space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters of a = 69.395, b = 199.572, c = 131.673 A, and {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90 Degree-Sign .

  18. The putative ABC transporter encoded by the orf19.4531 plays a role in the sensitivity of Candida albicans cells to azole antifungal drugs.

    Jiang, Linghuo; Xu, Dayong; Chen, Zhen; Cao, Yongbing; Gao, Pinghui; Jiang, Yuanying

    2016-05-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters constitute a large superfamily of integral membrane proteins in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In the human fungal pathogenCandida albicans, there are 28 genes encoding ABC transporters and many of them have not been characterized so far. The orf19.4531 (also known as IPF7530) encodes a putative ABC transporter. In this study, we have demonstrated that disruption of orf19.4531 causesC. albicanscells to become tolerant to azoles, but not to polyene antifungals and terbinafine. Therefore, the protein encoded by orf19.4531 is involved in azole sensitivity and we name it asROA1, the regulator of azole sensitivity 1 gene. Consistently, we show that the expression ofROA1is responsive to treatment of either fluconazole or ketoconazole inC. albicans In addition, through a GFP tagging approach, Roa1 is localized in a small punctuate compartment adjacent to the vacuolar membrane. However,ROA1is not essential for thein vitrofilamentation ofC. albicanscells. PMID:26975389

  19. Systematic nomenclature for the PLUNC/PSP/BSP30/SMGB proteins as a subfamily of the BPI fold-containing superfamily

    Bingle, C.D; Seal, R.L.; Craven, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the BPIFAn/BPIFBn systematic nomenclature for the PLUNC (palate lung and nasal epithelium clone)/PSP (parotid secretory protein)/BSP30 (bovine salivary protein 30)/SMGB (submandibular gland protein B) family of proteins, based on an adaptation of the SPLUNCn (short PLUNCn)/LPLUNCn (large PLUNCn) nomenclature. The nomenclature is applied to a set of 102 sequences which we believe represent the current reliable data for BPIFA/BPIFB proteins across all species, including marsupials an...

  20. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis reveals the ATP-bound monomeric state of the ATPase domain from the homodimeric MutL endonuclease, a GHKL phosphotransferase superfamily protein.

    Iino, Hitoshi; Hikima, Takaaki; Nishida, Yuya; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Fukui, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    DNA mismatch repair is an excision system that removes mismatched bases chiefly generated by replication errors. In this system, MutL endonucleases direct the excision reaction to the error-containing strand of the duplex by specifically incising the newly synthesized strand. Both bacterial homodimeric and eukaryotic heterodimeric MutL proteins belong to the GHKL ATPase/kinase superfamily that comprises the N-terminal ATPase and C-terminal dimerization regions. Generally, the GHKL proteins show large ATPase cycle-dependent conformational changes, including dimerization-coupled ATP binding of the N-terminal domain. Interestingly, the ATPase domain of human PMS2, a subunit of the MutL heterodimer, binds ATP without dimerization. The monomeric ATP-bound state of the domain has been thought to be characteristic of heterodimeric GHKL proteins. In this study, we characterized the ATP-bound state of the ATPase domain from the Aquifex aeolicus MutL endonuclease, which is a homodimeric GHKL protein unlike the eukaryotic MutL. Gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses clearly showed that the domain binds ATP in a monomeric form despite its homodimeric nature. This indicates that the uncoupling of dimerization and ATP binding is a common feature among bacterial and eukaryotic MutL endonucleases, which we suggest is closely related to the molecular mechanisms underlying mismatch repair. PMID:25809295

  1. Phylogenomic analysis of the cystatin superfamily in eukaryotes and prokaryotes

    Turk Vito

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cystatin superfamily comprises cysteine protease inhibitors that play key regulatory roles in protein degradation processes. Although they have been the subject of many studies, little is known about their genesis, evolution and functional diversification. Our aim has been to obtain a comprehensive insight into their origin, distribution, diversity, evolution and classification in Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea. Results We have identified in silico the full complement of the cystatin superfamily in more than 2100 prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. The analysis of numerous eukaryotic genomes has provided strong evidence for the emergence of this superfamily in the ancestor of eukaryotes. The progenitor of this superfamily was most probably intracellular and lacked a signal peptide and disulfide bridges, much like the extant Giardia cystatin. A primordial gene duplication produced two ancestral eukaryotic lineages, cystatins and stefins. While stefins remain encoded by a single or a small number of genes throughout the eukaryotes, the cystatins have undergone a more complex and dynamic evolution through numerous gene and domain duplications. In the cystatin superfamily we discovered twenty vertebrate-specific and three angiosperm-specific orthologous families, indicating that functional diversification has occurred only in multicellular eukaryotes. In vertebrate orthologous families, the prevailing trends were loss of the ancestral inhibitory activity and acquisition of novel functions in innate immunity. Bacterial cystatins and stefins may be emergency inhibitors that enable survival of bacteria in the host, defending them from the host's proteolytic activity. Conclusion This study challenges the current view on the classification, origin and evolution of the cystatin superfamily and provides valuable insights into their functional diversification. The findings of this comprehensive study provide guides for future

  2. Genome-level and biochemical diversity of the acyl-activating enzyme superfamily in plants

    In higher plants, the superfamily of carboxyl-CoA ligases and related proteins, collectively called acyl activating enzymes (AAEs), has evolved to provide enzymes for many pathways of primary and secondary metabolism and for the conjugation of hormones to amino acids. Across the superfamily there is...

  3. SUPERFAMILY--sophisticated comparative genomics, data mining, visualization and phylogeny.

    Wilson, Derek; Pethica, Ralph; Zhou, Yiduo; Talbot, Charles; Vogel, Christine; Madera, Martin; Chothia, Cyrus; Gough, Julian

    2009-01-01

    SUPERFAMILY provides structural, functional and evolutionary information for proteins from all completely sequenced genomes, and large sequence collections such as UniProt. Protein domain assignments for over 900 genomes are included in the database, which can be accessed at http://supfam.org/. Hidden Markov models based on Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) domain definitions at the superfamily level are used to provide structural annotation. We recently produced a new model library based on SCOP 1.73. Family level assignments are also available. From the web site users can submit sequences for SCOP domain classification; search for keywords such as superfamilies, families, organism names, models and sequence identifiers; find over- and underrepresented families or superfamilies within a genome relative to other genomes or groups of genomes; compare domain architectures across selections of genomes and finally build multiple sequence alignments between Protein Data Bank (PDB), genomic and custom sequences. Recent extensions to the database include InterPro abstracts and Gene Ontology terms for superfamiles, taxonomic visualization of the distribution of families across the tree of life, searches for functionally similar domain architectures and phylogenetic trees. The database, models and associated scripts are available for download from the ftp site. PMID:19036790

  4. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Full Text Available ... somebody who's already had a heart attack. Announcer: Research shows that controlling blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol are critical in preventing heart disease and stroke among people with diabetes. Judith Fradkin, M.D.: We call this approach "the ABCs of diabetes." A is the A1C, ...

  5. Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    Full Text Available ... are at the same risk for heart disease as somebody who's already had a heart attack. Announcer: Research shows that controlling blood ... We call this approach "the ABCs of diabetes." A is the A1C, a measure of how well ...

  6. Rapportering med ABC modellen

    Wiese, Lars Ole

    2006-01-01

    I denne artikel diskuteres Activity Based Costing (ABC) som rapporterings-teknik for kunde profitabilitet. Der argumenteres for, at indtægtserhvervel-sen inkl. dens direkte omkostningsforbrug bør adskilles fra omkostnings-beskrivelsen til produktfremstilling. Dvs. der gennemføres en aktivitetsba...

  7. CREST - a large and diverse superfamily of putative transmembrane hydrolases

    Olson Eric N

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of membrane-spanning proteins possess enzymatic activity and catalyze important reactions involving proteins, lipids or other substrates located within or near lipid bilayers. Alkaline ceramidases are seven-transmembrane proteins that hydrolyze the amide bond in ceramide to form sphingosine. Recently, a group of putative transmembrane receptors called progestin and adipoQ receptors (PAQRs were found to be distantly related to alkaline ceramidases, raising the possibility that they may also function as membrane enzymes. Results Using sensitive similarity search methods, we identified statistically significant sequence similarities among several transmembrane protein families including alkaline ceramidases and PAQRs. They were unified into a large and diverse superfamily of putative membrane-bound hydrolases called CREST (alkaline ceramidase, PAQR receptor, Per1, SID-1 and TMEM8. The CREST superfamily embraces a plethora of cellular functions and biochemical activities, including putative lipid-modifying enzymes such as ceramidases and the Per1 family of putative phospholipases involved in lipid remodeling of GPI-anchored proteins, putative hormone receptors, bacterial hemolysins, the TMEM8 family of putative tumor suppressors, and the SID-1 family of putative double-stranded RNA transporters involved in RNA interference. Extensive similarity searches and clustering analysis also revealed several groups of proteins with unknown function in the CREST superfamily. Members of the CREST superfamily share seven predicted core transmembrane segments with several conserved sequence motifs. Conclusions Universal conservation of a set of histidine and aspartate residues across all groups in the CREST superfamily, coupled with independent discoveries of hydrolase activities in alkaline ceramidases and the Per1 family as well as results from previous mutational studies of Per1, suggests that the majority of CREST members are

  8. Human ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter family

    Vasiliou Vasilis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There exist four fundamentally different classes of membrane-bound transport proteins: ion channels; transporters; aquaporins; and ATP-powered pumps. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are an example of ATP-dependent pumps. ABC transporters are ubiquitous membrane-bound proteins, present in all prokaryotes, as well as plants, fungi, yeast and animals. These pumps can move substrates in (influx or out (efflux of cells. In mammals, ABC transporters are expressed predominantly in the liver, intestine, blood-brain barrier, blood-testis barrier, placenta and kidney. ABC proteins transport a number of endogenous substrates, including inorganic anions, metal ions, peptides, amino acids, sugars and a large number of hydrophobic compounds and metabolites across the plasma membrane, and also across intracellular membranes. The human genome contains 49 ABC genes, arranged in eight subfamilies and named via divergent evolution. That ABC genes are important is underscored by the fact that mutations in at least I I of these genes are already known to cause severe inherited diseases (eg cystic fibrosis and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy [X-ALD]. ABC transporters also participate in the movement of most drugs and their metabolites across cell surface and cellular organelle membranes; thus, defects in these genes can be important in terms of cancer therapy, pharmacokinetics and innumerable pharmacogenetic disorders.

  9. Functional analysis of ABC transporter genes from Botrytis cinerea identifies BcatrB as a transporter of eugenol

    Schoonbeek, H.; Nistelrooy, van J.G.M.; Waard, de M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of multiple ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter genes from the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea in protection against natural fungitoxic compounds was studied by expression analysis and phenotyping of gene-replacement mutants. The expressio

  10. Detailed Analysis of Function Divergence in a Large and Diverse Domain Superfamily: Towards a Refined Protocol of Function Classification

    Dessailly, Benoit H.; Redfern, Oliver C.; Cuff, Alison L.; Orengo, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    Some superfamilies contain large numbers of protein domains with very different functions. The ability to refine the functional classification of domains within these superfamilies is necessary for better understanding the evolution of functions and to guide function prediction of new relatives. To achieve this, a suitable starting point is the detailed analysis of functional divisions and mechanisms of functional divergence in a single superfamily. Here we present such a detailed analysis in...

  11. Evolutionary and functional relationships within the DJ1 superfamily

    Cookson Mark R

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inferences about protein function are often made based on sequence homology to other gene products of known activities. This approach is valuable for small families of conserved proteins but can be difficult to apply to large superfamilies of proteins with diverse function. In this study we looked at sequence homology between members of the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily, which includes a human protein of unclear function, DJ-1, associated with inherited Parkinson's disease. Results DJ-1 orthologs in a variety of eukaryotic species cluster together in a single group. The most closely related group is the bacterial ThiJ genes. These are kinases involved in the biosynthesis of thiamine, a function that has been dispensed with evolutionarily in most eukaryotes where thiamine is an essential nutrient. The similarity with other characterized members of the superfamily, including proteases, is more remote. This is congruent with the recently solved crystal structures that fail to demonstrate the presence of a catalytic triad required for protease activity. Conclusion DJ-1 may have evolved from the bacterial gene encoding ThiJ kinase. However, as this function has been dispensed with in eukaryotes it appears that the gene has been co-opted for another function.

  12. Genome-wide comparative analysis of ABC systems in the Bdellovibrio-and-like organisms.

    Li, Nan; Chen, Huan; Williams, Henry N

    2015-05-10

    Bdellovibrio-and-like organisms (BALOs) are gram-negative, predatory bacteria with wide variations in genome sizes and GC content and ecological habitats. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems have been identified in several prokaryotes, fungi and plants and have a role in transport of materials in and out of cells and in cellular processes. However, knowledge of the ABC systems of BALOs remains obscure. A total of 269 putative ABC proteins were identified in BALOs. The genes encoding these ABC systems occupy nearly 1.3% of the gene content in freshwater Bdellovibrio strains and about 0.7% in their saltwater counterparts. The proteins found belong to 25 ABC system families based on their structural characteristics and functions. Among these, 16 families function as importers, 6 as exporters and 3 are involved in various cellular processes. Eight of these 25 ABC system families were deduced to be the core set of ABC systems conserved in all BALOs. All Bacteriovorax strains have 28 or less ABC systems. On the contrary, the freshwater Bdellovibrio strains have more ABC systems, typically around 51. In the genome of Bdellovibrio exovorus JSS (CP003537.1), 53 putative ABC systems were detected, representing the highest number among all the BALO genomes examined in this study. Unexpected high numbers of ABC systems involved in cellular processes were found in all BALOs. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the majority of ABC proteins can be assigned into many separate families with high bootstrap supports (>50%). In this study, a general framework of sequence-structure-function connections for the ABC systems in BALOs was revealed providing novel insights for future investigations. PMID:25707746

  13. ABC Technology Development Program

    The Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) facility will be designed to accomplish the following mission: 'Provide a weapon's grade plutonium disposition capability in a safe, economical, and environmentally sound manner on a prudent schedule for [50] tons of weapon's grade plutonium to be disposed on in [20] years.' This mission is supported by four major objectives: provide a reliable plutonium disposition capability within the next [15] years; provide a level of safety and of safety assurance that meets or exceeds that afforded to the public by modern commercial nuclear power plants; meet or exceed all applicable federal, state, and local regulations or standards for environmental compliance; manage the program in a cost effective manner. The ABC Technology Development Program defines the technology development activities that are required to accomplish this mission. The technology development tasks are related to the following topics: blanket system; vessel systems; reactivity control systems; heat transport system components; energy conversion systems; shutdown heat transport systems components; auxiliary systems; technology demonstrations - large scale experiments

  14. ABCs in College English Education

    李利文

    2011-01-01

    As is known to us all, human beings are always brought under control by such many things as the hormone in our body, the mood produced in our brain and the external world, which leads us to a topic of how to create an atmosphere for the undergraduates to fit well in with the college English education. In our teaching management, the ABCs about college English education works as an assistant. Here, ABCs about college English education refer to some fundamental skills with regard to the undergraduates English education. The ABCs, which always encourage students' involvement, would work effectively if teachers understand them well.

  15. The ABC of Ribosome-Related Antibiotic Resistance

    Wilson, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The increase in multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria is limiting the utility of our current arsenal of antimicrobial agents. Mechanistically understanding how bacteria obtain antibiotic resistance is a critical first step to the development of improved inhibitors. One common mechanism for bacteria to obtain antibiotic resistance is by employing ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters to actively pump the drug from the cell. The ABC-F family includes proteins conferring resistance to a variety of clinically important ribosome-targeting antibiotics; however, controversy remains as to whether resistance is conferred via efflux like other ABC transporters or whether another mechanism, such as ribosome protection, is at play. A recent study by Sharkey and coworkers (L. K. Sharkey, T. A. Edwards, and A. J. O’Neill, mBio 7:e01975-15, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01975-15) provides strong evidence that ABC-F proteins conferring antibiotic resistance utilize ribosome protection mechanisms, namely, by interacting with the ribosome and displacing the drug from its binding site, thus revealing a novel role for ABC-F proteins in antibiotic resistance. PMID:27143393

  16. A new method of research on molecular evolution of pro-teinase superfamily

    2001-01-01

    The molecular evolutionary tree, also known as a phylogenetic tree, of the serine proteinase superfamily was constructed by means of structural alignment. Three-dimensional structures of proteins were aligned by the SSAP program of Orengo and Taylor to obtain evolutionary dis-tances. The resulting evolutionary tree provides a topology graph that can reflect the evolution of structure and function of homology proteinase. Moreover, study on evolution of the serine proteinase superfamily can lead to better under-standing of the relationship and evolutionary difference among proteins of the superfamily, and is of significance to protein engineering, molecular design and protein structure prediction. Structure alignment is one of the useful methods of research on molecular evolution of protein.

  17. Politseiniku lustlik ABC / Pekka Erelt

    Erelt, Pekka, 1965-

    1999-01-01

    Politsei on välja andnud 'Politseiniku ABC', mis antakse igale politseinikule. Karikaturist Heiki Ernits on peaaegu igale taskuraamatu leheküljele joonistanud pildikese mundrimeestest kentsakates situatsioonides.

  18. Asymmetric switching in a homodimeric ABC transporter: a simulation study.

    Jussi Aittoniemi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ABC transporters are a large family of membrane proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes, including multidrug and tumor resistance and ion channel regulation. Advances in the structural and functional understanding of ABC transporters have revealed that hydrolysis at the two canonical nucleotide-binding sites (NBSs is co-operative and non-simultaneous. A conserved core architecture of bacterial and eukaryotic ABC exporters has been established, as exemplified by the crystal structure of the homodimeric multidrug exporter Sav1866. Currently, it is unclear how sequential ATP hydrolysis arises in a symmetric homodimeric transporter, since it implies at least transient asymmetry at the NBSs. We show by molecular dynamics simulation that the initially symmetric structure of Sav1866 readily undergoes asymmetric transitions at its NBSs in a pre-hydrolytic nucleotide configuration. MgATP-binding residues and a network of charged residues at the dimer interface are shown to form a sequence of putative molecular switches that allow ATP hydrolysis only at one NBS. We extend our findings to eukaryotic ABC exporters which often consist of two non-identical half-transporters, frequently with degeneracy substitutions at one of their two NBSs. Interestingly, many residues involved in asymmetric conformational switching in Sav1866 are substituted in degenerate eukaryotic NBS. This finding strengthens recent suggestions that the interplay of a consensus and a degenerate NBS in eukaroytic ABC proteins pre-determines the sequence of hydrolysis at the two NBSs.

  19. ABCE1 is essential for S phase progression in human cells.

    Toompuu, Marina; Kärblane, Kairi; Pata, Pille; Truve, Erkki; Sarmiento, Cecilia

    2016-05-01

    ABCE1 is a highly conserved protein universally present in eukaryotes and archaea, which is crucial for the viability of different organisms. First identified as RNase L inhibitor, ABCE1 is currently recognized as an essential translation factor involved in several stages of eukaryotic translation and ribosome biogenesis. The nature of vital functions of ABCE1, however, remains unexplained. Here, we study the role of ABCE1 in human cell proliferation and its possible connection to translation. We show that ABCE1 depletion by siRNA results in a decreased rate of cell growth due to accumulation of cells in S phase, which is accompanied by inefficient DNA synthesis and reduced histone mRNA and protein levels. We infer that in addition to the role in general translation, ABCE1 is involved in histone biosynthesis and DNA replication and therefore is essential for normal S phase progression. In addition, we analyze whether ABCE1 is implicated in transcript-specific translation via its association with the eIF3 complex subunits known to control the synthesis of cell proliferation-related proteins. The expression levels of a few such targets regulated by eIF3A, however, were not consistently affected by ABCE1 depletion. PMID:26985706

  20. The predicted ABC transporter AbcEDCBA is required for type IV secretion system expression and lysosomal evasion by Brucella ovis.

    Teane M A Silva

    Full Text Available Brucella ovis is a major cause of reproductive failure in rams and it is one of the few well-described Brucella species that is not zoonotic. Previous work showed that a B. ovis mutant lacking a species-specific ABC transporter (ΔabcBA was attenuated in mice and was unable to survive in macrophages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of this ABC transporter during intracellular survival of B. ovis. In HeLa cells, B. ovis WT was able to survive and replicate at later time point (48 hpi, whereas an ΔabcBA mutant was attenuated at 24 hpi. The reduced survival of the ΔabcBA mutant was associated with a decreased ability to exclude the lysosomal marker LAMP1 from its vacuolar membrane, suggesting a failure to establish a replicative niche. The ΔabcBA mutant showed a reduced abundance of the Type IV secretion system (T4SS proteins VirB8 and VirB11 in both rich and acid media, when compared to WT B. ovis. However, mRNA levels of virB1, virB8, hutC, and vjbR were similar in both strains. These results support the notion that the ABC transporter encoded by abcEDCBA or its transported substrate acts at a post-transcriptional level to promote the optimal expression of the B. ovis T4SS within infected host cells.

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the galacto-N-biose-/lacto-N-biose I-binding protein (GL-BP) of the ABC transporter from Bifidobacterium longum JCM1217

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of the galacto-N-biose-/lacto-N-biose I-binding protein (GL-BP) of the ABC transporter from B. longum is described. A recombinant galacto-N-biose-/lacto-N-biose I-binding protein (GL-BP) from Bifidobacterium longum JCM1217 has been prepared and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 10 mg ml−1 purified enzyme, 0.01 M zinc sulfate, 0.1 M MES buffer pH 5.9–6.4 and 20–22%(v/v) PEG MME 550 in the presence of 5 mM disaccharide ligands. Suitable crystals grew after 10 d incubation at 293 K. The crystals belong to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.3, b = 143.6, c = 114.6 Å for the lacto-N-biose I complex and a = 106.4, b = 143.4, c = 115.5 Å for the galacto-N-biose complex, and diffracted to 1.85 and 1.99 Å resolution, respectively

  2. Molecular modeling of the human multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1)

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a 190 kDa member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transmembrane transporters that is clinically relevant for its ability to confer multidrug resistance by actively effluxing anticancer drugs. Knowledge of the atomic structure of MRP1 is needed to elucidate its transport mechanism, but only low resolution structural data are currently available. Consequently, comparative modeling has been used to generate models of human MRP1 based on the crystal structure of the ABC transporter Sav1866 from Staphylococcus aureus. In these Sav1866-based models, the arrangement of transmembrane helices differs strikingly from earlier models of MRP1 based on the structure of the bacterial lipid transporter MsbA, both with respect to packing of the twelve helices and their interactions with the nucleotide binding domains. The functional importance of Tyr324 in transmembrane helix 6 predicted to project into the substrate translocation pathway was investigated

  3. The ABCs of Student Engagement

    Parsons, Seth A.; Nuland, Leila Richey; Parsons, Allison Ward

    2014-01-01

    Student engagement is an important consideration for teachers and administrators because it is explicitly associated with achievement. What the authors call the ABC's of engagement they outline as: Affective engagement, Behavioral engagement, and Cognitive engagement. They also present "Three Things Every Teacher Needs to Know about…

  4. Transient receptor potential (TRP gene superfamily encoding cation channels

    Pan Zan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transient receptor potential (TRP non-selective cation channels constitute a superfamily, which contains 28 different genes. In mammals, this superfamily is divided into six subfamilies based on differences in amino acid sequence homology between the different gene products. Proteins within a subfamily aggregate to form heteromeric or homomeric tetrameric configurations. These different groupings have very variable permeability ratios for calcium versus sodium ions. TRP expression is widely distributed in neuronal tissues, as well as a host of other tissues, including epithelial and endothelial cells. They are activated by environmental stresses that include tissue injury, changes in temperature, pH and osmolarity, as well as volatile chemicals, cytokines and plant compounds. Their activation induces, via intracellular calcium signalling, a host of responses, including stimulation of cell proliferation, migration, regulatory volume behaviour and the release of a host of cytokines. Their activation is greatly potentiated by phospholipase C (PLC activation mediated by coupled GTP-binding proteins and tyrosine receptors. In addition to their importance in maintaining tissue homeostasis, some of these responses may involve various underlying diseases. Given the wealth of literature describing the multiple roles of TRP in physiology in a very wide range of different mammalian tissues, this review limits itself to the literature describing the multiple roles of TRP channels in different ocular tissues. Accordingly, their importance to the corneal, trabecular meshwork, lens, ciliary muscle, retinal, microglial and retinal pigment epithelial physiology and pathology is reviewed.

  5. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  6. Utility of the Amborella trichopoda expansin superfamily in elucidating the history of angiosperm expansins.

    Seader, Victoria H; Thornsberry, Jennifer M; Carey, Robert E

    2016-03-01

    Expansins form a superfamily of plant proteins that assist in cell wall loosening during growth and development. The superfamily is divided into four families: EXPA, EXPB, EXLA, and EXLB (Sampedro and Cosgrove in Genome Biol 6:242, 2005. doi: 10.1186/gb-2005-6-12-242 ). Previous studies on Arabidopsis, rice, and Populus trichocarpa have clarified the evolutionary history of expansins in angiosperms (Sampedro et al. in Plant J 44:409-419, 2005. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2005.02540.x ). Amborella trichopoda is a flowering plant that diverged very early. Thus, it is a sister lineage to all other extant angiosperms (Amborella Genome Project in 342:1241089, 2013. doi: 10.1126/science.1241089 ). Because of this relationship, comparing the A. trichopoda expansin superfamily with those of other flowering plants may indicate which expansin genes were present in the last common ancestor of all angiosperms. The A. trichopoda expansin superfamily was assembled using BLAST searches with angiosperm expansin queries. The search results were analyzed and annotated to isolate the complete A. trichopoda expansin superfamily. This superfamily is similar to other angiosperm expansin superfamilies, but is somewhat smaller. This is likely because of a lack of genome duplication events (Amborella Genome Project 2013). Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses of A. trichopoda expansins have improved our understanding of the evolutionary history of expansins in angiosperms. Nearly all of the A. trichopoda expansins were placed into an existing Arabidopsis-rice expansin clade. Based on the results of phylogenetic and syntenic analyses, we estimate there were 12-13 EXPA genes, 2 EXPB genes, 1 EXLA gene, and 2 EXLB genes in the last common ancestor of all angiosperms. PMID:26646380

  7. Mutations in the Arabidopsis Peroxisomal ABC Transporter COMATOSE Allow Differentiation between Multiple Functions In Planta: Insights from an Allelic Series

    Dietrich, Daniela; Schmuths, Heike; Lousa, Carine De Marcos; Baldwin, Jocelyn M.; Baldwin, Stephen A.; Baker, Alison; Theodoulou, Frederica L; Holdsworth, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    COMATOSE (CTS), the Arabidopsis homologue of human Adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP), is required for import of substrates for peroxisomal β-oxidation. A new allelic series and a homology model based on the bacterial ABC transporter, Sav1866, provide novel insights into structure-function relations of ABC subfamily D proteins. In contrast to ALDP, where the majority of mutations result in protein absence from the peroxisomal membrane, all CTS mutants produced stable protein. Mutation of con...

  8. ABC Transporters, Atherosclerosis and Inflammation

    Fitzgerald, Michael L.; Mujawar, Zahedi; Tamehiro, Norimasa

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, driven by inflamed lipid-laden lesions, can occlude the coronary arteries and lead to myocardial infarction. This chronic disease is a major and expensive health burden. However, the body is able to mobilize and excrete cholesterol and other lipids, thus preventing atherosclerosis by a process termed reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Insight into the mechanism of RCT has been gained by the study of two rare syndromes caused by the mutation of ABC transporter loci. In Tangi...

  9. A Superfamily of Arabidopsis Thaliana Retrotransposons

    Konieczny, A; Voytas, D. F.; Cummings, M. P.; Ausubel, F M

    1991-01-01

    We describe a superfamily of Arabidopsis thaliana retrotransposable elements that consists of at least ten related families designated Ta1-Ta10. The Ta1 family has been described previously. Two genomic clones representing the Ta2 and Ta3 elements were isolated from an A. thaliana (race Landsberg erecta) λ library using sequences derived from the reverse transcriptase region of Ta1 as hybridization probes. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the Ta1, Ta2 and Ta3 families share >75% amino...

  10. Precambrian origins of the TNFR superfamily.

    Quistad, S D; Traylor-Knowles, N

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the tumor necrosis factor/tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNF/TNFR) is complicated and not well understood. To date, most TNFR studies have focused on vertebrate models leaving the role of TNFRs in invertebrates largely unexplored. The evolution of important cellular processes including stress response, apoptosis, development, and inflammation will be better understood by examining the TNF/TNFR superfamily in ancient invertebrate phyla. How widespread is this gene family within the evolutionary tree of life and is there evidence for similar function in invertebrates? A first step is to identify the presence or absence of these genes within basal metazoan taxa using the signature cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of the TNFR superfamily. In this perspective, we will start by examining what is currently known about the function of TNFRs in invertebrates. Then, we will assess the role of TNFRs in apoptosis and explore the origins of the domains found in TNFRs including the death domain (DD) and CRD. Finally, we will examine the phylogenetic relationship between TNFRs containing DDs identified to date. From these data, we propose a model for a Precambrian origin of TNFRs and their functional role in apoptosis. PMID:27551546

  11. Expression of the RND-type efflux pump AdeABC in Acinetobacter baumannii is regulated by the AdeRS two-component system.

    Marchand, Isabelle; Damier-Piolle, Laurence; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    2004-09-01

    The AdeABC pump of Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454, which confers resistance to various antibiotic classes including aminoglycosides, is composed of the AdeA, AdeB, and AdeC proteins; AdeB is a member of the RND superfamily. The adeA, adeB, and adeC genes are contiguous and adjacent to adeS and adeR, which are transcribed in the opposite direction and which specify proteins homologous to sensors and regulators of two-component systems, respectively (S. Magnet, P. Courvalin, and T. Lambert, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 45:3375-3380, 2001). Analysis by Northern hybridization indicated that the three genes were cotranscribed, although mRNAs corresponding to adeAB and adeC were also present. Cotranscription of the two regulatory genes was demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR. Inactivation of adeS led to aminoglycoside susceptibility. Transcripts corresponding to adeAB were not detected in susceptible A. baumannii CIP 70-10 but were present in spontaneous gentamicin-resistant mutants obtained in vitro. Analysis of these mutants revealed the substitutions Thr153-->Met in AdeS downstream from the putative His-149 site of autophosphorylation, which is presumably responsible for the loss of phosphorylase activity by the sensor, and Pro116-->Leu in AdeR at the first residue of the alpha(5) helix of the receiver domain, which is involved in interactions that control the output domain of response regulators. These mutations led to constitutive expression of the pump and, thus, to antibiotic resistance. These data indicate that the AdeABC pump is cryptic in wild A. baumannii due to stringent control by the AdeRS two-component system. PMID:15328088

  12. Sustaining an Effective ABC-ABM System

    Gary COKINS

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe the Activity- Based Costing (ABC and Activity-Based Management (ABM system and techniques to sustain them as a permanent and repeatable production reporting system, not just for one-off analysis. A comparison is made between ABC/ABM modeling software that extracts source data and business systems that include ABC/ABM modeling features. There are presented the stages of updating, running and rerunning the ABC/ABM system. The resulting information calculated and provided by the ABC/ABM system are analyzed and interpreted in terms of a multidimensional data analysis. The article ends with the authors' conclusions about the benefits of continued operation of sustaining the ABC/ABM system.

  13. Mechanism of ABC transporters: A molecular dynamics simulation of a well characterized nucleotide-binding subunit

    Peter M Jones; Anthony M George

    2002-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are membrane-bound molecular pumps that form one of the largest of all protein families. Several of them are central to phenomena of biomedical interest, including cystic fibrosis and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. ABC transporters share a common architecture comprising two hydrophilic nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) and two hydrophobic transmembrane domains (TMDs) that form the substrate pathway across the membrane. The conformational changes ...

  14. Dephosphorylation of the Core Clock Protein KaiC in the Cyanobacterial KaiABC Circadian Oscillator Proceeds via an ATP Synthase Mechanism

    Egli, Martin; Mori, Tetsuya; Pattanayek, Rekha; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H. (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC in the presence of ATP, to tick in a temperature-compensated manner. KaiC, the central cog of this oscillator, forms a homohexamer with 12 ATP molecules bound between its N- and C-terminal domains and exhibits unusual properties. Both the N-terminal (CI) and C-terminal (CII) domains harbor ATPase activity, and the subunit interfaces between CII domains are the sites of autokinase and autophosphatase activities. Hydrolysis of ATP correlates with phosphorylation at threonine and serine sites across subunits in an orchestrated manner, such that first T432 and then S431 are phosphorylated, followed by dephosphorylation of these residues in the same order. Although structural work has provided insight into the mechanisms of ATPase and kinase, the location and mechanism of the phosphatase have remained enigmatic. From the available experimental data based on a range of approaches, including KaiC crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering models, metal ion dependence, site-directed mutagenesis (i.e., E318, the general base), and measurements of the associated clock periods, phosphorylation patterns, and dephosphorylation courses as well as a lack of sequence motifs in KaiC that are typically associated with known phosphatases, we hypothesized that KaiCII makes use of the same active site for phosphorylation and dephosphorlyation. We observed that wild-type KaiC (wt-KaiC) exhibits an ATP synthase activity that is significantly reduced in the T432A/S431A mutant. We interpret the first observation as evidence that KaiCII is a phosphotransferase instead of a phosphatase and the second that the enzyme is capable of generating ATP, both from ADP and P{sub i} (in a reversal of the ATPase reaction) and from ADP and P-T432/P-S431 (dephosphorylation). This new concept regarding the mechanism of dephosphorylation is also supported by the

  15. ABC model and floral evolution

    LI Guisheng; MENG Zheng; KONG Hongzhi; CHEN Zhiduan; LU Anming

    2003-01-01

    The paper introduces the classical ABC model of floral development and thereafter ABCD, ABCDE and quartet models, and presents achievements in the studies on floral evolution such as the improved understanding on the relationship of reproductive organs between gnetophytes and angiosperms, new results in perianth evolution and identified homology of floral organs between dicots and monocots. The evo-devo studies on plant taxa at different evolutionary levels are useful to better understanding the homology of floral organs, and to clarifying the mysteries of the origin and subsequent diversification of flowers.

  16. The P450 gene superfamily: recommended nomenclature.

    Nebert, D W; Adesnik, M; Coon, M J; Estabrook, R W; Gonzalez, F J; Guengerich, F P; Gunsalus, I C; Johnson, E F; Kemper, B; Levin, W

    1987-02-01

    A nomenclature for the P450 gene superfamily is proposed based on evolution. Recommendations include Roman numerals for distinct gene families, capital letters for subfamilies, and Arabic numerals for individual genes. An updating of this list, which presently includes 65 entries, will be required every 1-2 years. Assignment of orthologous genes is presently uncertain in some cases--between widely diverged species and especially in the P450II family due to the large number of genes. As more is known, it might become necessary to change some gene assignments that are based on our present knowledge. PMID:3829886

  17. Identification and functional characterization of Penicillium marneffei pleiotropic drug resistance transporters ABC1 and ABC2.

    Panapruksachat, Siribun; Iwatani, Shun; Oura, Takahiro; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Chindamporn, Ariya; Niimi, Kyoko; Niimi, Masakazu; Lamping, Erwin; Cannon, Richard D; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    Penicilliosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei is an endemic, AIDS-defining illness and, after tuberculosis and cryptococcosis, the third most common opportunistic infection of AIDS patients in tropical Southeast Asia. Untreated, patients have poor prognosis; however, primary amphotericin B treatment followed by prolonged itraconazole prophylaxis is effective. To identify ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that may play a role in potential multidrug resistance of P. marneffei, we identified and classified all 46 P. marneffei ABC transporters from the genome sequence. PmABC1 and PmABC2 were most similar to the archetype Candida albicans multidrug efflux pump gene CDR1. P. marneffei Abc1p (PmAbc1p) was functionally expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, although at rather low levels, and correctly localized to the plasma membrane, causing cells to be fourfold to eightfold more resistant to azoles and many other xenobiotics than untransformed cells. P. marneffei Abc2p (PmAbc2p) was expressed at similarly low levels, but it had no efflux activity and did not properly localize to the plasma membrane. Interestingly, PmAbc1p mislocalized and lost its transport activity when cells were shifted to 37 °C. We conclude that expression of PmAbc1p in S. cerevisiae confers resistance to several xenobiotics indicating that PmAbc1p may be a multidrug efflux pump. PMID:26782644

  18. Main trends of karyotype evolution in the superfamily Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera)

    Vladimir Gokhman; Alex Gumovsky

    2009-01-01

    An overview of karyotype evolution in the superfamily Chalcidoidea is given. Structural types of chromosome sets in the superfamily are listed. Main pathways of karyotypic change in the Chalcidoidea are outlined. The chromosome set containing eleven subtelo- or acrocentrics is considered as an ancestral karyotype for the superfamily. Multiple independent reductions in n values through chromosomal fusions presumably occurred in various groups of chalcid families.

  19. Sequence and structural analyses of interleukin-8-like chemokine superfamily.

    Kanagarajadurai, Karuppiah; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-8 and related chemokines are small proteins that bind to receptors belonging to the large family of G-protein-coupled receptors. They can cause migration of cells like neutrophils and eosinophils and some of them are implicated in angiogenic diseases. More than 40 subfamilies of these ligands are known that share poor sequence similarity and display receptor specificity. There is very little structural information about the mode of binding between ligands and the receptors. We have employed multi-fold sensitive sequence search methods to provide a repertoire of 252 putative interleukin-8 proteins and homologues, which are shared across humans, aves and fish. The sequences can be organized into five major known clusters. The propensity of occurrence of certain amino acid alphabets is found to be specific in different locations of the polypeptide fold. The sequence dispersion is also observed to be cluster-specific when examined by Evolutionary Trace procedure. Amino acid alphabet analysis and Evolutionary Trace procedure reveal cluster-specific amino acid distribution that provide clues about how the small fold of the ligand could display remarkable receptor specificity. We notice regions, like the beta1-beta2 loop of the fold, that are potentially involved in receptor recognition and specificity that could be potential sites for residue mutations. Systematic studies of the distribution patterns enable better understanding of the evolution and molecular recognition of this important and diverse protein superfamily. PMID:19032164

  20. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    Choi Cheol-Hee

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein.

  1. A Bacitracin-Resistant Bacillus subtilis Gene Encodes a Homologue of the Membrane-Spanning Subunit of the Bacillus licheniformis ABC Transporter

    Ohki, Reiko; Tateno, Kozue; Okada, Youji; Okajima, Haruo; Asai, Kei; Sadaie, Yoshito; Murata, Makiko; Aiso, Toshiko

    2003-01-01

    Bacitracin is a peptide antibiotic nonribosomally produced by Bacillus licheniformis. The bcrABC genes which confer bacitracin resistance to the bacitracin producer encode ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins, which are hypothesized to pump out bacitracin from the cells. Bacillus subtilis 168, which has no bacitracin synthesizing operon, has several genes homologous to bcrABC. It was found that the disruption of ywoA, a gene homologous to bcrC, resulted in hypersensitivity to bacit...

  2. Fungal ABC transporter deletion and localization analysis.

    Kovalchuk, Andriy; Weber, Stefan S; Nijland, Jeroen G; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2012-01-01

    Fungal cells are highly complex as their metabolism is compartmentalized harboring various types of subcellular organelles that are bordered by one or more membranes. Knowledge about the intracellular localization of transporter proteins is often required for the understanding of their biological function. Among different approaches available, the localization analysis based on the expression of GFP fusions is commonly used as a relatively fast and cost-efficient method that allows visualization of proteins of interest in both live and fixed cells. In addition, inactivation of transporter genes is an important tool to resolve their specific function. Here we provide a detailed protocol for the deletion and localization analysis of ABC transporters in the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. It includes construction of expression plasmids, their transformation into fungal strains, cultivation of transformants, microscopy analysis, as well as additional protocols on staining of fungal cells with organelle-specific dyes like Hoechst 33342, MitoTracker DeepRed, and FM4-64. PMID:22183644

  3. An ABC for decision making

    Garcia, Luiz Henrique Costa, E-mail: luiz_mogi@yahoo.com.br [Associacao de Medicina Intensiva Brasileira (AMIB), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferreira, Bruna Cortez [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    The present study was aimed at proposing a systematic evaluation of cranial computed tomography, identifying the main aspects to be analyzed in order to facilitate the decision making process regarding diagnosis and management in emergency settings. The present descriptive study comprised a literature review at the following databases: Access Medicine and Access Emergency Medicine (McGraw-Hill Education); British Medical Journal Evidence Center; UptoDate; Bireme; PubMed; Lilacs; SciELO; ProQuest; Micromedex (Thomson Reuters); Embase. Once the literature review was completed, the authors identified the main diseases with tomographic repercussions and proposed the present system to evaluate cranial computed tomography images. An easy-to-memorize ABC system will facilitate the decision making in emergency settings, as it covers the main diseases encountered by intensivists and emergency physicians, and provides a sequential guidance about anatomical structures to be investigated as well as their respective alterations. (author)

  4. An ABC for decision making.

    Garcia, Luiz Henrique Costa; Ferreira, Bruna Cortez

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed at proposing a systematic evaluation of cranial computed tomography, identifying the main aspects to be analyzed in order to facilitate the decision making process regarding diagnosis and management in emergency settings. The present descriptive study comprised a literature review at the following databases: Access Medicine and Access Emergency Medicine (McGraw- Hill Education); British Medical Journal Evidence Center; UptoDate; Bireme; PubMed; Lilacs; SciELO; ProQuest; Micromedex (Thomson Reuters); Embase. Once the literature review was completed, the authors identified the main diseases with tomographic repercussions and proposed the present system to evaluate cranial computed tomography images. An easy-to-memorize ABC system will facilitate the decision making in emergency settings, as it covers the main diseases encountered by intensivists and emergency physicians, and provides a sequential guidance about anatomical structures to be investigated as well as their respective alterations. PMID:25987751

  5. An ABC for decision making

    The present study was aimed at proposing a systematic evaluation of cranial computed tomography, identifying the main aspects to be analyzed in order to facilitate the decision making process regarding diagnosis and management in emergency settings. The present descriptive study comprised a literature review at the following databases: Access Medicine and Access Emergency Medicine (McGraw-Hill Education); British Medical Journal Evidence Center; UptoDate; Bireme; PubMed; Lilacs; SciELO; ProQuest; Micromedex (Thomson Reuters); Embase. Once the literature review was completed, the authors identified the main diseases with tomographic repercussions and proposed the present system to evaluate cranial computed tomography images. An easy-to-memorize ABC system will facilitate the decision making in emergency settings, as it covers the main diseases encountered by intensivists and emergency physicians, and provides a sequential guidance about anatomical structures to be investigated as well as their respective alterations. (author)

  6. An ABC for decision making

    Luiz Henrique Costa Garcia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at proposing a systematic evaluation of cranial computed tomography, identifying the main aspects to be analyzed in order to facilitate the decision making process regarding diagnosis and management in emergency settings. The present descriptive study comprised a literature review at the following databases: Access Medicine and Access Emergency Medicine (McGraw- Hill Education; British Medical Journal Evidence Center; UptoDate; Bireme; PubMed; Lilacs; SciELO; ProQuest; Micromedex (Thomson Reuters; Embase. Once the literature review was completed, the authors identified the main diseases with tomographic repercussions and proposed the present system to evaluate cranial computed tomography images. An easy-to-memorize ABC system will facilitate the decision making in emergency settings, as it covers the main diseases encountered by intensivists and emergency physicians, and provides a sequential guidance about anatomical structures to be investigated as well as their respective alterations.

  7. A Comparative Analysis of Synonymous Codon Usage Bias Pattern in Human Albumin Superfamily

    Hoda Mirsafian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synonymous codon usage bias is an inevitable phenomenon in organismic taxa across the three domains of life. Though the frequency of codon usage is not equal across species and within genome in the same species, the phenomenon is non random and is tissue-specific. Several factors such as GC content, nucleotide distribution, protein hydropathy, protein secondary structure, and translational selection are reported to contribute to codon usage preference. The synonymous codon usage patterns can be helpful in revealing the expression pattern of genes as well as the evolutionary relationship between the sequences. In this study, synonymous codon usage bias patterns were determined for the evolutionarily close proteins of albumin superfamily, namely, albumin, α-fetoprotein, afamin, and vitamin D-binding protein. Our study demonstrated that the genes of the four albumin superfamily members have low GC content and high values of effective number of codons (ENC suggesting high expressivity of these genes and less bias in codon usage preferences. This study also provided evidence that the albumin superfamily members are not subjected to mutational selection pressure.

  8. Comparative analysis of cystatin superfamily in platyhelminths.

    Aijiang Guo

    Full Text Available The cystatin superfamily is comprised of cysteine proteinase inhibitors and encompasses at least 3 subfamilies: stefins, cystatins and kininogens. In this study, the platyhelminth cystatin superfamily was identified and grouped into stefin and cystatin subfamilies. The conserved domain of stefins (G, QxVxG was observed in all members of platyhelminth stefins. The three characteristics of cystatins, the cystatin-like domain (G, QxVxG, PW, a signal peptide, and one or two conserved disulfide bonds, were observed in platyhelminths, with the exception of cestodes, which lacked the conserved disulfide bond. However, it is noteworthy that cestode cystatins had two tandem repeated domains, although the second tandem repeated domain did not contain a cystatin-like domain, which has not been previously reported. Tertiary structure analysis of Taenia solium cystatin, one of the cestode cystatins, demonstrated that the N-terminus of T. solium cystatin formed a five turn α-helix, a five stranded β-pleated sheet and a hydrophobic edge, similar to the structure of chicken cystatin. Although no conserved disulfide bond was found in T. solium cystatin, the models of T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin corresponded at the site of the first disulfide bridge of the chicken cystatin. However, the two models were not similar regarding the location of the second disulfide bridge of chicken cystatin. These results showed that T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin had similarities and differences, suggesting that the biochemistry of T. solium cystatin could be similar to chicken cystatin in its inhibitory function and that it may have further functional roles. The same results were obtained for other cestode cystatins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cestode cystatins constituted an independent clade and implied that cestode cystatins should be considered to have formed a new clade during evolution.

  9. abc: An extensible AspectJ compiler

    Avgustinov, Pavel; Christensen, Aske Simon; Hendren, Laurie;

    2005-01-01

    checking and code generation, as well as data flow and control flow analyses. The AspectBench Compiler (abc) is an implementation of such a workbench. The base version of abc implements the full AspectJ language. Its frontend is built, using the Polyglot framework, as a modular extension of the Java...... language. The use of Polyglot gives flexibility of syntax and type checking. The backend is built using the Soot framework, to give modular code generation and analyses. In this paper, we outline the design of abc, focusing mostly on how the design supports extensibility. We then provide a general overview...

  10. Performance Optimization of Benchmark Functions Using VTS-ABC Algorithm

    Twinkle Gupta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A new variant based on tournament selection called VTS-ABC algorithm is provided in this paper. Its performance is compared with standard ABC algorithm with different size of data on several Benchmark functions and results show that VTS-ABC provides better quality of solution than original ABC algorithm in every case.

  11. Neuroprotective effect of chondroitinase ABC on primary and secondary brain injury after stroke in hypertensive rats.

    Chen, Xin-ran; Liao, Song-jie; Ye, Lan-xiang; Gong, Qiong; Ding, Qiao; Zeng, Jin-sheng; Yu, Jian

    2014-01-16

    Focal cerebral infarction causes secondary damage in the ipsilateral ventroposterior thalamic nucleus (VPN). Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are a family of putative inhibitory components, and its degradation by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) promotes post-injury neurogenesis. This study investigated the role of ChABC in the primary and secondary injury post stroke in hypertension. Renovascular hypertensive Sprague-Dawley rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and were subjected to continuous intra-infarct infusion of ChABC (0.12 U/d for 7 days) 24 h later. Neurological function was evaluated by a modified neurologic severity score. Neurons were counted in the peri-infarct region and the ipsilateral VPN 8 and 14 days after MCAO by Nissl staining and NeuN labeling. The expressions of CSPGs, growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) and synaptophysin (SYN) were detected with immunofluorescence or Western blotting. The intra-infarct infusion of ChABC, by degrading accumulated CSPGs, rescued neuronal loss and increased the levels of GAP-43 and SYN in both the ipsilateral cortex and VPN, indicating enhancd neuron survival as well as augmented axonal growth and synaptic plasticity, eventually improving overall neurological function. The study demonstrated that intra-infarct ChABC infusion could salvage the brain from both primary and secondary injury by the intervention on the neuroinhibitory environment post focal cerebral infarction. PMID:24326094

  12. Structural conservation in the major facilitator superfamily as revealed by comparative modeling

    Vardy, Eyal; Arkin, Isaiah T.; Gottschalk, Kay E.; Kaback, H. Ronald; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2004-01-01

    The structures of membrane transporters are still mostly unsolved. Only recently, the first two high-resolution structures of transporters of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) were published. Despite the low sequence similarity of the two proteins involved, lactose permease and glycerol-3-phosphate transporter, the reported structures are highly similar. This leads to the hypothesis that all members of the MFS share a similar structure, regardless of their low sequence identity. To test...

  13. CYP51: A Major Drug Target in the Cytochrome P450 Superfamily

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Hargrove, Tatyana Y.; Kleshchenko, Yuliya; Nes, W. David; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    The cytochrome P540 (CYP) superfamily currently includes about 9,000 proteins forming more than 800 families. The enzymes catalyze monooxygenation of a vast array of compounds and play essentially two roles. They provide biodefense (detoxification of xenobiotics, antibiotic production) and participate in biosynthesis of important endogenous molecules, particularly steroids. Based on these two roles, sterol 14|*alpha*|-demethylases (CYP51) belong to the second group of P450s. The CYP51 family,...

  14. Structure of a conserved hypothetical protein, TTHA0849 from Thermus thermophilus HB8, at 2.4 Å resolution: a putative member of the StAR-related lipid-transfer (START) domain superfamily

    The crystal structure of a conserved hypothetical protein, TTHA0849 from T. thermophilus HB8, has been determined at 2.4 Å resolution. The compact α+β structure shows the typical folding of the steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid-transfer (START) domain. The crystal structure of a conserved hypothetical protein, TTHA0849 from Thermus thermophilus HB8, has been determined at 2.4 Å resolution as a part of a structural and functional genomics project on T. thermophilus HB8. The main-chain folding shows a compact α+β motif, forming a hydrophobic cavity in the molecule. A structural similarity search reveals that it resembles those steroidogenic acute regulatory proteins that contain the lipid-transfer (START) domain, even though TTHA0849 shows comparatively weak sequence identity to polyketide cyclases. However, the size of the ligand-binding cavity is distinctly smaller than other START domain-containing proteins, suggesting that it catalyses the transfer of smaller ligand molecules

  15. Molecular and immunological analysis of an ABC transporter complex required for cytochrome c biogenesis.

    Goldman, B S; Beckman, D L; Bali, A; Monika, E M; Gabbert, K K; Kranz, R G

    1997-05-16

    The helABC genes are predicted to encode an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter necessary for heme export for ligation in bacterial cytochrome c biogenesis. The recent discoveries of homologs of the helB and helC genes in plant mitochondrial genomes suggest this is a highly conserved transporter in prokaryotes and some eukaryotes with the HelB and HelC proteins comprising the transmembrane components. Molecular genetic analysis in the Gram-negative bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus was used to show that the helABC and helDX genes are part of an operon linked to the secDF genes. To facilitate analysis of this transporter, strains with non-polar deletions in each gene, epitope and reporter-tagged HelABCD proteins, and antisera specific to the HelA and HelX proteins were generated. We directly demonstrate that this transporter is present in the cytoplasmic membrane as an HelABCD complex. The HelB and HelC but not HelD proteins are necessary for the binding and stability of the HelA protein, the cytoplasmic subunit containing the ATP-binding region. In addition we show that the HelA protein co-immunoprecipitates with either the HelC or HelD proteins. Thus, the HelABCD heme export complex is distinguished by the presence of four membrane-associated subunits and represents a unique subfamily of ABC transporters. PMID:9175857

  16. ABC of childhood memories [artists' book

    Wood, Philippa; MacLellan, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    The limited edition artists' book by Philippa Wood and Tamar MacLellan – ABC of Childhood Memories was a collaborative project that explored the 1960s/70s childhood memories of each artist through text based narrative and image.

  17. The abc-conjecture for Algebraic Numbers

    Jerzy BROWKIN

    2006-01-01

    The abc-conjecture for the ring of integers states that, for every ε> 0 and every triple of relatively prime nonzero integers (a, b, c) satisfying a + b = c, we have max(|a|, |b|, |c|) ≤ rad(abc)1+ε with a finite number of exceptions. Here the radical rad(m) is the product of all distinct prime factors of m.In the present paper we propose an abc-conjecture for the field of all algebraic numbers. It is based on the definition of the radical (in Section 1) and of the height (in Section 2) of an algebraic number.From this abc-conjecture we deduce some versions of Fermat's last theorem for the field of all algebraic numbers, and we discuss from this point of view known results on solutions of Fermat's equation in fields of small degrees over Q.

  18. Aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily: genomics and annotation.

    Mindnich, Rebekka D; Penning, Trevor M

    2009-07-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are phase I metabolising enzymes that catalyse the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H)-dependent reduction of carbonyl groups to yield primary and secondary alcohols on a wide range of substrates, including aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and ketones, ketoprostaglandins, ketosteroids and xenobiotics. In so doing they functionalise the carbonyl group for conjugation (phase II enzyme reactions). Although functionally diverse, AKRs form a protein superfamily based on their high sequence identity and common protein fold, the (alpha/beta) 8 -barrel structure. Well over 150 AKR enzymes, from diverse organisms, have been annotated so far and given systematic names according to a nomenclature that is based on multiple protein sequence alignment and degree of identity. Annotation of non-vertebrate AKRs at the National Center for Biotechnology Information or Vertebrate Genome Annotation (vega) database does not often include the systematic nomenclature name, so the most comprehensive overview of all annotated AKRs is found on the AKR website (http://www.med.upenn.edu/akr/). This site also hosts links to more detailed and specialised information (eg on crystal structures, gene expression and single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). The protein-based AKR nomenclature allows unambiguous identification of a given enzyme but does not reflect the wealth of genomic and transcriptomic variation that exists in the various databases. In this context, identification of putative new AKRs and their distinction from pseudogenes are challenging. This review provides a short summary of the characteristic features of AKR biochemistry and structure that have been reviewed in great detail elsewhere, and focuses mainly on nomenclature and database entries of human AKRs that so far have not been subject to systematic annotation. Recent developments in the annotation of SNP and transcript variance in AKRs are also summarised. PMID:19706366

  19. Aldo-keto reductase (AKR superfamily: Genomics and annotation

    Mindnich Rebekka D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs are phase I metabolising enzymes that catalyse the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate (NAD(PH-dependent reduction of carbonyl groups to yield primary and secondary alcohols on a wide range of substrates, including aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and ketones, ketoprostaglan-dins, ketosteroids and xenobiotics. In so doing they functionalise the carbonyl group for conjugation (phase II enzyme reactions. Although functionally diverse, AKRs form a protein superfamily based on their high sequence identity and common protein fold, the (α/(β8-barrel structure. Well over 150 AKR enzymes, from diverse organisms, have been annotated so far and given systematic names according to a nomenclature that is based on multiple protein sequence alignment and degree of identity. Annotation of non-vertebrate AKRs at the National Center for Biotechnology Information or Vertebrate Genome Annotation (vega database does not often include the systematic nomenclature name, so the most comprehensive overview of all annotated AKRs is found on the AKR website (http://www.med.upenn.edu/akr/. This site also hosts links to more detailed and specialised information (eg on crystal structures, gene expression and single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]. The protein-based AKR nomenclature allows unambiguous identification of a given enzyme but does not reflect the wealth of genomic and transcriptomic variation that exists in the various databases. In this context, identification of putative new AKRs and their distinction from pseudogenes are challenging. This review provides a short summary of the characteristic features of AKR biochemistry and structure that have been reviewed in great detail elsewhere, and focuses mainly on nomenclature and database entries of human AKRs that so far have not been subject to systematic annotation. Recent developments in the annotation of SNP and transcript variance in AKRs are also summarised.

  20. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR. PMID:27449595

  1. TNF and TNF Receptor Superfamily Members in HIV infection: New Cellular Targets for Therapy?

    Amit Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF and TNF receptors (TNFR superfamily members are engaged in diverse cellular phenomena such as cellular proliferation, morphogenesis, apoptosis, inflammation, and immune regulation. Their role in regulating viral infections has been well documented. Viruses have evolved with numerous strategies to interfere with TNF-mediated signaling indicating the importance of TNF and TNFR superfamily in viral pathogenesis. Recent research reports suggest that TNF and TNFRs play an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV. TNFR signaling modulates HIV replication and HIV proteins interfere with TNF/TNFR pathways. Since immune activation and inflammation are the hallmark of HIV infection, the use of TNF inhibitors can have significant impact on HIV disease progression. In this review, we will describe how HIV infection is modulated by signaling mediated through members of TNF and TNFR superfamily and in turn how these latter could be targeted by HIV proteins. Finally, we will discuss the emerging therapeutics options based on modulation of TNF activity that could ultimately lead to the cure of HIV-infected patients.

  2. Sensitive and specific fluorescent probes for functional analysis of the three major types of mammalian ABC transporters.

    Irina V Lebedeva

    Full Text Available An underlying mechanism for multi drug resistance (MDR is up-regulation of the transmembrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter proteins. ABC transporters also determine the general fate and effect of pharmaceutical agents in the body. The three major types of ABC transporters are MDR1 (P-gp, P-glycoprotein, ABCB1, MRP1/2 (ABCC1/2 and BCRP/MXR (ABCG2 proteins. Flow cytometry (FCM allows determination of the functional expression levels of ABC transporters in live cells, but most dyes used as indicators (rhodamine 123, DiOC(2(3, calcein-AM have limited applicability as they do not detect all three major types of ABC transporters. Dyes with broad coverage (such as doxorubicin, daunorubicin and mitoxantrone lack sensitivity due to overall dimness and thus may yield a significant percentage of false negative results. We describe two novel fluorescent probes that are substrates for all three common types of ABC transporters and can serve as indicators of MDR in flow cytometry assays using live cells. The probes exhibit fast internalization, favorable uptake/efflux kinetics and high sensitivity of MDR detection, as established by multidrug resistance activity factor (MAF values and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical analysis. Used in combination with general or specific inhibitors of ABC transporters, both dyes readily identify functional efflux and are capable of detecting small levels of efflux as well as defining the type of multidrug resistance. The assay can be applied to the screening of putative modulators of ABC transporters, facilitating rapid, reproducible, specific and relatively simple functional detection of ABC transporter activity, and ready implementation on widely available instruments.

  3. Inhibition of ABC transporters associated with multidrug resistance

    Egger, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first part of this dissertation (chapters 1 and 2) deals with the inhibition of the ABC transporters ABCB1 (p-glycoprotein) and ABCG2 (breast cancer resistance protein). Less lipophilic and better water soluble analogues of the known ABCB1 inhibitor tariquidar were synthesized from one central building block via Cu(I)-catalyzed N/O-arylation reactions. These compounds were tested for their inhibitory activity against the ABCB1 transporter in a flow cytometric calcein-AM efflux assay and a...

  4. Update on the olfactory receptor (OR gene superfamily

    Olender Tsviya

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The olfactory receptor gene (OR superfamily is the largest in the human genome. The superfamily contains 390 putatively functional genes and 465 pseudogenes arranged into 18 gene families and 300 subfamilies. Even members within the same subfamily are often located on different chromosomes. OR genes are located on all autosomes except chromosome 20, plus the X chromosome but not the Y chromosome. The gene:pseudogene ratio is lowest in human, higher in chimpanzee and highest in rat and mouse -- most likely reflecting the greater need of olfaction for survival in the rodent than in the human. The OR genes undergo allelic exclusion, each sensory neurone expressing usually only one odourant receptor allele; the mechanism by which this phenomenon is regulated is not yet understood. The nomenclature system (based on evolutionary divergence of genes into families and subfamilies of the OR gene superfamily has been designed similarly to that originally used for the CYP gene superfamily.

  5. ATP and AMP Mutually Influence Their Interaction with the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) at Separate Binding Sites*

    Randak, Christoph O.; Dong, Qian; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Elcock, Adrian H.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. In the presence of ATP and physiologically relevant concentrations of AMP, CFTR exhibits adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Previous studies suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for this activity. Two other ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome protein, ...

  6. Marine Natural Products as Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Inhibitors

    Lilia Cherigo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP is a protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter superfamily that has clinical relevance due to its multi-drug resistance properties in cancer. BCRP can be associated with clinical cancer drug resistance, in particular acute myelogenous or acute lymphocytic leukemias. The overexpression of BCRP contributes to the resistance of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as topotecan, methotrexate, mitoxantrone, doxorubicin and daunorubicin. The Food and Drugs Administration has already recognized that BCRP is clinically one of the most important drug transporters, mainly because it leads to a reduction of clinical efficacy of various anticancer drugs through its ATP-dependent drug efflux pump function as well as its apparent participation in drug resistance. This review article aims to summarize the different research findings on marine natural products with BCRP inhibiting activity. In this sense, the potential modulation of physiological targets of BCRP by natural or synthetic compounds offers a great possibility for the discovery of new drugs and valuable research tools to recognize the function of the complex ABC-transporters.

  7. An ABC analysis for power generation project

    Batool Hasani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary concerns on performance measurement is to know how much a particular project cost. However, using traditional method on project-based products often leads to inappropriate results. In this paper, we re-examine this issue by comparing the cost of a power station construction project using ABC versus traditional method. The results of survey show that ABC method is capable of providing better estimates for overhead costs compared with traditional method. In other words, ABC method helps reduce some of the unnecessary overhead cost items and increase on some other cost components. This helps increase the relative efficiency of the system by reducing total cost of project.

  8. Structural relationships in the lysozyme superfamily: significant evidence for glycoside hydrolase signature motifs.

    Alexandre Wohlkönig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chitin is a polysaccharide that forms the hard, outer shell of arthropods and the cell walls of fungi and some algae. Peptidoglycan is a polymer of sugars and amino acids constituting the cell walls of most bacteria. Enzymes that are able to hydrolyze these cell membrane polymers generally play important roles for protecting plants and animals against infection with insects and pathogens. A particular group of such glycoside hydrolase enzymes share some common features in their three-dimensional structure and in their molecular mechanism, forming the lysozyme superfamily. RESULTS: Besides having a similar fold, all known catalytic domains of glycoside hydrolase proteins of lysozyme superfamily (families and subfamilies GH19, GH22, GH23, GH24 and GH46 share in common two structural elements: the central helix of the all-α domain, which invariably contains the catalytic glutamate residue acting as general-acid catalyst, and a β-hairpin pointed towards the substrate binding cleft. The invariant β-hairpin structure is interestingly found to display the highest amino acid conservation in aligned sequences of a given family, thereby allowing to define signature motifs for each GH family. Most of such signature motifs are found to have promising performances for searching sequence databases. Our structural analysis further indicates that the GH motifs participate in enzymatic catalysis essentially by containing the catalytic water positioning residue of inverting mechanism. CONCLUSIONS: The seven families and subfamilies of the lysozyme superfamily all have in common a β-hairpin structure which displays a family-specific sequence motif. These GH β-hairpin motifs contain potentially important residues for the catalytic activity, thereby suggesting the participation of the GH motif to catalysis and also revealing a common catalytic scheme utilized by enzymes of the lysozyme superfamily.

  9. The ABC-paradox: is Time Driven ABC relevant for small and Medium sized enterprises (SME)?

    Fladkjær, Henrik Find; Jensen, Erling

    Several articles suggest that Activity Based Costing (ABC) has failed to succeed in practical use. It is even argued that we have an ABC-paradox. Activity Based Costing has won theoretically in nu-merous articles in journals, through books, being included in all major Business Accounting text-books...... manufacturing company we will analyse whether it is possible to create a satisfactory decision making foundation using a TDABC as a less complex cost model in the company. We have analysed our way to the conclusion that compared to ABC, the TDABC model provides the management with a number of pragmatic...

  10. A note on ABC implementation: An evaluation case.

    Nur Naha Abu Mansor

    2004-01-01

    Whilst featuring prominently in management accounting research for at least the last decade, activity-based costing (ABC) may have reached a plateau in term of implementation and success. This paper reports the results of a survey of activity-based costing (ABC) in a telecommunication organization. The study considers ABC information and systems being used in various parts of division of the company. It reports on success measures adapted from the Foster and Swenson (1997) survey of ABC imple...

  11. Approximate maximum likelihood estimation using data-cloning ABC

    Picchini, Umberto; Anderson, Rachele

    2015-01-01

    A maximum likelihood methodology for a general class of models is presented, using an approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) approach. The typical target of ABC methods are models with intractable likelihoods, and we combine an ABC-MCMC sampler with so-called "data cloning" for maximum likelihood estimation. Accuracy of ABC methods relies on the use of a small threshold value for comparing simulations from the model and observed data. The proposed methodology shows how to use large threshold ...

  12. Chondroitinase ABC plus bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for repair of spinal cord injury

    Chun Zhang; Xijing He; Haopeng Li; Guoyu Wang

    2013-01-01

    As chondroitinase ABC can improve the hostile microenvironment and cell transplantation is proven to be effective after spinal cord injury, we hypothesized that their combination would be a more effective treatment option. At 5 days after T8 spinal cord crush injury, rats were injected with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell suspension or chondroitinase ABC 1 mm from the edge of spinal cord damage zone. Chondroitinase ABC was first injected, and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell suspension was injected on the next day in the combination group. At 14 days, the mean Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score of the rats in the combination group was higher than other groups. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that the necrotic area was significantly reduced in the combination group compared with other groups. Glial fibrillary acidic protein-chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan double staining showed that the damage zone of astrocytic scars was significantly reduced without the cavity in the combination group. Glial fibrillary acidic protein/growth associated protein-43 double immunostaining revealed that positive fibers traversed the damage zone in the combination group. These results suggest that the combination of chondroitinase ABC and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation contributes to the repair of spinal cord injury.

  13. An asymmetric post-hydrolysis state of the ABC transporter ATPase dimer.

    George, Anthony M; Jones, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    ABC transporters are a superfamily of enzyme pumps that hydrolyse ATP in exchange for translocation of substrates across cellular membranes. Architecturally, ABC transporters are a dimer of transmembrane domains coupled to a dimer of nucleotide binding domains (NBDs): the NBD dimer contains two ATP-binding sites at the intersubunit interface. A current controversy is whether the protomers of the NBD dimer separate during ATP hydrolysis cycling, or remain in constant contact. In order to investigate the ABC ATPase catalytic mechanism, MD simulations using the recent structure of the ADP+Pi-bound MJ0796 isolated NBD dimer were performed. In three independent simulations of the ADP+Pi/apo state, comprising a total of >0.5 µs, significant opening of the apo (empty) active site was observed; occurring by way of intrasubunit rotations between the core and helical subdomains within both NBD monomers. In contrast, in three equivalent simulations of the ATP/apo state, the NBD dimer remained close to the crystal structure, and no opening of either active site occurred. The results thus showed allosteric coupling between the active sites, mediated by intrasubunit conformational changes. Opening of the apo site is exquisitely tuned to the nature of the ligand, and thus to the stage of the reaction cycle, in the opposite site. In addition to this, in also showing how one active site can open, sufficient to bind nucleotide, while the opposite site remains occluded and bound to the hydrolysis products ADP+Pi, the results are consistent with a Constant Contact Model. Conversely, they show how there may be no requirement for the NBD protomers to separate to complete the catalytic cycle. PMID:23573213

  14. An asymmetric post-hydrolysis state of the ABC transporter ATPase dimer.

    Anthony M George

    Full Text Available ABC transporters are a superfamily of enzyme pumps that hydrolyse ATP in exchange for translocation of substrates across cellular membranes. Architecturally, ABC transporters are a dimer of transmembrane domains coupled to a dimer of nucleotide binding domains (NBDs: the NBD dimer contains two ATP-binding sites at the intersubunit interface. A current controversy is whether the protomers of the NBD dimer separate during ATP hydrolysis cycling, or remain in constant contact. In order to investigate the ABC ATPase catalytic mechanism, MD simulations using the recent structure of the ADP+Pi-bound MJ0796 isolated NBD dimer were performed. In three independent simulations of the ADP+Pi/apo state, comprising a total of >0.5 µs, significant opening of the apo (empty active site was observed; occurring by way of intrasubunit rotations between the core and helical subdomains within both NBD monomers. In contrast, in three equivalent simulations of the ATP/apo state, the NBD dimer remained close to the crystal structure, and no opening of either active site occurred. The results thus showed allosteric coupling between the active sites, mediated by intrasubunit conformational changes. Opening of the apo site is exquisitely tuned to the nature of the ligand, and thus to the stage of the reaction cycle, in the opposite site. In addition to this, in also showing how one active site can open, sufficient to bind nucleotide, while the opposite site remains occluded and bound to the hydrolysis products ADP+Pi, the results are consistent with a Constant Contact Model. Conversely, they show how there may be no requirement for the NBD protomers to separate to complete the catalytic cycle.

  15. WeltABC | kinderKAMERA

    Christian Schreger

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Das WeltABC ist eine Einladung zur Reise durch Sprache(n und damit verknüpften Bildern. Es ist eine Sammlung scheinbar klarer Begriffe, deren Ausgangspunkt die Sprache Deutsch ist. Diese Begriffe werden mit weiteren Begriffen assoziiert und durch Fotos illustriert.

  16. New Broom To Sweep Clean At ABC

    2007-01-01

    The Agricultural Bank of China (ABC) has a new president. The last non- publicly traded state-owned lender in China announced on July 6 that Xiang Junbo, former Vice Governor of the People’s Bank of China, or the central bank, had beenappointed to take o

  17. Invited review: Mechanisms of GTP hydrolysis and conformational transitions in the dynamin superfamily.

    Daumke, Oliver; Praefcke, Gerrit J K

    2016-08-01

    Dynamin superfamily proteins are multidomain mechano-chemical GTPases which are implicated in nucleotide-dependent membrane remodeling events. A prominent feature of these proteins is their assembly- stimulated mechanism of GTP hydrolysis. The molecular basis for this reaction has been initially clarified for the dynamin-related guanylate binding protein 1 (GBP1) and involves the transient dimerization of the GTPase domains in a parallel head-to-head fashion. A catalytic arginine finger from the phosphate binding (P-) loop is repositioned toward the nucleotide of the same molecule to stabilize the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Dynamin uses a related dimerization-dependent mechanism, but instead of the catalytic arginine, a monovalent cation is involved in catalysis. Still another variation of the GTP hydrolysis mechanism has been revealed for the dynamin-like Irga6 which bears a glycine at the corresponding position in the P-loop. Here, we highlight conserved and divergent features of GTP hydrolysis in dynamin superfamily proteins and show how nucleotide binding and hydrolysis are converted into mechano-chemical movements. We also describe models how the energy of GTP hydrolysis can be harnessed for diverse membrane remodeling events, such as membrane fission or fusion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 580-593, 2016. PMID:27062152

  18. An alternative physiological role for the EmhABC efflux pump in Pseudomonas fluorescens cLP6a

    Adebusuyi Abigail A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efflux pumps belonging to the resistance-nodulation-division (RND superfamily in bacteria are involved in antibiotic resistance and solvent tolerance but have an unknown physiological role. EmhABC, a RND-type efflux pump in Pseudomonas fluorescens strain cLP6a, extrudes hydrophobic antibiotics, dyes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons including phenanthrene. The effects of physico-chemical factors such as temperature or antibiotics on the activity and expression of EmhABC were determined in order to deduce its physiological role(s in strain cLP6a in comparison to the emhB disruptant strain, cLP6a-1. Results Efflux assays conducted with 14C-phenanthrene showed that EmhABC activity is affected by incubation temperature. Increased phenanthrene efflux was measured in cLP6a cells grown at 10°C and decreased efflux was observed at 35°C compared with cells grown at the optimum temperature of 28°C. Membrane fatty acids in cLP6a cells were substantially altered by changes in growth temperature and in the presence of tetracycline. Changed membrane fatty acids and increased membrane permeability were associated with ~30-fold increased expression of emhABC in cLP6a cells grown at 35°C, and with increased extracellular free fatty acids. Growth of P. fluorescens cLP6a at supra-optimal temperature was enhanced by the presence of EmhABC compared to strain cLP6a-1. Conclusions Combined, these observations suggest that the EmhABC efflux pump may be involved in the management of membrane stress effects such as those due to unfavourable incubation temperatures. Efflux of fatty acids replaced as a result of membrane damage or phospholipid turnover may be the primary physiological role of the EmhABC efflux pump in P. fluorescens cLP6a.

  19. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Bagaria, A.; Swaminathan, S.; Kumaran, D.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and non-transport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. Typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP) and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consists of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations have been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the integral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, we report 1.9{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound to

  20. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    A Bagaria; D Kumaran; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    The APT-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and nontransport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport, and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP), and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consits of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations hafve been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the ingral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, they report 1.9 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound

  1. Cadherins: The Superfamily Critically Involved in Breast Cancer.

    Ashaie, Maeirah Afzal; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity among females, is regulated in part by diverse classes of adhesion molecules one of which is known as cadherins. Located at adherens junctions, the members of this superfamily are responsible for upholding proper cell-cell adhesion. Cadherins possess diverse structures and functions and any alteration in their structures or functions causes impeding of normal mammary cells development and maintenance, thus leading to breast malignancy. E-, N-, P-, VE-, Proto-, desmosomal and FAT cadherins have been found to regulate breast cancer in positive as well as negative fashion, whereby both Ecadherin (CDH1) and N-cadherin (CDH2) contribute significantly towards transitioning from epithelial state to mesenchymal state (EMT) and enacting the abnormal cells to invade and metastasize nearby and distant tissues. Aberration in gene expression of cadherins can be either due to somatic or epigenetic silencing or via transcriptional factors. Besides other cadherins, E-cadherin which serves as hallmark of EMT is associated with several regulatory factors such as Snail, Slug, Twist, Zeb, KLF4, NFI, TBX2, SIX, b-Myb, COX-2, Arf6, FOXA2, GATA3 and SMAR1, which modulate E-cadherin gene transcription to promote or represses tumor invasion and colonization. Signaling molecules such as Notch, TGF-β, estrogen receptors, EGF and Wnt initiate numerous signaling cascades via these vital factors of cell programming, controlling expression of E-cadherin at transcriptional (mRNA) and protein level. Thus, interactions of cadherins with their roles in tumor suppression and oncogenic transformation can be beneficial in providing valuable insights for breast cancer diagnosis and therapeutics development. PMID:26825466

  2. Polymorphic Variants of LIGHT (TNF Superfamily-14) Alter Receptor Avidity and Bioavailability1

    Cheung, Timothy C.; Coppieters, Ken; Sanjo, Hideki; Oborne, Lisa M.; Norris, Paula S.; Coddington, Amy; Granger, Steven W.; Elewaut, Dirk; Ware, Carl F.

    2010-01-01

    The TNF superfamily member, LIGHT (TNFSF14) is a key cytokine that activates T cells and dendritic cells, and is implicated as a mediator of inflammatory, metabolic and malignant diseases. LIGHT engages the Lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR) and herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM, TNFRSF14), but is competitively limited in activating these receptors by soluble decoy receptor-3 (DcR3, TNFRSF6B). Two variants in the human LIGHT alter the protein at E214K (rs344560) in the receptor-binding domain and S...

  3. Inhibition or knockdown of ABC transporters enhances susceptibility of adult and juvenile schistosomes to Praziquantel.

    Ravi S Kasinathan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma cause schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease that affects hundreds of millions. Treatment of schistosomiasis depends almost entirely on the drug praziquantel (PZQ. Though essential to treating and controlling schistosomiasis, a major limitation of PZQ is that it is not active against immature mammalian-stage schistosomes. Furthermore, there are reports of field isolates with heritable reductions in PZQ susceptibility, and researchers have selected for PZQ-resistant schistosomes in the laboratory. P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1 and other ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters remove a wide variety of toxins and xenobiotics from cells, and have been implicated in multidrug resistance (MDR. Changes in ABC transporter structure or expression levels are also associated with reduced drug susceptibility in parasitic helminths, including schistosomes. Here, we show that the activity of PZQ against schistosome adults and juveniles ex vivo is potentiated by co-administration of either the highly potent Pgp inhibitor tariquidar or combinations of inhibitors targeting multiple ABC multidrug transporters. Adult worms exposed to sublethal PZQ concentrations remain active, but co-administration of ABC transporter inhibitors results in complete loss of motility and disruption of the tegument. Notably, juvenile schistosomes (3-4 weeks post infection, normally refractory to 2 µM PZQ, become paralyzed when transporter inhibitors are added in combination with the PZQ. Experiments using the fluorescent PZQ derivative (R-PZQ-BODIPY are consistent with the transporter inhibitors increasing effective intraworm concentrations of PZQ. Adult worms in which expression of ABC transporters has been suppressed by RNA interference show increased responsiveness to PZQ and increased retention of (R-PZQ-BODIPY consistent with an important role for these proteins in setting levels of PZQ susceptibility. These results indicate that

  4. A note on ABC implementation: An evaluation case.

    Nur Naha Abu Mansor

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Whilst featuring prominently in management accounting research for at least the last decade, activity-based costing (ABC may have reached a plateau in term of implementation and success. This paper reports the results of a survey of activity-based costing (ABC in a telecommunication organization. The study considers ABC information and systems being used in various parts of division of the company. It reports on success measures adapted from the Foster and Swenson (1997 survey of ABC implementation.The Survey data was collected through a questionnaire to users of ABC sent through the company's e-mail system. 243 questionnaires were sent out for the 16 different ABC systems developed, 173 usable questionnaires were returned (a response rate of 71%. The respondents were selected based on their experience in using the various ABC systems irrespective of the divisions they operated in. They were mainly senior executives and executive level employees.The study is reported in four parts. Firstly, it reports on the usage of ABC information as compared to the traditional costing systems. It was found that budgeting, improving opportunities and aiding in product management decisions were highly scored as the main usage of ABC/M implementation. It states that ABC/M helped change in company's strategic focus, pricing strategy and changes in operations. Interestingly, it was found that ABC implementation provided almost no financial improvements, as perceived by respondents. Finally, the overall evaluation of the ABC systems is perceived by the users of the various ABC systems was to be mostly unsuccessful. A comparison of the survey results is made with the Foster and Swenson (1997 survey. The work is hoped to make a contribution to studying ABC implementation success in various settings.

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 132052 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Full Text Available EINNSIKSSLENLNNFSHDEPSVTSFINQSLKILNKTADFDLKIQKFREKLFNIHADVEDLIFDLKSYLQEIESYESNLPEIQKRLFFLKNLERTFALDLTQLIEKRDQLKMYFQQNDQGNEICRIKAQIE...RPGKDFCVIEAIFSSSIQINNWLIRNGFEITSSELQIKRKSYKKNNKILTKYSLNDLPINRQSLEKLGGFLIDFAGQSDTFIFDSLDKRRLI...NFQSNLNSLFVIQSIERKKIAKQLQNSVMLILSNLGLENANFLIQFSECKPSGDGIDDINFLFSANPDQKLAPLSNVISGGEMSRFLLAIKSSISKQPNTFFL...DEIDSGLSGKSLFSLVELIKEISKNQQVLCITHQPFLAARGSVHFKVNKNVINGITYTSIAKLTTKNQRKNELIELIGGGSCEVIEYASRLLDRSAA ... ... protein RecN, ABC transporter Prochlorococcus marinus str. MIT 9301 MLVQLKIENIALIEIIEINFEKGLNIITGDSGSGKSLILDSLNALFGGTNIPLKHLI

  6. Nanostructured assemblies from amphiphilic ABC multiblock polymers

    Hillmyer, Marc A.

    2012-02-01

    Amphiphilic AB diblock copolymers containing a water compatible segment can self-assemble in aqueous media to give supramolecular structures that include simple spherical micelles and macromolecular vesicles termed polymersomes. Amphiphilic ABA triblocks with hydrophobic end blocks can adopt analogous structures but can also form gels at high polymer concentrations. The structural and chemical diversity demonstrated in block copolymer micelles and gels makes them attractive for applications ranging from drug delivery to personal care products to nanoreactors. The inclusion of a third block in amphiphilic ABC triblock systems can lead to a much wider array of self-assembled structures that depend not only on composition but also on block sequence, architecture and incompatibility considerations. I will present our recent efforts on tuning micelle and gel structure and behavior using controlled architecture ABC triblocks. The combination of diverse polymer segments into a single macromolecule is a powerful method for development of self-assembled structures with both new form and new function.

  7. MANFAAT DATA WAREHOUSE PADA PT ABC

    Evaristus Didik Madyatmadja

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current system to find out problems faced by the company and propose alternative solutions and generate information needed by management by designing a data warehouse according to the information needs of PT ABC. This research implements analysis and design of data warehouse by Ralph Kimball and Ross cited by Connolly and Begg, known as Nine-Step Methodology. The result obtained is a data warehouse application that may present a multidimensional historical data that can assist the management in decisions. Designing data warehouse at PT ABC makes concise the enterprise data and can be viewed from several dimensions. It helps users analyze data for strategic decision quickly and accurately.

  8. Harpunsoiton ABC : harpunsoiton alkeiskirjan luominen lapselle

    Purhonen, Tiia

    2015-01-01

    Tässä opinnäytetyössä kerron tekeillä olevan projektini Harpunsoiton ABC:n luomisen taustoista ja vaiheista. Projektin tavoitteena on valmistaa lapsille suunnattu harpunsoiton alkeiskirja. Opinnäyteyössäni etenen harpunsoiton harrastamisen historiasta edelleen nykytilanteeseen Suomessa ja esittelen modernin harpun ominaisuuksia ja soittotekniikkaa. Vertailen nykyistä harpun opetusmateriaalin kirjoa muiden soittimien oppikirjojen laajaan tarjontaan etsien hyviä pedagogisia ideoita. Ope...

  9. ABC of physics a very brief guide

    Okun, Lev Borisovich

    2012-01-01

    This little book concentrates on the foundations of modern physics (its "ABC's") and its most fundamental constants: c - the velocity of light and ? - the quantum of action. First of all, the book is addressed to professional physicists, but in order to achieve maximal concentration and clarity it uses the simplest (high school) mathematics. As a result many pages of the book will be useful to college students and may appeal to a more general audience.

  10. Classification and nomenclature of the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs).

    Persson, Bengt; Kallberg, Yvonne

    2013-02-25

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies known today. The members are distantly related with typically 20-30% residue identity in pair-wise comparisons. Still, all hitherto structurally known SDRs present a common three-dimensional structure consisting of a Rossmann fold with a parallel beta sheet flanked by three helices on each side. Using hidden Markov models (HMMs), we have developed a semi-automated subclassification system for this huge family. Currently, 75% of all SDR forms have been assigned to one of the 464 families totalling 122,940 proteins. There are 47 human SDR families, corresponding to 75 genes. Most human SDR families (35 families) have only one gene, while 12 have between 2 and 8 genes. For more than half of the human SDR families, the three-dimensional fold is known. The number of SDR members increases considerably every year, but the number of SDR families now starts to converge. The classification method has paved the ground for a sustainable and expandable nomenclature system. Information on the SDR superfamily is continuously updated at http://sdr-enzymes.org/. PMID:23200746

  11. Structural basis for amino acid export by DMT superfamily transporter YddG.

    Tsuchiya, Hirotoshi; Doki, Shintaro; Takemoto, Mizuki; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Higuchi, Takashi; Fukui, Keita; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Tabuchi, Eri; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Nishizawa, Tomohiro; Ito, Koichi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-06-16

    The drug/metabolite transporter (DMT) superfamily is a large group of membrane transporters ubiquitously found in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and includes exporters for a remarkably wide range of substrates, such as toxic compounds and metabolites. YddG is a bacterial DMT protein that expels aromatic amino acids and exogenous toxic compounds, thereby contributing to cellular homeostasis. Here we present structural and functional analyses of YddG. Using liposome-based analyses, we show that Escherichia coli and Starkeya novella YddG export various amino acids. The crystal structure of S. novella YddG at 2.4 Å resolution reveals a new membrane transporter topology, with ten transmembrane segments in an outward-facing state. The overall structure is basket-shaped, with a large substrate-binding cavity at the centre of the molecule, and is composed of inverted structural repeats related by two-fold pseudo-symmetry. On the basis of this intramolecular symmetry, we propose a structural model for the inward-facing state and a mechanism of the conformational change for substrate transport, which we confirmed by biochemical analyses. These findings provide a structural basis for the mechanism of transport of DMT superfamily proteins. PMID:27281193

  12. Phase behavior of model ABC triblock copolymers

    Chatterjee, Joon

    The phase behavior of poly(isoprene-b-styrene- b-ethylene oxide) (ISO), a model ABC triblock copolymer has been studied. This class of materials exhibit self-assembly, forming a large array of ordered morphologies at length scales of 5-100 nm. The formation of stable three-dimensionally continuous network morphologies is of special interest in this study. Since these nanostructures considerably impact the material properties, fundamental knowledge for designing ABC systems have high technological importance for realizing applications in the areas of nanofabrication, nanoporous media, separation membranes, drug delivery and high surface area catalysts. A comprehensive framework was developed to describe the phase behavior of the ISO triblock copolymers at weak to intermediate segregation strengths spanning a wide range of composition. Phases were characterized through a combination of characterization techniques, including small angle x-ray scattering, dynamic mechanical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and birefringence measurements. Combined with previous investigations on ISO, six different stable ordered state symmetries have been identified: lamellae (LAM), Fddd orthorhombic network (O70), double gyroid (Q230), alternating gyroid (Q214), hexagonal (HEX), and body-centered cubic (BCC). The phase map was found to be somewhat asymmetric around the fI = fO isopleth. This work provides a guide for theoretical studies and gives insight into the intricate effects of various parameters on the self-assembly of ABC triblock copolymers. Experimental SAXS data evaluated with a simple scattering intensity model show that local mixing varies continuously across the phase map between states of two- and three-domain segregation. Strategies of blending homopolymers with ISO triblock copolymer were employed for studying the swelling properties of a lamellar state. Results demonstrate that lamellar domains swell or shrink depending upon the type of homopolymer that

  13. Follicle-restricted compartmentalization of transforming growth factor beta superfamily ligands in the feline ovary.

    Bristol, Sarah K; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2004-03-01

    Ovarian follicular development, follicle selection, and the process of ovulation remain poorly understood in most species. Throughout reproductive life, follicle fate is balanced between growth and apoptosis. These opposing forces are controlled by numerous endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors, including the ligands represented by the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) superfamily. TGFbeta, activin, inhibin, bone morphometric protein (BMP), and growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF-9) are present in the ovary of many animals; however, no comprehensive analysis of the localization of each ligand or its receptors and intracellular signaling molecules during folliculogenesis has been done. The domestic cat is an ideal model for studying ovarian follicle dynamics due to an abundance of all follicle populations, including primordial stage, and the amount of readily available tissue following routine animal spaying. Additionally, knowledge of the factors involved in feline follicular development could make an important impact on in vitro maturation/in vitro fertilization (IVM/IVF) success for endangered feline species. Thus, the presence and position of TGFbeta superfamily members within the feline ovary have been evaluated in all stages of follicular development by immunolocalization. The cat inhibin alpha subunit protein is present in all follicle stages but increases in intensity within the mural granulosa cells in large antral follicles. The inhibin betaA and betaB subunit proteins, in addition to the activin type I (ActRIB) and activin type II receptor (ActRIIB), are produced in primordial and primary follicle granulosa cells. Additionally, inhibin betaA subunit is detected in the theca cells from secondary through large antral follicle size classes. GDF-9 is restricted to the oocyte of preantral and antral follicles, whereas the type II BMP receptor (BMP-RII) protein is predominantly localized to primordial- and primary-stage follicles. TGFbeta1, 2

  14. LSSVM-ABC Algorithm for Stock Price prediction

    Hegazy, Osman; Soliman, Omar S.; Salam, Mustafa Abdul

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm which inspired from the behavior of honey bees swarm is presented. ABC is a stochastic population-based evolutionary algorithm for problem solving. ABC algorithm, which is considered one of the most recently swarm intelligent techniques, is proposed to optimize least square support vector machine (LSSVM) to predict the daily stock prices. The proposed model is based on the study of stocks historical data, technical indicators and optimizing...

  15. Television Viewing and ABC Program Policy: An Econometric Study

    Glenn Withers

    1985-01-01

    There has been a long-standing debate over whether the ABC should engage in programming that is directly competitive with commercial television stations. This study uses an econometric model of television viewing to examine determinants of television set ownership and use, of ABC viewing levels and of diversity in programming. It is established that complementary not competitive programming most enhances ABC viewing levels, though production of greater diversity of television programming may ...

  16. Ensembler: Enabling High-Throughput Molecular Simulations at the Superfamily Scale.

    Daniel L Parton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding body of available genomic and protein structural data provides a rich resource for understanding protein dynamics with biomolecular simulation. While computational infrastructure has grown rapidly, simulations on an omics scale are not yet widespread, primarily because software infrastructure to enable simulations at this scale has not kept pace. It should now be possible to study protein dynamics across entire (superfamilies, exploiting both available structural biology data and conformational similarities across homologous proteins. Here, we present a new tool for enabling high-throughput simulation in the genomics era. Ensembler takes any set of sequences-from a single sequence to an entire superfamily-and shepherds them through various stages of modeling and refinement to produce simulation-ready structures. This includes comparative modeling to all relevant PDB structures (which may span multiple conformational states of interest, reconstruction of missing loops, addition of missing atoms, culling of nearly identical structures, assignment of appropriate protonation states, solvation in explicit solvent, and refinement and filtering with molecular simulation to ensure stable simulation. The output of this pipeline is an ensemble of structures ready for subsequent molecular simulations using computer clusters, supercomputers, or distributed computing projects like Folding@home. Ensembler thus automates much of the time-consuming process of preparing protein models suitable for simulation, while allowing scalability up to entire superfamilies. A particular advantage of this approach can be found in the construction of kinetic models of conformational dynamics-such as Markov state models (MSMs-which benefit from a diverse array of initial configurations that span the accessible conformational states to aid sampling. We demonstrate the power of this approach by constructing models for all catalytic domains in the human

  17. Ensembler: Enabling High-Throughput Molecular Simulations at the Superfamily Scale.

    Parton, Daniel L; Grinaway, Patrick B; Hanson, Sonya M; Beauchamp, Kyle A; Chodera, John D

    2016-06-01

    The rapidly expanding body of available genomic and protein structural data provides a rich resource for understanding protein dynamics with biomolecular simulation. While computational infrastructure has grown rapidly, simulations on an omics scale are not yet widespread, primarily because software infrastructure to enable simulations at this scale has not kept pace. It should now be possible to study protein dynamics across entire (super)families, exploiting both available structural biology data and conformational similarities across homologous proteins. Here, we present a new tool for enabling high-throughput simulation in the genomics era. Ensembler takes any set of sequences-from a single sequence to an entire superfamily-and shepherds them through various stages of modeling and refinement to produce simulation-ready structures. This includes comparative modeling to all relevant PDB structures (which may span multiple conformational states of interest), reconstruction of missing loops, addition of missing atoms, culling of nearly identical structures, assignment of appropriate protonation states, solvation in explicit solvent, and refinement and filtering with molecular simulation to ensure stable simulation. The output of this pipeline is an ensemble of structures ready for subsequent molecular simulations using computer clusters, supercomputers, or distributed computing projects like Folding@home. Ensembler thus automates much of the time-consuming process of preparing protein models suitable for simulation, while allowing scalability up to entire superfamilies. A particular advantage of this approach can be found in the construction of kinetic models of conformational dynamics-such as Markov state models (MSMs)-which benefit from a diverse array of initial configurations that span the accessible conformational states to aid sampling. We demonstrate the power of this approach by constructing models for all catalytic domains in the human tyrosine kinase

  18. Protein Arrays for Multidrug-resistance in Human Leukemia Cell Determination

    Zuhong Lu

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel technique was developed, that was high throughput simultaneousscreening of multiple resistance protein expression based on a protein array system. Themethod combined the advantage of the specificity of enzyme-linked immunosorbentassays with the sensitivity and high throughput of microspot. In this system, the multipleresistance protein arrays were created by spotting the captured antibodies onto the glassslide. The arrays were then incubated with cell samples of leukemia patients. The boundproteins were recognized by biotin-conjugated antibodies and detected by CCD.Experiments demonstrated that three multiple resistance proteins, including Pgp, MRPand BCRP which are members of the ATP-binding-cassette (ABC superfamily ofmembrane transporters could be simultaneously detected using this new approach.Research work shows the result is coincident with flow cytometry (FCM (P>0.01. Itprovided a methodology to develop many high-density protein array systems to detect avariety of proteins. The protein arrays will provide a powerful tool to identify theleukemia cell protein expression and rapidly validate their MDR determination.

  19. Osabc1k8, an abc1-like kinase gene, mediates abscisic acid sensitivity and dehydration tolerance response in rice seedlings

    The activity of bc1 complex kinase (ABC1K) protein family, which widely exists in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, consists of 15 members in rice, and the role of this family in plants has not yet been studied in details. In this study, a novel function of OsABC1K8 (LOC-Os06g48770), a member of rice ABC1K family, was characterized. The transcript level of OsABC1K8 changes in response to salt, dehydration, cold, PEG, oxidative (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) stresses, or abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. Overexpression of OsABC1K8 significantly increased sensitivity to dehydration and reduced sensitivity to ABA. In the contrast, RNAi transgenic lines displayed significantly reduced sensitivity to dehydration stress and increased sensitivity to ABA. Furthermore, the transcriptional levels of several ABA/stress-regulated responsive genes were suppressed in OsABC1K8 over-expressing plants under dehydration stress. In conclusion, our results suggested that OsABC1K8 is a negative regulator in response to dehydration stress through an ABA-dependent pathway. (author)

  20. RLIP76, a non-ABC transporter, and drug resistance in epilepsy

    Awasthi Yogesh C; Cucullo Luca; Singhal Sharad S; Fazio Vince; Hallene Kerri L; Awasthi Sanjay; Dini Gabriele; Janigro Damir

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Permeability of the blood-brain barrier is one of the factors determining the bioavailability of therapeutic drugs and resistance to chemically different antiepileptic drugs is a consequence of decreased intracerebral accumulation. The ABC transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein, are known to play a role in antiepileptic drug extrusion, but are not by themselves sufficient to fully explain the phenomenon of drug-resistant epilepsy. Proteomic analyses of membrane protein ...

  1. Structure of the human CD97 gene: Exon shuffling has generated a new type of seven-span transmembrane molecule related to the secretin receptor superfamily

    Hamann, J.; Van Lier, R.A.W. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hartmann, E. [Max-Delbrueck-Centre for Molecular Medicine, Berlin-Buch (Germany)

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the structure and genetic mapping of the human CD97 gene, a homologue to the secretin receptor superfamily of cell surface proteins. The detailed organization of the gene, which maps to the short arm of chromosome 19, is given. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters of the Human Respiratory Tract Pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis: Role in Virulence.

    Murphy, Timothy F; Brauer, Aimee L; Johnson, Antoinette; Kirkham, Charmaine

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media (middle ear infections) in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In view of the huge global burden of disease caused by M. catarrhalis, the development of vaccines to prevent these infections and better approaches to treatment have become priorities. In previous work, we used a genome mining approach that identified three substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as promising candidate vaccine antigens. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive assessment of 19 SBPs of 15 ABC transporter systems in the M. catarrhalis genome by engineering knockout mutants and studying their role in assays that assess mechanisms of infection. The capacity of M. catarrhalis to survive and grow in the nutrient-limited and hostile environment of the human respiratory tract, including intracellular growth, account in part for its virulence. The results show that ABC transporters that mediate uptake of peptides, amino acids, cations and anions play important roles in pathogenesis by enabling M. catarrhalis to 1) grow in nutrient-limited conditions, 2) invade and survive in human respiratory epithelial cells and 3) persist in the lungs in a murine pulmonary clearance model. The knockout mutants of SBPs and ABC transporters showed different patterns of activity in the assay systems, supporting the conclusion that different SBPs and ABC transporters function at different stages in the pathogenesis of infection. These results indicate that ABC transporters are nutritional virulence factors, functioning to enable the survival of M catarrhalis in the diverse microenvironments of the respiratory tract. Based on the role of ABC transporters as virulence factors of M. catarrhalis, these molecules represent potential drug targets to eradicate the organism from the human respiratory tract. PMID:27391026

  3. OSTOTOIMINNAN TEHOSTAMINEN : Case ABC Kokkolan ravintola

    Huldén, Elin

    2014-01-01

    Tämän toiminnallisen opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli kehittää ravintolan tilaus-toimitusrytmiä, huomioiden riviteho, logistiikka, ekologisuus ja varaston hallinta. Työn toimeksiantaja oli Keskipohjanmaan Osuuskauppa KPO, ja tutkimus kohdistui ABC Kokkola liikennemyymälän ravintolaan. Teoriaosa koostuu työn keskeisempien käsitteiden määrittelystä, kuten tilaus-toimitusketju, riviteho, varastonhallinta ja varastonkierto. Teoriaosuus sisältää myös toimeksiantajan esittelyn sekä tietoa toimin...

  4. The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer defines a novel superfamily of prokaryotic small-molecule binding domains

    De Souza Robson F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT is a small protein that has been claimed to function as a signaling molecule downstream of the cyanobacterial sensory rhodopsin. However, orthologs of ASRT have been detected in several bacteria that lack rhodopsin, raising questions about the generality of this function. Using sequence profile searches we show that ASRT defines a novel superfamily of β-sandwich fold domains. Through contextual inference based on domain architectures and predicted operons and structural analysis we present strong evidence that these domains bind small molecules, most probably sugars. We propose that the intracellular versions like ASRT probably participate as sensors that regulate a diverse range of sugar metabolism operons or even the light sensory behavior in Anabaena by binding sugars or related metabolites. We also show that one of the extracellular versions define a predicted sugar-binding structure in a novel cell-surface lipoprotein found across actinobacteria, including several pathogens such as Tropheryma, Actinomyces and Thermobifida. The analysis of this superfamily also provides new data to investigate the evolution of carbohydrate binding modes in β-sandwich domains with very different topologies. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by M. Madan Babu and Mark A. Ragan.

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308811366 [

    Full Text Available XP_003082991.1 33090:1951 3041:1340 1035538:592 13792:592 70447:610 70448:205 Transporter, ABC s ... uperfamily (Breast cancer ... resistance protein) (ISS), partial Ostreococcus ta ...

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308804289 [

    Full Text Available XP_003079457.1 33090:1951 3041:1340 1035538:592 13792:592 70447:610 70448:205 Transporter, ABC s ... uperfamily (Breast cancer ... resistance protein) (ISS) Ostreococcus tauri MASRV ...

  7. Toward Determining ATPase Mechanism in ABC Transporters: Development of the Reaction Path–Force Matching QM/MM Method

    Zhou, Y.; Ojeda-May, P.; Nagaraju, M.; Pu, J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous ATP-dependent membrane proteins involved in translocations of a wide variety of substrates across cellular membranes. To understand the chemomechanical coupling mechanism as well as functional asymmetry in these systems, a quantitative description of how ABC transporters hydrolyze ATP is needed. Complementary to experimental approaches, computer simulations based on combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potentials have provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism in ABC transporters. Quantitatively reliable determination of the free energy requirement for enzymatic ATP hydrolysis, however, requires substantial statistical sampling on QM/MM potential. A case study shows that brute force sampling of ab initio QM/MM (AI/MM) potential energy surfaces is computationally impractical for enzyme simulations of ABC transporters. On the other hand, existing semiempirical QM/MM (SE/MM) methods, although affordable for free energy sampling, are unreliable for studying ATP hydrolysis. To close this gap, a multiscale QM/MM approach named reaction path–force matching (RP–FM) has been developed. In RP–FM, specific reaction parameters for a selected SE method are optimized against AI reference data along reaction paths by employing the force matching technique. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for a proton transfer reaction in the gas phase and in solution. The RP–FM method may offer a general tool for simulating complex enzyme systems such as ABC transporters. PMID:27498639

  8. Toward Determining ATPase Mechanism in ABC Transporters: Development of the Reaction Path-Force Matching QM/MM Method.

    Zhou, Y; Ojeda-May, P; Nagaraju, M; Pu, J

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous ATP-dependent membrane proteins involved in translocations of a wide variety of substrates across cellular membranes. To understand the chemomechanical coupling mechanism as well as functional asymmetry in these systems, a quantitative description of how ABC transporters hydrolyze ATP is needed. Complementary to experimental approaches, computer simulations based on combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potentials have provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism in ABC transporters. Quantitatively reliable determination of the free energy requirement for enzymatic ATP hydrolysis, however, requires substantial statistical sampling on QM/MM potential. A case study shows that brute force sampling of ab initio QM/MM (AI/MM) potential energy surfaces is computationally impractical for enzyme simulations of ABC transporters. On the other hand, existing semiempirical QM/MM (SE/MM) methods, although affordable for free energy sampling, are unreliable for studying ATP hydrolysis. To close this gap, a multiscale QM/MM approach named reaction path-force matching (RP-FM) has been developed. In RP-FM, specific reaction parameters for a selected SE method are optimized against AI reference data along reaction paths by employing the force matching technique. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for a proton transfer reaction in the gas phase and in solution. The RP-FM method may offer a general tool for simulating complex enzyme systems such as ABC transporters. PMID:27498639

  9. The Origin and Early Evolution of Membrane Proteins

    Pohorille, Andrew; Schweighofter, Karl; Wilson, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    The origin and early evolution of membrane proteins, and in particular ion channels, are considered from the point of view that the transmembrane segments of membrane proteins are structurally quite simple and do not require specific sequences to fold. We argue that the transport of solute species, especially ions, required an early evolution of efficient transport mechanisms, and that the emergence of simple ion channels was protobiologically plausible. We also argue that, despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. These properties can be subtly modulated by local modifications to the sequence rather than global changes in molecular architecture. In order to address the evolution and development of ion channels, we focus on identifying those protein domains that are commonly associated with ion channel proteins and are conserved throughout the three main domains of life (Eukarya, Prokarya, and Archaea). We discuss the potassium-sodium-calcium superfamily of voltage-gated ion channels, mechanosensitive channels, porins, and ABC-transporters and argue that these families of membrane channels have sufficiently universal architectures that they can readily adapt to the diverse functional demands arising during evolution.

  10. PASS2 database for the structure-based sequence alignment of distantly related SCOP domain superfamilies: update to version 5 and added features.

    Gandhimathi, Arumugam; Ghosh, Pritha; Hariharaputran, Sridhar; Mathew, Oommen K; Sowdhamini, R

    2016-01-01

    Structure-based sequence alignment is an essential step in assessing and analysing the relationship of distantly related proteins. PASS2 is a database that records such alignments for protein domain superfamilies and has been constantly updated periodically. This update of the PASS2 version, named as PASS2.5, directly corresponds to the SCOPe 2.04 release. All SCOPe structural domains that share less than 40% sequence identity, as defined by the ASTRAL compendium of protein structures, are included. The current version includes 1977 superfamilies and has been assembled utilizing the structure-based sequence alignment protocol. Such an alignment is obtained initially through MATT, followed by a refinement through the COMPARER program. The JOY program has been used for structural annotations of such alignments. In this update, we have automated the protocol and focused on inclusion of new features such as mapping of GO terms, absolutely conserved residues among the domains in a superfamily and inclusion of PDBs, that are absent in SCOPe 2.04, using the HMM profiles from the alignments of the superfamily members and are provided as a separate list. We have also implemented a more user-friendly manner of data presentation and options for downloading more features. PASS2.5 version is available at http://caps.ncbs.res.in/pass2/. PMID:26553811

  11. How heterogeneous is the involvement of ABC transporters against insecticides?

    Porretta, Daniele; Epis, Sara; Mastrantonio, Valentina; Ferrari, Marco; Bellini, Romeo; Favia, Guido; Urbanelli, Sandra

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular defense against xenobiotic compounds is a main research issue in medical and veterinary entomology, as insecticide/acaricide resistance is a major threat in the control of arthropods. ABC transporters are recognized as a component of the detoxifying mechanism in arthropods. We investigated the possible involvement of ABC transporters in defense to the organophosphate insecticide temephos in the malarial vector Anopheles stephensi. We performed bioassays on larvae of An. stephensi, using insecticide alone and in combination with ABC-transporter inhibitors, to assess synergism between these compounds. Next, we investigated the expression profiles of six ABC transporter genes in larvae exposed to temephos. Surprisingly, neither bioassays nor gene expression analyses provided any evidence for a major role of ABC transporters in defense against temephos in An. stephensi. We thus decided to review existing literature to generate a record of other studies that failed to reveal a role for ABC transporters against particular insecticides/acaricides. A review of the scientific literature led to the recovery of 569 papers about ABC transporters; among these, 50 involved arthropods, and 10 reported negative results. Our study on An. stephensi and accompanying literature review highlight the heterogeneity that exists in ABC transporter involvement in defense/resistance mechanisms in arthropods. PMID:26855383

  12. Dashboard auditing of ABC (Activity-Based Costing). Theoretical approaches

    Căpuşneanu, Sorinel/I

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to define the dashboard auditing according to the specifics of Activity-Based Costing method (ABC). It describes the main objectives of dashboard auditing, the criteria that a dashboard auditor should meet and the step-by-step stages of the entire dashboard auditing process of an enterprise from steel industry according to the Activity-Based Costing method (ABC).

  13. Dashboard Auditing of Activity-Based Costing (ABC)

    Sorinel Capusneanu

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to define the dashboard auditing according to the specifics of Activity-Based Costing method (ABC). It describes the main objectives of dashboard auditing, the criteria that a dashboard auditor should meet and the step-by-step stages of the entire dashboard auditing process according to the Activity-Based Costing method (ABC).

  14. Dashboard Auditing of Activity-Based Costing (ABC

    Sorinel Capusneanu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to define the dashboard auditing according to the specifics of Activity-Based Costing method (ABC. It describes the main objectives of dashboard auditing, the criteria that a dashboard auditor should meet and the step-by-step stages of the entire dashboard auditing process according to the Activity-Based Costing method (ABC.

  15. Sustained Delivery of Chondroitinase ABC from Hydrogel System

    Filippo Rossi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the injured spinal cord, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs are the principal responsible of axon growth inhibition and they contribute to regenerative failure, promoting glial scar formation. Chondroitinase ABC (chABC is known for being able to digest proteoglycans, thus degrading glial scar and favoring axonal regrowth. However, its classic administration is invasive, infection-prone and clinically problematic. An agarose-carbomer (AC1 hydrogel, already used in SCI repair strategies, was here investigated as a delivery system capable of an effective chABC administration: the material ability to include chABC within its pores and the possibility to be injected into the target tissue were firstly proved. Subsequently, release kinetic and the maintenance of enzymatic activity were positively assessed: AC1 hydrogel was thus confirmed to be a feasible tool for chABC delivery and a promising device for spinal cord injury topic repair strategies.

  16. The structure of hookworm platelet inhibitor (HPI), a CAP superfamily member from Ancylostoma caninum.

    Ma, Dongying; Francischetti, Ivo M B; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Andersen, John F

    2015-06-01

    Secreted protein components of hookworm species include a number of representatives of the cysteine-rich/antigen 5/pathogenesis-related 1 (CAP) protein family known as Ancylostoma-secreted proteins (ASPs). Some of these have been considered as candidate antigens for the development of vaccines against hookworms. The functions of most CAP superfamily members are poorly understood, but one form, the hookworm platelet inhibitor (HPI), has been isolated as a putative antagonist of the platelet integrins αIIbβ3 and α2β1. Here, the crystal structure of HPI is described and its structural features are examined in relation to its possible function. The HPI structure is similar to those of other ASPs and shows incomplete conservation of the sequence motifs CAP1 and CAP2 that are considered to be diagnostic of CAP superfamily members. The asymmetric unit of the HPI crystal contains a dimer with an extensive interaction interface, but chromatographic measurements indicate that it is primarily monomeric in solution. In the dimeric structure, the putative active-site cleft areas from both monomers are united into a single negatively charged depression. A potential Lys-Gly-Asp disintegrin-like motif was identified in the sequence of HPI, but is not positioned at the apex of a tight turn, making it unlikely that it interacts with the integrin. Recombinant HPI produced in Escherichia coli was found not to inhibit the adhesion of human platelets to collagen or fibrinogen, despite having a native structure as shown by X-ray diffraction. This result corroborates previous analyses of recombinant HPI and suggests that it might require post-translational modification or have a different biological function. PMID:26057788

  17. Using mass spectrometry for identification of ABC transporters from Xanthomonas citri and mutants expressed in different growth conditions

    Faria, J.N.; Balan, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Paes Leme, A.F. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Xanthomonas citri is a phytopathogenic bacterium that infects citrus plants causing significant losses for the economy. In our group, we have focused on the identification and characterization of ABC transport proteins of this bacterium, in order to determinate their function for growth in vitro and in vivo, during infection. ABC transporters represent one of the largest families of proteins, which transport since small molecules as ions up to oligopeptides and sugars. In prokaryotic cells many works have reported the ABC transport function in pathogenesis, resistance, biofilm formation, infectivity and DNA repair, but until our knowledge, there is no data related to these transporters and X. citri. So, In order to determinate which transporters are expressed in X. citri, we started a proteomic analysis based on mono and bi-dimensional gels associated to mass spectrometry analyses. After growing X. citri and two different mutants deleted for ssuA and nitA genes in LB and minimum media, cellular extracts were obtained and used for preparation of mono and bi-dimensional gels. Seven bands covering the expected mass of ABC transporter components (20 kDa to 50 kDa) in SDS-PAGE were cut off the gel, treated with trypsin and submitted to the MS for protein identification. The results of 2D gels were good enough and will serve as a standard for development of similar experiments in large scale. (author)

  18. Using mass spectrometry for identification of ABC transporters from Xanthomonas citri and mutants expressed in different growth conditions

    Full text: Xanthomonas citri is a phytopathogenic bacterium that infects citrus plants causing significant losses for the economy. In our group, we have focused on the identification and characterization of ABC transport proteins of this bacterium, in order to determinate their function for growth in vitro and in vivo, during infection. ABC transporters represent one of the largest families of proteins, which transport since small molecules as ions up to oligopeptides and sugars. In prokaryotic cells many works have reported the ABC transport function in pathogenesis, resistance, biofilm formation, infectivity and DNA repair, but until our knowledge, there is no data related to these transporters and X. citri. So, In order to determinate which transporters are expressed in X. citri, we started a proteomic analysis based on mono and bi-dimensional gels associated to mass spectrometry analyses. After growing X. citri and two different mutants deleted for ssuA and nitA genes in LB and minimum media, cellular extracts were obtained and used for preparation of mono and bi-dimensional gels. Seven bands covering the expected mass of ABC transporter components (20 kDa to 50 kDa) in SDS-PAGE were cut off the gel, treated with trypsin and submitted to the MS for protein identification. The results of 2D gels were good enough and will serve as a standard for development of similar experiments in large scale. (author)

  19. A putative ABC transporter is involved in negative regulation of biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    Zhu, Xinna; Long, Fei; Chen, Yonghui;

    2008-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes may persist for long periods in food processing environments. In some instances, this may be due to aggregation or biofilm formation. To investigate the mechanism controlling biofilm formation in the food-borne pathogen L. monocytogenes, we characterized LM-49, a mutant with...... enhanced ability of biofilm-formation generated via transposon Tn917 mutagenesis of L. monocytogenes 4b G. In this mutant, a Tn917 insertion has disrupted the coding region of the gene encoding a putative ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter permease identical to Lmof2365_1771 (a putative ABC......-transporter permease) presented in the sequenced strain L. monocytogenes str. 4b F2365. This disrupted gene, denoted lm.G_1771, encoded a protein with 10 transmembrane helixes. The revertant, LM-49RE, was obtained by replacing lm.G_1771::Tn917 with lm.G_1771 via homologous recombination. We found that LM-49RE formed...

  20. Biliary cholesterol secretion: More than a simple ABC

    Arne Dikkers, Uwe JF Tietge

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Biliary cholesterol secretion is a process important for 2 major disease complexes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cholesterol gallstone disease. With respect to cardiovascular disease, biliary cholesterol secretion is regarded as the final step for the elimination of cholesterol originating from cholesterol-laden macrophage foam cells in the vessel wall in a pathway named reverse cholesterol transport. On the other hand, cholesterol hypersecretion into the bile is considered the main pathophysiological determinant of cholesterol gallstone formation. This review summarizes current knowledge on the origins of cholesterol secreted into the bile as well as the relevant processes and transporters involved. Next to the established ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters mediating the biliary secretion of bile acids (ABCB11, phospholipids (ABCB4 and cholesterol (ABCG5/G8, special attention is given to emerging proteins that modulate or mediate biliary cholesterol secretion. In this regard, the potential impact of the phosphatidylserine flippase ATPase class I type 8B member 1, the Niemann Pick C1-like protein 1 that mediates cholesterol absorption and the high density lipoprotein cholesterol uptake receptor, scavenger receptor class B type I, is discussed.

  1. Subdivision of the MDR superfamily of medium-chain dehydrogenases/reductases through iterative hidden Markov model refinement

    Persson Bengt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Medium-chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases (MDR form a protein superfamily whose size and complexity defeats traditional means of subclassification; it currently has over 15000 members in the databases, the pairwise sequence identity is typically around 25%, there are members from all kingdoms of life, the chain-lengths vary as does the oligomericity, and the members are partaking in a multitude of biological processes. There are profile hidden Markov models (HMMs available for detecting MDR superfamily members, but none for determining which MDR family each protein belongs to. The current torrential influx of new sequence data enables elucidation of more and more protein families, and at an increasingly fine granularity. However, gathering good quality training data usually requires manual attention by experts and has therefore been the rate limiting step for expanding the number of available models. Results We have developed an automated algorithm for HMM refinement that produces stable and reliable models for protein families. This algorithm uses relationships found in data to generate confident seed sets. Using this algorithm we have produced HMMs for 86 distinct MDR families and 34 of their subfamilies which can be used in automated annotation of new sequences. We find that MDR forms with 2 Zn2+ ions in general are dehydrogenases, while MDR forms with no Zn2+ in general are reductases. Furthermore, in Bacteria MDRs without Zn2+ are more frequent than those with Zn2+, while the opposite is true for eukaryotic MDRs, indicating that Zn2+ has been recruited into the MDR superfamily after the initial life kingdom separations. We have also developed a web site http://mdr-enzymes.org that provides textual and numeric search against various characterised MDR family properties, as well as sequence scan functions for reliable classification of novel MDR sequences. Conclusions Our method of refinement can be readily applied to

  2. The Janus kinase family and signaling through members of the cytokine receptor superfamily

    Ihle, J.N. [St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Many cytokines initiate cellular responses through their interaction with members of the cytokine receptor superfamily which contain no catalytic domains in their cytoplasmic domains. Irrespective, ligand binding induces tyrosine phosphorylation, which requires a membrane proximal region of the cytoplasmic domain. Recent studies have shown that members of the Janus kinase (JAK) family of protein tyrosine kinases associate with the membrane proximal region, are rapidly tyrosine phosphorylated following ligand binding and their in vitro kinase activity is activated. The JAKs are 130-kDa proteins which lack SH2/SH3 domains and contain two kinase domains, an active domain and a second kinase-like domain. Individual receptors associate with, or require, one or more of the three known family members including JAK1, JAK2, and tyk2. Substrates of the JAKs include the 91-kDa and 113-kDa proteins of the interferon-stimulated transcription complex ISGF3. These proteins, when tyrosine phosphorylated, migrate to the nucleus and participate in the activation of gene transcription. Recent evidence suggests that the 91- and 113-kDa proteins are members of a large family of genes that are potential substrates of JAK family members and may regulate a variety of genes involved in cell growth, differentiation or function. 42 refs.

  3. Women: the ABC of food security.

    Arcellana, N P

    1997-12-01

    While the 1996 World Food Summit Plan of Action was being approved, a companion NGO (nongovernmental organization) Forum provided opportunities for rural women from 29 countries to relay their perspectives and recommendations. The Rural Women's Workshop was organized by four NGOs: Isis International-Manila, La Via Campesina, the People-Centred Development Forum, and the Women's Food and Agriculture Working Group. Isis International-Manila seeks to create spaces, facilitate processes, and disseminate information for rural women to voice concerns, network, and plan responses. The La Via Campesina network operates in Latin American and the Caribbean where it applies a strong gender perspective to all of its activities. Ultimate progress on the World Food Summit Plan of Action can be evaluated using the ABCs of food security: does the program or policy assure 1) access for women to the total means of production; 2) benefits for women; and 3) community-based resource management and sustainable agriculture. PMID:12321562

  4. Evolutionary history and stress regulation of the lectin superfamily in higher plants

    Ramachandran Srinivasan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lectins are a class of carbohydrate-binding proteins. They play roles in various biological processes. However, little is known about their evolutionary history and their functions in plant stress regulation. The availability of full genome sequences from various plant species makes it possible to perform a whole-genome exploration for further understanding their biological functions. Results Higher plant genomes encode large numbers of lectin proteins. Based on their domain structures and phylogenetic analyses, a new classification system has been proposed. In this system, 12 different families have been classified and four of them consist of recently identified plant lectin members. Further analyses show that some of lectin families exhibit species-specific expansion and rapid birth-and-death evolution. Tandem and segmental duplications have been regarded as the major mechanisms to drive lectin expansion although retrogenes also significantly contributed to the birth of new lectin genes in soybean and rice. Evidence shows that lectin genes have been involved in biotic/abiotic stress regulations and tandem/segmental duplications may be regarded as drivers for plants to adapt various environmental stresses through duplication followed by expression divergence. Each member of this gene superfamily may play specialized roles in a specific stress condition and function as a regulator of various environmental factors such as cold, drought and high salinity as well as biotic stresses. Conclusions Our studies provide a new outline of the plant lectin gene superfamily and advance the understanding of plant lectin genes in lineage-specific expansion and their functions in biotic/abiotic stress-related developmental processes.

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0126 [SEVENS

    Full Text Available membrane) [Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae MGH 78578] gb|ABR76648.1| putative transport protein (ABC... superfamily, membrane) [Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae MGH 78578] YP_001334878.1 3.9 26% ... ...CBRC-ACAR-01-0126 ref|YP_001334878.1| putative transport protein (ABC superfamily,

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0972 [SEVENS

    Full Text Available membrane) [Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae MGH 78578] gb|ABR76648.1| putative transport protein (ABC... superfamily, membrane) [Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae MGH 78578] YP_001334878.1 3.8 30% ... ...CBRC-ACAR-01-0972 ref|YP_001334878.1| putative transport protein (ABC superfamily,

  7. ABC transporters affect the elimination and toxicity of CdTe quantum dots in liver and kidney cells.

    Chen, Mingli; Yin, Huancai; Bai, Pengli; Miao, Peng; Deng, Xudong; Xu, Yingxue; Hu, Jun; Yin, Jian

    2016-07-15

    This paper aimed to investigate the role of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters on the efflux and the toxicity of nanoparticles in liver and kidney cells. In this study, we synthesized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) that were monodispersed and emitted green fluorescence (maximum peak at 530nm). Such QDs tended to accumulate in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2), human kidney cells 2 (HK-2), and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and cause significant toxicity in all the three cell lines. Using specific inhibitors and inducers of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance associated proteins (Mrps), the cellular accumulation and subsequent toxicity of QDs in HepG2 and HK-2 cells were significantly affected, while only slight changes appeared in MDCK cells, corresponding well with the functional expressions of ABC transporters in cells. Moreover, treatment of QDs caused concentration- and time- dependent induction of ABC transporters in HepG2 and HK-2 cells, but such phenomenon was barely found in MDCK cells. Furthermore, the effects of CdTe QDs on ABC transporters were found to be greater than those of CdCl2 at equivalent concentrations of cadmium, indicating that the effects of QDs should be a combination of free Cd(2+) and specific properties of QDs. Overall, these results indicated a strong dependence between the functional expressions of ABC transporters and the efflux of QDs, which could be an important reason for the modulation of QDs toxicity by ABC transporters. PMID:27131644

  8. New Family of Deamination Repair Enzymes in Uracil-DNA Glycosylase Superfamily*

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Dominy, Brian N.; Cao, Weiguo

    2011-01-01

    DNA glycosylases play a major role in the repair of deaminated DNA damage. Previous investigations identified five families within the uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) superfamily. All enzymes within the superfamily studied thus far exhibit uracil-DNA glycosylase activity. Here we identify a new class of DNA glycosylases in the UDG superfamily that lacks UDG activity. Instead, these enzymes act as hypoxanthine-DNA glycosylases in vitro and in vivo. Molecular modeling and structure-guided mutation...

  9. abc: An Extensible AspectJ Compiler

    Avgustinov, Pavel; Christensen, Aske Simon; Hendren, Laurie J.;

    2006-01-01

    checking and code generation, as well as data flow and control flow analyses. The AspectBench Compiler (abc) is an implementation of such a workbench. The base version of abc implements the full AspectJ language. Its front end is built using the Polyglot framework, as a modular extension of the Java...... language. The use of Polyglot gives flexibility of syntax and type checking. The back end is built using the Soot framework, to give modular code generation and analyses. In this paper, we outline the design of abc, focusing mostly on how the design supports extensibility. We then provide a general...

  10. A New Activity-Based Cost (ABC) Mathematical Model

    JIANG Shuo; SONG Lei

    2003-01-01

    Along with the product price competition growing intensely, it is apparently important for reasonably distributing and counting cost. But, in sharing indirect cost, traditional cost accounting unveils the limitations increasingly, especially in authenticity of cost information. And the accounting theory circles and industry circles begin seeking one kind of new accurate cost calculation method, and the activity-based cost (ABC) method emerges as the times require. In this paper, we will build its mathematical model by the basic principle of ABC, and will improve its mathematical model further. We will establish its comparison mathematical model and make the ABC method go a step further to its practical application.

  11. Efficient and stable reconstitution of the ABC transporter BmrA for solid-state NMR studies

    Kunert, Britta; Gardiennet, Carole; Lacabanne, Denis; Calles-Garcia, Daniel; Falson, Pierre; Jault, Jean-Michel; Meier, Beat H; Penin, François; Böckmann, Anja

    2014-01-01

    We present solid-state NMR sample preparation and first 2D spectra of the Bacillus subtilis ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter BmrA, a membrane protein involved in multidrug resistance. The homodimeric 130-kDa protein is a challenge for structural characterization due to its membrane-bound nature, size, inherent flexibility and insolubility. We show that reconstitution of this protein in lipids from Bacillus subtilis at a lipid-protein ratio of 0.5 w/w allows for optimal protein insertion...

  12. ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria.

    Narita, Shin-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric lipid bilayer with phospholipids and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs). β-Barreled outer membrane proteins and lipoproteins are embedded in the outer membrane. All of these constituents are essential to the function of the outer membrane. The transport systems for lipoproteins have been characterized in detail. An ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, LolCDE, initiates sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane to form a water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex in the periplasm. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB at the outer membrane and are incorporated into the lipid bilayer. A model analogous to the Lol system has been suggested for the transport of LPS, where an ABC transporter, LptBFG, mediates the detachment of LPS from the inner membrane. Recent developments in the functional characterization of ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria are discussed. PMID:21670534

  13. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.bhattacharjee@wur.nl [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Netherlands); Opstal, Edward J. van; Alink, Gerrit M. [Wageningen University, Division of Toxicology (Netherlands); Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Netherlands); Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M. [Wageningen University, Division of Toxicology (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size {approx}45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size {approx}50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  14. EST Table: AV404201 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Full Text Available ATP-binding component and membrane component of ABC supe...y) 10/09/28 80 %/110 aa ref|NP_415400.1| fused macrolide transporter subunits of ABC superfamily: ATP-binding component/membran...rfamily [Escherichia coli str. K-12 substr. W3110] ref|YP_001729858.1| macrolide ABC transporter ATP-binding/membrane protein... subunits of ABC superfamily: ATP-binding component/membrane component [Escherich...sporter subunits of ABC superfamily: ATP-binding component/membran

  15. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: L-Fuconate Dehydratase from Xanthomonas campestris

    Yew,W.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Rakus, J.; Pierce, R.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    Many members of the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily have unknown functions. In this report the authors use both genome (operon) context and screening of a library of acid sugars to assign the L-fuconate dehydratase (FucD) function to a member of the mandelate racemase (MR) subgroup of the superfamily encoded by the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris str. ATCC 33913 genome (GI: 21233491). Orthologues of FucD are found in both bacteria and eukaryotes, the latter including the rTS beta protein in Homo sapiens that has been implicated in regulating thymidylate synthase activity. As suggested by sequence alignments and confirmed by high-resolution structures in the presence of active site ligands, FucD and MR share the same active site motif of functional groups: three carboxylate ligands for the essential Mg2+ located at the ends of th third, fourth, and fifth-strands in the (/)7-barrel domain (Asp 248, Glu 274, and Glu 301, respectively), a Lys-x-Lys motif at the end of the second-strand (Lys 218 and Lys 220), a His-Asp dyad at the end of the seventh and sixth-strands (His 351 and Asp 324, respectively), and a Glue at the end of the eighth-strand (Glu 382). The mechanism of the FucD reaction involves initial abstraction of the 2-proton by Lys 220, acid catalysis of the vinylogous-elimination of the 3-OH group by His 351, and stereospecific ketonization of the resulting 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-fuconate product. Screening of the library of acid sugars revealed substrate and functional promiscuity: In addition to L-fuconate, FucD also catalyzes the dehydration of L-galactonate, D-arabinonate, D-altronate, L-talonate, and D-ribonate. The dehydrations of L-fuconate, L-galactonate, and D-arabinonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by Lys 220. The dehydrations of L-talonate and D-ribonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by His 351; however, protonation of the enediolate intermediates by the conjugate acid of Lys 220 yields L

  16. Use of RNA Interference by In Utero Electroporation to Study Cortical Development: The Example of the Doublecortin Superfamily

    Raanan Greenman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The way we study cortical development has undergone a revolution in the last few years following the ability to use shRNA in the developing brain of the rodent embryo. The first gene to be knocked-down in the developing brain was doublecortin (Dcx. Here we will review knockdown experiments in the developing brain and compare them with knockout experiments, thus highlighting the advantages and disadvantages using the different systems. Our review will focus on experiments relating to the doublecortin superfamily of proteins.

  17. Cupincin: A Unique Protease Purified from Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Bran Is a New Member of the Cupin Superfamily

    Sreedhar, Roopesh; Kaul Tiku, Purnima

    2016-01-01

    Cupin superfamily is one of the most diverse super families. This study reports the purification and characterization of a novel cupin domain containing protease from rice bran for the first time. Hypothetical protein OsI_13867 was identified and named as cupincin. Cupincin was purified to 4.4 folds with a recovery of 4.9%. Cupincin had an optimum pH and temperature of pH 4.0 and 60°C respectively. Cupincin was found to be a homotrimer, consisting of three distinct subunits with apparent mole...

  18. Enhanced form of solving real coded numerical optimization problem using ABC algorithm with linear crossover operator

    Mrs. Shanana Gajala Qureshi; Mrs. Uzma Arshi Ansari

    2012-01-01

    Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm is population-based swarm intelligence algorithm. There are many algorithms Present for solving numeric optimization problem.ABC is based on the intellectual behaviour of honey bee crowd. In this work, ABC algorithm is used with Genetic crossover machinist and tested on standard benchmark functions, and also result compared with the X-ABC algorithm with the advantage of fewer organize Parameters. Obtained results show that the performance of the ABC with ...

  19. Redundancy Level Optimization in Modular Software System Models using ABC

    Tarun Kumar Sharma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance of optimization algorithms is problem dependent and as per no free lunch theorem, there exists no such algorithm which can be efficiently applied to every type of problem(s. However, we can modify the algorithm/ technique in a manner such that it is able to deal with a maximum type of problems. In this study we have modified the structure of basic Artificial Bee Colony (ABC, a recently proposed metaheuristic algorithm based on the concept of swarm intelligence to optimize the models of software reliability. The modified variant of ABC is termed as balanced ABC (B-ABC. The simulated results show the efficiency and capability of the variant to solve such type of the problems.

  20. Yang-Mills Theory and the ABC Conjecture

    He, Yang-Hui; Probst, Malte; Read, James

    2016-01-01

    We establish a precise correspondence between the ABC Conjecture and N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory. This is achieved by combining three ingredients: (i) Elkies' method of mapping ABC-triples to elliptic curves in his demonstration that ABC implies Mordell/Faltings; (ii) an explicit pair of elliptic curve and associated Belyi map given by Khadjavi-Scharaschkin; and (iii) the fact that the bipartite brane-tiling/dimer model for a gauge theory with toric moduli space is a particular dessin d'enfant in the sense of Grothendieck. We explore this correspondence for the highest quality ABC-triples as well as large samples of random triples. The Conjecture itself is mapped to a statement about the fundamental domain of the toroidal compactification of the string realization of N=4 SYM.

  1. Multicompartment Micelles From π-Shaped ABC Block Copolymers

    XIA Jun; ZHONG Chong-Li

    2007-01-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics simulations were performed on the morphology and structure of multicompartment micelles formed from n-shaped ABC block copolymers in water. The influences of chain architectures were studied in a systematic way, and a rich variety of morphologies were observed, such as spherical, wormlike,X-shaped, Y-shaped, ribbon-like, layered rod-like, layered disk-like, as well as network morphologies. The simulations show that the distance between the two grafts plays an important role in control of the morphology. Since π-shaped ABC block copolymers can be reduced to linear ABC and star ABC block copolymers, they are good model copolymers for studying the self-assembly of complex block copolymers into micelles. The knowledge obtained in this work as well as the new morphologies identified provide useful information for future rational design and synthesis of novel multicompartment micelles.

  2. Product development in company ABC: Strategic analysis and recommendations

    Tadaniewicz, Darius

    2005-01-01

    ABC is a mature company, operating in the power electronics market, using the stage gate process to develop products. This analysis evaluates the company's development process including innovation and portfolio management. An examination of the market reveals that speed-to-market and commitment to innovation are critical success factors. Benchmarking shows how comparable companies have adapted the traditional stage gate process to incorporate more flexible practices. Analysis of ABC uncovers ...

  3. Product Profitability Analysis Based on EVA and ABC

    Chen Lin; Shuangyuan Wang; Zhilin Qiao

    2013-01-01

    On the purpose of maximizing shareholders’ value, the profitability analysis established on the basis oftraditional accounting earnings cannot meet the demands of providing accurate decision-making information forenterprises. Therefore, this paper implements the Activity Based Costing (ABC) and the Economic Value Added(EVA) into the traditional profitability analysis system, sets up an improved EVA-ABC based profitabilityanalysis system as well as its relative indexes, and applies it to the s...

  4. ABC-B transporter genes in Dirofilaria immitis.

    Bourguinat, Catherine; Che, Hua; Mani, Thangadurai; Keller, Kathy; Prichard, Roger K

    2016-08-01

    Dirofilaria immitis is a filarial nematode causing infection and heartworm disease in dogs and other canids, cats, and occasionally in humans. Prevention with macrocyclic lactones (ML) is recommended during the mosquito transmission season. Recently, ML resistance has been reported. ABC-B transporter genes are thought to be involved in the mechanism of ML resistance in other nematodes. This study aimed to identify all the ABC-B transporter genes in D. immitis using as a reference the nDi.2.2 D. immitis whole genome, which is not completely annotated. Using bioinformatic tools and PCR amplification on pooled D. immitis genomic DNA and on pooled cDNA, nine ABC transporter genes including one pseudogene were characterized. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses allowed identification of three P-glycoproteins (Pgps) (Dim-pgp-3 Dim-pgp-10, Dim-pgp-11), of two ABC-B half transporter genes (one ortholog of Cel-haf-4 and Cel-haf-9; and one ortholog of Cel-haf-1 and Cel-haf-3), of one ABC half transporter gene (ortholog of Cel-haf-5) that contained an ABC-C motif, and of one additional half transporter that would require functional study for characterization. The number of ABC-B transporter genes identified was lower than in Caenorhabditis elegans and Haemonchus contortus. Further studies are needed to understand their possible role in ML resistance in D. immitis. These ABC transporters constitute a base for ML resistance investigation in D. immitis and advance our understanding of the molecular biology of this parasite. PMID:27164440

  5. Promiscuity and electrostatic flexibility in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily.

    Pabis, Anna; Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic promiscuity, that is, the ability of single enzymes to facilitate the turnover of multiple, chemically distinct substrates, is a widespread phenomenon that plays an important role in the evolution of enzyme function. Additionally, such pre-existing multifunctionality can be harnessed in artificial enzyme design. The members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily have served extensively as both experimental and computational model systems for enhancing our understanding of catalytic promiscuity. In this Opinion, we present key recent computational studies into the catalytic activity of these highly promiscuous enzymes, highlighting the valuable insight they have provided into both the molecular basis for catalytic promiscuity in general, and its implications for the evolution of phosphatase activity. PMID:26716576

  6. TGF-β superfamily: how does it regulate testis development.

    Fan, Yun-Shu; Hu, Yan-Jun; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2012-04-01

    Testis development is a highly regulated sequence of developmental process that spans from the establishment of germ cell lineage during embryonic development to the periodic wave of spermatogenesis in adulthood. The normal development of testes and the fertility of male animals require specific cell types to respond correctly at a specific time point, the process of which is precisely regulated by various factors. Several members of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily are shown to be the key mediators. They act as the extracellular ligand of signaling transduction that regulates the proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cell behaviors to help coordinate the physiology of the cells to the overall development of the testis and the organism. This paper reviews the current understanding of some of TGF-βs' major regulatory roles in the overall process of testis development, analyzes the current studies and their limitations and points out the research areas that need further investigation. PMID:21947950

  7. The 'ABC' of examining foot radiographs.

    Pearse, Eyiyemi O.; Klass, Benjamin; Bendall, Stephen P.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report a simple systematic method of assessing foot radiographs that improves diagnostic accuracy and can reduce the incidence of inappropriate management of serious forefoot and midfoot injuries, particularly the Lisfranc-type injury. STUDY GROUP AND METHODS: Five recently appointed senior house officers (SHOs), with no casualty or Orthopaedic experience prior to their appointment, were shown a set of 10 foot radiographs and told the history and examination findings recorded in the casualty notes of each patient within 6 weeks of taking up their posts. They were informed that the radiographs might or might not demonstrate an abnormality. They were asked to make a diagnosis and decide on a management plan. The test was repeated after they were taught the 'ABC' method of evaluating foot radiographs. RESULTS: Diagnostic accuracy improved after SHOs were taught a systematic method of assessing foot radiographs. The proportion of correct diagnoses increased from 0.64 to 0.78 and the probability of recognising Lisfranc injuries increased from 0 to 0.6. CONCLUSIONS: The use of this simple method of assessing foot radiographs can reduce the incidence of inappropriate management of serious foot injuries by casualty SHOs, in particular the Lisfranc type injury. PMID:16263015

  8. Genome-wide analysis of the expansin gene superfamily reveals grapevine-specific structural and functional characteristics.

    Silvia Dal Santo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expansins are proteins that loosen plant cell walls in a pH-dependent manner, probably by increasing the relative movement among polymers thus causing irreversible expansion. The expansin superfamily (EXP comprises four distinct families: expansin A (EXPA, expansin B (EXPB, expansin-like A (EXLA and expansin-like B (EXLB. There is experimental evidence that EXPA and EXPB proteins are required for cell expansion and developmental processes involving cell wall modification, whereas the exact functions of EXLA and EXLB remain unclear. The complete grapevine (Vitis vinifera genome sequence has allowed the characterization of many gene families, but an exhaustive genome-wide analysis of expansin gene expression has not been attempted thus far. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified 29 EXP superfamily genes in the grapevine genome, representing all four EXP families. Members of the same EXP family shared the same exon-intron structure, and phylogenetic analysis confirmed a closer relationship between EXP genes from woody species, i.e. grapevine and poplar (Populus trichocarpa, compared to those from Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa. We also identified grapevine-specific duplication events involving the EXLB family. Global gene expression analysis confirmed a strong correlation among EXP genes expressed in mature and green/vegetative samples, respectively, as reported for other gene families in the recently-published grapevine gene expression atlas. We also observed the specific co-expression of EXLB genes in woody organs, and the involvement of certain grapevine EXP genes in berry development and post-harvest withering. CONCLUSION: Our comprehensive analysis of the grapevine EXP superfamily confirmed and extended current knowledge about the structural and functional characteristics of this gene family, and also identified properties that are currently unique to grapevine expansin genes. Our data provide a model for the

  9. The accidental assignment of function in the tautomerase superfamily

    Jamison P. Huddleston

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cg10062 from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a tautomerase superfamily member with the characteristic β−α−β fold and catalytic Pro-1. It is a cis-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD homologue with high sequence similarity (53% that includes the six critical active site residues (Pro-1, His-28, Arg-70, Arg-73, Tyr-103, and Glu-114. However, Cg10062 is a poor cis-CaaD: it has much lower catalytic efficiency and lacks isomer specificity. Two acetylene compounds (propiolate and 2-butynoate and an allene (2,3-butadienote were investigated as potential substrates for Cg10062. Cg10062 is a hydratase/decarboxylase using propiolate and cis-3-chloro- and 3-bromoacrylates, where malonate semialdehyde is the product of hydration and acetaldehyde is the product of decarboxylation. The two activities occur consecutively using the initial substrate. In contrast, 2-butynoate and 2,3-butadienote only undergo a hydration reaction with Cg10062 to afford acetoacetate. cis-CaaD does not function as a hydratase/decarboxylase using any of these substrates, yielding only the products of hydration. Cg10062 proceeds by direct hydration or covalent catalysis (using Pro-1 depending on the substrate. Direct hydration yields the hydration products and covalent catalysis yields the hydration and decarboxylation products. Cg10062 mutants shift the reaction toward one or the other mechanism. The observation that propiolate is the best substrate suggests that Cg10062 could be a hydratase/decarboxylase in a pathway that transforms an unknown acetylene compound to acetaldehyde via propiolate. The bifunctional activity of Cg10062 might also have implications for the evolution of the dehalogenase and decarboxylase activities in the tautomerase superfamily.

  10. Phylogenetic relationships among superfamilies of Cicadomorpha (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha) inferred from the wing base structure

    Yoshizawa, Kazunori; Wagatsuma, Mutsumi

    2012-01-01

    The infraorder Cicadomorpha is a monophyletic group of the order Hemiptera, suborder Auchenorrhyncha, and is composed of three superfamilies: Cercopoidea (spittle bugs), Cicadoidea (cicadas) and Membracoidea (leafhoppers and treehoppers). Phylogenetic relationships among the superfamilies have been highly controversial morphologically and molecularly, but recent molecular phylogenetic analyses provided support for Cercopoidea + Cicadoidea. In this study, we examined morphology of the wing bas...

  11. The sulphation pattern in chondroitin sulphate chains investigated by chondroitinase ABC and ACII digestion and reactivity with monoclonal antibodies.

    Hardingham, T E; Fosang, A J; Hey, N J; Hazell, P K; Kee, W J; Ewins, R J

    1994-03-01

    We have used progressive chondroitinase digestion of pig aggrecan in conjunction with ELISA assays and disaccharide analysis to derive information about the pattern of 4- and 6-sulphation in chondroitin sulphate chains. Digestion with chondroitinase ABC resulted in the release of mainly disaccharides from the nonreducing terminal of chondroitin sulphate chains but there was also the release of some tetra- and hexa-saccharides which were degraded to disaccharides with more extensive digestion. Chondroitinase ACII, in contrast, released only disaccharides. Analysis of the disaccharide composition of the intact and digested products at different stages of digestion showed that there was a slight increase in 6-sulphate content of the chains as they were shortened. Reaction of the partially digested proteoglycans with monoclonal antibodies 3-B-3 and 3-D-5 which recognise chains terminating in 6- or 4-sulphated disaccharides, respectively, showed major differences between chondroitinase ABC and ACII products. The results suggested that chondroitinase ABC preferentially cleaved next to 4-sulphated, rather than 6-sulphated disaccharides and this resulted in some oligosaccharides as well as disaccharide being released. Chondroitinase ACII also cleaved an additional disaccharide next to the linkage to protein of chondroitin sulphate, which was not removed by chondroitinase ABC and this disaccharide was mainly nonsulphated. PMID:7514097

  12. Know your ABCs: Characterization and gene expression dynamics of ABC transporters in the polyphagous herbivore Helicoverpa armigera.

    Bretschneider, Anne; Heckel, David G; Vogel, Heiko

    2016-05-01

    Polyphagous insect herbivores are adapted to many different secondary metabolites of their host plants. However, little is known about the role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a multigene family involved in detoxification processes. To study the larval response of the generalist Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera) and the putative role of ABC transporters, we performed developmental assays on artificial diet supplemented with secondary metabolites from host plants (atropine-scopolamine, nicotine and tomatine) and non-host plants (taxol) in combination with a replicated RNAseq experiment. A maximum likelihood phylogeny identified the subfamily affiliations of the ABC transporter sequences. Larval performance was equal on the atropine-scopolamine diet and the tomatine diet. For the latter we could identify a treatment-specific upregulation of five ABC transporters in the gut. No significant developmental difference was detected between larvae fed on nicotine or taxol. This was also mirrored in the upregulation of five ABC transporters when fed on either of the two diets. The highest number of differentially expressed genes was recorded in the gut samples in response to feeding on secondary metabolites. Our results are consistent with the expectation of a general detoxification response in a polyphagous herbivore. This is the first study to characterize the multigene family of ABC transporters and identify gene expression changes across different developmental stages and tissues, as well as the impact of secondary metabolites in the agricultural pest H. armigera. PMID:26951878

  13. Differentiation of foot-and-mouth disease virus infected animals from vaccinated animals using a blocking ELISA based on baculovirus expressed FMDV 3ABC antigen and a 3ABC monoclonal antibody

    Sørensen, K.J.; de Stricker, K.; Dyrting, K.C.;

    2005-01-01

    A blocking ELISA that differentiated foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infected animals from vaccinated animals was developed which uses baculovirus expressed FMDV 3ABC non-structural protein as antigen and monoclonal antibody against FMDV 3ABC non-structural protein as capture and detector...... infected with all seven serotypes of FMDV. The test detected antibodies from days 7 or 9 following experimental infection of non-vaccinated cattle and sheep, and in cattle strong positive reactions persisted for up to 395 days after infection. In vaccinated cattle that became carriers after challenge...... with homologous FMDV, positive reactions were obtained in all but one case. In some of these cattle the antibody response was detected late in comparison to the non-vaccinated infected cattle. The test gave results that compared favourably with two commercial ELISA's when used to test sera from cattle, pigs...

  14. Metodologia ABC: implantação numa microempresa ABC methodology: implementation on a micro firm

    Orlando Duran

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho relata a implantação da metodologia de custos baseados em atividades numa microempresa do ramo metalúrgico. A proposta pretende demonstrar a viabilidade de aplicar esta técnica em empresas sem importar seu tamanho, só realizando algumas adaptações que garantam baixo investimento e curto espaço de tempo para obter os resultados. Na parte final do trabalho se realiza uma análise dos resultados obtidos verificando-se o potencial da informação gerada pela metodologia e seu uso como ferramenta de gestão.This paper presents an implementation of the activity based costing (ABC methodology in a small firm. The approach presented is intended to demonstrate the feasibility of applying the ABC methodology at any sized firm, only through few adaptations for ensuring low investments fees and speed in obtaining results and information from the system. Discussion about the results obtained during the implementation case are presented and the potential of using the information generated from the system as a managing tool is commented.

  15. Functional Annotation of Two New Carboxypeptidases from the Amidohydrolase Superfamily of Enzymes

    Xiang, D.; Xu, C; Kumaran, D; Brown, A; Sauder, M; Burley, S; Swaminathan, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    Two proteins from the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes were cloned, expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The first protein, Cc0300, was from Caulobacter crescentus CB-15 (Cc0300), while the second one (Sgx9355e) was derived from an environmental DNA sequence originally isolated from the Sargasso Sea (gi|44371129). The catalytic functions and the substrate profiles for the two enzymes were determined with the aid of combinatorial dipeptide libraries. Both enzymes were shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Xaa dipeptides in which the amino acid at the N-terminus was relatively unimportant. These enzymes were specific for hydrophobic amino acids at the C-terminus. With Cc0300, substrates terminating in isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, valine, methionine, and tryptophan were hydrolyzed. The same specificity was observed with Sgx9355e, but this protein was also able to hydrolyze peptides terminating in threonine. Both enzymes were able to hydrolyze N-acetyl and N-formyl derivatives of the hydrophobic amino acids and tripeptides. The best substrates identified for Cc0300 were l-Ala-l-Leu with kcat and kcat/Km values of 37 s-1 and 1.1 x 105 M-1 s-1, respectively, and N-formyl-l-Tyr with kcat and kcat/Km values of 33 s-1 and 3.9 x 105 M-1 s-1, respectively. The best substrate identified for Sgx9355e was l-Ala-l-Phe with kcat and kcat/Km values of 0.41 s-1 and 5.8 x 103 M-1 s-1. The three-dimensional structure of Sgx9355e was determined to a resolution of 2.33 Angstroms with l-methionine bound in the active site. The a-carboxylate of the methionine is ion-paired to His-237 and also hydrogen bonded to the backbone amide groups of Val-201 and Leu-202. The a-amino group of the bound methionine interacts with Asp-328. The structural determinants for substrate recognition were identified and compared with other enzymes in this superfamily that hydrolyze dipeptides with different specificities.

  16. IMGT unique numbering for MHC groove G-DOMAIN and MHC superfamily (MhcSF) G-LIKE-DOMAIN

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Duprat, E.; Kaas, Quentin;

    2005-01-01

    unique numbering leads, for the first time, to the standardized description of the mutations, allelic polymorphisms, two-dimensional (2D) representations and three-dimensional (3D) structures of the G-DOMAINs and G-LIKE-DOMAINs in any species, and therefore, is highly valuable for their comparative...... immune system (RPI) of human and other vertebrates. The NUMEROTATION concept of IMGT-ONTOLOGY has allowed to define a unique numbering for the variable domains (V-DOMAINs) and constant domains (C-DOMAINs) of the IG and TR, which has been extended to the V-LIKE-DOMAINs and C-LIKE-DOMAINs of the...... immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) proteins other than the IG and TR (Dev Comp Immunol 27:55-77, 2003; 29:185-203, 2005). In this paper, we describe the IMGT unique numbering for the groove domains (G-DOMAINs) of the MHC and for the G-LIKE-DOMAINs of the MHC superfamily (MhcSF) proteins other than MHC. This IMGT...

  17. Enhanced form of solving real coded numerical optimization problem using ABC algorithm with linear crossover operator

    Mrs. Shanana Gajala Qureshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Bee Colony (ABC algorithm is population-based swarm intelligence algorithm. There are many algorithms Present for solving numeric optimization problem.ABC is based on the intellectual behaviour of honey bee crowd. In this work, ABC algorithm is used with Genetic crossover machinist and tested on standard benchmark functions, and also result compared with the X-ABC algorithm with the advantage of fewer organize Parameters. Obtained results show that the performance of the ABC with crossover gives better results than the X-ABC algorithm.

  18. Mutational Analysis of Intracellular Loops Identify Cross Talk with Nucleotide Binding Domains of Yeast ABC Transporter Cdr1p

    Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Komath, Sneha Sudha; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    The ABC transporter Cdr1 protein (Cdr1p) of Candida albicans, which plays a major role in antifungal resistance, has two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) that are interconnected by extracellular (ECLs) and intracellular (ICLs) loops. To examine the communication interface between the NBDs and ICLs of Cdr1p, we subjected all four ICLs to alanine scanning mutagenesis, replacing each of the 85 residues with an alanine. The resulting ICL mutant library was an...

  19. Relative Stabilities of Conserved and Non-Conserved Structures in the OB-Fold Superfamily

    Andrei T. Alexandrescu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The OB-fold is a diverse structure superfamily based on a β-barrel motif that is often supplemented with additional non-conserved secondary structures. Previous deletion mutagenesis and NMR hydrogen exchange studies of three OB-fold proteins showed that the structural stabilities of sites within the conserved β-barrels were larger than sites in non-conserved segments. In this work we examined a database of 80 representative domain structures currently classified as OB-folds, to establish the basis of this effect. Residue-specific values were obtained for the number of Cα-Cα distance contacts, sequence hydrophobicities, crystallographic B-factors, and theoretical B-factors calculated from a Gaussian Network Model. All four parameters point to a larger average flexibility for the non-conserved structures compared to the conserved β-barrels. The theoretical B-factors and contact densities show the highest sensitivity.Our results suggest a model of protein structure evolution in which novel structural features develop at the periphery of conserved motifs. Core residues are more resistant to structural changes during evolution since their substitution would disrupt a larger number of interactions. Similar factors are likely to account for the differences in stability to unfolding between conserved and non-conserved structures.

  20. Identification of the GTPase superfamily in Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    Clayton Luiz Borges

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas are the smallest known prokaryotes with self-replication ability. They are obligate parasites, taking up many molecules of their hosts and acting as pathogens in men, animals, birds and plants. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the infective agent of swine mycoplasmosis and Mycoplasma synoviae is responsible for subclinical upper respiratory infections that may result in airsacculitis and synovitis in chickens and turkeys. These highly infectious organisms present a worldwide distribution and are responsible for major economic problems. Proteins of the GTPase superfamily occur in all domains of life, regulating functions such as protein synthesis, cell cycle and differentiation. Despite their functional diversity, all GTPases are believed to have evolved from a single common ancestor. In this work we have identified mycoplasma GTPases by searching the complete genome databases of Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, J (non-pathogenic and 7448 (pathogenic strains. Fifteen ORFs encoding predicted GTPases were found in M. synoviae and in the two strains of M. hyopneumoniae. Searches for conserved G domains in GTPases were performed and the sequences were classified into families. The GTPase phylogenetic analysis showed that the subfamilies were well resolved into clades. The presence of GTPases in the three strains suggests the importance of GTPases in 'minimalist' genomes.

  1. Nucleotide-induced conformational dynamics in ABC transporters from structure-based coarse grained modelling.

    Flechsig, Holger

    2016-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are integral membrane proteins which mediate the exchange of diverse substrates across membranes powered by ATP molecules. Our understanding of their activity is still hampered since the conformational dynamics underlying the operation of such proteins cannot yet be resolved in detailed molecular dynamics studies. Here a coarse grained model which allows to mimic binding of nucleotides and follow subsequent conformational motions of full-length transporter structures in computer simulations is proposed and implemented. To justify its explanatory quality, the model is first applied to the maltose transporter system for which multiple conformations are known and we find that the model predictions agree remarkably well with the experimental data. For the MalK subunit the switching from open to the closed dimer configuration upon ATP binding is reproduced and, moreover, for the full-length maltose transporter, progression from inward-facing to the outward-facing state is correctly obtained. For the heme transporter HmuUV, for which only the free structure could yet be determined, the model was then applied to predict nucleotide-induced conformational motions. Upon binding of ATP-mimicking ligands the structure changed from a conformation in which the nucleotide-binding domains formed an open shape, to a conformation in which they were found in tight contact, while, at the same time, a pronounced rotation of the transmembrane domains was observed. This finding is supported by normal mode analysis, and, comparison with structural data of the homologous vitamin B12 transporter BtuCD suggests that the observed rotation mechanism may contribute a common functional aspect for this class of ABC transporters. Although in HmuuV noticeable rearrangement of essential transmembrane helices was detected, there are no indications from our simulations that ATP binding alone may facilitate propagation of substrate molecules in this transporter

  2. A PDZ-Like Motif in the Biliary Transporter ABCB4 Interacts with the Scaffold Protein EBP50 and Regulates ABCB4 Cell Surface Expression.

    Quitterie Venot

    Full Text Available ABCB4/MDR3, a member of the ABC superfamily, is an ATP-dependent phosphatidylcholine translocator expressed at the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. Defects in the ABCB4 gene are associated with rare biliary diseases. It is essential to understand the mechanisms of its canalicular membrane expression in particular for the development of new therapies. The stability of several ABC transporters is regulated through their binding to PDZ (PSD95/DglA/ZO-1 domain-containing proteins. ABCB4 protein ends by the sequence glutamine-asparagine-leucine (QNL, which shows some similarity to PDZ-binding motifs. The aim of our study was to assess the potential role of the QNL motif on the surface expression of ABCB4 and to determine if PDZ domain-containing proteins are involved. We found that truncation of the QNL motif decreased the stability of ABCB4 in HepG2-transfected cells. The deleted mutant ABCB4-ΔQNL also displayed accelerated endocytosis. EBP50, a PDZ protein highly expressed in the liver, strongly colocalized and coimmunoprecipitated with ABCB4, and this interaction required the QNL motif. Down-regulation of EBP50 by siRNA or by expression of an EBP50 dominant-negative mutant caused a significant decrease in the level of ABCB4 protein expression, and in the amount of ABCB4 localized at the canalicular membrane. Interaction of ABCB4 with EBP50 through its PDZ-like motif plays a critical role in the regulation of ABCB4 expression and stability at the canalicular plasma membrane.

  3. Increased expression of the yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter Pdr18 leads to increased ethanol tolerance and ethanol production in high gravity alcoholic fermentation

    Teixeira Miguel C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The understanding of the molecular basis of yeast tolerance to ethanol may guide the design of rational strategies to increase process performance in industrial alcoholic fermentations. A set of 21 genes encoding multidrug transporters from the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC Superfamily and Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS in S. cerevisiae were scrutinized for a role in ethanol stress resistance. Results A yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter encoded by the PDR18 gene, proposed to play a role in the incorporation of ergosterol in the yeast plasma membrane, was found to confer resistance to growth inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 expression was seen to contribute to decreased 3 H-ethanol intracellular concentrations and decreased plasma membrane permeabilization of yeast cells challenged with inhibitory ethanol concentrations. Given the increased tolerance to ethanol of cells expressing PDR18, the final concentration of ethanol produced during high gravity alcoholic fermentation by yeast cells devoid of PDR18 was lower than the final ethanol concentration produced by the corresponding parental strain. Moreover, an engineered yeast strain in which the PDR18 promoter was replaced in the genome by the stronger PDR5 promoter, leading to increased PDR18 mRNA levels during alcoholic fermentation, was able to attain a 6 % higher ethanol concentration and a 17 % higher ethanol production yield than the parental strain. The improved fermentative performance of yeast cells over-expressing PDR18 was found to correlate with their increased ethanol tolerance and ability to restrain plasma membrane permeabilization induced throughout high gravity fermentation. Conclusions PDR18 gene over-expression increases yeast ethanol tolerance and fermentation performance leading to the production of highly inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 overexpression in industrial yeast strains appears to be a promising approach to

  4. Functional Identification of Incorrectly Annotated Prolidases from the Amidohydrolase Superfamily of Enzymes

    Xiang, D.; Patskovsky, Y; Xu, C; Meyer, A; Sauder, J; Burley, S; Almo, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    The substrate profiles for two proteins from Caulobacter crescentus CB15 (Cc2672 and Cc3125) and one protein (Sgx9359b) derived from a DNA sequence (gi|44368820) isolated from the Sargasso Sea were determined using combinatorial libraries of dipeptides and N-acyl derivatives of amino acids. These proteins are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and are currently misannotated in NCBI as catalyzing the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Pro dipeptides. Cc2672 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Arg/Lys dipeptides and the N-acetyl and N-formyl derivatives of lysine and arginine. This enzyme will also hydrolyze longer peptides that terminate in either lysine or arginine. The N-methyl phosphonate derivative of l-lysine was a potent competitive inhibitor of Cc2672 with a Ki value of 120 nM. Cc3125 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Arg/Lys dipeptides but will not hydrolyze tripeptides or the N-formyl and N-acetyl derivatives of lysine or arginine. The substrate profile for Sgx9359b is similar to that of Cc2672 except that compounds with a C-terminal lysine are not recognized as substrates. The X-ray structure of Sgx9359b was determined to a resolution of 2.3 Angstroms. The protein folds as a (e/a)8-barrel and self-associates to form a homooctamer. The active site is composed of a binuclear metal center similar to that found in phosphotriesterase and dihydroorotase. In one crystal form, arginine was bound adventitiously to the eight active sites within the octamer. The orientation of the arginine in the active site identified the structural determinants for recognition of the a-carboxylate and the positively charged side chains of arginine-containing substrates. This information was used to identify 18 other bacterial sequences that possess identical or similar substrate profiles.

  5. Second-order nonlinear optical metamaterials: ABC-type nanolaminates

    We demonstrate a concept for second-order nonlinear metamaterials that can be obtained from non-metallic centrosymmetric constituents with inherently low optical absorption. The concept is based on iterative atomic-layer deposition of three different materials, A = Al2O3, B = TiO2, and C = HfO2. The centrosymmetry of the resulting ABC stack is broken since the ABC and the inverted CBA sequences are not equivalent—a necessary condition for non-zero second-order nonlinearity. In our experiments, we find that the bulk second-order nonlinear susceptibility depends on the density of interfaces, leading to a nonlinear susceptibility of 0.26 pm/V at a wavelength of 800 nm. ABC-type nanolaminates can be deposited on virtually any substrate and offer a promising route towards engineering of second-order optical nonlinearities at both infrared and visible wavelengths

  6. Screening of miRNA regulating ABCE1 gene in non-small-cell lung cancer%ABCE1基因在非小细胞肺癌内相关调节miRNA的筛选

    田野; 刘思洋; 许辉; 姜文军; 赵希彤; 王晴; 田大力

    2015-01-01

    Objective To screen the miRNAs regulating ATP-binding cassette transporter E1(ABCE1) gene in non-small-cell lung cancer, and explore new strategies in lung cancer diagnosis and therapy. Methods The 20 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer(11 squamous cell carcinoma and 9 adenocarcinoma) were enrolled, included 13 males and 7 females, which aged 45-73 years old with mean age of 62.9 years old. Bioinformatics was used to predict the miRNAs regulated ABCE1 gene;statistical analysis was then done to screen out the purpose miRNA by real-time quantitative PCR(RT-Q-PCR) and detected miRNAs and ABCE1 mRNA and protein. Results The result of bioinformatics software predicted that seven miRNAs had highest possibility to regulate ABCE1 gene, which were miR-29a/b/c, miR-135a/b, miR-203 and miR-141. The expression of miR-29a/b/c, miR-135a, miR-203, especially miR-135a and miR-29c in carcinoma tissues, compared to those in pericarcinomatous tissues experienced decrease to different degrees, while the expression of mRNA and protein of ABCE1 increased in carcinoma tissues ( P < 0.05). Moreover, there appeared to be negative correlation between miR-135a and ABCE1 in lung cancer tissues(r=-0.665,P=0.001). Conclusion It is demonstrated that the miR-135a negatively regulates ABCE1 gene, and the combination of them might be the new target for diagnosis and treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.%目的:筛选ATP结合盒E1(ABCE1)基因的相关调节miRNA,为诊治肺癌提供新思路。方法选取20例非小细胞肺癌患者,其中男性13例,女性7例;年龄45~73岁,平均年龄62.9岁。鳞癌11例,腺癌9例。应用生物信息学预测ABCE1基因上游的miRNA,通过实时定量聚合酶链反应(RT-Q-PCR)及免疫组织化学方法,对标本非小细胞癌组织和癌旁组织进行检测,并进行统计学分析,从中筛选出目的miRNA。结果生物信息软件预测7个最有可能调节 ABCE1基因的miRNA,分别为miR-29a

  7. ABCE1基因在非小细胞肺癌内相关调节miRNA的筛选%Screening of miRNA regulating ABCE1 gene in non-small-cell lung cancer

    田野; 刘思洋; 许辉; 姜文军; 赵希彤; 王晴; 田大力

    2015-01-01

    目的:筛选ATP结合盒E1(ABCE1)基因的相关调节miRNA,为诊治肺癌提供新思路。方法选取20例非小细胞肺癌患者,其中男性13例,女性7例;年龄45~73岁,平均年龄62.9岁。鳞癌11例,腺癌9例。应用生物信息学预测ABCE1基因上游的miRNA,通过实时定量聚合酶链反应(RT-Q-PCR)及免疫组织化学方法,对标本非小细胞癌组织和癌旁组织进行检测,并进行统计学分析,从中筛选出目的miRNA。结果生物信息软件预测7个最有可能调节 ABCE1基因的miRNA,分别为miR-29a/b/c、miR-135a/b、miR-203及miR-141;其中miR-29a/b/c、miR-135a、miR-203的表达在癌组织内较癌旁组织都有不同程度的降低,以miR-135a、miR-29c差异最为明显,与之对应ABCE1在相同的肺癌组织内表达上调(P<0.05);仅miR-135a与ABCE1在上述肺癌患者内表达呈现负性相关(r=-0.665,P=0.001)。结论在非小细胞肺癌内,很有可能是miR-135a负性调节ABCE1基因,两者结合可能成为诊治肺癌的新靶点。%Objective To screen the miRNAs regulating ATP-binding cassette transporter E1(ABCE1) gene in non-small-cell lung cancer, and explore new strategies in lung cancer diagnosis and therapy. Methods The 20 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer(11 squamous cell carcinoma and 9 adenocarcinoma) were enrolled, included 13 males and 7 females, which aged 45-73 years old with mean age of 62.9 years old. Bioinformatics was used to predict the miRNAs regulated ABCE1 gene;statistical analysis was then done to screen out the purpose miRNA by real-time quantitative PCR(RT-Q-PCR) and detected miRNAs and ABCE1 mRNA and protein. Results The result of bioinformatics software predicted that seven miRNAs had highest possibility to regulate ABCE1 gene, which were miR-29a/b/c, miR-135a/b, miR-203 and miR-141. The expression of miR-29a/b/c, miR-135a, miR-203, especially miR-135a and miR-29c in carcinoma tissues, compared to those

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of the bacterial ABC transporter SAV1866 in the closed form.

    St-Pierre, Jean-François; Bunker, Alex; Róg, Tomasz; Karttunen, Mikko; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-03-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family of proteins contains members involved in ATP-mediated import or export of ligands at the cell membrane. For the case of exporters, the translocation mechanism involves a large-scale conformational change that involves a clothespin-like motion from an inward-facing open state, able to bind ligands and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to an outward-facing closed state. Our work focuses on SAV1866, a bacterial member of the ABC transporter family for which the structure is known for the closed state. To evaluate the ability of this protein to undergo conformational changes at physiological temperature, we first performed conventional molecular dynamics (MD) on the cocrystallized adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound structure and on a nucleotide-free structure. With this assessment of SAV1866's stability, conformational changes were induced by steered molecular dynamics (SMD), in which the nucleotide binding domains (NBD) were pushed apart, simulating the ATP hydrolysis energy expenditure. We found that the transmembrane domain is not easily perturbed by large-scale motions of the NBDs. PMID:22339391

  9. [Role of ABC efflux transporters in the oral bioavailability and drug-induced intestinal toxicity].

    Yokooji, Tomoharu

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the organ that absorbs nutrients and water from foods and drinks. This organ is often exposed to various harmful xenobiotics, and therefore possesses various detoxification/barrier systems, including metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters. Intestinal epithelial cells express ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) and breast cancer resistance protein, in addition to various solute carrier (SLC) influx transporters. These transporters are expressed site- and membrane-specifically in enterocytes, which affects the bioavailability of ingested substrate drugs. Expression and/or function of transporters can be modulated by various compounds, including therapeutic drugs, herbal products, some foods, and by disease states. The modulation of transporters could cause unexpectedly higher or lower blood concentrations, marked inter- and intra-individual variations in pharmacokinetics, and unreliable pharmacological actions in association with toxicities of substrates. Recently, we found that hyperbilirubinemia, which occurs in some disease states, increased intestinal accumulation and toxicity of methotrexate, an MRP substrate, because of the suppression of MRP function by high plasma concentrations of conjugated bilirubin. We also attempted to ameliorate the intestinal toxicity of irinotecan hydrochloride by modulating the hepatic and intestinal functions of MRP2. This review summarizes our findings regarding the role of ABC transporters, especially MRPs, in oral bioavailability and in drug-induced intestinal toxicity. Our approach to treat intestinal toxicity using an MRP2 modulator is also described. PMID:23811769

  10. The kinesin superfamily protein KIF17: one protein with many functions.

    Wong-Riley, Margaret T T; Besharse, Joseph C

    2012-06-01

    Kinesins are ATP-dependent molecular motors that carry cargos along microtubules, generally in an anterograde direction. They are classified into 14 distinct families with varying structural and functional characteristics. KIF17 is a member of the kinesin-2 family that is plus end-directed. It is a homodimer with a pair of head motor domains that bind microtubules, a coiled-coil stalk, and a tail domain that binds cargos. In neurons, KIF17 transports N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR2B subunit, kainate receptor GluR5, and potassium Kv4.2 channels from cell bodies exclusively to dendrites. These cargos are necessary for synaptic transmission, learning, memory, and other functions. KIF17's interaction with NXF2 enables the transport of mRNA bidirectionally in dendrites. KIF17 or its homolog OSM-3 also mediates intraflagellar transport of cargos to the distal tips of flagella or cilia, thereby aiding in ciliogenesis. In many invertebrate and vertebrate sensory cells, KIF17 delivers cargos that contribute to chemosensory perception and signal transduction. In vertebrate photoreceptors, KIF17 is necessary for outer segment development and disc morphogenesis. In the testis, KIF17 (KIF17b) mediates microtubule-independent delivery of ACT from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and microtubule-dependent transport of Spatial-ε, both are presumably involved in spermatogenesis. KIF17 is also implicated in epithelial polarity and morphogenesis, placental transport and development, and the development of specific brain regions. The transcriptional regulation of KIF17 has recently been found to be mediated by nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), which also regulates NR2B as well as energy metabolism in neurons. Dysfunctions of KIF17 are linked to a number of pathologies. PMID:23762210

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 341895 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Full Text Available YP_007047129.1 1117:11981 1118:12038 167375:1945 59930:2000 292564:2000 primosomal protein N' (repl...ication factor Y) - superfamily II helicase Cyanobium gracile PCC 6307 MPLEPLLPLFHRLNREHFDGQ...LTRENRPLVDVRWSDGRLTRTAGLYRRGRLADGRDLCEIVLSRPLLEPLPRQATLGTLCHEMIHAWVDRVLAVQEVHGPRFRTRMEQINRAQDDFQVSLRHRYPLPVAASRWIARCPRCDSRTPYQRRRQGLACRHCCERLHGGRWDASCLLVFEPNTA ...

  12. Imaging of ABC transporters with positron emission tomography – new insights from the development of new radiotracers

    Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), form through their ability to transport a multitude of chemically unrelated compounds across cellular membranes a powerful physiological defense system which protects the body from exposure to xenobiotics. Historically, ABC transporters have been implicated in multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer, but more recent evidence suggests that changes in ABC transporter function and expression at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) occur in several neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. To better understand the role of ABC transporters in disease a tool is needed to assess their function and expression in-vivo. The nuclear imaging technique positron emission tomography (PET), which enables measurement of tissue concentration levels of radiolabeled compounds, has great potential for studying ABC transporters in-vivo, provided the availability of suitable radiotracers and imaging protocols. In this thesis the interaction of new radiotracers with Pgp and BCRP was investigated in order to assess their suitability for PET imaging. The radiolabeled Pgp inhibitors [11C]tariquidar and [11C]elacridar had been initially developed to visualize Pgp density at the BBB but had failed to provide useful, quantifiable brain PET signals. In this thesis, the suitability of [11C]tariquidar and [11C]elacridar to visualize Pgp density in tumors was investigated. An experimental murine tumor model comprising a wild-type and a Pgp overexpressing variant was developed and binding characteristics of [11C]tariquidar and [11C]elacridar as well as two other newly developed PET tracers ([11C]MC113 and [11C]HM30181) were systematically evaluated. These studies showed, that contrary to the BBB, radiolabeled Pgp inhibitors were able to assess Pgp density in tumors, which may find

  13. Migration of Adipose-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Stably Expressing Chondroitinase ABC In vitro

    Jian-Huang Wu; Miao Li; Yan Liang; Tao Lu; Chun-Yue Duan

    2016-01-01

    Background:Several studies have revealed that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) can be used as seed cells for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI).Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) decomposes chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in the glial scar that forms following SCI,allowing stem cells to penetrate through the scar and promote recovery of nerve function.This study aimed to establish ADSCs that stably express ChABC (ChABC-ADSCs) and evaluate the migratory capability of ChABC-ADSCs in vitro.Methods:ADSCs were obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats using secondary collagenase digestion.Their phenotypes were characterized using flow cytometry detection of cell surface antigens and their stem cell properties were confirmed by induction of differentiation.After successful culture,ADSCs were transfected with lentiviral vectors and ChABC-ADSCs were obtained.Proliferation curves of ChABC-ADSCs were determined using the Cell Counting Kit-8 method,ChABC expression was verified using Western blotting,and the migration of ChABC-ADSCs was analyzed using the transwell assay.Results:Secondary collagenase digestion increased the isolation efficiency of primary ADSCs.Following transfection using lentiviral vectors,the proliferation of ChABC-ADSCs was reduced in comparison with control ADSCs at 48 h (P < 0.05).And the level of ChABC expression in the ChABC-ADSC group was significantly higher than that of the ADSC group (P < 0.05).Moreover,ChABC-ADSC migration in matrigel was significantly enhanced in comparison with the control (P < 0.05).Conclusions:Secondary collagenase digestion can be used to effectively isolate ADSCs.ChABC-ADSCs constructed using lentiviral vector transfection stably express ChABC,and ChABC expression significantly enhances the migratory capacity of ADSCs.

  14. Migration of Adipose-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Stably Expressing Chondroitinase ABC In vitro

    Wu, Jian-Huang; Li, Miao; Liang, Yan; Lu, Tao; Duan, Chun-Yue

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies have revealed that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) can be used as seed cells for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) decomposes chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in the glial scar that forms following SCI, allowing stem cells to penetrate through the scar and promote recovery of nerve function. This study aimed to establish ADSCs that stably express ChABC (ChABC-ADSCs) and evaluate the migratory capability of ChABC-ADSCs in vitro. Methods: ADSCs were obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats using secondary collagenase digestion. Their phenotypes were characterized using flow cytometry detection of cell surface antigens and their stem cell properties were confirmed by induction of differentiation. After successful culture, ADSCs were transfected with lentiviral vectors and ChABC-ADSCs were obtained. Proliferation curves of ChABC-ADSCs were determined using the Cell Counting Kit-8 method, ChABC expression was verified using Western blotting, and the migration of ChABC-ADSCs was analyzed using the transwell assay. Results: Secondary collagenase digestion increased the isolation efficiency of primary ADSCs. Following transfection using lentiviral vectors, the proliferation of ChABC-ADSCs was reduced in comparison with control ADSCs at 48 h (P < 0.05). And the level of ChABC expression in the ChABC-ADSC group was significantly higher than that of the ADSC group (P < 0.05). Moreover, ChABC-ADSC migration in matrigel was significantly enhanced in comparison with the control (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Secondary collagenase digestion can be used to effectively isolate ADSCs. ChABC-ADSCs constructed using lentiviral vector transfection stably express ChABC, and ChABC expression significantly enhances the migratory capacity of ADSCs. PMID:27364797

  15. Crystal structure and potential physiological role of zebra fish thioesterase superfamily member 2 (fTHEM2)

    Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2) is an essential protein for mammalian cell proliferation. It belongs to the hotdog-fold thioesterase superfamily and catalyzes hydrolysis of thioester bonds of acyl-CoA in vitro, while its in vivo function remains unrevealed. In this study, Zebra fish was selected as a model organism to facilitate the investigations on THEM2. First, we solved the crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 at the resolution of 1.80 Å, which displayed a similar scaffolding as hTHEM2. Second, functional studies demonstrated that fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA in vitro. In addition, injection of morpholino against fTHEM2 at one-cell stage resulted in distorted early embryo development, including delayed cell division, retarded development and increased death rate. The above findings validated our hypothesis that fTHEM2 could serve as an ideal surrogate for studying the physiological functions of THEM2. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 is presented. • fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA. • The influence of fTHEM2 on early embryo development is demonstrated

  16. Crystal structure and potential physiological role of zebra fish thioesterase superfamily member 2 (fTHEM2).

    Yu, Shanshan; Li, Han; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2) is an essential protein for mammalian cell proliferation. It belongs to the hotdog-fold thioesterase superfamily and catalyzes hydrolysis of thioester bonds of acyl-CoA in vitro, while its in vivo function remains unrevealed. In this study, Zebra fish was selected as a model organism to facilitate the investigations on THEM2. First, we solved the crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 at the resolution of 1.80 Å, which displayed a similar scaffolding as hTHEM2. Second, functional studies demonstrated that fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA in vitro. In addition, injection of morpholino against fTHEM2 at one-cell stage resulted in distorted early embryo development, including delayed cell division, retarded development and increased death rate. The above findings validated our hypothesis that fTHEM2 could serve as an ideal surrogate for studying the physiological functions of THEM2. PMID:26067557

  17. Evolutionary expansion of the amidohydrolase superfamily in bacteria in response to the synthetic compounds molinate and diuron.

    Sugrue, Elena; Fraser, Nicholas J; Hopkins, Davis H; Carr, Paul D; Khurana, Jeevan L; Oakeshott, John G; Scott, Colin; Jackson, Colin J

    2015-04-01

    The amidohydrolase superfamily has remarkable functional diversity, with considerable structural and functional annotation of known sequences. In microbes, the recent evolution of several members of this family to catalyze the breakdown of environmental xenobiotics is not well understood. An evolutionary transition from binuclear to mononuclear metal ion coordination at the active sites of these enzymes could produce large functional changes such as those observed in nature, but there are few clear examples available to support this hypothesis. To investigate the role of binuclear-mononuclear active-site transitions in the evolution of new function in this superfamily, we have characterized two recently evolved enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of the synthetic herbicides molinate (MolA) and phenylurea (PuhB). In this work, the crystal structures, mutagenesis, metal ion analysis, and enzyme kinetics of both MolA and PuhB establish that these enzymes utilize a mononuclear active site. However, bioinformatics and structural comparisons reveal that the closest putative ancestor of these enzymes had a binuclear active site, indicating that a binuclear-mononuclear transition has occurred. These proteins may represent examples of evolution modifying the characteristics of existing catalysts to satisfy new requirements, specifically, metal ion rearrangement leading to large leaps in activity that would not otherwise be possible. PMID:25636851

  18. Crystal structure and potential physiological role of zebra fish thioesterase superfamily member 2 (fTHEM2)

    Yu, Shanshan; Li, Han; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Ying, E-mail: zhouying@moon.ibp.ac.cn

    2015-08-07

    Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2) is an essential protein for mammalian cell proliferation. It belongs to the hotdog-fold thioesterase superfamily and catalyzes hydrolysis of thioester bonds of acyl-CoA in vitro, while its in vivo function remains unrevealed. In this study, Zebra fish was selected as a model organism to facilitate the investigations on THEM2. First, we solved the crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 at the resolution of 1.80 Å, which displayed a similar scaffolding as hTHEM2. Second, functional studies demonstrated that fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA in vitro. In addition, injection of morpholino against fTHEM2 at one-cell stage resulted in distorted early embryo development, including delayed cell division, retarded development and increased death rate. The above findings validated our hypothesis that fTHEM2 could serve as an ideal surrogate for studying the physiological functions of THEM2. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 is presented. • fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA. • The influence of fTHEM2 on early embryo development is demonstrated.

  19. Gene expression of ABC transporters in Cooperia oncophora after field and laboratory selection with macrocyclic lactones.

    Tydén, Eva; Skarin, Moa; Höglund, Johan

    2014-12-01

    The most widespread helminth parasites of grazing cattle in northern Europe are the gastrointestinal nematodes Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora. Heavy reliance on the use of macrocyclic lactone (ML) in cattle has led to world-wide emergence of resistance to this drug class in C. oncophora. There is evidence that members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, such as P-glycoproteins (P-gp) and multidrug-resistant proteins (MRP), play a role in resistance to ML. In this study gene expression of Con-pgp9, Con-pgp11, Con-pgp12, Con-pgp16 and Con-mrp1 was examined in two isolates of C. oncophora sharing the same genetic background but exposed to ML differently. For isolate one (Laboratory-selected), adult worms were recovered before and after treatment with ML in vivo. For isolate two (Field-selected), adult worms were collected from tracer animals that had never received anthelmintics themselves. One group grazed together with untreated animals and one group grazed with animals that received suppressive prophylactic treatment with ML at monthly intervals for up to two consecutive grazing seasons. Real-time PCR data demonstrated differences in gene expression after ML selection, with the highest constitutive expression levels for Con-pgp16 and Con-mrp1. Remarkably, the same pattern of increasing expression levels of the ABC transport genes was observed in both Laboratory- and Field-selected isolates, despite the Field-selected isolate not being directly exposed to ML. The higher expression levels of ABC transporters observed in the Field-selected isolate was thus not a response to direct exposure to ML, but rather appeared to reflect a genetic characteristic inherited from worms in the previous generation which had survived exposure to ML in the co-grazing treated animals. PMID:25619799

  20. On Application of ABC Approach in Management of Agri- scientific Research Cost

    Liangchun; ZHA

    2014-01-01

    This paper firstly introduced theoretical background of the Activity-Based Costing(ABC). Then,it analyzed necessity,extension resistance and difficulty of ABC approach in agri-scientific research institutions. Finally,it came up with some recommendations for scientifically learning and steadily promoting ABC method in agri-scientific research field.

  1. On Application of ABC Approach in Management of Agri-scientific Research Cost

    Zha, Liangchun

    2014-01-01

    This paper firstly introduced theoretical background of the Activity-Based Costing (ABC). Then, it analyzed necessity, extension resistance and difficulty of ABC approach in agri-scientific research institutions. Finally, it came up with some recommendations for scientifically learning and steadily promoting ABC method in agri-scientific research field.

  2. A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria.

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, Iñigo; Novick, Richard P; Christie, Gail E; Penadés, José R

    2013-08-01

    The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23771138

  3. Function, Structure, and Evolution of the Major Facilitator Superfamily: The LacY Manifesto

    M. Gregor Madej

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The major facilitator superfamily (MFS is a diverse group of secondary transporters with members found in all kingdoms of life. A paradigm for MFS is the lactose permease (LacY of Escherichia coli, which couples the stoichiometric translocation of a galactopyranoside and an H+ across the cytoplasmic membrane. LacY has been the test bed for the development of many methods applied for the analysis of transport proteins. X-ray structures of an inward-facing conformation and the most recent structure of an almost occluded conformation confirm many conclusions from previous studies. Although structure models are critical, they are insufficient to explain the catalysis of transport. The clues to understanding transport are based on the principles of enzyme kinetics. Secondary transport is a dynamic process—static snapshots of X-ray crystallography describe it only partially. However, without structural information, the underlying chemistry is virtually impossible to conclude. A large body of biochemical/biophysical data derived from systematic studies of site-directed mutants in LacY suggests residues critically involved in the catalysis, and a working model for the symport mechanism that involves alternating access of the binding site is presented. The general concepts derived from the bacterial LacY are examined for their relevance to other MFS transporters.

  4. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea.

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  5. Phenotypic, Proteomic, and Genomic Characterization of a Putative ABC-Transporter Permease Involved in Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation

    Zhu, Xinna; Liu, Weibing; Lametsch, René;

    2011-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is able to form biofilms in food processing environments. Previously, we have reported that an lm.G_1771 gene (encoding a putative ABC-transporter permease) was involved in negative regulation of L. monocytogenes biofilm formation using LM-49, a biofilm......-enhanced mutant isolated on Tn917 mutagenesis (AEM 2008 p.7675–7683). Here, the possible action of this ABC-transporter permease in L. monocytogenes biofilm formation was characterized by phenotypic, proteomic, and genomic analyses using an lm.G_1771 gene deletant (Δ1771). The Δ1771 mutant exhibited the same...... enhanced ability for biofilm formation as the LM-49 strain using a crystal violet staining assay. DNA microarrays and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed 49 and 11 differentially expressed (twofold or more) genes or proteins in Δ1771, respectively. The transcriptomics study indicated that lm...

  6. Lipid traffic: the ABC of transbilayer movement

    Raggers, R.J.; Pomorski, T.; Holthuis, J.C.M.; Kälin, N; van Meer, G.

    2000-01-01

    Membrane lipids do not spontaneously exchange between the two leaflets of lipid bilayers because the polar headgroups cannot cross the hydrophobic membrane interior. Cellular membranes, notably eukaryotic plasma membranes, are equipped with special proteins that actively translocate lipids from one leaflet to the other. In addition, cellular membranes contain proteins that facilitate a passive equilibration of lipids between the two membrane halves. In recent years, a growing number of protei...

  7. Docking of the Periplasmic FecB Binding Protein to the FecCD Transmembrane Proteins in the Ferric Citrate Transport System of Escherichia coli▿

    Braun, Volkmar; Herrmann, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Citrate-mediated iron transport across the cytoplasmic membrane is catalyzed by an ABC transporter that consists of the periplasmic binding protein FecB, the transmembrane proteins FecC and FecD, and the ATPase FecE. Salt bridges between glutamate residues of the binding protein and arginine residues of the transmembrane proteins are predicted to mediate the positioning of the substrate-loaded binding protein on the transmembrane protein, based on the crystal structures of the ABC transporter...

  8. I am Calm: Towards a Psychoneurological Evaluation of ABC Ringtones

    John N.A. Brown

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthropology-Based Computing (ABC suggests that socio-cultural, neurological, and physiological parameters of normal human interaction with the world can be applied to current technology in order to improve Human-Computer Interaction (HCI. To challenge this theory, we hypothesized smartphone ringtones that could be targeted to specific people in a manner that would inform them without disturbing their work or the work of others. In this paper we report the quantitative data from the first formal trials of these ‘ABC ringtones’. Beta Wave activity patterns were recorded in the brains of 10 participants exposed to 5 different ringtones at three different volumes while they were focused on performing a typing test in a noisy environment. Our preliminary findings seem to show that the ABC ringtones - at a volume too low to be consciously heard - triggered a response in the pre-attentive part of the brain, and that the embedded information was transferred to the attentive part of the brain by an internal mechanism that did not disrupt the work being done in the typing task. We propose that these results provide preliminary evidence for the ABC model of HCI and its explanation of the centering mechanism that is requisite if Peripheral Interaction is to be applied in changing Ubiquitous Computing into Calm Technology.

  9. Dynamics of 'abc' and 'qd' constant parameters induction generator model

    Fajardo-R, L.A.; Medina, A.; Iov, F.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, parametric sensibility effects on dynamics of the induction generator in the presence of local perturbations are investigated. The study is conducted in a 3x2 MW wind park dealing with abc, qd0 and qd reduced order, induction generator model respectively, and with fluxes as state...

  10. ABC transporters from Botrytis cinerea in biotic and abiotic interactions

    Schoonbeek, H.

    2004-01-01

    Botrytis cinereais the causal agent of grey mould disease on a wide variety of crop plants. It is relatively insensitive to natural and synthetic fungitoxic compounds. This thesis describes how ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters contribute to protection by actively secre

  11. Selections from the ABC 2012 Annual Convention, Honolulu, Hawaii

    Whalen, D. Joel

    2013-01-01

    The 13 Favorite Assignments featured here were presented at the 2012 Association for Business Communication (ABC) Annual Convention, Honolulu, Hawaii. A variety of learning objectives are featured, including the following: enhancing resume's visual impact, interpersonal skills, social media, team building, web design, community service…

  12. The ABCs for Pre-Service Teacher Cultural Competency Development

    He, Ye; Cooper, Jewell E.

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to combine pre-service teachers' self-reflection with their field experiences to enhance their cultural competency, this study adopted Schmidt's ABC's (Autobiography, Biography, and Cross-cultural Comparison) Model in two courses in a pre-service teacher education program. Through group comparisons, this study measured the impact that…

  13. Preconceptual ABC design definition and system configuration layout

    This document is the conceptual design document for the follow-on to the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor, known as the ABC type reactor. It addresses blanket design options, containment options, off-gas systems, drainage systems, and components/layouts of the primary, secondary, and tertiary systems, and it contains a number of diagrams for the configuration of the major systems

  14. Conceptual proposals on safeguards while implementation of ABC-project

    The report deals with some conceptual problems of nuclear safeguard measures in connection with project ABC implementation. Safeguards issues in this area have a lot of common features with traditional approaches at existing facilities, at the same time there are some characteristic features arising in connection with specific technology process in this project

  15. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 59828 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Full Text Available ZP_09246036.1 1117:1104 1118:549 155977:3794 310037:782 ABC transporter periplasmic... solute-binding protein Acaryochloris sp. CCMEE 5410 MDRRSFLQTLGAVTLSQLLGACQQNNRTGLQVNLLQKTLPPQLVDKFRSNSNIPL

  16. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 111812 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Full Text Available ZP_09248989.1 1117:2187 1118:6262 155977:1012 310037:1673 Mn2+ ABC transporter peripl...asmic binding protein Acaryochloris sp. CCMEE 5410 MTEIPLRRSIVFASILAIGVAFAGCTTVDGPPTNPQEQTADNENRPANAEGKKTV

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 132317 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Full Text Available IGTVSYNEGNEVLNQYESFKHYLEQQTRSLVELEPAFNEKKALERIRSQAWSLVFAPPGLATIAMTKYQYIPLLPLDGISNLRSVIVVRQDSSFQDLKSLSNQTIALG...YP_003135785.1 1117:2586 1118:1345 43988:123 395962:166 ABC-type phosphate/phosphon...ate transport system periplasmic component-like protein Cyanothece sp. PCC 8802 MKLSRRLFLITLVVQACQNPSLKGEPLV

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 57308 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Full Text Available YP_007125960.1 1117:1044 1118:7351 102231:211 1173026:211 iron(III) dicitrate-binding peripl...asmic protein of ABC transporter Gloeocapsa sp. PCC 7428 MKIPLRRLTALFLLGILMFTLISACSNSISHNITNPRLLNTECRVVQHTKGETCIPLNPKRLVT ...

  19. Discovery of a distinct superfamily of Kunitz-type toxin (KTT from tarantulas.

    Chun-Hua Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kuntiz-type toxins (KTTs have been found in the venom of animals such as snake, cone snail and sea anemone. The main ancestral function of Kunitz-type proteins was the inhibition of a diverse array of serine proteases, while toxic activities (such as ion-channel blocking were developed under a variety of Darwinian selection pressures. How new functions were grafted onto an old protein scaffold and what effect Darwinian selection pressures had on KTT evolution remains a puzzle. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the presence of a new superfamily of ktts in spiders (TARANTULAS: Ornithoctonus huwena and Ornithoctonus hainana, which share low sequence similarity to known KTTs and is clustered in a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree of KTT evolution. The representative molecule of spider KTTs, HWTX-XI, purified from the venom of O. huwena, is a bi-functional protein which is a very potent trypsin inhibitor (about 30-fold more strong than BPTI as well as a weak Kv1.1 potassium channel blocker. Structural analysis of HWTX-XI in 3-D by NMR together with comparative function analysis of 18 expressed mutants of this toxin revealed two separate sites, corresponding to these two activities, located on the two ends of the cone-shape molecule of HWTX-XI. Comparison of non-synonymous/synonymous mutation ratios (omega for each site in spider and snake KTTs, as well as PBTI like body Kunitz proteins revealed high Darwinian selection pressure on the binding sites for Kv channels and serine proteases in snake, while only on the proteases in spider and none detected in body proteins, suggesting different rates and patterns of evolution among them. The results also revealed a series of key events in the history of spider KTT evolution, including the formation of a novel KTT family (named sub-Kuntiz-type toxins derived from the ancestral native KTTs with the loss of the second disulfide bridge accompanied by several dramatic sequence modifications

  20. Structural Analysis of Papain-Like NlpC/P60 Superfamily Enzymes with a Circularly Permuted Topology Reveals Potential Lipid Binding Sites

    Xu, Qingping; Rawlings, Neil D.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (SG); (Wellcome)

    2012-07-11

    NlpC/P60 superfamily papain-like enzymes play important roles in all kingdoms of life. Two members of this superfamily, LRAT-like and YaeF/YiiX-like families, were predicted to contain a catalytic domain that is circularly permuted such that the catalytic cysteine is located near the C-terminus, instead of at the N-terminus. These permuted enzymes are widespread in virus, pathogenic bacteria, and eukaryotes. We determined the crystal structure of a member of the YaeF/YiiX-like family from Bacillus cereus in complex with lysine. The structure, which adopts a ligand-induced, 'closed' conformation, confirms the circular permutation of catalytic residues. A comparative analysis of other related protein structures within the NlpC/P60 superfamily is presented. Permutated NlpC/P60 enzymes contain a similar conserved core and arrangement of catalytic residues, including a Cys/His-containing triad and an additional conserved tyrosine. More surprisingly, permuted enzymes have a hydrophobic S1 binding pocket that is distinct from previously characterized enzymes in the family, indicative of novel substrate specificity. Further analysis of a structural homolog, YiiX (PDB 2if6) identified a fatty acid in the conserved hydrophobic pocket, thus providing additional insights into possible function of these novel enzymes.

  1. Up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor superfamily genes in early phases of photoreceptor degeneration.

    Sem Genini

    Full Text Available We used quantitative real-time PCR to examine the expression of 112 genes related to retinal function and/or belonging to known pro-apoptotic, cell survival, and autophagy pathways during photoreceptor degeneration in three early-onset canine models of human photoreceptor degeneration, rod cone dysplasia 1 (rcd1, X-linked progressive retinal atrophy 2 (xlpra2, and early retinal degeneration (erd, caused respectively, by mutations in PDE6B, RPGRORF15, and STK38L. Notably, we found that expression and timing of differentially expressed (DE genes correlated with the cell death kinetics. Gene expression profiles of rcd1 and xlpra2 were similar; however rcd1 was more severe as demonstrated by the results of the TUNEL and ONL thickness analyses, a greater number of genes that were DE, and the identification of altered expression that occurred at earlier time points. Both diseases differed from erd, where a smaller number of genes were DE. Our studies did not highlight the potential involvement of mitochondrial or autophagy pathways, but all three diseases were accompanied by the down-regulation of photoreceptor genes, and up-regulation of several genes that belong to the TNF superfamily, the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, and pro-survival pathways. These proteins were expressed by different retinal cells, including horizontal, amacrine, ON bipolar, and Müller cells, and suggest an interplay between the dying photoreceptors and inner retinal cells. Western blot and immunohistochemistry results supported the transcriptional regulation for selected proteins. This study highlights a potential role for signaling through the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in early cell death events and suggests that retinal cells other than photoreceptors might play a primary or bystander role in the degenerative process.

  2. The ABCs of multidrug resistance in malaria.

    Koenderink, J.B.; Kavishe, R.A.; Rijpma, S.R.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Expanding drug resistance could become a major problem in malaria treatment, as only a limited number of effective antimalarials are available. Drug resistance has been associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms and an increased copy number of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), an ATP-bindi

  3. A Compute Environment of ABC95 Array Computer Based on Multi-FPGA Chip

    2000-01-01

    ABC95 array computer is a multi-function network's computer based on FPGA technology, The multi-function network supports processors conflict-free access data from memory and supports processors access data from processors based on enhanced MESH network.ABC95 instruction's system includes control instructions, scalar instructions, vectors instructions.Mostly net-work instructions are introduced.A programming environment of ABC95 array computer assemble language is designed.A programming environment of ABC95 array computer for VC++ is advanced.It includes load function of ABC95 array computer program and data, store function, run function and so on.Specially, The data type of ABC95 array computer conflict-free access is defined.The results show that these technologies can develop programmer of ABC95 array computer effectively.

  4. 75 FR 49549 - ABC & D Recycling, Inc.-Lease and Operation Exemption-a Line of Railroad in Ware, MA

    2010-08-13

    ... Surface Transportation Board ABC & D Recycling, Inc.--Lease and Operation Exemption--a Line of Railroad in Ware, MA ABC & D Recycling, Inc. (ABC & D), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption... operation of this trackage in FD 35356, ABC & D Recycling, Inc.--Lease and Operation Exemption--a Line...

  5. Functional Identification and Structure Determination of Two Novel Prolidases from cog1228 in the Amidohydrolase Superfamily

    Xiang, Dao Feng; Patskovsky, Yury; Xu, Chengfu; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Sisco, Abby A.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.; Almo, Steven C.; Raushel, Frank M. (Einstein); (TAM); (Lilly)

    2010-12-07

    Two uncharacterized enzymes from the amidohydrolase superfamily belonging to cog1228 were cloned, expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The two proteins, Sgx9260c (gi|44242006) and Sgx9260b (gi|44479596), were derived from environmental DNA samples originating from the Sargasso Sea. The catalytic function and substrate profiles for Sgx9260c and Sgx9260b were determined using a comprehensive library of dipeptides and N-acyl derivative of L-amino acids. Sgx9260c catalyzes the hydrolysis of Gly-L-Pro, L-Ala-L-Pro, and N-acyl derivatives of L-Pro. The best substrate identified to date is N-acetyl-L-Pro with a value of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} of 3 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Sgx9260b catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-hydrophobic L-Pro dipeptides and N-acyl derivatives of L-Pro. The best substrate identified to date is N-propionyl-L-Pro with a value of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} of 1 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Three-dimensional structures of both proteins were determined by X-ray diffraction methods (PDB codes 3MKV and 3FEQ). These proteins fold as distorted ({beta}/{alpha})8-barrels with two divalent cations in the active site. The structure of Sgx9260c was also determined as a complex with the N-methylphosphonate derivative of L-Pro (PDB code 3N2C). In this structure the phosphonate moiety bridges the binuclear metal center, and one oxygen atom interacts with His-140. The {alpha}-carboxylate of the inhibitor interacts with Tyr-231. The proline side chain occupies a small substrate binding cavity formed by residues contributed from the loop that follows {beta}-strand 7 within the ({beta}/{alpha})8-barrel. A total of 38 other proteins from cog1228 are predicted to have the same substrate profile based on conservation of the substrate binding residues. The structure of an evolutionarily related protein, Cc2672 from Caulobacter crecentus, was determined as a complex with the N-methylphosphonate derivative of L-arginine (PDB code 3MTW).

  6. D-Ribulose 5-Phosphate 3-Epimerase: Functional and Structural Relationships to Members of the Ribulose-Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrel Superfamily

    The 'ribulose phosphate binding' superfamily defined by the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database is considered the result of divergent evolution from a common (β/α)8-barrel ancestor. The superfamily includes D-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE), orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), and 3-keto-L-gulonate 6-phosphate decarboxylase (KGPDC), members of the OMPDC suprafamily, as well as enzymes involved in histidine and tryptophan biosynthesis that utilize phosphorylated metabolites as substrates. We now report studies of the functional and structural relationships of RPE to the members of the superfamily. As suggested by the results of crystallographic studies of the RPEs from rice and Plasmodium falciparum, the RPE from Streptococcus pyogenes is activated by Zn2+ which binds with a stoichiometry of one ion per polypeptide. Although wild type RPE has a high affinity for Zn2+ and inactive apoenzyme cannot be prepared, the affinity for Zn2+ is decreased by alanine substitutions for the two histidine residues that coordinate the Zn2+ ion (H34A and H67A); these mutant proteins can be prepared in an inactive, metal-free form and activated by exogenous Zn2+. The crystal structure of the RPE was solved at 1.8 Angstroms resolution in the presence of D-xylitol 5-phosphate, an inert analogue of the D-xylulose 5-phosphate substrate. This structure suggests that the 2,3-enediolate intermediate in the 1,1-proton transfer reaction is stabilized by bidentate coordination to the Zn2+ that also is liganded to His 34, Asp 36, His 67, and Asp 176; the carboxylate groups of the Asp residues are positioned also to function as the acid/base catalysts. Although the conformation of the bound analogue resembles those of ligands bound in the active sites of OMPDC and KGPDC, the identities of the active site residues that coordinate the essential Zn2+ and participate as acid/base catalysts are not conserved. We conclude that only the phosphate binding motif

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-1432 [SEVENS

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-1432 ref|YP_204672.1| ABC transporter ATPase component [Vibrio fischeri ... ES114] ref| ... 1| ABC transporter ATP-binding protein uup [Vibrio fischeri ... MJ11] gb|AAW85784.1| fused predicted transporter s ... of ABC superfamily: ATP-binding components [Vibrio fischeri ... ES114] gb|ACH65239.1| ABC transporter ATP-binding ... protein uup [Vibrio fischeri ... MJ11] YP_204672.1 1.5 28% ...

  8. The cabABC Operon Essential for Biofilm and Rugose Colony Development in Vibrio vulnificus.

    Jin Hwan Park

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A transcriptome analysis identified Vibrio vulnificus cabABC genes which were preferentially expressed in biofilms. The cabABC genes were transcribed as a single operon. The cabA gene was induced by elevated 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP and encoded a calcium-binding protein CabA. Comparison of the biofilms produced by the cabA mutant and its parent strain JN111 in microtiter plates using crystal-violet staining demonstrated that CabA contributed to biofilm formation in a calcium-dependent manner under elevated c-di-GMP conditions. Genetic and biochemical analyses revealed that CabA was secreted to the cell exterior through functional CabB and CabC, distributed throughout the biofilm matrix, and produced as the biofilm matured. These results, together with the observation that CabA also contributes to the development of rugose colony morphology, indicated that CabA is a matrix-associated protein required for maturation, rather than adhesion involved in the initial attachment, of biofilms. Microscopic comparison of the structure of biofilms produced by JN111 and the cabA mutant demonstrated that CabA is an extracellular matrix component essential for the development of the mature biofilm structures in flow cells and on oyster shells. Exogenously providing purified CabA restored the biofilm- and rugose colony-forming abilities of the cabA mutant when calcium was available. Circular dichroism and size exclusion analyses revealed that calcium binding induces CabA conformational changes which may lead to multimerization. Extracellular complementation experiments revealed that CabA can assemble a functional matrix only when exopolysaccharides coexist. Consequently, the combined results suggested that CabA is a structural protein of the extracellular matrix and multimerizes to a conformation functional in building robust biofilms, which may render V. vulnificus to survive in hostile environments and reach a concentrated infective dose.

  9. Novel understanding of ABC transporters ABCB1/MDR/P-glycoprotein, ABCC2/MRP2, and ABCG2/BCRP in colorectal pathophysiology

    Andersen, Vibeke; Svenningsen, Katrine; Knudsen, Lina Almind;

    2015-01-01

    transporter proteins, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative, colitis, Crohns disease, colorectal cancer, colitis, intestinal inflammation, intestinal carcinogenesis, ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp/CD243/MDR1), ABCC2/multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), Abcb1....../Mdr1a, abcc2/Mrp2, abcg2/Bcrp, knock-out mice, tight junction, membrane lipid function. RESULTS: Recently, human studies reported that changes in the levels of ABC transporters were early events in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence leading to CRC. A link between ABCB1, high fat diet and gut microbes in...... which may additionally affect ABC transporter function through nuclear receptors and transcriptional regulation. Another critical role of ABCB1 was suggested by the finding that ABCB1 expression identifies a subpopulation of pro-inflammatory Th17 cells which were resistant to treatment with...

  10. The Plant Short-Chain Dehydrogenase (SDR superfamily: genome-wide inventory and diversification patterns

    Moummou Hanane

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs form one of the largest and oldest NAD(P(H dependent oxidoreductase families. Despite a conserved ‘Rossmann-fold’ structure, members of the SDR superfamily exhibit low sequence similarities, which constituted a bottleneck in terms of identification. Recent classification methods, relying on hidden-Markov models (HMMs, improved identification and enabled the construction of a nomenclature. However, functional annotations of plant SDRs remain scarce. Results Wide-scale analyses were performed on ten plant genomes. The combination of hidden Markov model (HMM based analyses and similarity searches led to the construction of an exhaustive inventory of plant SDR. With 68 to 315 members found in each analysed genome, the inventory confirmed the over-representation of SDRs in plants compared to animals, fungi and prokaryotes. The plant SDRs were first classified into three major types — ‘classical’, ‘extended’ and ‘divergent’ — but a minority (10% of the predicted SDRs could not be classified into these general types (‘unknown’ or ‘atypical’ types. In a second step, we could categorize the vast majority of land plant SDRs into a set of 49 families. Out of these 49 families, 35 appeared early during evolution since they are commonly found through all the Green Lineage. Yet, some SDR families — tropinone reductase-like proteins (SDR65C, ‘ABA2-like’-NAD dehydrogenase (SDR110C, ‘salutaridine/menthone-reductase-like’ proteins (SDR114C, ‘dihydroflavonol 4-reductase’-like proteins (SDR108E and ‘isoflavone-reductase-like’ (SDR460A proteins — have undergone significant functional diversification within vascular plants since they diverged from Bryophytes. Interestingly, these diversified families are either involved in the secondary metabolism routes (terpenoids, alkaloids, phenolics or participate in developmental processes (hormone biosynthesis or

  11. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ABC COSTING IN A SERVICES PROVIDER COMPANY

    Luiz Ricardo Aguena Jacintho Gil de Castro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementation of the Activity-Based Cost (ABC method in a company of taxes and accounting services and outlines the positive and negative aspects encountered during implementation. It should be taken into account that this work has been developed in the fiscal area of cost verification. Bibliographical references, internal company documents and interviews with industry officials and the administrator responsible for the company were used. In the evolving of operations, the costs of the fiscal area and their main activities have been described monthly and through this information, drivers have been developed and the ABC (Activity-Based Costing method has been adopted. With the implementation it became clear that the system provides better visualization for the decision making process, it also provided learning for the company, so that the method should be used for an undetermined period of time.

  12. Learning the ABCs: Activity based costing in waste operations

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is facing a challenging new national role based on current world events, changing public perception and awareness, and a legacy of wastes generated in the past. Clearly, the DOE must put mechanisms in place to comply with environmental rules, regulations, and good management practices so that public health risk is minimized while programmatic costs are controlled. DOE has begun this process and has developed a Five-Year Plan to describe the activities necessary to comply with both cleanup, or environmental restoration, and waste management of existing waste streams. The focus of this paper is how to best manage the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of waste throughout the DOE weapons complex by using Activity Based Costing (ABC) to both plan and control expenditures in DOE Waste Management (WM). The basics of ABC, along with an example, will be detailed. (author)

  13. A STUDY ON THE ABC APPROACH IN COST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE

    Violeta ISAI; Riana Iren RADU; Camelia IONESCU

    2014-01-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC), an alternative approach to traditional accounting, represents a costing methodology that identifies the main cost drivers, or the main activities in an organization, thus assigning the cost of the products and services according to the number of specific activities or transactions used in the development process of a product or service. This system is based on the measurement of all the activities performed within an organization and provides the companies with t...

  14. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ABC COSTING IN A SERVICES PROVIDER COMPANY

    Luiz Ricardo Aguena Jacintho Gil de Castro; Fernando de Almeida Santos

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the Activity-Based Cost (ABC) method in a company of taxes and accounting services and outlines the positive and negative aspects encountered during implementation. It should be taken into account that this work has been developed in the fiscal area of cost verification. Bibliographical references, internal company documents and interviews with industry officials and the administrator responsible for the company were used. In the evolving of opera...

  15. Applying ABC analysis to the Navy's inventory management system

    May, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited ABC Analysis is an inventory categorization technique used to classify and prioritize inventory items in an effort to better allocate business resources. A items are defined as the inventory items considered extremely important to the business, requiring strict oversight and control. B items are important to the business, but don’t require the tight controls and oversight required of the A items. C items are marginally important to the...

  16. Inventory management for the health sector: ABC analysis approach

    Nabais, Joana Isabel Baptista

    2010-01-01

    A Work Project, presented as part of the requirements for the Award of a Masters Degree in Management from the NOVA – School of Business and Economics This project aims to analyse a hospital’s inventory management and make suggestions to improve its practices, with special attention on ABC analysis as an optimization tool for the inventory management, control and storage. Other cost reductions approaches are studied in order to contribute for the accurate management of clinical consumption...

  17. Supramolecular Polymers Formed by ABC Miktoarm Star Peptides

    Lin, Yi-an; Ou, Yu-Chuan; Cheetham, Andrew G.; Cui, Honggang

    2013-01-01

    We report here the design and synthesis of an ABC miktoarm star peptide connecting through a lysine junction a short peptide sequence and two hydrophobic but immiscible blocks (a hydrocarbon and a fluorocarbon). The designed molecule can self-assemble into one-dimensional nanostructures with a great diversity of kinetically evolving morphologies in aqueous solution, while molecules that contain only one of the two hydrophobic blocks form structurally similar filaments. We believe the rich ass...

  18. Second-order nonlinear optical metamaterials: ABC-type nanolaminates

    Alloatti, L., E-mail: alloatti@mit.edu; Kieninger, C.; Lauermann, M.; Köhnle, K. [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Electronics (IPQ), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Froelich, A.; Wegener, M. [Institute of Applied Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Frenzel, T. [Institute of Applied Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Freude, W. [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Electronics (IPQ), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Leuthold, J.; Koos, C., E-mail: christian.koos@kit.edu [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Electronics (IPQ), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2015-09-21

    We demonstrate a concept for second-order nonlinear metamaterials that can be obtained from non-metallic centrosymmetric constituents with inherently low optical absorption. The concept is based on iterative atomic-layer deposition of three different materials, A = Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B = TiO{sub 2}, and C = HfO{sub 2}. The centrosymmetry of the resulting ABC stack is broken since the ABC and the inverted CBA sequences are not equivalent—a necessary condition for non-zero second-order nonlinearity. In our experiments, we find that the bulk second-order nonlinear susceptibility depends on the density of interfaces, leading to a nonlinear susceptibility of 0.26 pm/V at a wavelength of 800 nm. ABC-type nanolaminates can be deposited on virtually any substrate and offer a promising route towards engineering of second-order optical nonlinearities at both infrared and visible wavelengths.

  19. The FTO (fat mass and obesity associated gene codes for a novel member of the non-heme dioxygenase superfamily

    Andrade-Navarro Miguel A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variants in the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated gene have been associated with an increased risk of obesity. However, the function of its protein product has not been experimentally studied and previously reported sequence similarity analyses suggested the absence of homologs in existing protein databases. Here, we present the first detailed computational analysis of the sequence and predicted structure of the protein encoded by FTO. Results We performed a sequence similarity search using the human FTO protein as query and then generated a profile using the multiple sequence alignment of the homologous sequences. Profile-to-sequence and profile-to-profile based comparisons identified remote homologs of the non-heme dioxygenase family. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that human FTO is a member of the non-heme dioxygenase (Fe(II- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases superfamily. Amino acid conservation patterns support this hypothesis and indicate that both 2-oxoglutarate and iron should be important for FTO function. This computational prediction of the function of FTO should suggest further steps for its experimental characterization and help to formulate hypothesis about the mechanisms by which it relates to obesity in humans.

  20. Bsep蛋白表达及调控与胆汁淤积的关系%Correlation between Bsep Protein Expression and Regulation and Cholestasis

    王火平

    2012-01-01

    Bsep protein, also known bile salt export pump, belongs to superfamily of ATP binding cas-sette( ABC )transporters. The research on hepatocellular minute structure confirmed that it's mainly expressed in hepatocytic canalicular membrane, is an important transporter of the process of bile excretion. At present many studies indicate that there is close association between Bsep protein expression changes and functional deficiency and cholestasis. Studies of Bsep protein and other bile salt transporters comprehensively and deeply is helpful to reveal molecular mechanism of cholestasis,providing theoretical basis and new ideas for the prevention , diagnosis and treatment of cholestasis.%Bsep蛋白即胆盐输出泵,属于ATP结合盒转运体超家族.对肝细胞细微结构的研究证实其主要表达于肝细胞胆管膜侧,为胆汁生成过程中重要的转运载体.目前大量研究表明,其表达量变化及功能缺失与胆汁淤积发生之间存在密切关系.对Bsep蛋白及其他胆酸转运体的研究有助于全面深入地揭示胆汁淤积发生的部分分子机制,为胆汁淤积的预防、诊治提供理论依据和新的思路.

  1. Salinomycin overcomes ABC transporter-mediated multidrug and apoptosis resistance in human leukemia stem cell-like KG-1a cells

    Fuchs, Dominik [Research Group Molecular Neuro-Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 305, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Daniel, Volker; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Opelz, Gerhard [Institute of Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 305, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Naujokat, Cord, E-mail: cord.naujokat@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 305, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-04-16

    Leukemia stem cells are known to exhibit multidrug resistance by expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which constitute transmembrane proteins capable of exporting a wide variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cytosol. We show here that human promyeloblastic leukemia KG-1a cells exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate resemble many characteristics of leukemia stem cells, including expression of functional ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein, BCRP and MRP8. Consequently, KG-1a cells display resistance to the induction of apoptosis by various chemotherapeutic drugs. Resistance to apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic drugs can be reversed by cyclosporine A, which effectively inhibits the activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP, thus demonstrating ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance in KG-1a cells. However, KG-1a are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction by salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to kill human breast cancer stem cell-like cells and to induce apoptosis in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug and apoptosis resistance. Whereas KG-1a cells can be adapted to proliferate in the presence of apoptosis-inducing concentrations of bortezomib and doxorubicin, salinomycin does not permit long-term adaptation of the cells to apoptosis-inducing concentrations. Thus, salinomycin should be regarded as a novel and effective agent for the elimination of leukemia stem cells and other tumor cells exhibiting ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance.

  2. Salinomycin overcomes ABC transporter-mediated multidrug and apoptosis resistance in human leukemia stem cell-like KG-1a cells

    Leukemia stem cells are known to exhibit multidrug resistance by expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which constitute transmembrane proteins capable of exporting a wide variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cytosol. We show here that human promyeloblastic leukemia KG-1a cells exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate resemble many characteristics of leukemia stem cells, including expression of functional ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein, BCRP and MRP8. Consequently, KG-1a cells display resistance to the induction of apoptosis by various chemotherapeutic drugs. Resistance to apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic drugs can be reversed by cyclosporine A, which effectively inhibits the activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP, thus demonstrating ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance in KG-1a cells. However, KG-1a are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction by salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to kill human breast cancer stem cell-like cells and to induce apoptosis in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug and apoptosis resistance. Whereas KG-1a cells can be adapted to proliferate in the presence of apoptosis-inducing concentrations of bortezomib and doxorubicin, salinomycin does not permit long-term adaptation of the cells to apoptosis-inducing concentrations. Thus, salinomycin should be regarded as a novel and effective agent for the elimination of leukemia stem cells and other tumor cells exhibiting ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance.

  3. Structural basis for the hydrolysis of ATP by a nucleotide binding subunit of an amino acid ABC transporter from Thermus thermophilus.

    Devi, Seenivasan Karthiga; Chichili, Vishnu Priyanka Reddy; Jeyakanthan, J; Velmurugan, D; Sivaraman, J

    2015-06-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a major family of small molecule transporter proteins, and their deregulation is associated with several diseases, including cancer. Here, we report the crystal structure of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of an amino acid ABC transporter from Thermus thermophilus (TTHA1159) in its apo form and as a complex with ADP along with functional studies. TTHA1159 is a putative arginine ABC transporter. The apo-TTHA1159 was crystallized in dimeric form, a hitherto unreported form of an apo NBD. Structural comparison of the apo and ADP-Mg(2+) complexes revealed that Phe14 of TTHA1159 undergoes a significant conformational change to accommodate ADP, and that the bound ADP interacts with the P-loop (Gly40-Thr45). Modeling of ATP-Mg(2+):TTHA1159 complex revealed that Gln86 and Glu164 are involved in water-mediated hydrogen bonding contacts and Asp163 in Mg(2+) ion-mediated hydrogen bonding contacts with the γ-phosphate of ATP, consistent with the findings of other ABC transporters. Mutational studies confirmed the necessity of each of these residues, and a comparison of the apo/ADP Mg(2+):TTHA1159 with its ATP-complex model suggests the likelihood of a key conformational change to the Gln86 side chain for ATP hydrolysis. PMID:25916755

  4. Keanekaragaman Jenis Kupu-Kupu Superfamili Papilionoidae di Banyuwindu, Limbangan Kendal

    Ratna Oqtafiana

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kupu-kupu turut memberi andil dalam mempertahankan keseimbangan ekosistem dan memperkaya keanekaragaman hayati. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui keanekaragaman jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae di Dukuh Banyuwindu Desa Limbangan Kecamatan Limbangan Kabupaten Kendal khususnya di habitat hutan sekunder, permukiman, Daerah Aliran Sungai (DAS dan persawahan.Populasi dalam penelitian ini adalah semua jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae yang ada di Banyuwindu, Limbangan Kendal. Sampel penelitian ini adalah jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae yang teramati di Banyuwindu Limbangan Kendal khususnya di habitat hutan sekunder, permukiman, DAS dan persawahan. Penelitian dilakukan dengan metode Indeks Point Abudance (IPA atau metode titik hitung.Hasil penelitian ditemukan sebanyak 62 jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae yang terdiri dari 737 individu yang tergolong kedalam empat famili yaitu Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae dan Nymphalidae. Hasil analisis indeks keanekaragaman jenis berkisar antara 2,74-3,09, indeks kemerataan jenis berkisar antara 0,86-0,87 dan memiliki dominansi berkisar antara 0,07-0,09. Indeks keanekaragaman jenis dan indeks kemerataan jenis tertinggi tercatat pada habitat permukiman yaitu 3,09 dan 0,87 dan memiliki dominansi 0,07 sedangkan terendah tercatat pada habitat persawahan yaitu 2,74 dan 0,86 dan memiliki dominansi 0,07.Butterfly also contribute in maintaining the ecological balance and enrich biodiversity. The aim of this research was to determine the diversity of butterflies’ superfamily Papilionoidae in Banyuwindu Hamlet Limbangan Sub district Kendal Regency, especially in the secondary forest habitat, settlements, river flow area (RFA and rice field. The population in this research were all kinds of butterflies’ Papilionoidae superfamily in Banyuwindu, Limbangan Kendal. The sample was kind of butterfly superfamily Papilionoidae that observed in Banyuwindu Limbangan Kendal

  5. A novel inhibitor of α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from Conus vexillum delineates a new conotoxin superfamily.

    Sulan Luo

    Full Text Available Conotoxins (CTxs selectively target a range of ion channels and receptors, making them widely used tools for probing nervous system function. Conotoxins have been previously grouped into superfamilies according to signal sequence and into families based on their cysteine framework and biological target. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of a new conotoxin, from Conus vexillum, named αB-conotoxin VxXXIVA. The peptide does not belong to any previously described conotoxin superfamily and its arrangement of Cys residues is unique among conopeptides. Moreover, in contrast to previously characterized conopeptide toxins, which are expressed initially as prepropeptide precursors with a signal sequence, a ''pro'' region, and the toxin-encoding region, the precursor sequence of αB-VxXXIVA lacks a ''pro'' region. The predicted 40-residue mature peptide, which contains four Cys, was synthesized in each of the three possible disulfide arrangements. Investigation of the mechanism of action of αB-VxXXIVA revealed that the peptide is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR antagonist with greatest potency against the α9α10 subtype. (1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectra indicated that all three αB-VxXXIVA isomers were poorly structured in aqueous solution. This was consistent with circular dichroism (CD results which showed that the peptides were unstructured in buffer, but adopted partially helical conformations in aqueous trifluoroethanol (TFE solution. The α9α10 nAChR is an important target for the development of analgesics and cancer chemotherapeutics, and αB-VxXXIVA represents a novel ligand with which to probe the structure and function of this protein.

  6. Analysis of the Active-Site Mechanism of Tyrosyl-DNA Phosphodiesterase I: A Member of the Phospholipase D Superfamily

    Gajewski, Stefan; Comeaux, Evan Q.; Jafari, Nauzanene; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Bashford, Donald; White, Stephen W.; van Waardenburg, Robert C.A.M. (UAB); (SJCH)

    2012-03-15

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I (Tdp1) is a member of the phospholipase D superfamily that hydrolyzes 3'-phospho-DNA adducts via two conserved catalytic histidines - one acting as the lead nucleophile and the second acting as a general acid/base. Substitution of the second histidine specifically to arginine contributes to the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy (SCAN1). We investigated the catalytic role of this histidine in the yeast protein (His432) using a combination of X-ray crystallography, biochemistry, yeast genetics, and theoretical chemistry. The structures of wild-type Tdp1 and His432Arg both show a phosphorylated form of the nucleophilic histidine that is not observed in the structure of His432Asn. The phosphohistidine is stabilized in the His432Arg structure by the guanidinium group that also restricts the access of nucleophilic water molecule to the Tdp1-DNA intermediate. Biochemical analyses confirm that His432Arg forms an observable and unique Tdp1-DNA adduct during catalysis. Substitution of His432 by Lys does not affect catalytic activity or yeast phenotype, but substitutions with Asn, Gln, Leu, Ala, Ser, and Thr all result in severely compromised enzymes and DNA topoisomerase I-camptothecin dependent lethality. Surprisingly, His432Asn did not show a stable covalent Tdp1-DNA intermediate that suggests another catalytic defect. Theoretical calculations revealed that the defect resides in the nucleophilic histidine and that the pK{sub a} of this histidine is crucially dependent on the second histidine and on the incoming phosphate of the substrate. This represents a unique example of substrate-activated catalysis that applies to the entire phospholipase D superfamily.

  7. Object Detection Based on Template Matching through Use of Best-So-Far ABC

    Anan Banharnsakun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Best-so-far ABC is a modified version of the artificial bee colony (ABC algorithm used for optimization tasks. This algorithm is one of the swarm intelligence (SI algorithms proposed in recent literature, in which the results demonstrated that the best-so-far ABC can produce higher quality solutions with faster convergence than either the ordinary ABC or the current state-of-the-art ABC-based algorithm. In this work, we aim to apply the best-so-far ABC-based approach for object detection based on template matching by using the difference between the RGB level histograms corresponding to the target object and the template object as the objective function. Results confirm that the proposed method was successful in both detecting objects and optimizing the time used to reach the solution.

  8. Object Detection Based on Template Matching through Use of Best-So-Far ABC

    2014-01-01

    Best-so-far ABC is a modified version of the artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm used for optimization tasks. This algorithm is one of the swarm intelligence (SI) algorithms proposed in recent literature, in which the results demonstrated that the best-so-far ABC can produce higher quality solutions with faster convergence than either the ordinary ABC or the current state-of-the-art ABC-based algorithm. In this work, we aim to apply the best-so-far ABC-based approach for object detection based on template matching by using the difference between the RGB level histograms corresponding to the target object and the template object as the objective function. Results confirm that the proposed method was successful in both detecting objects and optimizing the time used to reach the solution. PMID:24812556

  9. Object detection based on template matching through use of best-so-far ABC.

    Banharnsakun, Anan; Tanathong, Supannee

    2014-01-01

    Best-so-far ABC is a modified version of the artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm used for optimization tasks. This algorithm is one of the swarm intelligence (SI) algorithms proposed in recent literature, in which the results demonstrated that the best-so-far ABC can produce higher quality solutions with faster convergence than either the ordinary ABC or the current state-of-the-art ABC-based algorithm. In this work, we aim to apply the best-so-far ABC-based approach for object detection based on template matching by using the difference between the RGB level histograms corresponding to the target object and the template object as the objective function. Results confirm that the proposed method was successful in both detecting objects and optimizing the time used to reach the solution. PMID:24812556

  10. Robust LogitBoost and Adaptive Base Class (ABC) LogitBoost

    Li, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Logitboost is an influential boosting algorithm for classification. In this paper, we develop robust logitboost to provide an explicit formulation of tree-split criterion for building weak learners (regression trees) for logitboost. This formulation leads to a numerically stable implementation of logitboost. We then propose abc-logitboost for multi-class classification, by combining robust logitboost with the prior work of abc-boost. Previously, abc-boost was implemented as abc-mart using the mart algorithm. Our extensive experiments on multi-class classification compare four algorithms: mart, abcmart, (robust) logitboost, and abc-logitboost, and demonstrate the superiority of abc-logitboost. Comparisons with other learning methods including SVM and deep learning are also available through prior publications.

  11. In vitro functional characterization of BtuCD-F, the Escherichia coli ABC transporter for vitamin B-12 uptake

    Borths, EL; Poolman, B; Hvorup, RN; Locher, KP; Rees, DC; Hvorup, Rikki N.; Locher, Kaspar P.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2005-01-01

    BtuCD is an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter that facilitates uptake of vitamin B-12 into the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. The crystal structures of BtuCD and its cognate periplasmic binding protein BtuF have been recently determined. We have now explored BtuCD-F function in vitro, both in proteoliposomes and in various detergents. BtuCD reconstituted into proteoliposomes has a significant basal ATP hydrolysis rate that is stimulated by addition of BtuF and inhibited by sodium ortho-v...

  12. Three-dimensional modeling of the I-TevI homing endonuclease catalytic domain, a GIY-YIG superfamily member, using NMR restraints and Monte Carlo dynamics.

    Bujnicki, J M; Rotkiewicz, P; Kolinski, A; Rychlewski, L

    2001-10-01

    Using a recent version of the SICHO algorithm for in silico protein folding, we made a blind prediction of the tertiary structure of the N-terminal, independently folded, catalytic domain (CD) of the I-TevI homing endonuclease, a representative of the GIY-YIG superfamily of homing endonucleases. The secondary structure of the I-TevI CD has been determined using NMR spectroscopy, but computational sequence analysis failed to detect any protein of known tertiary structure related to the GIY-YIG nucleases (Kowalski et al., Nucleic Acids Res., 1999, 27, 2115-2125). To provide further insight into the structure-function relationships of all GIY-YIG superfamily members, including the recently described subfamily of type II restriction enzymes (Bujnicki et al., Trends Biochem. Sci., 2000, 26, 9-11), we incorporated the experimentally determined and predicted secondary and tertiary restraints in a reduced (side chain only) protein model, which was minimized by Monte Carlo dynamics and simulated annealing. The subsequently elaborated full atomic model of the I-TevI CD allows the available experimental data to be put into a structural context and suggests that the GIY-YIG domain may dimerize in order to bring together the conserved residues of the active site. PMID:11739889

  13. Chondroitinase ABC plus bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for repair of spinal cord injury☆

    Zhang, Chun; He, Xijing; Li, Haopeng; Wang, Guoyu

    2013-01-01

    As chondroitinase ABC can improve the hostile microenvironment and cell transplantation is proven to be effective after spinal cord injury, we hypothesized that their combination would be a more effective treatment option. At 5 days after T8 spinal cord crush injury, rats were injected with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell suspension or chondroitinase ABC 1 mm from the edge of spinal cord damage zone. Chondroitinase ABC was first injected, and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell suspension was...

  14. The Tangier disease gene product ABC1 controls the cellular apolipoprotein-mediated lipid removal pathway

    Lawn, Richard M.; Wade, David P.; Garvin, Michael R.; Wang, Xingbo; Schwartz, Karen; Porter, J. Gordon; Seilhamer, Jeffrey J.; Ashley M Vaughan; Oram, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The ABC1 transporter was identified as the defect in Tangier disease by a combined strategy of gene expression microarray analysis, genetic mapping, and biochemical studies. Patients with Tangier disease have a defect in cellular cholesterol removal, which results in near zero plasma levels of HDL and in massive tissue deposition of cholesteryl esters. Blocking the expression or activity of ABC1 reduces apolipoprotein-mediated lipid efflux from cultured cells, and increasing expression of ABC...

  15. A Common Weight Linear Optimization Approach for Multicriteria ABC Inventory Classification

    S. M. Hatefi; Torabi, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Organizations typically employ the ABC inventory classification technique to have an efficient control on a huge amount of inventory items. The ABC inventory classification problem is classification of a large amount of items into three groups: A, very important; B, moderately important; and C, relatively unimportant. The traditional ABC classification only accounts for one criterion, namely, the annual dollar usage of the items. But, there are other important criteria in real world which str...

  16. IMPROVED SEARCH MECHANISM IN ABC AND ITS APPLICATION IN ENGINEERING DESIGN PROBLEMS

    TARUN KUMAR SHARMA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABC (Artificial Bee Colony is one of the most recent nature inspired algorithm (NIA based on swarming metaphor. Proposed by Karaboga in 2005, ABC has proven to be a robust and efficient algorithm for solving global optimization problems over continuous space. In this paper, we propose a modified version of the ABC. In modified version called Dichotomous ABC (DABC, the idea is to move dichotomously in both directions to generate a new trial point. The results of a trade study carried out on three classical structural optimization problems taken from literature indicate the validity of the proposed algorithm.

  17. Developing a utility index for the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC-C) for fragile X syndrome

    Kerr, Cicely; Breheny, Katie; Lloyd, Andrew; Brazier, John; Bailey, Donald B.; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Cohen, Jonathan; Petrillo, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to develop a utility index (the ABC-UI) from the Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Community (ABC-C), for use in quantifying the benefit of emerging treatments for fragile X syndrome (FXS). Methods The ABC-C is a proxy-completed assessment of behaviour and is a widely used measure in FXS. A subset of ABC-C items across seven dimensions was identified to include in health state descriptions. This item reduction process was based on item performance, factor analysis and Rasch...

  18. Type II restriction endonuclease R.Eco29kI is a member of the GIY-YIG nuclease superfamily

    Feder Marcin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of experimentally determined crystal structures of Type II restriction endonucleases (REases exhibit a common PD-(D/EXK fold. Crystal structures have been also determined for single representatives of two other folds: PLD (R.BfiI and half-pipe (R.PabI, and bioinformatics analyses supported by mutagenesis suggested that some REases belong to the HNH fold. Our previous bioinformatic analysis suggested that REase R.Eco29kI shares sequence similarities with one more unrelated nuclease superfamily, GIY-YIG, however so far no experimental data were available to support this prediction. The determination of a crystal structure of the GIY-YIG domain of homing endonuclease I-TevI provided a template for modeling of R.Eco29kI and prompted us to validate the model experimentally. Results Using protein fold-recognition methods we generated a new alignment between R.Eco29kI and I-TevI, which suggested a reassignment of one of the putative catalytic residues. A theoretical model of R.Eco29kI was constructed to illustrate its predicted three-dimensional fold and organization of the active site, comprising amino acid residues Y49, Y76, R104, H108, E142, and N154. A series of mutants was constructed to generate amino acid substitutions of selected residues (Y49A, R104A, H108F, E142A and N154L and the mutant proteins were examined for their ability to bind the DNA containing the Eco29kI site 5'-CCGCGG-3' and to catalyze the cleavage reaction. Experimental data reveal that residues Y49, R104, E142, H108, and N154 are important for the nuclease activity of R.Eco29kI, while H108 and N154 are also important for specific DNA binding by this enzyme. Conclusion Substitutions of residues Y49, R104, H108, E142 and N154 predicted by the model to be a part of the active site lead to mutant proteins with strong defects in the REase activity. These results are in very good agreement with the structural model presented in this work and with our

  19. Chromokinesin: Kinesin superfamily regulating cell division through chromosome and spindle.

    Zhong, Ai; Tan, Fu-Qing; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-09-01

    Material transportation is essential for appropriate cellular morphology and functions, especially during cell division. As a motor protein moving along microtubules, kinesin has several intracellular functions. Many kinesins play important roles in chromosome condensation and separation and spindle organization during the cell cycle. Some of them even can directly bind to chromosomes, as a result, these proteins are called chromokinesins. Kinesin-4 and kinesin-10 family are two major families of chromokinesin and many members can regulate some processes, both in mitosis and meiosis. Their functions have been widely studied. Here, we summarize current knowledge about known chromokinesins and introduce their intracellular features in accordance with different families. Furthermore, we have also introduced some new-found but unconfirmed kinesins which may have a relationship with chromosomes or the cell cycle. PMID:27196062

  20. Biochemistry and Crystal Structure of Ectoine Synthase: A Metal-Containing Member of the Cupin Superfamily.

    Nils Widderich

    Full Text Available Ectoine is a compatible solute and chemical chaperone widely used by members of the Bacteria and a few Archaea to fend-off the detrimental effects of high external osmolarity on cellular physiology and growth. Ectoine synthase (EctC catalyzes the last step in ectoine production and mediates the ring closure of the substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid through a water elimination reaction. However, the crystal structure of ectoine synthase is not known and a clear understanding of how its fold contributes to enzyme activity is thus lacking. Using the ectoine synthase from the cold-adapted marine bacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis (Sa, we report here both a detailed biochemical characterization of the EctC enzyme and the high-resolution crystal structure of its apo-form. Structural analysis classified the (SaEctC protein as a member of the cupin superfamily. EctC forms a dimer with a head-to-tail arrangement, both in solution and in the crystal structure. The interface of the dimer assembly is shaped through backbone-contacts and weak hydrophobic interactions mediated by two beta-sheets within each monomer. We show for the first time that ectoine synthase harbors a catalytically important metal co-factor; metal depletion and reconstitution experiments suggest that EctC is probably an iron-dependent enzyme. We found that EctC not only effectively converts its natural substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid into ectoine through a cyclocondensation reaction, but that it can also use the isomer N-alpha-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid as its substrate, albeit with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeting amino acid residues that are evolutionarily highly conserved among the extended EctC protein family, including those forming the presumptive iron-binding site, were conducted to functionally analyze the properties of the resulting EctC variants. An assessment of

  1. Biochemistry and Crystal Structure of Ectoine Synthase: A Metal-Containing Member of the Cupin Superfamily.

    Widderich, Nils; Kobus, Stefanie; Höppner, Astrid; Riclea, Ramona; Seubert, Andreas; Dickschat, Jeroen S; Heider, Johann; Smits, Sander H J; Bremer, Erhard

    2016-01-01

    Ectoine is a compatible solute and chemical chaperone widely used by members of the Bacteria and a few Archaea to fend-off the detrimental effects of high external osmolarity on cellular physiology and growth. Ectoine synthase (EctC) catalyzes the last step in ectoine production and mediates the ring closure of the substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid through a water elimination reaction. However, the crystal structure of ectoine synthase is not known and a clear understanding of how its fold contributes to enzyme activity is thus lacking. Using the ectoine synthase from the cold-adapted marine bacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis (Sa), we report here both a detailed biochemical characterization of the EctC enzyme and the high-resolution crystal structure of its apo-form. Structural analysis classified the (Sa)EctC protein as a member of the cupin superfamily. EctC forms a dimer with a head-to-tail arrangement, both in solution and in the crystal structure. The interface of the dimer assembly is shaped through backbone-contacts and weak hydrophobic interactions mediated by two beta-sheets within each monomer. We show for the first time that ectoine synthase harbors a catalytically important metal co-factor; metal depletion and reconstitution experiments suggest that EctC is probably an iron-dependent enzyme. We found that EctC not only effectively converts its natural substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid into ectoine through a cyclocondensation reaction, but that it can also use the isomer N-alpha-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid as its substrate, albeit with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeting amino acid residues that are evolutionarily highly conserved among the extended EctC protein family, including those forming the presumptive iron-binding site, were conducted to functionally analyze the properties of the resulting EctC variants. An assessment of enzyme activity

  2. Distribution and Genetic Diversity of the ABC Transporter Lipoproteins PiuA and PiaA within Streptococcus pneumoniae and Related Streptococci

    Whalan, Rachael H.; Funnell, Simon G.P.; Bowler, Lucas D.; Hudson, Michael J.; Robinson, Andrew; Dowson, Christopher G.

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The existence of approximately 90 antigenically distinct capsular serotypes has greatly complicated the development of an effective pneumococcal vaccine. Virulence-associated proteins common and conserved among all capsular types now represent the best strategy to combat pneumococcal infections. PiuA and PiaA are the lipoprotein components of two pneumococcal iron ABC transporters and are required for full virulen...

  3. Role of conserved glycine in zinc-dependent medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily

    Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Singh, Raushan Kumar; Singh, Ranjitha;

    2012-01-01

    yet have been adequately investigated. Using a density functional theory-based screening strategy, we have identified a strictly conserved glycine residue (Gly) in the zinc-dependent MDR superfamily. To elucidate the role of this conserved Gly in MDR, we carried out a comprehensive structural...

  4. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    Sanath Kumar; Mun Mun Mukherjee; Varela, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is on...

  5. Fetal antigen 1 (FA1), a circulating member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) superfamily

    Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Krogh, T N; Støving, René Klinkby;

    1997-01-01

    We describe an ELISA technique for quantification of fetal antigen 1 (FA1), a glycoprotein belonging to the EGF-superfamily. The ELISA is based on immunospecifically purified polyclonal antibodies and has a dynamic range of 0.7-5.3 ng/ml, intra- and inter-assay C.V.s of less than 3.2% and an...

  6. The use of active breathing control (ABC) to reduce margin for breathing motion

    Purpose: For tumors in the thorax and abdomen, reducing the treatment margin for organ motion due to breathing reduces the volume of normal tissues that will be irradiated. A higher dose can be delivered to the target, provided that the risk of marginal misses is not increased. To ensure safe margin reduction, we investigated the feasibility of using active breathing control (ABC) to temporarily immobilize the patient's breathing. Treatment planning and delivery can then be performed at identical ABC conditions with minimal margin for breathing motion. Methods and Materials: An ABC apparatus is constructed consisting of 2 pairs of flow monitor and scissor valve, 1 each to control the inspiration and expiration paths to the patient. The patient breathes through a mouth-piece connected to the ABC apparatus. The respiratory signal is processed continuously, using a personal computer that displays the changing lung volume in real-time. After the patient's breathing pattern becomes stable, the operator activates ABC at a preselected phase in the breathing cycle. Both valves are then closed to immobilize breathing motion. Breathing motion of 12 patients were held with ABC to examine their acceptance of the procedure. The feasibility of applying ABC for treatment was tested in 5 patients by acquiring volumetric scans with a spiral computed tomography (CT) scanner during active breath-hold. Two patients had Hodgkin's disease, 2 had metastatic liver cancer, and 1 had lung cancer. Two intrafraction ABC scans were acquired at the same respiratory phase near the end of normal or deep inspiration. An additional ABC scan near the end of normal expiration was acquired for 2 patients. The ABC scans were also repeated 1 week later for a Hodgkin's patient. In 1 liver patient, ABC scans were acquired at 7 different phases of the breathing cycle to facilitate examination of the liver motion associated with ventilation. Contours of the lungs and livers were outlined when applicable

  7. MAP激酶家族在淀粉样β蛋白片段25~35引起的大鼠海马炎症反应及细胞凋亡中的作用%MAP kinase superfamily in amyloid β-protein fragment 25-35-induced inflammation andapoptosis in rat hippocampus in vivo

    金英; 范莹; 闫恩志; 宗志红; 包翠芬; 李智

    2005-01-01

    AIM To explore the mechanism of amyloid β-protein fragment 25-35(Aβ25-35)-induced inflammation and apoptosis in rat hippocampus in vivo by studying mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway and the protective effect of anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen. METHODS Rats were given ibuprofen (7.5 mg·kg-1 daily, ig) for 3 weeks prior to and 1 week after icv single dose of Aβ25-35 (10 μL, 1 mmol·L-1). Seven days after injection, Nissl staining and immunocytochemical technique were employed to determine the morphology of pyramidal neurons and astrocyte infiltration in hippocampal CA1. The expressions of IL-1β, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 MAPK, PKC, and caspase-3 were determined by Western blot. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed changes in IL-1β mRNA level. RESULTS Intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ25-35 elicited astrocyte activation and infiltration and caused a strong inflammatory reaction characterized by increased IL-1β production and elevated IL-1β mRNA level. The inflammatory reaction was accompanied by the loss of pyramidal neurons in hippocampal CA1. The phosphorylation of p38 MAPK was significantly increased, on the other hand, the phosphorylation of ERK was significantly reduced and these were coupled with the increase of caspase-3 expression in hippocampal CA1. Ibuprofen (7.5 mg·kg-1 daily, 4 weeks) significantly reduced Aβ-induced IL-1β expression, caspase-3 expression and p38 MAPK activation. The loss of pyramidal neurons was also significantly attenuated by treatment with ibuprofen. CONCLUSION The activation of p38 MAPK and the down-regulation of ERK play a pivotal role in the inflam-matory response and apoptosis evoked by Aβ25-35 in vivo, which can be prevented by ibuprofen.%目的研究淀粉样β蛋白片段25~35(Aβ25~35)引起的大鼠海马炎症反应、细胞凋亡机制及抗炎药物布洛芬的保护作用.方法大鼠灌胃给予布洛芬7.5 mg·kg-1,连续应用3

  8. Angiocentric glioma from a perspective of A-B-C classification of epilepsy associated tumors.

    Adamek, D; Siwek, G P; Chrobak, A A; Herman-Sucharska, I; Kwiatkowski, S; Morga, R; Radwańska, E; Urbanowicz, B

    2016-01-01

    Angiocentric glioma (AG) is a newly-classified, very rare, WHO grade I central nervous system (CNS) lesion, occurring usually in children and young adults. Only 52 patients with AG have been reported so far, making it one of the rarest neuropathological entities. Hereby we present two new cases of AG in young subjects with detailed neuropathological investigations and a neuroradiological picture along with a brief summary of all already published literature reports of this tumor. Histopathological examination of the resected tissue from both cases revealed similar changes characteristic of AG. The tumors were composed of spindle-like, elongated cells, forming characteristic pseudorosettes around vessels and diffusively infiltrating surrounding tissue, trapping neurons between tumor cells. Noticeably, some neoplastic cells encrusting vessels extended far beyond the main tumor mass. Hypothetically, this may be responsible for the recurrence of the tumor even in the case of apparently total excision. In immunohistochemistry, AG cells were glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin positive, also exhibiting a strikingly significant epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) dot-like staining pattern. In one of the cases, electron microscopy revealed ependymal differentiation features such as microvilli and cilia. Taken together, all these data strongly confirm a dual astroglial-ependymal nature of the tumor. Follow up corroborates benign character of this neoplasm. Both AGs reported here were immunonegative for the product of the mutated IDH-1 gene what, according to our best knowledge, has never been reported so far. It may suggest that in their pathogenesis AGs differ from grade II astrocytomas, which in most cases harbor a mutation of IDH-1. Noteworthy, neuroimaging in our cases was relatively characteristic but not conclusive, therefore biopsy (at least) is mandatory. A newly proposed so called "A-B-C" classification of long-term epilepsy-associated tumors (LEATs

  9. The Heterodimeric ABC Transporter EfrCD Mediates Multidrug Efflux in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Hürlimann, Lea M; Corradi, Valentina; Hohl, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V; Tieleman, D Peter; Seeger, Markus A

    2016-09-01

    Nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis are an emerging health problem. However, drug efflux pumps contributing to intrinsic drug resistance are poorly studied in this Gram-positive pathogen. In this study, we functionally investigated seven heterodimeric ABC transporters of E. faecalis that are annotated as drug efflux pumps. Deletion of ef0789-ef0790 on the chromosome of E. faecalis resulted in increased susceptibility to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, ethidium, and Hoechst 33342, and the corresponding transporter was named EfrCD. Unexpectedly, the previously described heterodimeric multidrug ABC transporter EfrAB contributes marginally to drug efflux in the endogenous context of E. faecalis In contrast, heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis revealed that EfrAB, EfrCD, and the product of ef2226-ef2227 (EfrEF) mediate the efflux of fluorescent substrates and confer resistance to multiple dyes and drugs, including fluoroquinolones. Four of seven transporters failed to exhibit drug efflux activity for the set of drugs and dyes tested, even upon overexpression in L. lactis Since all seven transporters were purified as heterodimers after overexpression in L. lactis, a lack of drug efflux activity is not attributed to poor expression or protein aggregation. Reconstitution of the purified multidrug transporters EfrAB, EfrCD, and EfrEF in proteoliposomes revealed functional coupling between ATP hydrolysis and drug binding. Our analysis creates an experimental basis for the accurate prediction of drug efflux transporters and indicates that many annotated multidrug efflux pumps might be incapable of drug transport and thus might fulfill other physiological functions in the cell. PMID:27381387

  10. Antitubercular Agent Delamanid and Metabolites as Substrates and Inhibitors of ABC and Solute Carrier Transporters.

    Sasabe, Hiroyuki; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Shibata, Masakazu; Hashizume, Kenta; Hamasako, Yusuke; Ohzone, Yoshihiro; Kashiyama, Eiji; Umehara, Ken

    2016-06-01

    Delamanid (Deltyba, OPC-67683) is the first approved drug in a novel class of nitro-dihydro-imidazooxazoles developed for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Patients with tuberculosis require treatment with multiple drugs, several of which have known drug-drug interactions. Transporters regulate drug absorption, distribution, and excretion; therefore, the inhibition of transport by one agent may alter the pharmacokinetics of another, leading to unexpected adverse events. Therefore, it is important to understand how delamanid affects transport activity. In the present study, the potencies of delamanid and its main metabolites as the substrates and inhibitors of various transporters were evaluated in vitro Delamanid was not transported by the efflux ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1/ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), solute carrier (SLC) transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptides, or organic cation transporter 1. Similarly, metabolite 1 (M1) was not a substrate for any of these transporters except P-gp. Delamanid showed no inhibitory effect on ABC transporters MDR1, BCRP, and bile salt export pump (BSEP; ABCB11), SLC transporters, or organic anion transporters. M1 and M2 inhibited P-gp- and BCRP-mediated transport but did so only at the 50% inhibitory concentrations (M1, 4.65 and 5.71 μmol/liter, respectively; M2, 7.80 and 6.02 μmol/liter, respectively), well above the corresponding maximum concentration in plasma values observed following the administration of multiple doses in clinical trials. M3 and M4 did not affect the activities of any of the transporters tested. These in vitro data suggest that delamanid is unlikely to have clinically relevant interactions with drugs for which absorption and disposition are mediated by this group of transporters. PMID:27021329

  11. Accelerator-based conversion (ABC) of reactor and weapons plutonium

    An accelerator-based conversion (ABC) system is presented that is capable of rapidly burning plutonium in a low-inventory sub-critical system. The system also returns fission power to the grid and transmutes troublesome long-lived fission products to short lived or stable products. Higher actinides are totally fissioned. The system is suited not only to controlled, rapid burning of excess weapons plutonium, but to the long range application of eliminating or drastically reducing the world total inventory of plutonium. Deployment of the system will require the successful resolution of a broad range of technical issues introduced in the paper

  12. Redundancy Level Optimization in Modular Software System Models using ABC

    Tarun Kumar Sharma; Millie Pant

    2014-01-01

    The performance of optimization algorithms is problem dependent and as per no free lunch theorem, there exists no such algorithm which can be efficiently applied to every type of problem(s). However, we can modify the algorithm/ technique in a manner such that it is able to deal with a maximum type of problems. In this study we have modified the structure of basic Artificial Bee Colony (ABC), a recently proposed metaheuristic algorithm based on the concept of swarm intelligence to optimize t...

  13. ABA, AAB and ABC renewal in taste aversion learning

    Javier Nieto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Existe evidencia de que los cambios en los estímulos ambientales afectan activamente la ocurrencia de la respuesta condicionada (RC. La renovación contextual o la reaparición de una RC extinguida se observa cuando se continúa la extinción de dicha respuesta en un contexto diferente. Se diseñaron dos experimentos con el propósito de evaluar la renovación contextual en un procedimiento de condicionamiento de aversión al sabor. En el Experimento 1, se analizó la renovación contextual ABA y AAB, mientras que el Experimento 2 se evaluó la renovación ABA, AAB y ABC. Ambos experimentos constaron de tres fases: adquisición, extinción y prueba. En ambos experimentos, la fase de adquisición se condujo en el Contexto A para todos los grupos y en ella, se inyectó i.p. Cloruro de Litio (LiCl a los sujetos inmediatamente después de que ingirieron una solución de sacarosa. En la fase de extinción, se expuso a los sujetos únicamente a la solución de sacarosa, sin la inyección. Los grupos AAB y AAA recibieron esta fase en el Contexto A, mientras que los sujetos de los grupos ABA y ABC la recibieron en el Contexto B. En la fase de prueba, se continúo la extinción. Los grupos ABA y AAA recibieron esta fase en el Contexto A, el grupo AAB en el contexto B, mientras el grupo ABC la recibió en un tercer contexto. Los resultados mostraron renovación de la aversión condicionada al sabor en los grupos ABA, AAB y ABC. Se analiza la relación de estos hallazgos con el modelo de recuperación de información de Bouton (1994.

  14. Design of the storage location based on the ABC analyses

    Jemelka, Milan; Chramcov, Bronislav; Kříž, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    The paper focuses on process efficiency and saving storage costs. Maintaining inventory through putaway strategy takes personnel time and costs money. The aim is to control inventory in the best way. The ABC classification based on Villefredo Pareto theory is used for a design of warehouse layout. New design of storage location reduces the distance of fork-lifters, total costs and it increases inventory process efficiency. The suggested solutions and evaluation of achieved results are described in detail. Proposed solutions were realized in real warehouse operation.

  15. The Twisted Dwarf's ABC: How Immunophilins Regulate Auxin Transport

    Bailly, Aurélien; Sovero, Valpuri; Geisler, Markus

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that immunophilins function as key regulators of plant development. One of the best investigated members, the multi-domain FKBP TWISTED DWARF1 (TWD1)/FKBP42, has been shown to reside on both the vacuolar and plasma membranes where it interacts in mirror image with two pairs of ABC transporters, MRP1/ MRP2 and PGP1/PGP19(MDR1), respectively. Twisted dwarf1 and pgp1/pgp19 mutants display strongly overlapping phenotypes, including reduction and disorientation of grow...

  16. Accelerator-based conversion (ABC) of reactor and weapons plutonium

    Jensen, R.J.; Trapp, T.J.; Arthur, E.D.; Bowman, C.D.; Davidson, J.W.; Linford, R.K.

    1993-06-01

    An accelerator-based conversion (ABC) system is presented that is capable of rapidly burning plutonium in a low-inventory sub-critical system. The system also returns fission power to the grid and transmutes troublesome long-lived fission products to short lived or stable products. Higher actinides are totally fissioned. The system is suited not only to controlled, rapid burning of excess weapons plutonium, but to the long range application of eliminating or drastically reducing the world total inventory of plutonium. Deployment of the system will require the successful resolution of a broad range of technical issues introduced in the paper.

  17. Analisis Incremental Kelayakan Penambahan Lini Perakitan Engine Motor PT ABC

    Jonny

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing motorcycle unit in Plant 1 of PT ABC requires engine supply from Plant 2. This has some burden on the operating cost of Plant 1 and the opportunity loss as well due to delay of motor engine delivery. Based on the problem, team proposes additional engine line in Plant 1 to cut engine supply from Plant 2. Therefore, team analyzes this proposal using incremental analysis to determine whether the proposal is feasible or not by comparing before and after condition with result NPV abo...

  18. Novel understanding of ABC transporters ABCB1/MDR/P-glycoprotein, ABCC2/MRP2, and ABCG2/BCRP in colorectal pathophysiology

    Andersen, Vibeke; Svenningsen, Katrine; Almind Knudsen, Lina; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Holmskov, Uffe; Stensballe, Allan; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    transporter proteins, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative, colitis, Crohns disease, colorectal cancer, colitis, intestinal inflammation, intestinal carcinogenesis, ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp/CD243/MDR1), ABCC2/multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), Abcb1....../Mdr1a, abcc2/Mrp2, abcg2/Bcrp, knock-out mice, tight junction, membrane lipid function. RESULTS: Recently, human studies reported that changes in the levels of ABC transporters were early events in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence leading to CRC. A link between ABCB1, high fat diet and gut microbes in...

  19. Transposition of the Tourist-MITE mPing in yeast: an assay that retains key features of catalysis by the class 2 PIF/Harbinger superfamily

    Hancock C Nathan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PIF/Harbinger is the most recently discovered DNA transposon superfamily and is now known to populate genomes from fungi to plants to animals. Mobilization of superfamily members requires two separate element-encoded proteins (ORF1 and TPase. Members of this superfamily also mobilize Tourist-like miniature inverted repeat transposable elements (MITEs, which are the most abundant transposable elements associated with the genes of plants, especially the cereal grasses. The phylogenetic analysis of many plant genomes indicates that MITEs can amplify rapidly from one or a few elements to hundreds or thousands. The most active DNA transposon identified to date in plants or animals is mPing, a rice Tourist-like MITE that is a deletion derivative of the autonomous Ping element. Ping and the closely related Pong are the only known naturally active PIF/Harbinger elements. Some rice strains accumulate ~40 new mPing insertions per plant per generation. In this study we report the development of a yeast transposition assay as a first step in deciphering the mechanism underlying the amplification of Tourist-MITEs. Results The ORF1 and TPase proteins encoded by Ping and Pong have been shown to mobilize mPing in rice and in transgenic Arabidopsis. Initial tests of the native proteins in a yeast assay resulted in very low transposition. Significantly higher activities were obtained by mutation of a putative nuclear export signal (NES in the TPase that increased the amount of TPase in the nucleus. When introduced into Arabidopsis, the NES mutant protein also catalyzed higher frequencies of mPing excision from the gfp reporter gene. Our yeast assay retains key features of excision and insertion of mPing including precise excision, extended insertion sequence preference, and a requirement for two proteins that can come from either Ping or Pong or both elements. Conclusions The yeast transposition assay provides a robust platform for analysis of

  20. Cross-species analyses identify the BNIP-2 and Cdc42GAP homology (BCH domain as a distinct functional subclass of the CRAL_TRIO/Sec14 superfamily.

    Anjali Bansal Gupta

    Full Text Available The CRAL_TRIO protein domain, which is unique to the Sec14 protein superfamily, binds to a diverse set of small lipophilic ligands. Similar domains are found in a range of different proteins including neurofibromatosis type-1, a Ras GTPase-activating Protein (RasGAP and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs. Proteins containing this structural protein domain exhibit a low sequence similarity and ligand specificity while maintaining an overall characteristic three-dimensional structure. We have previously demonstrated that the BNIP-2 and Cdc42GAP Homology (BCH protein domain, which shares a low sequence homology with the CRAL_TRIO domain, can serve as a regulatory scaffold that binds to Rho, RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs to control various cell signalling processes. In this work, we investigate 175 BCH domain-containing proteins from a wide range of different organisms. A phylogenetic analysis with ~100 CRAL_TRIO and similar domains from eight representative species indicates a clear distinction of BCH-containing proteins as a novel subclass within the CRAL_TRIO/Sec14 superfamily. BCH-containing proteins contain a hallmark sequence motif R(R/Kh(R/K(R/KNL(R/KxhhhhHPs ('h' is large and hydrophobic residue and 's' is small and weekly polar residue and can be further subdivided into three unique subtypes associated with BNIP-2-N, macro- and RhoGAP-type protein domains. A previously unknown group of genes encoding 'BCH-only' domains is also identified in plants and arthropod species. Based on an analysis of their gene-structure and their protein domain context we hypothesize that BCH domain-containing genes evolved through gene duplication, intron insertions and domain swapping events. Furthermore, we explore the point of divergence between BCH and CRAL-TRIO proteins in relation to their ability to bind small GTPases, GAPs and GEFs and lipid ligands. Our study suggests a need for a more extensive analysis of previously uncharacterized BCH, 'BCH

  1. Substrate overlap and functional competition between human nucleotide excision repair and Escherichia coli photolyase and (A)BC excision nuclease

    Human cell free extract prepared by the method of Manley et al. carries out repair synthesis on UV-irradiated DNA. Removal of pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivation with DNA photolyase reduces repair synthesis by about 50%. With excess enzyme in the reaction mixture photolyase reduced the repair signal by the same amount even in the absence of photoreactivating light, presumably by binding to pyrimidine dimers and interfering with the binding of human damage recognition protein. Similarly, the UvrB subunit of Escherichia coli (A)BC excinuclease when loaded onto UV-irradiated or psoralen-adducted DNA inhibited repair synthesis by cell-free extract by 75-80%. The opposite was true also as HeLa cell free extract specifically inhibited the photorepair of a thymine dimer by DNA photolyase and its removal by (A)BC excinuclease. Cell-free extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups A and C were equally effective in blocking the E. coli repair proteins, while extracts from complementation groups D and E were ineffective in blocking the E. coli enzyme. These results suggest that XP-D and XP-E cells are defective in the damage recognition subunits(s) of human excision nuclease

  2. Creating an iPhone Application for Collecting Continuous ABC Data

    Whiting, Seth W.; Dixon, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview and task analysis for creating a continuous ABC data- collection application using Xcode on a Mac computer. Behavior analysts can program an ABC data collection system, complete with a customized list of target clients, antecedents, behaviors, and consequences to be recorded, and have the data automatically sent to…

  3. Chondroitinase ABC treatment of injured spinal cord in rats Evaluation of long-term outcomes

    Haifeng Yuan; Qingquan Kong; Yongli Ding; Yueming Song; Lihong Hu; Zili Wang; Hao Liu; Limin Liu; Quan Gong; Tao Li

    2010-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans(CSPGs)which are produced by mature oligodendrocytes and reactive astrocytes can be upregulated after spinal cord injury and contribute to regenerative failure.Chondroitinase ABC(ChABC)digests glycosaminoglycan chains on CSPGs and can thereby overcome CSPG-mediated inhibition.However,many current studies have used an incomplete spinal cord injury model,and examined results after 8 12 weeks of ChABC treatment.In this study,a complete rat spinal cord transection injury model was used to study the long-term effects of ChABC treatment by subarachnoid catheter.Pathology of spinal cord regeneration was compared with control 24 weeks following ChABC treatment using immunohistochemistry and axon tracing techniques.At 24 weeks after injury,neurofilament 200 expression was significantly greater in the ChABC treatment group compared with the transection group.In the ChABC treatment group,axonal growth was demonstrated by a large number of biotinylated dextran amine positive axons caudal to,or past,the epicenter of injury.Biotinylated dextran amine-labeled fibers were found in the proximal end of the spinal cord in the transection alone group.These results confirm that ChABC can promote axon growth,neural regeneration,and repair after spinal cord injury in rats long after the initial injury.

  4. The ABCs of Activity-Based Costing: A Cost Containment and Reallocation Tool.

    Turk, Frederick J.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes activity-based costing (ABC) and how this tool may help management understand the costs of major activities and identify possible alternatives. Also discussed are the traditional costing systems used by higher education and ways of applying ABC to higher education. (GLR)

  5. The Role of Activity Based Costing (ABC) in Educational Support Services: A White Paper.

    Edds, Daniel B.

    Many front-line managers who are assuming more financial responsibility for their organizations find traditional cost accounting inadequate for their needs and are turning to Activity Based Costing (ABC). ABC is not a financial reporting system to serve the needs of regulatory agencies, but a tool that tracks costs from the general ledger…

  6. A TatABC-type Tat translocase is required for unimpaired aerobic growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032.

    Dan Oertel

    Full Text Available The twin-arginine translocation (Tat system transports folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria and the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts. Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative bacteria possess a TatABC-type Tat translocase in which each of the three inner membrane proteins TatA, TatB, and TatC performs a mechanistically distinct function. In contrast, low-GC Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, use a TatAC-type minimal Tat translocase in which the TatB function is carried out by a bifunctional TatA. In high-GC Gram-positive Actinobacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium glutamicum, tatA, tatB, and tatC genes can be identified, suggesting that these organisms, just like E. coli, might use TatABC-type Tat translocases as well. However, since contrary to this view a previous study has suggested that C. glutamicum might in fact use a TatAC translocase with TatB only playing a minor role, we reexamined the requirement of TatB for Tat-dependent protein translocation in this microorganism. Under aerobic conditions, the misassembly of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein QcrA was identified as a major reason for the severe growth defect of Tat-defective C. glutamicum mutant strains. Furthermore, our results clearly show that TatB, besides TatA and TatC, is strictly required for unimpaired aerobic growth. In addition, TatB was also found to be essential for the secretion of a heterologous Tat-dependent model protein into the C. glutamicum culture supernatant. Together with our finding that expression of the C. glutamicum TatB in an E. coli ΔtatB mutant strain resulted in the formation of an active Tat translocase, our results clearly indicate that a TatABC translocase is used as the physiologically relevant functional unit for Tat-dependent protein translocation in C. glutamicum and, most likely, also in other TatB-containing Actinobacteria.

  7. The use of active breathing control (ABC) to minimize breathing motion during radiation therapy

    Purpose. Reducing the treatment margin for organ motion during breathing reduces the volume of irradiated normal tissues. This may allow a higher dose of radiation to be delivered to the target volume for thoracic and abdominal tumors. However, such margin reduction must not increase the risk of marginal misses which may lead to local failure. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using Active Breathing Control (ABC) to temporarily immobilize the patient's breathing. Planning CT scans and radiation delivery can then be performed at identical ABC conditions such that a minimal margin for breathing motion can be prescribed safely. Methods and Materials. An active breathing control (ABC) apparatus was constructed consisting of two pairs of flow monitor and scissors valve; one each to control the inhalation and exhalation paths to the patient. The patient breathed through a mouth-piece or face mask connected to the ABC apparatus. A personal computer was used to process the respiratory signal and to display the changing lung volume in real-time. At some time after the patient achieved a stable breathing pattern, the operator activated ABC at a pre-selected point in the breathing cycle. Both valves were then closed to immobilize breathing motion. The period of active breath-hold was that which could be comfortably and repeatedly tolerated by each individual patient, as determined during a training session. The feasibility of the ABC procedure was studied by acquiring volumetric CT scans of a patient during active breath-hold. A helical CT scanner was used. These ABC scans were acquired at one-half to one-third the dose delivered with routine CT scanning. Nine patients with tumors in the thorax and abdomen were studied. Contiguous CT slices were obtained for a region which encompassed the target volume. At least 4 sets of volumetric scans were obtained; one with the patient breathing normally; two ABC scans at the same point near the end of normal inspiration

  8. The X-ray Crystallographic Structure and Activity Analysis of a Pseudomonas-Specific Subfamily of the HAD Enzyme Superfamily Evidences a Novel Biochemical Function

    Peisach,E.; Wang, L.; Burroughs, A.; Aravind, L.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Allen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily is a large family of proteins dominated by phosphotransferases. Thirty-three sequence families within the HAD superfamily (HADSF) have been identified to assist in function assignment. One such family includes the enzyme phosphoacetaldehyde hydrolase (phosphonatase). Phosphonatase possesses the conserved Rossmanniod core domain and a C1-type cap domain. Other members of this family do not possess a cap domain and because the cap domain of phosphonatase plays an important role in active site desolvation and catalysis, the function of the capless family members must be unique. A representative of the capless subfamily, PSPTO{_}2114, from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, was targeted for catalytic activity and structure analyses. The X-ray structure of PSPTO{_}2114 reveals a capless homodimer that conserves some but not all of the intersubunit contacts contributed by the core domains of the phosphonatase homodimer. The region of the PSPTO{_}2114 that corresponds to the catalytic scaffold of phosphonatase (and other HAD phosphotransfereases) positions amino acid residues that are ill suited for Mg+2 cofactor binding and mediation of phosphoryl group transfer between donor and acceptor substrates. The absence of phosphotransferase activity in PSPTO{_}2114 was confirmed by kinetic assays. To explore PSPTO{_}2114 function, the conservation of sequence motifs extending outside of the HADSF catalytic scaffold was examined. The stringently conserved residues among PSPTO{_}2114 homologs were mapped onto the PSPTO{_}2114 three-dimensional structure to identify a surface region unique to the family members that do not possess a cap domain. The hypothesis that this region is used in protein-protein recognition is explored to define, for the first time, HADSF proteins which have acquired a function other than that of a catalyst. Proteins 2008.

  9. Application of activity-based costing (ABC) for a Peruvian NGO healthcare provider.

    Waters, H; Abdallah, H; Santillán, D

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the application of activity-based costing (ABC) to calculate the unit costs of the services for a health care provider in Peru. While traditional costing allocates overhead and indirect costs in proportion to production volume or to direct costs, ABC assigns costs through activities within an organization. ABC uses personnel interviews to determine principal activities and the distribution of individual's time among these activities. Indirect costs are linked to services through time allocation and other tracing methods, and the result is a more accurate estimate of unit costs. The study concludes that applying ABC in a developing country setting is feasible, yielding results that are directly applicable to pricing and management. ABC determines costs for individual clinics, departments and services according to the activities that originate these costs, showing where an organization spends its money. With this information, it is possible to identify services that are generating extra revenue and those operating at a loss, and to calculate cross subsidies across services. ABC also highlights areas in the health care process where efficiency improvements are possible. Conclusions about the ultimate impact of the methodology are not drawn here, since the study was not repeated and changes in utilization patterns and the addition of new clinics affected applicability of the results. A potential constraint to implementing ABC is the availability and organization of cost information. Applying ABC efficiently requires information to be readily available, by cost category and department, since the greatest benefits of ABC come from frequent, systematic application of the methodology in order to monitor efficiency and provide feedback for management. The article concludes with a discussion of the potential applications of ABC in the health sector in developing countries. PMID:11326572

  10. From MDR to MXR

    Litman, Thomas; Druley, T E; Stein, W D;

    2001-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of membrane transporters is one of the largest protein classes known, and counts numerous proteins involved in the trafficking of biological molecules across cell membranes. The first known human ABC transporter was P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which confers m...

  11. New protein constructs from KLRB1 superfamily for immunologic and structural research

    Kolenko, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2014), s. 98. ISSN 2155-9899. [International Conference and Exhibition on Clinical & Cellular Immunology /3./. 29.09.2014-01.10.2014, Baltimore] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : KLRB1 * receptor * structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  12. Avl9p, a Member of a Novel Protein Superfamily, Functions in the Late Secretory Pathway

    Harsay, Edina; Schekman, Randy

    2007-01-01

    The branching of exocytic transport routes in both yeast and mammalian cells has complicated studies of the late secretory pathway, and the mechanisms involved in exocytic cargo sorting and exit from the Golgi and endosomes are not well understood. Because cargo can be sorted away from a blocked route and secreted by an alternate route, mutants defective in only one route do not exhibit a strong secretory phenotype and are therefore difficult to isolate. In a genetic screen designed to isolat...

  13. Abacavir forms novel cross-linking abacavir protein adducts in patients.

    Meng, Xiaoli; Lawrenson, Alexandre S; Berry, Neil G; Maggs, James L; French, Neil S; Back, David J; Khoo, Saye H; Naisbitt, Dean J; Park, B Kevin

    2014-04-21

    Abacavir (ABC), a nucleoside-analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor, is associated with severe hypersensitivity reactions that are thought to involve the activation of CD8+ T cells in a HLA-B*57:01-restricted manner. Recent studies have claimed that noncovalent interactions of ABC with HLA-B*57:01 are responsible for the immunological reactions associated with ABC. However, the formation of hemoglobin-ABC aldehyde (ABCA) adducts in patients exposed to ABC suggests that protein conjugation might represent a pathway for antigen formation. To further characterize protein conjugation reactions, we used mass spectrometric methods to define ABCA modifications in patients receiving ABC therapy. ABCA formed a novel intramolecular cross-linking adduct on human serum albumin (HSA) in patients and in vitro via Michael addition, followed by nucleophilic adduction of the aldehyde with a neighboring protein nucleophile. Adducts were detected on Lys159, Lys190, His146, and Cys34 residues in the subdomain IB of HSA. Only a cysteine adduct and a putative cross-linking adduct were detected on glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP). These findings reveal that ABC forms novel types of antigens in all patients taking the drug. It is therefore vital that the immunological consequences of such pathways of haptenation are explored in the in vitro models that have been used by various groups to define new mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity exemplified by ABC. PMID:24571427

  14. Eukaryotic LYR Proteins Interact with Mitochondrial Protein Complexes

    Heike Angerer

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria host ancient essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic pathways. LYR (leucine/tyrosine/arginine) motif proteins (LYRMs) of the Complex1_LYR-like superfamily interact with protein complexes of bacterial origin. Many LYR proteins function as extra subunits (LYRM3 and LYRM6) or novel assembly factors (LYRM7, LYRM8, ACN9 and FMC1) of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) core complexes. Structural insights into complex I accessory subunits LYRM6 and LYRM3 have bee...

  15. Phosphorylation of plastoglobular proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Lohscheider, Jens N; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2016-06-01

    Plastoglobules (PGs) are plastid lipid-protein particles with a small specialized proteome and metabolome. Among the 30 core PG proteins are six proteins of the ancient ABC1 atypical kinase (ABC1K) family and their locations in an Arabidopsis mRNA-based co-expression network suggested central regulatory roles. To identify candidate ABC1K targets and a possible ABC1K hierarchical phosphorylation network within the chloroplast PG proteome, we searched Arabidopsis phosphoproteomics data from publicly available sources. Evaluation of underlying spectra and/or associated information was challenging for a variety of reasons, but supported pSer sites and a few pThr sites in nine PG proteins, including five FIBRILLINS. PG phosphorylation motifs are discussed in the context of possible responsible kinases. The challenges of collection and evaluation of published Arabidopsis phosphorylation data are discussed, illustrating the importance of deposition of all mass spectrometry data in well-organized repositories such as PRIDE and ProteomeXchange. This study provides a starting point for experimental testing of phosho-sites in PG proteins and also suggests that phosphoproteomics studies specifically designed toward the PG proteome and its ABC1K are needed to understand phosphorylation networks in these specialized particles. PMID:26962209

  16. Germ-line transgenesis of the Tc1/mariner superfamily transposon Minos in Ciona intestinalis

    Sasakura, Yasunori; Awazu, Satoko; Chiba, Shota; Satoh, Nori

    2003-01-01

    The tadpole larva of the basal chordate Ciona intestinalis has the most simplified, basic body-plan of chordates. Because it has a compact genome with a complete draft sequence, a large quantity of EST/cDNA information, and a short generation time, Ciona is a suitable model for future genetics. We establish here a transgenic technique in Ciona that uses the Tc1/mariner superfamily transposon Minos. Minos was integrated efficiently into the genome of germ cells and transmitted stably to ...

  17. Directed Evolution of a Thermostable Quorum-quenching Lactonase from the Amidohydrolase Superfamily*

    Chow, Jeng Yeong; Xue, Bo; Lee, Kang Hao; Tung, Alvin; Wu, Long; Robinson, Robert C.; Yew, Wen Shan

    2010-01-01

    A thermostable quorum-quenching lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GI: 56420041) was used as an initial template for in vitro directed evolution experiments. This enzyme belongs to the phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) group of enzymes within the amidohydrolase superfamily that hydrolyze N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) that are involved in virulence pathways of quorum-sensing pathogenic bacteria. Here we have determined the N-butyryl-l-homoserine lactone-liganded structure...

  18. Origination, Expansion, Evolutionary Trajectory, and Expression Bias of AP2/ERF Superfamily in Brassica napus.

    Song, Xiaoming; Wang, Jinpeng; Ma, Xiao; Li, Yuxian; Lei, Tianyu; Wang, Li; Ge, Weina; Guo, Di; Wang, Zhenyi; Li, Chunjin; Zhao, Jianjun; Wang, Xiyin

    2016-01-01

    The AP2/ERF superfamily, one of the most important transcription factor families, plays crucial roles in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. So far, a comprehensive evolutionary inference of its origination and expansion has not been available. Here, we identified 515 AP2/ERF genes in B. napus, a neo-tetraploid forming ~7500 years ago, and found that 82.14% of them were duplicated in the tetraploidization. A prominent subgenome bias was revealed in gene expression, tissue-specific, and gene conversion. Moreover, a large-scale analysis across plants and alga suggested that this superfamily could have been originated from AP2 family, expanding to form other families (ERF, and RAV). This process was accompanied by duplicating and/or alternative deleting AP2 domain, intragenic domain sequence conversion, and/or by acquiring other domains, resulting in copy number variations, alternatively contributing to functional innovation. We found that significant positive selection occurred at certain critical nodes during the evolution of land plants, possibly responding to changing environment. In conclusion, the present research revealed origination, functional innovation, and evolutionary trajectory of the AP2/ERF superfamily, contributing to understanding their roles in plant stress tolerance. PMID:27570529

  19. Supersymmetric Theory of Stochastic ABC Model: A Numerical Study

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V; Ensslin, Torsten A; Wang, Kang L

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate numerically the stochastic ABC model, a toy model in the theory of astrophysical kinematic dynamos, within the recently proposed supersymmetric theory of stochastics (STS). STS characterises stochastic differential equations (SDEs) by the spectrum of the stochastic evolution operator (SEO) on elements of the exterior algebra or differentials forms over the system's phase space, X. STS can thereby classify SDEs as chaotic or non-chaotic by identifying the phenomenon of stochastic chaos with the spontaneously broken topological supersymmetry that all SDEs possess. We demonstrate the following three properties of the SEO, deduced previously analytically and from physical arguments: the SEO spectra for zeroth and top degree forms never break topological supersymmetry, all SDEs possesses pseudo-time-reversal symmetry, and each de Rahm cohomology class provides one supersymmetric eigenstate. Our results also suggests that the SEO spectra for forms of complementary degrees, i.e., k and ...

  20. [ABC supplies classification: a managment tool of costs in nursing].

    Lourenço, Karina Gomes; Castilho, Valéria

    2006-01-01

    The implementation of costs management systems has been extremely helpful to healthcare area owing to their efficacy in cutting expenditures as well as improving service quality. The ABC classification is an applied strategy to stocktaking and control. The research, which consists of an exploratory/descriptive quantitative analysis, has been carried out in order to identify, in a year time period, the demand for supplies at Universidade de Sao Paulo's Hospital. Of 1938 classified materials, 67 itens had been classified that they correspond to the materials with bigger costs for the hospital. 31.3% of these A-Class supplies catalogued items are the nursing materials, more used for the nursing team. PMID:16915729

  1. Observation of an ABC effect in proton-proton collisions

    Dymov, S; Kacharava, A; Khoukaz, A; Komarov, V; Kulessa, P; Kulikov, A; Kurbatov, V; Macharashvili, G; Merzliakov, S; Mielke, M; Mikirtychiants, S; Nekipelov, M; Nioradze, M; Ohm, H; Rathmann, F; Ströher, H; Tsirkov, D; Uzikov, Yu; Valdau, Yu; Wilkin, C; Yaschenko, S; Zalikhanov, B

    2009-01-01

    The cross section for inclusive multipion production in the pp->ppX reaction was measured at COSY-ANKE at four beam energies, 0.8, 1.1, 1.4, and 2.0 GeV, for low excitation energy in the final pp system, such that the diproton quasi-particle is in the 1S0 state. At the three higher energies the missing mass Mx spectra show a strong enhancement at low Mx, corresponding to an ABC effect that moves steadily to larger values as the energy is increased. Despite the missing-mass structure looking very different at 0.8 GeV, the variation with Mx and beam energy are consistent with two-pion production being mediated through the excitation of two Delta(1232) isobars, coupled to S-- and D-- states of the initial pp system.

  2. Supramolecular Polymers Formed by ABC Miktoarm Star Peptides.

    Lin, Yi-An; Ou, Yu-Chuan; Cheetham, Andrew G; Cui, Honggang

    2013-12-17

    We report here the design and synthesis of an ABC miktoarm star peptide connecting through a lysine junction a short peptide sequence and two hydrophobic but immiscible blocks (a hydrocarbon and a fluorocarbon). The designed molecule can self-assemble into one-dimensional nanostructures with a great diversity of kinetically evolving morphologies in aqueous solution, while molecules that contain only one of the two hydrophobic blocks form structurally similar filaments. We believe the rich assembly behavior and morphological evolution are a direct reflection of the molecular frustration present within the filament core as a result of the in-compatibility of the fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon segments. Our finding opens new opportunities for creating complex supramolecular polymers through the architecture design of small molecular building units. PMID:24490124

  3. Multidrug resistance-associated proteins: Export pumps for conjugates with glutathione, glucuronate or sulfate.

    Homolya, László; Váradi, András; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2003-01-01

    Many endogenous or xenobiotic lipophilic substances are eliminated from the cells by the sequence of oxidation, conjugation to an anionic group (glutathione, glucuronate or sulfate) and transport across the plasma membrane into the extracellular space. The latter step is mediated by integral membrane glycoproteins belonging to the superfamily of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters. A subfamily, referred as ABCC, includes the famous/infamous cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), the sulfonylurea receptors (SUR 1 and 2), and the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs). The name of the MRPs refers to their potential role in clinical multidrug resistance, a phenomenon that hinders the effective chemotherapy of tumors. The MRPs that have been functionally characterized so far share the property of ATP-dependent export pumps for conjugates with glutathione (GSH), glucuronate or sulfate. MRP1 and MRP2 are also mediating the cotransport of unconjugated amphiphilic compounds together with free GSH. MRP3 preferentially transports glucuronides but not glutathione S-conjugates or free GSH. MRP1 and MRP2 also contribute to the control of the intracellular glutathione disulfide (GSSG) level. Although these proteins are low affinity GSSG transporters, they can play essential role in response to oxidative stress when the activity of GSSG reductase becomes rate limiting. The human MRP4, MRP5 and MRP6 have only partially been characterized. However, it has been revealed that MRP4 can function as an efflux pump for cyclic nucleotides and nucleoside analogues, used as anti-HIV drugs. MRP5 also transports GSH conjugates, nucleoside analogues, and possibly heavy metal complexes. Transport of glutathione S-conjugates mediated by MRP6, the mutation of which causes pseudoxantoma elasticum, has recently been shown. In summary, numerous members of the multidrug resistance-associated protein family serve as export pumps that prevent the accumulation of anionic conjugates

  4. Applying Activity Based Costing (ABC Method to Calculate Cost Price in Hospital and Remedy Services

    A Dabiri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Activity Based Costing (ABC is one of the new methods began appearing as a costing methodology in the 1990. It calculates cost price by determining the usage of resources. In this study, ABC method was used for calculating cost price of remedial services in hospitals.Methods: To apply ABC method, Shahid Faghihi Hospital was selected. First, hospital units were divided into three main departments: administrative, diagnostic, and hospitalized. Second, activity centers were defined by the activity analysis method. Third, costs of administrative activity centers were allocated into diagnostic and operational departments based on the cost driver. Finally, with regard to the usage of cost objectives from services of activity centers, the cost price of medical services was calculated.Results: The cost price from ABC method significantly differs from tariff method. In addition, high amount of indirect costs in the hospital indicates that capacities of resources are not used properly.Conclusion: Cost price of remedial services with tariff method is not properly calculated when compared with ABC method. ABC calculates cost price by applying suitable mechanisms but tariff method is based on the fixed price. In addition, ABC represents useful information about the amount and combination of cost price services.

  5. The viral transmembrane superfamily: possible divergence of Arenavirus and Filovirus glycoproteins from a common RNA virus ancestor

    Buchmeier Michael J

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies of viral entry proteins from influenza, measles, human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1, and Ebola virus have shown, first with molecular modeling, and then X-ray crystallographic or other biophysical studies, that these disparate viruses share a coiled-coil type of entry protein. Results Structural models of the transmembrane glycoproteins (GP-2 of the Arenaviruses, lymphochoriomeningitis virus (LCMV and Lassa fever virus, are presented, based on consistent structural propensities despite variation in the amino acid sequence. The principal features of the model, a hydrophobic amino terminus, and two antiparallel helices separated by a glycosylated, antigenic apex, are common to a number of otherwise disparate families of enveloped RNA viruses. Within the first amphipathic helix, demonstrable by circular dichroism of a peptide fragment, there is a highly conserved heptad repeat pattern proposed to mediate multimerization by coiled-coil interactions. The amino terminal 18 amino acids are 28% identical and 50% highly similar to the corresponding region of Ebola, a member of the Filovirus family. Within the second, charged helix just prior to membrane insertion there is also high similarity over the central 18 amino acids in corresponding regions of Lassa and Ebola, which may be further related to the similar region of HIV-1 defining a potent antiviral peptide analogue. Conclusions These findings indicate a common pattern of structure and function among viral transmembrane fusion proteins from a number of virus families. Such a pattern may define a viral transmembrane superfamily that evolved from a common precursor eons ago.

  6. The structure and function of endophilin proteins

    Kjaerulff, Ole; Brodin, Lennart; Jung, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Members of the BAR domain protein superfamily are essential elements of cellular traffic. Endophilins are among the best studied BAR domain proteins. They have a prominent function in synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE), receptor trafficking and apoptosis, and in other processes that require...

  7. Relationship of LRP-human major vault protein to in vitro and clinical resistance to anticancer drugs.

    Izquierdo, M A; Scheffer, G L; Flens, M J; Shoemaker, R H; Rome, L H; Scheper, R J

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) has been related to two members of the ABC-superfamily of transporters, P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein (MRP). We have described a 110 kD protein termed the Lung Resistance-related Protein (LRP) that is overexpressed in several non-Pgp MDR cells lines of different histogenetic origin. Reversal of MDR parallels a decrease in LRP expression. In a panel of 61 cancer cell lines which have not been subjected to laboratory drug selection, LRP was a superior predictor for in vitro resistance to MDR-related drugs when compared to Pgp and MRP, and LRP's predictive value extended to MDR unrelated drugs, such as platinum compounds. LRP is widely distributed in clinical cancer specimens, but the frequency of LRP expression inversely correlates with the known chemosensitivity of different tumour types. Furthermore, LRP expression at diagnosis has been shown to be a strong and independent prognostic factor for response to chemotherapy and outcome in acute myeloid leukemia and ovarian carcinoma (platinum-based treatment) patients. Recently, LRP has been identified as the human major protein. Vaults are novel cellular organelles broadly distributed and highly conserved among diverse eukaryotic cells, suggesting that they play a role in fundamental cell processes. Vaults localise to nuclear pore complexes and may be the central plug of the nuclear pore complexes. Vaults structure and localisation support a transport function for this particle which could involve a variety of substrates. Vaults may therefore play a role in drug resistance by regulating the nucleocytoplasmic transport of drugs. PMID:8862006

  8. The ABC Catering Services Ltd.ABC食品供应服务公司

    黄权初

    2001-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction ABC Catering Services Ltd. has long recognized its needs to compete effectively in its key markets in the Pacific Rim. With ABC' s historical focus on delivering almost faultless service, comparatively little attention has been given to the supply chain cost of that delivery. However, the new kitchen at Seoul, was open in 1997, added more workload to the company. Things have not been working well since then.The ABC Corporation realizes that it is necessary to reduce supply chain costs and to improve its operation efficiency in order to retain and expand customer base.

  9. A Design of ABC95 Array Computer Multi-function Interconnection Chips

    2002-01-01

    ABC95 array computer is a multi-function network computer based on FPGA technology. A notable feature of ABC95 array computer is the support of complex interconnection, which determines that the computer must have enough I/O band and flexible communications between Pes. The authors designed the interconnecting network chips of ABC95 and realized a form of multi-function interconnection. The multi-function interconnecting network supports conflict-free access from processors to memory matrix and the MESH network of enhanced processors to processor communications. The design scheme has been proved feasible by experiment.

  10. D-Ribulose 5-Phosphate 3-Epimerase: Functional and Structural Relationships to Members of the Ribulose-Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrel Superfamily

    Akana,J.; Federov, A.; Federov, E.; Novak, W.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    The 'ribulose phosphate binding' superfamily defined by the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database is considered the result of divergent evolution from a common ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8}-barrel ancestor. The superfamily includes D-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE), orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), and 3-keto-L-gulonate 6-phosphate decarboxylase (KGPDC), members of the OMPDC suprafamily, as well as enzymes involved in histidine and tryptophan biosynthesis that utilize phosphorylated metabolites as substrates. We now report studies of the functional and structural relationships of RPE to the members of the superfamily. As suggested by the results of crystallographic studies of the RPEs from rice and Plasmodium falciparum, the RPE from Streptococcus pyogenes is activated by Zn{sup 2+} which binds with a stoichiometry of one ion per polypeptide. Although wild type RPE has a high affinity for Zn{sup 2+} and inactive apoenzyme cannot be prepared, the affinity for Zn{sup 2+} is decreased by alanine substitutions for the two histidine residues that coordinate the Zn{sup 2+} ion (H34A and H67A); these mutant proteins can be prepared in an inactive, metal-free form and activated by exogenous Zn{sup 2+}. The crystal structure of the RPE was solved at 1.8 Angstroms resolution in the presence of D-xylitol 5-phosphate, an inert analogue of the D-xylulose 5-phosphate substrate. This structure suggests that the 2,3-enediolate intermediate in the 1,1-proton transfer reaction is stabilized by bidentate coordination to the Zn{sup 2+} that also is liganded to His 34, Asp 36, His 67, and Asp 176; the carboxylate groups of the Asp residues are positioned also to function as the acid/base catalysts. Although the conformation of the bound analogue resembles those of ligands bound in the active sites of OMPDC and KGPDC, the identities of the active site residues that coordinate the essential Zn{sup 2+} and participate as acid/base catalysts

  11. PUB16 gene expression under abiotic stress and their putative role as an ARM repeat protein in Arabidopsis thaliana self-pollination pathway

    María Gabriela Acosta; Miguel Ángel Ahumada; Sergio Luis Lassaga; Víctor Hugo Casco

    2012-01-01

    The armadillo repeat super-family proteins (ARM repeat super-family proteins) possess tandem armadillo repeats and have been postulated to play different roles in plant development, morphogenesis, defense, cell death, and signal transduction through hormone signalling. In The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR), we found 113 loci closely related to ARM repeat family proteins. This extensive group of proteins was studied in flowers tissues by western blot using antibodies directed against ...

  12. Protein-protein interactions in the β-oxidation part of the phenylacetate utilization pathway: crystal structure of the PaaF-PaaG hydratase-isomerase complex.

    Grishin, Andrey M; Ajamian, Eunice; Zhang, Linhua; Rouiller, Isabelle; Bostina, Mihnea; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2012-11-01

    Microbial anaerobic and so-called hybrid pathways for degradation of aromatic compounds contain β-oxidation-like steps. These reactions convert the product of the opening of the aromatic ring to common metabolites. The hybrid phenylacetate degradation pathway is encoded in Escherichia coli by the paa operon containing genes for 10 enzymes. Previously, we have analyzed protein-protein interactions among the enzymes catalyzing the initial oxidation steps in the paa pathway (Grishin, A. M., Ajamian, E., Tao, L., Zhang, L., Menard, R., and Cygler, M. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 10735-10743). Here we report characterization of interactions between the remaining enzymes of this pathway and show another stable complex, PaaFG, an enoyl-CoA hydratase and enoyl-Coa isomerase, both belonging to the crotonase superfamily. These steps are biochemically similar to the well studied fatty acid β-oxidation, which can be catalyzed by individual monofunctional enzymes, multifunctional enzymes comprising several domains, or enzymatic complexes such as the bacterial fatty acid β-oxidation complex. We have determined the structure of the PaaFG complex and determined that although individually PaaF and PaaG are similar to enzymes from the fatty acid β-oxidation pathway, the structure of the complex is dissimilar from bacterial fatty acid β-oxidation complexes. The PaaFG complex has a four-layered structure composed of homotrimeric discs of PaaF and PaaG. The active sites of PaaF and PaaG are adapted to accept the intermediary components of the Paa pathway, different from those of the fatty acid β-oxidation. The association of PaaF and PaaG into a stable complex might serve to speed up the steps of the pathway following the conversion of phenylacetyl-CoA to a toxic and unstable epoxide-CoA by PaaABCE monooxygenase. PMID:22961985

  13. Non-equivalent roles of two periplasmic subunits in the function and assembly of triclosan pump TriABC from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Weeks, Jon W; Nickels, Logan M; Ntreh, Abigail T; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2015-10-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug efflux transporters function in complexes with periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs) that enable antibiotic efflux across the outer membrane. In this study, we analyzed the function, composition and assembly of the triclosan efflux transporter TriABC-OpmH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We report that this transporter possesses a surprising substrate specificity that encompasses not only triclosan but the detergent SDS, which are often used together in antibacterial soaps. These two compounds interact antagonistically in a TriABC-dependent manner and negate antibacterial properties of each other. Unlike other efflux pumps that rely on a single MFP for their activities, two different MFPs, TriA and TriB, are required for triclosan/SDS resistance mediated by TriABC-OpmH. We found that analogous mutations in the α-helical hairpin and membrane proximal domains of TriA and TriB differentially affect triclosan efflux and assembly of the complex. Furthermore, our results show that TriA and TriB function as a dimer, in which TriA is primarily responsible for stabilizing interactions with the outer membrane channel, whereas TriB is important for the stimulation of the transporter. We conclude that MFPs are engaged into complexes as asymmetric dimers, in which each protomer plays a specific role. PMID:26193906

  14. Therapeutic potential of inhibiting ABCE1 and eRF3 genes via siRNA strategy using chitosan nanoparticles in breast cancer cells

    Cengiz, Bagdat Burcu; Asik, Mehmet Dogan [Hacettepe University, Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine Division (Turkey); Kara, Goknur [Hacettepe University, Biochemistry Division, Chemistry Department (Turkey); Turk, Mustafa [Kirikkale University, Bioengineering Department (Turkey); Denkbas, Emir Baki, E-mail: denkbas@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Biochemistry Division, Chemistry Department (Turkey)

    2015-04-15

    In recent years, targeted cancer therapy strategies have begun to take the place of the conventional treatments. Inhibition of the specific genes, involved in cancer progress, via small interfering RNA (siRNA) has become one of the promising therapeutic approaches for cancer therapy. However, due to rapid nuclease degradation and poor cellular uptake of siRNA, a suitable carrier for siRNA penetration inside the cells is required. We used chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs) to efficiently deliver ATP-binding casette E1 (ABCE1) and eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3)-targeting siRNAs, individually and together, to reduce the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of breast cancer cells. The CS-NPs were generated by ionic gelation method using tripolyphosphate (TPP) as a crosslinker. Nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained with diameters ranging between 110 and 230 nm and the zeta potential of approximately 27 mV optimizing the solution pH to 4.5 and CS/TPP mass ratio to 3:1. Loading efficiencies of 98.69 % ± 0.051 and 98.83 % ± 0.047 were achieved when ABCE1 siRNA and eRF3 siRNA were entrapped into the NPs, respectively. Cell proliferation assay demonstrated that siRNA-loaded CS-NPs were more effective on cancer cells when compared to siRNAs without CS-NPs. Parallel results were also obtained by apoptosis/necrosis, double-staining analysis. Within our study, the potency of ABCE1 and eRF3 siRNAs were shown for the first time with this kind of polymeric delivery system. The results also indicated that ABCE1 and eRF3, important molecules in protein synthesis, could serve as effective targets to inhibit the cancer cells.

  15. Therapeutic potential of inhibiting ABCE1 and eRF3 genes via siRNA strategy using chitosan nanoparticles in breast cancer cells

    In recent years, targeted cancer therapy strategies have begun to take the place of the conventional treatments. Inhibition of the specific genes, involved in cancer progress, via small interfering RNA (siRNA) has become one of the promising therapeutic approaches for cancer therapy. However, due to rapid nuclease degradation and poor cellular uptake of siRNA, a suitable carrier for siRNA penetration inside the cells is required. We used chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs) to efficiently deliver ATP-binding casette E1 (ABCE1) and eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3)-targeting siRNAs, individually and together, to reduce the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of breast cancer cells. The CS-NPs were generated by ionic gelation method using tripolyphosphate (TPP) as a crosslinker. Nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained with diameters ranging between 110 and 230 nm and the zeta potential of approximately 27 mV optimizing the solution pH to 4.5 and CS/TPP mass ratio to 3:1. Loading efficiencies of 98.69 % ± 0.051 and 98.83 % ± 0.047 were achieved when ABCE1 siRNA and eRF3 siRNA were entrapped into the NPs, respectively. Cell proliferation assay demonstrated that siRNA-loaded CS-NPs were more effective on cancer cells when compared to siRNAs without CS-NPs. Parallel results were also obtained by apoptosis/necrosis, double-staining analysis. Within our study, the potency of ABCE1 and eRF3 siRNAs were shown for the first time with this kind of polymeric delivery system. The results also indicated that ABCE1 and eRF3, important molecules in protein synthesis, could serve as effective targets to inhibit the cancer cells

  16. ABC transporters P-gp and Bcrp do not limit the brain uptake of the novel antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drug cannabidiol in mice.

    Brzozowska, Natalia; Li, Kong M; Wang, Xiao Suo; Booth, Jessica; Stuart, Jordyn; McGregor, Iain S; Arnold, Jonathon C

    2016-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of CNS disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy. ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) mediate pharmacoresistance in these disorders. P-gp and Bcrp are expressed at the blood brain barrier (BBB) and reduce the brain uptake of substrate drugs including various antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. It is therefore important to assess whether CBD is prone to treatment resistance mediated by P-gp and Bcrp. Moreover, it has become common practice in the drug development of CNS agents to screen against ABC transporters to help isolate lead compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties. The current study aimed to assess whether P-gp and Bcrp impacts the brain transport of CBD by comparing CBD tissue concentrations in wild-type (WT) mice versus mice devoid of ABC transporter genes. P-gp knockout (Abcb1a/b (-∕-)), Bcrp knockout (Abcg2 (-∕-)), combined P-gp/Bcrp knockout (Abcb1a/b (-∕-) Abcg2 (-∕-)) and WT mice were injected with CBD, before brain and plasma samples were collected at various time-points. CBD results were compared with the positive control risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone, antipsychotic drugs that are established ABC transporter substrates. Brain and plasma concentrations of CBD were not greater in P-gp, Bcrp or P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice than WT mice. In comparison, the brain/plasma concentration ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone were profoundly higher in P-gp knockout mice than WT mice. These results suggest that CBD is not a substrate of P-gp or Bcrp and may be free from the complication of reduced brain uptake by these transporters. Such findings provide favorable evidence for the therapeutic development of CBD in the treatment of various CNS disorders. PMID:27257556

  17. Efficient and stable reconstitution of the ABC transporter BmrA for solid-state NMR studies.

    Kunert, Britta; Gardiennet, Carole; Lacabanne, Denis; Calles-Garcia, Daniel; Falson, Pierre; Jault, Jean-Michel; Meier, Beat H; Penin, François; Böckmann, Anja

    2014-01-01

    We present solid-state NMR sample preparation and first 2D spectra of the Bacillus subtilis ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter BmrA, a membrane protein involved in multidrug resistance. The homodimeric 130-kDa protein is a challenge for structural characterization due to its membrane-bound nature, size, inherent flexibility and insolubility. We show that reconstitution of this protein in lipids from Bacillus subtilis at a lipid-protein ratio of 0.5 w/w allows for optimal protein insertion in lipid membranes with respect to two central NMR requirements, high signal-to-noise in the spectra and sample stability over a time period of months. The obtained spectra point to a well-folded protein and a highly homogenous preparation, as witnessed by the narrow resonance lines and the signal dispersion typical for the expected secondary structure distribution of BmrA. This opens the way for studies of the different conformational states of the transporter in the export cycle, as well as on interactions with substrates, via chemical-shift fingerprints and sequential resonance assignments. PMID:25988146

  18. Comprehensive classification of nucleotidyltransferase fold proteins: identification of novel families and their representatives in human

    Kuchta, K.; Knizewski, L.; Wyrwicz, L. S.; Rychlewski, L.; Ginalski, K.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a comprehensive review of large and highly diverse superfamily of nucleotidyltransferase fold proteins by providing a global picture about their evolutionary history, sequence-structure diversity and fulfilled functional roles. Using top-of-the-line homology detection method combined with transitive searches and fold recognition, we revised the realm of these superfamily in numerous databases of catalogued protein families and structures, and identified 10 new families o...

  19. Dimerization and enzymatic activity of fungal 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily

    Kristan Katja

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR superfamily. SDR proteins usually function as dimers or tetramers and 17β-HSDcl is also a homodimer under native conditions. Results We have investigated here which secondary structure elements are involved in the dimerization of 17β-HSDcl and examined the importance of dimerization for the enzyme activity. Sequence similarity with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea indicated that Arg129 and His111 from the αE-helices interact with the Asp121, Glu117 and Asp187 residues from the αE and αF-helices of the neighbouring subunit. The Arg129Asp and His111Leu mutations both rendered 17β-HSDcl monomeric, while the mutant 17β-HSDcl-His111Ala was dimeric. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis confirmed the conservation of the secondary structure in both monomers. The three mutant proteins all bound coenzyme, as shown by fluorescence quenching in the presence of NADP+, but both monomers showed no enzymatic activity. Conclusion We have shown by site-directed mutagenesis and structure/function analysis that 17β-HSDcl dimerization involves the αE and αF helices of both subunits. Neighbouring subunits are connected through hydrophobic interactions, H-bonds and salt bridges involving amino acid residues His111 and Arg129. Since the substitutions of these two amino acid residues lead to inactive monomers with conserved secondary structure, we suggest dimerization is a prerequisite for catalysis. A detailed understanding of this dimerization could lead to the development of compounds that will specifically prevent dimerization, thereby serving as a new type of inhibitor.

  20. Identification and characterization of an iron ABC transporter operon in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Pal 5.

    Urzúa, Lucia Soto; Vázquez-Candanedo, Ada P; Sánchez-Espíndola, Adriana; Ramírez, Carlos Ávila; Baca, Beatriz E

    2013-06-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium and endophyte of sugarcane. We have cloned and sequenced the genes coding for the components of the iron ABC-type acquisition system of G. diazotrophicus. Sequence analysis revealed three ORFs, (feuA, feuB, and feuC) organized as an operon and encoding polypeptides of 346 (38 kDa), 342 (34.2 kDa), and 240 (26 kDa) amino acids, respectively. The deduced translation products of the feu operon showed similarity with a periplasmic solute-binding protein (FeuA), permease (FeuB), and ATPase (FeuC) involved in Fe transport. The role of FeuB in the survival of G. diazotrophicus under iron depletion was evaluated by comparing the ability of wild-type and FeuB-Km(R) -mutant strains in a medium without iron supplementation and in a medium containing 2, 2'-dipyridyl (DP). Growth of the mutant was affected in the medium containing DP. The operon was expressed at higher levels in cells depleted for iron than in those that contained the metal. A decrease in nitrogenase activity was observed with the FeuB-Km(R) -mutant strain that with the wild-type under iron deficiency conditions, suggesting that the Feu operon play role in Fe nutrition of G. diazotrophicus. PMID:23624722

  1. Armpits, Belly Buttons and Chronic Wounds: The ABCs of Our Body Bacteria

    ... and Chronic Wounds: The ABCs of Our Body Bacteria By Alisa Machalek and Allison MacLachlan Posted April ... treating skin and other conditions. Chronic Wounds and Bacteria Bacteria from human skin grown on agar in ...

  2. Selection of optimal artificial boundary condition (ABC) frequencies for structural damage identification

    Mao, Lei; Lu, Yong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the sensitivities of artificial boundary condition (ABC) frequencies to the damages are investigated, and the optimal sensors are selected to provide the reliable structural damage identification. The sensitivity expressions for one-pin and two-pin ABC frequencies, which are the natural frequencies from structures with one and two additional constraints to its original boundary condition, respectively, are proposed. Based on the expressions, the contributions of the underlying mode shapes in the ABC frequencies can be calculated and used to select more sensitive ABC frequencies. Selection criteria are then defined for different conditions, and their performance in structural damage identification is examined with numerical studies. From the findings, conclusions are given.

  3. Vipsi ABC Grupp teatas kavatsusest börsile minna / Anne Oja

    Oja, Anne, 1970-

    2010-01-01

    Kaubanduskontsern ABC Grupp maksis tagasi 97,2 mln. krooni eest võlakirju, juhatuse esimehe teatel kasutab ettevõtte meeskond saadud kogemusi naasmaks tulevikus avaliku ettevõtte staatusesse juba aktsiaemitendina

  4. Plant ABC Transporters Enable Many Unique Aspects of a Terrestrial Plant's Lifestyle.

    Hwang, Jae-Ung; Song, Won-Yong; Hong, Daewoong; Ko, Donghwi; Yamaoka, Yasuyo; Jang, Sunghoon; Yim, Sojeong; Lee, Eunjung; Khare, Deepa; Kim, Kyungyoon; Palmgren, Michael; Yoon, Hwan Su; Martinoia, Enrico; Lee, Youngsook

    2016-03-01

    Terrestrial plants have two to four times more ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes than other organisms, including their ancestral microalgae. Recent studies found that plants harboring mutations in these transporters exhibit dramatic phenotypes, many of which are related to developmental processes and functions necessary for life on dry land. These results suggest that ABC transporters multiplied during evolution and assumed novel functions that allowed plants to adapt to terrestrial environmental conditions. Examining the literature on plant ABC transporters from this viewpoint led us to propose that diverse ABC transporters enabled many unique and essential aspects of a terrestrial plant's lifestyle, by transporting various compounds across specific membranes of the plant. PMID:26902186

  5. Brassboard Astrometric Beam Combiner (ABC) Development for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM)

    Jeganathan, Muthu; Kuan, Gary; Rud, Mike; Lin, Sean; Sutherland, Kristen; Moore, James; An, Xin

    2008-01-01

    The Astrometric Beam Combiner (ABC) is a critical element of the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) that performs three key functions: coherently combine starlight from two siderostats; individually detect starlight for angle tracking; and disperse and detect the interferometric fringes. In addition, the ABC contains: a stimulus, cornercubes and shutters for in-orbit calibration; several tip/tilt mirror mechanisms for in-orbit alignment; and internal metrology beam launcher for pathlength monitoring. The detailed design of the brassboard ABC (which has the form, fit and function of the flight unit) is complete, procurement of long-lead items is underway, and assembly and testing is expected to be completed in Spring 2009. In this paper, we present the key requirements for the ABC, details of the completed optical and mechanical design as well as plans for assembly and alignment.

  6. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, whereas vertebrates contain two to four genes. In cnidarians, the gene appears to encode a secreted protein, but transmembrane isoforms of the protein have also evolved, and in many species, alternative splicing facilitates the expression of both transmembrane and secreted isoforms. In most species, the...... longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...

  7. Chondroitinase ABC Improves Basic and Skilled Locomotion in Spinal Cord Injured Cats

    Tester, Nicole J.; Howland, Dena R.

    2007-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are upregulated in the central nervous system following injury. Chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (CS GAG) side chains substituted on this family of molecules contribute to the limited functional recovery following injury by restricting axonal growth and synaptic plasticity. In the current study, the effects of degrading CS GAGs with Chondroitinase ABC (Ch’ase ABC) in the injured spinal cords of adult cats were assessed. Three groups were evaluate...

  8. Analysis over Critical Issues of Implementation or Non-implementation of the ABC Method in Romania

    Sorinel Cãpusneanu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the critical issues regarding implementation or non-implementation of the Activity-Based Costing (ABC method in Romania. There are highlighted the specialists views in the field opinions and own point of view of the authors regarding informational, technical, behavioral, financial, managerial, property and competitive issues regarding implementation or non-implementation of the ABC method in Romania.

  9. SOME IMPORTANT FACTORS AFFECTING EVOLUTION OF ACTIVITY BASED COSTING (ABC SYSTEM IN EGYPTIAN MANUFACTURING FIRMS

    Karim MAMDOUH ABBAS

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aims to determine the factors affecting evolution of Activity Based Costing (ABC system in Egyptian case. The study used the survey method to describe and analyze these factors in some Egyptian firms. The population of the study is Egyptian manufacturing firms. Accordingly, the number of received questionnaires was 392 (23 Egyptian manufacturing firms in the first half of 2013. Finally, the study stated some influencing factors for evolution this system (ABC in Egyptian manufacturing firms.

  10. Glycolysis Inhibition Inactivates ABC Transporters to Restore Drug Sensitivity in Malignant Cells

    Ayako Nakano; Daisuke Tsuji; Hirokazu Miki; Qu Cui; Salah Mohamed El Sayed; Akishige Ikegame; Asuka Oda; Hiroe Amou; Shingen Nakamura; Takeshi Harada; Shiro Fujii; Kumiko Kagawa; Kyoko Takeuchi; Akira Sakai; Shuji Ozaki

    2011-01-01

    Cancer cells eventually acquire drug resistance largely via the aberrant expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ATP-dependent efflux pumps. Because cancer cells produce ATP mostly through glycolysis, in the present study we explored the effects of inhibiting glycolysis on the ABC transporter function and drug sensitivity of malignant cells. Inhibition of glycolysis by 3-bromopyruvate (3BrPA) suppressed ATP production in malignant cells, and restored the retention of daunorubic...

  11. ABC Transporters and their Role in Nucleoside and Nucleotide Drug Resistance

    Fukuda, Yu; Schuetz, John D.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters confer drug resistance against a wide range of chemotherapeutic agents, including nucleoside and nucleotide based drugs. While nucleoside based drugs have been used for many years in the treatment of solid and hematological malignancies as well as viral and autoimmune diseases, the potential contribution of ABC transporters has only recently been recognized. This neglect is likely because activation of nucleoside derivatives require an initial carrier-m...

  12. The Assessment of Burden of COPD (ABC) Scale: A Reliable and Valid Questionnaire.

    Slok, Annerika H M; Bemelmans, Thomas C H; Kotz, Daniel; van der Molen, Thys; Kerstjens, Huib A M; In 't Veen, Johannes C C M; Chavannes, Niels H; Asijee, Guus M; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H; van Schayck, Onno C P

    2016-08-01

    The newly developed Assessment of Burden of COPD (ABC) scale is a 14-item self-administered questionnaire which measures the physical, psychological, emotional and/or social burden as experienced by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The ABC scale is part of the ABC tool that visualises the outcomes of the questionnaire. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability and construct validity of the ABC scale. This multi-centre survey study was conducted in the practices of 19 general practitioners and 9 pulmonologists throughout the Netherlands. Next to the ABC scale, patients with COPD completed the Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Reliability analyses were performed with data from 162 cases. Cronbach's alpha was 0.91 for the total scale. Test-retest reliability, measured at a two week interval (n = 137), had an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.92. Analyses for convergent validity were performed with data from 133 cases. Discriminant and known-groups validity was analysed with data from 162 cases. The ABC scale total score had a strong correlation with the total score of the SGRQ (r = 0.72, p < 0.001) but a weak correlation with the forced expired volume in 1 second predicted (r = -0.28, p < 0.001). Subgroups with more severe disease, defined by GOLD-stage, frequency of exacerbations, activity level and depression scored statistically significantly (p < 0.05) worse on almost all domains of the ABC scale than the less severe subgroups. The ABC scale seems a valid and reliable tool with good discriminative properties. PMID:26788838

  13. Influence of detergents on the activity of the ABC transporter LmrA

    Infed, Nacera; Hanekop, Nils; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz

    2011-01-01

    The ABC transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis has been intensively studied and a role in multidrug resistance was proposed. Here, we performed a comprehensive detergent screen to analyze the impact of detergents for a successful solubilization, purification and retention of functional properties of this ABC transporter. Our screen revealed the preference of LmrA for zwitterionic detergents. In detergent solution, LmrA purified with FC-16 was highly active with respect to ATPase activity, w...

  14. Efficient processing of TFO-directed psoralen DNA interstrand crosslinks by the UvrABC nuclease

    Christensen, Laura A.; Wang, Hong; van Houten, Bennett; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2008-01-01

    Photoreactive psoralens can form interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) in double-stranded DNA. In eubacteria, the endonuclease UvrABC plays a key role in processing psoralen ICLs. Psoralen-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can be used to direct ICLs to specific genomic sites. Previous studies of pyrimidine-rich methoxypsoralen–modified TFOs indicated that the TFO inhibits cleavage by UvrABC. Because different chemistries may alter the processing of TFO-directed ICLs, we investigated th...

  15. Improvement of Managerial Accounting in Electricity Industry by Applyng the ABC Method (Activity Based Costing)

    Rof Letiþia Maria; Stanciu Ionela Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this scientific approach is to present a valid and reasoned opinion on the contribution of a modern method of cost calculation, ABC method (Activity Based Costing), in improvement of managerial accounting, to conduct a comparative study of traditional methods of calculation and to highlight the benefits of adopting and implementing modern methods of calculation. ABC method is a methodological approach of "refining" the system costs, that places in the centre of cost matter th...

  16. SOME IMPORTANT FACTORS AFFECTING EVOLUTION OF ACTIVITY BASED COSTING (ABC) SYSTEM IN EGYPTIAN MANUFACTURING FIRMS

    Karim MAMDOUH ABBAS

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation aims to determine the factors affecting evolution of Activity Based Costing (ABC) system in Egyptian case. The study used the survey method to describe and analyze these factors in some Egyptian firms. The population of the study is Egyptian manufacturing firms. Accordingly, the number of received questionnaires was 392 (23 Egyptian manufacturing firms) in the first half of 2013. Finally, the study stated some influencing factors for evolution this system (ABC) in Eg...

  17. Motivation of foreign degree students to choose ABC University for their undergraduate studies

    Thapa, Suman; Phung, Mai Anh

    2013-01-01

    Every year, the number of foreign degree students is increasing in Finnish universities. These foreign students come from a wide range of nations all over the world. Being one of the best universities of applied sciences in Helsinki, Finland, each year ABC University receives applications of students from Vietnam, China, Nepal, Bangladesh, Russia, various African countries and so on. The aim of this qualitative research is to investigate why foreign degree students choose ABC University as th...

  18. Active Breathing Control (ABC) : Messung und Reduktion von ateminduzierten Organbewegungen des Thorax

    Kientopf, Aline

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility.METHODS AND MATERIALS: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases startin...

  19. Multiple gains of spliceosomal introns in a superfamily of vertebrate protease inhibitor genes

    Frese Marc-André

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intron gains reportedly are very rare during evolution of vertebrates, and the mechanisms underlying their creation are largely unknown. Previous investigations have shown that, during metazoan radiation, the exon-intron patterns of serpin superfamily genes were subject to massive changes, in contrast to many other genes. Results Here we investigated intron dynamics in the serpin superfamily in lineages pre- and postdating the split of vertebrates. Multiple intron gains were detected in a group of ray-finned fishes, once the canonical groups of vertebrate serpins had been established. In two genes, co-occurrence of non-standard introns was observed, implying that intron gains in vertebrates may even happen concomitantly or in a rapidly consecutive manner. DNA breakage/repair processes associated with genome compaction are introduced as a novel factor potentially favoring intron gain, since all non-canonical introns were found in a lineage of ray-finned fishes that experienced genomic downsizing. Conclusion Multiple intron acquisitions were identified in serpin genes of a lineage of ray-finned fishes, but not in any other vertebrates, suggesting that insertion rates for introns may be episodically increased. The co-occurrence of non-standard introns within the same gene discloses the possibility that introns may be gained simultaneously. The sequences flanking the intron insertion points correspond to the proto-splice site consensus sequence MAG↑N, previously proposed to serve as intron insertion site. The association of intron gains in the serpin superfamily with a group of fishes that underwent genome compaction may indicate that DNA breakage/repair processes might foster intron birth.

  20. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    Feng-Xia Tian

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs constitute a superfamily of NAD(P+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  1. Hybrid optimization algorithm of PSO and ABC%PSO和ABC的混合优化算法

    刘俊芳; 张雪英; 宁爱平

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a parallel hybrid optimization algorithm of ABC-PSO by combining Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm and Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm.In each iteration, the swarm is divided into two sub-groups, one sub-group evolves using PSO algorithm, the other sub-group evolves using ABC algorithm and then the two algorithms are compared after selecting the best fitness value.Through comparing the hybrid algorithm with the standard PSO algorithm in evolving solution to four standard functions, the results show that the ABC-PSO hybrid algorithm has a better optimization performance.%通过将粒子群优化(Particle Swarm Optimization,PSO)算法与人工蜂群(Artificial Bee Colony,ABC)算法相结合,提出一种ABC-PSO并行混合优化算法.在每次迭代中,将种群分为两个子种群,一个子种群使用PSO算法,另一个子种群使用ABC算法,两个算法寻优后进行比较,选出最优适应值.通过混合算法对4个标准函数进行测试,并与标准PSO算法进行比较,结果表明混合算法具有更好的优化性能.

  2. Optimization of Straight Cylindrical Turning Using Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) Algorithm

    Prasanth, Rajanampalli Seshasai Srinivasa; Hans Raj, Kandikonda

    2016-06-01

    Artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm, that mimics the intelligent foraging behavior of honey bees, is increasingly gaining acceptance in the field of process optimization, as it is capable of handling nonlinearity, complexity and uncertainty. Straight cylindrical turning is a complex and nonlinear machining process which involves the selection of appropriate cutting parameters that affect the quality of the workpiece. This paper presents the estimation of optimal cutting parameters of the straight cylindrical turning process using the ABC algorithm. The ABC algorithm is first tested on four benchmark problems of numerical optimization and its performance is compared with genetic algorithm (GA) and ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm. Results indicate that, the rate of convergence of ABC algorithm is better than GA and ACO. Then, the ABC algorithm is used to predict optimal cutting parameters such as cutting speed, feed rate, depth of cut and tool nose radius to achieve good surface finish. Results indicate that, the ABC algorithm estimated a comparable surface finish when compared with real coded genetic algorithm and differential evolution algorithm.

  3. astroABC: An Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo sampler for cosmological parameter estimation

    Jennings, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Given the complexity of modern cosmological parameter inference where we are faced with non-Gaussian data and noise, correlated systematics and multi-probe correlated data sets, the Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) method is a promising alternative to traditional Markov Chain Monte Carlo approaches in the case where the Likelihood is intractable or unknown. The ABC method is called "Likelihood free" as it avoids explicit evaluation of the Likelihood by using a forward model simulation of the data which can include systematics. We introduce astroABC, an open source ABC Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) sampler for parameter estimation. A key challenge in astrophysics is the efficient use of large multi-probe datasets to constrain high dimensional, possibly correlated parameter spaces. With this in mind astroABC allows for massive parallelization using MPI, a framework that handles spawning of jobs across multiple nodes. A key new feature of astroABC is the ability to create MPI groups with different communica...

  4. General survey of hAT transposon superfamily with highlight on hobo element in Drosophila.

    Ladevèze, Véronique; Chaminade, Nicole; Lemeunier, Françoise; Periquet, Georges; Aulard, Sylvie

    2012-09-01

    The hAT transposons, very abundant in all kingdoms, have a common evolutionary origin probably predating the plant-fungi-animal divergence. In this paper we present their general characteristics. Members of this superfamily belong to Class II transposable elements. hAT elements share transposase, short terminal inverted repeats and eight base-pairs duplication of genomic target. We focus on hAT elements in Drosophila, especially hobo. Its distribution, dynamics and impact on genome restructuring in laboratory strains as well as in natural populations are reported. Finally, the evolutionary history of hAT elements, their domestication and use as transgenic tools are discussed. PMID:23111927

  5. Giant mini-clusters as possible origin of halo phenomena observed in super-families

    1985-01-01

    Among 91 mini-clusters from 30 high energy Chiron-type families in Chacaltaya emulsion chambers, there were observed several extremely large multiplicity clusters in the highest energy range, far beyond the average of ordinary type clusters. Some details of microscopic observation of those giant mini-clusters in nuclear emulsion plates and some phenomenological regularity found in common among them are described. Such giant mini-clusters are possible candidates for the origin of narrow symmetric single halo phenomena in X-ray films which are frequently observed in super-families of visible energy greater than 1,000 TeV.

  6. Discovery of novel, high potent, ABC type PTP1B inhibitors with TCPTP selectivity and cellular activity.

    Liu, Peihong; Du, Yongli; Song, Lianhua; Shen, Jingkang; Li, Qunyi

    2016-08-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a key negative regulator of both insulin and leptin receptor pathways has been an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity. With the goal of enhancing potency and selectivity of the PTP1B inhibitors, a series of methyl salicylate derivatives as ABC type PTP1B inhibitors (P1-P7) were discovered. More importantly, compound P6 exhibited high potent inhibitory activity (IC50 = 50 nM) for PTP1B with 15-fold selectivity over T-cell PTPase (TCPTP). Further studies on cellular activities revealed that compound P6 could enhance insulin-mediated insulin receptor β (IRβ) phosphorylation and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:27123900

  7. Cell differentiation and infectivity of Leishmania mexicana are inhibited in a strain resistant to an ABC-transporter blocker.

    Silva, N; Camacho, N; Figarella, K; Ponte-Sucre, A

    2004-06-01

    We analysed whether markers of cell differentiation and infectivity differed when compared to the parental sensitive strain [NR(Gs)] in an in vitro selected Leishmania strain [NR(Gr)] resistant to Glibenclamide, an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC)-transporter blocker. The data show that the cell body area was larger in NR(Gr) compared to NR(Gs) and that functional characters associated with an infective metacyclic phenotype, such as resistance to the lytic effect of the alternative complement pathway and expression of the Meta-1 protein, were reduced. The infectivity of NR(Gr) to J774.1 macrophages was also significantly reduced. These results suggest that resistance in Leishmania against Glibenclamide, a general blocker of P-glycoproteins, could produce functional modifications that may be relevant for Leishmania differentiation, infectivity and survival. PMID:15206465

  8. Bioinformatic methods in protein characterization

    Kallberg, Yvonne

    2002-01-01

    Bioinformatics is an emerging interdisciplinary research field in which mathematics. computer science and biology meet. In this thesis. bioinformatic methods for analysis of functional and structural properties among proteins will be presented. I have developed and applied bioinformatic methods on the enzyme superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs), coenzyme-binding enzymes of the Rossmann fold type, and amyloid-forming proteins and peptides. The basis...

  9. Toward an asymptotic behaviour of the ABC dynamo

    Bouya, Ismaël

    2016-01-01

    The ABC flow was originally introduced by Arnol'd to investigate Lagrangian chaos. It soon became the prototype example to illustrate magnetic-field amplification via fast dynamo action, i.e. dynamo action exhibiting magnetic-field amplification on a typical timescale independent of the electrical resistivity of the medium. Even though this flow is the most classical example for this important class of dynamos (with application to large-scale astrophysical objects), it was recently pointed out (Bouya Isma\\"el and Dormy Emmanuel, Phys. Fluids, 25 (2013) 037103) that the fast dynamo nature of this flow was unclear, as the growth rate still depended on the magnetic Reynolds number at the largest values available so far $(\\text{Rm} = 25000)$ . Using state-of-the-art high-performance computing, we present high-resolution simulations (up to 40963) and extend the value of $\\text{Rm}$ up to $ 5\\cdot10^5$ . Interestingly, even at these huge values, the growth rate of the leading eigenmode still depends on the controll...

  10. Study on ADI CD bias correlating ABC function

    Deng, Guogui; Hao, Jingan; Xing, Bin; Jiang, Yuntao; Li, Gaorong; Zhang, Qiang; Yue, Liwan; Zu, Yanlei; Hu, Huayong; Liu, Chang; Shen, Manhua; Zhang, Shijian; He, Weiming; Zhang, Nannan; Lin, Yi-Shih; Wu, Qiang; Shi, Xuelong

    2015-03-01

    As the technology node of semiconductor industry is being driven into more advanced 28 nm and beyond, the critical dimension (CD) error budget at after-development inspection (ADI) stage and its control are more and more important and difficult (1-4). 1 nm or even 0.5 nm CD difference is critical for process control. 0.5~1 nm drift of poly linewidth will result in a detectable off-target drift of device performance. The 0.5~1 nm CD drift of hole or metal linewidth on the backend interconnecting layers can potentially contribute to the bridging of metal patterns to vias, and thereby impact yield. In this paper, we studied one function in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) measurement, i.e. the adjustment of brightness and contrast (ABC). We revealed how the step of addressing focus and even the choice of addressing pattern may bring in a systematic error into the CD measurement. This provides a unique insight in the CD measurement and the measurement consistency of through-pitch (TP) patterns and functional patterns.

  11. Human ABC transporter ABCG2/BCRP expression in chemoresistance: basic and clinical perspectives for molecular cancer therapeutics

    Noguchi K

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Kohji Noguchi, Kazuhiro Katayama, Yoshikazu Sugimoto Division of Chemotherapy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Adenine triphosphate (ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter proteins, such as ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, transport various structurally unrelated compounds out of cells. ABCG2/BCRP is referred to as a “half-type” ABC transporter, functioning as a homodimer, and transports anticancer agents such as irinotecan, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38, gefitinib, imatinib, methotrexate, and mitoxantrone from cells. The expression of ABCG2/BCRP can confer a multidrug-resistant phenotype on cancer cells and affect drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in normal tissues, thus modulating the in vivo efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. Clarification of the substrate preferences and structural relationships of ABCG2/BCRP is essential for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects in vivo during chemotherapy. Its single-nucleotide polymorphisms are also involved in determining the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, and those that reduce the functional activity of ABCG2/BCRP might be associated with unexpected adverse effects from normal doses of anticancer drugs that are ABCG2/BCRP substrates. Importantly, many recently developed molecular-targeted cancer drugs, such as the tyrosine kinase inhisbitors, imatinib mesylate, gefitinib, and others, can also interact with ABCG2/BCRP. Both functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms and inhibitory agents of ABCG2/BCRP modulate the in vivo pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these molecular cancer treatments, so the pharmacogenetics of ABCG2/BCRP is an important consideration in the application of molecular-targeted chemotherapies. Keywords: kinase inhibitor, SNP, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, molecular target

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YML064C, YLR377C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Full Text Available L064C Bait gene name TEM1 Bait description GTP-binding protein of the ras superfamily involved in termin...atase, key regulatory enzyme in the gluconeogenesis pathway, required for glucose metabolism; undergoes either...YML064C TEM1 GTP-binding protein of the ras superfamily involved in termination of ...sis pathway, required for glucose metabolism; undergoes either proteasome-mediate...d or autophagy-mediated degradation depending on growth conditions; interacts with Vid30p Rows with this pre

  13. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium - Effects of Prochloraz

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H.; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. PMID:27028005

  14. Characterizations of Two Bacterial Persulfide Dioxygenases of the Metallo-β-lactamase Superfamily.

    Sattler, Steven A; Wang, Xia; Lewis, Kevin M; DeHan, Preston J; Park, Chung-Min; Xin, Yufeng; Liu, Honglei; Xian, Ming; Xun, Luying; Kang, ChulHee

    2015-07-31

    Persulfide dioxygenases (PDOs), also known as sulfur dioxygenases (SDOs), oxidize glutathione persulfide (GSSH) to sulfite and GSH. PDOs belong to the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily and play critical roles in animals, plants, and microorganisms, including sulfide detoxification. The structures of two PDOs from human and Arabidopsis thaliana have been reported; however, little is known about the substrate binding and catalytic mechanism. The crystal structures of two bacterial PDOs from Pseudomonas putida and Myxococcus xanthus were determined at 1.5- and 2.5-Å resolution, respectively. The structures of both PDOs were homodimers, and their metal centers and β-lactamase folds were superimposable with those of related enzymes, especially the glyoxalases II. The PDOs share similar Fe(II) coordination and a secondary coordination sphere-based hydrogen bond network that is absent in glyoxalases II, in which the corresponding residues are involved instead in coordinating a second metal ion. The crystal structure of the complex between the Pseudomonas PDO and GSH also reveals the similarity of substrate binding between it and glyoxalases II. Further analysis implicates an identical mode of substrate binding by known PDOs. Thus, the data not only reveal the differences in metal binding and coordination between the dioxygenases and the hydrolytic enzymes in the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily, but also provide detailed information on substrate binding by PDOs. PMID:26082492

  15. Chondroitinase ABC promotes recovery of adaptive limb movements and enhances axonal growth caudal to a spinal hemisection

    Jefferson, Stephanie C.; Tester, Nicole J.; Howland, Dena R.

    2011-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that Chondroitinase ABC (Ch’ase ABC) digestion of inhibitory chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans significantly enhances axonal growth and recovery in rodents following spinal cord injury (SCI). Further, our group has shown improved recovery following SCI in the larger cat model. The purpose of the current study was to determine if intraspinal delivery of Ch’ase ABC, following T10 hemisections in adult cats, enhances adaptive movement features during a skilled...

  16. Building Social Capital : A Field Study of the Active, Beautiful and Clean Waters (ABC Waters) Programme in Singapore

    Tovatt, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents a field study examining the effect of the Active, Beautiful and Clean Waters (ABC Waters) Programme in Singapore on social capital. Based on a multi-disciplinary approach and following the theoretical framework of bonding and bridging social capital developed by Robert Putnam and others, three different cases of the ABC Programme were compared, looking particularly at the level of blue-green landscape integration. The three cases comprised the ABC flagship project ‘Bishan...

  17. ABC and VED Analysis of the Pharmacy Store of a Tertiary Care Teaching, Research and Referral Healthcare Institute of India

    Devnani, M; Gupta, AK; Nigah, R

    2010-01-01

    The ABC and VED (vital, essential, desirable) analysis of the pharmacy store of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India, was conducted to identify the categories of items needing stringent management control. The annual consumption and expenditure incurred on each item of pharmacy for the year 2007-08 was analyzed and inventory control techniques, i.e. ABC, VED and ABC-VED matrix analysis, were applied. The drug formulary of the pharmacy consisted...

  18. Arabidopsis POLYOL TRANSPORTER5, a new member of the monosaccharide transporter-like superfamily, mediates H+-Symport of numerous substrates, including myo-inositol, glycerol, and ribose.

    Klepek, Yvonne-Simone; Geiger, Dietmar; Stadler, Ruth; Klebl, Franz; Landouar-Arsivaud, Lucie; Lemoine, Rémi; Hedrich, Rainer; Sauer, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Six genes of the Arabidopsis thaliana monosaccharide transporter-like (MST-like) superfamily share significant homology with polyol transporter genes previously identified in plants translocating polyols (mannitol or sorbitol) in their phloem (celery [Apium graveolens], common plantain [Plantago major], or sour cherry [Prunus cerasus]). The physiological role and the functional properties of this group of proteins were unclear in Arabidopsis, which translocates sucrose and small amounts of raffinose rather than polyols. Here, we describe POLYOL TRANSPORTER5 (AtPLT5), the first member of this subgroup of Arabidopsis MST-like transporters. Transient expression of an AtPLT5-green fluorescent protein fusion in plant cells and functional analyses of the AtPLT5 protein in yeast and Xenopus oocytes demonstrate that AtPLT5 is located in the plasma membrane and characterize this protein as a broad-spectrum H+-symporter for linear polyols, such as sorbitol, xylitol, erythritol, or glycerol. Unexpectedly, however, AtPLT5 catalyzes also the transport of the cyclic polyol myo-inositol and of different hexoses and pentoses, including ribose, a sugar that is not transported by any of the previously characterized plant sugar transporters. RT-PCR analyses and AtPLT5 promoter-reporter gene plants revealed that AtPLT5 is most strongly expressed in Arabidopsis roots, but also in the vascular tissue of leaves and in specific floral organs. The potential physiological role of AtPLT5 is discussed. PMID:15598803

  19. Molecular phylogeny of the bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea (Heterodonta, Veneroida reveals dynamic evolution of symbiotic lifestyle and interphylum host switching

    Goto Ryutaro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Galeommatoidea is a superfamily of bivalves that exhibits remarkably diverse lifestyles. Many members of this group live attached to the body surface or inside the burrows of other marine invertebrates, including crustaceans, holothurians, echinoids, cnidarians, sipunculans and echiurans. These symbiotic species exhibit high host specificity, commensal interactions with hosts, and extreme morphological and behavioral adaptations to symbiotic life. Host specialization to various animal groups has likely played an important role in the evolution and diversification of this bivalve group. However, the evolutionary pathway that led to their ecological diversity is not well understood, in part because of their reduced and/or highly modified morphologies that have confounded traditional taxonomy. This study elucidates the taxonomy of the Galeommatoidea and their evolutionary history of symbiotic lifestyle based on a molecular phylogenic analysis of 33 galeommatoidean and five putative galeommatoidean species belonging to 27 genera and three families using two nuclear ribosomal genes (18S and 28S ribosomal DNA and a nuclear (histone H3 and mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase subunit I protein-coding genes. Results Molecular phylogeny recovered six well-supported major clades within Galeommatoidea. Symbiotic species were found in all major clades, whereas free-living species were grouped into two major clades. Species symbiotic with crustaceans, holothurians, sipunculans, and echiurans were each found in multiple major clades, suggesting that host specialization to these animal groups occurred repeatedly in Galeommatoidea. Conclusions Our results suggest that the evolutionary history of host association in Galeommatoidea has been remarkably dynamic, involving frequent host switches between different animal phyla. Such an unusual pattern of dynamic host switching is considered to have resulted from their commensalistic lifestyle, in

  20. Cupincin: A Unique Protease Purified from Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Bran Is a New Member of the Cupin Superfamily.

    Sreedhar, Roopesh; Kaul Tiku, Purnima

    2016-01-01

    Cupin superfamily is one of the most diverse super families. This study reports the purification and characterization of a novel cupin domain containing protease from rice bran for the first time. Hypothetical protein OsI_13867 was identified and named as cupincin. Cupincin was purified to 4.4 folds with a recovery of 4.9%. Cupincin had an optimum pH and temperature of pH 4.0 and 60 °C respectively. Cupincin was found to be a homotrimer, consisting of three distinct subunits with apparent molecular masses of 33.45 kDa, 22.35 kDa and 16.67 kDa as determined by MALDI-TOF, whereas it eluted as a single unit with an apparent molecular mass of 135.33 ± 3.52 kDa in analytical gel filtration and migrated as a single band in native page, suggesting its homogeneity. Sequence identity of cupincin was deduced by determining the amino-terminal sequence of the polypeptide chains and by and de novo sequencing. For understanding the hydrolysing mechanism of cupincin, its three-dimensional model was developed. Structural analysis indicated that cupincin contains His313, His326 and Glu318 with zinc ion as the putative active site residues, inhibition of enzyme activity by 1,10-phenanthroline and atomic absorption spectroscopy confirmed the presence of zinc ion. The cleavage specificity of cupincin towards oxidized B-chain of insulin was highly specific; cleaving at the Leu15-Tyr16 position, the specificity was also determined using neurotensin as a substrate, where it cleaved only at the Glu1-Tyr2 position. Limited proteolysis of the protease suggests a specific function for cupincin. These results demonstrated cupincin as a completely new protease. PMID:27064905

  1. Cupincin: A Unique Protease Purified from Rice (Oryza sativa L. Bran Is a New Member of the Cupin Superfamily.

    Roopesh Sreedhar

    Full Text Available Cupin superfamily is one of the most diverse super families. This study reports the purification and characterization of a novel cupin domain containing protease from rice bran for the first time. Hypothetical protein OsI_13867 was identified and named as cupincin. Cupincin was purified to 4.4 folds with a recovery of 4.9%. Cupincin had an optimum pH and temperature of pH 4.0 and 60 °C respectively. Cupincin was found to be a homotrimer, consisting of three distinct subunits with apparent molecular masses of 33.45 kDa, 22.35 kDa and 16.67 kDa as determined by MALDI-TOF, whereas it eluted as a single unit with an apparent molecular mass of 135.33 ± 3.52 kDa in analytical gel filtration and migrated as a single band in native page, suggesting its homogeneity. Sequence identity of cupincin was deduced by determining the amino-terminal sequence of the polypeptide chains and by and de novo sequencing. For understanding the hydrolysing mechanism of cupincin, its three-dimensional model was developed. Structural analysis indicated that cupincin contains His313, His326 and Glu318 with zinc ion as the putative active site residues, inhibition of enzyme activity by 1,10-phenanthroline and atomic absorption spectroscopy confirmed the presence of zinc ion. The cleavage specificity of cupincin towards oxidized B-chain of insulin was highly specific; cleaving at the Leu15-Tyr16 position, the specificity was also determined using neurotensin as a substrate, where it cleaved only at the Glu1-Tyr2 position. Limited proteolysis of the protease suggests a specific function for cupincin. These results demonstrated cupincin as a completely new protease.

  2. A PhoPQ-Regulated ABC Transporter System Exports Tetracycline in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Chen, Lin; Duan, Kangmin

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important human pathogen whose infections are difficult to treat due to its high intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics. Here, we show that the disruption of PA4456, encoding the ATP binding component of a putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, increased the bacterium's susceptible to tetracycline and other antibiotics or toxic chemicals. Fluorescence spectroscopy and antibiotic accumulation tests showed that the interruption of the ABC transporter caused increased intracellular accumulation of tetracycline, demonstrating a role of the ABC transporter in tetracycline expulsion. Site-directed mutagenesis proved that the conserved residues of E170 in the Walker B motif and H203 in the H-loop, which are important for ATP hydrolysis, were essential for the function of PA4456. Through a genome-wide search, the PhoPQ two-component system was identified as a regulator of the computationally predicted PA4456-4452 operon that encodes the ABC transporter system. A >5-fold increase of the expression of this operon was observed in the phoQ mutant. The results obtained also show that the expression of the phzA1B1C1D1E1 operon and the production of pyocyanin were significantly higher in the ABC transporter mutant, signifying a connection between the ABC transporter and pyocyanin production. These results indicated that the PhoPQ-regulated ABC transporter is associated with intrinsic resistance to antibiotics and other adverse compounds in P. aeruginosa, probably by extruding them out of the cell. PMID:26953208

  3. Identification of novel families and classification of the C2 domain superfamily elucidate the origin and evolution of membrane targeting activities in eukaryotes.

    Zhang, Dapeng; Aravind, L

    2010-12-01

    Eukaryotes contain an elaborate membrane system, which bounds the cell itself, nuclei, organelles and transient intracellular structures, such as vesicles. The emergence of this system was marked by an expansion of a number of structurally distinct classes of lipid-binding domains that could throw light on the early evolution of eukaryotic membranes. The C2 domain is a useful model to understand these events because it is one of the most prevalent eukaryotic lipid-binding domains deployed in diverse functional contexts. Most studies have concentrated on C2 domains prototyped by those in protein kinase C (PKC-C2) isoforms that bind lipid in a calcium-dependent manner. While two other distinct families of C2 domains, namely those in PI3K-C2 and PTEN-C2 are also recognized, a complete picture of evolutionary relationships within the C2 domain superfamily is lacking. We systematically studied this superfamily using sequence profile searches, phylogenetic and phyletic-pattern analysis and structure-prediction. Consequently, we identified several distinct families of C2 domains including those respectively typified by C2 domains in the Aida (axin interactor, dorsalization associated) proteins, B9 proteins (e.g. Mks1 (Xbx-7), Stumpy (Tza-1) and Tza-2) involved in centrosome migration and ciliogenesis, Dock180/Zizimin proteins which are Rac/CDC42 GDP exchange factors, the EEIG1/Sym-3, EHBP1 and plant RPG/PMI1 proteins involved in endocytotic recycling and organellar positioning and an apicomplexan family. We present evidence that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) contained at least 10 C2 domains belonging to 6 well-defined families. Further, we suggest that this pre-LECA diversification was linked to the emergence of several quintessentially eukaryotic structures, such as membrane repair and vesicular trafficking system, anchoring of the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton to the plasma and vesicular membranes, localization of small GTPases to membranes and lipid

  4. Operating cost analysis of anaesthesia: Activity based costing (ABC analysis

    Majstorović Branislava M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cost of anaesthesiology represent defined measures to determine a precise profile of expenditure estimation of surgical treatment, which is important regarding planning of healthcare activities, prices and budget. Objective. In order to determine the actual value of anaestesiological services, we started with the analysis of activity based costing (ABC analysis. Methods. Retrospectively, in 2005 and 2006, we estimated the direct costs of anestesiological services (salaries, drugs, supplying materials and other: analyses and equipment. of the Institute of Anaesthesia and Resuscitation of the Clinical Centre of Serbia. The group included all anesthetized patients of both sexes and all ages. We compared direct costs with direct expenditure, “each cost object (service or unit” of the Republican Health-care Insurance. The Summary data of the Departments of Anaesthesia documented in the database of the Clinical Centre of Serbia. Numerical data were utilized and the numerical data were estimated and analyzed by computer programs Microsoft Office Excel 2003 and SPSS for Windows. We compared using the linear model of direct costs and unit costs of anaesthesiological services from the Costs List of the Republican Health-care Insurance. Results. Direct costs showed 40% of costs were spent on salaries, (32% on drugs and supplies, and 28% on other costs, such as analyses and equipment. The correlation of the direct costs of anaestesiological services showed a linear correlation with the unit costs of the Republican Healthcare Insurance. Conclusion. During surgery, costs of anaesthesia would increase by 10% the surgical treatment cost of patients. Regarding the actual costs of drugs and supplies, we do not see any possibility of costs reduction. Fixed elements of direct costs provide the possibility of rationalization of resources in anaesthesia.

  5. Phenotypic profiling of ABC transporter coding genes in Myxococcus xanthus

    RoyDWelch

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Information about a gene sometimes can be deduced by examining the impact of its mutation on phenotype. However, the genome-scale utility of the method is limited because, for nearly all model organisms, the majority of mutations result in little or no observable phenotypic impact. The cause of this is often attributed to robustness or redundancy within the genome, but that is only one plausible hypothesis. We examined a standard set of phenotypic traits, and applied statistical methods commonly used in the study of natural variants to an engineered mutant strain collection representing disruptions in 180 of the 192 ABC transporters within the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. These strains display continuous variation in their phenotypic distributions, with a small number of “outlier” strains at both phenotypic extremes, and the majority within a confidence interval about the mean that always includes wild type. Correlation analysis reveals substantial pleiotropy, indicating that the traits do not represent independent variables. The traits measured in this study co-cluster with expression profiles, thereby demonstrating that these changes in phenotype correspond to changes at the molecular level, and therefore can be indirectly connected to changes in the genome. However, the continuous distributions, the pleiotropy, and the placement of wild type always within the confidence interval all indicate that this standard set of M. xanthus phenotypic assays is measuring a narrow range of partially overlapping traits that do not directly reflect fitness. This is likely a significant cause of the observed small phenotypic impact from mutation, and is unrelated to robustness and redundancy.

  6. Annotating Enzymes of Uncertain Function: The Deacylation of d-Amino Acids by Members of the Amidohydrolase Superfamily

    Cummings, J.; Fedorov, A; Xu, C; Brown, S; Fedorov, E; Babbitt, P; Almo, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic activities of three members of the amidohydrolase superfamily were discovered using amino acid substrate libraries. Bb3285 from Bordetella bronchiseptica, Gox1177 from Gluconobacter oxidans, and Sco4986 from Streptomyces coelicolor are currently annotated as d-aminoacylases or N-acetyl-d-glutamate deacetylases. These three enzymes are 22-34% identical to one another in amino acid sequence. Substrate libraries containing nearly all combinations of N-formyl-d-Xaa, N-acetyl-d-Xaa, N-succinyl-d-Xaa, and l-Xaa-d-Xaa were used to establish the substrate profiles for these enzymes. It was demonstrated that Bb3285 is restricted to the hydrolysis of N-acyl-substituted derivatives of d-glutamate. The best substrates for this enzyme are N-formyl-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 5.8 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}), N-acetyl-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 5.2 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}), and l-methionine-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 3.4 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). Gox1177 and Sco4986 preferentially hydrolyze N-acyl-substituted derivatives of hydrophobic d-amino acids. The best substrates for Gox1177 are N-acetyl-d-leucine (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 3.2 x 104 M{sup -1} s-1), N-acetyl-d-tryptophan (kcat/Km = 4.1 x 104 M-1 s-1), and l-tyrosine-d-leucine (kcat/Km = 1.5 x 104 M-1 s-1). A fourth protein, Bb2785 from B. bronchiseptica, did not have d-aminoacylase activity. The best substrates for Sco4986 are N-acetyl-d-phenylalanine and N-acetyl-d-tryptophan. The three-dimensional structures of Bb3285 in the presence of the product acetate or a potent mimic of the tetrahedral intermediate were determined by X-ray diffraction methods. The side chain of the d-glutamate moiety of the inhibitor is ion-paired to Arg-295, while the {alpha}-carboxylate is ion-paired with Lys-250 and Arg-376. These results have revealed the chemical and structural determinants for substrate specificity in this protein. Bioinformatic analyses of an additional {approx}250

  7. Annotating enzymes of uncertain function: the deacylation of D-amino acids by members of the amidohydrolase superfamily.

    Cummings, Jennifer A; Fedorov, Alexander A; Xu, Chengfu; Brown, Shoshana; Fedorov, Elena; Babbitt, Patricia C; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2009-07-14

    The catalytic activities of three members of the amidohydrolase superfamily were discovered using amino acid substrate libraries. Bb3285 from Bordetella bronchiseptica, Gox1177 from Gluconobacter oxidans, and Sco4986 from Streptomyces coelicolor are currently annotated as d-aminoacylases or N-acetyl-d-glutamate deacetylases. These three enzymes are 22-34% identical to one another in amino acid sequence. Substrate libraries containing nearly all combinations of N-formyl-d-Xaa, N-acetyl-d-Xaa, N-succinyl-d-Xaa, and l-Xaa-d-Xaa were used to establish the substrate profiles for these enzymes. It was demonstrated that Bb3285 is restricted to the hydrolysis of N-acyl-substituted derivatives of d-glutamate. The best substrates for this enzyme are N-formyl-d-glutamate (k(cat)/K(m) = 5.8 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), N-acetyl-d-glutamate (k(cat)/K(m) = 5.2 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), and l-methionine-d-glutamate (k(cat)/K(m) = 3.4 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)). Gox1177 and Sco4986 preferentially hydrolyze N-acyl-substituted derivatives of hydrophobic d-amino acids. The best substrates for Gox1177 are N-acetyl-d-leucine (k(cat)/K(m) = 3.2 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), N-acetyl-d-tryptophan (k(cat)/K(m) = 4.1 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), and l-tyrosine-d-leucine (k(cat)/K(m) = 1.5 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)). A fourth protein, Bb2785 from B. bronchiseptica, did not have d-aminoacylase activity. The best substrates for Sco4986 are N-acetyl-d-phenylalanine and N-acetyl-d-tryptophan. The three-dimensional structures of Bb3285 in the presence of the product acetate or a potent mimic of the tetrahedral intermediate were determined by X-ray diffraction methods. The side chain of the d-glutamate moiety of the inhibitor is ion-paired to Arg-295, while the alpha-carboxylate is ion-paired with Lys-250 and Arg-376. These results have revealed the chemical and structural determinants for substrate specificity in this protein. Bioinformatic analyses of an additional approximately 250 sequences identified as members of this group

  8. CD177: A member of the Ly-6 gene superfamily involved with neutrophil proliferation and polycythemia vera

    Bettinotti Maria; Caruccio Lorraine; Stroncek David F

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Genes in the Leukocyte Antigen 6 (Ly-6) superfamily encode glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored glycoproteins (gp) with conserved domains of 70 to 100 amino acids and 8 to 10 cysteine residues. Murine Ly-6 genes encode important lymphocyte and hematopoietic stem cell antigens. Recently, a new member of the human Ly-6 gene superfamily has been described, CD177. CD177 is polymorphic and has at least two alleles, PRV-1 and NB1. CD177 was first described as PRV-1, a gene that is ...

  9. Crystal Structure Analysis of Wild Type and Fast Hydrolyzing Mutant of EhRabX3, a Tandem Ras Superfamily GTPase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Chandra, Mintu; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2016-01-16

    The enteric protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, is the causative agent of amoebic dysentery, liver abscess and colitis in human. Vesicular trafficking plays a key role in the survival and virulence of the protozoan and is regulated by various Rab GTPases. EhRabX3 is a catalytically inefficient amoebic Rab protein, which is unique among the eukaryotic Ras superfamily by virtue of its tandem domain organization. Here, we report the crystal structures of GDP-bound fast hydrolyzing mutant (V71A/K73Q) and GTP-bound wild type EhRabX3 at 3.1 and 2.8Å resolutions, respectively. Though both G-domains possess "phosphate binding loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases fold", only the N-terminal domain binds to guanine nucleotide. The relative orientation of the N-terminal domain and C-terminal domain is stabilized by numerous inter-domain interactions. Compared to other Ras superfamily members, both the GTPase domains displayed large deviation in switch II perhaps due to non-conservative substitutions in this region. As a result, entire switch II is restructured and moved away from the nucleotide binding pocket, providing a rationale for the diminished GTPase activity of EhRabX3. The N-terminal GTPase domain possesses unusually large number of cysteine residues. X-ray crystal structure of the fast hydrolyzing mutant of EhRabX3 revealed that C39 and C163 formed an intra-molecular disulfide bond. Subsequent mutational and biochemical studies suggest that C39 and C163 are critical for maintaining the structural integrity and function of EhRabX3. Structure-guided functional investigation of cysteine mutants could provide the physiological implications of the disulfide bond and could allow us to design potential inhibitors for the better treatment of intestinal amebiasis. PMID:26555751

  10. Glycolysis inhibition inactivates ABC transporters to restore drug sensitivity in malignant cells.

    Ayako Nakano

    Full Text Available Cancer cells eventually acquire drug resistance largely via the aberrant expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, ATP-dependent efflux pumps. Because cancer cells produce ATP mostly through glycolysis, in the present study we explored the effects of inhibiting glycolysis on the ABC transporter function and drug sensitivity of malignant cells. Inhibition of glycolysis by 3-bromopyruvate (3BrPA suppressed ATP production in malignant cells, and restored the retention of daunorubicin or mitoxantrone in ABC transporter-expressing, RPMI8226 (ABCG2, KG-1 (ABCB1 and HepG2 cells (ABCB1 and ABCG2. Interestingly, although side population (SP cells isolated from RPMI8226 cells exhibited higher levels of glycolysis with an increased expression of genes involved in the glycolytic pathway, 3BrPA abolished Hoechst 33342 exclusion in SP cells. 3BrPA also disrupted clonogenic capacity in malignant cell lines including RPMI8226, KG-1, and HepG2. Furthermore, 3BrPA restored cytotoxic effects of daunorubicin and doxorubicin on KG-1 and RPMI8226 cells, and markedly suppressed subcutaneous tumor growth in combination with doxorubicin in RPMI8226-implanted mice. These results collectively suggest that the inhibition of glycolysis is able to overcome drug resistance in ABC transporter-expressing malignant cells through the inactivation of ABC transporters and impairment of SP cells with enhanced glycolysis as well as clonogenic cells.

  11. Accelerator-based conversion (ABC) of weapons plutonium: Plant layout study and related design issues

    In preparation for and in support of a detailed R and D Plan for the Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) of weapons plutonium, an ABC Plant Layout Study was conducted at the level of a pre-conceptual engineering design. The plant layout is based on an adaptation of the Molten-Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) detailed conceptual design that was completed in the early 1070s. Although the ABC Plant Layout Study included the Accelerator Equipment as an essential element, the engineering assessment focused primarily on the Target; Primary System (blanket and all systems containing plutonium-bearing fuel salt); the Heat-Removal System (secondary-coolant-salt and supercritical-steam systems); Chemical Processing; Operation and Maintenance; Containment and Safety; and Instrumentation and Control systems. Although constrained primarily to a reflection of an accelerator-driven (subcritical) variant of MSBR system, unique features and added flexibilities of the ABC suggest improved or alternative approaches to each of the above-listed subsystems; these, along with the key technical issues in need of resolution through a detailed R ampersand D plan for ABC are described on the bases of the ''strawman'' or ''point-of-departure'' plant layout that resulted from this study

  12. A Common Weight Linear Optimization Approach for Multicriteria ABC Inventory Classification

    S. M. Hatefi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Organizations typically employ the ABC inventory classification technique to have an efficient control on a huge amount of inventory items. The ABC inventory classification problem is classification of a large amount of items into three groups: A, very important; B, moderately important; and C, relatively unimportant. The traditional ABC classification only accounts for one criterion, namely, the annual dollar usage of the items. But, there are other important criteria in real world which strongly affect the ABC classification. This paper proposes a novel methodology based on a common weight linear optimization model to solve the multiple criteria inventory classification problem. The proposed methodology enables the classification of inventory items via a set of common weights which is very essential in a fair classification. It has a remarkable computational saving when compared with the existing approaches and at the same time it needs no subjective information. Furthermore, it is easy enough to apply for managers. The proposed model is applied on an illustrative example and a case study taken from the literature. Both numerical results and qualitative comparisons with the existing methods reveal several merits of the proposed approach for ABC analysis.

  13. Efficient processing of TFO-directed psoralen DNA interstrand crosslinks by the UvrABC nuclease.

    Christensen, Laura A; Wang, Hong; Van Houten, Bennett; Vasquez, Karen M

    2008-12-01

    Photoreactive psoralens can form interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) in double-stranded DNA. In eubacteria, the endonuclease UvrABC plays a key role in processing psoralen ICLs. Psoralen-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can be used to direct ICLs to specific genomic sites. Previous studies of pyrimidine-rich methoxypsoralen-modified TFOs indicated that the TFO inhibits cleavage by UvrABC. Because different chemistries may alter the processing of TFO-directed ICLs, we investigated the effect of another type of triplex formed by purine-rich TFOs on the processing of 4'-(hydroxymethyl)-4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (HMT) ICLs by the UvrABC nuclease. Using an HMT-modified TFO to direct ICLs to a specific site, we found that UvrABC made incisions on the purine-rich strand of the duplex approximately 3 bases from the 3'-side and approximately 9 bases from the 5'-side of the ICL, within the TFO-binding region. In contrast to previous reports, the UvrABC nuclease cleaved the TFO-directed psoralen ICL with a greater efficiency than that of the psoralen ICL alone. Furthermore, the TFO was dissociated from its duplex binding site by UvrA and UvrB. As mutagenesis by TFO-directed ICLs requires nucleotide excision repair, the efficient processing of these lesions supports the use of triplex technology to direct DNA damage for genome modification. PMID:18996898

  14. Melanocortin receptors and their accessory proteins

    Cooray, Sadani N.; Clark, Adrian J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The melanocortin receptor family consists of 5 members which belong to the GPCR superfamily. Their specific ligands, the melanocortins are peptide hormones which are formed by the proteolytic cleavage of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) protein. It is now recognised that certain GPCRs require accessory proteins for their function. Like these GPCRs the melanocortin receptor family is also known to be associated with accessory proteins that regulate their function. ...

  15. Mechanistic Diversity in the RuBisCO Superfamily: The Enolase in the Methionine Salvage Pathway in Geobacillus kaustophilus

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), the most abundant enzyme, is the paradigm member of the recently recognized mechanistically diverse RuBisCO superfamily. The RuBisCO reaction is initiated by abstraction of the proton from C3 of the D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate substrate by a carbamate oxygen of carboxylated Lys 201 (spinach enzyme). Heterofunctional homologues of RuBisCO found in species of Bacilli catalyze the tautomerization ('enolization') of 2,3-diketo-5-methylthiopentane 1-phosphate (DK-MTP 1-P) in the methionine salvage pathway in which 5-methylthio-D-ribose (MTR) derived from 5'-methylthioadenosine is converted to methionine (Ashida, H., Saito, Y., Kojima, C., Kobayashi, K., Ogasawara, N., and Yokota, A. (2003) A functional link between RuBisCO-like protein of Bacillus and photosynthetic RuBisCO, Science 302, 286-290]. The reaction catalyzed by this 'enolase' is accomplished by abstraction of a proton from C1 of the DK-MTP 1-P substrate to form the tautomerized product, a conjugated enol. Because the RuBisCO- and 'enolase'-catalyzed reactions differ in the regiochemistry of proton abstraction but are expected to share stabilization of an enolate anion intermediate by coordination to an active site Mg2+, we sought to establish structure-function relationships for the 'enolase' reaction so that the structural basis for the functional diversity could be established. We determined the stereochemical course of the reaction catalyzed by the 'enolases' from Bacillus subtilis and Geobacillus kaustophilus. Using stereospecifically deuterated samples of an alternate substrate derived from D-ribose (5-OH group instead of the 5-methylthio group in MTR) as well as of the natural DK-MTP 1-P substrate, we determined that the 'enolase'-catalyzed reaction involves abstraction of the 1-proS proton. We also determined the structure of the activated 'enolase' from G. kaustophilus (carboxylated on Lys 173) liganded with Mg2+ and 2,3-diketohexane 1

  16. Secondary metabolites inhibiting ABC transporters and reversing resistance of cancer cells and fungi to cytotoxic and antimicrobial agents

    Michael eWink

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungal, bacterial and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: 1. Activation of ABC transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, 2. Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidise lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulphate or amino acids, and 3. Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarises the evidence that secondary metabolites of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids ( monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins, steroids (including cardiac glycosides and tetraterpenes but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse MDR, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these secondary metabolites are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion.

  17. Characterization of putative multidrug resistance transporters of the major facilitator-superfamily expressed in Salmonella Typhi

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Ismat, Fouzia; Iqbal, Mazhar;

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by efflux pumps is a well-known phenomenon in infectious bacteria. Although much work has been carried out to characterize multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, such information is still lacking for many deadly pathogens. The aim of this...... study was to gain insight into the substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized transporters of Salmonella Typhi to identify their role in the development of multidrug resistance. S. Typhi genes encoding putative members of the major facilitator superfamily were cloned and expressed in the drug......-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain KAM42, and tested for transport of 25 antibacterial compounds, including representative antibiotics of various classes, antiseptics, dyes and detergents. Of the 15 tested putative transporters, STY0901, STY2458 and STY4874 exhibited a drug-resistance phenotype. Among these, STY4874...

  18. Effect of New O-Superfamily Conotoxin on Voltage-Activated Currents of Hippocampal Neurons

    李湛; 何湘平; 戴秋云; 黄培堂; 谢佐平

    2004-01-01

    The effects of a new O-superfamily conotoxin, SO3, on sodium current (/Na), transient A-type potassium currents (/A), and delayed rectified potassium currents (/K), were examined in cultured rat hippocampal neurons using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Addition of SO3 caused a concentration-dependent,rapidly developing, and reversible inhibition of voltage-activated currents. The IC50 values for the blockage of /Na, /A, and /K were calculated as 0.49, 33.9, and 7.6 μmol/L, respectively. The determined Hill coefficients were 1.7, 0.6, and 1.2, respectively. These results indicate that SO3 can selectively inhibit neuronal sodium and potassium currents.

  19. Custeio ABC no ambiente hospitalar: um estudo nos hospitais universitários e de ensino brasileiros ABC costing in hospital environment: a study in brazilian university hospitals

    Gilberto José Miranda

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O Custeio Baseado em Atividades tem se mostrado como uma alternativa promissora para fazer frente à complexidade que caracteriza os custos hospitalares. Nos últimos dez anos, somente na Plataforma Lattes, foram encontrados mais de uma centena de estudos dessa natureza. Este trabalho tem como objetivo, conhecer, empiricamente, a utilização do Custeio ABC nos hospitais universitários e de ensino brasileiros e comparar os resultados, conforme as possibilidades, com as pesquisas realizadas nas maiores empresas brasileiras pelos autores: Khoury (1999, Beuren e Roedel (2002 e Azevedo, Santos e Pamplona (2004. Dos 115 questionários enviados aos hospitais universitários, 34 foram respondidos. O estudo levou a conclusões importantes, como: Os sistemas de custos atuais dos hospitais têm poucas condições de fornecer informações úteis à gestão; o Custeio ABC é bastante conhecido no ambiente, mas o número de usuários ainda é relativamente pequeno: apenas 15% da amostra; mas existe expectativa por parte de 44% dos hospitais com relação ao uso futuro da abordagem. As principais causas apresentadas para a não-utilização do Sistema ABC foram: (a o sistema utilizado atende às necessidades da organização e (b o Custeio Baseado em Atividades é muito complexo.The Cost Based Activity has been a promising alternative to deal with the complexity that characterizes hospital costs. In the last ten years, only in the Plataforma Lattes, more than a hundred studies of this nature had been found. This work aims to find out, empirically, the use of ABC Costing in Brazilian university hospitals and to compare the results, according to the possibilities, with the researches that have been made in the biggest Brazilian companies by the authors: Khoury (1999, Beuren and Roedel (2002 and Azevedo, Santos and Pamplona (2004. A hundred and fifteen questionnaires were sent to the university hospitals, 34 had been answered. The study relates important

  20. Modulation of expression and activity of intestinal multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 by xenobiotics.

    Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Arana, Maite Rocío; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Mottino, Aldo Domingo

    2016-07-15

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2) is a transporter that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. In the intestine, it is localized to the apical membrane of the enterocyte and plays a key role in limiting the absorption of xenobiotics incorporated orally. MRP2 may also play a role in systemic clearance of xenobiotics available from the serosal side of the intestine. MRP2 transports a wide range of substrates, mainly organic anions conjugated with glucuronic acid, glutathione and sulfate and its expression can be modulated by xenobiotics at transcriptional- and post-transcriptional levels. Transcriptional regulation is usually mediated by a group of nuclear receptors. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a major member of this group. Relevant drugs described to up-regulate intestinal MRP2 via PXR are rifampicin, spironolactone and carbamazepine, among others. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) was also reported to modulate MRP2 expression, phenobarbital being a typical activator. Dietary compounds, including micronutrients and other natural products, are also capable of regulating intestinal MRP2 expression transcriptionally. We have given them particular attention since the composition of the food ingested daily is not necessarily supervised and may result in interactions with therapeutic drugs. Post-transcriptional regulation of MRP2 activity by xenobiotics, e.g. as a consequence of inhibitory actions, is also described in this review. Unfortunately, only few studies report on drug-drug or nutrient-drug interactions as a consequence of modulation of intestinal MRP2 activity by xenobiotics. Future clinical studies are expected to identify additional interactions resulting in changes in efficacy or safety of therapeutic drugs. PMID:27155371