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Sample records for aabo cyclotron

  1. Cyclotrons: 1978

    A compilation is presented of the experimental facilities of the world's cyclotrons including history and status, staff and operation, research staff, target facilities, magnet, acceleration system, vacuum system, characteristic beams, beam properties, and a plan view of the facility for each cyclotron

  2. Cyclotrons: 1978

    Martin, J.A. (comp.)

    1978-01-01

    A compilation is presented of the experimental facilities of the world's cyclotrons including history and status, staff and operation, research staff, target facilities, magnet, acceleration system, vacuum system, characteristic beams, beam properties, and a plan view of the facility for each cyclotron. (GHT)

  3. Cyclotrons as mass spectrometers

    Clark, D.J.

    1984-04-01

    The principles and design choices for cyclotrons as mass spectrometers are described. They are illustrated by examples of cyclotrons developed by various groups for this purpose. The use of present high energy cyclotrons for mass spectrometry is also described. 28 references, 12 figures.

  4. Cyclotrons as mass spectrometers

    The principles and design choices for cyclotrons as mass spectrometers are described. They are illustrated by examples of cyclotrons developed by various groups for this purpose. The use of present high energy cyclotrons for mass spectrometry is also described. 28 references, 12 figures

  5. Cyclotron waves in plasma

    Lominadze, D G

    2013-01-01

    Cyclotron Waves in Plasma is a four-chapter text that covers the basic physical concepts of the theory of cyclotron waves and cyclotron instabilities, brought about by the existence of steady or alternating plasma currents flowing perpendicular to the magnetic field.This book considers first a wide range of questions associated with the linear theory of cyclotron oscillations in equilibrium plasmas and in electron plasmas in metals and semiconductors. The next chapter deals with the parametric excitation of electron cyclotron oscillations in plasma in an alternating electric field. A chapter f

  6. Cyclotron operations and development

    The 60 in. cyclotron is now in its 34th year of continuous operation. Maintaining the cyclotron in operating condition required installation of a new oscillator tube, replacement of the variac coils on the main magnet power supply and overhaul of the main magnet oil circulating pump. The new University Hospital clinical neutron therapy cyclotron is now operating so that cancer therapy operations at the 60 in. cyclotron stopped at the end of February, 1984. Calcium measurements will continue for the near future. The machine ran 908 hours between April 16, 1983 and April 15, 1984. Other statistics of cyclotron operations are given

  7. Alfven cyclotron instability and ion cyclotron emission

    Two-dimensional solutions of compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAE) are studied in the cold plasma approximation. For finite inverse aspect ratio tokamak plasmas the two-dimensional eigenmode envelope is localized at the low magnetic field side with the radial and poloidal localization on the order of a/√m and a/(fourth root of m), respectively, where m is the dominant poloidal mode number. Charged fusion product driven Alfven Cyclotron Instability (ACI) of the compressional Alfven eigenmodes provides the explanation for the ion cyclotron emission (ICE) spectrum observed in tokamak experiments. The ACI is excited by fast charged fusion products via Doppler shifted cyclotron wave-particle resonances. The ion cyclotron and electron Landau dampings and fast particle instability drive are calculated perturbatively for deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas. Near the plasma edge at the low field side the velocity distribution function of charged fusion products is localized in both pitch angle and velocity. The poloidal localization of the eigenmode enhances the ACI growth rates by a factor of √m in comparison with the previous results without poloidal envelope. The thermal ion cyclotron damping determines that only modes with eigenfrequencies at multiples of the edge cyclotron frequency of the background ions can be easily excited and form an ICE spectrum similar to the experimental observations. Theoretical understanding is given for the results of TFTR DD and DT experiments with υα0/υA α0/υA > 1

  8. [Cyclotron based nuclear science

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Heavy ion reactors, nuclear structure and fundamental interactions; atomic and materials studies; nuclear theory; and superconducting cyclotron and instrumentation

  9. Medical cyclotron facilities

    This report examines the separate proposals from the Austin Hospital and the Australian Atomic Energy Commission for a medical cyclotron facility. The proponents have argued that a cyclotron facility would benefit Australia in areas of patient care, availability and export of radioisotopes, and medical research. Positron emission tomography (PET) and neutron beam therapy are also examined

  10. Alfven cyclotron instability and ion cyclotron emission

    Two-dimensional solutions of compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAEs) are studied in the cold plasma approximation. For finite inverse aspect ratio tokamak plasmas the two-dimensional eigenmode envelope is localized at the low magnetic field side with the radial and poloidal localization on the order of a/√m and a/4√m, respectively, where m is the dominant poloidal mode number. Charged fusion product driven Alfven cyclotron instability (ACI) of the compressional Alfven eigenmodes provides the explanation for the ion cyclotron emission (ICE) spectrum observed in tokamak experiments. The ACI is excited by fast charged fusion products via Doppler shifted cyclotron wave-particle resonances. The ion cyclotron and electron Landau damping and fast particle instability drive are calculated perturbatively for deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas. Near the plasma edge at the low field side the velocity distribution function of charged fusion products is localized in both pitch angle and velocity. The poloidal localization of the eigenmode enhances the ACI growth rates by a factor of √m in comparison with the previous results without poloidal envelope. The thermal ion cyclotron damping determines that only modes with eigenfrequencies at multiples of the edge cyclotron frequency of the background ions can be easily excited and form an ICE spectrum similar to the experimental observations. Theoretical understanding is given for the results of TFTR DD and DT experiments with υα0/υA ≅ 1 and JET experiments with υα0/υA > 1. (author). 15 refs, 7 figs

  11. Vancouver Cyclotron Conference

    Although no longer on the high energy frontier, the cyclotron field is still a major scientific growth area. Its progress is highlighted at the international conference on cyclotron design, development and utilization held at intervals of about three years, under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). Vancouver, surrounded by mountains, water and some cyclotrons, provided a pleasant setting for the 13th Conference, held last summer. With over 200 cyclotrons in operation around the world, the attendance, 241 delegates and 26 industrial exhibitors, was a near record, reflecting the flourishing state of the field. The early sessions covered the initial operation of new or upgraded cyclotron facilities. Major facilities completed since the previous Conference in Berlin in May 1989 included the 400 MeV ring cyclotron at Osaka, the U400M cyclotron at Dubna which will be coupled to the U400 to give 20 MeV nucléon uranium beams, the 130 MeV cyclotron at Jyvaskyla (in Finland, the furthest north!), the 110 MeV JAERI machine in Japan, and the 65 MeV proton therapy cyclotron in Nice. Among the facility upgrades were the KFA cyclotron at Julich which will inject the 2.5 GeV storage ring COSY, and the addition of an FM mode to the K=200 CW mode at Uppsala to give protons up to 180 MeV. The impressive current of 1.5 mA at 72 MeV obtained from the PSI Injector II will soon be injected into the 590 MeV ring

  12. [Cyclotron based nuclear science

    This report contains descriptions of research programs carried out by Institute staff, in nuclear physics as well as progress on new instrumentation during the period April 1, 1989, to July 31, 1990. During this year the ECR source was completed and beams were injected into the cyclotron. In November, 1989 experiments began with beams from the ECR + K500 cyclotron. To date, the highest velocity beam accelerated has been 43 MeV/nucleon 14N, and the highest energy beam has been 1.57 GeV 63Cu. Heavy ion reaction experiments and cyclotron operation and instrumentation are briefly described in this paper

  13. Synchro-cyclotron

    1972-01-01

    The electromagnetic coil which forms the first section of the proton extraction channel in the improved synchro-cyclotron. The photograph shows the positioning gear and the current septum. An extraction efficiency above 50% is expected.

  14. Cyclotrons for isotope production

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radioisotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicates a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper we will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, and isotope production, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. We will also discuss the possibility of systems capable of extracted energies up to 100 MeV and extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  15. MSU superconducting cyclotron project

    The Cyclotron Laboratory at MSU is in the process of designing and constructing a large double cyclotron system for the purpose of providing high quality beams of heavy ions with energies up to 200 MeV per nucleon for lighter heavy ions such as calcium and up to 20 MeV per nucleon for the heaviest particles such as uranium. The 500 MeV first stage cyclotron is at present in the final year of its construction phase; funding for the second stage cyclotron and for a large expansion of experimental facilities and building is expected in fiscal year 1980. The project has been described in a number of previous publications. A broad overview of the project is presented here in a brief form along with a statement of project status as of July 1979

  16. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    Clark, Henry [Texas A& M University; Yennello, Sherry [Texas A& M University; Tribble, Robert [Texas A& M University

    2014-08-26

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  17. 88-Inch Cyclotron operations

    The 88-Inch Cyclotron, operated by the Nuclear Science Division, provides a large fraction of the beam time that is used by Division scientists. Variable energy high resolution beams from hydrogen through argon are produced and used for studies of nuclear structure and nuclear reaction mechanisms. The cyclotron is also the Laboratory's major source of medical isotopes and its only source of polarized proton and deuteron beams. Ions as heavy as 40Ar can be accererated to the Coulomb barrier of 5 MeV/nucleon, while lighter heavy ions can reach 20-30 MeV/nucleon. The cyclotron thus operates in the important transition region between low and high energies: 10-30 MeV/nucleon. As a national accelerator laboratory the 88-Inch Cyclotron is used extensively by outside groups from many institutions in the US and abroad. The 88-Inch Cyclotron also plays a significant educational role. In 1983 twelve graduate students from the University of California at Berkeley employed this facility in their research toward the Ph.D. degree. Five students received their doctorates from UCB in 1983 for research done at the cyclotron. Eleven graduate students from other universities participated in research at the cyclotron. The cyclotron now operates 14 1/2 eight hour shifts per week with one additional shift for maintenance at the beginning of the week and one half shift for shutdown for the weekend. It was operated for 20 shifts per week until October 1981 when increased power rates and budget limitations made the reduction in running time necessary. Several improvement programs are ongoing

  18. Inflation and Cyclotron Motion

    Greensite, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We consider, in the context of a braneworld cosmology, the motion of the universe coupled to a four-form gauge field, with constant field strength, defined in higher dimensions. It is found, under rather general initial conditions, that in this situation there is a period of exponential inflation combined with cyclotron motion in the inflaton field space. The main effect of the cyclotron motion is that conditions on the flatness of the inflaton potential, which are typically necessary for exponential inflation, can be evaded. There are Landau levels associated with the four-form gauge field, and these correspond to quantum excitations of the inflaton field.

  19. Cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals

    Kopička, Karel; Fišer, Miroslav; Hradilek, Pavel; Hanč, Petr; Lebeda, Ondřej

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2003), s. A763-A768. ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Keywords : cyclotron * radionuclides * radiopharmaceuticals Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 0.263, year: 2003

  20. Neutron radiography with cyclotron

    The technique using thermal neutrons was demanded because of its inspection ability to show hydrogeneous material such as plastics, water, explosives or composite materials and irradiated nuclear fuel capsules. This paper describes some experimental results and applications in neutron radiography by the use of several small cyclotrons producing neutrons by Be(p,n) reaction. (author)

  1. Argentina cyclotron facility

    Even since its creation in 1950, the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) pays special attention to the development of activities related to the production of radioisotopes, ionising radiations and its applications, promoting producing and supporting them. In 1953, with the installation of an Crockroft-Walton electrostatic accelerator and in 1954 whit the acquisition of an synchrocyclotron, CNEA started early in the production of radioisotopes. After that, with the installation of the RA-1 and RA-3 research reactors baby cyclotrons and processing plants, CNEA complete and complement all infrastructure dedicated to production activities. In this sense, in 1994 a Cyclotron Facility for radioisotope production started its operations at Ezeiza Atomic Center. The cyclotron installed is a isochronous, negative ion, CP-42 accelerator, mainly used for the production of short and medium half life radioisotopes for nuclear medicine. With the object of covering the local demand of these radioisotopes some improvements were made in the cyclotron in order to increase the beam current. Finally, a brief description of the processes for the production of Tl-201, FDG (F-18) and I-123 is made. (author)

  2. Biomedical cyclotron facility

    During the fifth year of operation the mechanical performance of the cyclotron and accessory equipment was excellent. Major items put into operation were a small computer system interfaced with Ge-Li gamma spectrometer and a pneumatic-tube system for fast delivery of short-lived radionuclides. A table is presented listing the radionuclides produced

  3. Cyclotron motion in graphene

    Schliemann, John

    2008-01-01

    We investigate cyclotron motion in graphene monolayers considering both the full quantum dynamics and its semiclassical limit reached at high carrier energies. Effects of zitterbewegung due to the two dispersion branches of the spectrum dominate the irregular quantum motion at low energies and are obtained as a systematic correction to the semiclassical case. Recent experiments are shown to operate in the semiclassical regime.

  4. Production of cyclotron radionuclides

    Chun, Kwon Soo; Lim, Sang Moo; Yang, Seung Dae; Suh, Yong Sup; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Yun, Yong Kee; Park, Hyun; Lee, Ji Sup; Chai, Jong Seo; Kim, Yoo Seok; Hong, Sung Suk; Lee, Min Yong; Beak, Seung Ki; Kim, Jang Hye; Kim, Gi Sup [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    In the project, 12,077mCi of {sup 201}Tl, 5,717mCi of {sup 67}Ga, 2,096mCi of {sup 123}l, 482mCi of [{sup 123}I]mlBG and 2,738mCi of {sup 18}FDG were supplied, and the revenue were 387,253,000won. In the production of RI, 13 deg for {sup 201}Tl and {sup 67}Ga, 45 deg for {sup 123}l angle solid target have been used, and liquid target system has been used for {sup 18}F production. For the efficient use of the cyclotron, the MC-50 cyclotron was opened to outside user and basic research project was carried out. The technical supports and radionuclides analysis were done during the execution of the research. Then the facilities of safety supervision and handling techniques of radioisotope production were improved. 7 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  5. Production of cyclotron radionuclides

    Suh, Yong Sup; Lim, Sang Moo; Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, Kwon Soo; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Yun, Yong Kee; Park, Hyun; Lee, Ji Sup; Lee, Jong Doo; Chai, Jong Seo; Kim, Yoo Seok; Hong, Sung Suk; Lee, Min Yong; Beak, Seung Ki [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    In the project, 11,492mCi of {sup 201}Tl, 4,384mCi of {sup 67}Ga, 1,245mCi of {sup 123}l, 523mCi of [{sup 123}I]mlBG and 1,283mCi of {sup 18}FDG were supplied, and the revenue were 304,723,000won. In the production of RI, 13 deg for {sup 201}Tl and {sup 67}Ga, 45 deg for {sup 123}l angle solid target have been used, and liquid target system has been used for {sup 18}F production. For the efficient use of the cyclotron, the MC-50 cyclotron was opened to outside user and basic research project was carried out. The technical supports and radionuclides analysis were done during the execution of the research. Then the facilities of safety supervision and handling techniques of radioisotope production were improved. 7 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  6. Production cyclotron's project

    In December 1986 the National Atomic Energy Commission signed a contract to aquire a production cyclotron which will have a beam intensity up to 100 μA and a maximum energy of 40 MeV. The concretion of this project will allow the country to supply itself of an important variety of medical radioisotopes. The advantages of these radioisotopes could be summarized in the following way: shorter periods, in some cases absence of beta-minus emission, as well as lower γ energies and radionuclides without carrier. All this will contribute to improve the radiological protection and a better quality information could be obtained with a minimum of radiation. The installation is divided into two areas: cyclotron area and production area. This division results from the analysis of the safety problems that will appear. (M.E.L.)

  7. Startup work on Inshas cyclotron

    Startup works on the MGC-20 variable energy cyclotron in the Inshas Nuclear Research Center (Egypt) are described. The cyclotron is intended for acceleration of hydrogen and helium ions in a wide energy range (for protons - from 5 to 20 MeV). Main units of the cyclotron and results of computer experimental acceleration of protons to 18 MeV are described. The prospects of furthers investigations are presented

  8. Cyclotron Research and Applications

    Mach, Rostislav

    MELVILLE, NY 11747-4501 : AMER INST PHYSICS, 2 HUNTINGTON QUADRANGLE, STE 1NO1, 2009 - (Dubnickova, A.; Dubnicka, S.; Granja, C.; Leroy, C.; Stekl, I.), s. 98-99 ISBN 978-0-7354-0741-1. ISSN 0094-243X. [5th International Summer School on Nuclear Physics Methods and Accelerators in Biology and Medicine . Bratislava (SK), 06.07.2009-15.07.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Cyclotron * R&D of Radiopharmaceuticals Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear , Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  9. Cyclotron at an impasse

    Government's big dream to build a high cyclotron departments revolves in a vicious circle with no apparent hope of realization. Ministers regularly discuss about billion crowns project since 2001, but it has not found any public authority, which would have the strength to complete a huge uncompleted building in Bratislava Karlova Ves and was able to run equipment that are waiting in warehouses in Russia. The reason is not only missing 50 million euros per completion, but also the need for annual operating cash injection for ten million euros. And speak nothing of inability to find relevant use for expensive equipment.

  10. High-current cyclotron injector

    Choosing the parameters of a high-current cyclotron intended for production of 1-10 mA intensity beam is considered. The cyclotron is assumed to be used as an injector for deuteron accelerating facility to 45 MeV/nucleon energy. 13 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  12. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs

  13. Medical cyclotron: why, where, how

    Cyclotrons for medical purposes are particularly useful for the production of radioactive isotopes of elements normally constituting organic matter (15O, 13N, 11C). The short half-life and positron emission of those elements are of great interest in medical diagnosis. Many others carrier-free radioisotopes can be produced by cyclotrons. Three categories of cyclotrons are mentioned. Desk top cyclotron only adapted to the production of short-lived radioisotopes in a hospital; low energy and average energy cyclotrons which require well-entrained personnel for their operation and are best adapted to the production of radioelements on a regional or even national scale. Examples relative to the interest of short-lived radioisotopes in lung and brain investigations and tumor detection are given

  14. Cyclotron trap: future experiments

    The cyclotron trap at PSI was built to increase the brightness of a source of x-rays emitted from exotic atoms. It allows to work at target densities where the interaction with the surrounding atoms is substantially reduced. Especially electron refilling can be excluded for medium to low Z atoms, which results in a high or even complete ionization. X-rays emitted from higher n-states of electron-free exotic atoms have well defined energies with the error originating only from the error in the mass values of the constituent particles. In consequence an experiment for a new determination of the pion mass was performed using a high resolution crystal spectrometer. The determination of the response function of the spectrometer could be performed using x-rays from completely ionized pionic carbon and with a dedicated electron cyclotron resonance ion trap (ECRIT). A further extension of the ECRIT method allows a direct calibration of exotic atom transitions as well as a precise determination of the energy of fluorescence lines. In combination an increase in accuracy of one order of magnitude can be achieved and a dense set of x-ray energy standards below 20 keV can be established. (author)

  15. Cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals

    Kopička, K.; Fišer, M.; Hradilek, P.; Hanč, P.; Lebeda, O.

    2003-01-01

    Some of the cyclotron-produced radionuclides may serve as important materials for the production of radiopharmaceuticals. This lecture deals with basic information relating to various aspects of these compounds. In comparison with radionuclides/compounds used for non-medical purposes, radiopharmaceuticals are subject to a broader scale of regulations, both from the safety and efficacy point of view; besides that, there are both radioactive and medical aspects that must be taken into account for any radiopharmaceutical. According to the regulations and in compliance with general rules of work with radioactivity, radiopharmaceuticals should only be prepared/manufactured under special conditions, using special areas and special equipment and applying special procedures (e.g. sterilisation, disinfection, aseptic work). Also, there are special procedures for cleaning and maintenance. Sometimes the requirements for the product safety clash with those for the safety of the personnel; several examples of solutions pertaining to these cases are given in the lecture. Also, the specific role of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals is discussed.

  16. Applied research with cyclotrons

    During the past three decades the Flerov laboratory carried out research and development of a number of applications that have found or may find use in modern technologies. One of the applications is the so-called ion track technology enabling us to create micro- and nano-structured materials. Accelerated heavy ion beams are the unique tools for structuring insulating solids in a controllable manner. At FLNR JINR the U-400 cyclotron and the IC-100 cyclotron are employed for irradiation of materials to be modified by the track-etch technique. For practical applications, U-400 delivers the 86Kr ion beams with total energies of 250, 350, 430 and 750 MeV, and the 136Xe ion beams with the energy of 430 MeV. The cyclotron is equipped with a specialized channel for irradiation of polymer foils. IC-100 is a compact accelerator specially designed for the technological uses. High-intensity krypton ion beams with the energy of ∼ 1 MeV/u are available now at IC-100. Production of track-etch membranes is an example of mature technology based on irradiation with accelerated ions. The track-etch membranes offer distinct advantages over other types of membranes due to their precisely determined structure. One-pore, oligo-pore and multi-pore samples can serve as models for studying the transport of liquids, gases, particles, solutes, and electrolytes in narrow channels. Track-etch pores are also used as templates for making nano wires, nano tubes or array of nano rods. The microstructures obtained this way may find use in miniaturized devices such as sensors for biologically important molecules. Bulk and surface modification for the production of new composites and materials with special optical properties can be performed with ion beams. Flexible printed circuits, high-performance heat transfer modules, X-ray filters, and protective signs are examples of products developed in collaboration with research and industrial partners. Some recent achievements and promising ideas that

  17. Isochronous cyclotron data base description

    The relational data base of the control parameters of the isochronous cyclotron, Isochronous Cyclotron Data Base (ICDB), is described. The relational data base under consideration, written in Transact SQL for the MS SQL Server 2000 with the use of MS Enterprise Manager and MS Query Analyzer, was installed on the server of the AIC144 isochronous cyclotron in Krakow, which operates under the control of the operating system MS Windows Server 2003 (Standard Edition). The interface of the data base under considerations is written in C++ with the use of Visual C++ .NET and is built in the Cyclotron Operator Help Program (COHP), which is used for modeling the operational modes of the isochronous cyclotron. Communication between the COHP and the relational data base is realised on the base of the Open Data Base Connectivity protocol. The relational data base of the control parameter of the isochronous cyclotron is intended: firstly, for systematization and automatic use of all measured and modelled magnetic field maps in the process of modeling the operational modes; secondly, for systematization and convenient access to the stored operational modes; thirdly, for simplifying the operator's work. The relational data base of the control parameter of the isochronous cyclotron reflects its physical structure and the logic of its operator's work. (author)

  18. [Cyclotron based nuclear science

    This report contains descriptions of research programs carried out by Institute staff, as well as progress on new instrumentation during the period, April 1, 1990, to March 31, 1991. The K500 cyclotron and ECR source provided beam for 4140 hours during the period. The beam was actually available for experiments 1927.50 hours and 1110.50 hours was devoted to developing new beams and exploring cyclotron performance. A wide range of beams from protons to Xe with energies from 2.4 MeV/u to 60 MeV/U have been used in experiments. The highest total energy beam accelerated was 35 MeV/u 63Cu. The ECR source, made a tremendous improvement in accelerator performance and reliability. Substantial amounts of beam time were devoted to investigations of hot nuclei, electron-positron, giant resonances, atomic effects of high velocity ion beams, astrophysics related reactions and proton and alpha bremsstrahlung. Scientific accomplishments included determination of the heat capacity of nuclei through new insight into the level densities and establishing a lower limit for electron positron resonances a factor of ten better than previous measurements. The proton spectrometer, constructed for studies of the Gamow-Teller interaction is complete, and initial physics measurements will be made in the next few months. All of the BaF2 crystals have been delivered and acceptance tests are underway. A K=315 MDM spectrometer has been obtained from Oxford University and is scheduled for installation in Spring 1992, after removal of the K=150 Enge split pole spectrometer. Institute groups continue participation in MEGA, instrumentation projects for RHIC, and few nucleon studies at LAMPF and KEK. Reports of these activities are included

  19. EC-5 fifth international workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron heating

    Prater, R.; Lohr, J. [eds.

    1985-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: electron cyclotron emission measurements; electron cyclotron emission theory; electron cyclotron heating; gyrotron development; and ECH systems and waveguide development. These paper have been indexed separately elsewhere. (LSP).

  20. Multimegawatt cyclotron autoresonance accelerator

    Means are discussed for generation of high-quality multimegawatt gyrating electron beams using rf gyroresonant acceleration. TE111-mode cylindrical cavities in a uniform axial magnetic field have been employed for beam acceleration since 1968; such beams have more recently been employed for generation of radiation at harmonics of the gyration frequency. Use of a TE11-mode waveguide for acceleration, rather than a cavity, is discussed. It is shown that the applied magnetic field and group velocity axial tapers allow resonance to be maintained along a waveguide, but that this is impractical in a cavity. In consequence, a waveguide cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA) can operate with near-100% efficiency in power transfer from rf source to beam, while cavity accelerators will, in practice, have efficiency values limited to about 40%. CARA experiments are described in which an injected beam of up to 25 A, 95 kV has had up to 7.2 MW of rf power added, with efficiencies of up to 96%. Such levels of efficiency are higher than observed previously in any fast-wave interaction, and are competitive with efficiency values in industrial linear accelerators. Scaling arguments suggest that good quality gyrating megavolt beams with peak and average powers of 100 MW and 100 kW can be produced using an advanced CARA, with applications in the generation of high-power microwaves and for possible remediation of flue gas pollutants. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  1. [Cyclotron based nuclear science

    The period 1 April 1992--31 March 1993 saw the initial runs of three new spectrometers, which constitute a major portion of the new detection capabilities developed for this facility. These devices are the Proton Spectrometer (PSP) (data from which are shown on the cover of this document), the Mass Achroniat Recoil Mass Spectrometer (MARS), and the Multipole Dipole Multipole (MDM) Particle Spectrometer. The ECR-K500 cyclotron combination operated 5,849 hours. The beam was on target 39% of this time. Studies of nuclear dynamics and nuclear thermodynamics using the neutron ball have come to fruition. A critical re-evaluation of the available data on the giant monopole resonance indicated that the incompressibility is not specified to a range smaller than 200--350 MeV by those data. New systematic experiments using the MDM spectrometer are now underway. The MEGA collaboration obtained the first data on the μ → eγ decay rate and determination of the Michel parameter in normal μ decay. Experiments appear to confirm the existence of monoenergetic pair peaks even for relatively low Zprojectile -- Ztarget combinations. Studies of the (α,2α) knockout reaction indicate that this reaction may prove to be a valuable tool for determination of reaction rates of astrophysical interest. Theoretical work reported in this document ranges from nuclear structure calculations using the IBM-2 model to calculations of kaon production and the in-medium properties of the rho and phi mesons. Nuclear dynamics and exotic shapes and fragmentation modes of hot nuclei are also addressed. New measurements of x-ray emission from highly ionized ions, of molecular dissociation and of surface interactions are reported. The research is presented in nearly 50 brief summaries usually including data and references

  2. CSIR cyclotron modified for radiotherapy

    National Accelerator Centre (NAC) staff members will be making an important contribution to radiation therapy in South Africa when the Transvaal Department of Hospital Services starts treating certain types of cancer with fast neutrons, at the Pretoria Cyclotron on the CSIR campus. The fast neutrons will be utilized mainly to treat advanced cancers of the head and the neck. The project will develop along two lines. Firstly the Pretoria cyclotron must be modified and secondly satisfactory radiobiological data must be provided before patients may be treated. This radiobiological experiment heralds a new area for use of the cyclotron which has thus far been used mainly for basic nuclear research and the production of isotopes.

  3. MC-50 AVF cyclotron operation

    The first cyclotron in Korea, MC-59 cyclotron is used for neutron irradiation, radionuclide development, production and material and biomedical research. 50.5MeV and 35MeV proton beam have been extracted with 20-70 .mu.A. A total of beam extraction time are 1095.7 hours. 206.5 hours are used for the developments and 663.8 hours are for radionuclide production and development and 225.4 hours for application researches. The shutdown days are 23days. Fundamental data for failure decrement and efficient beam extraction were composed and maintenance technologies were developed. (author). 8 tabs., 17 figs., 10 refs

  4. MC-50 AVF cyclotron operation

    Chae, Jong Seo; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, You Seok; Park, Chan Won; Lee, Yong Min; Hong, Sung Seok; Lee, Min Yong

    1995-12-01

    The first cyclotron in Korea, MC-59 cyclotron is used for neutron irradiation, radionuclide development, production and material and biomedical research. 50.5MeV and 35MeV proton beam have been extracted with 20-70 .mu.A. A total of beam extraction time are 1095.7 hours. 206.5 hours are used for the developments and 663.8 hours are for radionuclide production and development and 225.4 hours for application researches. The shutdown days are 23days. Fundamental data for failure decrement and efficient beam extraction were composed and maintenance technologies were developed. (author). 8 tabs., 17 figs., 10 refs.

  5. MC-50 AVF cyclotron operation

    The first cyclotron in Korea, MC-50 cyclotron is used for neutron irradiation, radionuclide development, production and material and biomedical research. 50.5MeV and 35MeV proton beam have been extracted with 20-60μA. A total of beam extraction time are 1095.7 hours. 206.5 hours are used for the developments and 663.8 hours are for radionuclide production and development and 225.4 hours for application researches. The shutdown days are 23 days. Fundamental data for failure decrement and efficient beam extraction were composed and maintenance technologies were developed

  6. Cyclotron subharmonics resonant (CSR) heating

    Corresponding to the experiment done with the JIPPT-II-U device [Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 2339 (1985)], the cyclotron subharmonics resonant (CSR) heating mechanism is studied using particle simulation codes with an emphasis on the relationship between CSR and the nonlinear Landau damping

  7. Status report on cyclotron operation

    The operation of the cyclotron in 2002 was concentrated to 9 months; January, July and August were reserved for maintenance and holidays. The overall working time of the accelerator was 4084 hours, the breakdown periods amounted to 15 hours last year. In order to improve the circumstances of the irradiations, several following improvements were done. (R.P.)

  8. Status report on cyclotron operation

    Kovács, P; Ander, I; Lakatos, T; Fenyvesi, A; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Tarkanyi, F

    2003-01-01

    The operation of the cyclotron in 2002 was concentrated to 9 months; January, July and August were reserved for maintenance and holidays. The overall working time of the accelerator was 4084 hours, the breakdown periods amounted to 15 hours last year. In order to improve the circumstances of the irradiations, several following improvements were done. (R.P.)

  9. The development of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals

    The purpose of this project is to develop the radiopharmaceuticals and automatic synthetic unit for labelled compounds, and to establish mass production system of radiopharmaceuticals. These will contribute to the early diagnosis of the disease hard to cure. The contents of this project are as follows, the development of the radiopharmaceutical for imaging of cancer, the development of automatic synthesizer for the synthesis of radio-pharmaceuticals, the development of hormone derivatives labelled with 12'3I, the development of the radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of myocardial metabolism

  10. The development of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals

    Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, K. W.; Suh, Y. S.; Lee, J. D.; Ahn, S. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to developthe radiopharmaceuticals and automatic synthetic unit for labelled compounds, and to establish mass production system of radiopharmaceuticals. These will contribute to the early diagnosis of the disease hard to cure. The contents of this project are as follows, the development of the radiopharmaceutical for imaging of cancer, the development of automatic synthesizer for the synthesis of radio-pharmaceuticals, the development of hormone derivatives labelled with {sup 12}'3I, the development of the radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of myocardial metabolism.

  11. Development of the compact cyclotron for PET system

    Compact cyclotrons for PET (Positron Emission Tomography) system have been developed for more than 25 years. After the permission of the health insurance, applied for the cancer diagnostics, many cyclotrons have been installed in the hospitals. For most of the PET cyclotrons, negative ion acceleration is mainly adopted. History and innovations concerning the PET cyclotron the PET cyclotron are described in this paper. (author)

  12. Cyclotron production of Cu-61

    Lebeda, Ondřej; Ráliš, Jan; Seifert, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 40, 2 Supplement (2013), S323-S323. ISSN 1619-7070. [Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). 19.10.2013-23.10.2013, Lyon] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010797 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : cyclotron U-120M * PET * Cu-61 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  13. Medical use of baby cyclotron

    Baby cyclotron established at Nakano Hospital of National Sanatorium and its building were introduced. Production of compounds labelled with 11C, 13N, 15O, or 18F and the plan of medical use of accelerator isotopes were described. The usefulness of positron nuclear medicine and problems in its clinical use for the lung, the heart, the brain, and cancer were also described. Finally, measuring method of labelled compounds was introduced. (Tsunoda, M.)

  14. Future cyclotron systems: An industrial perspective

    The use of commercial cyclotron systems for the production of radioisotopes continues to grow on a world-wide scale. Improvements in technology have significantly increased the production capabilities of modern cyclotron-based isotope production facilities. In particular, the change to negative ion acceleration and new high power systems have resulted in dramatic improvements in reliability, increases in capacity, and decreases in personnel radiation dose. As more and more older machines are retired, decisions regarding their replacement are made based on several factors including the market's potential and the cyclotron system's abilities. Taking the case of the recently upgraded TR30 cyclotron at TRIUMF/Nordion, the authors investigate the requirements industrial/medical users are likely to impose on future commercial cyclotron systems and the impact this will have on cyclotron technology by the end of the century

  15. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  16. Commercial compact cyclotrons in the 90's

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicate a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper the authors will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Design criteria for the different types of commercial cyclotrons will be presented, with reference to those demands that differ from those in a research oriented cyclotron project. The authors also discuss the possibility of systems designed for higher energies and capable of extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA

  17. Commercial compact cyclotrons in the 90's

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicate a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper we will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Design criteria for the different types of commercial cyclotrons will be presented, with reference to those demands that differ from those in a research oriented cyclotron project. We will also discuss the possibility of systems designed for higher energies and capable of extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA. (author)

  18. Future cyclotron systems : an industrial perspective

    The use of commercial cyclotron systems for the production of radioisotopes continues to grow on a world-wide scale. Improvements in technology have significantly increased the production capabilities of modem cyclotron-based isotope production facilities. In particular, the change to negative ion acceleration and new high power systems have resulted in dramatic improvements in reliability, increases in capacity, and decreases in personnel radiation dose. As more and more older machines are retired decisions regarding their replacement are made based on several factors including the market's potential and the cyclotron system's abilities. Taking the case of the recently upgraded TR30 cyclotron at TRIUMF/Nordion, we investigate the requirements industrial/medical users are likely to impose on future commercial cyclotron systems and the impact this will have on cyclotron technology by the end of the century. (author)

  19. A new cyclotron for biomedical research

    This paper presents the rationale for replacing the old AEG Compact Cyclotron (built in 1969/71) of the Institute for Radiology and Pathophysiology at the German Cancer Research Center by a 30 MeV H-/15 MeV D- cyclotron. A status report is followed by the scientific and technical reasoning as well as budgetary and organizational considerations. In the appendix we tried to explain the function of a cyclotron in a simple and comprehensive manner. (orig.)

  20. Status report on the cyclotron

    Complete text of publication follows. The operation of the cyclotron in 1999 was concentrated to the usual 9 months; January, July and August were reserved for maintenance and holidays. The overall working time of the accelerator was 4265 hours, the breakdown periods amounted to 76 hours last year. The cyclotron was available for users during 3888 hours, the effectively used beam time is summarized in Table 1. (FERMI: Front-End Readout Microsystems, Radiation hardness measurements, CERN RD-16). The time used for machine setup and beam tuning or waiting for the start of an irradiation totalled to 546 hours. The modernization of the vacuum and control systems of the cyclotron - within the framework of a Technical Assistance Program (HUN/4/013) of the International Atomic Energy Agency - has been carried on. The renewal of the gas supply system was completed in the winter maintenance period. It included the replacement of the manual valves with high pressure solenoid valves and the installation of a Tylan FC-280A mass flow controller to set and change the amount of gas flow into the ion source. All the new elements have been connected to the PLC-station dedicated to the control of the vacuum subsystems. The control code, which provides automated has change processes and allows for very precise regulation of the gas inlet, has been developed as well. As a result, the time to change the working gas in the ion source has been significantly decreased (by a factor of 5 to 10) - the process is completely automated now and does not require any manual or local control from the operator. (author)

  1. Ion cyclotron waves at Titan

    Russell, C. T.; Wei, H. Y.; Cowee, M. M.; Neubauer, F. M.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    During the interaction of Titan's thick atmosphere with the ambient plasma, it was expected that ion cyclotron waves would be generated by the free energy of the highly anisotropic velocity distribution of the freshly ionized atmospheric particles created in the interaction. However, ion cyclotron waves are rarely observed near Titan, due to the long growth times of waves associated with the major ion species from Titan's ionosphere, such as CH4+ and N2+. In the over 100 Titan flybys obtained by Cassini to date, there are only two wave events, for just a few minutes during T63 flyby and for tens of minutes during T98 flyby. These waves occur near the gyrofrequencies of proton and singly ionized molecular hydrogen. They are left-handed, elliptically polarized, and propagate nearly parallel to the field lines. Hybrid simulations are performed to understand the wave growth under various conditions in the Titan environment. The simulations using the plasma and field conditions during T63 show that pickup protons with densities ranging from 0.01 cm-3 to 0.02 cm-3 and singly ionized molecular hydrogens with densities ranging from 0.015 cm-3 to 0.25 cm-3 can drive ion cyclotron waves with amplitudes of ~0.02 nT and of ~0.04 nT within appropriate growth times at Titan, respectively. Since the T98 waves were seen farther upstream than the T63 waves, it is possible that the instability was stronger and grew faster on T98 than T63.

  2. Cyclotron closed orbits on a radial grid

    Baumgarten, C., E-mail: christian.baumgarten@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-08-11

    A method for the computation of closed orbits in cyclotrons is derived with emphasis on fixed spatial starting coordinates. The method is a direct extension of Gordon's algorithm . It can also be applied to FFAGs and synchro-cyclotrons.

  3. Studies of electron cyclotron emission on text

    The Auburn University electron cyclotron emission (ECE) system has made many significant contributions to the TEXT experimental program during the past five years. Contributions include electron temperature information used in the following areas of study: electron cyclotron heating (ECH), pellet injection, and impurity/energy transport. Details of the role which the Auburn ECE system has played will now be discussed

  4. The cyclotron development activities at CIAE

    Zhang, Tianjue; Li, Zhenguo; An, Shizhong; Yin, Zhiguo; Yang, Jianjun; Yang, Fang

    2011-12-01

    The cyclotron has an obvious advantage in offering high average current and beam power. Cyclotron development for various applications, e.g. radioactive ion-beam (RIB) generation, clean nuclear energy systems, medical diagnostics and isotope production, were performed at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) for over 50 years. At the moment two cyclotrons are being built at CIAE, the 100 MeV, CYCIAE-100, and a 14 MeV, the CYCIAE-14. Meanwhile, we are designing and proposing to build a number of cyclotrons with different energies, among them are the CYCIAE-70, the CYCIAE-800, and the upgrading of CYCIAE-CRM, which is going to increase its beam current to mA level. The contribution will present an overall introduction to the cyclotron development activities conducted at CIAE, with different emphasis to each project in order to demonstrate the design and construction highlights.

  5. Computer design of a compact cyclotron

    Here we present results of the computer design of the structural elements of a compact cyclotron by the example of HITFiL cyclotron selected as the driving accelerator that is under construction at the Institute of Modern Physics (Lanzhou, China). In the article a complex approach to modeling of the compact cyclotron, including calculation of electromagnetic fields of the structural elements and beam dynamics calculations, is described. The existing design data on the axial injection, magnetic, acceleration and extraction systems of the cyclotron are used as a starting point in the simulation. Some of the upgrades of the cyclotron structural elements were proposed, which led to substantial improvement of the beam quality and transmission

  6. Developing the smallest possible medical cyclotron

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Imagine a portable medical cyclotron operated in a conventional radioactive facility at a hospital. Imagine a nurse or technician switching it on and producing isotopes at the patient’s bedside. Sounds like science fiction? Think again.   CERN has teamed up with Spain’s national scientific research centre (CIEMAT) to develop an avant-garde cyclotron to be used for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). “We plan to make a cyclotron that doesn't need an insulated building or ‘vault’: a cyclotron small enough to fit inside a hospital lift,” explains Jose Manuel Perez, who is leading the CIEMAT/CERN collaboration. “It will be the smallest possible medical cyclotron for single patient dose production and will dramatically reduce costs for hospitals.” While PET technology has transformed imaging techniques, many of its medical benefits have remained confined to highly specialised hospitals. “Studies have foun...

  7. The production of cyclotron radionuclide

    Chun, Kwon Soo; Lee, Jong Doo; Lim, Sang Moo; Yang, Seung Dae; Suh, Yong Sup; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Yun, Yong Kee; Park, Hyun; Lee, Ji Sup; Lee, Jong Doo [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1997-12-01

    In the project, 3,985mCi of {sup 67}Ga, 1,912mCi of {sup 201}Tl and 2,569mCi of {sup 123}I were supplied. Total amount of the supplied activities and the revenue were 8,466mCi and 103,191,950won, respectively. For the increase of the R.I. production yield, 13 deg angle solid target was developed and new {sup 201}TI chemical processing system was installed in the hot-cell. With this new solid target, R.I. production yield could be increased by more than 2 times per batch. For the efficient use of the cyclotron, the MC-50 cyclotron was opened to outside user and basic research project was carried out. The technical supports and radionuclides analysis were done during the execution of the research. Then the facilities of safety supervision and handling techniques of radioisotope production were improved. (author). 7 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. The production of cyclotron radionuclide

    Chun, Kwon Soo; Lee, Jong Doo; Lim, Sang Moo; Yang, Seung Dae; Suh, Yong Sup; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Yun, Yong Kee; Park, Hyun; Lee, Ji Sup; Chai, Jong Seo; Kim, Yoo Seok; Hong, Sung Suk; Lee, Min Yong; Beak, Seung Ki [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    In the project, 3,412mCi of {sup 67}Ga, 10,718mCi of {sup 201}Tl, 1,848mCi of {sup 123}I, 542mCi of [{sup 123}I]mIBG and 285mCi of {sup 18}FDG were supplied. Total amount of the supplied activities and the revenue were 16,805mCi and 257,777,660won, respectively. For the increase of the R.I. production yield, 13 deg angle solid target was used. Tl-201 has been produced two times per week for increasing demand. For the efficient use of the cyclotron, the MC-50 cyclotron was opened to outside user and basic research project was carried out. The technical supports and radionuclides analysis were done during the execution of the research. Then the facilities of safety supervision and handling techniques of radioisotope production were improved. 7 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  9. Cyclotron-Resonance-Maser Arrays

    The cyclotron-resonance-maser (CRM) array [1] is a radiation source which consists of CRM elements coupled together under a common magnetic field. Each CRM-element employs a low-energy electron-beam which performs a cyclotron interaction with the local electromagnetic wave. These waves can be coupled together among the CRM elements, hence the interaction is coherently synchronized in the entire array. The implementation of the CRM-array approach may alleviate several technological difficulties which impede the development of single-beam gyro-devices. Furthermore, it proposes new features, such as the phased-array antenna incorporated in the CRM-array itself. The CRM-array studies may lead to the development of compact, high-power radiation sources operating at low-voltages. This paper introduces new conceptual schemes of CRM-arrays, and presents the progress in related theoretical and experimental studies in our laboratory. These include a multi-mode analysis of a CRM-array, and a first operation of this device with five carbon-fiber cathodes

  10. Production of radiopharmaceuticals by cyclotrons

    Companies specialized in the development and installation of accelerator-based systems dedicated to the medical applications brought on the market cyclotrons well fitted to the requests of the industrial community or universities and so covering every segment of the market. These machines are fully automatic, and need reduced maintenance; they are highly specialized for defined tasks. They can produce high beam intensity and realize dual beam irradiation. Also the prices are reducing considerably. The targets and the automatic system follow the same trend. Unfortunately, the flexibility of these devices for new area of research and development has been dramatically reduced. The growing number of PET cameras has increased the popularity of PET tracers used for nuclear imaging. Consequently, there is a growing demand for these radiopharmaceuticals compounds labeled with short-lived radioisotopes for clinical applications. From a research and development tool in the eighties, PET has now grown up to a clinical tool. Moreover, depending of the social welfare, reimbursement of some PET examinations is granted, which accelerates the trend for an extended use of PET tracers. Regulatory affairs try to establish and standardize the control on these radiopharmaceutical compounds produced in a growing number of local radio pharmacies owning a baby cyclotron. On the other hand, the attention of equipment suppliers was brought in the setting up of a total quality control follow up. These efforts were successively achieved by getting for instance the ISO 9001 certificate

  11. Physics design of a compact medical cyclotron

    Background: A compact cyclotron with energy of 11 MeV and current of 50 μA is under construction in Institute of Fluid Physics of China Academy of Engineering Physics. The compact cyclotron is developed for medical isotope production. Purpose: To minimize the cost and to shorten the time of the development of the compact cyclotron, a lot of efforts were dedicated to the physics design of the compact cyclotron. Methods: Physics design of the main magnet was performed using TOSCA software, and start-to-end beam dynamics design was performed using home-made software CYCDYN. Results: Physics design of the compact cyclotron was given in details. Design methods and results of the main subsystems (including ion source, radial sector focusing magnet, RF cavity, central region and extraction system) were also given in this paper. Conclusion: Now commissioning of this cyclotron has been finished, and the goal for extracting proton beams of 11 MeV and 50 μA on average has been achieved. Physics design of the cyclotron has been validated by the commissioning results. (authors)

  12. Injection and extraction for cyclotrons

    Kleeven, W

    2006-01-01

    The main design goals for beam injection are explained and special problems related to a central region with internal ion source are considered. The principle of a PIG source is addressed. The issue of vertical focusing in the cyclotron centre is briefly discussed. Several examples of numerical simulations are given. Different ways of (axial) injection are briefly outlined. A proposal for a magnetostatic axial inflector is given. Different solutions for beam extraction are treated. These include the internal target, extraction by stripping, resonant extraction using a deflector and self-extraction. The different ways of creating a turn-separation are explained. The purpose of different types of extraction devices such as harmonic coils, deflectors and gradient corrector channels are outlined. Several illustrations are given in the form of photographs and drawings.

  13. Production of radioisotopes using a cyclotron

    Cyclotron produced radioisotopes are generally neutron deficient and decay by EC or β+ emission. They find major applications in diagnostic nuclear medicine. The production processes involve rather sophisticated technology and the areas needing research and development work include nuclear data, targetry, chemical processing, remote control, automation and quality control. A comparison of the various parameters relevant to the production of radioisotopes using a nuclear reactor and a cyclotron is given. The cyclotron products are more expensive than the reactor products; they are, however, far superior to the latter as far as in-vivo functional studies are concerned. (author)

  14. Vacuum system for JAERI AVF cyclotron

    JAERI AVF cyclotron system has been already constructed to promote the application of advanced radiation technology. This cyclotron system consists of two ion sources, an ion injection line, an AVF cyclotron and eight main beam transport lines. The ultimate pressure in each vacuum section was mainly designed on the basis of the ion beam losses caused by the charge exchange with residual gas. The pressure distributions in whole vacuum sections, which were estimated on the practical arrangement of the vacuum components, showed clearly that the objective ultimate pressure could be attainable. The specification for the vacuum system was fixed up taking into account guiding principles such as clean vacuum, maintenance-free and high reliability, and the details of its final composition were described. We also showed the several results of evacuation curve measurement and residual gas analysis in the cyclotron vacuum chamber, reliability test for the vacuum gauge controller and so on. (author) 55 refs

  15. Intensity limitations in compact Hminus cyclotrons

    At TRIUMF, we have demonstrated 2.5 mA in a compact H- cyclotron. It is worthwhile to explore possibility of going to even higher intensity. In small cyclotrons, vertical focusing vanishes at the center. The space charge tune shift further reduces vertical focusing, thus determining an upper limit on instantaneous current. Limit on average current is of course also dependent upon phase acceptance, but this can be made quite large in an H- cyclotron. Longitudinal space charge on the first turn can reduce the phase acceptance as well. For finite ion source brightness, another limit comes from bunching efficiency in presence of space charge forces. We present methods of calculating and optimizing these limits. In particular, we show that it is possible to achieve 10mA in a 50 MeV compact H- cyclotron

  16. H- superconducting cyclotron for PET isotope production

    The scientific design of a 14-MeV H- compact superconducting cyclotron for producing of the 18F and 13N isotopes has been developed. Main requirements to the facility as a medical accelerator are met in the design. In particular, the main requirement for the cyclotron was the smallest possible size due to the superconducting magnet. The calculations show that the proposed cyclotron allows extracted beam intensity over 500 μA. To increase system reliability and production rates, an external H- ion source is applied. The choice of the cyclotron concept, design of the structure elements, calculation of the electromagnetic fields and beam dynamics from the ion source to the extraction system were performed.

  17. Cyclotron/PET project in Uruguay

    The Positron Computed Tomography (PET) is a tri dimensional image technique which shows biochemical information. PET is used in neurology and cardiology diseases. The National Center Cyclotron PET has been found to research, development and health science applications.

  18. Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    Dahl, David A.; Scott, Jill R.; McJunkin, Timothy R.

    2012-03-06

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

  19. The variable energy cyclotron at Calcutta

    The applications of the Variable Energy Cyclotron, now under construction at Calcutta, for : (1) studies in radiology, cancer therapy, nuclear physics, radiation damage (2) nuclear data generation and (3) isotope production are described (M.G.B.)

  20. Isochronous cyclotron AIC-144 main parameters

    General technical description of the Cracow AIC-144 isochronous cyclotron is given as well as some of possible application of the facility in experimental physics, medical therapy and diagnostics, pharmacology, agriculture, metallurgy and radiochemistry. 15 refs, 10 figs, 10 tabs

  1. Cyclotrons for high-intensity beams

    Seidel, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the important physical and technological aspects of cyclotrons for the acceleration of high-intensity beams. Special emphasis is given to the discussion of beam loss mechanisms and extraction schemes.

  2. NIRS-Chiba isochronous cyclotron 1978

    In the period from January to December 1978, the NIRS-Chiba isochronous cyclotron has been used regularly for medical and biological purposes, i.e. clinical trial of fast neutron therapy, radiobiology and production of short-lived radioactive nuclides. Reporting the activities during the period, the following are given: features of the year, machine research and improvement, partition of machine time, radiation doses received by personnel, principal particulars of cyclotron, personnel, and publications. (Mori, K.)

  3. Building 211 cyclotron characterization survey report

    NONE

    1998-03-30

    The Building 211 Cyclotron Characterization Survey includes an assessment of the radioactive and chemical inventory of materials stored within the facility; an evaluation of the relative distribution of accelerator-produced activation products within various cyclotron components and adjacent structures; measurement of the radiation fields throughout the facility; measurement and assessment of internal and external radioactive surface contamination on various equipment, facility structures, and air-handling systems; and an assessment of lead (Pb) paint and asbestos hazards within the facility.

  4. Cyclotron beam dynamic simulations in MATLAB

    MATLAB is useful for beam dynamic simulations in cyclotrons. Programming in an easy-to-use environment permits creation of models in a short space of time. Advanced graphical tools of MATLAB give good visualization features to created models. The beam dynamic modeling results with an example of two different cyclotron designs are presented. Programming with MATLAB opens wide possibilities of the development of the complex program, able to perform complete block of calculations for the design of the accelerators

  5. A national medical cyclotron facility: report to the Minister of Health by the Medical Cyclotron Committee

    Research and training in nuclear medicine in Australia are both limited by the lack of a medical cyclotron facility. The Committee recommends the establishment of a national medical cyclotron to provide a supply of short-lived radioisotopes for research in relevant fields of medicine, and for diagnostic use in nuclear medicine

  6. Electron cyclotron heating of plasmas

    As nuclear fusion becomes an increasingly important potential energy source in these times of global oil and energy crises, the development of technologies that can lead to the realization of this virtually inexhaustible source of energy takes on ever greater urgency. Over the past decade electron cyclotron heating has undergone a significant maturation and has emerged as an essential component of the major approaches to achieving controlled nuclear fusion. The gyrotron, first developed in the Soviet Union, has made it possible to employ ECH in large tokamak and stellarator fusion devices by providing megawatts of microwave power at frequencies above 100 GHz. A contemporary VGT-8110 gyrotron, for example, shown here with Kevin Felch and Pat Cahalan of Communications and Power Industries, is capable of delivering 10 second pulses of 1 MW of power at 110 GHz. The present monograph addresses the ECH physics critical to the international fusion reactor experiment, ITER, but also presents the fundamentals of ECH that are essential to its successful implementation in applications that range from active experiments in planetary magnetospheres to commercial plasma sources for the manufacture of computer chips. The book seeks to convey the physics of ECH in an orderly and coherent fashion to a professional audience by presenting the basic theoretical foundations and then using the theory to interpret a number of established experimental results. Exercises are included to aid the reader in making the theory more concrete. (orig.)

  7. Neutron radiography by using JSW baby cyclotron

    At present, JSW baby cyclotrons are mostly used for the production of the radioisotopes for medical use. The attempt to use this baby cyclotron for neutron radiography began already in 1981. The feasibility of the neutron radiography for the explosives in metallic cases which are used for H1 rockets was investigated. In 1983, it was shown that the neutron radiography by using the baby cyclotron in Muroran Works, Japan Steel Works, Ltd. was able to be carried out as a routine work. Since then, the nondestructive inspection by neutron radiography has been performed for rocket pyrotechnic articles, and contributed to heighten their reliability. Further, the radiography by using fast neutrons was developed and put to practical use for recent large H2 rockets. The JSW baby cyclotron BC 168 which has been used for neutron radiography can accelerate 16 MeV protons or 8 MeV deuterons up to 50 μA. The principle of thermal neutron radiography is the generation of fast neutrons by irradiating a Be target with the proton beam accelerated by a baby cyclotron, the moderation of the fast neutrons, the formation of the thermal neutron flux of uniform distribution with a collimator, the thermal neutron flux hitting the Gd plate in a film cassette through an object, and the exposure of an X-ray film to electrons from the Gd plate. Fast neutron radiography apparatus, and commercial neutron radiography are described. (K.I.)

  8. 83-inch cyclotron research program. Final report

    In June of 1960 the US Atomic Energy Commission authorized the construction of a modern variable energy cyclotron facility at The University of Michigan to be used for research in nuclear spectroscopy. The Legislature of the State of Michigan made available funds for construction of a building to house the 83-inch cyclotron and auxiliary equipment as well as the University's remodeled 42-inch cyclotron. The research program centered around the 83-inch cyclotron was funded by the AEC and its successors, the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Department of Energy (DOE), from September 1964 through March 1977. The program represented a continuation of the research effort using the 42-inch cyclotron facility which had been supported continuously by the AEC since February 1950. This final report to DOE briefly describes the research facility, the research program, and highlights the principal accomplishments of the effort. It begins with a historical note to place this effort within the context of nuclear physics research in the Department of Physics of the University of Michigan

  9. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity 14C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate 14C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect 14C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible

  10. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  11. Decommissioning of a University Cyclotron

    In the decommissioning of a university cyclotron, the cost estimate provided by a decommissioning company to carry out the entire project was in excess of Pounds 1million. This level of funding was not available, and a more modest budget of Pounds 125 thousand was provided (about US$ 250 000 or Euro 180 000). This made it essential that as much of the work as possible was carried out by existing staff. Whereas existing staff could be trained to draft all the required documentation, complete the characterization survey and deliver some aspects of the decontamination programme, their greatest contribution to the project was in sorting, segregation, measurement, packaging and consignment for disposal of all of the decommissioning wastes. This necessitated provision of additional training to existing operators. At an early stage it was identified that an experienced decommissioning consultant was needed to oversee the project. The Decommissioning Consultant appointed external contractors to carry out all the heavy dismantling and demolition work associated with the project. This work involved: -Assembly of a caged storage area adjacent to the cyclotron to hold the wastes from dismantling and demolition, pending characterization for segregation and disposal by existing staff at the facility; -Removal of the D's and cutting them up in situ ready for characterization for shipment to the low level waste repository; -Removal of all rotating machinery in the adjacent generator house, then dismantling the concrete block and brick wall between the inner vault and the generator house; -Removal of extra shielding supported by girder matrix to assist removal of the concrete block wall. Collect core samples of bricks and blocks for activity estimation by operators working at the facility; -Moving of the resonator into the generator house for dismantling, monitoring and characterization; -Dismantling of ancillary equipment such as beam lines, remote target handling system, vacuum

  12. Improvements and applications at NIRS cyclotron facility

    The NIRS-Chiba isochronous cyclotron has been working in routinely, and providing the stable beams for bio-medical studies and various kind of related experiments since 1975. The clinical trail of eye melanoma has been under continued. Recently two new beam lines were constructed in order to carry out the bio-physical study, and to produce the long-lived R.I.s for SPECT. Some progressive improvements, such as updating the magnetic-channel and development of a floating septum system, were performed for stable operation of the cyclotron. A brief review of the current status of the cyclotron and typical application of latest experiments in the various fields are described

  13. Computer modeling of a compact isochronous cyclotron

    Smirnov, V. L.

    2015-11-01

    The computer modeling methods of a compact isochronous cyclotron are described. The main stages of analysis of accelerator facilities systems are considered. The described methods are based on theoretical fundamentals of cyclotron physics and mention highlights of creation of the physical project of a compact cyclotron. The main attention is paid to the analysis of the beam dynamics, formation of a magnetic field, stability of the movement, and a realistic assessment of intensity of the generated bunch of particles. In the article, the stages of development of the accelerator computer model, analytical ways of assessment of the accelerator parameters, and the basic technique of the numerical analysis of dynamics of the particles are described.

  14. Cyclotron maser emission: Stars, planets, and laboratory

    This paper is a review of results by the group over the past decade on auroral kilometric radiation and similar cyclotron emissions from stars and planets. These emissions are often attributed to a horseshoe or crescent shaped momentum distribution of energetic electrons moving into the convergent magnetic field which exists around polar regions of dipole-type stars and planets. We have established a laboratory-based facility that has verified many of the details of our original theoretical description and agrees well with numerical simulations. The experiment has demonstrated that the horseshoe distribution does indeed produce cyclotron emission at a frequency just below the local cyclotron frequency, with polarization close to X-mode and propagating nearly perpendicularly to the beam motion. We discuss recent developments in the theory and simulation of the instability including addressing a radiation escape problem and the effect of competing instabilities, relating these to the laboratory, space, and astrophysical observations.

  15. Challenges for the ITER ion cyclotron system

    Ion cyclotron heating is one of the methods proposed for heating and for driving current in the ITER plasma. The ITER environment is significantly different from that of present day tokamak because of heating from neutrons and from the high radiated heat flux. In addition, the proposed 15 cm gap between the plasma separatrix and the outer wall (where the ion cyclotron antennas are located) necessitates running the antennas at relatively high values of voltage in order to couple the required power to the plasma. There are two main questions: (1) Can the ion cyclotron antennas deliver the required power to the plasma? (2) Can they survive in the ITER environment? Results presented in this paper indicate that the antennas can survive both normal operation and disruptions in ITER, and can deliver the power to the plasma

  16. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    This report describes the author's continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  17. Radiation exposure to workers at cyclotron facilities

    Radiopharmaceuticals quickly furnish the information doctors need to establish a precise diagnosis of the patient's condition, and therefore to prescribe the most effective therapy. In cancerology, F18-FDG, the most widely used PET imaging tracer, excels in the early detection of cancer tumors, even very tiny ones, which it locates and clearly distinguishes from healthy surrounding tissues. IPEN-CNEN/SP has two cyclotron accelerators used mainly for radioisotope production to be utilized in nuclear medicine for diagnosis and therapy. The first is a CV-28 cyclotron, variable energy that came into operation in 1982, which was used to produce F18-FDG and Iodine 123 up to 1998. The second, a Cyclone 30 cyclotron, 30 MeV, commenced operation in 1998 for certification purpose, and due to increase demand for radiopharmaceuticals in Brazil, started F18-FDG production in 1999. Cyclotron Laboratory will be a reference Research and Developing Center in our country and will help the Brazilian and Latin-American community. It is necessary to have an adequate database to allow regular follow up and analysis of the individual dose distributions for each group involved in the cyclotron activities. These databases are also important means to assess the effectiveness of efforts in order to maintain doses ALARA and reduce inequalities. The official individual occupational dosimetry is provided by certified Laboratory of Thermoluminescent Dosimetry at IPEN-CNEN/SP. This paper describes the occupational doses distribution in Laboratory of Cyclotrons at IPEN-CNEN/SP from January, 1998 to July, 2000 and propose improvements for the future. (author)

  18. Mass resolution of accelerated ions in LNR cyclotrons

    The possibiliti of separating in cyclotron accelerated ions with different mass-to-charge ratios is considered. The calculations and experiment have demonstrated that mass resolution of accelerated ions for the U-400 cyclotron is approximately 3600; for U-200 cyclotron, approximately 1500. Ion beams which have not been separated in the cyclotron may be separated during beam extraction by means of the charge exchange in thin targets

  19. Cyclotron wave adsorption in large aspect ratio elongated tokamaks

    Transverse dielectric susceptibility elements are derived for radio frequency waves in a large aspect ratio toroidal plasma with elliptic magnetic surfaces by solving the Vlasov equation for untrapped, t-trapped and d-trapped particles. These dielectric characteristics are suitable for estimating the wave absorption by the fundamental cyclotron resonance damping in the frequency range of ion-cyclotron and electron cyclotron resonances.

  20. Mass measurements with the GANIL cyclotrons

    An original method of mass measurements using the GANIL facility cyclotrons as an Accelerator-Mass spectrometer system is presented. The first test runs show that a precision of 3.10-6 can be achieved. Further improvement of this value can be obtained. Although some limitations apply to this technique, a broad spectrum of nuclei can be studied by this method

  1. A visual assistance environment for cyclotron operation

    A computer-based operation system for a cyclotron which assists inexperienced operators has been developed. Cyclotron start-up operations require dozens of adjustable parameters to be finely tuned to maximize extracted beam current. The human interfaces of the system provide a visual environment designed to enhance beam parameter adjustments. First, the mental model of operators is analyzed. It is supposed to be composed of five partial mental models: beam behavior model, feasible setting regions model, parameter sensitivity model, parameter mutual relation model, and status map model. Next, based on these models, three visual interfaces are developed, i.e., (1) Beam trajectory is rapidly calculated and graphically displayed whenever the operators change the cyclotron parameters. (2) Feasible setting regions (FSR) of the parameters that satisfy the cyclotron's beam acceptance criteria are indicated. (3) Search traces, being a historical visual map of beam current values, are superimposed on the FSRs. Finally, to evaluate system effectiveness, the search time required to reach maximum beam current conditions was measured. In addition, system operability was evaluated using written questionnaires. Results of the experiment showed that the search time to reach specific beam conditions was reduced by approximately 65% using these interfaces. The written questionnaires survey showed the operators highly evaluate system operability. (author)

  2. Passive cyclotron current drive for fusion plasmas

    The creation of toroidal current using cyclotron radiation in a passive way is, together with the well known bootstrap current, an interesting method for stationary current drive in high-temperature fusion reactors. Here, instead of externally applied RF-waves, fish-scale like structures at the first wall help to create enough asymmetry in the self generated cyclotron radiation intensity to drive a current within the plasma. The problem of computing passive cyclotron current drive consists of actually two linked problems, which are the computation of the electron equilibrium under the presence of self-generated radiation, and the computation of the photon equilibrium in a bounded system with a distorted electron distribution. This system of integro-differential equations cannot be solved directly in an efficient way. Therefore a linearization procedure was developed to decouple both sets of equations, finally linked through a generalized local current drive efficiency. The problem of the exact accounting for the wall profile effects was reduced to the solution of a Fredholm-type integral equation of the 2nd-kind. Based on all this an extensive computer code was developed to compute the passively driven current as well as radiation losses, radiation transport and overall efficiencies. The results therefrom give an interesting and very detailed insight into the problems related to passive cyclotron current drive

  3. Development of the cyclotron radioisotope production technology

    Suh, Yong Sup; Chun, K.S.; Yang, S.D.; Lee, J.D.; Ahn, S.H.; Yun, Y.K.; Park, H.; Lee, J.S.; Chai, J.S.; Kim, U.S.; Hong, S.S.; Lee, M.Y.; Park, C.W.; Baik, S. K.; Kim, E. H.; Kim, T. K.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, J. H

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute the advance of nuclear medicine and to the improvement of human health through the development of various accelerator radionuclides and mass production with automization of production. The results obtained from this study are following: 1) In order to introduce 30 MeV high current cyclotron, the specification of cyclotron has been made, the building site was selected and we drew the draw-up of cyclotron. The cyclotron installation contract was postponed until the financial resources could be secured. 2) For a development high purity 1-123 producing system, a Xe-124 target system, a temperature measurement system of the inner part of the target and a target window were fabricated. A Xe-124 gas target recovery system and a full production system of 1-123 was drew up. 3) For a development of a therapeutic nuclide At-211, a target for the production of At-211 via {sup 209}Bi(alpha, 2n) reaction was fabricated. Produced At-211 was separated by distillation method. 4) For development of beta-emitting nuclides, Ti-45, C-11, F{sub 2}-18, beam irradiation system suitable for each target were fabricated. 5) For automatic production of Ga-67, automated module and PLC program was made 6) For the quality control of radiopharmaceuticals, analytical method of thallium and copper by polarography was investigated and established.

  4. Progress report for cyclotron based nuclear science

    Research activities and progress on construction of the new cyclotron facility are summarized. Research is described under the headings heavy-ion reactions, nuclear structure, nuclear theory, and atomic studies. Progress in instrumentation and systems development is discussed. Publications are listed

  5. <600> MeV synchro-cyclotron

    1971-01-01

    One of the 14 pancakes of the new magnet coils for the 600 MeV synchro-cyclotron which were wound and coated with epoxy resin on the CERN site. These new coils will replace the present ones which have been in use for more than 14 years but are now showing signs of deteriorations.

  6. Electron cyclotron heating and associated parallel cooling

    It has been experimentally observed that during the electron-cyclotron heating the electron longitudinal temperature drops as the perpendicular temperature increases. The experiment was carried in a linear mirror machine with a low density (1010 cm-3) weakly ionized (< 1.0 %) plasma. (Author)

  7. The irradiation facility at the AGOR cyclotron

    Brandenburg, Sytze; Ostendorf, Reint; Hofstee, Mariet; Kiewiet, Harry; Beijers, Hans

    2007-01-01

    The KVI is conducting radiobiology research using protons up to 190 MeV from the superconducting AGOR cyclotron in collaboration with the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) since 1998. Using the same set-up, we have started irradiations for radiation hardness studies of detectors and compone

  8. Physics of Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Features

    Sschoenherr, Gabriele; Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Falkner, Sebastian; Dauser, Thomas; Pottschmidt, Katja; Kretschmar, Peter; Klochkov, Dmitry; Ferrigno, Carlo; Britton Hemphill, Paul; Wilms, Joern

    2016-04-01

    Cyclotron resonant scattering features (short: cyclotron lines) are sensitive tracers of the physics of the accretion columns and mounds of X-ray pulsars. They form by interaction of X-ray photons with magnetically quantized electrons in the accreted plasma close to the neutron star. Such lines have been observed as absorption-like features for about 20 X-ray pulsars. Their energies provide a direct measure of the magnetic field strength in the line-forming region. By detailed modelling of the lines and of their parameter dependencies we can further decipher the physical conditions in the accretion column. For instance the fact that the complex scattering cross sections have a strong angle-dependence relates the phase-resolved cyclotron line shapes to parameters that constrain the systems’ still poorly understood geometry. Modelling the physics of cyclotron lines to a degree that allows for detailed and solid comparison to data therefore provides a unique access also to a better understanding of the overall picture of magnetically accreting neutron star systems.

  9. Electron-cyclotron-resonance ion sources (review)

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dougar-Jabon, V.D. [People`s Friendship Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1992-01-01

    The physical principles are described and a brief survey of the present state is given of ion sources based on electron-cyclotron heating of plasma in a mirror trap. The characteristics of ECR sources of positive and negative ions used chiefly in accelerator technology are presented. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Directory of cyclotrons used for radionuclide production in Member States

    The directory of cyclotrons used for radionuclide production is an update of the data base on cyclotrons that was compiled in 1983 by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The directory contains technical, utilization and administrative information supplied to the IAEA as of October 1997. The directory was prepared through information collected by questionnaires sent to institutions that either have a cyclotron, or that were identified to be in the process of installation of a cyclotron. The directory contains 206 entries for cyclotrons operating in 34 Member States. The largest concentration of cyclotrons for radionuclide production are located in the United States of America (66), Japan (33) and Germany (22). The largest number of cyclotrons for a single country is the United States of America. The expansion in number of cyclotrons during the last decade has been driven by the advent of advances in medical imaging instrumentation (PET, SPET and more recently 511 KeV emission tomography); introduction of user friendly compact medical cyclotrons from several companies that manufacture cyclotrons; and recent decisions that 15O-oxygen PET studies in Japan, and 18F-FDG PET studies in Germany are eligible for reimbursement by government or insurance companies

  11. Status report of Variable Energy Cyclotron at Kolkata

    The Variable Energy Cyclotron at Kolkata also known as K-130 cyclotron was the first large circular accelerator indigenously developed and commissioned in 1977. Up to middle of nineties, cyclotron was extensively utilized for doing research in nuclear physics, radiochemistry, radiation damage studies and other related areas using an internal hot cathode PIG ion source. The projectiles were alpha, proton and deuteron. Then in late nineties, the cyclotron started accelerating high charge state light heavy ions using an indigenously developed 6.4 GHz ECR ion source. Later on another ECR ion source of 14.4 GHz was coupled to it. Since ECR ion sources were located outside the cyclotron, beam was injected into the cyclotron through an axial injection line. The K-130 cyclotron after accelerating high charge state light heavy ions for about 10 years was shut down in early 2007 for large scale changes of cyclotron sub-systems under 'Modernization of VEC Technical Systems' program. This is because most of the cyclotron sub-systems were prone to failure frequently as these systems were very old and their maintenance was also getting difficult as spares were not readily available. These problems were hampering smooth cyclotron operation and experiments as well

  12. Research activities by INS cyclotron facility

    Research activities made by the cyclotron facility and the related apparatuses at Institute for Nuclear Study (INS), University of Tokyo, have been reviewed in terms of the associated scientific publications. This publication list, which is to be read as a continuation of INS-Rep.-608 (October, 1986), includes experimental works on low-energy nuclear physics, accelerator technology, instrumental developments, radiation physics and other applications in interdisciplinary fields. The publications are classified into the following four categories. (A) : Internal reports published in INS. (B) : Publications in international scientific journals on experimental research works done by the cyclotron facility and the related apparatuses at INS. Those made by outside users are also included. (C) : Publications in international scientific journals on experimental low-energy nuclear physics, which have been done by the staff of INS Nuclear Physics Division using facilities outside INS. (D) : Contributions to international conferences. (author)

  13. Superconducting cyclotron: neutron source for therapy

    A neutron source for medical therapy purposes is described. The cyclotron consists of: an iron metal housing acting as a magnetic yoke, magnetic shield, radiation shield, and vacuum vessel; a pair of superconducting coils mounted in a cavity in the housing, the coils being cooled to superconducting temperatures; an ion orbiting region defined by pairs of sectoral-shaped rf electrode structures focusing flutter poles mounted in the intense magnetic field between coils; a source of ions; an ion target to produce neutrons; a channel formed in the iron housing from the target to the exterior for passage of the beam of neutrons formed at the target, the channel acting as a beam collimator; and a mounting structure for movably mounting the cyclotron and target such that the neutron beam produced can be employed at more than one position

  14. New magnet pole shape for isochronous cyclotrons

    A new design has been developed for shaping pole tips to produce the radially increasing fields required for isochronous cyclotrons. The conventional solid hillpoles are replaced by poles mounted over a small secondary gap which tapers radially from maximum at the magnet edge to zero near the center. Field measurements with a model magnet and calculations with the code TRIM show an increase in field at the edge of the magnet without the usual corresponding large increase in fringing, and a radial field shape more nearly field independent than for conventional hills. The flying hills have several advantages for variable energy multiparticle cyclotrons: (1) a large reduction in the power dissipated by isochronizing trim coils; (2) a more constant shape and magnitude flutter factor, eliminating flutter coils and increasing the operating range; and (3) a sharper fall-off of the fringe field, simplifying beam extraction. 6 figures

  15. Safety of material handling for superconducting cyclotron

    State of the art of material handling for superconducting cyclotron project has been ensured through advance safety analysis and safety planning for selection and procurement of proper material handling equipment at right time and right place to minimized time, cost over run and man-day loss. Mechanization of material handling is the most important aspect of safety. Typical problems of superconducting cyclotron material handling was solved by indigenous design, fabrication and utilization of a unique material handling equipment for 180 deg rotation of a 28 tons single weight complicated upper pole-cap assembly with safety and ease. Material handling is an art and has been implemented through the science of safe movement, handling during manufacturing and assembly and installation of SCC project. (author)

  16. New magnet pole shape for isochronous cyclotrons

    A new design has been developed for shaping pole tips to produce the radially increasing fields required for isochronous cyclotrons. The conventional solid hill poles are replaced by poles mounted over a small secondary gap which tapers radially from maximum at the magnet edge to zero near the center. Field measurements with a model magnet and calculations with the code TRIM show an increase in field at the edge of the magnet without the usual corresponding large increase in fringing, and a radial field shape more nearly field independent than for conventional hills. The flying hills have several advantages for variable energy multiparticle cyclotrons: (1) a large reduction in the power dissipated by isochronizing trim coils; (2) a more constant shape and magnitude flutter factor, eliminating flutter coils and increasing the operating range; and (3) a sharper fall-off of the fringe field, simplifying beam extraction

  17. Thermal cyclotron radiation from solar active regions

    Various frequency spectra with the fine structure resulting from the thermal cyclotron radio emission from solar active regions are discussed. The conditions in sources (distribution of magnetic field and kinetic temperature over the height) are put forward which provide the frequency spectrum as a set of cyclotron lines and high frequency cut-offs. For each kind of distribution the frequency spectrum and polarization are of peculiar character. This permits one to find the conditions in the source through the properties of the observed microwave solar radio emission. To obtain reliable data on the fine structure and judge about conditions in the sources it is necessary to study microwave solar radio emission using the swept-frequency or multi-channel receivers combined with high directional antennae. (Auth.)

  18. An ionic cyclotron resonance isotopic separation device

    Isotopes are separated using ion cyclotron resonance. The process takes place under vacuum in a vertical cylindrical vessel, with means for creating a plasma containing ions of the isotope to be separated. An electrical field is generated, perpendicular to a vertical magnetic field and oscillating at a frequency near to the cyclotron frequency of the isotope in question. Mixtures enriched and depleted in the isotopes in question are collected separately in the upper part of the vessel. The plasma generator includes a container for the element for treatment made of electro-conducting material which does not melt at operating temperature, open at the top. During operation part of the container is held at a high enough temperature to provoke evaporation or sublimation of the element being treated, while its upper part stays cooler. An ionizer is situated above the container. Isotopes of metals such as zinc, cadmium, tin, calcium and particularly gadolinium can be separated. 1 fig

  19. A compact H- cyclotron for isotope production

    This paper describes the design of a compact, high intensity H- cyclotron for isotope production exploiting the recently developed TRIUMF high brightness multicusp volume H- ion source. A 5 mA version of this H- source currently under development, makes possible accelerated beam intensities of up to 500 μA. The cyclotron has a four sector, radial ridge design, with two 45 degrees dees in opposite valleys. Beam extraction is by stripping to H+ in thin graphite foils. Two foil strippers permit the simultaneous extraction of two beams. By varying the radial position of the stripper the energy of the extracted beams can be varied between 15 MeV and 30 MeV

  20. Theory of ion cyclotron resonance heating

    It is shown that the use of magnetoacoustic waves at the ion cyclotron frequency is not an efficient method to heat the plasmas of small size tokamaks. On the contrary the method is very promizing for present day or next generation tokamaks, at least from a theoretical point of view. The power absorbed by the plasma can exceed ohmic losses in the walls and in the coupling structures by an order of magnitude or more

  1. Use of maze in cyclotron hoppers

    Introduction: the increasing number of cyclotrons in Brazil due to constitutional amendment 49 /06 that enabled the production of radiopharmaceuticals with a short half - life by private companies. The radionuclides used for PET - CT require production centers near or within the diagnostic centers. In order to minimize maintenance and operating risks, gaining efficiency, our facility was the first in Brazil to use the access to a cyclotron bunker via maze, rather than armored door stopper type. Materials: the design calculations were based on the Monte Carlo method (MCNP5 - Monte Carlo N-Particletransportcode version 5). At the ends of the labyrinth are installed a door of polyethylene, for thermalization of neutrons, and other of wood for limiting access. Both legs of the maze have wall thickness of 100cm. In inspection Brazilian CNEN realize measures of dose rate for neutrons and gamma 9 points: 7 around the bunker, 1 over the bunker and 1 in the exhaust with the cyclotron operating with maximum load, double beam of 50uA for 2 hours. After commissioning were carried out around the bunker, the following measures: cumulative dose in three months with dosimeters for neutron rate dose with a gas proportional detector type filled with 3He and polyethylene neutron moderator and dose rate with a Geiger - Mueller detector for gamma radiation. Readings with neutron detectors were classified as background radiation and dose rates were always below the limits established in standard EN 3.01, and the calculation of the predicted regardless of the intensity of irradiation inside the bunker. Conclusion: the use of labyrinths as a way to access the bunkers cyclotron has been shown to be effective as the radiation shielding and efficient by allowing quick and easy access, virtually eliminating the maintenance

  2. DAISY - the Oslo Cyclotron data acquisition system

    The new CACTUS multidetector system for the Oslo Cyclotron consists of 8 particle telescopes, 28 NAI detectors and 2 Ge detectors. Each detector gives rise to one energy parameter and one time parameter. Thus, a total of 80 parameters are present. The counting rate is 100 kByte/s for the highest beam intensities. A new data acquisition system, DAISY, satisfying these demands has been designed. The present report is intended as a complete technical manual for the new system. 24 refs

  3. Properties of segmented ion cyclotron antennas

    A possible issue for Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive systems in next step fusion devices is related to the high electric field at which these systems are planned to operate, which may limit the power transfer efficiency to the plasma core. This paper addresses the problem of maintaining a high power handling in an IC launcher at high power density, with some suggestion for a solution. (authors)

  4. Electron cyclotron emission measurement in Tore Supra

    Electron cyclotron radiation from Tore-Supra is measured with Michelson and Fabry-Perot interferometers. Calibration methods, essential for this diagnostic, are developed allowing the determination of electron temperature in the plasma. In particular the feasibility of Fabry-Perot interferometer calibration by an original method is demonstrated. A simulation code is developed for modelling non-thermal electron population in these discharges using measurements in non-inductive current generation regime

  5. Development of Cyclotron Radionuclides for Medical Applications

    Qaim, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Soon after the discovery of radioactivity it was shown that radionuclides can be used both for diagnostic and therapeutic studies, depending on the characteristic radiations emitted by them. By 1960’s the radionuclide production technology using nuclear reactors was well established. In early 1970’s a renaissance of the cyclotrons occurred because many of the neutron deficient radionuclides could only be produced using irradiations with charged particles, like protons, deuterons, α-particles,...

  6. Beam stripping extraction from the VINCY cyclotron

    Ristić-Đurović Jasna L.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction system of a cyclotron guides an ion beam from a spiral acceleration orbit, through an extraction trajectory, into a high energy transport line. The two methods commonly used to direct an ion into the extraction path are deflection, by the electric field of an electrostatic deflector, and ion stripping, by a thin carbon foil. Compared to the electrostatic deflector system, the stripping extraction provides a fast and easy change of the extracted ion energy and is easier to manufacture operate, and maintain. However, the extraction trajectory and dynamics of an ion beam after stripping are highly dependant on the ion energy and specific charge. Thus, when a multipurpose machine such as the VINCY Cyclotron is concerned, it is far from easy to deliver a variety of ion beams into the same high energy transport line and at the same time preserve a reasonable compactness of the extraction system. The front side stripping extraction system of the VINCY Cyclotron provides high (~70 MeV and mid (~30 MeV energy protons, as well as a number of heavy ions in broad energy ranges. The back side stripping extraction system extracts low energy protons (~18 MeV and enables their simultaneous use with high energy protons at the front side of the machine.

  7. Laboratory study of auroral cyclotron emission processes

    Ronald, Kevin

    2007-11-01

    Electrons encounter an increasing magnetic field and increase in pitch angle as they descend towards the auroral ionosphere, according to the conservation of the magnetic moment. This process results in a horseshoe shaped distribution function in electron velocity space which has been observed by satellites [1]. Research has shown this distribution to be unstable to a cyclotron maser instability [2] and the emitted Auroral Kilometric Radiation is observed to be polarised in the extraordinary mode. Experimental results are presented based on an electron beam of energy 75keV having a cyclotron frequency of 4.45GHz, compressed using magnet coils to mimic the naturally occurring phenomenon. The emitted radiation spectrum was observed to be close to the cyclotron frequency. Electron transport measurements confirmed that the horseshoe distribution function was obtained. Measurements of the antenna pattern radiated from the output window demonstrated the radiation to be polarised and propagating perpendicular to the static magnetic field. The radiation generation efficiency was estimated to be 2% in close agreement to the numerical predictions of the 2D PiC code KARAT. The efficiency was also comparable with estimates of the astrophysical phenomenon. [1] R. J. Strangeway et al, Geophys. Rev. Lett., 25, 1998, pp. 2065-2068 [2] I Vorgul et al, Physics of Plasmas, 12, 2005, pp. 1-8

  8. TRIUMF high intensity cyclotron development for ISAC

    Over the last 15 years the 500 MeV H- cyclotron has been extracting routinely a total current of up to 220 μA protons through three lines at different energies. For ISAC a new 500 MeV beamline which was recently commissioned to 100 μA is now being operated up to 70 μA. Work to increase the total cyclotron extracted current to 300 μA was approved within the 2000-2005 plan. 300 μA peak was successfully obtained at 95% duty cycle, limited only by the maximum beam current presently accepted by the beamlines. Measurements also confirmed the feasibility of 400 μA total cw extracted beam, provided total beam dump capacity be increased. Total 400 μA peak at 25% duty cycle was achieved with good transmission and reasonable percentage losses. Because of these results a new high intensity beam line with a 200 μA beam dump and an additional RIB target ion-source was included in the next 2005-2010 plan submission. The new station will allow studies of target efficiency. Delivery of a second simultaneous RIB beam for experiments is also being considered. The paper will review recent results, and cyclotron refurbishing and primary beamline upgrade plans. (author)

  9. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    Our goal is to improve the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. The radiochemistry group seeks to develop innovative cyclotron targetry, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiolabeled antibodies, which are then used to assess important unanswered questions in tumor pharmacology and immunology. Examples include selected positron emitting radionuclides, such as Iodine-124, and Ga-66; I-124, I-123, I-131 labeled iododeoxyuridine, C-11 colchicine, and antimetabolites, like C-11 methotrexate; and radiolabeled antibodies, 3F8, M195, A33, and MRK16 for application in the pharmacology and immunology projects. The pharmacology program studies tumor resistance to chemotherapy, particularly the phenomenon of multidrug resistance and the relationship between tumor uptake and retention and the tumor response for anti-metabolite drugs. The immunology program studies the physiology of antibody localization at the tissue level as the basis for novel approaches to improving tumor localization such as through the use of an artificial lymphatic system which mechanically reduces intratumoral pressures in tumors in vivo. Quantitative imaging approaches based on PET and SPECT in radioimmunotherapy are studied to give greater insight into the physiology of tumor localization and dosimetry.

  10. Nuclear physics with superconducting cyclotron at Kolkata: Scopes and possibilities

    Sailajananda Bhattacharya

    2010-08-01

    The K500 superconducting cyclotron at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, India is getting ready to deliver its first accelerated ion beam for experiment. At the same time, the nuclear physics programme and related experimental facility development activities are taking shape. A general review of the nuclear physics research opportunities with the superconducting cyclotron and the present status of the development of different detector arrays and other experimental facilities will be presented.

  11. Proceedings of eighth joint workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron resonance heating. Vol. 2

    The theory of electron cyclotron resonance phenomena is highly developed. The main theoretical tools are well established, generally accepted and able to give a satisfactory description of the main results obtained in electron cyclotron emission, absorption and current drive experiments. In this workshop some advanced theoretical and numerical tools have been presented (e.g., 3-D Fokker-Planck codes, treatment of the r.f. beam as a whole, description of non-linear and finite-beam effects) together with the proposal for new scenarios for ECE and ECA measurements (e.g., for diagnosing suprathermal populations and their radial transport). (orig.)

  12. Proceedings of eighth joint workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron resonance heating. Vol. 1

    The theory of electron cyclotron resonance phenomena is highly developed. The main theoretical tools are well established, generally accepted and able to give a satisfactory description of the main results obtained in electron cyclotron emission, absorption and current drive experiments. In this workshop some advanced theoretical and numerical tools have been presented (e.g., 3-D Fokker-Planck codes, treatment of the r.f. beam as a whole, description of non-linear and finite-beam effects) together with the proposal for new scenarios for ECE and ECA measurements (e.g., for diagnosing suprathermal populations and their radial transport). (orig.)

  13. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on HT-7 tokamak

    An electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic system measures the electron cyclotron emission from optically thick plasma that is limited to the blackbody radiation limit of the plasma at the cyclotron resonance location. This provides an electron temperature profile for plasmas with spatially varying magnetic fields, such as a tokamak. The second harmonic x-mode electron cyclotron emission (ECE) at frequency range 98-126 GHz is normally used in HT-7 tokamak to measure electron temperature, which is the only ECE detectable mode with optical depth >1. The theoretical review of ECE emission and its radiometry is briefly summarized. (authors)

  14. The Michigan State University Cyclotron Laboratory: Its Early Years

    Austin, Sam M.

    2016-01-01

    The Michigan State University Cyclotron Laboratory was founded in 1958 and over the years grew in stature, becoming the highest-ranked university-based program in nuclear science. Its K50 cyclotron had unmatched capability as a light-ion accelerator and helped to define what a modern cyclotron could do to advance our understanding of nuclei. This paper describes the first twenty years of the Cyclotron Laboratory's evolution and gives some insight into the cultural characteristics of the laboratory, and of its early members, that led it to thrive.

  15. Cyclotron based nuclear science. Progress report, April 1, 1985-March 31, 1986

    Progress report for cyclotron based nuclear science cyclotron facility are summarized. Research is described under the headings heavy ion reactions, nuclear theory, atomic studies and activation analysis, superconducting cyclotron and instrumentation. Publications are listed

  16. A line-of-sight electron cyclotron emission receiver for electron cyclotron resonance heating feedback control of tearing modes

    Oosterbeek, J.W.; Bürger, A.; Westerhof, E.;

    2008-01-01

    An electron cyclotron emission (ECE) receiver inside the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) transmission line has been brought into operation. The ECE is extracted by placing a quartz plate acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer under an angle inside the electron cyclotron wave (ECW) beam...... control of plasma instabilities this line-of-sight ECE diagnostic removes the need to localize the instabilities in absolute coordinates. (C) 2008 American Institute of Physics....

  17. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) for cyclotrons and radioactive beam production

    Improvements in Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources are discussed. These improvements include improvements in the charge-state distribution to increase the fraction of high charge-state current, improvement in production of beams of metallic ions, and reduction of construction cost and energy consumption for such sources

  18. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak

    Jeong, S. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K. D.; Kwon, M. [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kogi, Y. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Higashiku, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Kawahata, K.; Nagayama, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Mase, A. [KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration.

  19. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak.

    Jeong, S H; Lee, K D; Kogi, Y; Kawahata, K; Nagayama, Y; Mase, A; Kwon, M

    2010-10-01

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration. PMID:21033954

  20. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating System on EAST

    Wang, Lei

    2009-08-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system which will provide at least than 10 MW heating power, with a frequency range from 25 MHz to 100 MHz, is being built up for the EAST. The system includes high-power and wide-frequency radio amplifier, transmission line as well as resonant double loop (RDL) antenna. As a part of this system a sub-ICRH system unit with a ultimate output power of 2.5 MW was set up and employed for heating experiment. The maximum of the launched power reached 200 kW in 2008.

  1. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating System on EAST

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system which will provide at least than 10 MW heating power, with a frequency range from 25 MHz to 100 MHz, is being built up for the EAST. The system includes high-power and wide-frequency radio amplifier, transmission line as well as resonant double loop (RDL) antenna. As a part of this system a sub-ICRH system unit with a ultimate output power of 2.5 MW was set up and employed for heating experiment. The maximum of the launched power reached 200 kW in 2008. (magnetically confined plasma)

  2. Calibration source for electron cyclotron emission measurements

    A high temperature radiation source has been developed for the absolute calibration of diagnostic instruments for measuring electron cyclotron emission from high temperature plasmas. The source has a radiation area of φ150 mm and can be heated up to 500degC. The measured emissivity of the source is close to unity in the wavelength region between 0.5 and 5 mm. The grating polychromator has been calibrated using the radiation source developed. The obtained temperatures agree with those by the pulse height analysis of soft X-rays and Thomson scattering measurement within 10%. (author)

  3. Electron cyclotron emission imaging in tokamak plasmas

    Munsat, Tobin; Domier, Calvin W.; Kong, Xiangyu; Liang, Tianran; Luhmann, Jr.; Neville C.; Tobias, Benjamin J.; Lee, Woochang; Park, Hyeon K.; Yun, Gunsu; Classen, Ivo. G. J.; Donne, Anthony J. H.

    2010-07-01

    We discuss the recent history and latest developments of the electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic technique, wherein electron temperature is measured in magnetically confined plasmas with two-dimensional spatial resolution. The key enabling technologies for this technique are the large-aperture optical systems and the linear detector arrays sensitive to millimeter-wavelength radiation. We present the status and recent progress on existing instruments as well as new systems under development for future experiments. We also discuss data analysis techniques relevant to plasma imaging diagnostics and present recent temperature fluctuation results from the tokamak experiment for technology oriented research (TEXTOR).

  4. Cyclotron resonance in a cathode ray tube

    Absorption of the RF energy by the electron beam in a cathode ray tube due to the cyclotron resonance is described. The cathode ray tube is placed within a Helmholtz coils system supplied by a sawtooth current generator. In order to generate RF field and to detect RF absorption a gate dip-meter equipped with a FET transistor is used. The bias voltage variations of the FET transistors as a function of the magnetic field are recorded. The operating point of the cathode ray tube has been chosen so that the relaxation oscillations of the detection system can be observed. (authors)

  5. The next generation of electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostics (invited)

    Zhang, P.; Domier, C.W.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Tobias, B.; Shen, Z.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Park, H.; Classen, I.G.J.; van de Pol, M.J.; Donne, A. J. H.; R. Jaspers,

    2008-01-01

    A 128 channel two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging system collects time-resolved 16x8 images of T-e profiles and fluctuations on the TEXTOR tokamak. Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) is undergoing significant changes which promise to revolutionize and extend its capabilities

  6. Development of visual beam adjustment method for cyclotron

    We have developed a computer-based visual assistance system for JAERI AVF cyclotron operation. This system provides a CRT display about the cyclotron beam trajectories, feasible setting regions (FSRs), and search traces designed to improve beam parameter adjustment. As a result of the test in actual operation, it was realized that simulated beam trajectories and FSRs nearly agree with actual beam conditions. (author)

  7. Beam extraction system in AIC-144 automatic isochronous cyclotron

    Project of beam extraction system in Cracow AIC-144 cyclotron is described. The problems of increase of beam emittance, and change of the magnetic field in the cyclotron chamber are discussed. Expected extraction coefficient of the beam is about 0.7. (S.B.)

  8. New superconducting cyclotron driven scanning proton therapy systems

    Since one and a half decades ACCEL is investing in development and engineering of state of the art particle-therapy systems. A new medical superconducting 250 MeV proton cyclotron with special focus on the present and future beam requirements of fast scanning treatment systems has been designed. The first new ACCEL medical proton cyclotron is under commissioning at PSI for their PROSCAN proton therapy facility having undergone successful factory tests especially of the closed loop cryomagnetic system. The second cyclotron is part of ACCEL's integrated proton therapy system for Europe's first clinical center, RPTC in Munich. The cyclotron, the energy selection system, the beamline as well as the four gantries and patient positioners have been installed. The scanning system and major parts of the control software have already been tested. We will report on the concept of ACCEL's superconducting cyclotron driven scanning proton therapy systems and the current status of the commissioning work at PSI and RPTC

  9. A new generation of medical cyclotrons for the 90's

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for use in radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicates a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper the authors will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Existing and potential markets for these cyclotrons will be presented. They will also discuss the possibility of systems capable of extracted energies up to 150 MeV and extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA

  10. A new generation of medical cyclotrons for the 90's

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for use in radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicates a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper we will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Existing and potential markets for these cyclotrons will be presented. We will also discuss the possibility of systems capable of extracted energies up to 150 MeV and extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA. (author)

  11. Operation of the Karlsruhe Isochronous Cyclotron in 1975

    The operation of the Karlsruhe Isochronous Cyclotron in 1975 is briefly surveyed. The main reasons for a very short period for maintenance, repair and installation, and several additional efforts to improve the reliability of the accelerator installation, are discussed. The status and the results of several technical developments for the cyclotron are described: 1) the axial injection system; 2) computer aided cyclotron operation; 3) ion source development; 4) capacitive current measurement at the external beam; 5) new correction coils for the cyclotron; 6) improvement of the neutron time-of-flight spectrometer. As there is an increasing interest in using this type of accelerator for research in fields other than nuclear physics, it was felt appropriate to present short surveys on investigations at our cyclotron in 1975 in the fields of: 1) solid state physics; 2) engineering; 3) materials research; 4) nuclear medicine; 5) nuclear chemistry. (orig.)

  12. Visual assistance system for cyclotron operation

    A computer-based operation system for a cyclotron which assists operators has been developed. It is the operation assistance system depending on visual sense to indicate beam parameters to operators. First, the mental model of operators at the time of beam adjustment was analyzed, and it was presumed to be composed of five partial mental models, that is, beam behavior model, feasible setting region model, parameter sensitivity model, parameter interrelation model and status map model. Next, three visual interfaces were developed. Beam trajectory is rapidly calculated and graphically displayed whenever operators change parameters. Feasible setting regions (FSR) for parameters that satisfy the beam acceptance criteria of a cyclotron are indicated. The distribution of beam current values which are the quantity for evaluating adjustment is indicated as search history. Finally, for evaluating the system effectiveness, the search time required to reach the optimum conditions was measured. In addition, the system usability was evaluated by written questionnaires. The result of experiment showed the reduction of search time by about 65%. The written questionnaires survey showed the operators highly evaluate system usability. (K.I.)

  13. Coherent cyclotron motion beyond Kohn's theorem

    Maag, T.; Bayer, A.; Baierl, S.; Hohenleutner, M.; Korn, T.; Schüller, C.; Schuh, D.; Bougeard, D.; Lange, C.; Huber, R.; Mootz, M.; Sipe, J. E.; Koch, S. W.; Kira, M.

    2016-02-01

    In solids, the high density of charged particles makes many-body interactions a pervasive principle governing optics and electronics. However, Walter Kohn found in 1961 that the cyclotron resonance of Landau-quantized electrons is independent of the seemingly inescapable Coulomb interaction between electrons. Although this surprising theorem has been exploited in sophisticated quantum phenomena, such as ultrastrong light-matter coupling, superradiance and coherent control, the complete absence of nonlinearities excludes many intriguing possibilities, such as quantum-logic protocols. Here, we use intense terahertz pulses to drive the cyclotron response of a two-dimensional electron gas beyond the protective limits of Kohn's theorem. Anharmonic Landau ladder climbing and distinct terahertz four- and six-wave mixing signatures occur, which our theory links to dynamic Coulomb effects between electrons and the positively charged ion background. This new context for Kohn's theorem unveils previously inaccessible internal degrees of freedom of Landau electrons, opening up new realms of ultrafast quantum control for electrons.

  14. Acceleration of tritons with a compact cyclotron

    With the compact cyclotron at the Faculty of Physics of the Technical University of Munich, tritons have been accelerated to an energy of 7 MeV. A safe and reliable operation of the gas supply for the ion source was obtained by a new tritium storage system. A quantity of 1500 Ci tritium is stored by two special Zr-Al getter pumps in a non-gaseous phase. The tritium can be released in well-defined amounts by heating the getter material. During triton acceleration the pressure in the cyclotron vacuum chamber is maintained only by a large titanium sputter-ion pump, thus forming a closed vacuum system without any exhaust of tritium contaminated gas. Any tritium contaminations in the air can be detected by an extremely sensitive tritium monitoring system. The triton beam with a maximum intensity of 30 μA has been used so far to produce neutron-rich radioisotopes such as 28Mg, 43K, or 72Zn, which are successfully applied in tracer techniques in the studies of biological systems. (orig.)

  15. Electron cyclotron emission from tokamak plasmas

    Emitted electron radiation can be used as a diagnostic signal to measure the electron temperature of a thermonuclear plasma. This type of diagnostics is well established in tokamak physics. In ch. 2 of this thesis the development, calibration and special design features are treated of a six-channel prototype of a twelve-channel grating spectrometer which is built for JET at Culham for electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements. In order to test this prototype measurements have been performed with the T-10 tokamak at the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow. With this prototype nearly half of the temperature profile of the T-10 could be measured. Detailed observations of sawteeth instabilities have been performed. Plasma heating by electron cyclotron resonance heating experiments was studied. A detailed description of these measurements and results is given in ch. 3. Often ECE spectra from tokamaks showed non-thermal features. In order to interprete them a computer code Notec has been developed. This code that calculates the ECE radiation emerging from the plasma for a 3-D configuration, is described in ch. 4. Some preliminary results and applications are presented. (Auth.)

  16. Ion cyclotron emission studies: Retrospects and prospects

    Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2016-05-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) studies emerged in part from the papers by A.B. Mikhailovskii published in the 1970s. Among the discussed subjects were electromagnetic compressional Alfvénic cyclotron instabilities with the linear growth rate √ {n_α /n_e } driven by fusion products, -particles which draw a lot of attention to energetic particle physics. The theory of ICE excited by energetic particles was significantly advanced at the end of the 20th century motivated by first DT experiments on TFTR and subsequent JET experimental studies which we highlight. More recently ICE theory was advanced by detailed theoretical and experimental studies on spherical torus (ST) fusion devices where the instability signals previously indistinguishable in high aspect ratio tokamaks due to high toroidal magnetic field became the subjects of experiments. We discuss further prospects of ICE theory applications for future burning plasma (BP) experiments such as those to be conducted in ITER device in France, where neutron and gamma rays escaping the plasma create extremely challenging conditions fusion alpha particle diagnostics.

  17. Status of the NSCL Cyclotron Gas Stopper

    Joshi, N; Brodeur, M; Morrissey, D J; Schwarz, S

    2016-01-01

    A gas-filled reverse cyclotron for the thermalisation of energetic beams is under construction at NSCL/MSU. Rare isotopes produced via projectile fragmentation after in-flight separation will be injected into the device and converted into low-energy beams through buffer gas interactions as they spiral towards the centre of the device. The extracted thermal beams will be used for low energy experiments such as precision mass measurements with traps or laser spectroscopy, and further transport for reacceleration. Detailed calculations have been performed to optimize the magnetic field design as well as the transport and stopping of ions inside the gas. An RF carpet will be used to transport the thermal ions to the axial extraction point. The calculations indicate that the cyclotron gas stopper will be much more efficient for the thermalisation of light and medium mass ions compared to linear gas cells. In this contribution we will discuss simulations of the overall performance and acceptance of machine, the bea...

  18. Cyclotron Production of Technetium-99m

    Gagnon, Katherine M.

    Technetium-99m (99mTc) has emerged as the most widely used radionuclide in medicine and is currently obtained from a 99Mo/ 99mTc generator system. At present, there are only a handful of ageing reactors worldwide capable of producing large quantities of the parent isotope, 99Mo, and owing to the ever growing shutdown periods for maintenance and repair of these ageing reactors, the reliable supply 99mTc has been compromised in recent years. With an interest in alternative strategies for producing this key medical isotope, this thesis focuses on several technical challenges related to the direct cyclotron production of 99mTc via the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction. In addition to evaluating the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc and 100Mo(p,x)99Mo reactions, this work presented the first experimental evaluation of the 100Mo(p,2n) 99gTc excitation function in the range of 8-18 MeV. Thick target calculations suggested that large quantities of cyclotron-produced 99mTc may be possible. For example, a 6 hr irradiation at 500 μA with an energy window of 18→10 MeV is expected to yield 1.15 TBq of 99mTc. The level of coproduced 99gTc contaminant was found to be on par with the current 99Mo/99mTc generator standard eluted with a 24 hr frequency. Highly enriched 100Mo was required as the target material for 99mTc production and a process for recycling of this expensive material is presented. An 87% recovery yield is reported, including metallic target preparation, irradiation, 99mTc extraction, molybdate isolation, and finally hydrogen reduction to the metal. Further improvements are expected with additional optimization experiments. A method for forming structurally stable metallic molybdenum targets has also been developed. These targets are capable of withstanding more than a kilowatt of beam power and the reliable production and extraction of Curie quantities of 99mTc has been demonstrated. With the end-goal of using the cyclotron-produced 99mTc clinically, the quality of the cyclotron

  19. Harmonics of cyclotron and cyclotron-phonon resonances in semiconductors with superlattice

    The harmonics of cyclotron and cyclotron-phonon resonances (CR and CPR, respectively) in semiconductors with a superlattice (SL) in the presence of strong magnetic field, H, arranged, parallel to SL axis, are studied based on quantum kinetic equation. The peculiarities of CR and CPR reveal themselves most explicitly with electromagnetic wave E(t) polarized transversely to H. This leads to sudden changes in the dependence of the absorption coefficient against incident light frequency. These sudden changes are shifted relative to the peaks of respective resonances by a miniband-width. At E(t) parallel H the sudden changes are absent and maxima of CR and CPR are defined less explicitly. In SL the maxima of CR and CPR as well as the sudden changes can manifest themselves in a rather weak magnetic field, while the respective quantum oscillations in conventional semiconductors are not revealed. (author)

  20. Construction and commissioning of K110 AVF cyclotron

    The TIARA facilities (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application: TIARA) was constructed at Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment (presently, Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute) under the 6-year program from 1988 in order to promote effective use of ion beams. The first phase of the construction including a K110 AVF cyclotron and a 3 MV tandem accelerator was complete in 1991, and the second phase including a 3 MV single-ended accelerator and 400 kV implanter in 1993. Large AVF cyclotrons have been used mostly for fundamental nuclear physics and medical applications of radiation therapy and radioisotope production so far. The JAEA K110 AVF cyclotron is the first one dedicated to R and D in materials science and other irradiation purpose. This cyclotron facility consists of three external ion sources, an injection line, a K110 AVF cyclotron, eight main beam transport lines, and a control system. The first beam, 50 MeV 4He2+, was extracted from the cyclotron in March 1991. This report describes an outline of the K110 AVF cyclotron system and results of performance tests. (author)

  1. Survey on radionuclide producing using cyclotron method in Malaysia

    This research discuss about basic design and systems of medical cyclotron that Malaysia currently have, its applications in radionuclide production and upcoming technologies of cyclotron. Surveys have been carried out on cyclotron facilities at Hospital Putrajaya and Wijaya International Medical Center, WIMC as well as reactor facility at Malaysia Nuclear Agency. The sources in this research also involves on-line and library searches. Information obtained are recorded, categorized, synthesized and discussed. systems of cyclotron of Hospital Putrajaya are further discussed in details. Based from the surveys carried out, it is found out that cyclotron facilities both in Hospital Putrajaya and WIMC only produce (18F)FDG with radioactivity of 18F produced in 2007 are 16479 mCi and 92546 mCi respectively. Survey also revealed that radioisotope production at Nuclear Malaysia has had its operation been ceased. A new radiopharmaceutical, namely CHOL is suggested to be synthesized by both facilities as a new PET tracer. Latest developments concerning technologies of cyclotron as well as other accelerators such as laser for future medical accelerator, prospect of boron neutron capture and the potential of hadron therapy in Malaysia are discussed here. Radioisotope production in Malaysia is expected to keep booming in future due to increase in usage of PET techniques and the construction of more compact, easy to handle and less costly cyclotrons. (author)

  2. Cyclotron targets and production technologies used for radiopharmaceuticals

    Some technical aspects of development and production of cyclotron-made radiopharmaceuticals (excluding PET) are discussed. In this field, nuclear chemistry and pharmacy are in a close contact; therefore, requirements of both should be taken into account. The principles of cyclotron targetry, separation/recovery of materials and synthesis of the active substances are given, as well as issues connected with formulation pharmaceutical forms of radioactive medical products. As the radiopharmaceuticals should fulfil the requirements for in vivo preparations, there exist a variety of demands pertaining to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), which is also briefly discussed. A typical production chain is presented involving the treatment of irradiated cyclotron target, choosing and validation of method for pharmacon synthesis, selection or development of necessary analytical procedures, preparing active substance according pharmaceutical standards, development of dosage form, adoption of final technology procedure and opening the clinical trial. Practical examples of real technologies based on cyclotron-made radionuclides (81Rb, 123I, 68Ge, 211At) are given. Special attention is devoted to the technology of enriched cyclotron targets. Frequently used medicinal products employing some cyclotron-produced active substances are characterised (Rb/Kr or Ge/Ga generators, 123I-labelled MIBG, OIH, MAB's and some others). The cyclotron produced radioactive implants for transluminal coronary angioplasty (radioactive stent) are introduced as an example of a medical device developed for therapeutic application. (author)

  3. Utilization of cyclotron for the production of radionuclides for medical use

    The various types of cyclotrons (medical cyclotrons, medium energy cyclotrons, high energy cyclotrons, proton linear accelerators) used for the production of radionucleides are reviewed. The production method of five of the most important, together with their medical use are described: iodine-123, rubidium-81, krypton-81m, thalllium-201, indium-111 and gallium-67

  4. Electron tube with transverse cyclotron interaction

    Chodorow, M.

    1985-04-23

    An electron-beam tube for generating high microwave power at high frequencies comprises a fast-wave circuit such as a hollow waveguide. The circuit wave has a component of electric field perpendicular to its propagation axis. This field interacts with motions of the electrons transverse to the axis, in particular cyclotron rotation in an axial magnetic field. The above features are common to the well-known ''gyrotrons''. In the inventive tube the fast-wave circuit has means for locking a linearly polarized transverse-electric mode to the orientation of a circuit member such as the ridge in a ridged waveguide. The member (ridge) rotates spirally with distance along the guide. The added periodicity permits interaction with a space harmonic of the circuit wave. The -1 harmonic has a dispersion characteristic which provides beam-wave interaction over a wider frequency range than is possible in prior-art tubes of the gyrotron type.

  5. Electron tube with transverse cyclotron interaction

    An electron-beam tube for generating high microwave power at high frequencies comprises a fast-wave circuit such as a hollow waveguide. The circuit wave has a component of electric field perpendicular to its propagation axis. This field interacts with motions of the electrons transverse to the axis, in particular cyclotron rotation in an axial magnetic field. The above features are common to the well-known ''gyrotrons''. In the inventive tube the fast-wave circuit has means for locking a linearly polarized transverse-electric mode to the orientation of a circuit member such as the ridge in a ridged waveguide. The member (ridge) rotates spirally with distance along the guide. The added periodicity permits interaction with a space harmonic of the circuit wave. The -1 harmonic has a dispersion characteristic which provides beam-wave interaction over a wider frequency range than is possible in prior-art tubes of the gyrotron type

  6. Ion cyclotron emission by spontaneous emission

    Da Costa, O. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Gresillon, D. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    1994-07-01

    The goal of the study is to examine whether the spontaneous emission can account for ICE (ion cyclotron emission) experimental results, or part of them. A straightforward approach to plasma emission is chosen, investigating the near equilibrium wave radiation by gyrating ions, and thus building from the majority and fast fusion ions the plasma fluctuations and emission on the fast magnetoacoustic or compressional Alfven wave mode in the IC frequency range. Similarities with the ICE experiments are shown: the emission temperature in the presence of fast ions (even in a very small amount), the strong fast ion emission increase with the harmonic, the fine double-line splitting of each peak, the linear but not proportional increase of the peak width with the harmonic. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources

    Starting with the pioneering work of R. Geller and his group in Grenoble (France), at least 14 ECR sources have been built and tested during the last five years. Most of those sources have been extremely successful, providing intense, stable and reliable beams of highly charged ions for cyclotron injection or atomic physics research. However, some of the operational features of those sources disagreed with commonly accepted theories on ECR source operation. To explain the observed behavior of actual sources, it was found necessary to refine some of the crude ideas we had about ECR sources. Some of those new propositions are explained, and used to make some extrapolations on the possible future developments in ECR sources

  8. Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind

    Wei, H. Y.; Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Omidi, N.

    2016-02-01

    The ion cyclotron waves (ICWs) refer to electromagnetic transverse waves with nearly field-aligned propagation, circular polarization, and frequencies near the proton gyro-frequency. This chapter presents the ICW studies observed in the solar wind over a wide range of heliocentric distances, at all solar longitudes, and at locations far from planets or comets. To better understand the wave source region, case studies have been performed on a special group of ICW storm events, in which the left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH) waves were observed simultaneously in the spacecraft frame. The study in the chapter assumes the waves are generated through one possible mechanism (i.e., the temperature anisotropy instability). The variations of the wave properties with heliocentric distances may also provide information on the possible wave generation sources and the effects of the wave to the solar wind plasma.

  9. Ion cyclotron resonance heating system on EAST

    The Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) system which can provide no less than 10 MW radio frequency (RF) heating power (frequency range from 25 MHz to 100 MHz) is being set up for the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) in the institute of plasma physics. System includes High-power and wide-frequency radio amplifier, liquid phase shifter and resonant double loop (RDL) antenna. Now one ICRH system unit whose ultimate output is 2.5 MW has been set up and employed for RF heating experiment and maximum of the injected RF power reached to 200 kW in 2008 EAST tokamak experiment. The results of ICRH heating are satisfying. (author)

  10. Time-resolved ion cyclotron resonance

    Ion cyclotron resonance (i.c.r.) is a technique for the study of ion-molecule reactions in the collisional range from thermal to several electron volts. The study of these reactions at low energy has been given impetus by the discovery of their importance in the ionosphere and in interstellar space. This communication identifies some possible weaknesses inherent in current i.c.r. work and suggests an improved technique with which it is possible to determine absolute rate constants more reliably. As an illustration of the technique a measurement of the rate constant for the reaction CH4+ + CH4 → CH5+ + CH3 is presented. This value is k = 1.21 + - 0.09 x 10-15 m3 s-1. A new i.c.r. cell design is discussed with which it is hoped to provide further improvement in reliability by the production of a homogeneous radiofrequency field within a true quadrupole trap. (author)

  11. Ion cyclotron resonance heating system on Aditya

    D Bora; Sunil Kumar; Raj Singh; S V Kulkarni; A Mukherjee; J P Singh; Raguraj Singh; S Dani; A Patel; Sai Kumar; V George; Y S S Srinivas; P Khilar; M Kushwah; P Shah; H M Jadav; Rajnish Kumar; S Gangopadhyay; H Machhar; B Kadia; K Parmar; A Bhardwaj; Suresh Adav; D Rathi; D S Bhattacharya

    2005-02-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system has been designed, fabricated indigenously and commissioned on Tokamak Aditya. The system has been commissioned to operate between 20·0 and 47·0 MHz at a maximum power of 200 kW continuous wave (CW). Duration of 500 ms is sufficient for operation on Aditya, however, the same system feeds the final stage of the 1·5 MW ICRH system being prepared for the steady-state superconducting tokamak (SST-1) for a duration of 1000 s. Radio frequency (RF) power (225 kW) has been generated and successfully tested on a dummy load for 100s at 30·0 MHz. Lower powers have been coupled to Aditya in a breakdown experiment. We describe the system in detail in this work.

  12. Ionospheric modification at twice the electron cyclotron frequency

    In 2004, a new transmission band was added to the HAARP high-frequency ionospheric modification facility that encompasses the second electron cyclotron harmonic at altitudes between ∼220 and 330 km. Initial observations indicate that greatly enhanced airglow occurs whenever the transmission frequency approximately matches the second electron cyclotron harmonic at the height of the upper hybrid resonance. This is the reverse of what happens at higher electron cyclotron harmonics. The measured optical emissions confirm the presence of accelerated electrons in the plasma

  13. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes our continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections during the next year. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  14. Superconducting cyclotron and its vacuum system

    A large superconducting cyclotron is under construction at this Centre and will be used to accelerate heavy ion beams to energy up to 80 MeV/A for light heavy ions and about 10 MeV/A for medium mass heavy ions. The vacuum system for this accelerator has several different aspects. The main acceleration chamber will be evacuated to a level of about 10-7 torr using both turbo molecular pumps and specially designed cryopanels. The surfaces exposed to this 'vacuum' are mostly made of OFE copper. The cryogenic transfer lines, to cool the cryopanels, are of several meters in length and they pass through RF resonators extending below the magnet. The cryostat that will house the superconducting coils has an annular vacuum chamber, which is evacuated to a level of approximately 10-5 torr using a turbo molecular pump. Cryopumping action starts once the coils are cooled to low temperatures. A differential pumping is provided below the RF liner that encloses the pole tip of the main magnet. The space that is pumped in this case contains epoxy-potted trim coils wound around the pole tips. Crucial interlocks are provided between the differential vacuum and the acceleration chamber vacuum to avoid distortion of the RF liner, which is made of thin copper sheets. The other important vacuum system provides thermal insulation for the liquid helium transfer lines. In this paper a brief description of the superconducting cyclotron will be given. Details of various vacuum aspects of the accelerator and the logistics of their operation will be presented. Introduction of some of the improved equipment now available and improved techniques are also discussed

  15. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    Khazanov, George V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is very well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis of modern

  16. Automated irradiation systems for use in cyclotrons

    There are two cyclotrons in operation at IPEN-CNEN/SP: one model CV-28, capable of accelerating p, d, 3He++ and α, with energies of 24, 14, 36 and 28MeV, respectively, and beam currents up to 30μA; the other one, model Cyclone 30, accelerates protons with energy of 30MeV and currents up to 350μA. They have the objective of irradiating targets both for radioisotope production for use in Nuclear Medicine, such as 67Ga, 201Tl, 111In, 123I, 18F and general research. The development of irradiating systems completely automatized was the objective of this work, always aiming to reduce the radiation exposition dose to the workers and to increase the reliability of use of these systems, because very high activities are expected in these processes. In the automation, a Programmable Logical Controller (PLC) was used connected to a feedback net, to manage all the variables involved in the irradiation processes. The program of the PLC was developed using SIMATIC STEP SEVEN (S7), software from SIEMENS, where all the steps are supervised in screens at a microcomputer. The assembling and sequence of leading were developed using the software from UNISOFT, that keeps the operator informed about the work being carried out, at any time. The system is being tested at the CV-28 Cyclotron of IPEN through the irradiations with 24MeV protons and currents up to 10μA in targets of: Solid, natural Zinc electroplated onto a nickelated Copper support for the production of 67Ga; Gas, natural Krypton for the production of the generator 81Rb-81mKr; Liquid, natural water for the production of 18F. (author)

  17. The NSCL cyclotron gas stopper - Entering commissioning

    Schwarz, S.; Bollen, G.; Chouhan, S.; Das, J. J.; Green, M.; Magsig, C.; Morrissey, D. J.; Ottarson, J.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Villari, A. C. C.; Zeller, A.

    2016-06-01

    Linear gas stopping cells have been used successfully at NSCL to slow down ions produced by projectile fragmentation from the 100 MeV/u to the keV energy range. These 'stopped beams' have first been used for low-energy high precision experiments and more recently for NSCLs re-accelerator ReA. A gas-filled reverse cyclotron is currently under construction by the NSCL to complement the existing stopping cells: Due to its extended stopping length, efficient stopping and fast extraction is expected even for light and medium-mass ions, which are difficult to thermalize in linear gas cells. The device is based on a 2.6 T maximum-field cyclotron-type magnet to confine the injected beam while it is slowed down in ≈100 mbar of LN2-temperature helium gas. Once thermalized, the beam will be transported to the center of the device by a traveling-wave RF-carpet system, extracted along the symmetry axis with an ion conveyor and miniature RF-carpets, and accelerated to a few tens of keV of energy for delivery to the users. The superconducting magnet has been constructed on a 60 kV platform and energized to its nominal field strength. The magnet's two cryostats use 3 cryo-refrigerators each and liquid-nitrogen cooled thermal shields to cool the coil pair to superconductivity. This concept, chosen not to have to rely on external liquid helium, has been working well. Measurements of axial and radial field profiles confirm the field calculations. The individual RF-ion guiding components for low-energy ion transport through the device have been tested successfully. The beam stopping chamber with its 0.9 m-diameter RF carpet system and the ion extraction system are being prepared for installation inside the magnet for low-energy ion transport tests.

  18. Ion extraction in the cyclotron geometry

    The detailed physics of ion beam extraction from a plasma column by intense sinusoidal radio frequency (rf) electric fields at the ion cyclotron frequency omega/sub ci/ and its harmonics is experimentally studied. Results describe the instantaneous relationship - within one rf period of approx. = 3009 nsec - between applied rf, the plasma response and the ions expelled by rf and plasma fields. Reflex discharges in H2, D2, and He with ion and electron densities greater than or equal to1011 cm-3 are subjected to 0-5 kV zero-to-peak rf electric fields E vector and 0.65-9.00 kG background magnetic fields B0 vector with E vector perpendicular to B0 vector. Ion currents up to 200 μA are extracted. Nonperturbing optical diagnostics measure the relative amplitude and phase of instantaneous ion and electron density fluctuations induced by the rf during each rf cycle and the time variation of extracted ion bursts, the latter made possible by the use of a phosphor beam-stop. Detailed dependences on external electric and magnetic fields are reported. The plasma density fluctuations are in good agreement with the dispersion relation for electrostatic ion cyclotron waves (EICW), and the beam data show current enhancement at the second harmonic over that at the fundamental and evidence for a radically different mechanism for the rf-driven ion extraction process than conventional wisdom assumes. This work represents the first detailed, systematic study of the ac ion extraction process

  19. Ion cyclotron emission in tokamak plasmas

    Detection of α(3.5 MeV) fusion products will be of major importance for the achievement of self sustained discharges in fusion thermonuclear reactors. Due to their cyclotronic gyration in the confining magnetic field of a tokamak, α particles are suspected to radiate in the radio-frequency band [RF: 10-500 MHz]. Our aim is to determine whether detection of RF emission radiated from a reactor plasma can provide information concerning those fusion products. We observed experimentally that the RF emission radiated from fast ions situated in the core of the discharge is detectable with a probe located at the plasma edge. For that purpose, fast temporal acquisition of spectral power was achieved in a narrow frequency band. We also propose two complementary models for this emission. In the first one, we describe locally the energy transfer between the photon population and the plasma and we compute the radiation equilibrium taking place in the tokamak. α particles are not the unique species involved in the equilibrium and it is necessary to take into account all other species present in the plasma (Deuterium, Tritium, electrons,...). Our second model consists in the numerical resolution of the Maxwell-Vlasov with the use of a variational formulation, in which all polarizations are considered and the 4 first cyclotronic harmonics are included in a 1-D slab geometry. The development of this second model leads to the proposal for an experimental set up aiming to the feasibility demonstration of a routine diagnostic providing the central α density in a reactor. (author)

  20. Mean magnetic field calculation program with allowance for flutter for isochronous cyclotron (Cyclotron Analytic Model Program - CAMP)

    The Cyclotron Analytic Model Program (CAMP) written in C++ with the use of Visual C++ is described. The program is intended for the mean magnetic field calculation of the isochronous cyclotron with allowance for flutter. The program algorithm was developed on the basis of the paper 'Calculation of Isochronous Fields for Sector-Focused Cyclotrons', by M.M.Gordon (Particle Accelerators. 1983. V.13). The accuracy of the calculations, performed with this program, was tested with the use of maps of isochronous magnetic fields of different cyclotrons with the azimuthally varying fields - AVF cyclotrons, in which the ion beams were produced. The calculation by CAMP showed that the isochronous mean magnetic field curve for the measured magnetic field, in which the ion beam was produced, exactly corresponded to the curve of the isochronous mean magnetic field, calculated with the allowance for flutter for all the AVF cyclotrons that were considered. As is evident from the calculations, this program can be used for calculations for both straight-sector and spiral-sector cyclotrons. (author)

  1. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 23

    1967-10-09

    Progress is reported in the design, installation of various components of the cyclotron, including coils, magnets, rf system, and vacuum system. Also reported are measurements on magnets and rf components. (LEW)

  2. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 20

    1967-06-30

    Progress is reported in the fabrication and testing of cyclotron components, including magnet system and rf system components. Work on vacuum components and instrumentation and control equipment is also reported. (LEW)

  3. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 32

    1968-06-28

    Completion of magnet tests, followed by completion of installation of major cyclotron components, are reported. Intermediate level power tests of the rf system are also reported. Design and fabrication of the control system are reported to be under way. (LEW)

  4. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 26

    1968-01-17

    Progress is reported in the fabrication, installation, and testing of cyclotron components, including magnets and coils, rf components, vacuum and control equipment. Also reported are magnet and rf component measurements. (LEW)

  5. Undergraduate Education with the Rutgers 12-Inch Cyclotron

    Koeth, Timothy W.

    The Rutgers 12-Inch Cyclotron is a research grade accelerator dedicated to undergraduate education. From its inception, it has been intended for instruction and has been designed to demonstrate classic beam physics phenomena and provides students hands on experience with accelerator technology. The cyclotron is easily reconfigured, allowing experiments to be designed and performed within one academic semester. Our cyclotron offers students the opportunity to operate an accelerator and directly observe many fundamental beam physics concepts, including axial and radial betatron motion, destructive resonances, weak and azimuthally varying field (AVF) focusing schemes, RF and DEE voltage effects, diagnostic techniques, and perform low energy nuclear reactions. This paper emphasizes the unique beam physics measurements and beam manipulations capable at the Rutgers 12-Inch Cyclotron.

  6. Variable-Energy Cyclotron for Proton Therapy Application

    Alenitsky, Yu G; Vorozhtsov, A S; Glazov, A A; Mytsyn, G V; Molokanov, A G; Onishchenko, L M

    2004-01-01

    The requirements to characteristics of the beams used for proton therapy are considered. The operation and proposed cyclotrons for proton therapy are briefly described. The technical decisions of creation of the cyclotron with energy variation in the range 70-230 MeV and with current up to 100 nA are estimated. Taking into account the fact, that the size and cost of the cyclotron are approximately determined by the maximum proton energy, it is realistically offered to limit the maximum proton energy to 190 MeV and to elaborate a cyclotron project with a warm winding of the magnet for acceleration of H^{-} ions. The energy of the extracted protons for each run is determined by a stripped target radius in the vacuum chamber of the accelerator, and the radiation dose field for the patient is created by the external devices using the developed techniques.

  7. Heavy ion booster cyclotron design studies at Berkeley

    Design studies on four booster cyclotrons for heavy ions are described. Comparisons are made of normal vs. superconducting main coils and of K = 400 and 800 sizes. Performance and cost estimates are given. (U.S.)

  8. H-superconducting cyclotron for PET isotope production

    The scientific design of a 14-MeV H- compact superconducting cyclotron for producing of the 18F and 13N isotopes has been developed. Main requirements to the facility as a medical accelerator are met in the design. In particular, the main requirement for the cyclotron was the smallest possible size due to the superconducting magnet. The calculations show that the proposed cyclotron allows extracted beam intensity over 500 μA. To increase system reliability and production rates, an external H- ion source is applied. The choice of the cyclotron concept, design of the structure elements, calculation of the electromagnetic fields and beam dynamics from the ion source to the extraction system were performed.

  9. The fundamental cyclotron line in 4U 1538-52

    Rodes-Roca, J J; Bernabéu, J G

    2009-01-01

    We present pulse phase averaged spectra of the high mass X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1538-52/QV Nor. Observations of this persistent accreting pulsar were made with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We study the variability of cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF or simply cyclotron line) in the high energy spectra of this binary system. We show that the parameters of the CRSF are correlated. The first one is, as suggested by theory, between the width and the energy of the cyclotron line. The second one is between the relative width and the optical depth of the cyclotron line. We discuss these results with studies of other X-ray pulsars and their implications on the line variability.

  10. Single electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    Asner, D M; de Viveiros, L; Doe, P J; Fernandes, J L; Fertl, M; Finn, E C; Formaggio, J A; Furse, D; Jones, A M; Kofron, J N; LaRoque, B H; Leber, M; McBride, E L; Miller, M L; Mohanmurthy, P; Monreal, B; Oblath, N S; Robertson, R G H; Rosenberg, L J; Rybka, G; Rysewyk, D; Sternberg, M G; Tedeschi, J R; Thummler, T; VanDevender, B A; Woods, N L

    2014-01-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta elec- tron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta sp...

  11. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  12. Development of baby cyclotron for PET in Korea

    Development of a 13 MeV cyclotron for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been in progress since April 1999 at the Korea Cancer Center Hospital (KCCH). The study has been carried out in a joint collaboration between KCCH and the Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH). Increasing desire for an uninterrupted, reliable and timely supply of the isotopes to customers has prompted obtaining a dedicated 5-13 MeV cyclotron for PET applications and pursuing the purchase of another 30MeV medical cyclotron in the very near future. A decision has been made to design the PET cyclotron in Korea. This will not only ease the problems associated with maintenance during operation but also keep the door open for continuous upgrading of the machine in the future

  13. Cyclotron radiation by a multi-group method

    A multi-energy group technique is developed to study conditions under which cyclotron radiation emission can shift a Maxwellian electron distribution into a non-Maxwellian; and if the electron distribution is non-Maxwellian, to study the rate of cyclotron radiation emission as compared to that emitted by a Maxwellian having the same mean electron density and energy. The assumptions in this study are: the electrons should be in an isotropic medium and the magnetic field should be uniform. The multi-group technique is coupled into a multi-group Fokker-Planck computer code to study electron behavior under the influence of cyclotron radiation emission in a self-consistent fashion. Several non-Maxwellian distributions were simulated to compare their cyclotron emissions with the corresponding energy and number density equivalent Maxwellian distribtions

  14. Flat-top system of the DC-280 cyclotron

    Gulbekyan, G. G.; Buzmakov, V. A.; Zarubin, V. B.; Ivanenko, I. A.; Kazarinov, N. Yu.; Karamysheva, G. A.; Franko, I.

    2013-07-01

    The flat-top cavity of the radio-frequency accelerating system designed at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, for the DC-280 cyclotron is described. The cyclotron is intended for increasing the capabilities and efficiency of experiments on the synthesis of super-heavy elements and an investigation of their nuclear physical and chemical properties. The DC-280 isochronous heavy-ion cyclotron will produce accelerated beam of ions in the range from neon to uranium. The parameters, design, and results of the experimental and 3D computer modeling of the flat-top cavity of the RF accelerating system of the DC-280 cyclotron are reported.

  15. Status report of the operation of the RIBF ring cyclotrons

    The yearly operation status of the RIBF ring cyclotrons (RRC, fRC, IRC and SRC) including statistics of machine time, troubles, and developments in the Aug. 2012 - Jul. 2013 period is reported. (author)

  16. The beam handling system of the Oslo Cyclotron

    The beam optic system of the Oslo Cyclotron is described. A computer program for the calculation of optimal settings of quadropoles is presented. The reliability of the computer program is confirmed by experimental data

  17. Directory of cyclotrons used for radionuclide production in member states

    The present directory of cyclotron facilities used for the production of radionuclides in Member States is an update of the one compiled by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in late 1997 and published as IAEA-TECDOC-1007 in 1998. The directory was prepared through information collected by questionnaires that the IAEA sent to known institutions operating cyclotrons for radionuclide production. Technical as well as administrative data supplied to the IAEA as of October 2001 were taken into account. The directory is considered to include most of the cyclotrons of the world that are used at least partially for radionuclide production. It contains 246 entries based on questionnaires accomplished and submitted to the IAEA by cyclotron facilities from 39 Member States, which represents a 19% increase over the 206 cyclotrons listed in the 1998 edition. The increase in number during the last four years was driven by several factors, i.e. advent of advances in medical imaging, introduction of compact, user-friendly medical cyclotron, and recent decisions that costs for 150-oxygen PET studies in Japan and 18F-FDG PET studies in Germany and the United States are eligible for reimbursement by government or insurance companies. There is no doubt that the fastest growing segment of the market is in the commercial distribution of FDG to local hospitals. Although there are good reasons to believe that the number of cyclotron facilities dedicated to the production of PET tracers will continue to grow in the near future, the need to further update the directory will be assessed in due course, depending on comments and suggestions we shall receive from users of the directory. The Industrial Applications and Chemistry Section of the IAEA can, in the meantime, receive more information on existing facilities not included herein as well as on new and planned cyclotron installations to be used for radionuclide production

  18. Development of visual beam adjustment method for cyclotron

    We have developed a computer-based visual assistance system for JAERI AVF-cyclotron operation. This system provides a CRT display about the cyclotron beam trajectories, feasible setting regions (FSR's), and search traces designed to enhance beam parameter adjustment. As a result of the test in actual operation, it was realized that simulated beam trajectories and FSR's were nearly agreeable with actual beam condition in the axial injection block and the extraction block. (author)

  19. Cyrce, a cyclotron for research and teaching in Alsace

    Nuclear imaging, often considered as a speciality, arose from the combined efforts of physics, chemistry, biology and medicine. This functional imaging modality is based on technical and scientific developments and benefits from the high sensitivity of detection of radio-isotopes. Cyrce, a cyclotron set up in Strasbourg, merges into the French national network of cyclotrons dedicated to clinical and preclinical research but also designed for teaching and pharmaceutical collaborations. (authors)

  20. Ion-Beam-Excited Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens;

    1976-01-01

    Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field.......Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field....

  1. PET computer programs for use with the 88-inch cyclotron

    This report describes in detail several offline programs written for the PET computer which provide an efficient data management system to assist with the operation of the 88-Inch Cyclotron. This function includes the capability to predict settings for all cyclotron and beam line parameters for all beams within the present operating domain of the facility. The establishment of a data base for operational records is also described from which various aspects of the operating history can be projected

  2. High intensity ion beam injection into the 88-inch cyclotron

    Wutte, Daniela; Clark, Dave J.; Laune, Bernard; Leitner, Matthaeus A.; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2000-01-01

    Low cross section experiments to produce super-heavy elements have increased the demand for high intensity heavy ion beams at energies of about 5 MeV/nucleon at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Therefore, efforts are underway to increase the overall ion beam transmission through the axial injection line and the cyclotron. The ion beam emittance has been measured for various ion masses and charge states. Beam transport simulations including space charge ...

  3. Accelerator activities at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata

    The Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) at Kolkata indigenously developed the first large accelerator in the country, the room temperature cyclotron K-130 during seventies which is still delivering ions beams to the users spread all over the country for research in nuclear science and applied physics. VECC, with its vast experience and expertise in accelerator technology, took up the challenging task of constructing the first superconducting cyclotron in the country the K500 superconducting cyclotron. It has also been commissioned with internal beam. The problems associated with getting the external beam are analysed in detail since last one year and some of them are fixed. Efforts are on to get external beam from the K500 cyclotron and it is expected that soon it will also deliver beams to the users. In order to study structure of unstable nuclei that are very neutron rich or proton rich, an ISOL based RIB facility is under-development at VECC. Several components of this facility have already been tested and installed. VECC is also working on to build a world class national accelerator facility called ANURIB (Advanced National facility for Unstable and Rare Isotope Beams) at the new campus in Kolkata. This facility will serve a wide user community in nuclear and material sciences. VECC is also setting up a medical cyclotron to produce proton beam with energy up to 30 MeV and current up to 350 μA, to produce various isotopes for medical applications. This cyclotron will also be used for R and D in material science and to settle the various problems related with handling of high beam current on ADS related components. Apart from these main facilities VECC is also involved in the R and D activities related with accelerators such as studies on using cyclotrons to achieve high power proton beam, development and testing of superconducting cavities, development of superconducting magnets for FAIR project etc. (author)

  4. Cyclotron Target Monitoring During Bombardment for PET Isotope Production

    The increasing use of radio-labeled pharmaceuticals in medicine has generated the need for radioisotope availability on a routine commercial basis. Cyclotrons are commonly used to produce short-lived positron-emitting isotopes. A growing number of small cyclotrons have been installed in hospitals. The materials produced in cyclotrons are used in PET (Positron Emitting Tomography) studies as research tools for observing physiological mechanisms and diagnostic procedures for numerous medical problems. Due to the short half-lives of positron-emitting isotopes, they must be produced as rapidly as possible and be available in the required quantity. Sometimes, due to problems in the cyclotron operation, the production run fails. Physicians and patients expect the radioisotopes to be available at a particular time. A failed run, in addition to delaying or even canceling the scheduled medical examination, is also extremely costly. Hence the need for automated control sensors to monitor the expensive production process arises. The need is even greater in PET commercial, production and distribution centers, and in high energy cyclotron centers that produce and distribute isotopes for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), since numerous hospital clinics and patients rely on the prompt availability of the radiopharmaceuticals. Our goal was to develop an optimum radiation detection system to be used as a diagnostic tool for startup, maintenance and operational needs of the cyclotron facility

  5. Status and development of the Kazakhstan isochronous cyclotron

    Arzumanov, A.; Batischev, V.; Borissenko, A.; Gorkovets, M.; Koptev, V.; Lyssukhin, S.; Mulgin, S.; Popov, Yu.; Zhdanov, S.

    2001-12-01

    A report is presented on the status of the cyclotron in Almaty at present time. In spite of sharp curtailment of government-funded basic research program the cyclotron still remains as multipurpose accelerator facility and is being used for fundamental research and application in different fields of applied science. During last years some cyclotron systems were upgraded and some were designed anew. The system for on-line precise ion beam energy measurement using time-of-flight method was designed and constructed. Inductive pick-up electrodes are integrated into beam transport channel and are located at the distance of 10 m from each other. Average beam energy determination is performed with the accuracy about 0.1%. This system allows to analyze ion beam parameters in pulse-mode of cyclotron operation with macro duty factor in the range of 2-50. In connection with development of cyclotron based radioisotope production and necessity of irradiation of toxic materials and loose and smelted powders with low heat conductivity circular beam scanning system was designed and installed. Transversal rotating magnetic field is generated by stator of usual electro-motor. The scanner allows to form predictable beam power density distribution on the target surface and obtain rather uniform irradiation fields. Cyclotron based neutron source with Be target for research on radioecology and neutron dosimetry was constructed and is located at one of the external beam transportation channel. Parameters of the system and examples of its application are presented.

  6. Proceedings of the 12. Joint Workshop on Electron Cyclotron Emission and Electron Cyclotron Heating

    The 12. Joint Workshop on Electron Cyclotron Emission and Electron Cyclotron Heating was held in Aix-en-Provence (France) from 13 to 16 May 2002. The meeting was hosted by the Association Euratom-CEA sur la Fusion (CEA/Cadarache, France), with additional financial support from: - Region Provence-Alpes Cote d'Azur - The City of Aix-en-Provence - Communaute de l'Agglomeration du Pays d'Aix - Thales Electron Devices (France) - Alstom Magnets and Superconductors (France) - Spinner GmbH (Germany). The members of the local organizing committee were: G. Giruzzi, M. Lennholm, R. Magne and V. Poli, from CEA/Cadarache. The composition of the International Programme Committee was the following: M. Bornatici (Italy), A. Costley (ITER), E. de la Luna (Spain), G. Giruzzi (France), W. Kasparek (Germany), B. Lloyd (UK), J. Lohr (USA), K. Sakamoto (Japan). The subjects of the meeting were classified in four main topics: Electron Cyclotron Theory; Electron Cyclotron Emission; Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive Experiments; Electron Cyclotron Technology. The results presented in these topics have been summarised in the closing session by E. Westerhof, A. Kraemer-Flecken, T. Goodman and G. Bosia, respectively. The workshop was attended by 85 participants from 18 countries, providing 10 invited talks, 30 oral presentations and 50 posters. The success of the workshop is mainly due to the amount and quality of their work and of their presentations. The generosity of the sponsors, the selection and advice work of the International Programme Committee, as well as the contribution of the chairmen and of the summary speakers should also be warmly acknowledged. The papers in this collection have been reproduced directly from the authors' manuscripts, provided either as camera-ready texts or as pdf files. The constraints on the papers lengths and formats have been kept to a minimum, on purpose. This series of workshops has now reached a good level of maturity, with well established

  7. Dynamic regimes of cyclotron instability in the afterglow mode of minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    Mansfeld, D.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Tarvainen, Olli; Kalvas, Taneli; Koivisto, Hannu; Komppula, Jani; Kronholm, Risto; Laulainen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the dynamic regimes of cyclotron instabilities in non-equilibrium plasma of a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source operated in pulsed mode. The instability appears in decaying ion source plasma shortly (1–10 ms) after switching off the microwave radiation of the klystron, and manifests itself in the form of powerful pulses of electromagnetic emission associated with precipitation of high-energy electrons along the magnetic field lines. Recently it was ...

  8. Mean magnetic field calculation program with allowance for flutter for isochronous cyclotron (Cyclotron Analytic Model Program - CAMP)

    Kiyan, I N; Vorozhtsov, S B

    2002-01-01

    The Cyclotron Analytic Model Program (CAMP) written in C++ with the use of Visual C++ is described. The program is intended for the mean magnetic field calculation of the isochronous cyclotron with allowance for flutter. The program algorithm was developed on the basis of the paper 'Calculation of Isochronous Fields for Sector-Focused Cyclotrons', by M.M.Gordon (Particle Accelerators. 1983. V.13). The accuracy of the calculations, performed with this program, was tested with the use of maps of isochronous magnetic fields of different cyclotrons with the azimuthally varying fields - AVF cyclotrons, in which the ion beams were produced. The calculation by CAMP showed that the isochronous mean magnetic field curve for the measured magnetic field, in which the ion beam was produced, exactly corresponded to the curve of the isochronous mean magnetic field, calculated with the allowance for flutter for all the AVF cyclotrons that were considered. As is evident from the calculations, this program can be used for cal...

  9. Electron cyclotron emission spectroscopy on thermonuclear plasmas

    Analysis of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) enables one to infer the radial profile of the electron temperature in tokamaks. The Dutch FOM institute for plasma physics has designed, built, installed and operated a grating polychromator for ECE measurements at JET. This thesis deals with a few instrumental aspects of this project and with applications of ECE measurements in tokamak physics studies. Ch. 3 and 4 deal with the wave transport in ECE systems. In Ch. 3 a method is developed to infer the mode conversion, which is a source for transmission losses, in a waveguide component from the antenna pattern of its exit aperture. In Ch. 4 the design and manufacture of the waveguide transition system to the grating polychromator are described. In Ch. 5 a method is reported for calibration of the spectrometers, based on the use of a microwave source which simulates a large area blackbody of very high temperature. The feasibility of the method is tested by applying it to two different ECE systems. In Ch. 6 a study of heat pulse propagation in tokamak plasma's, based on measurement of the electron temperature with the grating polychromator, is presented. 105 refs.; 48 figs.; 8 tabs

  10. Fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    Lyneis, Claude M; Leitner, D; Todd, D S; Sabbi, G; Prestemon, S; Caspi, S; Ferracin, P

    2008-02-01

    The concepts and technical challenges related to developing a fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a rf frequency greater than 40 GHz and magnetic confinement fields greater than twice B(ECR) will be explored in this article. Based on the semiempirical frequency scaling of ECR plasma density with the square of operating frequency, there should be significant gains in performance over current third generation ECR ion sources, which operate at rf frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz. While the third generation ECR ion sources use NbTi superconducting solenoid and sextupole coils, the new sources will need to use different superconducting materials, such as Nb(3)Sn, to reach the required magnetic confinement, which scales linearly with rf frequency. Additional technical challenges include increased bremsstrahlung production, which may increase faster than the plasma density, bremsstrahlung heating of the cold mass, and the availability of high power continuous wave microwave sources at these frequencies. With each generation of ECR ion sources, there are new challenges to be mastered, but the potential for higher performance and reduced cost of the associated accelerator continues to make this a promising avenue for development. PMID:18315111

  11. Ion cyclotron system design for KSTAR tokamak

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Jeong, S. H.; Yoony, J. S.; Bae, Y. D.; Kwak, J. G.; Ju, M. H

    1998-05-01

    The KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak (R=1.8 m, a=0.5 m, k=2, b=3.5T, I=2MA, t=300 s) is being constructed to do long-pulse, high-b, advanced-operating-mode fusion physics experiments. The ion cyclotron (IC) system (in conjunction with an 8-MW neutral beam and a 1.5-MW lower hybrid system) will provide heating and current drive capability for the machine. The IC system will deliver 6 MW of RF power to the plasma in the 25 to 60 MHz frequency range, using a single four-strap antenna mounted in a midplane port. It will be used for ion heating, fast-wave current drive (FWCD), and mode-conversion current drive (MCCD). The phasing between current straps in the antenna will be adjustable quickly during operation to provide the capability of changing the current-drive efficiency. This report describes the design of the IC system hardware: the electrical characteristics of the antenna and the matching system, the requirements on the power sources, and electrical analyses of the launcher. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 40 figs.

  12. Ion cyclotron system design for KSTAR tokamak

    The KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak (R=1.8 m, a=0.5 m, k=2, b=3.5T, I=2MA, t=300 s) is being constructed to do long-pulse, high-b, advanced-operating-mode fusion physics experiments. The ion cyclotron (IC) system (in conjunction with an 8-MW neutral beam and a 1.5-MW lower hybrid system) will provide heating and current drive capability for the machine. The IC system will deliver 6 MW of RF power to the plasma in the 25 to 60 MHz frequency range, using a single four-strap antenna mounted in a midplane port. It will be used for ion heating, fast-wave current drive (FWCD), and mode-conversion current drive (MCCD). The phasing between current straps in the antenna will be adjustable quickly during operation to provide the capability of changing the current-drive efficiency. This report describes the design of the IC system hardware: the electrical characteristics of the antenna and the matching system, the requirements on the power sources, and electrical analyses of the launcher. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 40 figs

  13. Ferrite-guided cyclotron-resonance maser.

    Jerby, Eli; Kesar, A; Aharony, A; Breitmeier, G

    2002-06-01

    The concept of a cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) with a ferrite loading incorporated in its waveguide is proposed. The CRM interaction occurs between the rotating electron beam and the em wave propagating along a longitudinally magnetized ferrite medium. The ferrite anisotropic permeability resembles the CRM susceptibility in many aspects, and particularly in their similar response to the axial magnetic field (the ferrite susceptibility can be regarded as a passive analog of the active CRM interaction). The ferrite loading slows down the phase velocity of the em wave and thus the axial (Weibel) mechanism of the CRM interaction dominates. The ferrite loading enables also a mechanism of spectral tunability for CRM's. The ferrite loading is proposed, therefore, as a useful ingredient for high-power CRM devices. A linear model of the combined ferrite-guided CRM interaction reveals its useful features. Future schemes may also incorporate ferrite sections functioning as isolators, gyrators, or phase shifters within the CRM device itself for selective suppression of backward waves and spurious oscillations, and for gain and efficiency enhancement. PMID:12188841

  14. Ferrite-guided cyclotron-resonance maser

    The concept of a cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) with a ferrite loading incorporated in its waveguide is proposed. The CRM interaction occurs between the rotating electron beam and the em wave propagating along a longitudinally magnetized ferrite medium. The ferrite anisotropic permeability resembles the CRM susceptibility in many aspects, and particularly in their similar response to the axial magnetic field (the ferrite susceptibility can be regarded as a passive analog of the active CRM interaction). The ferrite loading slows down the phase velocity of the em wave and thus the axial (Weibel) mechanism of the CRM interaction dominates. The ferrite loading enables also a mechanism of spectral tunability for CRM's. The ferrite loading is proposed, therefore, as a useful ingredient for high-power CRM devices. A linear model of the combined ferrite-guided CRM interaction reveals its useful features. Future schemes may also incorporate ferrite sections functioning as isolators, gyrators, or phase shifters within the CRM device itself for selective suppression of backward waves and spurious oscillations, and for gain and efficiency enhancement

  15. Vacuum control systems at the NAC cyclotrons

    A modular microprocessor-based system being used for control of the vacuum pumping stations at the NAC cyclotrons is described. The microcomputer-system consists of a set of Euro-card sized modules plugged into a bussed back-plane. The set may typically consist of (i) the processor module containing a Z80 CPU running under the CP/M 2.2 operating system, 64 kbytes of RAM, timer and peripheral ICs; (2) a 128-kbyte bubble memory module containing the compiled software; (3) a number of 32-bit relay output modules for driving contacters for vacuum valves and pumps; (4) a number of 80-bit opto-isolator input modules for reading the binary status of valve position limit-switches, binary setpoints from pressure-, temperature-, waterflow- and rotational-speed transducers as well as digital data from vacuum meters; (5) a 32-channel eight-bit analogue-to-digital converter module for digitizing analogue voltages from vacuum and temperature gauges; (6) an interface module for bi-directional data transfer to a CAMAC mailbox memory module for communication with the central control computers as well as for data transfer between the vacuum control system's front-panel and the processor and (7) front-panel modules. (author)

  16. A small low energy cyclotron for radioisotope measurements

    Direct detection of 14C by accelerator mass spectrometry has proved to be a much more sensitive method for radiocarbon dating than the decay counting method invented earlier by Libby. A small cyclotron (the ''cyclotrino'') was proposed for direct detection of radiocarbon in 1980. This combined the suppression of background through the use of negative ions, which had been used effectively in tandem accelerators, with the high intrinsic mass resolution of a cyclotron. Development of a small electrostatically-focused cyclotron for use as a mass spectrometer was previously reported but the sensitivity needed for detection of 14C at natural abundance was not achieved. The major contributions of this work are the integration of a high current external ion source with a small flat-field, electrostatically-focused cyclotron to comprise a system capable of measuring 14C at natural levels, and the analysis of ion motion in such a cyclotron, including a detailed analysis of phase bunching and its effect on mass resolution. A high current cesium sputter negative ion source generates a beam of carbon ions which is pre-separated with a Wien filter and is transported to the cyclotron via a series of electrostatic lenses. Beam is injected radially into the cyclotron using electrostatic deflectors and an electrostatic mirror. Axial focusing is entirely electrostatic. A microchannel plate detector is used with a phase-grated output. In its present form the system is capable of improving the sensitivity of detecting 14C in some biomedical experiments by a factor of 104. Modifications are discussed which could bring about an additional factor of 100 in sensitivity, which is important for archaeological and geological applications. Possibilities for measurements of other isotopes, such as 3H, and 10Be, and 26Al, are discussed. 70 refs

  17. The PET / cyclotron facility at Putrajaya Hospital - an update

    Malaysia desire to have a cyclotron for nuclear medical use came into realisation recently with the establishment of a PET/Cyclotron Facility at Putrajaya Hospital. The testing and commissioning of the cyclotron, hot cells, QC equipment and PET/CT started on March 27, culminating in the first patient to be injected on May 10 2006. Three other patients were to be followed on May 15. The patients from both the Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya Hospital were pre-selected by physicians from these hospitals. The 18 MeV cyclotron is capable of generating 16.4 MeV protons and 8.4 MeV deuterons. The cyclotron at Putrajaya has three targets (2 liquid and 1 gas) and is capable of producing 18F-FDG and 18F-DOPA. To complement this, the facility has 2 modules for FDG synthesis, 1 for F-DOPA and 1 for nucleophilic synthesis. The facility will be GMP compliant. For the first production for human use, the water-18 target was irradiated for 50 minutes at 20 mA to produce 1.3 Ci of F-18. At the end of synthesis, the activity of the FDG obtained was 600 mCi. The product was then injected to a 26-year-old female, with a suspected adenocarcinoma. (Author)

  18. Preparation and use of cyclotron-produced isotopes in medicine

    Cyclotrons are far less efficient instrument for producing radioactive isotopes than reactors. However, cyclotron-produced isotopes are usually neutron-deficient, because they are formed by the reaction with positively charged particles, and such isotopes can be used for injection without further chemical processing. A few examples of cyclotron-produced isotopes in medicine are as follows: 18F is injected into a patient for bone-scanning. 11CO and 11CO2 are used for the studies of lung function, and 11CO-labelled red blood cells for the localization of placenta, estimation of red cell volume and splenic blood volume. 123I is the ideal isotope for scanning thyroids. 52Fe is the only isotope suitable for the external observation of haemopoiesis. 111In and 67Ga are under test as tumor-localising agents. The isotopes in regular production at present with the cyclotron of Medical Research Council (U.K.) are listed in a table attached. Suitable production method using the cyclotron and the type of reaction for each medical purpose are described in comparison with the other methods or reactions and target materials or nuclides. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  19. Heavy ion cocktail beams at the 88 inch Cyclotron

    Cyclotrons in combination with ECR ion sources provide the ability to accelerate ''cocktails'' of ions. A cocktail is a mixture of ions of near-identical mass-to-charge (m/q) ratio. The different ions cannot be separated by the injector mass-analyzing magnet and are tuned out of the ion source together. The cyclotron then is utilized as a mass analyzer by shifting the accelerating frequency. This concept was developed soon after the first ECR ion source became operational at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and has since become a powerful tool in the field of heavy ion radiation effects testing. Several different ''cocktails'' at various energies are available at the 88-Inch cyclotron for radiation effect testing, covering a broad range of linear energy transfer and penetration depth. Two standard heavy ion cocktails at 4.5 MeV/nucleon and 10 MeV/nucleon have been developed over the years containing ions from boron to bismuth. Recently, following requests for higher penetration depths, a 15MeV/nucleon heavy ion cocktail has been developed. Up to nine different metal and gaseous ion beams at low to very high charge states are tuned out of the ion source simultaneously and injected together into the cyclotron. It is therefore crucial to balance the ion source very carefully to provide sufficient intensities throughout the cocktail. The paper describes the set-up and tuning of the ion source for the various heavy ion cocktails

  20. Electric and Magnetic Vertical Focusing Study for 100 MeV High Intensity Proton Cyclotron

    2008-01-01

    <正>For the central region design of cyclotrons, the basic problem in the vertical motion is very different from the one in the radial motion. The reason is that vertical tune is almost zero at the center of cyclotrons,

  1. Radiation effects testing at the 88-inch cyclotron at LBNL

    The effects of ionizing particles on sensitive microelectronics is an important component of the design of systems as diverse as satellites and space probes, detectors for high energy physics experiments and even internet server farms. Understanding the effects of radiation on human cells is an equally important endeavor directed towards future manned missions in space and towards cancer therapy. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Berkeley Laboratory, facilities are available for radiation effects testing (RET) with heavy ions and with protons. The techniques for doing these measurements and the advantages of using a cyclotron will be discussed, and the Cyclotron facilities will be compared with other facilities worldwide. RET of the same part at several facilities of varying beam energy can provide tests of the simple models used in this field and elucidate the relative importance of atomic and nuclear effects. The results and implications of such measurements will be discussed

  2. Radiation effects testing at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL

    The effects of ionizing particles on sensitive microelectronics is an important component of the design of systems as diverse as satellites and space probes, detectors for high energy physics experiments and even internet server farms. Understanding the effects of radiation on human cells is an equally important endeavor directed towards future manned missions in space and towards cancer therapy. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Berkeley Laboratory, facilities are available for radiation effects testing (RET) with heavy ions and with protons. The techniques for doing these measurements and the advantages of using a cyclotron will be discussed, and the Cyclotron facilities will be compared with other facilities worldwide. RET of the same part at several facilities of varying beam energy can provide tests of the simple models used in this field and elucidate the relative importance of atomic and nuclear effects. The results and implications of such measurements will be discussed

  3. Electron cyclotron waves, transport and instabilities in hot plasmas

    A number of topics relevant to the magnetic confinement approach to the thermonuclear fusion is addressed. The absorption and emission of electron cyclotron waves in a thermal plasma with a small population of supra-thermal, streaming electrons is examined and the properties of electron cyclotron waves in a plasma with a pure loss-cone distribution are studied. A report is given on the 1-D transport code simulations that were performed to assist the interpretation of the electron cyclotron heating experiments on the TFR tokamak. Transport code simulations of sawteeth discharges in the T-10 tokamak are discussed in order to compare the predictions of different models for the sawtooth oscillations with the experimental findings. 149 refs.; 69 figs.; 7 tabs

  4. CAS CERN Accelerator School: Cyclotrons, linacs and their applications. Proceedings

    These proceedings present the lectures given at the eighth specialized course organized by the CERN Accelerator School (CAS), the topic this time being 'Cyclotrons, Linacs and Their Applications'. Following an introductory lecture on linacs, the fundamental features of electron, ion and induction linacs are described together with their RF systems and particle sources. Cyclotrons are then introduced followed by details of their different types, their magnet and RF design, and their injection and extraction systems, with a glance towards exotic and possible future machines. Chapters are then presented on the use of linacs and cyclotrons for medical, fission, fusion and material applications, as well as for isotope production. Finally, descriptions of the design of a radioisotope facility, the matching of accelerators to their task and the computational tools used in their design are included. (orig.)

  5. Stochasticity of the energy absorption in the electron cyclotron resonance

    The energy absorption mechanism in cyclotron resonance of the electrons is a present problem, since it could be considered from the stochastic point of view or this related with a non-homogeneous but periodical of plasma spatial structure. In this work using the Bogoliubov average method for a multi periodical system in presence of resonances, the drift equations were obtained in presence of a RF field for the case of electron cyclotron resonance until first order terms with respect to inverse of its cyclotron frequency. The absorbed energy equation is obtained on part of electrons in a simple model and by drift method. It is showed the stochastic character of the energy absorption. (Author)

  6. CACTUS - a multidetector set-up at the Oslo Cyclotron

    The design and construction of the multidetector system CACTUS is discussed, and its operation in the context of the Oslo Cyclotron is described. The multidetector system has been initiated to meet the requirements at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory in the experimental work on nuclear structure at high intrinsic excitation energy. The laboratory has developed a promising technique based on measuring γ-decay after single nucleon transfer reactions with the use of pγ coincidences. However, a proper interpretation of the experimental results has often been difficult due to low counting rates. One of the most important aims for the new experimental set-up has been to obtain pγ as well as pγγ coincidence spectra with high statistics. The CACTUS detector system which is mounted on the 90o beam line of the cyclotron, consists of 28 NaI and 2 Ge detectors in combination with 8 Si particle telescopes

  7. Calibration of the simulation model of the VINCY cyclotron magnet

    Ćirković Saša

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The MERMAID program will be used to isochronise the nominal magnetic field of the VINCY Cyclotron. This program simulates the response, i. e. calculates the magnetic field, of a previously defined model of a magnet. The accuracy of 3D field calculation depends on the density of the grid points in the simulation model grid. The size of the VINCY Cyclotron and the maximum number of grid points in the XY plane limited by MERMAID define the maximumobtainable accuracy of field calculations. Comparisons of the field simulated with maximum obtainable accuracy with the magnetic field measured in the first phase of the VINCY Cyclotron magnetic field measurements campaign has shown that the difference between these two fields is not as small as required. Further decrease of the difference between these fields is obtained by the simulation model calibration, i. e. by adjusting the current through the main coils in the simulation model.

  8. Design study of the KIRAMS-430 superconducting cyclotron magnet

    Kim, Hyun Wook; Kang, Joonsun; Hong, Bong Hwan; Jung, In Su

    2016-07-01

    Design study of superconducting cyclotron magnet for the carbon therapy was performed at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS). The name of this project is The Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project and a fixed frequency cyclotron with four spiral sector magnet was one of the candidate for the accelerator type. Basic parameters of the cyclotron magnet and its characteristics were studied. The isochronous magnetic field which can guide the 12C6+ ions up to 430 MeV/u was designed and used for the single particle tracking simulation. The isochronous condition of magnetic field was achieved by optimization of sector gap and width along the radius. Operating range of superconducting coil current was calculated and changing of the magnetic field caused by mechanical deformations of yokes was considered. From the result of magnetic field design, structure of the magnet yoke was planned.

  9. The next generation of electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostics (invited)

    A 128 channel two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging system collects time-resolved 16x8 images of Te profiles and fluctuations on the TEXTOR tokamak. Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) is undergoing significant changes which promise to revolutionize and extend its capabilities far beyond what has been achieved to date. These include the development of a minilens array configuration with increased sensitivity antennas, a new local oscillator pumping scheme, enhanced electron cyclotron resonance heating shielding, and a highly flexible optical design with vertical zoom capability. Horizontal zoom and spot size (rf bandwidth) capabilities are also being developed with new ECEI electronics. An interface module is under development to remotely control all key features of the new ECEI instrument, many of which can be changed during a plasma discharge for maximum flexibility.

  10. Vertical Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostic for TCV Plasmas

    Goodman T. P.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD are used to heat the plasma, to tailor the current profiles and to achieve different operating regimes of tokamak plasmas. Plasmas with ECRH/ECCD are characterized by non-thermal electrons, which cannot be described by a Maxwellian distribution. Non-thermal electrons are also generated during MHD activity, like sawteeth crashes. Quantifying the non-thermal electron distribution is therefore a key for understanding EC heated fusion plasmas. For this purpose a vertical electron cyclotron emission (V-ECE diagnostic is being installed at TCV. The diagnostic layout, the calibration, the analysis technique for data interpretation, the physics potentials and limitations are discussed.

  11. Spectra and Neutron Dosimetry Inside a PET Cyclotron Vault Room

    The neutron field around a PET cyclotron was investigated during 18F radioisotope production with an 18 MeV proton beam. Pairs of thermoluminescent dosemeters, TLD600 and TLD700, were used as thermal neutron detector inside a Bonner Spheres Spectrometer to measure the neutron spectra at three different positions inside the cyclotron's vault room. Neutron spectra were also determined by Monte Carlo calculations. The hardest spectrum was observed in front of cyclotron target and the softest was noticed at the antipode of target. Neutron doses derived from the measured spectra vary between 11 and 377 mSv/μA-h of proton integrated current, Doses were also measured with a single-moderator remmeter, with an active thermal neutron detector, whose response in affected by the radiation field in the vault room

  12. Next customers to cyclotron center meanwhile are not entered

    In this paper the financial aspects of construction of the Cyclotron Centre of the Slovak Republic (CC SR) are analysed. This building represents the problems of exploitation of commodity deblocation of Russian Federation debt to Slovakia. The estimated expenses have risen from original planned 2 billion Slovak crowns to 6 billion Slovak crowns. Devices which should be part of centre - a cyclotron used for radiopharmaceuticals production for oncological purposes and a big cyclotron for industrial purposes, a centre of positron emissive tomography (PET), a laboratory of nano-technologies, a source of heavy ions - they indicates that the oncological institutes, departments of health service, of education, of economy, of defence, of environment, also Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Slovak Republic and Slovak Academy of Sciences should become the customers principally. Around 2.2 billion of Slovak crowns from deblocation have been spent for a construction of Cyclotron Centre of SR yet. The national budget has contributed by 95 million Slovak crowns; 90.5 million USD will be obtained from deblocation of Russian debt yet. IAEA has supported this centre by grant of almost 800 thousand USD. Budget of Cyclotron Centre of SR is still rising also because of rising of VAT from 10 percent to 19 percent. VAT will be paid also for goods imported within the framework of deblocation after integration of Slovak Republic to European Union; besides also 10 percent duty is paid. Project of CC SR has not passed the state expert opinion. Agreement for construction of Cyclotron Centre of SR was issued by State Health Institute of Bratislava, therefore it was confirmed also by the main hygienist of Slovak Republic

  13. A 600 MeV cyclotron for radioactive beam production

    The magnetic field design for a 600 MeV proton cyclotron is described. The cyclotron has a single stage, a normal conducting magnet coil and a 9.8 m outside yoke diameter. It has 8 sectors, with a transition to 4 sectors in the center region. The magnetic field design was done using 1958 Harwell rectangular ridge system measurements and was compared with recent 3-dimensional field calculations with the program TOSCA at NSCL. The center region 4--8 sector transition focussing was also checked with TOSCA

  14. The National Medical Cyclotron - An Australian experience in technology

    The establishment of the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) in the early 1990's was the practical outcome of a vision, held by nuclear medicine professionals, to complement the available neutron-rich radionuclides produced in Australia, with neutron-deficient radionuclides. The NMC is operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) in collaboration with the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH) in Sydney where the PET department is able to use the short-lived radiotracers to good advantage. Neutron-deficient radionuclides, are also produced by the NMC laboratories. The cyclotron-generated radionuclides are used in over 70,000 patient studies per year

  15. Inexpensive rf modeling and analysis techniques as applied to cyclotrons

    A review and expansion of the circuit analogy method of modeling and analysing multiconductor TEM mode rf resonators is described. This method was used to predict the performance of the NSCL K500 and K1200 cyclotron resonators and the results compared well to the measured performance. The method is currently being applied as the initial stage of the design process to optimize the performance of the rf resonators for a proposed K250 cyclotron for medical applications. Although this technique requires an experienced rf modeller, the input files tend to be simple and small, the software is very inexpensive or free, and the computer runtimes are nearly instantaneous

  16. Solid targets for production of radioisotopes with cyclotron

    The design of targets for production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals of cyclotron to medical applications requires a detailed analysis of several variables such as: cyclotron operation conditions, choice of used materials as target and their physicochemical characteristics, activity calculation, the yielding of each radioisotope by irradiation, the competition of nuclear reactions in function of the projectiles energy and the collision processes amongst others. The objective of this work is to determine the equations for the calculation for yielding of solid targets at the end of the proton irradiation. (Author)

  17. Vortex cyclotron resonance in high-Tc superconductors

    The orbital motion of pancake vortices takes place as a result of momentum exchange with electromagnetic waves. The coherent wave for vortex motion is obtained from the Lorentz-covariant wave equation for vortices. When the static magnetic field is tilted from the c axis, the vortex orbit becomes elliptical due to an interlayer electromagnetic interaction or gauge current. The gauge current also produces a coupling between the vortex cyclotron motion and transverse Josephson plasma, which was experimentally observed. The cyclotron mass of superfluid electrons and the frequency of a transverse Josephson plasma were obtained in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  18. Heavy ion cocktail beams at the 88 inch Cyclotron

    Leitner, Daniela; McMahan, Margaret A.; Argento, David; Gimpel, Thomas; Guy, Aran; Morel, James; Siero, Christine; Thatcher, Ray; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2002-01-01

    Cyclotrons in combination with ECR ion sources provide the ability to accelerate "cocktails" of ions. A cocktail is a mixture of ions of near-identical mass-to-charge (m/q) ratio. The different ions cannot be separated by the injector mass-analyzing magnet and are tuned out of the ion source together. The cyclotron then is utilized as a mass analyzer by shifting the accelerating frequency. This concept was developed soon after the first ECR ion source became operational at the 88-Inch C...

  19. Production of medical radioisotopes in ORNL 86-Inch Cyclotron

    Procedures, targets, and costs are discussed for the production of iodine-123 at the ORNL 86-Inch Cyclotron. The cyclotron is a fixed frequency machine producing 22-MeV proton beams with currents of 3 mA. Flat plate targets are used in the bombardment of readily fabricated metals when highest production rates are necessary, while capsule targets are used when flat plate coatings are difficult or when high production rates are not required. Window targets with metal foils or powders, inorganic compounds, or isotopically enriched materials are also used. (PMA)

  20. ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE EFFICIENCY IN GENERAL TOKAMAK GEOMETRY

    Green's-function techniques are used to calculate electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency in general tokamak geometry in the low-collisionality regime. Fully relativistic electron dynamics is employed in the theoretical formulation. The high-velocity collision model is used to model Coulomb collisions and a simplified quasi-linear rf diffusion operator describes wave-particle interactions. The approximate analytic solutions which are benchmarked with a widely used ECCD model, facilitate time-dependent simulations of tokamak operational scenarios using the non-inductive current drive of electron cyclotron waves

  1. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    Classen, I. G. J. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Boom, J. E.; Vries, P. C. de [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Schneider, P. A. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Donne, A. J. H. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E. [Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Park, H. K. [POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Munsat, T. [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  2. Cyclotron based nuclear science: Progress report, April 1, 1987-March 31, 1988

    This report discusses experiment run on the K500 cyclotron and 88 in cyclotron at Texas AandM University. The main topics of these experiments are: Heavy ion reactions; Nuclear structure and fundamental interactions; Atomic and material science; Nuclear theory; and Superconducting cyclotron and instrumentation

  3. Mechanical Design of the Injection Beam Line of Small Medical Cyclotron

    2011-01-01

    The injection beam line is a key device for beam transport of the small medical cyclotron, giving direct influence to the beam quality of the cyclotron. According to the medical needs of the cyclotron, the overall length of the injection beam line is as short as possible,

  4. 3D computer model of the VINCY cyclotron magnet

    The VINCY Cyclotron magnetic field simulation was performed with the help of the three-dimensional (3D) software. The following aspects of the system were considered: 3D calculation of the magnetic field in the median plane, 3D calculation of the magnetic field in the extraction region, 3D calculation of the stray magnetic field. 8 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 35

    1986-10-29

    Efforts are reported on the installation and checkout of cyclotron components which had been previously fabricated. Final integration of subsystems and major systems leading to internal beam tests is reported near completion. Progress is reported in relation to control system components, focus and steering magnet design, and rf system testing. (LEW)

  6. Observation of the backward electrostatic ion cyclotron wave

    The backward branch of the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave has been observed, we believe, for the first time. The wave, which was driven by a phased antenna structure inserted in a neon plasma, exists in the parameter ranges 2T/sub i//m/sub i/ 2 Ω/sub i/. Double-tip probe interferomety data agree with the theoretical dispersion relation

  7. Wave propagation through an electron cyclotron resonance layer

    Westerhof, E.

    1997-01-01

    The propagation of a wave beam through an electron cyclotron resonance layer is analysed in two-dimensional slab geometry in order to assess the deviation from cold plasma propagation due to resonant, warm plasma changes in wave dispersion. For quasi-perpendicular propagation, N-parallel to x upsilo

  8. Magnetic field measurements on the Chalk River superconducting cyclotron

    Midplane magnetic fields have been measured for the modified flutter pole geometry of the cyclotron magnet at forty-eight excitations with mean inductions spanning the range two to five tesla. Midplane fringing fields have been measured both through the cryostat and beyond the yoke at selected excitations. Measurements of yoke temperature effects and hysteresis are also described

  9. Initial field measurements on the Chalk River superconducting cyclotron

    The midplane magnetic field of the Chalk River superconducting cyclotron has been mapped in detail over the full operating range of 2.5 to 5 tesla. The field measuring apparatus is described and results given include measurements of the field stability, reproducibility and harmonic content. (author)

  10. Ion-Beam-Excited Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Instability

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The stability limits of the ion‐beam‐excited, electrostatic, ion cyclotron instability were investigated in a Q‐machine plasma where the electrons could be heated by microwaves. In agreement with theory, the beam energy necessary for excitation decreased with increasing electron temperature....

  11. New development of neutron radiography with a small cyclotron

    A series of neutron radiography testing has been performed for several years by using a small accelerator called 'Baby Cyclotron' manufactured by Japan Steel Works, Ltd. The Baby Cyclotron produces fast neutrons at the rate of 4x1012 n/cm2s, and enables to perform neutron radiography imaging by various techniques. The most important application of this Baby Cyclotron radiography system is the non-destructive testing (NDT) of various explosive devices prepared for space launch vehicles. It is assured that thermal neutron radiography testing is a very useful means for the NDT. Also fast neutron radiography testing is in progress. The fast neutron radiography with a CR39 track-etch image recorder was developed, and it was shown to be the very useful NDT means when the thicker objects used for new H-2 launch vehicles had to be examined. Because thermal neutron radiography has the high detectability of hydrogenous materials, organic elastomers such as O-rings and explosive powder are clearly observable through the opaque steel walls of containers. The Baby Cyclotron and the neutron radiography facility, thermal neutron and fast neutron radiography testings and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  12. Digital control in LLRF system for CYCIAE-100 cyclotron

    Yin, Zhiguo; Fu, Xiaoliang; Ji, Bin; Zhang, Tianjue; Wang, Chuan

    2016-05-01

    As a driven accelerator, the CYCIAE-100 cyclotron is designed by China Institute of Atomic Energy for the Beijing Radio Ion-beam Facility project. The cyclotron RF system is designed to use two RF power sources of 100 kW to drive two half-wavelength cavities respectively. Two Dee accelerating electrodes are kept separately from each other inside the cyclotron, while their accelerating voltages are maintained in phase by the efforts of LLRF control. An analog-digital hybrid LLRF system has been developed to achieve cavity tuning control, dee voltage amplitude and phase stabilization etc. The analog subsystems designs are focused on RF signal up/down conversion, tuning control, and dee voltage regulation. The digital system provides an RF signal source, aligns the cavity phases and maintains a Finite State Machine. The digital parts combine with the analog functions to provide the LLRF control. A brief system hardware introduction will be given in this paper, followed by the review of several major characteristics of the digital control in the 100 MeV cyclotron LLRF system. The commissioning is also introduced, and most of the optimization during the process was done by changing the digital parts.

  13. Cyclotron targets and production technologies used for radiopharmaceuticals in NPI

    Fišer, Miroslav; Kopička, Karel; Hradilek, Pavel; Hanč, Petr; Lebeda, Ondřej; Panek, T.; Vognar, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2003), s. A737-A743. ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Keywords : cyclotron * radiopharmaceuticals Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 0.263, year: 2003

  14. Remote machining and robotic welding in a proton cyclotron

    Increasing residual radiation in the TRIUMF meson research facility cyclotron at the University of British Columbia has required development of a remotely operable industrial robot cutting and vacuum tight welding capability for modification and updating of vacuum tank access ports, and for possible repairs of leaks or holes in the vacuum tank periphery

  15. Dynamic effects on cyclotron scattering in pulsar accretion columns

    Brainerd, J. J.; Meszaros, P.

    1991-01-01

    A resonant scattering model for photon reprocessing in a pulsar accretion column is presented. The accretion column is optically thin to Thomson scattering and optically thick to resonant scattering at the cyclotron frequency. Radiation from the neutron star surface propagates freely through the column until the photon energy equals the local cyclotron frequency, at which point the radiation is scattered, much of it back toward the star. The radiation pressure in this regime is insufficient to stop the infall. Some of the scattered radiation heats the stellar surface around the base of the column, which adds a softer component to the spectrum. The partial blocking by the accretion column of X-rays from the surface produces a fan beam emission pattern. X-rays above the surface cyclotron frequency freely escape and are characterized by a pencil beam. Gravitational light bending produces a pencil beam pattern of column-scattered radiation in the antipodal direction, resulting in a strongly angle-dependent cyclotron feature.

  16. Cyclotrons with Fast Variable and/or Multiple Energy Extraction

    Baumgarten, C

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the principle possibility of stripping extraction in combination with reverse bends in isochronous separate sector cyclotrons (and/or FFAGs). If one uses reverse bends between the sectors (instead of drifts) and places stripper foils at the sector exit edges, the stripped beam has a reduced bending radius and it should be able to leave the cyclotron within the range of the reverse bend - even if the beam is stripped at less than full energy. We are especially interested in $H_2^+$-cyclotrons, which allow to double the charge to mass ratio by stripping. However the principle could be applied to other ions or ionized molecules as well. For the production of proton beams by stripping extraction of an $H_2^+$-beam, we discuss possible designs for three types of machines: First a low-energy cyclotron for the simultaneous production of several beams at multiple energies - for instance 15 MeV, 30 MeV and 70 MeV - thus allowing to have beam on several isotope production targets. In this case it is desired ...

  17. Ion-Beam-Excited Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Instability

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    The stability limits of the ion‐beam‐excited, electrostatic, ion cyclotron instability were investigated in a Q‐machine plasma where the electrons could be heated by microwaves. In agreement with theory, the beam energy necessary for excitation decreased with increasing electron temperature....

  18. Ion-Beam-Excited, Electrostatic, Ion Cyclotron Instability

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    The stability limits of the ion‐beam‐excited, electrostatic, ion cyclotron instability were investigated in a Q‐machine plasma where the electrons could be heated by microwaves. In agreement with theory, the beam energy necessary for excitation decreased with increasing electron temperature....

  19. Assessment of radionuclidic impurities in cyclotron produced Tc-99m

    Lebeda, Ondřej; van Lier, E. J.; Štursa, Jan; Ráliš, Jan; Zyuzin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 12 (2012), s. 1286-1291. ISSN 0969-8051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Technetium-99m * cyclotron * proton irradiation * radionuclidic impurities Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.517, year: 2012

  20. Radiation safety and quality control in the cyclotron laboratory

    Radiation safety was determined to maintain quality control in the cyclotron laboratory. Based on the results of 438 runs in the Faraday cup (20 μA for 10 min), 20 runs on 18O-water target (40 μA for 2 h) and 10 runs on 18O-gas targets (30 μA for 45 min), we have established that occupationally exposed workers remain 10 ± 5 times below federal regulatory limits (FRLs) in the cyclotron vault, 30 ± 8 times below FRL in the radiochemistry laboratory and 200 ± 10 times below the FRL outside the cyclotron laboratory during beam operation. (The FRL for unrestricted area are <20 μSv in 1 h.) The non-occupationally exposed workers serving in offices in the vicinity of the cyclotron vault within 100 m distance remained 200 times below the FRL irrespective of beam being on or off, suggesting that routine beam operation of 40 μA for 2 h once a day during office hours is safe provided quality control and system performance measures as discussed in this report are strictly maintained. (authors)

  1. Feasibility study of direct cyclotron production of 227-Th

    Kozempel, J.; Vlk, M.; Mičolová, P.; Lebeda, Ondřej; Moša, M.; Morgenstern, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 40, 2 Supplement (2013), S191-S192. ISSN 1619-7070. [Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). 19.10.2013-23.10.2013, Lyon] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : 227Th * alternative method of production 227Th * cyclotron U-120M Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  2. Development of beam instruments at JAERI cyclotron facility

    Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Ishibori, Ikuo; Agematsu, Takashi; Yokota, Watalu; Nara, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiteru; Arakawa, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    A beam phase monitor and two kinds of fluence distribution monitors have been developed for measuring characteristics of cyclotron beams. The beam phase monitor provides a beam phase signal for tuning a beam chopping system and a beam phase selection system. A two-dimensional fluence distribution on a large area is measured with fluence distribution monitors. (author)

  3. Computational tools for cyclotron design, commissioning, and operation

    Many support systems are required in the design, commissioning, and normal operation of a modern cyclotron. Presented is an overview of the computing environment developed during these various stages at TRIUMF. The current computing environment is also discussed, with emphasis on how one can provide an integrated system which is user-friendly

  4. 10 MeV Medical Cyclotron Prototype Beam Commissioning

    GUAN; Feng-ping; GE; Tao; YIN; Zhi-guo; SONG; Guo-fang; ZHANG; Tian-jue; JI; Bin; LI; Peng-zhan; CAO; Lei; HOU; Shi-gang; LIU; Geng-shou; WANG; Feng; LEI; Yu; WU; Long-cheng; WEN; Li-peng; LI; Zhen-guo; CUI; Tao; JIA; Xian-lu; YAO; Hong-juan; PAN; Gao-feng; ZHANG; Su-ping; CAI; Hong-ru; XIE; Huai-dong

    2012-01-01

    <正>A 10 MeV medical cyclotron prototype for the production of short-lived isotopes has been developed independently at CIAE with a time span of 2 years. On the inner target, 8 hours stability test has been finished. The extraction beam is 10 MeV with a beam intensity of 100 μA.

  5. An irradiation facility at the 225 cm cyclotron in Stockholm

    An irradiation facility now in operation at the 225 cm cyclotron of the Research Institute for Physics in Stockholm is described. Irradiations are performed in an unfocused and otherwise lost part of the beam. The target can be inserted and extracted from the irradiation position without disturbing simultaneous in-beam measurements. (Auth.)

  6. Operation of the Karlsruhe Isochronous Cyclotron in 1976

    The operation of the Karlsruhe Isochronous Cyclotron in 1976 is briefly surveyed. The status and the results of the following technical developments are briefly described: 1) Computer aided cyclotron operation; 2) New correction coils for the cyclotron; 3) Non-intercepting measurement of the extraction rate; 4) Lambshift source for polarized deuterons; 5) Improvements of the 6Li3+-Penning ion source; 6) New beam line to an irradiation room for machine parts; 7) Nova 2 computer system for nuclear physics experiments; 8) Routine production of Iodine-123 for nuclear medicine. - In the annual report 1975 we have included a section consisting of a series of brief reports on applied research in progress. This year we give a compilation of the current basic nuclear physics work at our cyclotron. The short papers prepared by the experimental groups are arranged according to the following topics: 1) Experiments using the 156 MeV 6Li3+-beam; 2) Experiments using the 52 MeV polarized deuteron beam; 3) Further nuclear reactions; 4) Nuclear spectroscopy; 5) Measurements of nuclear magnetic moments; 6) Measurements with the neutron time-of-flight spectrometer. (orig.)

  7. Cyclotron produced Tc-99m: testing compatibility with established kits

    Lebeda, Ondřej; Ráliš, Jan; Hradilek, Pavel; Hanč, Petr; van Lier, E. J.; Zyuzin, A.; Moša, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 40, 2 Supplement (2013), S424-S425. ISSN 1619-7070. [Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). 19.10.2013-23.10.2013, Lyon] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : cyclotron U-120M * Tc-99m * 100Mo Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  8. An ion trap - laser experiment at the INS cyclotron

    A new nuclear instrument which comprises an ion guide behind a recoil mass separator, an RF trap, a Penning trap and a UV laser system is being built to perform a laser-microwave double resonance experiment. Initially the instrument will be used to measure hyperfine anomalies of Ca isotopes produced by a cyclotron beam. (author)

  9. 40. anniversary of cyclotron of Institute of Nuclear Physics, Tashkent

    Full text: The Cyclotron U-150-II of Institute of Nuclear Physics was projected in middle of the last century for nuclear-physical researches in a scientific research institute of electro physical equipment in Leningrad. The Cyclotron can accelerate positive ions with beam energy of the protons 18 MeV, deuterons 20 MeV, alpha particles 40 MeV. Intensity of a beam a little some microampere. The building of a Cyclotron represents an impressive three-floor construction in volume of 2000 m3. The capital equipment, the high-frequency generator, sources of power supplies, vacuum pumps and other technological units are placed on the first and socle floors of a building. The second and third floors served for accommodation of scientific laboratories. A building of a Cyclotron has three experimental halls, where it was possible to carry out physical researches. They have divided from each other, and the main thing from the accelerator, concrete walls with the purpose of reduction of the big radiating background at the working accelerator, preventing realization of experiments. It provided also biological protection of the on duty personnel. The first some years of operation of the Cyclotron have revealed a line of lacks of this machine. For example, for change of energy of a beam of a Cyclotron it took 2-3 weeks. Also, for transition of acceleration of one particles to others it take same time. Time parameters of a beam were unstable. In 1968 reconstruction of the Cyclotron has been started that has allowed to bring in basic changes to parameters U-150-II. The time took on change of an operating mode of a Cyclotron was sharply reduced, and it was possible to reduce it till 10-20 hours, to improve the energy and time resolution of a beam many times over, to reduce angular straggling of particles in a beam. And, all this enormous amount of works was spent by forces of institute. In 70th years the big development was received with works on radiating stability of materials and

  10. Standardized high current solid targets for cyclotron production of radionuclides

    The Cyclotron and Radiopharmaceuticals Department (CRP) is an advanced and modern facility that encompasses two essential components: radioisotope research, and radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing. Radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing program is not only quite unique, but also an essential component of King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center (KFSH and RC) in providing quality patient care for the population of the Kingdom. Accurate diagnosis and therapy with medical imaging equipment requires quality radiopharmaceuticals that are available readily and with reliability. The CRP Department provides that quality and reliability. Research activities of the CRP Department are focused on developing new radiotracers with potential usefulness in biomedical research and clinical applications. Research projects consist of: developing cyclotron targetry for radioisotope production; developing synthesis methods for radiolabeling biomolecules; and developing analytical methods for quality control. The CRP Department operates a semi-commercial radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing program that supplies the diagnostic radioactive products to several hospitals in the Kingdom and neighboring countries. These products for clinical applications are produced according to the international standards of Good Manufacturing Practices of quality and efficacy. At the heart of the radioisotope program is a medium energy cyclotron capable of accelerating a number of particles for transformation of non-radioactive atoms into radionuclides that are the primary sources for research and development activities, and for preparing radiopharmaceuticals. In addition to having the only cyclotron facility in the region, KFSH and RC also has the only Positron Emission Tomography Center (PET) in this part of the world. This combination of cyclotron and the ultra modern PET facility translates into advanced and specialized care for the patients at KFSH and RC

  11. Surface cyclotron O-modes at harmonics of electron cyclotron frequencies

    Investigation of surface waves is of great interest in the branches of plasma physics and solid state physics due to their numerous applications. Surface waves are also widely used in plasma chemistry and technology. RF and microwave gas discharges produced and sustained by surface modes can be useful in semiconductor processing, in pumping laser media, in plasma production, and so on. Application of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) for plasma production is also intensively studied. To describe ECR theoretically one cannot use hydrodynamic approach, only solving the kinetic equation allows to account adequately the effect of finite sizes of Larmor radius of the charged plasma particles. ECR discharges are widely utilized for different technological purposes and even for cleaning inner walls in fusion devices. The goals of the present report are to describe the dispersion properties of the surface cyclotron O-modes, parameters of the gas discharge sustained by these modes and possibility to excite these O-modes by charged particle flow. The SCOM dispersion properties can be studied using kinetic description. Magnitude of their eigenfrequency is mainly determined by the value of external steady magnetic field Bo vector and it is weakly depending on the plasma density. Possibility to apply the SCOM for sustaining microwave gas discharge was shown in the literature. Kinetic modeling is the most correct method for the research into the gas discharges, but it is very expensive in computer time. That is why here we study the properties of the SCOM analytically in the case of main ECR. In conclusion it was shown that SCOM can propagate in bounded magnetoactive plasma in addition to TM and X modes of this type. The SCOM can be excited by charged particle beam propagating above the plasma interface. Their propagation can be a reason of edge plasma heating in fusion devices and they can be applied for sustaining plasma in microwave gas discharge. To sustain a large plasma

  12. Dynamic regimes of cyclotron instability in the afterglow mode of minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    Mansfeld, D.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Tarvainen, O.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the dynamic regimes of cyclotron instabilities in non-equilibrium plasma of a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source operated in pulsed mode. The instability appears in decaying ion source plasma shortly (1-10 ms) after switching off the microwave radiation of the klystron, and manifests itself in the form of powerful pulses of electromagnetic emission associated with precipitation of high-energy electrons along the magnetic field lines. Recently it was shown that this plasma instability causes perturbations of the extracted ion current, which limits the performance of the ion source and generates strong bursts of bremsstrahlung emission. In this article we present time-resolved diagnostics of electromagnetic emission bursts related to cyclotron instability in the decaying plasma. The temporal resolution is sufficient to study the fine structure of the dynamic spectra of the electromagnetic emission at different operating regimes of the ion source. It was found that at different values of magnetic field and heating power the dynamic spectra demonstrate common features: Decreasing frequency from burst to burst and an always falling tone during a single burst of instability. The analysis has shown that the instability is driven by the resonant interaction of hot electrons, distributed between the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) zone and the trap center, with slow extraordinary wave propagation quasi-parallel with respect to the external magnetic field.

  13. The internal target assembly for the cyclotron AIC-144

    To enhance the amounts (activities) of isotopes produced on the isochronous cyclotron AIC-144 in Cracow, a new internal target assembly has been designed and built in the Institute. The internal space of the target head is efficiently cooled with water. Metallic supports with materials for irradiations are loaded mechanically to the transition chamber which is further connected with the vacuum chamber of the cyclotron. The radial movement of the target head as well as the vertical and horizontal movements of the target support are operated with 3 stepper motors. To reduce radiation risk for the personnel, hand operations have been almost eliminated owing to full automation by OMRON industrial controllers. The assembly has been recently tested for 9 possible breakdown stats, and passed all of them in the simulated activation conditions. (author)

  14. Materials surfaces studies using cyclotron accelerated 14 N

    As part of Cyclotron Laboratory efforts to broaden the range of nuclear methods' applications to materials science using various charged particles, nitrogen-14 has been accelerated using the subharmonic regime (10-14 MeV for 14 N 3+ at 11,300 - 13,000 k Hz and B = 11.5 - 13.3 kGs). Results concerning the RBS characterization of metallic glass multilayer structures and Ni - Cr alloys using 14 N ions are presented. A comparison between RBS method performances using alpha particles and nitrogen-14 ions accelerated at the IPNE Cyclotron is also made. Possible new uses of 14 N ion beams, especially in metallic surface treatment, are discussed. (Author)

  15. Vortex dynamics and shear layer instability in high intensity cyclotrons

    Cerfon, Antoine J

    2016-01-01

    We show that the space charge dynamics of high intensity beams in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field in cyclotrons is described by the two-dimensional Euler equations for an incompressible fluid. This analogy with fluid dynamics gives a unified and intuitive framework to explain the beam spiraling and beam break up behavior observed in experiments and in simulations. In particular, we demonstrate that beam break up is the result of a classical instability occurring in fluids subject to a sheared flow. We give scaling laws for the instability and predict the nonlinear evolution of beams subject to it. Our work suggests that cyclotrons may be uniquely suited for the experimental study of shear layers and vortex distributions that are not achievable in Penning-Malmberg traps.

  16. Radiation protection aspects of the operation in a cyclotron facility

    Silva, P. P. N.; Carneiro, J. C. G. G.

    2014-02-01

    The activated accelerator cyclotron components and the radioisotope production may impact on the personnel radiation exposure of the workers during the routine maintenance and emergency repair procedures and any modification of the equipment. Since the adherence of the principle of ALARA (as low as reasonable achievable) constitutes a major objective of the cyclotron management, it has become imperative to investigate the radiation levels at the workplace and the probable health effects to the worker caused by radiation exposure. The data analysis in this study was based on the individual monitoring records during the period from 2007 to 2011. Monitoring of the workplace was also performed using gamma and neutron detectors to determine the dose rate in various predetermined spots. The results of occupational radiation exposures were analysed and compared with the values established in national standards and international recommendations. Important guidelines have been developed to reduce the individual dose.

  17. Beam orbit storage effect in the isochronous cyclotrons

    The BOS-effect is useful to apply in many isochronous cyclotron operated for today. Some general advantages are pointed out below: 1) the storage orbits effect may be utilized in order to increasing the internal space charge in a given extraction zone (for instance medical isotope production and other applications on internal beam); 2) returning of the unextracted beam to the space of quasi stable acceleration region (n ≥ 0), will caused decreasing activity of construction elements of cyclotron. This is very important problem by exploitation on high intensity internal beams; 3) because of avoiding the internal beam losses on constructions elements, as well longitudinal extension of the beam and also change of the angle in radial emittance during the second accelerations process it is to expect a magnifying of the extracted beam. (author). 7 refs, 21 figs

  18. A pythonic integrated solution for virtual prototyping of cyclotrons

    Virtual prototyping (VP) is a novel technique in engineering, which is desired to be applied to cyclotron design and development. Some sub-prototyping components, including beam dynamics, magnet, RF system and control system of cyclotrons, have been developed separately, but an integrated platform which encapsulates these different components is required for global system optimization. Considering that the VP integrated platform is a large-scale software and has numerous loose-coupled components, this paper describes the pythonic approach to implement this platform. By mixing the high-level interpreted Python language and the compiled languages like Fortran/C/C++ in an effective method, this approach can achieve a combination of code efficiency, flexibility and compactness

  19. Current performance of the self-extracting cyclotron

    The self-extracting cyclotron is a 14MeV multi-mA H+ machine from which the beam extracts without a deflector. The development of this prototype has started in 1998, and has now reached a point such that IBA considers to use it as a production machine. It is now installed in an irradiation facility and is equipped with two beam lines and two high power target-system. Beams of more than 1 mA have been extracted and transported to targets Further development is ongoing in order to increase the current on target to at least 2 mA in the coming months. Commercial isotope production will start at the end of this year. This paper will describe the current configuration of the cyclotron and the associated performances. Emphases will be put on reliability and associated problems, beam optics and performances of sub-systems

  20. Verification of the shielding built for a Cyclotron accelerator

    According to the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) resolution 112/2011, administrative controls must be applied during the construction of a cyclotron and documents must be created showing that the facility can operate without radiological risks, referring even to the shielding efficiency. This study aimed to perform the analysis of the construction and efficiency of the bunker built for shielding, in the cyclotron of University of Sao Paulo Medical School Health System. This was possible through the measurements of a radiometric survey in normal working conditions, and testing related to compression resistance and density. The results showed that the compression resistance of the concrete used is higher than the expected value and the average density value obtained is within the tolerated limits. The radiometric survey results showed that the levels of ionizing radiation are well below the established limits. (author)

  1. Examination of the plasma located in PSI Ring Cyclotron

    Pogue, N. J.; Adelmann, A.; Schneider, M.; Stingelin, L.

    2016-06-01

    A plasma has been observed inside the vacuum chamber of the PSI Ring Cyclotron. This ionized gas cloud may be a substantial contributor to several interior components having reduced lifetimes. The plasma's generation has been directly linked to the voltage that is applied to the Flat Top cavity through visual confirmation using CCD cameras. A spectrometer was used to correlate the plasma's intensity and ignition to the Flat Top cavity voltage as well as to determine the composition of the plasma. This paper reports on the analysis of the plasma using spectroscopy. The spectrometer data was analyzed to determine the composition of the plasma and that the plasma intensity (luminosity) directly corresponds to the Flat Top voltage. The results show that the plasma is comprised of elements consistent with the cyclotrons vacuum interior.

  2. Physics of electron cyclotron current drive on DIII-D

    Petty, C C; Harvey, R W; Kinsey, J E; Lao, L L; Lohr, J; Luce, T C; Makowski, M A; Prater, R

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 PHYSICS OF ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have focused on determining the effect of trapped particles on the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency. The measured ECCD efficiency increases as the deposition location is moved towards the inboard midplane or towards smaller minor radius for both co and counter injection. The measured ECCD efficiency also increases with increasing electron density and/or temperature. The experimental ECCD is compared to both the linear theory (Toray-GA) as well as a quasilinear Fokker-Planck model (CQL3D). The experimental ECCD is found to be in better agreement with the more complete Fokker-Planck calculation, especially for cases of high rf power density and/or loop voltage. The narrow width of the measured ECCD profile is consistent with only low levels of radial transport for the current carrying electrons.

  3. Studies of radioisotope production with an AVF cyclotron in TIARA

    Sekine, Toshiaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The production of radioisotopes to be used mainly for nuclear medicine and biology is studied with an AVF cyclotron in TIARA. A production method of no-carrier-added {sup 186}Re with the {sup 186}W(p,n){sup 186}Re reaction has been developed; this product may be used as a therapeutic agent in radioimmunotherapy due to the adequate nuclear and chemical properties. For the study of the function of plants using a positron-emitter two-dimensional imaging system, a simple method of producing the positron emitter {sup 18}F in water was developed by taking advantage of a highly-energetic {alpha} beam from the AVF cyclotron. (author)

  4. Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Cyclotron and Synchrotron Radiations

    Bagrov, V G; Levin, A; Tlyachev, V B

    2000-01-01

    We study the impact of Aharonov-Bohm solenoid on the radiation of a charged particle moving in a constant uniform magnetic field. With this aim in view, exact solutions of Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations are found in the magnetic-solenoid field. Using such solutions, we calculate exactly all the characteristics of one-photon spontaneous radiation both for spinless and spinning particle. Considering non-relativistic and relativistic approximations, we analyze cyclotron and synchrotron radiations in detail. Radiation peculiarities caused by the presence of the solenoid may be considered as a manifestation of Aharonov-Bohm effect in the radiation. In particular, it is shown that new spectral lines appear in the radiation spectrum. Due to angular distribution peculiarities of the radiation intensity, these lines can in principle be isolated from basic cyclotron and synchrotron radiation spectra

  5. Micro computer aided beam transport for the SF cyclotron

    An improvement of the beam transport system for the SF cyclotron is described. The system was designed to handle on-line alignment of the beam extracted from the SF cyclotron onto the optical axis of the transport line. It also enables to measure the beam emittance. The measurement of the emittance parameters is in particular necessary to calculate the beam optics. The calculation has been modified to become easy to handle. With the help of the computer-aided on-line beam profile measurement system, the operation of the beam transport system is very subservient to shorten the beam-tuning time and to improve the beam-transmission efficiency and the quality. (author)

  6. Electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic system for Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    A 16-channel electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging diagnostic system has been developed and installed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project for measuring plasma electron cyclotron emission with a temporal resolution of 2 μs. The high spatial resolution of the system is achieved by utilizing a low cost linear mixer/receiver array. Unlike conventional ECE diagnostics, the sample volumes of the ECE imaging system are aligned vertically, and can be shifted across the plasma cross-section by varying the local oscillator frequency, making possible 2D measurements of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations. The poloidal/radial wavenumber spectra and correlation lengths of Te fluctuations in the plasma core can also be obtained by properly positioning the focal plane of the imaging system. Due to these unique features, ECE imaging is an ideal tool for plasma transport study. Technical details of the system are described, together with preliminary experimental results. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  7. Ernest Orlando Lawrence (1901-1958), Cyclotron and Medicine

    Chu, William T.

    2005-09-01

    On August 8, 2001, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory celebrated the centennial of the birth of its founder (and namesake), Ernest Orlando Lawrence. For the occasion, many speeches were given and old speeches were remembered. We recall the words of the late Luis Alvarez, a Nobel Laureate and one of the Lawrence's closest colleagues: ''Lawrence will always be remembered as the inventor of the cyclotron, but more importantly, he should be remembered as the inventor of the modern way of doing science''. J. L. Heilbron and R. W. Seidel, in the introduction of their book, ''Lawrence and His Laboratory'' stated, ''The motives and mechanisms that shaped the growth of the Laboratory helped to force deep changes in the scientific estate and in the wider society. In the entrepreneurship of its founder, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, these motives, mechanisms, and changes came together in a tight focus. He mobilized great and small philanthropists, state and local governments, corporations, and plutocrats, volunteers and virtuosos. The work they supported, from astrophysics and atomic bombs, from radiochemistry to nuclear medicine, shaped the way we observe, control, and manipulate our environment.'' Indeed, all over the civilized world, the ways we do science changed forever after Lawrence built his famed Radiation Laboratory. In this editorial, we epitomize his legacy of changing the way we do medicine, thereby affecting the health and well being of all humanity. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the invention of the cyclotron by Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the University of California at Berkeley. Lawrence conceived the idea of the cyclotron early in 1929 after reading an article by Rolf Wideroe on high-energy accelerators. In the spring of 1930 one of his students, Nels Edlefsen, constructed two crude models of a cyclotron. Later in the fall of the same year, another student, M. Stanley Livingston

  8. Nonlinear particle simulation of ion cyclotron waves in toroidal geometry

    Kuley, A., E-mail: akuley@uci.edu; Lin, Z. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, CA-92697 (United States); Bao, J. [Fusion Simulation Center, Peking University, Beijing (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, CA-92697 (United States); Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y. [Institute of Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2015-12-10

    Global particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the nonlinear interactions of radio frequency (RF) waves with plasmas in tokamak. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation with realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. Boris push scheme for the ion motion has been developed in the toroidal geometry using magnetic coordinates and successfully verified for the ion cyclotron and ion Bernstein waves in global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The nonlinear simulation capability is applied to study the parametric decay instability of a pump wave into an ion Bernstein wave side band and a low frequency ion cyclotron quasi mode.

  9. Electron cyclotron emission and absorption experiment on the CASTOR tokamak

    Electron cyclotron radiation and absorption measurements on the CASTOR tokamak are reported. Emission spectra were obtained using fast-scanning Fourier spectrometer and InSb detectors, operating in the spectral range 30 to 300 GHz and receiving two orthogonal polarization components simultaneously. In the high plasma loop voltage runaway electrons gave rise to an intense broad-band emission. Runaway particles can be removed by increasing the plasma density. The electron temperature profile was deduced from thermal emission and absorption around second cyclotron harmonics. From the second and third harmonics of the non-thermal emission the energy and number of non-thermal particles can be calculated. During the lower-hybrid-current-drive (LHCD) experiments, the presence of 60 keV electrons with density of 1.1016 m-3 was deduced from emission spectra. (author). 5 figs., 6 refs

  10. Unstable Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves Exited by an Ion Beam

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens;

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in a quiescent cesium plasma into which a low‐energy beam of sodium ions was injected. The instability appeared when the beam velocity was above 12 times the ion thermal velocity. The waves propagated along the magnetic field with a velocity somewha...... smaller than that of the beam. The dispersion relation was in good agreement with theory.......Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in a quiescent cesium plasma into which a low‐energy beam of sodium ions was injected. The instability appeared when the beam velocity was above 12 times the ion thermal velocity. The waves propagated along the magnetic field with a velocity somewhat...

  11. Examination of the Plasma located in PSI Ring Cyclotron

    Pogue, Nathaniel; Schneider, Markus; Stingelin, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    A plasma has been observed inside the vacuum chamber of the PSI Ring Cyclotron. This ionized gas cloud maybe a substantial contributor to several interior components having reduced lifetimes. The plasma's generation has been directly linked to the voltage that is applied to the Flat Top Cavity through visual confirmation using CCD cameras. A spectrometer was used to correlate the plasma's intensity and ignition to the Flat Top Cavity voltage as well as to determine the composition of the plasma. This paper reports on the analysis of the plasma using spectroscopy. The spectrometer data was analyzed to determine the composition of the plasma and that the plasma intensity (luminosity) directly corresponds to the Flat Top voltage. The results showed that the plasma was comprised of elements consistent with the cyclotrons vacuum interior

  12. Microcomputer based control system for the TAMU K-500 cyclotron

    A parallel processor control system is being implemented for the K-500 superconducting cyclotron at TAMU. It consists of 10 cost effective personal computers communicating via a local area network. The cyclotron hardware is interfaced to the control system through IEEE-696 (STD bus) I/O cards and a memory mapped, tristate parallel data bus. Most of the software is being written in FORTH. Specific programs for each processor are compiled using tabular information extracted from a database describing the controls and accelerator hardware interfaces. This approach provides considerable flexibility in adapting the software to changing hardware configurations while eliminating the usual computational bottlenecks associated with an on-line data base. (orig.)

  13. Dispersion relation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves using Cluster observations

    Pakhotin, I. P.; S. N. Walker; Shprits, Y. Y.; Balikhin, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-point wave observations on Cluster spacecraft are used to infer the dispersion relation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. In this study we use a phase differencing method and observations from STAFF and WHISPER during a well-studied event of 30 March 2002. The phase differencing method requires the knowledge of the direction of the wave vector, which was obtained using minimum variance analysis. Wave vector amplitudes were calculated for a number of frequencies to infer the...

  14. Radionuclide production and radiopharmaceutical chemistry with BNL cyclotrons

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) radiopharmaceutical chemistry program focuses on production and utilization of radionuclides having a half-life of > 2 hr. However, a major portion of the BNL program is devoted to short-lived radionuclides, such as 11C and 18F. Activities encompassed in the program are classified into seven areas: cyclotron parameters, radiochemistry, design and rapid synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals and labeled compounds, radiotracer evaluation in animals, studies in humans, technology transfer, and several other areas

  15. Radio frequency system of the RIKEN ring cyclotron

    The radio-frequency system of the RIKEN ring cyclotron (K = 540) is required to work in a frequency range of 20 to 45 MHz and to generate the maximum acceleration voltage 250 kV. A new movable box type variable frequency resonator was designed for that purpose. The final amplifier is capable of supplying RF power of 300 kW. The whole system had been installed at RIKEN in September 1986 and has been working well. (author)

  16. Electron Cyclotron Waves Polarization in the TJII Stellarator

    Cappa, A.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.; Wagner, D.

    2013-05-01

    This report describes the theoretical calculations related with the electron cyclotron (EC) waves polarization control in the TJII stellarator. Two main aspects will be distinguished: the determination of the vacuum polarization that the wave must exhibit if a given propagation mode in a cold plasma is desired and the calculation of the behavior of the grooved polarizers and other transmission systems used to launch the vacuum wave with the required polarization. (Author) 13 refs.

  17. Automatic system for driving probes of electron cyclotron

    The automatic system for driving six probes used on electron model of the ring cyclotron is described. This system allows one to move probes one by one or simultaneously. The active forcing of the process of switching on of the current in phase windings is used a driving scheme of step-motors. The shift of probes from one radius to other can be carried out both from the front panel of driving device (autonomous regime), and from the computer

  18. Modeling whistler wave generation regimes in magnetospheric cyclotron maser

    D. L. Pasmanik; A. G. Demekhov; V. Y. Trakhtengerts; M. Parrot

    2004-01-01

    Numerical analysis of the model for cyclotron instability in the Earth's magnetosphere is performed. This model, based on the self-consistent set of equations of quasi-linear plasma theory, describes different regimes of wave generation and related energetic particle precipitation. As the source of free energy the injection of energetic electrons with transverse anisotropic distribution function to the interaction region is considered. A parametric study of the model is performed. The ma...

  19. Topologically-protected entanglement of electron pair cyclotron motions

    Champel, T.; Hernangómez-Pérez, D.; Florens, S.

    2015-01-01

    Considering two-dimensional electron gases under a perpendicular magnetic field, we pinpoint a specific kind of long-range bipartite entanglement of the electronic motions. This entanglement is achieved through the introduction of bicomplex spinorial eigenfunctions admitting a polar decomposition in terms of a real modulus and three real phases. Within this bicomplex geometry the cyclotron motions of two electrons are intrinsically tied, so that the highlighted eigenstates of the kinetic ener...

  20. Multimegawatt DAE$\\delta$ALUS Cyclotrons for Neutrino Physics

    Abs, M; Alonso, J R; Barletta, W A; Barlow, R; Calabretta, L; Calanna, A; Campo, D; Celona, L; Conrad, J M; Gammino, S; Kleeven, W; Koeth, T; Maggiore, M; Okuno, H; Piazza, L A C; Seidel, M; Shaevitz, M H; Stingelin, L; Yang, J J; Yeck, J

    2012-01-01

    DAE$\\delta$ALUS (Decay-At-rest Experiment for $\\delta_{CP}$ studies At the Laboratory for Underground Science) provides a new approach to the search for CP violation in the neutrino sector. High-power continuous-wave proton cyclotrons efficiently provide the necessary proton beams with an energy of up to 800 MeV to create neutrinos from pion and muon decay-at-rest. The experiment searches for $\\bar{\

  1. Ion cyclotron harmonics in the Saturn downward current auroral region

    Menietti, J.D.; Schippers, P.; Santolík, O; Gurnett, D. A.; Crary, F.; Coates, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of intense upgoing electron beams and diffuse ion beams have been reported during a pass by Cassini in a downward current auroral region, nearby a source region of Saturn kilometric radiation. Using the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument low frequency waveform receiver and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer Investigation (CAPS) instrument we have been able to identify ion cyclotron harmonic waves associated with the particle beams. These observations indicate si...

  2. Ion sources for RFQ accelerators and for cyclotrons

    Ion sources used in conjunction with low energy accelerators, either RF quadrupole linacs or small cyclotrons, are reviewed. The topics covered include low energy accelerators used as injectors to larger accelerators, ion sources for low and medium currents of heavy ions, high-current heavy ion sources, ion sources for pulsed high currents of light ions, and new developments in ion sources such as beams of radioactive ions

  3. Electron Cyclotron Waves Polarization in the TJII Stellarator

    This report describes the theoretical calculations related with the electron cyclotron (EC) waves polarization control in the TJII stellarator. Two main aspects will be distinguished: the determination of the vacuum polarization that the wave must exhibit if a given propagation mode in a cold plasma is desired and the calculation of the behavior of the grooved polarizers and other transmission systems used to launch the vacuum wave with the required polarization. (Author) 13 refs.

  4. Electron-cyclotron plasma startup in the GDT experiment

    Yakovlev, D. V.; Shalashov, A. G.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Savkin, V. Ya.; Bagryansky, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports on a new plasma startup scenario in the Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) magnetic mirror device. The primary 5 MW neutral beam injection (NBI) plasma heating system fires into a sufficiently dense plasma target ("seed plasma"), which is commonly supplied by an arc plasma generator. In the reported experiments, a different approach to seed plasma generation is explored. One of the channels of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating system is used to ionize the neutral gas and bu...

  5. Occupational radioprotection in the cyclotron laboratory radioisotope production at IEN

    The Cyclotron of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear is operated mainly for radioisotope production, neutron production studies and irradiation damage analysis. The risks associated to the activities developed in these laboratories are exposition to beta, neutron and gama radiation and contamination. The radioprotection program adapted are presented briefly and the results of the air and surface contamination analysis, liquid efluents and dose equivalent of the workers in 1988 are shown. (author)

  6. Cyclotron, positrons and PET [positron emission tomography]. An overview

    PET (positron emission tomography) is a powerful new scientific tool which is capable of revealing biochemical transformations while they are occurring in the brain and other organs in the living human body. The application of PET to problems in biology and medicine is dominated by the short half-life of the isotopes used to prepare the radiotracers. The most commonly used positron emitting isotopes are carbon-11, fluorine-18, nitrogen-13, and oxygen-15 which have half-lives of 20.4, 110, 10 and 2 minutes, respectively. Their incorporation into radiotracers having diverse chemical structures and biochemical specificities has allowed the study of blood flow, sugar metabolism, oxygen metabolism, neurotransmission, enzyme activity and binding sites for therapeutic drugs and substances of abuse. PET research is most commonly carried out at a Cyclotron-PET Center (cyclotron, positron emission tomography, chemistry laboratory) where the short-lived isotopes can be produced and used efficiently. The number of Cyclotron-PET Centers has grown from 4 in 1976 to several dozen in 1988 and the number is expected to double in the next five years attesting to the vitality of the field and the current and anticipated contributions to research in biology and medicine

  7. PET cyclotron design for decommissioning and waste inventory reduction - 16098

    In this paper we will examine the decommissioning and radioactive waste implications of a hypothetical cyclotron facility. from conception through design into operation and finally decommissioning. Supported by the computer codes MCNPX, MCNP and FISPACT we illustrate the induced activity in the cyclotron pit walls. Using the computer codes it is possible to highlight the problems associated with neutron activation of the cyclotron pit walls and the need for specialist shielding materials, such as boronated polyethylene. Using MCNP it is possible to design a vault for cost effective decommissioning through the use of sacrificial layers. This code allows the likely degree of activation and penetration of activation products to be quantified and hence gives an idea of waste disposal costs. In summary, a dedicated PET facility will challenge most RPAs. A wide range of skills are needed which encompass practical operational procedures, through specialist shielding design using Monte Carlo codes to the ability to appear confident to Regulators who may be finding the experience the same steep learning curve. (authors)

  8. Neutron spectra due 13N production in a PET cyclotron

    Monte Carlo and experimental methods have been used to characterize the neutron radiation field around PET (Positron Emission Tomography) cyclotrons. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to estimate the neutron spectra, the neutron fluence rates and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) in seven locations around a PET cyclotron during 13N production. In order to validate these calculations, H*(10) was measured in three sites and were compared with the calculated doses. All the spectra have two peaks, one above 0.1 MeV due to the evaporation neutrons and another in the thermal region due to the room-return effects. Despite the relatively large difference between the measured and calculated H*(10) for one point, the agreement was considered good, compared with that obtained for 18F production in a previous work. - Highlights: • MCNPX code was used to estimate the neutron spectra in a PET cyclotron. • Neutrons were estimated when 13N is produced. • Neutron spectra show evaporation and room-return neutrons. • Calculated H*(10) were compared with measured H*(10)

  9. RF control hardware design for CYCIAE-100 cyclotron

    Yin, Zhiguo; Fu, Xiaoliang; Ji, Bin; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tianjue; Li, Pengzhan; Wei, Junyi; Xing, Jiansheng; Wang, Chuan

    2015-11-01

    The Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility project is being constructed by BRIF division of China Institute of Atomic Energy. In this project, a 100 MeV high intensity compact proton cyclotron is built for multiple applications. The first successful beam extraction of CYCIAE-100 cyclotron was done in the middle of 2014. The extracted proton beam energy is 100 MeV and the beam current is more than 20 μA. The RF system of the CYCIAE-100 cyclotron includes two half-wavelength cavities, two 100 kW tetrode amplifiers and power transmission line systems (all above are independent from each other) and two sets of Low Level RF control crates. Each set of LLRF control includes an amplitude control unit, a tuning control unit, a phase control unit, a local Digital Signal Process control unit and an Advanced RISC Machines based EPICS IOC unit. These two identical LLRF control crates share one common reference clock and take advantages of modern digital technologies (e.g. DSP and Direct Digital Synthesizer) to achieve closed loop voltage and phase regulations of the dee-voltage. In the beam commission, the measured dee-voltage stability of RF system is better than 0.1% and phase stability is better than 0.03°. The hardware design of the LLRF system will be reviewed in this paper.

  10. Present status of the ring cyclotron vacuum system

    The accelerator in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, is the cascade type, in which the AVF cyclotron that started the operation about 20 years ago is used as the injector, and the ring cyclotron that was completed three years ago is used as the booster, and it has been jointly utilized mainly for the research on atomic nucleus physics. These two cyclotrons are different in their performances and constitution of machinery and equipment, such as the construction of vacuum tanks, sealing types, the kinds of vacuum pumps and the arrangement, but commonness was given to the design concept, operation method, the control of operation, the interlock for the protection of equipment and so on, thus consideration was given to contribute to the operation, monitoring and maintenance by operators. The constitution of the vacuum tanks and their connection, pneumatic expansion seal and the structural materials of the vacuum tanks are described. The constitution of the evacuating system, the operation and monitoring are explained. In three years, the time of the operation of the evacuating system reached 20,000 hours. The degree of attained vacuum has been as designed, and the operation has been carried out satisfactorily without trouble. There was not long stoppage. (K.I.)

  11. Emittance Measurement for Beamline Extension at the PET Cyclotron

    Sae-Hoon Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle-induced X-ray emission is used for determining the elemental composition of materials. This method uses low-energy protons (of several MeV, which can be obtained from high-energy (of tens MeV accelerators. Instead of manufacturing an accelerator for generating the MeV protons, the use of a PET cyclotron has been suggested for designing the beamline for multipurpose applications, especially for the PIXE experiment, which has a dedicated high-energy (of tens MeV accelerator. The beam properties of the cyclotron were determined at this experimental facility by using an external beamline before transferring the ion beam to the experimental chamber. We measured the beam profile and calculated the emittance using the pepper-pot method. The beam profile was measured as the beam current using a wire scanner, and the emittance was measured as the beam distribution at the beam dump using a radiochromic film. We analyzed the measurement results and are planning to use the results obtained in the simulations of external beamline and aligned beamline components. We will consider energy degradation after computing the beamline simulation. The experimental study focused on measuring the emittance from the cyclotron, and the results of this study are presented in this paper.

  12. The cyclotron laboratory and the RFQ accelerator in Bern

    Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Nirkko, M.; Weber, M. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Scampoli, P. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland and Department of Physical Sciences, University Federico II, Via Cintia, I-60126 Napoli (Italy); Bremen, K. von [SWAN Isotopen AG, Inselspital, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland)

    2013-07-18

    Two proton accelerators have been recently put in operation in Bern: an 18 MeV cyclotron and a 2 MeV RFQ linac. The commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron, equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker, will provide beams for routine 18-F and other PET radioisotope production as well as for novel detector, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. The accelerator is embedded into a complex building hosting two physics laboratories and four Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) laboratories. This project is the result of a successful collaboration between the Inselspital, the University of Bern and private investors, aiming at the constitution of a combined medical and research centre able to provide the most cutting-edge technologies in medical imaging and cancer radiation therapy. The cyclotron is complemented by the RFQ with the primary goals of elemental analysis via Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE), and the detection of potentially dangerous materials with high nitrogen content using the Gamma-Resonant Nuclear Absorption (GRNA) technique. In this context, beam instrumentation devices have been developed, in particular an innovative beam profile monitor based on doped silica fibres and a setup for emittance measurements using the pepper-pot technique. On this basis, the establishment of a proton therapy centre on the campus of the Inselspital is in the phase of advanced study.

  13. The electron cyclotron absorption diagnostic at the Rijnhuizen tokamak project

    A new 20-channel electron cyclotron absorption diagnostic has been developed at the Rijnhuizen tokamak project. It is the first time the electron pressure profile in a tokamak plasma can be measured directly with a time resolution of 1 ms. The diagnostic measures simultaneously the emission and absorption of the second harmonic electron cyclotron frequencies. Microwaves are injected from the high field side and detected at the low field side in the equatorial midplane. The transmitted power is measured after a single pass through the plasma column. The absorption measurements are complicated by nonresonant losses: refraction of the injected microwaves (losses up to 100%), and scattering of microwaves by density fluctuations (losses 2% - 3%). A fast algorithm has been developed to obtain a quantitative measure for these nonresonant losses. This calculation method is based on a parametrization of the experimental data. Combining the electron cyclotron absorption (ECA) measurements and the parametrization provides a reliable tool for determining the optical depth, the electron temperature, and the electron pressure. A good agreement was found between pressure and temperature profiles, measured with ECA and other diagnostics. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  14. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive in toroidal geometry

    Work of the Principal Investigator has continued on the development, use and dissemination of numerical tools required in both the planning of electron cyclotron heating experiments and in answering physics questions associated with those experiments. The TORCH code which evolved from the earlier TORAY code has been linked with the BALDUR 11/2 D transport and equilibrium code. This allows us to carry out combined electron cyclotron ray tracing and transport studies for the Compact Ignition Tokamak. Moreover, our concern has not only been with propagation of electron cyclotron radiation into the plasma and the deposition of this radiation there, but also with the excitation and presence of synchrotron radiation and the propagation of that radiation out of the plasma. The ray tracing codes that have been developed for studying ECH heating and current drive, have been generalized and used in our studies to trace the path of synchrotron radiation. This allows us to examine in detail the background as well as the enhanced radiation signals that are detected at the edge of the plasma

  15. Target development for diversified irradiations at a medical cyclotron

    The irradiation facility at an old medical cyclotron (Ep=17 MeV; Ed=10 MeV) was upgraded by extending the beam line and incorporation of solid state targetry. Tests performed to check the quality of the available beam are outlined. Results on nuclear data measurements and improvement of radiochemical separations are described. Using solid targets, with the proton beam falling at a slanting angle of 20°, a few radionuclides, e.g. 75Se, 120I, 124I, etc. were produced with medium currents (up to 20 µA) in no-carrier-added form in quantities sufficient for local use. The extended irradiation facility has considerably enhanced the utility of the medical cyclotron. - Highlights: • Extension of the beam line of an old medical cyclotron. • Incorporation of solid state targetr. • Development of divers target holder systems. • Tests performed to check quality of beam shape, intensity and energy. • Usefulness of the new facility demonstrated by diversified irradiations

  16. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    Our goal is to improve the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. The radiochemistry group seeks to develop innovative cyclotron targetry, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiolabeled antibodies, which are then used to assess important unanswered questions in tumor pharmacology and immunology. Examples include selected positron emitting radionuclides, such as Iodine-124, and Ga-66; I-124, I-123, I-131 labeled iododeoxyuridine, C-11 colchicine, and antimetabolites, like C-11 methotrexate; and radiolabeled antibodies, 3F8, M195, A33, and MRK16 for application in the pharmacology and immunology projects. The pharmacology program studies tumor resistance to chemotherapy, particularly the phenomenon of multidrug resistance and the relationship between tumor uptake and retention and the tumor response for anti-metabolite drugs. The immunology program studies the physiology of antibody localization at the tissue level as the basis for novel approaches to improving tumor localization such as through the use of an artificial lymphatic system which mechanically reduces intratumoral pressures in tumors in vivo. Quantitative imaging approaches based on PET and SPECT in radioimmunotherapy are studied to give greater insight into the physiology of tumor localization and dosimetry.

  17. Resonant Cyclotron Scattering and Comptonization in Neutron Star Magnetospheres

    Lyutikov, M; Lyutikov, Maxim; Gavriil, Fotis P.

    2006-01-01

    Resonant cyclotron scattering of the surface radiation in the magnetospheres of neutron stars may considerably modify the emergent spectra and impede efforts to constraint neutron star properties. Resonant cyclotron scattering by a non-relativistic warm plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field has a number of unusual characteristics: (i) in the limit of high resonant optical depth, the cyclotron resonant layer is half opaque, in sharp contrast to the case of non-resonant scattering. (ii) The transmitted flux is on average Compton up-scattered by ~ $1+ 2 beta_T$, where $\\beta_T$ is the typical thermal velocity in units of the velocity of light; the reflected flux has on average the initial frequency. (iii) For both the transmitted and reflected fluxes the dispersion of intensity decreases with increasing optical depth. (iv) The emergent spectrum is appreciably non-Plankian while narrow spectral features produced at the surface may be erased. (v) Optical photons are less affected by resonant Comptonization tha...

  18. The cyclotron laboratory and the RFQ accelerator in Bern

    Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Nirkko, M.; Scampoli, P.; von Bremen, K.; Weber, M.

    2013-07-01

    Two proton accelerators have been recently put in operation in Bern: an 18 MeV cyclotron and a 2 MeV RFQ linac. The commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron, equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker, will provide beams for routine 18-F and other PET radioisotope production as well as for novel detector, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. The accelerator is embedded into a complex building hosting two physics laboratories and four Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) laboratories. This project is the result of a successful collaboration between the Inselspital, the University of Bern and private investors, aiming at the constitution of a combined medical and research centre able to provide the most cutting-edge technologies in medical imaging and cancer radiation therapy. The cyclotron is complemented by the RFQ with the primary goals of elemental analysis via Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE), and the detection of potentially dangerous materials with high nitrogen content using the Gamma-Resonant Nuclear Absorption (GRNA) technique. In this context, beam instrumentation devices have been developed, in particular an innovative beam profile monitor based on doped silica fibres and a setup for emittance measurements using the pepper-pot technique. On this basis, the establishment of a proton therapy centre on the campus of the Inselspital is in the phase of advanced study.

  19. Atmospheric tracer study of the emissions from the University of Michigan Cyclotron/PET Facility

    The University of Michigan (U of M) Cyclotron/Positron Emission Tomography (PET) facility consists of a cyclotron (Model CS-30, The Cyclotron Corporation), radiochemistry laboratory, and Pet scanner. Accelerator-produced radioactive materials, such as, carbon-11 and oxygen-15 are typically emitted from the Cyclotron/PET facility through short stacks located on the roof. This project studied the dispersion of emissions from the facility within the medical complex. To achieve this purpose, the research project had three phases: a physical modeling study; a preliminary field smoke release study; and, a field study using a tracer gas to simulate emission dispersion from the U of M Cyclotron/PET facility vault stack. The objective was to determine normalized concentrations, under selected wind directions and speeds, for use in establishing radionuclide concentrations at the air intakes of the Cyclotron/PET facility and surrounding buildings and at selected ground-level locations

  20. Considerations, measurements and logistics associated with low-energy cyclotron decommissioning

    The University of Iowa’s 20-year-old 17 MeV Scanditronix cyclotron underwent decommissioning in the summer of 2011. To satisfy local, state and federal regulations defining removal, transportation and long-term safe and environmentally secure disposal of the 22 ton activated cyclotron, a series of nuclear spectroscopic measurements were performed to characterize the nature and extent of proton and neutron activation of the 22-ton cyclotron, its associated targets, and the concrete wall that was demolished to remove the old cyclotron. Neutron activation of the concrete wall was minimal and below exempt concentrations resulting in standard landfill disposal. The cyclotron assessment revealed the expected array of short and medium-lived radionuclides. Subsequent calculations suggest that meaningful levels residual activity will have decayed virtually to background after 15 years, with the total residual activity of the entire cyclotron dropping below 37 MBq (1 mCi).

  1. Observation of a high-confinement regime in a tokamak plasma with ion cyclotron resonance heating

    Steinmetz, K.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Wagner, F.; Wesner, F.; Bäumler, J.; Becker, G.; Bosch, H. S.; Brambilla, M.; Braun, F.; Brocken, H.; Eberhagen, A.; Fritsch, R.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; v. Gierke, G.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Hofmann, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Izvozchikov, A.; Janeschitz, G.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lisitano, G.; van Mark, E.; Mast, F.; Mayer, H. M.; McCormick, K.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Müller, E. R.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Puri, S.; Rapp, H.; Röhr, H.; Ryter, F.; Schmitter, K.-H.; Schneider, F.; Setzensack, C.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F.; Speth, E.; Steuer, K.-H.; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Zasche, D.

    1987-01-01

    The H mode in ion cyclotron-resonance-heated plasmas has been investigated with and without additional neutral beam injection. Ion cyclotron-resonance heating can cause the transition into a high-confinement regime (H mode) in combination with beam heating. The H mode, however, has also been realized-for the first time-with ion cyclotron-resonance heating alone in the D (H)-hydrogen minority scheme at an absorbed rf power of 1.1 MW.

  2. Microwave emission related to cyclotron instabilities in a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    Izotov, I.; Tarvainen, O.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2015-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) have been essential in the research and applications of nuclear physics over the past 40 years. They are extensively used in a wide range of large-scale accelerator facilities for the production of highly charged heavy ion beams of stable and radioactive elements. ECRISs are susceptible to kinetic instabilities due to resonance heating mechanism leading to anisotropic electron velocity distribution function. Instabilities of cyclotron type are a proven cause of frequently observed periodic bursts of ‘hot’ electrons and bremsstrahlung, accompanied with emission of microwave radiation and followed by considerable drop of multiply charged ions current. Detailed studies of the microwave radiation associated with the instabilities have been performed with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen and argon plasmas. It is demonstrated that during the development of cyclotron instability ‘hot’ electrons emit microwaves in sub-microsecond scale bursts at temporally descending frequencies in the 8-15 GHz range with two dominant frequencies of 11.09 and 12.59 GHz regardless of ECRIS settings i.e. magnetic field strength, neutral gas pressure or species and microwave power. The experimental data suggest that the most probable excited plasma wave is a slow extraordinary Z-mode propagating quasi-longitudinally with respect to the external magnetic field.

  3. Intelligent CAE system of CYCLONE type cyclotron main magnet and its applications

    The main magnet that represents the feature of the cyclotron is the most important part in a cyclotron construction. Though there are many codes devoted to solve magnetic field computation problems, the results from them depend on the user's skill and experience very much. To help cyclotron magnet designer to get acceptable results, an intelligent CAE (computer aided engineering) system for CYCLONE type cyclotron magnet design and machining has been developed. A reasonable good results in the design could be got even if the designer is a beginner, because of the help from an expert knowledge library installed in the program

  4. Intelligent CAE system of CYCLONE type cyclotron main magnet and its applications

    The main magnet that features the cyclotron is the most important part in a cyclotron construction. Though there are many codes devoted to solving magnetic field computation problems, the results depend on the user's skill and experience very much. To help a cyclotron magnet designer get acceptable results, an intelligent CAE system for CYCLONE type cyclotron magnet design and machining has been developed. Reasonable good results could be got even the designer with the help from an expert knowledge library installed in the program

  5. Wave propagation and absorption near the electron-cyclotron layer in the 'THOR' device

    The wave propagation and absorption near the electron-cyclotron frequency in a plasma with parameters as expected in the THOR device are considered. Both the ordinary and extraordinary modes are found to be only weakly damped by cyclotron damping. The extraordinary mode launched from the inside of the torus is expected to be completely absorbed at the electron-cyclotron layer via the Bernstein mode generated by mode conversion at the upper-hybrid layer. This study is preliminary to the application of high frequency microwave radiation to plasma heating near the electron-cyclotron frequency in THOR

  6. Cyclotron operating mode determination based on intelligent methods

    Particle accelerators are generators that produce beams of charged particles with energies depending on the accelerator type. The MGC-20 cyclotron is a cyclic particle accelerator used for accelerating protons, deuterons, alpha particles, and helium-3 to different energies. Main applications are isotopes production, nuclear reactions studies, and mass spectroscopy studies and other industrial applications. The cyclotron is a complicated machine depends on using a strong magnetic field and high frequency-high voltage electric field together to accelerate and bend charged particles inside the accelerating chamber. It consists of the following main parts, the radio frequency system, the main magnet with the auxiliary concentric and harmonic coils, the electrostatic deflector, and the ion source, the beam transport system, and high precision and high stability DC power supplies.To accelerate a particle to certain energy, one has to adjust the cyclotron operating parameters to be suitable to accelerate this particle to that energy. If the cyclotron operating parameters together are adjusted to accelerate a charged particle to certain energy, then these parameters together are named the operating mode to accelerate this particle to that energy. For example the operating mode to accelerate protons to 18 MeV is named the (18 MeV protons operating mode). The operating mode includes many parameters that must be adjusted together to be successful to accelerate, extract, focus, steer a particle from the ion source to the experiment. Due to the big number of parameters in the operating modes, 19 parameters have been selected in this thesis to be used in an intelligent system based on feed forward back propagation neural network to determine the parameters for new operating modes. The new intelligent system depends on the available information about the currently used operating modes.The classic way to determine a new operating mode was depending on trial and error method to

  7. Concepts and strategies to establish a cyclotron/PET center

    Cyclotron accelerators are prolific sources of charged particle for the production of radionuclides and have become an essential tool in the practice of modern nuclear medicine by providing reliably radiotracers for SPECT and PET studies. In a recent survey conducted by the IAEA in 2001 (1) , the growth in the number of cyclotron facilities installed in laboratories and hospitals in developed as well as developing nations was put into evidence This trend, which started in the late 70's, continues up to the present time, and all indications are that it will continue in the next future. The reasons for this growth are several, amongst them it can be mentioned the fact that the technology involved has became more user or 'hospital friendly', third party reimbursement for several of clinical studies based on F-18 PET radiopharmaceuticals at least in some of the advanced countries starting with F-18FDG in 1998, and above all, the clear, irrefutable and demonstrable Conclusion of the positive cost/benefit outcomes of PET studies in the field of oncology and to a lesser degree, thus far, for cardiology and neurology. It is however recognized that the overall financial cost of the technology, which comprises the premises to house the facility, the cyclotron accelerator, the corresponding radiochemistry and quality control equipment and the PET camera can nevertheless be an expensive proposition that requires careful advance planning. This fact is even more relevant when the facility is planed for installation in a developing country which frequently, in addition to having a lack of sufficient financial resources, do have shortages of qualify human resources for advance planning and later, to run efficiently the facility. Several are the steps that needs consideration when planning a cyclotron facility, the most critical ones are a careful definition of the mission and scope of the facility including the utilization programme of the facility as a whole, followed by a

  8. Low power density ion cyclotron arrays for fusion reactors

    Highlights: • A low power density, high directivity, FW heating and current drive launching structure is proposed for use in a commercial fusion reactor. • The structure, integrated in the reactor blanket first wall, is modular, unobtrusive and imposes no specific constraints to the blanket functions. • It may significantly reduce the undesirable effects of FW evanescence in the plasma scrape off layer such as increased thermal wall loading, localized hot spots, impurity production, and enhanced E × B0 particles convection. - Abstract: Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) Heating and Current Drive (H&CD) is a well established technique of auxiliary heating in present tokamaks, as it features high on-axis heating and current drive efficiencies associated with proven and low cost technology. An important limiting factor to the use of ICRF as candidate heating method in a commercial reactor is linked to the evanescence of the fast wave in vacuum and in most of the SOL layer, imposing proximity of the launching structure to the plasma boundary and causing high RF standing and DC rectified voltages at the plasma periphery, possible voltage breakdowns and enhanced local wall loading. Further to previous work (Bosia et al., Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Arrays applicable to Current Drive in Fusion Reactors, in: AIP Proc. of 20th Topical Conf on RF Power in plasmas No. 1580, 2013, 215) developing new concepts for Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Heating & Current Drive arrays, based on the use of periodic structures, a practical example for an in-blanket IC array for DEMO1 is presented in this study

  9. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency: Stereo observations

    Transverse, near-circularly polarized, parallel-propagating electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency were found sporadically in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They could play an important role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. These low-frequency waves (LFWs) are intermittent but often occur in prolonged bursts lasting over 10 minutes, named 'LFW storms'. Through a comprehensive survey of them from Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory A using dynamic spectral wave analysis, we have identified 241 LFW storms in 2008, present 0.9% of the time. They are left-hand (LH) or right-hand (RH) polarized in the spacecraft frame with similar characteristics, probably due to Doppler shift of the same type of waves or waves of intrinsically different polarities. In rare cases, the opposite polarities are observed closely in time or even simultaneously. Having ruled out interplanetary coronal mass ejections, shocks, energetic particles, comets, planets, and interstellar ions as LFW sources, we discuss the remaining generation scenarios: LH ion cyclotron instability driven by greater perpendicular temperature than parallel temperature or by ring-beam distribution, and RH ion fire hose instability driven by inverse temperature anisotropy or by cool ion beams. The investigation of solar wind conditions is compromised by the bias of the one-dimensional Maxwellian fit used for plasma data calibration. However, the LFW storms are preferentially detected in rarefaction regions following fast winds and when the magnetic field is radial. This preference may be related to the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in fast wind and the minimum in damping along the radial field.

  10. Cyclotron resonance precipitation of energetic electrons from the inner magnetosphere

    Cyclotron resonance between trapped energetic electrons and VLF waves produces pitch angle scattering which leads to electron precipitation in the inner magnetosphere. Previous experiments have shown that in the drift loss cone at L values from 1.5 to 1.8 energy spectrum of the electrons above 50 keV is often dominated by a single narrow peak. The center energy of this peak varies with L in a manner characteristic of cyclotron resonance between the electrons and monochromatic VLF waves in the vicinity of the geomagnetic equator. The source of the waves is probably VLF communication or navigation transmitters. The authors report the results of a study of 680 occurrences of these peaks detected by the low altitude polar orbiting satellite S81-1. The present data, from altitudes between 170 and 270 km, show the resonance peaks only in two restricted longitude zones centered at 100E and 300E; this result contrasts with the previous measurements at higher altitudes, which detected peaks over a wide range of longitudes. The majority of nighttime events were near transmitter locations where the cyclotron resonance condition was met by electrons with pitch angles near the edge of the loss cone. Detailed study of the events occurring near 100E reveals a 27-day periodicity in the frequency of occurrence; peaks are most often observed during minima in solar/geomagnetic activity. The peaks observed at nighttime in both longitude zones have a possible seasonal variation, being most frequent when it is wintertime at the site of the VLF transmitters responsible for the precipitation

  11. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency: Stereo observations

    Jian, L. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T. [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Klecker, B. [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Omidi, N. [Solana Scientific Inc., Solana Beach, CA 92075 (United States); Isenberg, P. A. [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Goldstein, M. L.; Figueroa-Viñas, A. [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, MD 20771 (United States); Blanco-Cano, X., E-mail: lan.jian@nasa.gov [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-05-10

    Transverse, near-circularly polarized, parallel-propagating electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency were found sporadically in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They could play an important role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. These low-frequency waves (LFWs) are intermittent but often occur in prolonged bursts lasting over 10 minutes, named 'LFW storms'. Through a comprehensive survey of them from Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory A using dynamic spectral wave analysis, we have identified 241 LFW storms in 2008, present 0.9% of the time. They are left-hand (LH) or right-hand (RH) polarized in the spacecraft frame with similar characteristics, probably due to Doppler shift of the same type of waves or waves of intrinsically different polarities. In rare cases, the opposite polarities are observed closely in time or even simultaneously. Having ruled out interplanetary coronal mass ejections, shocks, energetic particles, comets, planets, and interstellar ions as LFW sources, we discuss the remaining generation scenarios: LH ion cyclotron instability driven by greater perpendicular temperature than parallel temperature or by ring-beam distribution, and RH ion fire hose instability driven by inverse temperature anisotropy or by cool ion beams. The investigation of solar wind conditions is compromised by the bias of the one-dimensional Maxwellian fit used for plasma data calibration. However, the LFW storms are preferentially detected in rarefaction regions following fast winds and when the magnetic field is radial. This preference may be related to the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in fast wind and the minimum in damping along the radial field.

  12. TORCAPP: time-dependent cyclotron orbit calculation and plotting package

    TORCAPP calculates the motion of charged particles in electromagnetic fields with time as the independent variable, and produces a variety of printed and plotted output of results. Finite-size beam behavior is studied conveniently by following groups of particles which define an appropriate phase space area. Since time is the independent variable, general motion in the near-median-plane region may be followed. This includes, for example, loops not enclosing the origin and strongly radial motions. Thus, TORCAPP is particularly useful for injection studies for isochronous cyclotrons, or other devices with near-median-plane charged particle motion

  13. Radiochemical separation methods for preparation of biomedical cyclotron radionuclides

    A short review of the radiochemical methods for preparation of widely used or promising cyclotron-produced radionuclides for nuclear medicine and biomedical or environmental studies is given. The presented data include the current status of the production of some gamma-emitters (97Ru, 111In, 123I, 201Tl), generator-pairs (68Ge/68Ga, 82 Sr/82Rb, 128Ba/128Cs, 178W/178Ta), radioisotopes for metabolism studies (26Al, 67Cu, 237Pu) and actinides tracers for environmental researches (235Np, 236Np, 236Pu). The conditions for preparation of high-purity isotopes have been investigated and procedures including target chemistry design were developed. (author)

  14. Alcator C vertical viewing electron cyclotron emission diagnostic

    Electron cyclotron emission measured vertically through the center of a tokamak plasma yields detailed information about the electron velocity distribution. A diagnostic developed for this purpose on Alcator C tokamak uses specialized focusing optics to obtain a well collimated viewing chord, a compact viewing dump made of pyrex or Macor to reduce the effects of wall reflection and depolarization, and a rapid-scan polarizing Michelson interferometer - InSb detector system for the spectrum measurement; all constrained by the limited access and the compact size of Alcator C. Results of diffraction analysis are used to evaluate the theoretical performance of the optical system

  15. The operator view of the Superconducting Cyclotron at LNS Catania

    The upper level of a distributed control system designed for the Superconducting Cyclotron (SC), will be discussed. In particular, we will present a detailed description of the operator view of this accelerator along with the tools for I/O points management, data representations, data archiving and retrieval. A dedicated program, developed by us, working under X-Window will be described as a starting point for a new man-machine interface approach in small laboratories opposed to the first industrial available packages. (author)

  16. Radio frequency system of the RIKEN ring cyclotron

    The radio-frequency system of the RIKEN ring cyclotron is required to work in a frequency range of 20 to 45 MHz and to generate the maximum acceleration voltage of 250 kV. A new movable box-type variable-frequency resonator which is a compact half wave length coaxial type was developed for the above purpose. Each of two resonators is powered by separate RF power amplifier capable of delivering the power of 300 kW. The whole system was installed in September 1986 and has been working successfully. (author)

  17. Frequency-scanning marginal oscillator for ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy

    Kemper, Paul R.; Bowers, Michael T.

    1982-07-01

    A number of ion cyclotron resonance applications have arisen in the past few years which require a frequency-scanned detection system. Since the traditional marginal oscillator detector has always been a fixed-frequency detector, alternative detection techniques such as bridge circuit detectors have become widely used. In this paper we present an alternative to the bridge detector, namely, a frequency-scanning marginal oscillator. Requirements and modifications necessary to convert a marginal oscillator to frequency scanning operation are discussed in detail and the necessary circuit diagrams presented. Finally, a theoretical comparison is made between bridge circuit and marginal oscillator sensitivities.

  18. Ballistic bunching theory of electron cyclotron resonance masers

    Baik, C. W.; Jeon, S. G.; Park, G. S. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    A bunching parameter which determines the strength of modulation in electron cyclotron resonance masers (ECRM) is derived using a ballistic bunching theory. Unlike klystrons that utilize space bunching, this bunching parameter strongly depends on the beam velocity ratio due to phase bunching in ECRM. The dependencies of the beam velocity ratio ({approx} {alpha}{sup 2}), the interaction length ({approx} d), and the input drive power ({approx} P{sub in}{sup 1/2}) on the bunching parameter are derived. The orbital phase bunching results calculated using the ballistic bunching theory and a large-signal code are compared and show reasonable agreement.

  19. Calibration of electron cyclotron emission radiometer for KSTAR.

    Kogi, Y; Jeong, S H; Lee, K D; Akaki, K; Mase, A; Kuwahara, D; Yoshinaga, T; Nagayama, Y; Kwon, M; Kawahata, K

    2010-10-01

    We developed and installed an electron cyclotron emission radiometer for taking measurements of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) plasma. In order to precisely measure the absolute value of electron temperatures, a calibration measurement of the whole radiometer system was performed, which confirmed that the radiometer has an acceptably linear output signal for changes in input temperature. It was also found that the output power level predicted by a theoretical calculation agrees with that obtained by the calibration measurement. We also showed that the system displays acceptable noise-temperature performance around 0.23 eV. PMID:21033948

  20. Calibration of electron cyclotron emission radiometer for KSTAR

    Kogi, Y. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Jeong, S. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K. D.; Kwon, M. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Akaki, K.; Mase, A. [KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Kuwahara, D. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Yoshinaga, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    We developed and installed an electron cyclotron emission radiometer for taking measurements of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) plasma. In order to precisely measure the absolute value of electron temperatures, a calibration measurement of the whole radiometer system was performed, which confirmed that the radiometer has an acceptably linear output signal for changes in input temperature. It was also found that the output power level predicted by a theoretical calculation agrees with that obtained by the calibration measurement. We also showed that the system displays acceptable noise-temperature performance around 0.23 eV.

  1. Life Sciences at the Cyclotron Center of the Slovak Republic

    In this presentation the history and present status of the Cyclotron Center of the Slovak (CC SR) are presented. A state run scientific center and production facility ensuring: - the basic and applied research in nuclear physics, chemistry, biology and medicine; - production of radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals; - and applications of heavy ions and electron accelerator technologies in medicine and material science. Current financial status of the CC SR is following: Deblocation of the Russian; Federation debt to the Slovak Republic (94 %); State budget of the Slovak Republic (3 %); IAEA (3 %)

  2. Electron-cyclotron radiation from mirror plasmas. Progress report

    A working code is described which calculates the electron cyclotron emission from the warm and hot electrons in TMX-Upgrade. It has been used to generate spectra and also to investigate the spatial resolution possible to the diagnostic. The code can be used to find the position of the emitting plasma for a given frequency. Calculations were done of the effect on the spectrum in the parallel direction of the hot electrons. The changes in the spectrum with hot electron energy, distribution function, and density were studied. The hot electron perpendicular spectrum has been calculated, and shows the frequencies at which the spectrum can be expected to diagnose the hot electron energy

  3. Calibration of electron cyclotron emission radiometer for KSTAR

    We developed and installed an electron cyclotron emission radiometer for taking measurements of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) plasma. In order to precisely measure the absolute value of electron temperatures, a calibration measurement of the whole radiometer system was performed, which confirmed that the radiometer has an acceptably linear output signal for changes in input temperature. It was also found that the output power level predicted by a theoretical calculation agrees with that obtained by the calibration measurement. We also showed that the system displays acceptable noise-temperature performance around 0.23 eV.

  4. A compact accelerating structure for stacked isochronous cyclotrons

    Meitzler, C. R.; Byeon, J.; McIntyre, P. M.; Rogers, Bob; Sattarov, A.

    2003-03-01

    An accelerator-driven thorium cycle power reactor is being developed, based on a flux-coupled stack of isochronous cyclotrons. (IC) The stack consists of seven independent accelerators (total beam power 15 MW at 1 GeV), stacked on a spacing ˜ 20 cm. The close spacing poses unique problems for the design of the accelerating cavities. We have invented a 4-bar RF dipole structure for the purpose. We have built a cold model and are studying its operating characteristics. The structure will be described. We present measurements of the resonant frequency, parasitic capacitances, and electric and magnetic field distributions in the structure.

  5. Electron cyclotron resonance microwave ion sources for thin film processing

    Plasmas created by microwave absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) are increasingly used for a variety of plasma processes, including both etching and deposition. ECR sources efficiently couple energy to electrons and use magnetic confinement to maximize the probability of an electron creating an ion or free radical in pressure regimes where the mean free path for ionization is comparable to the ECR source dimensions. The general operating principles of ECR sources are discussed with special emphasis on their use for thin film etching. Data on source performance during Cl base etching of Si using an ECR system are presented. 32 refs., 5 figs

  6. Magnetic field measurement system of the VINCY Cyclotron

    This paper presents the magnetic field measurement system of the VINCY Cyclotron, main part of the TESLA accelerator installation whose construction has been going on in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences. Measurement system consists of mechanical structure and control unit for the automatic positioning of the measurement probe in the median plane, between the poles of the magnet, and corresponding measuring instrumentation, based on two digital tesla meters. Concept of the measurement system is defined by the TESLA team, while realisation of the measurement system is performed in co-operation with the LOLA Institute. (author)

  7. Electron cyclotron maser based on the combination two-wave resonance

    A mechanism of a combination two-wave cyclotron interaction between an electron beam and the forward/backward components of a far-from-cutoff standing wave is analyzed. This regime can be promising for the realization of high-power continuous-wave electron cyclotron masers operating in the THz frequency range.

  8. Neutrotherapy cyclotron ''MEDICYC''. Increase of proton exit energy from 50 to 60

    The neutrotherapy cyclotron ''MEDICYC''built by the ''Centre Antoine Lacassagne'' at Nice, has been studied firstly to accelerate protons up to 50 MeV. The required energy is now increased to 60 MeV. The method used to calculate the new sectors, magnetic maps, beam dynamics, and extraction are presented. Details ae given on the cyclotron resonance

  9. Initiatives in experimental nuclear physics at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre: past, present and future

    We discuss briefly the initiatives in low energy nuclear physics experiments, viz., nuclear reaction studies, nuclear structure studies, detector developments carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata since its inception. Developments leading to radioactive ion beam facility as well as the preparations for the utilization of the super-conducting cyclotron under construction at Kolkata are also discussed. (author)

  10. Remote radiation mapping inside the vault of the Kolkata K-130 cyclotron using mobile robot

    In order to estimate the accidental/worst scenario exposure to radiation in a cyclotron environment, it is necessary to have an idea of the distribution of the radiation dose rate during the operation of the cyclotron at different locations in the cyclotron vault as well as the experimental areas. A mobile robot-based dose rate mapping system has recently been developed for this purpose for the K-130 cyclotron at Kolkata. The robot is equipped with a single board computer that not only controls the motion of the robot (based on user commands given remotely) but also acquires data captured by a radiation (neutron and gamma) monitor mounted on the robot. The robot is tele-operated from a stationary computer located in the cyclotron control room over wireless-Ethernet and its position and orientation is visualized with the help of five cameras mounted at different positions in the cyclotron vault. As the robot keeps moving, it continues to send the measured radiation dose rate to the stationary computer for analysis and visualization by the health physicist. This mobile robot-based radiation monitoring system is currently being used to measure the dose rate at twelve pre-decided locations in the cyclotron vault when the cyclotron is delivering beams of different energies. (author)

  11. Six-dimensional beam matching for axial injection into a cyclotron

    The general optical structure of a beam line for axial injection into a cyclotron is proposed. It provides the beam matching in the six-dimensional phase space at the entrance of the cyclotron. As an illustration, the hyperboloid and the spiral inflectors are considered

  12. MGTs-20 cyclotron start-up in the Center of Nuclear Research (Egypt)

    The start-up of the MGTs-20 cyclotron, delivered in the Nuclear Research Center of the Atomic Energy Commission of Egypt, is described. The history of the MGTs-20 development beginning with the start-up of the first one in 1969. A list of 8 produced cyclotrons of such a kind (including the Egyptian one) and fields of their applications are presented

  13. Differential turbulent heating of different ions in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    The article considers the collisionless ion sound turbulent heating of different ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The ion sound arises due to parametric instability of pumping wave propagating along the magnetic field with the frequency close to that of electron cyclotron. Within the framework of turbulent heating model the different ions temperatures are calculated in gas-mixing ECRIS plasma

  14. A status report of the cyclotron facility at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre

    Operational experience gained since the commissioning of the CS-30 cyclotron at the Research Centre in 1982, has shown this facility to be a viable entity. The incidence of problems with major cyclotron systems has been low, thus allowing routine daily production of radiopharmaceuticals for distribution. Facility operating history, usage, and the radiopharmaceutical program is described. (author)

  15. Study of tokamak plasma electron cyclotron emission during electron-wave interaction near the lower hybrid frequency

    The quasilinear theory of wave-particle interaction is presented. Diagnostic possibilities of electron cyclotron emission. To study the cyclotron radiation (whose wavelength is millimeter order), a Michelson type interferometer is used, which allows to select willingly the useful spectral field. The cyclotron radiation allows characterization of a pumping wave: in studying the spectrum part where plasma is optically thin the studied cyclotron emissivity is directly proportional to absorbed power by plasma. Saturation of power absorption by plasma has been observed and studied

  16. Theoretical and experimental study of cyclotronic waves in a fusion plasma

    This thesis presents a study concerning cyclotronic waves in a plasma. It starts with an illustration of the elementary interaction between electromagnetic waves and matter.It shows that electrons from tokamak absorbs waves at cyclotronic frequency. Cyclotronic waves are studied by solving the dispersion relation in plasma; it concerns polarisation, absorption, dispersion, extinction. Then, classical theories are reminded in order to speak about decoupled electrons and their interactions. Absorption and emission properties of cyclotronic waves by electrons from a queue are described. After that, cyclotronic waves propagation is studied taking into account resonance. The last part of this thesis is dedicated to the electronic distribution function that is made by a wave spectra at a inferior hybrid frequency. (TEC). 129 refs., 75 figs

  17. Verification of effectiveness of borated water shield for a cyclotron type self-shielded

    The technological advances in positron emission tomography (PET) in conventional clinic imaging have led to a steady increase in the number of cyclotrons worldwide. Most of these cyclotrons are being used to produce 18F-FDG, either for themselves as for the distribution to other centers that have PET. For there to be safety in radiological facilities, the cyclotron intended for medical purposes can be classified in category I and category II, ie, self-shielded or non-shielded (bunker). Therefore, the aim of this work is to verify the effectiveness of borated water shield built for a cyclotron accelerator-type Self-shielded PETtrace 860. Mixtures of water borated occurred in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, as well as the results of the radiometric survey in the vicinity of the self-shielding of the cyclotron in the conditions established by the manufacturer showed that radiation levels were below the limits. (author)

  18. Roles of Fast-Cyclotron and Alfven-Cyclotron Waves for the Multi-Ion Solar Wind

    Xiong, Ming; Li, Xing

    2012-01-01

    Using linear Vlasov theory of plasma waves and quasi-linear theory of resonant wave-particle interaction, the dispersion relations and the electromagnetic field fluctuations of fast and Alfven waves are studied for a low-beta multi-ion plasma in the inner corona. Their probable roles in heating and accelerating the solar wind via Landau and cyclotron resonances are quantified. We assume that (1) low-frequency Alfven and fast waves have the same spectral shape and the same amplitude of power s...

  19. Polarization in cyclotron radiation in strong magnetic fields

    Luidmila Semionova; Denis Leahy; Jorge Paez

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the problem of radiative transitions of electrons in the presence of a strong magnetic field.We derive fully relativistic cyclotron transition rates for an arbitrary magnetic field,for any orientation of electron spin and for any polarization of the emitted radiation.Also,we obtain the transition rates for any value of the initial electron's parallel momentum.For very strong magnetic fields,transitions to the ground state predominate.Transition rates summed over the electron's spin orientation and for unpolarized radiation are also obtained,which confirm previous results by Latal.Transition widths are calculated for different electron spin orientations and different polarizations of radiation.We obtain general expressions for transition rates that reduce to the results for the non-relativistic case and for unpolarized radiation.Additionally we get,for the non-relativistic approximation,the transition rates for any polarization of radiation.As an application,the first five emission lines are evaluated and compared to the X-ray emitting neutron star V0332+53,which has multiple observable cyclotron lines,taking into account gravitational redshift.The most probable polarization is ∈(2).

  20. Automatic radioisotope production devices adapted to a medical cyclotron

    The authors describe an irradiation device set up beside a compact medical cyclotron (520.CGR-MeV cyclotron). The variable energy machine can accelerate 3-22 MeV protons, 3-13 MeV deuterons, 6-26 MeV alpha particles and 5-31 MeV helium-3 particles, the currents extracted at the maximum energies reaching 50 μA for 4He and 3He, 70 μA for protons and deuterons. The essential characteristics demanded of the apparatus in order to produce a regular and abundant supply of short-lived radioisotopes were as follows: - Flexibility of use or the possibility of fast, completely non-manual target changing. - Simplicity of operation: the target-holder components must be easily interchangeable and the transfer of radioisotopes from the irradiation point to the chemical laboratory must be rapid. - Working safety: the automatic target-holder cooling controls must be duplicated by manual controls. - Target cooling efficiency: these targets, whether gaseous, liquid or solid, must be able to support a high particle current. (Auth.)

  1. Spiral design and beam dynamics for a variable energy cyclotron

    Beam-orbit studies were performed for the conversion of the SREL synchrocyclotron magnet for use as a room temperature, multiparticle, isochronous cyclotron. Based on model magnet measurements of field profiles for 8 to 230K gauss hill fields, a four sector spiral pole tip design has been realized which allows all isotope species of heavy ion beams to be accelerated to required final energies. The total spiral angle of 380 allows injection of the beams from the MP tandem into the cyclotron through a valley. The two valey RF system of 140 kV peak accelerates beams on harmonic numbers 2, 3, 4, 6 and 10 at 14 to 21 MHz. Computer calculations indicated acceptable ν/sub z/, ν/sub r/ and phase space beam characteristics and passing of resonances for typical beams considered: 16O at 8 and 150 MeV/amu, 60Ni at 100 MeV/amu and 238U at 2.5 and 16 MeV/amu. Single turn extraction is achieved with electrostatic deflection

  2. Theory for broadband detection of ion cyclotron resonance signals

    McIver, Robert T.; Ledford, Edward B.; Hunter, Richard L.

    1980-02-01

    A complete line shape theory is developed for the transient response of a new type of ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) detector circuit. The detector is basically a balanced capacitance bridge which is sensitive to the abundance of gaseous ions stored in a static magnetic ion trap. For the first time, the equations of motion of ions in the ICR analyzer cell are shown to be coupled to the circuit equations of the detector. Also, the effect of nonreactive ion-molecule collisions on line shapes and on the transient response of the detector are analyzed and shown to allow measurement of ion-molecule collisions frequencies as a function of ion translational energy. One of the most important features of the capacitance bridge detector is its broadband sensitivity to a wide range of ion cyclotron resonance frequencies. This allows a mass spectrum of ions stored in the ICR analyzer cell to be obtained by scanning the frequency ω1 of the irradiating rf electric field at a fixed magnetic field strength. The capacitance bridge circuit can serve not only as a direct replacement for marginal oscillator circuits traditionally used in ICR experiments, but also as the detector for recently developed Fourier Transform and Rapid Scan ICR experiments.

  3. Spin flips in cyclotron emission by an electron

    Melrose, D.B.; Russell, K. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2002-01-11

    The spin dependence of cyclotron emission is treated using the non-relativistic limit of the Dirac equation; the Schroedinger-Pauli theory is inadequate because of the importance of spin-orbit coupling, which is an intrinsically relativistic effect. Only the choice of the magnetic moment as the spin operator is physically acceptable; all other spin operators precess at a rate comparable with or in excess of cyclotron transition rates. The spin-flip (s=1{yields}-1) transition rate is smaller than the non-spin-flip of the order B/B{sub c} (B{sub c}=4.4x10{sup 9} T), and the reverse spin-flip (s=-1{yields}+1) transition rate is smaller by a further factor of order (B/B{sub c}){sup 2}, implying that it is strongly forbidden. It is shown that there is a preference for electrons with spin s=1 initially in a high Landau level, n>>1, to relax to the ground state, s=-1, n=0, by stepwise jumps to the lowest Landau level for s=1 and then making the spin-flip transition to s=-1, rather than making the spin-flip transition from a higher Landau level, and that this preference increases with decreasing B/B{sub c}. (author)

  4. Polarization in cyclotron radiation in strong magnetic fields

    We revisit the problem of radiative transitions of electrons in the presence of a strong magnetic field. We derive fully relativistic cyclotron transition rates for an arbitrary magnetic field, for any orientation of electron spin and for any polarization of the emitted radiation. Also, we obtain the transition rates for any value of the initial electron's parallel momentum. For very strong magnetic fields, transitions to the ground state predominate. Transition rates summed over the electron's spin orientation and for unpolarized radiation are also obtained, which confirm previous results by Latal. Transition widths are calculated for different electron spin orientations and different polarizations of radiation. We obtain general expressions for transition rates that reduce to the results for the non-relativistic case and for unpolarized radiation. Additionally we get, for the non-relativistic approximation, the transition rates for any polarization of radiation. As an application, the first five emission lines are evaluated and compared to the X-ray emitting neutron star V0332+53, which has multiple observable cyclotron lines, taking into account gravitational redshift. The most probable polarization is in(2). (research papers)

  5. Development of electron cyclotron resonance heavy ion source

    A multiply charged heavy ion (MCHI) beam is a major scientific ingredient to explore many new fields of research over a wide energy range (from a few eV to a few TeV). The basic requirement is to have an ion source that will produce highly charged (Z) high intensity ion beam with low emittance over the entire mass range and will work stably over a long time and having 100% duty cycle. These are very useful requirements in accelerator applications in particular. Performance of present day Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) has almost fulfilled all the above conditions. In ECRIS, high-Z ions are produced by subjecting low-Z ions in a plasma to successive impact of hot electrons, which are efficiently energized by rf power, the frequency of which equals the cyclotron frequency of the electrons in the magnetic field. The emphasis on ECRIS development has been to increase electron temperature Te and nτ factor, where n is electron density and τ is the ion confinement time, which in turn is related to plasma confinement and stability. In this paper the development on ECRIS and the experiences with the 6.4 GHz ECRIS indigenously built at the VEC centre will be briefly presented. (author). 32 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  6. The variable cyclotron line of GX 301-2

    We present a 200 ksec observation of the High Mass X-ray Binary GX 301-2 taken in 2000 November with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the pre-periastron flare and the actual periastron passage of the neutron star. To model the spectrum we use a power law with the Fermi Dirac cutoff and a cyclotron line at higher energies plus either a reflection component or a heavily absorbed partial covering component. Although completely different, both models describe the data equally well. Phase resolved spectra show that the energy and the depth of the cyclotron resonant scattering feature vary strongly with pulse phase: It is deepest in the fall of the main pulse, the rise of the secondary pulse, and the pulse minimum in-between with τC∼0.3. In the other phase bins the line is much less deep with τC∼0.1. The energy of the line correlates strongly with its depth and varies by 25 % from 30.1 keV in the fall of the secondary pulse to 37.9 keV in the fall of the main pulse

  7. Export of radiopharmaceuticals and establishment of export base of cyclotron

    Sam young Unit ech has seized an opportunity to advance into the radiopharmaceuticals market through successful transfer of radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing technology and medical cyclotron, an original technology in nuclear medicine that is the core of less developed areas in nuclear-related fields. The company has continued to push for research development and establishment of market base through industry-academia-research center cooperation with an aim to complement relatively less developed domestic technology and market than in advanced countries, and is making efforts to establish export base in the overseas market based on stabilized supply in the domestic market. As for radiopharmaceuticals, the company is exporting Tc-99m generator to Vietnam, Thailand and the Philippines and preparing itself to export manufacture facilities for Tc-99m generator to Syria and Kazakhstan. In addition, it plans to export 13Mev Cyclotron that has been commercialized after being developed in the domestic market to the U. S. The company plans to grow up to play a pivotal role in the domestic RT area by conducting proactive business activities with an aim to revitalize the domestic market and further domestic original technologies and products in the global market

  8. Application of Electron Cyclotron Current Drive on ITER

    The TORAY-GA code has been used to calculate the effectiveness of electron cyclotron waves for applications on the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) using the steerable launchers of the reference design. This study focuses on the effect on the electron cyclotron current drive of operation of ITER over a range of toroidal magnetic field BT from 2.35 to 5.3 T. For BT above 4.3 T and for BT near 2.6 T where the second harmonic takes the place of the fundamental, the launchers are satisfactory for addressing the main objectives of ECCD in ITER. Between about 4.3 T and 3.3 T, the top launcher is not usable and the midplane launchers can only be used to deposit heat near the outer part of the plasma. The applications for which the midplane launchers can be used for BT between 3.3 T and 2.6 T depend rather sensitively on the equilibrium and the application

  9. Topology of relativistic refractive index surfaces for electron cyclotron waves

    The dispersion of electron cyclotron waves in a weakly relativistic Maxwellian plasma is investigated. It is shown that the apparently very complicated picture of the coupling of the extraordinary (X) mode to Bernstein waves can be accounted for in a simple way by considering the refractive indices as Riemann-like surfaces in the Clemmow-Mullaly-Allis (CMA) parameter space, (ωp2/ω2, ωc/ω), and by introducing a few topological concepts from the analysis of complex functions. A detailed study is made of the surface representing the X mode for perpendicular propagation, with special attention given to the connection between this mode and Gross-Bernstein modes. For perpendicular propagation non-transcendental approximations to the relativistic refractive indices for X and O modes can be given. We show that these approximations are good up to ∼ 25 keV and, at frequencies up to the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency, the X mode approximation also accounts correctly for the connection of the X mode to Bernstein modes. The accuracy and the numerical efficiency of the approximations make them well suited for routine calculations for millimetre wave applications in fusion plasmas, including the analysis of X mode and O mode reflectometry. (author)

  10. Vacuum system of the cyclotrons in VECC, Kolkata

    The vacuum system of the K=130 Room Temperature Cyclotron (RTC) (operational since 1978) has been recently modernized and the same of the Kbend=520 Superconducting Cyclotron (SCC), currently under commissioning, is being deployed for remote monitoring and control. The vacuum system of RTC is designed to achieve and maintain vacuum level of 2 X 10-6 mbar inside 23 m3 volume of Resonator tank and DEE tank. This has been upgraded by replacing several valves, Freon units, gauges and pumps. The relay based manual control system has been replaced by PLC based automated system. The SCC vacuum system also has an elaborate arrangement comprising of turbo molecular pumping modules with associated isolation valves and characteristic gauges. This paper describes essential elements, typically used to obtain high (1X10-7 mbar) vacuum using rotary pumps, diffusion pumps and cold traps/turbo-molecular pumps and other system components such as valves, gauges and baffles. The supervisory control methodology/scheme of both the vacuum systems, developed in-house using EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System), a standard open-source software tool for designing distributed control system, is also elaborated here. (author)

  11. Isotope separation of zinc by ion cyclotron resonance

    The separation of zinc isotopes has been performed in CEA Saclay by ion cyclotron resonance (ICR). Zinc, enriched in the isotope 68 is needed for medical applications and zinc, depleted in the isotope 64, in nuclear water reactors. A high density (up to 8 x 1011 cm-3), low electronic temperature (1-3 eV) plasma has been obtained, using Joule heating combined with electron cyclotron resonance heating. The density and electronic radial profiles have been measured as well as the multicharged ions, which have been found negligible. The selective resonant heating of 68 Zn, measured with an electrostatic analyser, has reached 180 eV, while the ionic energy of non resonant isotopes remains around 3 eV. In the so-called depletion experiments, we choose to have 64 Zn resonant; in this case, the 64 Zn ion energy was increased up to 150 eV. The conditions for depleting the initial natural zinc in 64 Zn have been optimised: i.e. the rich collector bias and the spacing of the blades of the 'rich'collector. It has been easy to get a depletion factor of 0.26 with a high flow rate. As a conclusion, operating conditions that make the ICR process attractive in the depletion mode have been derived. (author)

  12. Important radiation protection aspects of the operation of a commercial medical cyclotron

    Since July 1991 the Radiopharmaceutical Division of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a 30 MeV H'- ion Medical Cyclotron (Model; CYCLONE 30, Manufacturer: Ion Beam Applications, Louvain La Neuve, Belgium). During routine isotope production operations at the cyclotron a thick copper substrate plate electroplated with thin layer of selected enriched target material are bombarded with 30 MeV proton beam current up to 450 μA. The nuclear reaction of protons with the copper atoms result in the reduction of prompt evaporation neutrons with a peak energy of ∼ 1.8 MeV. These evaporation neutrons slow down via multiple collisions with the concrete shielding walls of the target cave, bounce back to the,interior space of the cave activating the cyclotron parts, beam tube components and other utilities installed in the irradiation cave. After the completion of 60 hour isotope production run, gamma dose equivalent rates of ∼105 μSvh-1 were measured at contact with the target irradiation stations and beam collimators. Evidently, these gamma rays emitted from the activated cyclotron components impose crucial radiation exposure hazard problems for the cyclotron maintenance technicians. Experiments had been carried out in order to identify the specific pathways of cyclotron component activation and to assess the probable personnel radiation exposure during handling of the activated cyclotron parts. The cool-down (radioactive decay) of the activated cyclotron components was estimated experimentally at different target bombardment conditions using the wall mounted gamma area monitors interfaced to the Health Physics Data Acquisition System. The gamma dose equivalent rates at contact with various locations of interest at the target irradiation station and at the typical work areas of the maintenance personnel were carefully recorded with a radiation (gamma) survey instrument during the three years operation period of the cyclotron. A

  13. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron

    Hojo, S., E-mail: s-hojo@nirs.go.jp; Katagiri, K.; Nakao, M.; Sugiura, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Noda, A.; Noda, K. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba (Japan); Okada, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Komiyama, A.; Honma, T. [Accelerator Engineering Corporation, 6-18-1 Konakadai, Inage, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C{sup 4+} ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8–10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C{sup 4+}, for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  14. Power requirements for electron cyclotron current drive and ion cyclotron resonance heating for sawtooth control in ITER

    Chapman, I T; Sauter, O; Zucca, C; Asunta, O; Buttery, R J; Coda, S; Goodman, T; Igochine, V; Johnson, T; Jucker, M; La Haye, R J; Lennholm, M; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-01-01

    13MW of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) power deposited inside the q = 1 surface is likely to reduce the sawtooth period in ITER baseline scenario below the level empirically predicted to trigger neo-classical tearing modes (NTMs). However, since the ECCD control scheme is solely predicated upon changing the local magnetic shear, it is prudent to plan to use a complementary scheme which directly decreases the potential energy of the kink mode in order to reduce the sawtooth period. In the event that the natural sawtooth period is longer than expected, due to enhanced alpha particle stabilisation for instance, this ancillary sawtooth control can be provided from > 10MW of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power with a resonance just inside the q = 1 surface. Both ECCD and ICRH control schemes would benefit greatly from active feedback of the deposition with respect to the rational surface. If the q = 1 surface can be maintained closer to the magnetic axis, the efficacy of ECCD and ICRH schemes sig...

  15. Installation and commissioning of radiation monitoring system in K-500 and K-130 cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre Kolkata

    Particle accelerator is a potential source of radiation and radioactivity due to neutron and gamma radiations emitted from the cyclotron during operation. An understanding of radiation fields around cyclotron systems is essential to minimize radiation exposure both during operation and maintenance. In Superconducting Cyclotron (K-500) Accelerator Area Radiation Monitoring System has been installed and commissioned. The system includes area radiation monitors in 21 locations. Each location has a Neutron flux monitor and a Gamma area monitor. Both local and remote display of each monitor is available. Depending on the location Gamma Area Monitors 12 numbers of 0.01 to 10 mR/hr Low Range , 9 numbers 0.1 to 100 mR/hr High Range and Neutron Flux Monitors 0 to 5000 N/sq.cm/sec have been used. Both the Gamma and Neutron monitors are continuously monitored from the control panel in HPU room and control room. Monitors employ micro controller based design. They indicate dose rates/neutron field on a digital display and have visual and audio alarm. The units are configured to set the alarm level, reset mode auto/manual etc using the keypad on the individual monitors. Both local and remote configuration is possible. 4-20mA Current loop/0-5V Analog output is also available for remote indication. Analog meters are used in the control panel at HPU control room to indicate actual radiation levels at various locations of the cyclotron. Audio visual alarm status is indicated in both local and remote location i.e. HPU control room. Muting of audible alarm can be done by momentary operation of the mute switch, locally and/or remotely. Local/Remote alarm reset switch provides alarm reset at local as well as remote simultaneously. Remote terminations are provided through a 22 pin connector output from each monitor. Built in serial port RS485 is available in all monitors for centralized monitoring. Similar design and same make area monitors are used in K130 Radiation Monitoring System

  16. Electron cyclotron emission imaging and applications in magnetic fusion energy

    Tobias, Benjamin John

    Energy production through the burning of fossil fuels is an unsustainable practice. Exponentially increasing energy consumption and dwindling natural resources ensure that coal and gas fueled power plants will someday be a thing of the past. However, even before fuel reserves are depleted, our planet may well succumb to disastrous side effects, namely the build up of carbon emissions in the environment triggering world-wide climate change and the countless industrial spills of pollutants that continue to this day. Many alternatives are currently being developed, but none has so much promise as fusion nuclear energy, the energy of the sun. The confinement of hot plasma at temperatures in excess of 100 million Kelvin by a carefully arranged magnetic field for the realization of a self-sustaining fusion power plant requires new technologies and improved understanding of fundamental physical phenomena. Imaging of electron cyclotron radiation lends insight into the spatial and temporal behavior of electron temperature fluctuations and instabilities, providing a powerful diagnostic for investigations into basic plasma physics and nuclear fusion reactor operation. This dissertation presents the design and implementation of a new generation of Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostics on toroidal magnetic fusion confinement devices, or tokamaks, around the world. The underlying physics of cyclotron radiation in fusion plasmas is reviewed, and a thorough discussion of millimeter wave imaging techniques and heterodyne radiometry in ECEI follows. The imaging of turbulence and fluid flows has evolved over half a millennium since Leonardo da Vinci's first sketches of cascading water, and applications for ECEI in fusion research are broad ranging. Two areas of physical investigation are discussed in this dissertation: the identification of poloidal shearing in Alfven eigenmode structures predicted by hybrid gyrofluid-magnetohydrodynamic (gyrofluid-MHD) modeling, and

  17. Development of septum handling device for room temperature cyclotron at Kolkata

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) is operating a room temperature cyclotron for last 35 years successfully. Various species of charged particles have been accelerated for different experiments in material science, nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, radio isotope production etc. All the hardware components of the cyclotron are very old. Sometimes they fail due to their aging. Almost each time during maintenance of RF structure, the deflector assembly is required to be taken out from the cyclotron. Once the deflector is inside the cyclotron the septum becomes radioactive due to irradiation of high energy beam on it. Once the deflector is taken out of the cyclotron for maintenance, the septum which is the most radioactive part becomes a hazard for the persons working in that area. Due to this reason the septum is needed to be removed from the deflector assembly and kept in the hot store for the safety of the people working in that area. The job of handling the septum leads to exposure of the people. The septum handling device for VECC room temperature cyclotron has been developed in an attempt to reduce the exposure to the persons who are handling septum during maintenance. This paper will present the design and operation features of manual robotic arm which can be operated from a distance of approximately one meter to take out and insert the septum in deflector assembly by one person very quickly. (author)

  18. Dose estimation of the radiation workers in the SK cyclotron center using dual-TLD method

    The Cyclotron Center in Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital (SK Cyclotron Center) produced the 18F-FDG compound and provided it to the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) center for diagnosis services. The works in SK Cyclotron Center are distinguished into three procedures including production, dispensation, and carry of the compound. As the medical cyclotron was operated to produce the radioactive compounds, secondary radiations such as neutrons and γ-rays were also induced. To estimate the exposure for the staffs working in the SK Cyclotron Center, the dual-TLD (TLD-600/700) chips were used to measure the doses contributed from photons and neutrons during the operation of the cyclotron, and the doses contributed from photons during dispensation and carry of the nuclear compounds. In the results, the mean Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) of the finger for a worker were 2.11 mSv y-1 and 96.19 mSv y-1, respectively. Results estimated by the regular personal chest badges and finger ring dosimeters which considered only the doses of photons were compared. By means of the results of this work, doses contributed from different working procedures and from different types of radiation to the workers in the SK Cyclotron Center were realized.

  19. Technical Note: Building a combined cyclotron and MRI facility: Implications for interference

    Purpose: With the introduction of hybrid PET/MRI systems, it has become more likely that the cyclotron and MRI systems will be located close to each other. This study considered the interference between a cyclotron and a superconducting MRI system. Methods: Interactions between cyclotrons and MRIs are theoretically considered. The main interference is expected to be the perturbation of the magnetic field in the MRI due to switching on or off the magnetic field of the cyclotron. MR imaging is distorted by a dynamic spatial gradient of an external inplane magnetic field larger than 0.5–0.04 μT/m, depending on the specific MR application. From the design of a cyclotron, it is expected that the magnetic fringe field at large distances behaves as a magnetic dipolar field. This allows estimation of the full dipolar field and its spatial gradients from a single measurement. Around an 18 MeV cyclotron (Cyclone, IBA), magnetic field measurements were performed on 5 locations and compared with calculations based upon a dipolar field model. Results: At the measurement locations the estimated and measured values of the magnetic field component and its spatial gradients of the inplane component were compared, and found to agree within a factor 1.1 for the magnetic field and within a factor of 1.5 for the spatial gradients of the field. In the specific case of the 18 MeV cyclotron with a vertical magnetic field and a 3T superconducting whole body MR system, a minimum distance of 20 m has to be considered to prevent interference. Conclusions: This study showed that a dipole model is sufficiently accurate to predict the interference of a cyclotron on a MRI scanner, for site planning purposes. The cyclotron and a whole body MRI system considered in this study need to be placed more than 20 m apart, or magnetic shielding should be utilized.

  20. Nonlinear compressional electromagnetic ion-cyclotron wavepackets in space plasmas

    I. Kourakis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The parametric coupling between large amplitude magnetic field-aligned circularly polarized electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC waves and ponderomotively driven ion-acoustic perturbations in magnetized space plasmas is considered. A cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the modulated EMIC wave envelope is derived, and then solved analytically. The modulated EMIC waves are found to be stable (unstable against ion-acoustic density perturbations, in the subsonic (supersonic, respectively case, and they may propagate as 'supersonic bright' (`'subsonic dark', i.e. 'black' or 'grey'type envelope solitons, i.e. electric field pulses (holes, voids,associated with (co-propagating density humps. Explicit bright and dark (black/grey envelope excitation profiles are presented, and the relevance of our investigation to space plasmas is discussed.

  1. EAST ion cyclotron resonance heating system for long pulse operation

    Zhao, Y.P. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhang, X.J., E-mail: xjzhang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Mao, Y.Z.; Yuan, S.; Xue, D.Y.; Deng, X.; Wang, L.; Ju, S.Q.; Cheng, Y.; Qin, C.M.; Chen, G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Lin, Y. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Li, J.G.; Wan, B.N.; Song, Y.T. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Braun, F. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kumazawa, R. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Wukitch, S. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Radio frequency (RF) power in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is one of the primary auxiliary heating techniques for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The ICRF system for EAST has been developed to support long-pulse high-β advanced tokamak fusion physics experiments. The ICRF system is capable of delivering 12 MW 1000-s RF power to the plasma through two antennas. The phasing between current straps of the antennas can be adjusted to optimize the RF power spectrum. The main technical features of the ICRF system are described. Each of the 8 ICRF transmitters has been successfully tested to 1.5 MW for a wide range of frequency (25–70 MHz) on a dummy load. Part of the ICRF system was in operation during the EAST 2012 spring experimental campaign and a maximum power of 800 kW (at 27 MHz) lasting for 30 s has been coupled for long pulse H mode operation.

  2. Importance of electron cyclotron wave energy transport in ITER

    Using the CYTRAN routine to cover non-local effects in electron cyclotron (EC) wave emission along with the ASTRA code, the importance of EC wave emission in the local electron power balance is analyzed for various ITER operation regimes, and, for comparison, for FIRE, IGNITOR and the reactor-grade ITER-EDA. As a result, EC wave emission is a significant contributor to core electron cooling if the core electron temperature is about 35 keV or higher as expected for ITER and tokamak reactor steady-state operation, and, in fact, becomes the dominant core electron cooling mechanism already at temperatures exceeding 40 keV, such affecting the core plasma power balance in an important way. (author)

  3. A LabVIEW based cyclotron magnetic field mapping system

    This paper describes the application of National Instruments LabVIEW to the NSCL K500 magnet mapping, as part of the Coupled Cyclotron Upgrade. LabVIEW provides a fast development environment for hardware control from a PC running Windows NT. The PC and LabVIEW environment allow non-professional computer programmers to obtain a reliable and flexible system where modifications can be quickly implemented. This program supports the use of motor controllers, data acquisition cards, digital I/O modules and GPIB instruments. A complete map of 360 degrees is obtained in approximately 90 minutes, measuring 185000 field values with a spacing of 1.6 mm in radius every degree. (author)

  4. Flash ionisation signature in coherent cyclotron emission from Brown Dwarfs

    Vorgul, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Brown dwarfs form mineral clouds in their atmospheres, where charged particles can produce large-scale discharges in form of lightning resulting in a substantial sudden increase of local ionisation. Brown dwarfs are observed to emit cyclotron radio emission. We show that signatures of strong transient atmospheric ionisation events (flash ionisation) can be imprinted on a pre-existing radiation. Detection of such flash ionisation events will open investigations into the ionisation state and atmospheric dynamics. Such ionisation events can also result from explosion shock waves, bursts or eruptions. We present an analytical model that describes the modulation of a pre-existing electromagnetic radiation by a time-dependent (flash) conductivity that is characteristic for flash ionisation events like lightning. Our conductivity model reproduces the conductivity function derived from observations of Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flashes, and is applicable to astrophysical objects with strong temporal variations in the loca...

  5. Cyclotron Resonance Gain for FIR and THz Radiation in Graphene

    Cole, Nightvid

    2016-01-01

    A cyclotron resonance maser source using low-effective-mass conduction electrons in graphene, if successful, would allow for generation of Far Infrared (FIR) and Terahertz (THz) radiation without requiring magnetic fields running into the tens of Tesla. In order to investigate this possibility, we consider a device in which electrons are effectively injected via pumping from the valence band to the conduction band using an infrared (IR) laser source, subsequently gyrate in a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the plane of the graphene, and give rise to gain for a FIR/THz wave crossing the plane of the graphene. A set of integral expressions is derived by assuming that the non-radiative energy loss processes of the electrons can be adequately represented by a damping force proportional and antiparallel to their momentum. Minimal gain may occur at very short electron damping times of hundreds of femtoseconds.

  6. Alternative optical concept for electron cyclotron emission imaging

    Liu, J. X., E-mail: jsliu9@berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Milbourne, T. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23185 (United States); Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dominguez, A.; Efthimion, P. C.; Hill, K. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Kung, C.; Pablant, N. A.; Tobias, B. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Kubota, S. [Department of Physics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Kasparek, W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Lu, J. [Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Park, H. [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The implementation of advanced electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems on tokamak experiments has revolutionized the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities and improved our understanding of instabilities, which lead to disruptions. It is therefore desirable to have an ECEI system on the ITER tokamak. However, the large size of optical components in presently used ECEI systems have, up to now, precluded the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER. This paper describes a new optical ECEI concept that employs a single spherical mirror as the only optical component and exploits the astigmatism of such a mirror to produce an image with one-dimensional spatial resolution on the detector. Since this alternative approach would only require a thin slit as the viewing port to the plasma, it would make the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER feasible. The results obtained from proof-of-principle experiments with a 125 GHz microwave system are presented.

  7. More about a universal compact isochronous superconducting cyclotron archetype

    Except the fact that they can accelerate protons at comparable energies, AGOR and CYCLONE 235 stand at two extremities as far as the complexity of the conceptual design is concerned. The widest range of ions species associated with a very large energy and RF frequency ranges for AGOR, a fixed energy and a constant RF frequency for only protons in CYCLONE 235. In fact, the two designs have in common the same theoretical 'model' that I described in a referred paper. Now, I suggest we look again at this model and try to show how it could be regarded as the 'Universal Compact Isochronous Superconducting Cyclotron Archetype'. Based on the behavior of CYCLONE 235, and on some more recent calculations, I will explain why the name of 'Archetype' can be used, and show how attractive is the simplicity of the ejection scheme ensued in terms of reliability and cost. (author)

  8. Enhanced confinement in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    Power loss by plasma-wall interactions may become a limitation for the performance of ECR and fusion plasma devices. Based on our research to optimize the performance of electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) devices by the use of metal-dielectric (MD) structures, the development of the method presented here, allows to significantly improve the confinement of plasma electrons and hence to reduce losses. Dedicated measurements were performed at the Frankfurt 14 GHz ECRIS using argon and helium as working gas and high temperature resistive material for the MD structures. The analyzed charge state distributions and bremsstrahlung radiation spectra (corrected for background) also clearly verify the anticipated increase in the plasma-electron density and hence demonstrate the advantage by the MD-method.

  9. Pulsed magnetic field-electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    The pulsed magnetic field (PuMa)-electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source uses a pulsed coil to improve the peak current by opening the magnetic bottle along the beam axis. After demonstration of the principle of the pulsed magnetic extraction, the ion source was tested with different gases. We received promising results from helium to krypton. The influence of the current in the pulsed coil on the analyzed ion current was measured. With increased current levels within the pulsed coil not only the pulse height of the PuMa pulse, but the pulse length can also be controlled. By using the pulsed coil the maximum of the charge state distribution can be shifted to higher charge states. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  10. Television imaging system for fast neutron radiography using baby cyclotron

    A television imaging system for fast neutron radiography (FNR-TV) developed using the fast neutron source reactor YAYOI was applied to the baby-cyclotron based fast neutron source to get images of thick objects quickly. In the system the same technique as a current television imaging system of thermal neutron radiography was applied, while the luminescent converter was used to detect fast neutrons. Using the CR39 track etch method it took about 7 h to get an image, while the FNR-TV only 20 s enough for taking the same object. However the FNR-TV imaging result of the simulation model of a large explosive device for the space launch vehicle of H-2 type was not so good as the image taken with the CR39 track etch method. The reason was that the luminescence intensity of the FNR-TV converter was a quarter of that in the YAYOI. (author)

  11. Project 8: Towards cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy on tritium

    Fertl, Martin; Project 8 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Project 8 aims to determine the neutrino mass by making a precise measurement of the β--decay of molecular tritium (Q = 18.6 keV) using the recently demonstrated the technique of cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy (CRES). Here we discuss the production of a gas cell that fulfills the stringent requirements for cryogenic operation, safe tritium handling, a non-magnetic design, and a good microwave guide performance. The phased program that allows Project 8 to probe the neutrino mass range accessible using molecular tritium is described. Major financial support by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics to the University of Washington under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020 is acknowledged.

  12. Uniform irradiation system using beam scanning method for cyclotron

    JAERI AVF-cyclotron is equipped with an ion beam scanner for large area irradiation. The two-dimensional fluence distribution of ion beam obtained using cellulose triacetate film dosimeter was not uniform. This is resulted from the distortion of excitation current for electromagnet of the scanner. So, the beam scanning condition, i.e., the relation between the ion species, the beam profile and the scanning width, was extremely limited to make a good uniformity. We have developed a beam scanning simulator to get fluence distributions by calculation and then compared the simulated distributions with the measured ones. It was revealed that the both of them are in good agreement and the beam scanning condition to get good uniformity was led by using this simulator. On the basis of these results, the power supply of scanner was improved. A good uniformity of beam distribution was available. (author)

  13. Grating monochromator for electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation.

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shouichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

    2013-07-01

    Recently, we started to observe optical line spectra from an ECR plasma using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for beam tuning because it allows the extraction of the desired ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research gives new insights into its simplification. In this paper, the grating monochromator method for beam tuning of a Hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN azimuthal varying field (AVF) cyclotron is described. PMID:23902055

  14. Determination of the Electron Cyclotron Current Drive Profile

    Evaluation of the profile of non-inductive current density driven by absorption of electron cyclotron waves (ECCD) using time evolution of the poloidal flux indicated a broader profile than predicted by theory. To determine the nature of this broadening, a 1-1/2 D transport calculation of current density evolution was used to generate the signals which the DIII-D motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic would measure in the event that the current density evolution followed the neoclassical Ohm's law with the theoretical ECCD profile. Comparison with the measured MSE data indicates the experimental data is consistent with the ECCD profile predicted by theory. The simulations yield a lower limit on the magnitude of the ECCD which is at or above the value found in Fokker-Planck calculations of the ECCD including quasilinear and parallel electric field effects

  15. Radioisotope production at the cyclotron in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    A radioisotope production laboratory has been installed at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear in Rio de Janeiro. It is intended primarily for processing short-lived radioisotopes produced by a multiparticle, variable energy, isochronous, compact CV-28 Cyclotron and for preparation of radiopharmaceuticals and labelled molecules. Carrier-free iodine-123, indium-111, thalium-201, bromine-77 and gallium-67 with high purity have been produced. An irradiated target transport system has been built. Special targets that can dissipate high surface power densities are being developed. Each radioisotope is processed in a remotely controlled cell equiped with electric and pneumatic systems as well as manipulators ans tongs. Quality control is achieved by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, spot tests, gamma-ray spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography. Biological tests in mice have confirmed the good quality of the radiopharmaceuticals. (Author)

  16. Reversed shear Alfven eigenmode stabilization by localized electron cyclotron heating

    Van Zeeland, M A; Hyatt, A W; Lohr, J; Petty, C C [General Atomics, PO Box 85608 San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Heidbrink, W W [University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Nazikian, R; Solomon, W M; Gorelenkov, N N; Kramer, G J [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 (United States); Austin, M E [University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Berk, H L [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Holcomb, C T; Makowski, M A [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); McKee, G R [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53726 (United States); Sharapov, S E [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rhodes, T L [University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, 90095 (United States)], E-mail: vanzeeland@fusion.gat.com

    2008-03-15

    Reversed shear Alfven eigenmode (RSAE) activity in DIII-D is stabilized by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) applied near the minimum of the magnetic safety factor (q{sub min}) in neutral beam heated discharges with reversed-magnetic shear. The degree of RSAE stabilization, fast ion density and the volume averaged neutron production (S{sub n}) are highly dependent on ECH deposition location relative to q{sub min}. While discharges with ECH stabilization of RSAEs have higher S{sub n} and more peaked fast ion profiles than discharges with significant RSAE activity, neutron production remains strongly reduced (up to 60% relative to TRANSP predictions assuming classical fast ion transport) even when RSAEs are stabilized.

  17. Ion cyclotron resonance bridge detector for frequency sweep

    Pitsakis, M.N.; Wobschall, D.C.

    1983-11-01

    An electronic ion cyclotron resonance detection system was designed and constructed. The ions are excited by sweeping the frequency of the electric field (3--300 kHz) using a sweep frequency generator with a nonlinear sweep voltage in order to maintain an approximately constant mass resolution. Ion detection is accomplished by a bridge with a phase-sensitive detector as a demodulator. The required reference signal for the phase-sensitive detector is generated by a circuit with a transfer function which approximates that of the ICR signal in order to obtain an accurate phase match between the signal source and the detector. The device is capable of detecting a minimum concentration of 50 ions/cm/sup 3/ over a mass range of 15 to 1500 amu.

  18. Frequency-swept detector for ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers

    Wronka, J.; Ridge, D. P.

    1982-04-01

    Design, construction, performance, and use of a frequency-swept bridge detector for ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry are described. Special features include characterization and simple automatic correction of phase shift to allow broadband detection. The result is a detection system that may be used either at constant field or constant frequency. Drift-mode operation is simplified in that it may be satisfactorily used without the various signal modulation schemes used in previous detectors. In the trapped mode the detector may be pulsed to control the timing of ion detection. This detector makes it possible to do frequency-swept double resonance experiments which provide spectra of all the product ions of a given reactant ion. Circuit schematics and typical frequency- and field-swept spectra are shown.

  19. Ion cyclotron resonance bridge detector for frequency sweep

    Pitsakis, Michael N.; Wobschall, Darold C.

    1983-11-01

    An electronic ion cyclotron resonance detection system was designed and constructed. The ions are excited by sweeping the frequency of the electric field (3-300 kHz) using a sweep frequency generator with a nonlinear sweep voltage in order to maintain an approximately constant mass resolution. Ion detection is accomplished by a bridge with a phase-sensitive detector as a demodulator. The required reference signal for the phase-sensitive detector is generated by a circuit with a transfer function which approximates that of the ICR signal in order to obtain an accurate phase match between the signal source and the detector. The device is capable of detecting a minimum concentration of 50 ions/cm3 over a mass range of 15 to 1500 amu.

  20. Electron cyclotron resonance breakdown studies in a linear plasma system

    Vipin K Yadav; K Sathyanarayana; D Bora

    2008-03-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma breakdown is studied in a small linear cylindrical system with four different gases - hydrogen, helium, argon and nitrogen. Microwave power in the experimental system is delivered by a magnetron at 2.45 ± 0.02 GHz in TE10 mode and launched radially to have extra-ordinary (X) wave in plasma. The axial magnetic field required for ECR in the system is such that the fundamental ECR surface ( = 875.0 G) resides at the geometrical centre of the plasma system. ECR breakdown parameters such as plasma delay time and plasma decay time from plasma density measurements are carried out at the centre using a Langmuir probe. The operating parameters such as working gas pressure (1 × 10-5 -1 × 10-2 mbar) and input microwave power (160{800 W) are varied and the corresponding effect on the breakdown parameters is studied. The experimental results obtained are presented in this paper.

  1. Activation analysis using cyclotron-produced fast neutrons

    The possibilities of activation analysis by using cyclotron-produced fast neutrons are investigated for more than 30 chemical elements. The angular distributions of fast neutrons produced by bombarding a thick beryllium target with 11.5 MeV protons, 3 and 6 MeV deuterons were obtained for five angles in the forward hemisphere. The yield's of the radionuclides produced by nuclear reactions (n,p), (n,α), (n,γ), (n,n,γ) were measured or calculated. It is showed that the yields of the majority of radionuclides are within 103-105 Bk.(μA.h.g)1. These data were used for the evaluation of the limit detection of chemical elements. The values of the LD are equal to 0.1-1 μg for some elements, whereas for majority elements they are l-100 μg

  2. Highly efficient H- ion source for cyclotrons without caesium

    Full text: An internal high current H- ion source for cyclotrons and other injectors was developed which makes use of some very effective methods of H- ion production. The source is distinguished by high gas efficiency. A surface-plasma method for H- ion production without using caesium vapor was realized. A strong current arc discharge was applied for dissociation and dissociative ionization of H2 molecules. An H+-H- recharge method using a residual gas layer adjusted by thickness and pressure was realized in this source. In a double-chamber ion source with high-current discharge in the single chamber and low-current low-volt discharge in the different chamber is used the supplementary electrode which a composite-plate cover with low electronic work function (∼1,5 eV). Anticipate of ion current of H- is 1-2 mA. (author)

  3. Characteristics of surface sterilization using electron cyclotron resonance plasma

    Yonesu, Akira; Hara, Kazufumi; Nishikawa, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of surface sterilization using electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma were investigated. High-energy electrons and oxygen radicals were observed in the ECR zone using electric probe and optical emission spectroscopic methods. A biological indicator (BI), Geobacillus stearothermophilus, containing 1 × 106 spores was sterilized in 120 s by exposure to oxygen discharges while maintaining a temperature of approximately 55 °C at the BI installation position. Oxygen radicals and high-energy electrons were found to be the sterilizing species in the ECR region. It was demonstrated that the ECR plasma could be produced in narrow tubes with an inner diameter of 5 mm. Moreover, sterilization tests confirmed that the spores present inside the narrow tube were successfully inactivated by ECR plasma irradiation.

  4. The variable cyclotron line in GX 301-2

    Kreykenbohm, I; Coburn, W; Kuster, M; Rothschild, R E; Heindl, W A; Kretschmar, P; Staubert, R; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Wilms, Joern; Coburn, Wayne; Kuster, Markus; Rothschild, Richard E.; Heindl, William A.; Kretschmar, Peter; Staubert, Ruediger

    2004-01-01

    We present pulse phase resolved spectra of the hypergiant high mass X-ray binary GX 301-2. We observed the source in 2001 October with RXTE continuously for a total on-source time of almost 200ksec. We model the continuum with both, a heavily absorbed partial covering model and a reflection model. In either case we find that the well known cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) at 35keV is - although present at all pulse phases - strongly variable over the pulse: the line position varies by 25% from 30keV in the fall of the secondary pulse to 38keV in the fall of the main pulse where it is deepest. The line variability implies that we are seeing regions of magnetic field strength varying between 3.4 10^12G and 4.2 10^12G.

  5. Hot plasma effects on the polarization of electron cyclotron waves

    The evolution of the wave polarization during the propagation of electron cyclotron waves in hot plasmas is investigateD. The coupled mode equations are solved in slab geometry, including the relativistic corrections to the dielectric tensor. This formalism is applied to purely ordinary or extraordinary modes, propagating obliquely with respect to the magnetic field in tokamak plasmas, in order to determine the rate of change of the mode purity due to finite temperature effects. It is found that such an alteration of the mode purity can be one to three orders of magnitude larger than in a cold plasma. However, the overall effect remains tolerable for most applications and typical parameters of magnetically confined plasmas. (authors)

  6. Maser on cyclotron resonance in nonresonant electron bunching mode

    For masers on cyclotron resonance (MCR) one introduces a new design based on the electron bunching in the field of non-resonance wave. The mentioned design ensures division into two sections of electron-wave interaction space at the expense of magnetic field profiling. It is shown that under certain conditions the particle motion towards the field of non-resonance wave (the first section) is followed by the efficient electron bunching without any essential change in their energy. In the second section where the value of the magnetic field is close to the resonance value one observes the efficient emission of a working wave by the bunched electron beam. So, the klystron type electron-wave interaction with separation of processes of particle bunching and emission takes place

  7. Kinematic and temperature restrictions on the electron cyclotron maser instability

    The ranges of temperature T, harmonic number s and wave propagation angle THETA in which the loss-cone-driven electron cyclotron instability can exist are found to be limited by opposing contributions to the growth rate from adjacent harmonics. For waves with refractive index n approx. = to 1 it is found that instability is possible only if T and s satisfy ssup(a)T approx. = to C with a 2 - 2.5 and where the constant C is determined by THETA and the form of the distribution function. It is argued that the corresponding restrictions for waves with very large or very small n are less severe. Instability is found to be forbidden for waves propagating outside a range |THETA-900| 2phi(s) approx. = s-1; this restriction limits the range of potentially unstable frequencies at a given harmonic. (author)

  8. Health physics considerations at a neutron therapy facility cyclotron

    The U.C.L.A. Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF) is one of four such facilities in the United States currently involved in NCI sponsored trials of neutron therapy and reflects the present interest in the use of high energy neutron beams for treating certain types of human cancers. The NTF houses a CP-45 negative ion cyclotron which accelerates a 46 MeV proton beam for production of neutrons from a beryllium target. In addition to patient treatment, the NTF is involved in the production of positron emitting radioisotopes for diagnostic use in Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The activation of therapy treatment collimators, positron and neutron target systems, and a high and rapidly varying external radiation environment in a clinical setting have contributed to the need for a comprehensive radiation control program in which patient care is balanced with the maintenance of occupational exposures to ALARA levels

  9. On the modulational instability of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves

    The instability of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves to low frequency density modulations is considered and nonlinear equations are derived which describe its development in terms of a coherent four wave interaction. A dispersion relation for the linear phase of the instability is obtained and threshold conditions for marginal stability determined. It is shown, using data from recent optical observations, that the conditions necessary for the instability to occur in the auroral plasma would probably be satisfied and that modulational frequencies in agreement with the observations are obtained for plausible wave amplitudes. The nonlinear development of the instability is then studied and it is shown that substantial modulation can occur. It is suggested therefore that this instability could lead to the development of a strongly turbulent state. (author)

  10. Electron Cyclotron Maser Emissions from Evolving Fast Electron Beams

    Tang, J F; Chen, L; Zhao, G Q; Tan, C M

    2016-01-01

    Fast electron beams (FEBs) are common products of solar active phenomena. Solar radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool in the understanding of FEBs as well as the solar plasma environment in which they are propagating along solar magnetic fields. In particular, the evolutions of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to the interaction with the ambient plasma and field when propagating can significantly influence the efficiency and property of their emissions. In this paper, we discuss some possible evolutions of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to the energy loss processes and the pitch-angle effect caused by the magnetic field inhomogeneity, and analyze the effects of these evolutions on electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission, which is one of the most important mechanisms of producing solar radio bursts by FEBs. The results show that the growth rates all decrease with the energy loss factor $Q$, but increase with the magnetic mirror ratio $\\sigma$ as well ...

  11. Mechanism for electron cyclotron heating of collisionless plasma

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dugard-Jabon, V.D.; Milant' ev, V.P.

    1975-01-01

    The electron distribution with respect to transverse energy is derived for electron cyclotron resonance in a constant, homogeneous magnetic field; weak relativistic effects are taken into account. After the establishment of a steady-state distribution with groups of hot and cold electrons, no energy is pumped from the rf field to the plasma. The rf electrostatic perturbations are studied on the basis of the distribution function found; it is shown that waves of two types are unstable eigenmodes of the plasma at rest and drift waves. The growth rates for the corresponding instabilities are derived. A study is also made of the stability of right-handed circularly polarized electromagnetic wave propagating along the magnetic field. Instabilities occur at frequencies which depend on the degree of anisotropy, analogous to the case of a plasma with a temperature anisotropy.

  12. Production of short-lived radiopharmaceuticals with CV-28 cyclotron

    A variable energy isochronous cyclotron CV-28 at the Physical Department of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is used for radionuclide production of medical interest. The production methods of 67Ga, 77Br, 111In, 123I, 201Tb and their corresponding radiopharmaceuticals were developed. The radiopharmaceuticals 77Br-bromophenol, 77Br-rose bengal, 123I-hippuric acid, 123I-rose bengal, 111In-EDTA, 111In-DTPA and 111In-citrate were under routine production. Their labelling yields were 96%, 82%, 96%, 82%, 89+-6%, 92+-4% and 100+-25%, respectively. The labelling yield and purity were determined using thin layer and paper chromatography. Bio-distribution studies in experimental animals have shown the good quality of these compounds

  13. Low radio frequency biased electron cyclotron resonance plasma etching

    Samukawa, Seiji; Toyosato, Tomohiko; Wani, Etsuo

    1991-03-01

    A radio frequency (rf) biased electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma etching technology has been developed to realize an efficient ion acceleration in high density and uniform ECR plasma for accurate Al-Si-Cu alloy film etching. In this technology, the substrate is located at the ECR position (875 G position) and the etching is carried out with a 400 kHz rf bias power. This Al-Si-Cu etching technology achieves a high etching rate (more than 5000 A/min), excellent etching uniformity (within ±5%), highly anisotropic etching, and Cu residue-free etching in only Cl2 gas plasma. These etching characteristics are accomplished by the combination of the dense and uniform ECR plasma generation at the ECR position with the efficient accelerated ion flux at the ECR position by using 400 kHz rf bias.

  14. Texas experimental tokamak electron cyclotron resonant heating system

    Electron cyclotron resonant heating of the plasma in the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) has been achieved with a single gyrotron system, and is presently being expanded to a three gyrotron system. Each gyrotron can provide up to 200 kilowatts of rf power into the plasma. Future expansion includes a fourth gyrotron capable of delivering an additional 500 kilowatts of rf power into the plasma. A description of the overall system architecture is given in this paper. Also discussed is the overall grounding scheme and the high-voltage power distribution system. The utilization of fiber-optic links in the control system to reduce noise problems associated with high-voltage systems, provide high-voltage isolation, and eliminate ground loops is also discussed. 3 refs., 5 figs

  15. Electron-cyclotron resonance heating and current drive

    A brief summary of the theory and experiments on electron-cyclotron heating and current drive is presented. the general relativistic formulation of wave propagation and linear absorption is considered in some detail. The O-mode and the X-mode for normal and oblique propagation are investigated and illustrated by several examples. The experimental verification of the theory in T-10 and D-III-D is briefly discussed. Quasilinear evolution of the momentum distribution and related applications as, for instance, non linear wave damping and current drive, are also considered for special cases of wave frequencies, polarization and propagation. In the concluding section we present the general formulation of the wave damping and current drive in the absence of electron trapping for arbitrary values of the wave frequency. (author) 8 fig. 13 ref

  16. Directory of cyclotrons used for radionuclide production in Member States [2006 update

    The present directory of cyclotron facilities used for the production of radionuclides in Member States is an update of the one compiled by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in late 2001 and published in 2002. This directory was prepared through information collected by questionnaires that the IAEA sent to known institutions operating cyclotrons for radionuclide production. Technical as well as administrative data supplied to the IAEA as of November 2005 were taken into account. The directory is considered to include most of the cyclotrons of the world that are used at least partially for radionuclide production. There are 262 entries for cyclotrons operating in 39 Member States of the IAEA. This is an increase of 7% over the 246 reported in the 2002 cyclotron directory. This can be compared to the 350 or so cyclotrons believed to be presently operating in the world, which are involved in some aspects of radionuclide production. The increase has been in the number of cyclotrons in developed countries, but even more so in the developing countries. The increase in number during the last four years was driven by several factors, i.e. advent of advances in medical imaging, introduction of compact, user friendly medical cyclotron, and a recent decision that costs for 15O-oxygen position emission tomography (PET) studies in Japan and 18F-FDG PET studies in Germany and the United States of America are eligible for reimbursement by government or health insurance companies. There is no doubt that the fastest growing segment of the market is in the commercial distribution of FDG to local hospitals. The IAEA is promoting cyclotron technology as applied to nuclear medicine. Requests for cyclotron technology is steadily increasing; many developing Member States are interested in this technology. There is need to stimulate, build and maintain consulting capability in interested developing Member States. There are good reasons to believe that the number of cyclotron

  17. Beam space charge effects in high-current cyclotron injector CI-5

    Separated sector cyclotron-injector CI-5 has been studied in the framework of the external injection into phasotron project. The calculations of beam dynamics characteristics of Cyclotron CI-5 for H- beam of 5 MeV energy are presented. Space charge limits (both transverse and longitudinal) have been investigated. Analytical estimations and numerical simulations of particle motion taking into account space charge effects confirm that it is possible to achieve 10 mA in a 5 MeV separated sector H- Cyclotron

  18. Intelligent Low-level RF System by Non-destructive Beam Monitoring Device for Cyclotrons

    Malafeh, M S Sharifi Asadi; Afarideh, H; Chai, J S

    2015-01-01

    The project of a10MeV PET cyclotron accelerator for medical diagnosis and treatment was started at Amirkabir University of Technology in 2012. The low-level RF system of cyclotron accelerator is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance frequency of the cavity. In this work Intelligent Low Level Radio Frequency Circuit or ILLRF suitable for Most of the AVF cyclotron accelerators was designed by the beam monitoring device and narrow band tunable band-pass filter. In this design, for the RF phase detection does not need to signal processing by microcontroller

  19. The physics design of magnet in 14 MeV cyclotron

    2011-01-01

    The 14 MeV, 400 μA compact cyclotron is under construction at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The design of main magnet and the result of beam dynamics in the cyclotron will be described in this paper, including the choice of main parameters of magnet, the method of shimming isochronous field in the compact cyclotron and optimization of the magnetic field in central region. The beam will be accelerated to 14.6 MeV by optimizing the magnet structure.

  20. Intelligent low-level RF system by non-destructive beam monitoring device for cyclotrons

    Sharifi Asadi Malafeh, M. S.; Ghergherehchi, M.; Afarideh, H.; Chai, J. S.; Yoon, Sang Kim

    2016-04-01

    The project of a 10 MeV PET cyclotron accelerator for medical diagnosis and treatment was started at Amirkabir University of Technology in 2012. The low-level RF system of the cyclotron accelerator is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance frequency of the cavity. In this work an Intelligent Low Level Radio Frequency Circuit or ILLRF, suitable for most AVF cyclotron accelerators, is designed using a beam monitoring device and narrow band tunable band-pass filter. In this design, the RF phase detection does not need signal processing by a microcontroller.

  1. The rare isotope beams production at the Texas A&M university Cyclotron Institute

    Tabacaru, G.; May, D. P.; Ärje, Juha; Chubarian, G.; Clark, H.; Kim, G.J.; Tribble, R. E.

    2013-01-01

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M is currently configuring a scheme for the production of radioactive-ion beams that incorporates a light-ion guide and a heavy-ion guide coupled with an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source constructed for charge-breeding. This scheme is part of an upgrade to the facility and is intended to produce radioactive beams suitable for injection into the K500 superconducting cyclotron. The current status of the project and details on the ion sources...

  2. Ray-tracing modelling of ICRH at arbitrary cyclotron harmonics in large hot plasmas

    A ray tracing model for studying ion cyclotron resonance heating at higher cyclotron harmonics in very hot large plasmas is presented. It includes the full hot dielectric tensor for bi-Maxwellian distribution functions with parallel drift retaining temperature effects to all orders and allows for non-Maxwellian distribution functions. It is shown that the model only retaining first-order temperature corrections underestimates the electron damping on the Bernstein wave, that highly energetic tails efficiently absorb fast wave power at high cyclotron harmonics and that significant α-particle absorption is to be expected in D-heating D-T scenarios. (author)

  3. Cyclotron emission from an rf-plasma generated in Wendelstein VII-A

    Emission measurements near the electron cyclotron frequency were made on an rf- generated plasma in Wendelstein VIIA. Contrary to the expected maximum for cyclotron resonance at the torus axis (corresponding to the radial profile of the electron temperature of a thermal plasma) the emission showed a minimum there and very high values far away of the cyclotron resonance. This observation can be understood by the assumption of a small component of high energy runaway electrons, whose radiation is dispersed by the cold main part of the plasma. It is estimated, that the total energy of the runaway electrons is about the same as the energy of the cold plasma. (orig.)

  4. Microstructure and magnetic properties of pure iron for cyclotron electromagnets

    Ferrara, Enzo, E-mail: ferrara@inrim.it [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce, 91 – 10135 Torino (Italy); Olivetti, Elena; Fiorillo, Fausto [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce, 91 – 10135 Torino (Italy); Forton, Eric [Ion Beam Applications, Avenue Baudouin 1" e" r, 25 – 1348 Louvain la Neuve (Belgium); Martino, Luca; Rocchino, Luciano [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce, 91 – 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Microstructure and magnetic properties of cyclotron electromagnets. • Optical Microscopy, SEM, XRD show large irregular and small interspersed grains. • AlN, MnS, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} inclusions have size from some hundred nm to a few µm. • Reproducible magnetic measurements were achieved modifying testing approach. • Coercivity contribution by grain boundaries, stresses, and impurities is provided. - Abstract: The microstructural and magnetic properties of pure iron ingots used as cores of cyclotron electromagnets have been investigated upon annealing sequence from 650 °C to 820 °C. Optical Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and X-ray Diffraction were employed in the structural analysis, while magnetization curve and hysteresis loops were obtained in rod and ring samples, machined out of the large (around 4 m diameter) cast yoke, by combination of point-by-point and continuous (frequency f = 0.03 Hz) hysteresisgraph methods. Quite inhomogeneous grain structure was observed, with large and irregularly shaped grains (size of several mm), posing special constraints to the conventional magnetic testing approach (e.g., the IEC 60404-4 standard). Reproducible DC magnetic measurements could be performed using large cross-sectional area samples and suitable spatial averaging of the measured effective magnetic field, the eddy current effects being minimized at the same time. Full magnetic softening was obtained upon the annealing sequence in the absence of grain growth and change of distribution and morphology of the inclusions. The measured increase of permeability and decrease of coercivity are therefore entirely ascribed to the relief of the residual stresses, affecting the as-prepared and preliminarily annealed massive (∼80 × 10{sup 3} kg) yoke. By recognizing in this way the role of stresses, we are eventually able to estimate the additional contributions to the material coercivity provided by the grain boundaries and the precipitated

  5. Flash ionization signature in coherent cyclotron emission from brown dwarfs

    Vorgul, I.; Helling, Ch.

    2016-05-01

    Brown dwarfs (BDs) form mineral clouds in their atmospheres, where charged particles can produce large-scale discharges in the form of lightning resulting in substantial sudden increase of local ionization. BDs are observed to emit cyclotron radio emission. We show that signatures of strong transient atmospheric ionization events (flash ionization) can be imprinted on a pre-existing radiation. Detection of such flash ionization events will open investigations into the ionization state and atmospheric dynamics. Such events can also result from explosion shock waves, material outbursts or (volcanic) eruptions. We present an analytical model that describes the modulation of a pre-existing electromagnetic radiation by a time-dependent (flash) conductivity that is characteristic for flash ionization events like lightning. Our conductivity model reproduces the conductivity function derived from observations of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, and is applicable to astrophysical objects with strong temporal variations in the local ionization, as in planetary atmospheres and protoplanetary discs. We show that the field responds with a characteristic flash-shaped pulse to a conductivity flash of intermediate intensity. More powerful ionization events result in smaller variations of the initial radiation, or in its damping. We show that the characteristic damping of the response field for high-power initial radiation carries information about the ionization flash magnitude and duration. The duration of the pulse amplification or the damping is consistently shorter for larger conductivity variations and can be used to evaluate the intensity of the flash ionization. Our work suggests that cyclotron emission could be probe signals for electrification processes inside BD atmosphere.

  6. Bunker door interlock limit issues of K-130 cyclotron, VECC

    The K-130 cyclotron is in operation at VECC, Kolkata. Recently modernization of the cyclotron has taken place. Central region modification has increased reasonable internal beam current. During the tuning of the projectiles, loss of beam is unavoidable and projectiles hitting different parts of the machine inside the vacuum chamber . These interactions produce prompt radiation comprising neutron and gamma. However machine bunker is not accessible during the operation of the machine. The induced activity produced because of interactions of the primary and secondary radiation a radiation hazardous environment during the shut down for the related maintenance work. Area radiation monitors placed at machine bunker room have the interlock with massive shield door of the bunker. Area radiation monitors are set to specified limiting value, lower than that will allow to open the shield door in normal condition. As, the internal beam current being increased and the probability of beam spread being more. Consequently generation of induced activity is also high leading to delay in machine bunker door opening because of the interlock settings. Radiation dose mapping after a long operation of the machine was done for the different strategic points (The locations mainly people access immediate after shut down). Different consequences and remedial measures being presented in paper to raise the dose rate limit level for the interlocks between the area radiation monitors with machine bunker door, keeping in mind of the regulatory requirements. Raising the limit of dose rate limiting value will minimize the waiting time to access the machine bunker which will increase the duty factor of the machine. (author)

  7. Conceptual design of CFETR electron cyclotron wave system

    Tang, Yunying, E-mail: yytang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Jinzhai Road 96, Hefei 230026, Anhui (China); Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Fukun; Zhang, Liyuan; Wei, Wei; Xu, Handong; Xu, Weiye; Wu, Dajun; Feng, Jianqiang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The conceptual design of 170 GHz/20 MW electron cyclotron wave system was introduced. • The layout of RF sources was given. • The design and layout of transmission lines were shown and series of microwave components were introduced. • The structure of launcher was described in detail. • By the optic calculation and optimization of RF propagation inside the launcher, the quasi-optical parameters for launcher design were given. And then temperature distribution and thermal-stress of the injection mirror were analyzed. - Abstract: China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is a test tokamak which is built for magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. The electron cyclotron (EC) wave system of CFETR is designed to inject 20 MW RF power into the plasma for heating and current drive (H&CD) applications. The EC wave system consists of RF sources, twenty transmission lines (TLs) and one equatorial launcher. RF sources contain twenty gyrotrons with the output power 1 MW. There are series of microwave components distributed along the TL and the percentage of power losses of each TL is about 8.7%. In the equatorial launcher, five RF beams are injected into one focusing mirror and then reflected to the plasma via one injection mirror. The focusing mirror is spherical to focus Gaussian beam and the injection mirror which is flat can steer in the toroidal direction. After optic calculation and optimization, all the quasi-optical parameters for launcher design are given. Combining with the thermal stress analysis, the chosen inner diameter of water channel of injection mirror is 12 mm and the suggested water velocity is 3 m/s.

  8. Cyclotron production of 44Sc: From bench to bedside

    Introduction: 44Sc, a PET radionuclide, has promising decay characteristics (T1/2 = 3.97 h, Eβ+av = 632 keV) for nuclear imaging and is an attractive alternative to the short-lived 68Ga (T1/2 = 68 min, Eβ+av = 830 keV). The aim of this study was the optimization of the 44Sc production process at an accelerator, allowing its use for preclinical and clinical PET imaging. Methods: 44CaCO3 targets were prepared and irradiated with protons (~ 11 MeV) at a beam current of 50 μA for 90 min. 44Sc was separated from its target material using DGA extraction resin and concentrated using SCX cation exchange resin. Radiolabeling experiments at activities up to 500 MBq and stability tests were performed with DOTANOC by investigating different scavengers, including gentisic acid. Dynamic PET of an AR42J tumor-bearing mouse was performed after injection of 44Sc-DOTANOC. Results: The optimized chemical separation method yielded up to 2 GBq 44Sc of high radionuclidic purity. In the presence of gentisic acid, radiolabeling of 44Sc with DOTANOC was achieved with a radiochemical yield of ~ 99% at high specific activity (10 MBq/nmol) and quantities which would allow clinical application. The dynamic PET images visualized increasing uptake of 44Sc-DOTANOC into AR42J tumors and excretion of radioactivity through the kidneys of the investigated mouse. Conclusions: The concept “from-bench-to-bedside” was clearly demonstrated in this extended study using cyclotron-produced 44Sc. Sufficiently high activities of 44Sc of excellent radionuclidic purity are obtainable for clinical application, by irradiation of enriched calcium at a cyclotron. This work demonstrates a promising basis for introducing 44Sc to clinical routine of nuclear imaging using PET

  9. Analysis of non-thermal electron cyclotron emission during electron cyclotron current drive experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    Non-thermal electron distributions are diagnosed employing a fast scanning Michelson Interferometer capable of viewing the plasma vertically (constant Btoroidal) along a chord at r/a ∼ .6 terminated by a highly absorptive Macor viewing dump, and horizontally at the midplane. Extraordinary (X) mode and Ordinary (O) mode polarizations of Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) in the second to the tenth harmonic of the fundamental electron cyclotron frequency have been collected under a variety of plasma conditions, during high power microwave injection at 60 GHz in the DIII-D Tokamak. Plasma refraction limits the data analysis to frequencies above the fifth harmonic where the data is characterized by a smooth, exponentially decreasing intensity, due to the high degree of harmonic overlap in this frequency range. Analysis of this data has shown the extreme sensitivity of this diagnostic to emission from high pitch angle particles. Results of delta function distribution calculations and distribution function fitting show that for a low density target plasma (central line averaged ne=0.5x1013 cm-3), the emission is dominated by electrons near the trapping boundary (ψ ∼ 53 degrees) at the author's viewing location, with average energies 400keV e=1.0x1013 cm-3) the population of electrons during ECH contributing to the emission increases in average energy to [E] ∼ 1.2MeV as a result of the residual electric field induced by the primary transformer. Non-thermal electron densities (nhot)∼1x1010 cm-3 are estimated during the ECH phases while the post-ECH phase is characterized by a very diffuse (nhot∼5x107 cm-3), energetic ([E] ∼ 1.5 MeV), population in the trapped region of momentum space

  10. The national medical cyclotron facility : statement of evidence to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works

    A proposal is made for the establishment of the national medical cyclotron by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), located at the operated jointly with the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH), Sydney. The proposal calls for the acquisition of a cyclotron and associated equipment together with the construction of a building to house the cyclotron and the radiopharmaceutical production facilities as well as the establishment of a positron emission tomography (PET) facility. The national medical cyclotron will produce radioisotopes for immediate medical application within the hospital and for nation-wide distribution. It will also provide PET facilities for the investigation and diagnosis of diseases of high social cost such as epilepsy, stroke, heart disease, cancer and certain psychiatric disorders. The estimated capital cost of the installation is $16.4M (January 1988) plus $4.1M for the purchase of the PET Camera

  11. High-current cyclotron complex for the electronuclear method of energy production (proposal for designing)

    The prospects of the electronuclear method development for energy production are discussed. The preliminary evaluations show that application of accelerators with the proton power of 1-10 MW makes it possible to obtain heat capacity of the subcritical assembly up to 1 GW. The proposed accelerator-cyclotron complex is presently the cheapest and the most reliable facility for obtaining the proton beams of the megawatt capacity. The basic parameters are selected with an account of the experience in creating the Supercyclotron project. The complex consists of three isochronous cyclotrons with the proton finite energies equal to 15, 60 and 800 MeV correspondingly. The magnetic and HF- systems of two cyclotrons are analogous. The magnetic system in the third cyclotron consists of ten warm sector electromagnets

  12. Development and application of intelligent CAE system for cyclotron main magnet

    The main magnet that represents the feature of the cyclotron is the most important part in a cyclotron construction. Though there are many codes devoted to solve magnetic field computation problems, the results from them are depended on user's skill and experience very much. To help cyclotron magnet designer get acceptable result an intelligent CAE system for cyclotron main magnet design and machining has been developed. A reasonable good results in design could be get even the designer is a beginner with the help from an expert knowledge library installed in the program. The codes include following functions: 1. Intelligent CAD; 2. 2D and 3D magnetic field computation; 3. Beam dynamics analysis; 4. CAM for main magnet

  13. High performance computation on beam dynamics problems in high intensity compact cyclotrons

    ADELMANN; Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the research progress in the beam dynamics problems for future high intensity compact cyclotrons by utilizing the state-of-the-art high performance computation technology. A "Start-to-Stop" model, which includes both the interaction of the internal particles of a single bunch and the mutual interaction of neighboring multiple bunches in the radial direction, is established for compact cyclotrons with multi-turn extraction. This model is then implemented in OPAL-CYCL, which is a 3D object-oriented parallel code for large scale particle simulations in cyclotrons. In addition, to meet the running requirement of parallel computation, we have constructed a small scale HPC cluster system and tested its performance. Finally, the high intensity beam dynamics problems in the 100 MeV compact cyclotron, which is being constructed at CIAE, are studied using this code and some conclusions are drawn.

  14. Cyclotron-based nuclear science. Progress report, April 1, 1979-March 31, 1980

    Research at the cyclotron institute is summarized. These major areas are covered: nuclear structure; nuclear reactions and scattering; polarization studies; interdisciplinary nuclear science; instrumentation and systems development; and publications

  15. Ion heating in ATC Tokamak in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    Takahashi, H.; Daughney, C.C.; Ellis, R.A. Jr.; Goldston, R.J.; Hsuan, H.; Nagashima, T.; Paoloni, F.J.; Sivo, A.J.; Suckewer, S.

    1977-03-01

    Ion heating by irradiation of rf fields in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is investigated using several diagnostic techniques. It is shown that substantial heating of the bulk of the ions can be achieved by this method.

  16. Cyclotron-based nuclear science. Progress report, April 1, 1979-March 31, 1980

    1980-06-01

    Research at the cyclotron institute is summarized. These major areas are covered: nuclear structure; nuclear reactions and scattering; polarization studies; interdisciplinary nuclear science; instrumentation and systems development; and publications. (GHT)

  17. Design of Spiral Inflector and Central Region for a Medical Cyclotron

    2011-01-01

    CYCIAE-14 is a medical cyclotron designed to accelerate H- ions and extract protons, and it adopts the external ion source and axial injection line. The spiral inflector and the central region are the important

  18. Radiation protection aspects for a 40 MeV cyclotron plant

    Inside the new C.N.R. Research Area of Tor Vergata, 20 km from Rome and near to the 2nd University of Rome and its Medical Center, the Italian National Research Council (C.N.R.) intends to build a Center in which a 40 MeV cyclotron and a PET (Positron Emitter Tomography) facility will be installed. It will be the first cyclotron, devoted to research purposes of biomedical size (> 20 MeV) in Italy (at the moment 5 'baby' cyclotron with energy less than 17 MeV are employed for medical purpose) and also in the Mediterranean Area. The two main research areas for the cyclotron plant are chemistry and medicine; the Center will be encharged also to support for the radiopharmaceutical needs (in particular l8F and 123I compounds) four main Roman hospitals

  19. Research and development of ion surfing RF carpets for the cyclotron gas stopper at the NSCL

    Gehring, A. E.; Brodeur, M.; Bollen, G.; Morrissey, D. J.; Schwarz, S.

    2016-06-01

    A model device to transport thermal ions in the cyclotron gas stopper, a next-generation beam thermalization device under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, is presented. Radioactive ions produced by projectile fragmentation will come to rest at distances as large as 45 cm from the extraction orifice of the cyclotron gas stopper. The thermalized ions will be transported to the exit by RF carpets employing the recently developed "ion surfing" method. A quarter-circle prototype RF carpet was tested with potassium ions, and ion transport velocities as high as 60 m/s were observed over distances greater than 10 cm at a helium buffer gas pressure of 80 mbar. The transport of rubidium ions from an RF carpet to an electrode below was also demonstrated. The results of this study formed the basis of the design of the RF carpets for use in the cyclotron gas stopper.

  20. Decommissioning and dismantling of the national medical cyclotron - a radiation protection perspective

    The National Medical Cyclotron at Camperdown Sydney ceased operations in October 2009 after producing medical isotopes for application in nuclear medicine for approximately 19 years. ANSTO commenced the decommissioning and dismantling of the cyclotron in January 2011 after approval was given by ARPANSA following a detailed submission process. The radiation protection aspects of the decommissioning and dismantling of the 30 Mev National Medical Cyclotron by ANSTO and external contractors are described in this paper. This includes the preparation of a radiation protection plan, activation analysis of the cyclotron and its components and estimating individual and collective doses from available radiological data. The paper will also look at the planning and risk assessment of various work tasks performed, health physics monitoring and controls (both physical and administrative) and a review of individual and collective doses received during the dismantling process. Finally we will go through the challenges, issues and a review of the outcomes.

  1. Heat load estimation of cryo-pump for VEC superconducting cyclotron

    The superconducting cyclotron is under construction at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta. The superconducting cyclotron produces highly energetic particle of 80 MeV/nucleon for light and heavy ions for basic research in science. The cryo pump shall provide clean, high speed pumping of all gases and produces the vacuum of order of 10-7 Torr necessary for the acceleration of charged particle in the cyclotron. It functions through a combination of condensation and adsorption of gases and vapors on surfaces held at cryogenic temperature. It is necessary to know the total steady state heat loads comprising mainly of radiation and conduction through the supporting structures. A simplified one-dimensional model is used to simulate the conduction heat load via support. NISA software is used to find the temperature distribution in the crescent shaped panels. The model intends to calculate the maximum heat load with reasonable approximations

  2. Solid targets and irradiation facilities for production of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides at the Debrecen cyclotron

    The MGC-20E (NIIEFA, Leningrad, USSR) variable energy compact cyclotron (k=20) was installed in ATOMKI (Debrecen, Hungary) in 1985. Protons, deuterons, 3 He- and α-particles can be accelerated with currents up to 300 μA for internal irradiation and up to 50 μA for external beams. The establishment of the Cyclotron Laboratory was partly supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The application of the cyclotron is multipurpose: basic nuclear research, application of activation technique for analytical and wear studies, application of intense fast neutron source for agro-biological, bio-medical application and for radiation damage test of electronic components, and finally radioisotope production for medical diagnostics and for other scientific and applied fields. The cyclotron laboratory has six target rooms, a radiochemistry laboratory and a medical unit equipped with PET

  3. Excitation of resonance ion cyclotron instability in a magnetron diode plasma

    It is shown experimentally that resonance excitation of the ion cyclotron oscillations occurs in the magnetron diode palsma, if the frequency of the plasma drift rotation is near to a half of the cyclotron frequency. This effect is observed when positive potentials of the external and internal and electrodes are close to each other and the coaxial electron beam is injected between electrodes. This resonance is observed in the barrow range of external parameters

  4. Determination of Magnet Specification of 13 MeV Proton Cyclotron Based on Opera 3D

    Taufik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The magnet is one of the main components of a cyclotron, used to form a circular particle beam trajectories and to provide focusing of the beam. To support the mastery of 13-MeV proton cyclotron technologies, cyclotron magnet design must be done to satisfy cyclotron magnet requirements. This research was conducted by studying important parameters in designing the cyclotron magnet which is then used to determine the design requirements. The magnet design was based on the results of a 3D simulation using Opera 3D software. Opera 3D is a software developed by Cobham plc to solve physical problems in 3D such as magnetostatic using finite element methods. The simulation started by drawing a 3D model of the magnet using a modeler, followed by magnetic field calculations by Tosca module in the Opera 3D software. Simulation results were analyzed with the Genspeo software to determine whether the parameters of the cyclotron magnet have met design requirements. The results indicate that the magnet design satisfied the cyclotron magnet design requirement, that B in the median plane of the magnetic pole approached the isochronous curve, providing axial and radial focusing beam, crossing the resonance line at vr = 1 when the particle energy is low and the particle energy is more than 13 MeV, and lead to small enough phase shift of about 13°. The dimension of the cyclotron magnet is 1.96 m × 1.30 m × 1.21 m; its weight is 17.3 ton; its coil current is 88,024 ampere-turn; its center magnetic field is 1.27479 T; its maximum magnetic field is 1.942116 T; its minimum magnetic field is 0.7689 T; its valley gap is 120 mm; its hill gaps are 40 to 50.78 mm; and its hill angles are 35° to 44°.to 44°

  5. History of creation and pre-war years of the Radium Institute cyclotron. Part 1

    This paper deals with the history of creation and development in pre-war years of Radium Institute cyclotron - the first magnetic resonance accelerator made in Europe. The paper has been based on the materials of historical archives of V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute, literary writings and personal memories of one of the authors. This publication is dedicated to 45-th anniversary of putting the cyclotron in operation and to 60-th anniversary of the Institute

  6. Environmental Assessment: UCLA biomedical research CS-22 cyclotron replacement, University of California at Los Angeles

    DOE proposes to participate in the joint funding, along with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and private donors, of a new biomedical cyclotron research instrument for UCLA. DOE proposes to provide funding in the amount of $500,000 to UCLA for removal and disposal of the existing 19 year old CS-22 cyclotron and refitting of the existing room, plus $900,000 (of the $1.5 million total cost) for installation of a new generation Cyclone 18/9 biomedical isotope compact cyclotron. The remaining $600,000 for the new instrument would be provided by NIH and private donors. The total cost for the entire project is $2,0000,000. Operation and use of the instrument would be entirely by UCLA. The Biomedical Cyclotron Facility is a line item included on UCLA's Broad Scope A License. The CS-22 cyclotron was turned over to UCLA's jurisdiction by DOE in 1989 when the Laboratory of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences General Contract with DOE was changed to a Cooperative Agreement, and ''Clause B'' involving safety responsibility was terminated. In support of this, a large closeout survey was performed, licensing actions were completed, and it was agreed that environmental, health and safety compliance would be UCLA's responsibility. Since the CS022 cyclotron was DOE property prior to the above changes, DOE proposes to provide this entire funding for its removal and disposal, and to provide partial funding for its replacement. This report describes the removal of the existing cyclotron, and the operation and installation of a new cyclotron as well as any associated environmental impacts

  7. Status of the Berkeley small cyclotron AMS [accelerator mass spectrometry] project

    A small, low-energy cyclotron has been designed and built at Berkeley for direct detection dating of 14C. The system combines the use of a negative ion source to reject 14N with the high resolution of a cyclotron to reject other background ions. In order to allow the dating of old and small samples, the present system incorporates a high-current external ion source and injection beamline. The system is expected to be operational by mid-1987

  8. Experimental techniques in determination of electron cyclotron power deposition profiles in thermonuclear plasmas

    Miquel Pallicer, Àngel

    2014-01-01

    Electron cyclotron waves are widely used in magnetic confinement devices, specially in those involved in nuclear fusion research, to heat the electrons and achieve the ignition temperature. A still unsolved issue is the determination of the exact position where the cyclotron power is absorbed by the plasma. Although a verified theoretical method exists to determine the absorbed zone, it relies on local and integral density and temperature values, quantities that are not known with suffi...

  9. The radiation damage in silicon diodes induced by stray fast neutrons from the ANSTO Cyclotron

    Intense flux of fast neutrons are produced during routine isotope production runs at the National Medical Cyclotron. These stray neutrons induce irreversible displacement damage in the semiconductor devices, the vital building blocks of the various electronic instruments used in the facility. This poster highlights the results of the radiation hardness investigation study of commercial silicon diodes undertaken at the Health Physics laboratory of the National Medical Cyclotron

  10. Bi-directional Alfv\\'en Cyclotron Instabilities in the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak

    Sharapov, S E; Akers, R; Ayed, N Ben; Cecconello, M; Cook, J W C; Cunningham, G; Verwichte, E; Tea, the MAST

    2014-01-01

    Alfv\\'en cyclotron instabilities excited by velocity gradients of energetic beam ions were investigated in MAST experiments with super-Alfv\\'enic NBI over a wide range of toroidal magnetic fields from ~0.34 T to ~0.585 T. In MAST discharges with high magnetic field, a discrete spectrum of modes in the sub-cyclotron frequency range is excited toroidally propagating counter to the beam and plasma current (toroidal mode numbers n < 0).

  11. Optically detected cyclotron resonance in a single GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction

    Bartsch, Gregor

    2011-09-23

    Optically detected far-infrared cyclotron resonance (FIR-ODCR) in GaAs/AlGaAs HJs is interpreted in the frame of an exciton-dissociation mechanism. It is possible to explain the ODR mechanism by an exciton drag, mediated by ballistically propagating phonons. Furthermore, very narrow resonances are presented and realistic electron mobility values can be calculated. The exceptionally narrow ODCRs allow to measure conduction-band nonparabolicity effects and resolve satellite resonances, close to the main cyclotron resonance line.

  12. Biomedical research with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report, October 1, 1977--September 30, 1978

    Progress is reported on biomedical studies using cyclotron-produced 18F, 15O, 11C, 13N, 52Fe, 38K, 206Bi, 73Se, 53Co, and 43K. The following research projects are described: tumor detection and diagnosis; neurological studies; radiopharmaceutical development; 38K as an indicator of blood flow to the myocardium; dosimetry for internally deposited isotopes in animals and man; cyclotron development; positron tomographic imaging with the TOKIM System; and review of positron emission transaxial tomograph instruments

  13. Determination of Magnet Specification of 13 MeV Proton Cyclotron Based on Opera 3D

    The magnet is one of the main components of a cyclotron, used to form a circular particle beam trajectories and to provide focusing of the beam. To support the mastery of 13-MeV proton cyclotron technologies, cyclotron magnet design must be done to satisfy cyclotron magnet requirements. This research was conducted by studying important parameters in designing the cyclotron magnet which is then used to determine the design requirements. The magnet design was based on the results of a 3D simulation using Opera 3D software. Opera 3D is a software developed by Cobham plc to solve physical problems in 3D such as magnetostatic using finite element methods. The simulation started by drawing a 3D model of the magnet using a modeler, followed by magnetic field calculations by Tosca module in the Opera 3D software. Simulation results were analyzed with the Genspeo software to determine whether the parameters of the cyclotron magnet have met design requirements. The results indicate that the magnet design satisfied the cyclotron magnet design requirement, that B in the median plane of the magnetic pole approached the isochronous curve, providing axial and radial focusing beam, crossing the resonance line at vr = 1 when the particle energy is low and the particle energy is more than 13 MeV, and lead to small enough phase shift of about 13°. The dimension of the cyclotron magnet is 1.96 m × 1.30 m × 1.21 m; its weight is 17.3 ton; its coil current is 88,024 ampere-turn; its center magnetic field is 1.27479 T; its maximum magnetic field is 1.942116 T; its minimum magnetic field is 0.7689 T; its valley gap is 120 mm; its hill gaps are 40 to 50.78 mm; and its hill angles are 35° to 44°. (author)

  14. Nonlinear electron acceleration by oblique whistler waves: Landau resonance vs. cyclotron resonance

    Artemyev, A. V.; A. A. Vasiliev; Mourenas, Didier; Agapitov, O. V.; V. V. Krasnoselskikh

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the nonlinear interaction of relativistic electrons and highamplitude strongly oblique whistler waves in the Earth’s radiation belts. We consider electrontrapping into Landau and fundamental cyclotron resonances in a simplified model of dipolarmagnetic field. Trapping into the Landau resonance corresponds to a decrease of electronequatorial pitch-angles, while trapping into the first cyclotron resonance increases electronequatorial pitch-angles. For 100 k...

  15. Limitations of electron cyclotron resonance ion source performances set by kinetic plasma instabilities

    Tarvainen, Olli; Laulainen, Janne; Komppula, Jani; Kronholm, Risto; Kalvas, Taneli; Koivisto, Hannu; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.

    2015-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropy of the electron energy distribution function stemming from the resonant nature of the electron heating process. Electron cyclotron plasma instabilities are related to non-linear interaction between plasma waves and energetic electrons resulting to strong microwave emission and a burst of energetic electrons escaping the plasma, and explain the periodic oscillations of the e...

  16. Radioisotope production using U-120 cyclotron, Central Institute for Nuclear Research, Rossendorf (DDR)

    The method of radionuclide production at the Rossendorf U-120 cyclotron and chemical reprocessing of the products produced into radiopharmaceuticals, aimed at application in nuclear medice, are described. The radionuclides are produced by target irradiation at nuclear reactions (4He, 2n), (d, 2n), (d, n), (d, α) and others. 67Ga, 81Rb-21mKr, 211At, 111In, 123I, 18F radionuclide production are considered in detail. The Rossendorf U-120 cyclotron beam parameters are also presented

  17. Proceedings of the meeting on beam monitors for Cyclotrons and related facilities

    The meeting on the beam monitors for Cyclotrons and related facilities was held at Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo on February 24, 1993. This proceedings contains all the paper presented at the meeting, covering the present status of the beam instruments and their performances. The coverage area of this meeting was the ion sources, the cyclotrons, the linacs, the synchrotrons and the beam transport system. The meeting consisted of 12 plenary talks and 30 scientists and engineers participated. (author)

  18. An investigation into the technical feasibility of cyclotron production of technetium-99m

    The role of technetium-99m in nuclear medicine is well established with 80 per cent to 90 per cent of all nuclear medicine studies utilising this isotope. Technetium-99m is currently produced from nuclear reactors via production of the parent radionuclide molybdenum-99. The reactor production of 99mTc has both significant financial and environmental costs, with unresolved problems in the areas of radioactive waste disposal and reactor decommissioning. Recent scientific publications have indicated that medical quality 99mTc may be produced using cyclotrons without having the associated problems of waste disposal and decommissioning. Further scientific research is now required to demonstrate the feasibility of this cyclotron production technique. A collaboration between the Cyclotron and PET Centre, Austin Hospital, the National Medical Cyclotron, ANSTO, Sydney, and the Crocker Nuclear Laboratory, University of California, Davis, USA has been proposed. The general objective of the proposed collaboration is to acquire additional scientific data to evaluate the 99mTc cyclotron production method and to determine the feasibility of cyclotron technology for Australian nuclear medicine. 16 refs., 2 tabs

  19. Coupling of electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves in the solar wind

    Sreeraj, T.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2016-08-01

    The coupling of electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves is examined in three component magnetized plasma consisting of electrons, protons, and alpha particles. In the theoretical model relevant to solar wind plasma, electrons are assumed to be superthermal with kappa distribution and protons as well as alpha particles follow the fluid dynamical equations. A general linear dispersion relation is derived for such a plasma system which is analyzed both analytically and numerically. For parallel propagation, electrostatic ion cyclotron (proton and helium cyclotron) and ion acoustic (slow and fast) modes are decoupled. For oblique propagation, coupling between the cyclotron and acoustic modes occurs. Furthermore, when the angle of propagation is increased, the separation between acoustic and cyclotron modes increases which is an indication of weaker coupling at large angle of propagation. For perpendicular propagation, only cyclotron modes are observed. The effect of various parameters such as number density and temperature of alpha particles and superthermality on dispersion characteristics is examined in details. The coupling between various modes occurs for small values of wavenumber.

  20. Influence of injection beam emittance on beam transmission efficiency in a cyclotron

    Kurashima, Satoshi, E-mail: kurashima.satoshi@jaea.go.jp; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Okumura, Susumu [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The JAEA AVF cyclotron accelerates various kinds of high-energy ion beams for research in biotechnology and materials science. Beam intensities of an ion species of the order of 10{sup −9}–10{sup −6} ampere are often required for various experiments performed sequentially over a day. To provide ion beams with sufficient intensity and stability, an operator has to retune an ion source in a short time. However, the beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron rarely increases in proportion to the intensity at the ion source. To understand the cause of this beam behavior, transmission efficiencies of a {sup 12}C{sup 5+} beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to the cyclotron were measured for various conditions of the ion source. Moreover, a feasible region for acceleration in the emittance of the injection beam was clarified using a transverse-acceptance measuring system. We confirmed that the beam emittance and profile were changed depending on the condition of the ion source and that matching between the beam emittance and the acceptance of the cyclotron was degraded. However, after fine-tuning to improve the matching, beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron increased.

  1. Rumors from a great Russia. Finding a common theme to tighten, it offers only useless cyclotron

    TREND repeatedly pointed to uselessness and ineffectiveness of economic completion of Cyclotron Centre by Slovak Republic. Equipment manufacturer, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, has already ready a cyclotron DC-72. It is paid from de-blocking, but huge building in Bratislava's Karlova Ves must be completed and funding for its operation must be found. According to preliminary calculations, just to complete the construction of itself, which is also in the Russian regime, will be around 50 million euros. However, unexhausted unlocking account barely exceed two million U.S. dollars. The future operation of special equipment looks even more complicated. President of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Jaromir Pastorek, prior to entering directly said: 'Usability of the cyclotron is enormously low and the costs enormous'. According to preliminary calculations, it would cost 11 million per year with a view to increasing costs. The estimated benefits are - in an optimistic scenario - so ten percent. The greatest pressure on the completion creates the Ministry of Economy of the Slovak Republic. Treatment of ocular melanoma, which can handle the planned type of cyclotron, is rare. The device would help approximately twenty patients yearly. It is financially more advantageous to send them abroad for treatment. Similar situation is with the often remembered radiopharmaceutical preparation. It is now economically more advantageous on cheaper, commercial cyclotron, under the control of pharmaceutical companies. Russians are losing patience with former cyclotron ordering and today's forlorn searching for finance. They are preparing materials for arbitration.

  2. Status of the ITER Ion Cyclotron H and CD system

    Highlights: ► We summarize the progress and outstanding issues in the development of the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (IC H and CD) system. ► The system is designed to robustly couple 20 MW in quasi-CW operation for a broad range of plasma scenarios, and is upgradeable to up to 40 MW. ► The design is rendered challenging by the wide spectrum of requirements and interface constraints to which it is subject. ► R and D is ongoing to validate key antenna components, and to qualify the radio-frequency (RF) sources and the transmission and matching components. ► Intensive numerical modeling and experimental studies on antenna mock-ups have been conducted to validate and optimize the RF design. -- Abstract: The ongoing design of the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive system (20 MW, 40–55 MHz) is rendered challenging by the wide spectrum of requirements and interface constraints to which it is subject, several of which are conflicting and/or still in a high state of flux. These requirements include operation over a broad range of plasma scenarios and magnetic fields (which prompts usage of wide-band phased antenna arrays), high radio-frequency (RF) power density at the first wall (and associated operation close to voltage and current limits), resilience to ELM-induced load variations, intense thermal and mechanical loads, long pulse operation, high system availability, efficient nuclear shielding, high density of antenna services, remote-handling ability, tight installation tolerances, and nuclear safety function as tritium confinement barrier. R and D activities are ongoing or in preparation to validate critical antenna components (plasma-facing Faraday screen, RF sliding contacts, RF vacuum windows), as well as to qualify the RF power sources and the transmission and matching components. Intensive numerical modeling and experimental studies on antenna mock-ups have been conducted to validate and optimize the RF design. The paper

  3. Applied research with cyclotron beams at FLNR JINR

    Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Apel, P.Yu.; Didyk, A.Yu.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Gulbekian, G.G. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow (Russian Federation). Flerov Lab. of Nuclear Reactions

    1997-03-01

    The Center of Applied Physics at the Flerov Laboratory carries out an R and D program comprising development of track membrane technology, materials research with heavy ion beams and production of radioisotopes. Experiments are performed on three cyclotrons: U-400, U-200 and IC-100 providing a wide variety of ion beams with the energies of 1 to 10 MeV/u. The activity on track membranes (TMs) includes studies of track formation in polymers and latent track structure, track sensitization and etching, methods of membrane testing, development of track membranes on the basis of new materials, surface modification of TMs, design and construction of facilities for track membrane production. Recent experiments on heavy ion-induced radiation damage in non-polymeric substances have been devoted to defect creation in semiconductor and dielectric single crystals. TEM, SEM, STM and `in situ` luminescent spectroscopy are used to investigate heavy ion effects. Methods for producing several isotopes of high radiochemical and isotopic purity for medical, biomedical and environmental protection applications have been developed. (author)

  4. Production of *sp67*Ga at the Oslo Cyclotron

    A method for production of *sp67*Ga at the Oslo Cyclotron is described. The method is based on the nuclear reaction *sp68*Zn (p,2n)*sp67*Ga. The target is natural zinc metal of thickness 1.3 mm fixed by a thin alloy layer to a copper disc for efficient cooling during irradiation. By applying a beam of 29 MeV protons, a maximum production yield of approx. 1.8 mCi/*my*Ah was obtained. By demanding a contamination level of *sp66*Ga <=1%, the ''useful'' yield after a decaytime of 88 h is approx. 0.8 mCi/*my*Ah. Gallium has been separated carrierfree from the zinc matrix by cation exchange from 7.5M hydrocloric acid solutions and prepared as citrate complex at pH 5.5. After sterile filtering, autoclavation, pyrogene testing and analysis for iron and zinc, the *sp67*Ga-radiopharmaceutical has been applied in human investigations at the Ullevaal hospital in Oslo. (Auth.)

  5. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 14

    1967-01-10

    The past quarter has seen further progress in the solution of the problem of achieving a cyclotron which meets or exceeds the performance requirements. The magnet system, with the exception of the trim coils and their supplies, is all on order or about to be ordered, and a high confidence level exists that the system will meet all requirements. The rf system studies, nearly complete, have indicated that the solution chosen will meet the frequency requirements and will be within the power expected. The center studies, complete in the first phase, have resulted in a preliminary center design of the electrostatic focusing system and a design of the magnetic center which provides the required axial focusing. A high degree of cooperation on the center study programs between the U of M and CSF has efficiently yielded these results. The overall schedule continues to be maintained, and the program is expected to be completed on the 37-month schedule. For better control and greater visibility on schedule progress, two reference points have been selected as more immediate objectives. These are 17 July 1967 for the start of the magnet testing program and 2 October 1967 as the start of the rf high power tests. Each task involved is being analyzed with these dates in mind, and they appear to be reasonable.

  6. Particle beam extraction at the Orsay cryogenic coil cyclotron

    We are presenting the design and the performance of the single turn extraction in the Orsay cryogenic cyclotron. After a careful shaping of the average magnetic field in the extraction area for a representative set of particles, we get the various expected corresponding νsub(r) (νsub(s)) diagrams and then the corrected diagram of the kinetic energy per nucleon T at the exit vs Z/A. The study of the accelerated orbits till the entrance in the extraction devices shows the turn separation is sufficient to allow the insertion of an electrostatic septum and satisfying energies and RF phases are obtained. The designed extraction devices are successively: an electrostatic deflector, located in a hill, with an electric field 100 kV/cm, an iron free channel, located in the following hill, having to produce a field drop 0.25 T, some magnetostatic channels for radial focusing. A quick look at the technological features of the electromagnetic channel is given proving its possibility

  7. Current drive by electron cyclotron waves in stellarators

    In this paper we propose a method to estimate the induced current by Electron Cyclotron waves fast enough, from the numerical point of view, to be included in a ray-tracing code, and yet accounting for the complicated geometry of stellarators. Since trapped particle effects are particularly important in this Current Drive method and in stellarator magnetic configuration, they are considered by the modification they introduce in the current drive efficiency. Basically, the method consists of integrating the Fisch and Boozer relativistic efficiency, corrected with the effect of trapped particles, times the absorbed power per momentum interval. This one is calculated for a Maxwellian distribution function, assuming a nearly linear regime. The influence of impurities and of species which are not protons is studied, calculating the efficiency for plasmas with Zeff) - Finally, a numerical analysis particularized to TJ-II stellarator is presented. The absorbed power density is calculated by the ray tracing code RAYS, taking into account the actual microwave beam structure. (Author) 23 refs

  8. Ion cyclotron wave excitation by double resonance coupling

    A modulated high frequency wave is used to remotely excite low frequency oscillations in a linear, strongly magnetized plasma column. An electromagnetic wave is launched as an extraordinary mode across the plasma by an external waveguide in the Upper Hybrid frequency regime f=fUH=fce=8 GHz, with P≤2 W. By frequency modulating (at fFM=1-60 kHz, with fci≅30 kHz) the pump wave, the resonant layer is swept radially across the profile and perpendicularly to the field lines at f=fFM. The resulting radial oscillation of the electron linear and non linear pressure can be considered to act as a source term for the ion wave. A localized virtual antenna is thereby created inside the plasma. Measurements of the ion dielectric response (interferograms and perturbed distribution functions) via laser induced fluorescence identify the two branches (forward, or ion-acoustic-like, and backward, or Bernstein, modes) of the electrostatic dispersion relation in the ion cyclotron frequency range. By changing the modulation bandwidth, and thus the spatial excursion of the oscillating resonant layer, a control on the perpendicular wavelength of the excited mode can be exerted. In particular, the possibility of selective excitation of the ion Bernstein wave is demonstrated experimentally. (author) 38 refs., 13 figs

  9. Automatic control of the ITER Ion Cyclotron system

    The ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating System should routinely operate close to the maximum nominal RF power output (20 MW) in quasi-continuous operation, with infrequent power interruptions, due to voltage breakdowns and/or equipment protective actions. An efficient power transfer from the IC array to the plasma requires a sophisticated control system capable of: i) controlling the array radiation spectrum during the power pulse, so as to optimize plasma coupling and absorption and to minimize parasitic power losses in the plasma edge; ii) maintaining the RF power flow to the plasma against significant load variations, including fast fluctuations induced by ELMs; iii) reliably detecting and suppressing RF voltage breakdowns in the array and/or in the transmission system, with a time response of few microseconds, to limit the energy deposited in the arc and to avoid local equipment damage; iv) providing an accurate real time performance assessment In this paper a method of fully automatic control of the ITER ICH system is proposed. In particular, the problem of an efficient and reliable arc detection in the array and in the associated transmission line(s) is addressed and ways to maintain the required power flow to the plasma in case of partial fault conditions analyzed. (author)

  10. Alfven ion-cyclotron instability: Simulation theory and techniques

    The numerical properties of a particle-ion, fluid-electron computer simulation code, used in the study of the parallel-propagating electromagnetic Alfven ion-cyclotron (AIC) instability, are examined. A numerical odd--even mode is suppressed by means of a two-timestep averaging methods. Excellent energy conservation is obtained by using a method similar to the Boris particle mover to advance the transverse fields. Linear growth rates obtained from the code differ substantially from those predicted by uniform Vlasov theory, here derived using a multifluid model. Short wavelengths in particular show substantial growth rates when damping is predicted, and additionally show strong linear mode coupling. Positive growth rates are even observed in the case of a Maxwellian ion distribution. Disagreement is also generally found among short-wavelength mode frequencies. These inconsistencies are resolved by taking into consideration general grid and discrete-particle effects of the simulation model. A theoretical study reveals a real, physical process by which an ion distribution may collisionlessly relax via short-wavelength AIC instabilities acting resonantly on small portions of the distribution function. This process is combined with a linear mode coupling theory and other characteristics of the AIC instability to explain all observed differences. Nonlinear short-wavelength saturation levels are also obtained and their relevance to other field-aligned, electromagnetic simulations is discussed. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc

  11. Cyclotron irradiation of Cu3Au alloys at low temperatures

    Ordered and disordered Cu3Au alloys were irradiated at liquid nitrogen and helium temperatures with protons and α-particles from a cyclotron. An increase of resistivity by irradiation and its recovery by isochronal annealing were measured. The results were compared with those of copper irradiated and annealed under the same conditions. Defect introduction rates were carefully determined, based on which a resistivity due to Frenkel pairs in the alloy and a number of replacements in a cascade were estimated. The recovery of the order in the alloy occurred in the stage III and in the 4000K stage but not in the stage I and II, which suggests that the migrating defects in the former stages are vacancy families and those in the latter stages are interstitial families. It was shown that in the stage I annealing of the ordered alloy, the similar processes proceed as in the pure copper, while in the disordered alloy the long range migration of defects is prevented. It was also shown that the defects survived the stage I annealing in the disordered alloy disappear in the stage II

  12. Archaeometrical studies on ancient greek silver coins at Bucharest cyclotron

    The analysis of archaeological objects requires simultaneously non destructive, fast, versatile, sensitive and multielemental methods. Romania has a lot of interesting archaeological sites: Greek on the Black Sea coast, Roman in Transylvania and Dobroudja, Byzantine on the Danube border. Our purpose was to help Romanian archaeologists to identify objects provenance (workshops, technologies, mines) and to explain commercial, military and political aspects. Two methods were used: in air 3 MeV protons PIXE and 241Am source based XRF. For in air PIXE, we used a 3 4 MeV proton beam obtained from the 6.5 MeV Cyclotron nominal regime protons extracted through a 20 mm aluminium foil into the air, striking the sample after 8 10 cm. X rays were detected through reflection, using a horizontal Si(Li) detector. XRF measurements were done with a spectrometer consisting of a 30 mCi 241Am annular gamma source, a Si(Li) detector and a conventional electronic chain. The high number of relevant samples (10 20) and the associated dispersion of concentration values, allow us to consider as acceptable for such experiments obtained sensitivities down to 2 5 ppm for PIXE and down to 20 30 ppm for XRF and accuracy of 15 20% (PIXE), 10 15% (XRF). We obtain the composition of silver coins and comparing the quantities of Ag, Cu, Sn, Pb, and Au, we can find which coins are originals and which are local castled

  13. Topologically protected entanglement of electron-pair cyclotron motions

    Champel, T.; Hernangómez-Pérez, D.; Florens, S.

    2016-02-01

    Considering two-dimensional electron gases under a perpendicular magnetic field, we pinpoint a specific kind of long-range bipartite entanglement of the electronic motions. This entanglement is achieved through the introduction of bicomplex spinorial eigenfunctions admitting a polar decomposition in terms of a real modulus and three real phases. Within this bicomplex geometry the cyclotron motions of two electrons are intrinsically tied, so that the highlighted eigenstates of the kinetic energy operator actually describe the free motion of a genuine electron pair. Most remarkably, these states embody phase singularities in the four-dimensional (4D) space, with singular points corresponding to the simultaneous undetermination of the three phases. Because the entanglement between the two electrons forming a pair, as well as the winding and parity quantum numbers characterizing the 4D phase singularity, are topological in nature, we expect them to manifest some robustness in the presence of a smooth disorder potential and an electron-electron interaction potential. The relevance of this effective approach in terms of 4D vortices of electron pairs is discussed in the context of the fractional quantum Hall effect.

  14. Overview of the international research on ion cyclotron wall conditioning

    This paper gives an overview of the experimental and modeling activity on Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC), with hydrogen as working gas, in order to assess the applicability of this technique on ITER for recovery from disruptions, vent or air leak, recycling control and mitigation of the tritium inventory build-up. Experimental results obtained on TORE SUPRA, TEXTOR, ASDEX-Upgrade, JET, KSTAR and LHD are presented. The conditions for safely producing RF plasmas with conventional ICRH antennas have been carefully investigated. Discharge homogeneity has been improved by adding a small poloidal component to the toroidal field. Proper choice of the duty cycle RF on/off allows mitigating re-implantation of wall desorbed particles reionized in the ICWC discharge. A 0-D model of ICWC plasmas in He and H2 has been developed which reproduces experimentally determined electron density, neutral and ion fluxes. The installation in 2010/11 of the ITER like wall (ILW) in JET, allows now assessing the efficiency of ICWC for fuel removal on the ITER material mix. Experimental observations in carbon devices and modeling seem to indicate that ICWC, like other plasma-based conditioning techniques, interacts preferentially with transient reservoirs rather than in co-deposited layers. An attempt is made to extrapolate the found fuel removal rates to ITER. (author)

  15. Proposals for ITER IC (Ion Cyclotron System) Reference Design Upgrades

    A possible issue for the ITER ion cyclotron (IC) heating and current drive system is related to the high electric field (2 kV/mm parallel to B0) at which the array is planned to operate, which may be associated to a low dielectric rigidity of the vessel vacuum. The combined effects are likely to set the upper limit to the RF power transfer efficiency to the plasma core. The IC launcher proposed in the ITER final design report is an array of 8 (2 poloidal x 4 toroidal) structures, called ILS, having properties of load resilience, useful to maintain an efficient power flow in an ELM (edge localized mode) plasma, such as the one in ITER. Each ILS is itself a poloidal array of 2 short circuited current straps, in series with 2 tuning capacitive reactances, connected in parallel to low characteristics impedance feeder. In the present proposal the general ILS scheme is kept unchanged, but lay out changes are proposed which significantly improves the efficiency and the reliability of the array. These are: -) to increase the poloidal order of the array from 8 to 12 ILS, -) to modify the geometry of the tuning reactances, and -) to change the lay out of the vacuum transmission line. (A.C.)

  16. Pc based RF control system for the Vincy cyclotron

    The concept and design procedure for the RF control system of the VINCY cyclotron are described. Special attention has been paid to the choice of computer support of this system. The merits and limitations of the chosen solution have been analyzed. A PC type computer has been selected as the platform for performing the functions of initiation, control, and supervision of the RF system. The integration of the hardware is carried out by direct connection to the PC bus via standard communication interfaces. The system software operates under a graphic oriented Windows operating system applying the modern concept of virtual instrumentation. The application of this concept allowed considerable simplification of the operator-RF system interaction and resulted in additional flexibility of the software to further extensions or modifications of the system. The selected open architecture of the computer platform allows a simple and economic upgrading of the realized system in accordance with future requirements. Tests of the realized RF control system prototype are in progress. (authors)

  17. High current DC negative ion source for cyclotron

    Etoh, H., E-mail: Hrh-Etoh@shi.co.jp; Aoki, Y.; Mitsubori, H.; Arakawa, Y.; Sakuraba, J.; Kato, T.; Mitsumoto, T.; Hiasa, T.; Yajima, S. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo 141-6025 (Japan); Onai, M.; Hatayama, A. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, Kanagawa 223-8522 (Japan); Shibata, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Okumura, Y. [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A filament driven multi-cusp negative ion source has been developed for proton cyclotrons in medical applications. In Cs-free operation, continuous H{sup −} beam of 10 mA and D{sup −} beam of 3.3 mA were obtained stably at an arc-discharge power of 3 kW and 2.4 kW, respectively. In Cs-seeded operation, H{sup −} beam current reached 22 mA at a lower arc power of 2.6 kW with less co-extracted electron current. The optimum gas flow rate, which gives the highest H{sup −} current, was 15 sccm in the Cs-free operation, while it decreased to 4 sccm in the Cs-seeded operation. The relationship between H{sup −} production and the design/operating parameters has been also investigated by a numerical study with KEIO-MARC code, which gives a reasonable explanation to the experimental results of the H{sup −} current dependence on the arc power.

  18. Isotope exchange by Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning on JET

    Wauters, T., E-mail: t.wauters@fz-juelich.de [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Douai, D.; Kogut, D. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lyssoivan, A. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Belonohy, E. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Blackman, T. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Crombé, K. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Drenik, A. [Jožef Stefan Institute, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Graham, M. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Joffrin, E. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lerche, E. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Loarer, T. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lomas, P.L.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Oberkofler, M. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Philipps, V. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Plyusnin, V. [IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2015-08-15

    The isotopic exchange efficiencies of JET Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) discharges produced at ITER half and full field conditions are compared for JET carbon (C) and ITER like wall (ILW). Besides an improved isotope exchange rate on the ILW providing cleaner plasma faster, the main advantage compared to C-wall is a reduction of the ratio of retained discharge gas to removed fuel. Complementing experimental data with discharge modeling shows that long pulses with high (∼240 kW coupled) ICRF power maximizes the wall isotope removal per ICWC pulse. In the pressure range 1–7.5 × 10{sup −3} Pa, this removal reduces with increasing discharge pressure. As most of the wall-released isotopes are evacuated by vacuum pumps in the post discharge phase, duty cycle optimization studies for ICWC on JET-ILW need further consideration. The accessible reservoir by H{sub 2}-ICWC at ITER half field conditions on the JET-ILW preloaded by D{sub 2} tokamak operation is estimated to be 7.3 × 10{sup 22} hydrogenic atoms, and may be exchanged within 400 s of cumulated ICWC discharge time.

  19. ATLAS 10 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source upgrade project

    A major upgrade of the first ATLAS 10 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, which began operations in 1987, is in the planning and procurement phase. The new design will convert the old two-stage source into a single-stage source with an electron donor disk and high gradient magnetic field that preserves radial access for solid material feeds and pumping of the plasma chamber. The new magnetic-field profile allows for the possibility of a second ECR zone at a frequency of 14 GHz. An open hexapole configuration, using a high-energy-product Nd-Fe-B magnet material, having an inner diameter of 8.8 cm and pole gaps of 2.4 cm, has been adopted. Models indicate that the field strengths at the chamber wall, 4 cm in radius, will be 9.3 kG along the magnet poles and 5.6 kG along the pole gaps. The individual magnet bars will be housed in austenitic stainless steel, allowing the magnet housing within the aluminum plasma chamber to be used as a water channel for direct cooling of the magnets. Eight solenoid coils from the existing ECR will be enclosed in an iron yoke to produce the axial mirror. Based on a current of 500 A, the final model predicts a minimum B field of 3 kG with injection and extraction mirror ratios of 4.4 and 2.9, respectively. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  20. Cyclotron production of 169Yb. A potential radiolanthanide for brachytherapy

    In the present study, ytterbium-169 was produced via the 169Tm(p, n)169Yb nuclear process at the AMIRS (Cyclone-30, IBA, Belgium) cyclotron, irradiating Tm2O3 with proton particles of 15 MeV primary energy and 20 μA current for 20 min. Deposition of Tm2O3 on Cu substrate was carried out via by the sedimentation method. The 543 mg of thulium(III)oxide with 108 mg of ethyl cellulose and 8 mL of acetone were used to prepare a Tm2O3 layer of 11.69 cm2. Yields of about 0.643 MBq 169Yb per μAh were experimentally obtained. 169Yb was separated in 80 ± 5% radiochemical yield using liquid-liquid extraction. Solvent extraction of no-carrier added 169Yb from irradiated thulium(III)oxide target hydrochloric solution was investigated using di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP). (author)

  1. {sup 124}I production for PET imaging at a cyclotron

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Ensaf, Mohammadreza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School; Enferadi, Milad [North Khorasan Univ. of Medical Sciences, Bojnurd (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Iranian Applied Research Center for Public Health and Sustainable Development

    2012-03-15

    We here present a method for the production of Iodine-124 using a cyclotron. With this method, it will be possible to produce clinically relevant amounts of {sup 124}I with high chemical and radionuclidic purity for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The electroplated TeO{sub 2} targets were irradiated with 29.5 MeV protons at current of 39.5 {mu}A for 3.8 h. The separation of the produced Iodine activity from the bulk target material was performed by ion exchange chromatography method. {sup 124}I positron emitter excitation functions via {sup 124}Te(p,n){sup 124}I, {sup 125}Te(p,2n){sup 124}I, {sup 126}Te(p,3n){sup 124}I, {sup 124}Te(d,2n){sup 124}I, {sup 121}Sb(a,n){sup 124}I and {sup nat}Te(p,xn){sup 124}I reactions were calculated by ALICE/ASH 0.1 (GDH Model and Hybrid Model) and TALYS-1.2 codes and compared to existing data. Theoretical calculation of production yield and calculation of target thickness requirement were obtained by TALYS-1.2 and SRIM codes for each reaction. (orig.)

  2. 124I production for PET imaging at a cyclotron

    We here present a method for the production of Iodine-124 using a cyclotron. With this method, it will be possible to produce clinically relevant amounts of 124I with high chemical and radionuclidic purity for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The electroplated TeO2 targets were irradiated with 29.5 MeV protons at current of 39.5 μA for 3.8 h. The separation of the produced Iodine activity from the bulk target material was performed by ion exchange chromatography method. 124I positron emitter excitation functions via 124Te(p,n)124I, 125Te(p,2n)124I, 126Te(p,3n)124I, 124Te(d,2n)124I, 121Sb(a,n)124I and natTe(p,xn)124I reactions were calculated by ALICE/ASH 0.1 (GDH Model and Hybrid Model) and TALYS-1.2 codes and compared to existing data. Theoretical calculation of production yield and calculation of target thickness requirement were obtained by TALYS-1.2 and SRIM codes for each reaction. (orig.)

  3. Quasilinear ion distribution function during first harmonic ion cyclotron heating

    The quasilinear modification of the ion distribution function during first harmonic ion cyclotron (FHIC) heating is investigated both with a simple already well established analytic one-dimensional approach, and with a new two dimensional steady state solver of the quasilinear kinetic equation, SSFPQL. By accepting to disregard the effects of ion trapping in banana orbits, but including finite Larmor radius effects, the latter code has been made much faster than full surface-averaged codes; yet it can provide most of the relevant information on the suprathermal ion tail produced by this heating method. With SSFPQL we confirm that the one-dimensional model gives fair approximations for global properties of the distribution function, such as the average energy content of the tail and the fusion reactivity. On the other hand the tail is found to be very anisotropic, the increase of the parallel effective temperature being a small fraction of the total energy increase. Information on the anisotropy is essential to study the feedback of the fast ion tail on wave propagation and absorption, which is quite sensitive to the distribution of parallel velocities. The insight gained in the derivation and discussion of this model can be used to build a selfconsistent description of this heating scenario, whose implementation requires only a reasonable numerical effort. (orig.)

  4. Beam pattern evaluation for cyclotron operations based on neural networks

    A beam pattern evaluation method using neural network has been developed to assist non-expert cyclotron operators. While an expert operator can easily tell beam accelerating conditions by the beam pattern measured by a scanned beam probe, it is not easy for non-expert operators to evaluate the pattern. The followings are the summarized procedure of the proposed method. First, the features of the beam patterns, which correspond to the view points of the experts, are extracted using Gabor expansion. A neural network algorithm is applied to calculate the Gabor expansion. Next, the number of the extracted features is reduced by averaging the features of high frequency ranges in five partial zones. The idea of this process is based on the fact that the operators do not pay attention to the details of the high frequency components of the patterns. Finally, the pattern evaluation process by the expert operators is learned by the back-propagation algorithm on a multi-layered feed forward neural network. Parallel processing architecture of the feature extraction network, and the learning capability of the non-linear clustering network are very useful for the evaluation model of beam patterns. (author)

  5. Multifunctional monitor of beam parameters for a cyclotron

    The ionization monitor is described designed for on-line monitoring of beam intensity and position in a cyclotron transport channel, and also of beam current pulse form related to a modulation of accelerating voltage and beam energy. The monitor comprises the extracting system in a form of flat capacitor formed by the reflecting electrode and forming grid. To eliminate the effect of slow ionic component the reflecting electrode is provided with an antidynatron grid. The electron component istransmitted to the electron multiplier with a gain factor up to 108 assembled on two microchannel electron plates. Thethreshold monitor sensitivity at a pressure of 10sup(-5)Tor constitutes 10sup(-11) - 10sup(-12) A. Introduction of a special stroboscopic electrode between the electron multiplier and transducer allows one to record timing beam parameters, in particular, microbunches duration and phase position. The complex of electronic equipment for visualization and digital processing of measuring results is constructed on the basis of the CAMAC units and TV set. up

  6. Electron temperature measurements on ATF using electron cyclotron emission

    Second and third harmonic electron cyclotron emission measurements have been carried out on the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. ATF is a 1=2, m=12 torsatron with a major radius of 2.1m and an average plasma radius of 0.3m. At the standard magnetic field values of 1T and 2T, we have used heterodyne receivers with fixed frequency Gunn local oscillators. The optically thick second harmonic emission has been used to monitor the electron temperature profile as a function of time. The optically thin third harmonic emission has been used to measure the central electron temperature during ECH and Neutral Beam Injection. Results from both harmonics agree well with the Thomson scattering data. Calculations of the width of the resonance zones indicate values from 1 cm at the edge to 5 cm centrally. An in-situ absolute calibration of the system using a liquid nitrogen source has been performed. The beam pattern of the system has also been measured in-situ and agrees well with theoretical calculations. A beam viewing dump has been installed to reduce the wall reflection problem for the optically thin emission. (author)

  7. Requirements for production targets on middle energy cyclotrons

    The daily supply of positron emitting radionuclides for clinical PET requires a target system which provides with boring regularity, predictable amounts of radionuclide of consistent and satisfactory quality and quantity. Although the four most commonly used positron emitting radionuclides, 11C, 13N, 15O, and 18F, can be produced from targets of natural isotopic abundance, cost minimization and operation simplification has made the use of targets of isotopically enriched materials relatively common. Historically, cyclotron operation and synthetic radiochemistry has been developed and carried out by Ph.D. scientists with strong laboratory skills. Clinical centers, for reasons of economy and due to the routine nature of their activity are not likely to attract such highly trained people. The equipment manufacturers have responded with remotely operated automatic systems either microcomputer menu driven or operable by rote. Although the equipment manufacturers offer periodic maintenance plans, the probability that operating personnel with a lower level of training will work on target systems, imposes stringent criteria when targets are designed. Among these criteria are ease of foil exchange, simplicity of seal design, and engineering the various target connections to avoid accidental interchange. Target thickness must be controlled so that when the beam passing through the target has been attenuated below the useful point of the excitation function, the remaining beam is attenuated with a minimum of target chamber activation

  8. Cyclotron side-band emissions from ring-current electrons

    VLF-emissions with subharmonic cyclotron frequency from magnetospheric electrons have been detected by the S3-A satellite (Explorer 45) whose orbit is close to the magnetic equatorial plane where the wave-particle interaction is most efficient. These emissions are observed during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm in the nightside of the magnetosphere outside of the plasmasphere around L = 3 to 5. The emissions consist essentially of two frequency regimes, one below the equatorial electron gyro-frequency (fsub(H0) and the other above. The emissions below fsub(H0) are whistler mode and there is a sharp band of 'missing emissions' along f = fsub(H0)/2. The emissions above fsub(H0) are electrostatic mode and the frequency ranges up to 3fsub(H0)/2. It is concluded that these emissions are generated by the enhanced relativity low energy (1 to 5 keV) ring current electrons, penetrating into the nightside magnetosphere during the main phase of a magnetic storm. Although the high energy (50 to 350 keV) electrons showed remarkable changes of pitch angle distribution, their associations with VLF-emissions are not so significant as those of low energy electrons. (author)

  9. Passive cyclotron current generation with fish-scale structures

    The paper presents a theoretical and a numerical treatment of the problem of passive current drive in a fusion plasma. In such a scenario the current is driven by the self-generated cyclotron radiation. The necessary asymmetry is introduced with the help of fish-scale structures on the reflecting wall which surrounds the plasma. The problem of the photon equilibrium in a bounded system is the subject of the first part of this paper. The general case of a plasma surrounded by a reflecting wall is presented in the form of a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. This integral equation is then simplified for small fish-scale-like structures on the first wall with the help of a probabilistic approach. A self-consistent solution for the radiation intensity distribution is obtained numerically for a cylindrical plasma model under such boundary conditions. Based on this and on local current drive efficiencies derived in a companion paper [S. V. Kasilov and W. Kernbichler, Phys. Plasmas, 3, 4115 (1996)], the radial profile of a steady toroidal current as well as overall efficiencies are computed. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  10. Electron Cyclotron Maser Emissions from Evolving Fast Electron Beams

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, G. Q.; Tan, C. M.

    2016-05-01

    Fast electron beams (FEBs) are common products of solar active phenomena. Solar radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool for understanding FEBs and the solar plasma environment in which they propagate along solar magnetic fields. In particular, the evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to the interaction with the ambient plasma and field during propagation can significantly influence the efficiency and properties of their emissions. In this paper, we discuss the possible evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to energy loss processes and the pitch-angle effect caused by magnetic field inhomogeneity, and we analyze the effects of the evolution on electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) emission, which is one of the most important mechanisms for producing solar radio bursts by FEBs. Our results show that the growth rates all decrease with the energy loss factor Q, but increase with the magnetic mirror ratio σ as well as with the steepness index δ. Moreover, the evolution of FEBs can also significantly influence the fastest growing mode and the fastest growing phase angle. This leads to the change of the polarization sense of the ECM emission. In particular, our results also reveal that an FEB that undergoes different evolution processes will generate different types of ECM emission. We believe the present results to be very helpful for a more comprehensive understanding of the dynamic spectra of solar radio bursts.

  11. Electron-cyclotron maser and solar microwave millisecond spike emission

    Li, Hong-Wei; Li, Chun-Sheng; Fu, Qi-Jun

    1986-01-01

    An intense solar microwave millisecond spike emission (SMMSE) event was observed on May 16, 1981 by Zhao and Jin at Beijing Observatory. The peak flux density of the spikes is high to 5 x 100,000 s.f.u. and the corresponding brightness temperature (BT) reaches approx. 10 to the 15th K. In order to explain the observed properties of SMMSE, it is proposed that a beam of electrons with energy of tens KeV injected from the acceleration region downwards into an emerging magnetic arch forms so-called hollow beam distribution and causes electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) instability. The growth rate of second harmonic X-mode is calculated and its change with time is deduced. It is shown that the saturation time of ECM is t sub s approx. equals 0.42 ms and only at last short stage (delta t less than 0.2 t sub s) the growth rate decreases to zero rather rapidly. So a SMMSE with very high BT will be produced if the ratio of number density of nonthermal electrons to that of background electrons, n sub s/n sub e, is larger than 4 x .00001.

  12. Electron cyclotron resonance heating in a short cylindrical plasma system

    Vipin K Yadav; D Bora

    2004-09-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma is produced and studied in a small cylindrical system. Microwave power is delivered by a CW magnetron at 2.45 GHz in TE10 mode and launched radially to have extraordinary (X) wave in plasma. The axial magnetic field required for ECR in the system is such that the first two ECR surfaces ( = 875.0 G and = 437.5 G) reside in the system. ECR plasma is produced with hydrogen with typical plasma density e as 3.2 × 1010 cm-3 and plasma temperature e between 9 and 15 eV. Various cut-off and resonance positions are identified in the plasma system. ECR heating (ECRH) of the plasma is observed experimentally. This heating is because of the mode conversion of X-wave to electron Bernstein wave (EBW) at the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) layer. The power mode conversion efficiency is estimated to be 0.85 for this system. The experimental results are presented in this paper.

  13. Electron-cyclotron plasma startup in the GDT experiment

    Yakovlev, D V; Gospodchikov, E D; Solomakhin, A L; Savkin, V Ya; Bagryansky, P A

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports on a new plasma startup scenario in the Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) magnetic mirror device. The primary 5 MW neutral beam injection (NBI) plasma heating system fires into a sufficiently dense plasma target ("seed plasma"), which is commonly supplied by an arc plasma generator. In the reported experiments, a different approach to seed plasma generation is explored. One of the channels of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating system is used to ionize the neutral gas and build up the density of plasma to a level suitable for NBI capture. After a short transition (about 1 ms) the discharge becomes essentially similar to a standard one initiated by the plasma gun. The paper presents the discharge scenario and experimental data on the seed plasma evolution during ECR heating, along with the dependencies on incident microwave power, magnetic configuration and pressure of a neutral gas. The characteristics of consequent high-power NBI discharge are studied and differences to the conventional sce...

  14. Initial experience with an 11 MeV self-shielded medical cyclotron on operation and radiation safety

    Pant G; Senthamizhchelvan S

    2007-01-01

    A self-shielded medical cyclotron (11 MeV) was commissioned at our center, to produce positron emitters, namely, 18 F, 15 O, 13 N and 11 C for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Presently the cyclotron has been exclusively used for the production of 18 F - for 18 F-FDG imaging. The operational parameters which influence the yield of 18 F - production were monitored. The radiation levels in the cyclotron and radiochemistry laboratory were also monitored to assess the radiatio...

  15. Analysis of non-thermal electron cyclotron emission during electron cyclotron current drive experiments on the D3-D tokamak

    Non-thermal electron distributions are diagnosed employing a fast scanning Michelson Interferometer which is capable of viewing the plasma vertically (constant B(sub toroidal)) along a chord at r/a approx. = .6 terminated by a highly absorptive Macor viewing dump, and horizontally at the midplane. Extraordinary (X) mode and Ordinary (O) mode polarizations of Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) in the second to the tenth harmonic of the fundamental electron cyclotron frequency have been collected under a variety of plasma conditions, during high power microwave injection at 60 GHz in the DIII-D Tokamak. Plasma refraction limits the data analysis to frequencies above the fifth harmonic where the data is characterized by a smooth, exponentially decreasing intensity, due to the high degree of harmonic overlap in this frequency range. Analysis of this data has shown the extreme sensitivity of this diagnostic to emission from high pitch angle particles. Results of delta function distribution calculations and distribution function fitting show that for a low density target plasma (central line averaged n(sub e) = 0.5 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -3)), the emission is dominated by electrons near the trapping boundary at our viewing location, with average energies 400 keV less than (E) less than 500 keV during ECH. Under higher plasma target density conditions (central line averaged n(sub e) = 1.0 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -3)) the population of electrons during ECH contributing to the emission increases in average energy to (E) approx. = 1.2 MeV as a result of the residual electric field induced by the primary transformer. Non-thermal electron densities (n(sub hot)) of approx. 1 x 10(exp 10) cm(exp -3) are estimated during the ECH phase while the post-ECH phase is characterized by a very diffuse (n(sub hot) approx. 5 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -3)), energetic ((E) approx. 1.5 MeV), population in the trapped region of momentum space

  16. A note on electrostatic ion/dust cyclotron instabilities in dusty plasmas

    The electrostatic dust cyclotron instability (EDC) in dusty plasmas is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic ion cyclotron instability (EIC) in electron-ion plasmas, negative ion plasmas, and dusty plasmas. While the EIC instability can be driven by an electron drift along the magnetic field, the EDC instability can be driven by an ion drift along B in a plasma with negatively charged dust. The frequency of these EDC waves is of the order of the dust cyclotron frequency, which can be much smaller than the ion cyclotron frequency due to the dust close-quote s small charge-to-mass ratio. Thus, at these lower frequencies, it is necessary to also consider the effect of collisions (ion-neutral, electron-neutral, as well as dust-neutral). We report briefly on our recent kinetic analyses on the electrostatic dust cyclotron instability in a weakly ionized collisional dusty plasma. The EDC is then compared to the EIC in both the collisionless and collisional regimes. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  17. The beam commissioning of BRIF and future cyclotron development at CIAE

    Zhang, Tianjue; Yang, Jianjun

    2016-06-01

    As an upgrade project of the existing HI-13 tandem accelerator facility, the Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility (BRIF) is being constructed in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). This project consists of an 100 MeV proton compact cyclotron, a two-stage ISOL system, a superconducting linac booster and various experimental terminals. The beam commissioning of the cyclotron was launched by the end of 2013 and on July 4, 2014 the first 100 MeV proton beam was received on a temporary target which was positioned at the outlet of the cyclotron. The beam current was stably maintained at above 25 μA for about 9 h on July 25, 2014 and the cyclotron is now ready for providing CW proton beam on target-source for RIB production. The beam current is expected to be increased to 200-500 μA in the coming years. The installation of the ISOL system is finished and the stable ion beam test shows it can reach a mass resolution better than 10,000. It is expected to generate dozens of RIB by 100 MeV proton beam. In addition, this paper also introduces the recent progress of the pre-study of an 800 MeV, 3-4 MW separate-sector proton cyclotron, which is aimed to provide high power proton beam for various applications, such as neutron and neutrino physics, proton radiography and nuclear data measurement and ADS system.

  18. An energy spread minimization system for microbeam generation in the JAERI AVF cyclotron

    A heavy-ion microbeam with energy of hundreds of MeV is a significantly useful probe for research in biology and biotechnology. A single-ion hit technique using the heavy-ion microbeam is being developed at the JAERI AVF cyclotron facility for elucidation of biofunctions. For production of a microbeam with a spot size of one micro-meter in diameter, the energy spread in the beam is required to be reduced to 0.02% to minimize the effect of chromatic aberrations in the focusing lenses. The energy spread in the cyclotron beam depends on a waveform of the acceleration voltage and beam phase acceptance of the cyclotron. The typical energy spread of the cyclotron beam is around 0.1% in the ordinary acceleration mode using a sinusoidal voltage waveform. The energy spread can be reduced by superimposing a fifth-harmonic voltage waveform on the fundamental one to generate a flat-top waveform for uniform energy gain. The flat-top acceleration system has been designed for the variable-energy multi-particle AVF cyclotron with acceleration harmonic mode of 1, 2 and 3. An additional coaxial cavity has been installed to generate the fifth-harmonic voltage, coupled to the main resonator. The frequency range of the fifth harmonics, 55-110 MHz, was fully covered by the flat-top acceleration system

  19. Predictive ion source control using artificial neural network for RFT-30 cyclotron

    Kong, Young Bae; Hur, Min Goo; Lee, Eun Je; Park, Jeong Hoon; Park, Yong Dae; Yang, Seung Dae

    2016-01-01

    An RFT-30 cyclotron is a 30 MeV proton accelerator for radioisotope production and fundamental research. The ion source of the RFT-30 cyclotron creates plasma from hydrogen gas and transports an ion beam into the center region of the cyclotron. Ion source control is used to search source parameters for best quality of the ion beam. Ion source control in a real system is a difficult and time consuming task, and the operator should search the source parameters by manipulating the cyclotron directly. In this paper, we propose an artificial neural network based predictive control approach for the RFT-30 ion source. The proposed approach constructs the ion source model by using an artificial neural network and finds the optimized parameters with the simulated annealing algorithm. To analyze the performance of the proposed approach, we evaluated the simulations with the experimental data of the ion source. The performance results show that the proposed approach can provide an efficient way to analyze and control the ion source of the RFT-30 cyclotron.

  20. Space charge dominated beam dynamics in 1 MeV compact proton cyclotron

    Compact high current cyclotrons to accelerate proton beams are still considered as favorable source for many applications such as isotope production, injector for high intensity cyclotron for ADSS etc. Data shows that existing commercial compact machines are limited to beam current below 1 m.A, With proper design and improved understanding of how to control the high intensity beam at low energy, it is possible to increase this current and accelerate beam of several mA's with minimum losses. The development of 1 MeV, 5 mA compact proton cyclotron at VECC is an R and D effort with the main aim to study and settle various technological and beam dynamics related problems during injection and acceleration of high intensity beams. The evolution of space charge dominated beam in a cyclotron is very complex due to the coupling between the transverse and longitudinal motions. For optimum performance, the input phase ellipses of the injected beam must be matched to the acceptance of the central region. The envelope mismatch is the major cause of emittance growth and halo formation. Thus it is important to study the evolution of space charge dominated beam during transport and acceleration in the cyclotron focusing channel to avoid beam loss