WorldWideScience

Sample records for a1at deficiency compared

  1. Progression of Emphysema Evaluated by MRI Using Hyperpolarized 3He (HP 3He) Measurements in Patients with Alpha-1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) Deficiency Compared with CT and Lung Function Tests

    Stavngaard, T.; Vejby Soegaard, L. (Danish Research Center for Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre (Denmark)); Batz, M. (Inst. of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany)); Schreiber, L.M. (Dept. of Interventional and Diagnostic Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg Univ. Medical School, Mainz (Germany)); Dirksen, A. (Dept. of Respiratory Medicine, Gentofte Hospital, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2009-11-15

    Background: The progression of emphysema is traditionally measured by pulmonary function test, with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) being the most accepted and used measurement. However, FEV1 is insensitive in detecting mild/slow progression of emphysema because of low reproducibility as compared to yearly decline. Purpose: To investigate the progression of emphysema over a period of 2 years using diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized (HP) 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency. Material and Methods: Nine patients with severe A1AT deficiency were studied over a period of 2 years (baseline, year 1, and year 2) with HP 3He MRI using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), lung function tests (FEV1 and carbon monoxide lung diffusion capacity [DL,CO]), and computed tomography (CT) using densitometric parameters (15th percentile density [CT-PD15] and relative area of emphysema below -910 HU [CT-RA-910]). Results: Seven patients were scanned three times, one patient two times, and one patient only at baseline. The mean increase in ADC values from first to last HP 3He MR scanning was 3.8% (0.014 cm2/s [SD 0.024 cm2/s]; not significant). The time trends for FEV1, DL,CO, CT-PD15, and CT-RA-910 were all statistically significant. We found a high correlation between ADC and DL,CO (P<0.001). Conclusion: This pilot study indicates the possible use of nonionizing HP 3He MRI for monitoring the progression of emphysema. However, in the future, larger studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results

  2. Progression of Emphysema Evaluated by MRI Using Hyperpolarized 3He (HP 3He Measurements in Patients with Alpha-1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) Deficiency Compared with CT and Lung Function Tests

    Background: The progression of emphysema is traditionally measured by pulmonary function test, with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) being the most accepted and used measurement. However, FEV1 is insensitive in detecting mild/slow progression of emphysema because of low reproducibility as compared to yearly decline. Purpose: To investigate the progression of emphysema over a period of 2 years using diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized (HP) 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency. Material and Methods: Nine patients with severe A1AT deficiency were studied over a period of 2 years (baseline, year 1, and year 2) with HP 3He MRI using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), lung function tests (FEV1 and carbon monoxide lung diffusion capacity [DL,CO]), and computed tomography (CT) using densitometric parameters (15th percentile density [CT-PD15] and relative area of emphysema below -910 HU [CT-RA-910]). Results: Seven patients were scanned three times, one patient two times, and one patient only at baseline. The mean increase in ADC values from first to last HP 3He MR scanning was 3.8% (0.014 cm2/s [SD 0.024 cm2/s]; not significant). The time trends for FEV1, DL,CO, CT-PD15, and CT-RA-910 were all statistically significant. We found a high correlation between ADC and DL,CO (P3He MRI for monitoring the progression of emphysema. However, in the future, larger studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results

  3. Deficiencies

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  4. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF IRON SUPPLEMENTS IN SOUTH INDIAN ANTENATAL WOMEN WITH IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA

    Geetha; Rageshwari; Parvathavarthini; Sowmia; Priestly Vivekkumar; Simhadri V. S. D. N. A; Umamageswari

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Iron deficiency anemia is the most common nutritional disorder in the world. It is a major public health problem particularly among pregnant women with adverse effects on the mother and the new born. Iron supplementation is universally recommended to correct or prevent iron deficiency. AIMS & OBJECTIVE: The present study was conducted to compare the efficacy and tolerability of three oral iron preparations in anemic pregnant women of more than 14 weeks of gesta...

  5. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF IRON SUPPLEMENTS IN SOUTH INDIAN ANTENATAL WOMEN WITH IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA

    Geetha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron deficiency anemia is the most common nutritional disorder in the world. It is a major public health problem particularly among pregnant women with adverse effects on the mother and the new born. Iron supplementation is universally recommended to correct or prevent iron deficiency. AIMS & OBJECTIVE: The present study was conducted to compare the efficacy and tolerability of three oral iron preparations in anemic pregnant women of more than 14 weeks of gestation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Randomized Control trial, done at Tagore Medical College and Hospital, Chennai. 60 antenatal women were selected; they were divided into three groups, 20 in each group. They were treated with Carbonyl iron, ferrous sulphate and ferrous fumarate. Hemoglobin estimation was done at 0 day, 30th and 60th day. Adverse effects were monitored. RESULTS: Data analysis showed an increase in haemoglobin levels in all three groups after the 30th day (p<0.05. Carbonyl iron showed highly significant increase (p<0.05 in the haemoglobin level as compared to the other two drugs at the end of the 60th day. CONCLUSION: Carbonyl iron is superior in efficacy when compared to ferrous sulphate and ferrous fumarate and is better tolerated. So carbonyl iron is safe in pregnancy and can be given as a supplement to treat iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy.

  6. Comparative proteome analysis of the response of ramie under N, P and K deficiency.

    Deng, Gang; Liu, Li Jun; Zhong, Xin Yue; Lao, Cheng Ying; Wang, Hong Yang; Wang, Bo; Zhu, Cong; Shah, Fahad; Peng, Ding Xiang

    2014-06-01

    Ramie is an important natural fiber. There has been little research on the molecular mechanisms of ramie related to the absorption, utilization and metabolism of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). One approach to reveal the mechanisms of N, P and K (NPK) utilization and metabolism in ramie is comparative proteome analysis. The differentially expressed proteins in the leaves of ramie were analyzed by proteome analysis after 6 days of N- and K-deficient treatments and 3 days of P-deficient treatment using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and 32, 27 and 51 differential proteins were obtained, respectively. These proteins were involved in photosynthesis, protein destination and storage, energy metabolism, primary metabolism, disease/defense, signal transduction, cell structure, transcription, secondary metabolism and protein synthesis. Ramie responded to NPK stress by enhancing secondary metabolism and reducing photosynthesis and energy metabolism to increase endurance. Specifically, ramie adapted to NPK deficiency by increasing signal transduction pathways, enhancing the connection between glycolysis and photosynthesis, promoting the intracellular flow of carbon and N; promoting the synthesis cysteine and related hormones and upregulating actin protein to promote growth of the root system. The experimental results provide important information for further study on the high-efficiency NPK utilization mechanism of ramie. PMID:24573224

  7. Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Children With First Attack of Seizure and on Healthy Control Group: A Comparative Study

    Razieh FALLAH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Fallah R, Tirandazi F, Ferdosian F, Fadavi N. Iron Deficiency And Iron Deficiency Anemia in Children With First Attack of Seizure and on Healthy Control Group : A Comparative Study. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Summer;8(3: 18-23. AbstractObjectiveSeizures are the most common pediatric neurologic problem. Research of the association between iron deficiency and seizures has shown conflicting results.This study evaluates iron status of children with a first seizure attack (febrile seizure (FS or first unprovoked afebrile seizure (FUS and healthy control group.Materials & MethodsIn a cross sectional case control study, iron status of 6–60 month year old admitted children with first seizure to Shahid Sadoughi Hospital from August 2011–December 2012 were evaluated and compared with healthy control children that were referred to primary health care center of Azadshar, Yazd, Iran.Results150 children were compared in three equal (FS, afebrile seizure, and control groups.Hemoglobin levels in FUS (11.39 ± 1.07 g/dl and FS (11.46 ± 1.18 g/dl were lower than the control group (11.9 ± 0.89 g/dl group.Serum iron levels in FS (38.52 ± 11.38 μg/dL and FUS (42.68 ± 14.76 μg/dL were lower than the control group (54.32 ± 13.46 μg/dL.Serum ferritin level in FUS (46.21 ± 27.63 ng/mL and FS (48.91 ±22.96 ng/mL was lower than the control group (75.13 ± 35.57 ng/mL.Iron deficiency (48% in FS, 44% in FUS and 28% in control group and iron deficiency anemia (26% in FUS, 22% in FS, and 10% in healthy children was more frequent in children with seizures.ConclusionIron status should be evaluated in children with a first attack of febrile or afebrile seizures.ReferencesMikati MA. Seizures in Childhood. Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, Schor NF, St. Geme JW, Behrman RE. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. Philadelphia, Saunders 2011; 19th edition, Pp: 2013-2017.Yadav D, Chandra J. Iron deficiency: beyond anemia. Indian J Pediatr 2011

  8. Comparative study of Zn deficiency in L. sativa and B. oleracea plants: NH4(+) assimilation and nitrogen derived protective compounds.

    Navarro-León, Eloy; Barrameda-Medina, Yurena; Lentini, Marco; Esposito, Sergio; Ruiz, Juan M; Blasco, Begoña

    2016-07-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a major problem in agricultural crops of many world regions. N metabolism plays an essential role in plants and changes in their availability and their metabolism could seriously affect crop productivity. The main objective of the present work was to perform a comparative analysis of different strategies against Zn deficiency between two plant species of great agronomic interest such as Lactuca sativa cv. Phillipus and Brassica oleracea cv. Bronco. For this, both species were grown in hydroponic culture with different Zn doses: 10μM Zn as control and 0.01μM Zn as deficiency treatment. Zn deficiency treatment decreased foliar Zn concentration, although in greater extent in B. oleracea plants, and caused similar biomass reduction in both species. Zn deficiency negatively affected NO3(-) reduction and NH4(+) assimilation and enhanced photorespiration in both species. Pro and GB concentrations were reduced in L. sativa but they were increased in B. oleracea. Finally, the AAs profile changed in both species, highlighting a great increase in glycine (Gly) concentration in L. sativa plants. We conclude that L. sativa would be more suitable than B. oleracea for growing in soils with low availability of Zn since it is able to accumulate a higher Zn concentration in leaves with similar biomass reduction. However, B. oleracea is able to accumulate N derived protective compounds to cope with Zn deficiency stress. PMID:27181942

  9. Comparative 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex-Deficient, l-Valine-Producing Corynebacterium glutamicum▿†

    Bartek, Tobias; Blombach, Bastian; Lang, Siegmund; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Oldiges, Marco; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    l-Valine can be formed successfully using C. glutamicum strains missing an active pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC). Wild-type C. glutamicum and four PDHC-deficient strains were compared by 13C metabolic flux analysis, especially focusing on the split ratio between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Compared to the wild type, showing a carbon flux of 69% ± 14% through the PPP, a strong increase in the PPP flux was observed in PDHC-deficient strains with a maximum o...

  10. Efficacy and tolerability of 16% subcutaneous immunoglobulin compared with 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary antibody deficiency.

    Niebur, H B; Duff, C M; Shear, G F; Nguyen, D; Alberdi, T K; Dorsey, M J; Sleasman, J W

    2015-09-01

    Multiple subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) products are available to treat primary antibody deficiency (PAD). The efficacy and tolerability of 16% SCIG (Vivaglobin(®) ) was compared with 20% SCIG (Hizentra(®) ) in PAD subjects. The study was a prospective, single-centre, open-label study of PAD subjects transitioning Vivaglobin to equivalent Hizentra doses, rounded to the nearest vial size. Comparisons included immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels; tetanus, varicella and Streptococcus pneumoniae titres; adverse events (AEs), annual infection rate and quality of life during 8 weeks of Vivaglobin and 24 weeks of Hizentra. Thirty-two subjects (aged 2-75 years) participated. Rounding to the nearest Hizentra vial size resulted in a 12·8% (± 2·9%) increase in SCIG dose. Median immunoglobulin (Ig)G level following 8 weeks of Vivaglobin was similar to 24 weeks of Hizentra (1050 versus 1035 mg/dl, respectively; P = 0·77). Both products had similar protective titres to tetanus, varicella and serotypes of S. pneumoniae, which were variable but well above protective levels. After 12 weeks of Hizentra, subjects reported fewer local site reactions compared with Vivaglobin. Switching products resulted in increased systemic AEs in some subjects but, overall, not significantly higher than during Vivaglobin treatment. Average infusion time decreased from 104·7 min (3·3 sites) with Vivaglobin to 70·7 min (2·2 sites) with Hizentra (P = 0·0005). Acute serious bacterial infections were similar. Treatment satisfaction was superior with Hizentra. Hizentra and Vivaglobin have similar pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Although transition to a different SCIG product initially increased AEs, Hizentra is well tolerated and can be infused more rapidly and with fewer sites compared to Vivaglobin. PMID:25761372

  11. Comparative gene expression and phenotype analyses of skeletal muscle from aged wild-type and PAPP-A-deficient mice.

    Conover, Cheryl A; Bale, Laurie K; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2016-07-01

    Mice deficient in pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) have extended lifespan associated with decreased incidence and severity of degenerative diseases of age, such as cardiomyopathy and nephropathy. In this study, the effect of PAPP-A deficiency on aging skeletal muscle was investigated. Whole-genome expression profiling was performed on soleus muscles from 18-month-old wild-type (WT) and PAPP-A knock-out (KO) mice of the same sex and from the same litter ('womb-mates') to identify potential mechanisms of skeletal muscle aging and its retardation in PAPP-A deficiency. Top genes regulated in PAPP-A KO compared to WT muscle were associated with increased muscle function, increased metabolism, in particular lipid metabolism, and decreased stress. Fiber cross-sectional area was significantly increased in solei from PAPP-A KO mice. In vitro contractility experiments indicated increased specific force and decreased fatigue in solei from PAPP-A KO mice. Intrinsic mitochondrial oxidative capacity was significantly increased in skeletal muscle of aged PAPP-A KO compared to WT mice. Moreover, 18-month-old PAPP-A KO mice exhibited significantly enhanced endurance running on a treadmill. Thus, PAPP-A deficiency in mice is associated with indices of healthy skeletal muscle function with age. PMID:27086066

  12. Iodine deficiency in children: A comparative study in two districts of south-interior Karnataka, India

    Mansoor Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Iodine is an essential component of the hormones produced by the thyroid gland that are essential for mammalian life. Although goiter is the most visible sequelae of iodine deficiency, the major impact of hypothyroidism as a result of iodine deficiency is impaired neurodevelopment, particularly early in life. According to the World Health Organization, it is the single most preventable cause of mental retardation and brain damage. The simplest, most effective and inexpensive preventive method is the consumption of iodized salt. Objectives: The objective of the following study is to estimate the prevalence of goiter in children in the rural areas of Mysore and Coorg districts in India and estimate iodine levels in salt samples. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study in the age group of 6-12 years, using population proportionate to size systematic sampling method. The total sample size was 10,082: out of which 5337 was from Mysore and the rest from Coorg district. Clinical examination of the thyroid gland was done and salt samples collected for the estimation of Iodine. Results: The total prevalence of goiter was 19.01% in children of 6-12 years in Coorg district and 8.77% in Mysore district and it was more in females than in males. Conclusions: It was observed that iodine deficiency disorders is endemic in both districts, with a prevalence of 19.01% in children aged 6-12 years in Coorg district and 8.77% in Mysore district. Analysis of salt samples suggested that most of the samples were inadequately iodised (73.92% in Coorg and 45.92% in Mysore.

  13. A comparative study on radiation sensitivity of preparations from normal and dystrophic (vitamin E deficient) muscles

    The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of homogenates prepared from striated muscles of normal rabbits increases on the effect of low dose 60Co γ irradiation while it decreases on the effect of high doses. However, no activity increase can be observed in homogenates from muscle of vitamin E deficient rabbits even with low dose irradiation. Nevertheless, activity increase in the homogenates prepared by addition of a non-ionic detergent (Triton-X-100) continuously decreases, irrespective of the fact whether the homogenates originate from normal or dystrophic muscle. The activity increase occurring on low dose irradiation can also be observed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The difference between the preparations from normal and dystrophic muscle is manifested by the lower activating effect of irradiation in dystrophic than in normal muscle, activity increase may be even absent. The ATPase activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum will not grow on the effect of preparations. The different behavior to irradiation of AChE in normal and dystrophic muscle preparations was discussed with special reference to the role of vitamin E in stabilizing membrane structures. (author)

  14. Comparative study on radiation sensitivity of preparations from normal and dystrophic (vitamin E deficient) muscles

    Katona, G.; Szekessy-Hermann, V. (Semmelweis Orvostudomanyi Egyetem, Budapest (Hungary)); Szabo, L.D. (Orszagos Frederic Joliot-Curie Sugarbiologiai es Sugaregeszseguegyi Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary))

    1983-11-22

    The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of homogenates prepared from striated muscles of normal rabbits increases on the effect of low dose /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. irradiation while it decreases on the effect of high doses. However, no activity increase can be observed in homogenates from muscle of vitamin E deficient rabbits even with low dose irradiation. Nevertheless, activity increase in the homogenates prepared by addition of a non-ionic detergent (Triton-X-100) continuously decreases, irrespective of the fact whether the homogenates originate from normal or dystrophic muscle. The activity increase occurring on low dose irradiation can also be observed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The difference between the preparations from normal and dystrophic muscle is manifested by the lower activating effect of irradiation in dystrophic than in normal muscle, activity increase may be even absent. The ATPase activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum will not grow on the effect of preparations. The different behavior to irradiation of AChE in normal and dystrophic muscle preparations was discussed with special reference to the role of vitamin E in stabilizing membrane structures.

  15. Comparative study on radiation sensitivity of preparations from normal and dystrophic (Vitamin-E deficient) muscles

    Katona, G.; Szabo, L.D.; Szekessy-Hermann, V.

    1983-01-01

    The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of homogenates prepared from the cross-striated muscles of normal rabbits increases with low dose /sup 60/Co-..gamma..-irradiation while it decreases with high doses. However, no activity increase can be observed in homogenates from muscles of vitamin-E deficient rabbits even with low dose irradiation. Nonetheless, activity increases in the homogenates prepared by addition of a non-ionic detergent (Triton-X-100) continuously decreases, irrespective of whether or not the homogenates originate from normal or dystrophic muscles. The activity increases occurring at low dose irradiation can also be observed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The difference between the preparations for normal and dystrophic muscles is manifested by the lower activating effect of irradiation in dystrophic rather than in normal muscle, and activity increases may even be absent. The ATPase activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum does not increase with the efffect of preparations. The different behaviour to irradiation of AChE in normal and dystrophic muscle preparations was discussed with special reference to the role of vitamin-E in stabilizing membrane structure. 34 references, 6 figures.

  16. A Comparative Study of Ethylene Emanation upon Nitrogen Deficiency in Natural Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana

    De Gernier, Hugues; De Pessemier, Jérôme; Xu, Jiajia; Cristescu, Simona M.; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Hermans, Christian

    2016-01-01

    An original approach to develop sustainable agriculture with less nitrogen fertilizer inputs is to tackle the cross-talk between nitrogen nutrition and plant growth regulators. In particular the gaseous hormone, ethylene, is a prime target for that purpose. The variation of ethylene production in natural accessions of the model species Arabidopsis thaliana was explored in response to the nitrate supply. Ethylene was measured with a laser-based photoacoustic detector. First, experimental conditions were established with Columbia-0 (Col-0) accession, which was grown in vitro on horizontal plates across a range of five nitrate concentrations (0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, or 10 mM). The concentrations of 1 and 10 mM nitrate were retained for further characterization. Along with a decrease of total dry biomass and higher biomass allocation to the roots, the ethylene production was 50% more important at 1 mM than at 10 mM nitrate. The total transcript levels of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASES (ACS) in roots and those of ACC OXIDASES (ACO) in shoots increased by 100% between the same treatments. This was mainly due to higher transcript levels of ACS6 and of ACO2 and ACO4 respectively. The assumption was that during nitrogen deficiency, the greater biomass allocation in favor of the roots was controlled by ethylene being released in the shoots after conversion of ACC originating from the roots. Second, biomass and ethylene productions were measured in 20 additional accessions. Across all accessions, the total dry biomass and ethylene production were correlated negatively at 1 mM but positively at 10 mM nitrate. Furthermore, polymorphism was surveyed in ACC and ethylene biosynthesis genes and gene products among accessions. Very few substitutions modifying the amino acids properties in conserved motifs of the enzymes were found in the accessions. Natural variation of ethylene production could be further explored to improve Nitrogen Use Efficiency (NUE), in particular by

  17. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF INTRAVENOUS IRON SUCROSE AND O RAL IRON IN IRON DEFICIENCY ANAEMIA AMONG PREGNANT WOME N IN RURAL

    Meenal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA is the commonest medi cal disorder in pregnancy in developing countries including India. It is not only the leading cause of maternal death but also an aggravating factor in haemorrhage, sepsis and tox emia. Conditions such as abortions, premature births, antepartum haemorrhage, post partum haemorrhage and low birth weight were especially associated with low haemoglobin leve ls in pregnancy. 40 -80% of women belonging to low socio economic groups are anaemic i n the last trimester of pregnancy. Research on alternative to Iron Folic acid (IFA su pplementation is being carried out in some parts of India. Intravenous (IV Iron sucrose thera py is one such alternative. This study was planned to evaluate the response to intravenous iron sucrose in anaemic pregnant women from rural areas and compare it with oral iron therapy.

  18. Iron supplementation protocols for iron deficiency anemia: A comparative review of iron regimens in three countries of India, Iran and England

    Tahereh Fathi Najafi; Robab Latifnejad Roudsari; Mahshid Hejazi

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim: Iron deficiency anemia is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world today. It affects the lives of millions of women and children through contributing to poor cognitive development, increased maternal mortality and decreased work capacity.  Because of the important role of Iron in the physical and cognitive health, and for the universal consideration of eradication of this problem, this review aimed to compare iron supplementary programs in three countries if I...

  19. X-ray deficiency on strongly accreting T Tauri stars. Comparing Orion with Taurus

    Bustamante, I.; Merín, B.; Bouy, H.; Manara, C. F.; Ribas, Á.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Depending on whether a T Tauri star accretes material from its circumstellar disk or not, different X-ray emission properties can be found. The accretion shocks produce cool heating of the plasma, contributing to the soft X-ray emission from the star. Aims: Using X-ray data from the Chandra Orion Ultra-deep Project and accretion rates that were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 photometric measurements in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), we studied the relation between the accretion processes and the X-ray emissions of a coherent sample of T Tauri sources in the region. Methods: We performed regression and correlation analyses of our sample of T Tauri stars between the X-ray parameters, stellar properties, and the accretion measurements. Results: We find that a clear anti-correlation is present between the residual X-ray luminosity and the accretion rates in our samples in Orion that is consistent with that found on the XMM-Newton Extended Survey of the Taurus molecular cloud (XEST) study. A considerable number of classified non-accreting sources show accretion rates comparable to those of classical T Tauri Stars (CTTS). Our data do not allow us to confirm the classification between classical and weak-line T Tauri stars (WTTS), and the number of WTTS in this work is small compared to the complete samples. Thus, we have used the entire samples as accretors in our analysis. We provide a catalog with X-ray luminosities (corrected from distance) and accretion measurements of an ONC T Tauri stars sample. Conclusions: Although Orion and Taurus display strong differences in their properties (total gas and dust mass, star density, strong irradiation from massive stars), we find that a similar relation between the residual X-ray emission and accretion rate is present in the Taurus molecular cloud and in the accreting samples from the ONC. The spread in the data suggests dependencies of the accretion rates and the X-ray luminosities other than the

  20. Comparing The Gene Expression Changes Induced By Either Folate Deficiency Or Ionizing Radiation In Cultured Human Lymphocytes

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) which is the primary cause of chromosomal aberrations and cancer and the most serious DNA lesion caused by ionizing radiation are also caused by several common vitamin or mineral deficiencies such as folate, B6 or B12. In a previous study, we showed that physiological levels of folate deficiency cause as much DNA damage as relatively high levels of ionizing radiation, but with a different cellular response. In the current study, cultured human lymphocytes were either irradiated at low and high doses or cultured at different levels of folate deficiency to assess changes in the cellular response by measuring: apoptosis, cell cycle, and changes in gene expression using flow cytometry and micro array. Irradiated lymphocytes showed cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase in a dose dependant manner. The G2/M arrest was still evident 72 h after irradiation. In contrast to radiation, folate deficiency caused an arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle in an apparently dose-dependent manner. For the conditions used in this study, though, physiological concentrations of folate deficiency (12 nM) induced as much DNA damage as did 1 Gy of radiation, a relatively high dose; they affected the expression of different genes. Radiation activated excision and DNA double-strand break repair genes, and repressed mitochondrial encoded genes. Folate deficiency activated base and nucleotide excision repair genes and repressed folate-related genes. No DNA double-strand break repair gene was activated by folate deficiency. Results explain why physiological levels of folate deficiency cause as much DNA damage as relatively high levels of ionizing radiation, but with a different cellular response. The results also explain why low doses of radiation can induce radio adaptive response. These findings suggest that exposure to very low doses of radiation from background or occupational exposure may pose a smaller cancer risk than consuming poor diet

  1. Comparable Genital Tract Infection, Pathology, and Immunity in Rhesus Macaques Inoculated with Wild-Type or Plasmid-Deficient Chlamydia trachomatis Serovar D

    Qu, Yanyan; Frazer, Lauren C.; O'Connell, Catherine M.; Tarantal, Alice F.; Andrews, Charles W.; O'Connor, Shelby L.; Russell, Ali N.; Sullivan, Jeanne E.; Poston, Taylor B.; Vallejo, Abbe N.; Darville, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Rhesus macaques were studied to directly address the potential for plasmid-deficient Chlamydia trachomatis to serve as a live attenuated vaccine in the genital tract. Five repeated cervical inoculations of rhesus macaques with wild-type serovar D strain D/UW-3/Cx or a plasmid-deficient derivative of this strain, CTD153, resulted in infections with similar kinetics and induced comparable levels of protective immunity. After all animals received five challenges with D/UW-3/Cx, levels of inflamm...

  2. Comparing the Genotoxic Effects Induced by Folate Deficiency to Those Induced By Ionizing Radiation in Cultured Human Lymphocytes

    DNA double -strand breaks (DSB) which is the primary cause of chromosomal aberrations and cancer and the most serious DNA lesion caused by ionizing radiation, are also caused by several common vitamin or mineral deficiencies such as folate, B6, or B12. In the current study, cultured human lymphocytes were either irradiated at low and high doses or cultured at different levels of folate deficiency to assess: cell proliferation, apoptosis , cell cycle, DNA single -strand (SSB) and double strand (DSB ) breaks. Radiation and folate deficiency, decreased cell proliferation and induced DNA breaks, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. Cells irradiated with 1 Gy had proliferation rate ∼ 50% that of unirradiated cells; 5 Gy completely abolished lymphocyte proliferation. The proliferation rate of cells cultured in 12 nM folate was 46% that of control cells and lymphocytes cultured in 0 nM folate did not proliferate. Irradiated lymphocytes showed cell cycle arrest in G 2/M phase in a dose dependant manner. The G 2/M arrest was still evident 72 h after irradiation. In contrast to radiation, folate deficiency caused an arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle in an apparently dose-dependent manner. DNA breaks as measured by the alkaline Comet assay were increased for radiation doses of 1 Gy and higher, although statistical significance was achieved only at 5 Gy. Similarly, cells cultured in low folate showed a dose-dependent increase in DNA breaks. For the conditions used in this study, physiological concentrations of folate deficiency (12 nM) induced as much DNA damage as did 1 Gy of radiation, a relatively high dose. Results suggest that physiological levels of folate deficiency cause as much DNA damage as relatively high levels of ionizing radiation, but with a different cellular response. The results also suggest that low doses of radiation can induce radio adaptive response, protecting the cells from damage induced by subsequent irradiation. This adaptive response has not

  3. Comparing the Genotoxic Effects Induced by Folate Deficiency to Those Induced By Ionizing Radiation in Cultured Human Lymphocytes

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) which is the primary cause of chromosomal aberrations and cancer and the most serious DNA lesion caused by ionizing radiation, are also caused by several common vitamin or mineral deficiencies such as folate, B6, or B12. In the current study, cultured human lymphocytes were either irradiated at low and high doses or cultured at different levels of folate deficiency to assess: cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, DNA single-strand (SSB) and double strand (DSB) breaks and changes in gene expression. Both, radiation and folate deficiency, decreased cell proliferation and induced DNA breaks, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. Cells irradiated with 1 Gy had proliferation rate of ?50% that of unirradiated cells; 5 Gy completely abolished lymphocyte proliferation. The proliferation rate of cells cultured in 12 n M folate was 46% that of control cells and lymphocytes cultured in 0 n M folate did not proliferate. Irradiated lymphocytes showed cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase in a dose dependant manner. The G2/M arrest was still evident 72 h after irradiation. In contrast to radiation, folate deficiency caused an arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle in an apparently dose-dependent manner. DNA breaks as measured by the alkaline Comet assay were increased for radiation doses of 1 Gy and higher, although statistical significance was achieved only at 5 Gy. Similarly, cells cultured in low folate showed a dose-dependent increase in DNA breaks. For the conditions used in this study, physiological concentrations of folate deficiency (12 n M) induced as much DNA damage as did 1 Gy of radiation, a relatively high dose. Results suggest that physiological levels of folate deficiency cause as much DNA damage as relatively high levels of ionizing radiation, but with a different cellular response. The results also suggest that low doses of radiation can induce radio adaptive response, protecting the cells from damage induced by subsequent irradiation

  4. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF IMPROVEMENT IN HAEMOGLOBIN % IN IRON DEFICIENCY ANAEMIA TREATED WITH IRON SUPPLEMENTS ALONE AND IRON WITH B12 SUPPLEMENTATION

    Suhasini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available C o - existence of vitamin B 12 deficiencies along with iron has been observed among young females aged between 15 to 25 years .but limited evidence is available from india.so comparative study was done in young females with iron deficiency anaema in the improvement of haemoglobin % treated with iro n supplementation alone and iron along with B12 supplementation in Kadapa , A ndhra Pradesh. A total of 50 young females with moderate anaemia 1 (Hb % in between 8 - 10gm % were taken. T hey were divided into two groups .group - 1 consists of 25 patients treated with oral iron, group - 2 consists of 25 patients treated with oral iron and oral B12. R esults - significantly found that Hb% improvement was more in females treated with iron and B 12 compared with group treated with iron alone. Conclusion : This study shows that in addition to iron supplementation B12 supplementation was benefi cial in the improvement of Hb%

  5. Comparative effects of dietary nucleoside-nucleotide mixture and its components on endotoxin induced bacterial translocation and small intestinal injury in protein deficient mice.

    Adjei, A A; Yamauchi, K.; Chan, Y. C.; Konishi, M; Yamamoto, S.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Nucleoside-nucleotide mixture has been shown to improve gut morphology and reduce the incidence of bacterial translocation in protein deficient mice. AIMS--To compare the reparative effect of nucleoside-nucleotide mixture and their individual components on maintenance of gut integrity and bacterial translocation based on their differential metabolism and utilisation. METHODS--ICR (CD-1) mice were randomised into eight groups of 10 animals each and fed 20% casein diet (control), pr...

  6. Comparative effects of wild type Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and its indole acetic acid-deficient mutants on wheat.

    Hassan, T U; Bano, A

    2016-09-01

    The present investigation evaluated the role of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and its IAA-deficient mutant on soil health and plant growth under salinity stress in the presence of tryptophan. In the first phase, S. maltophilia isolated from roots of the halo- phytic herb, Cenchrus ciliaris was used as bio-inoculant on wheat grown in saline sodic soil. A field experiment was conducted at Soil Salinity Research Institute during 2010-2011. Treatments included seed inoculation with S. maltophilia with or without tryptophan; uninoculated untreated plants were taken as control. An aqueous solution of tryptophan was added to rhizosphere soil at 1 μg l(_1) after seed germination. Inoculation with S. maltophilia significantly increased soil organic matter, enhanced (20-30%) availability of P, K, Ca and NO3 -N and decreased Na content and electrical conductivity of rhizosphere soil. Plant height, fresh weight, proline and phytohormone content of leaves were increased 30-40% over the control. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) were 40-50% higher than control. Addition of tryptophan further augmented (10-15%) growth parameters, whereas NO3 -N, P, K and Ca content, proline content and SOD and POD increased 20-30%. In a second phase, indoleacetic acid (IAA)-deficient mutants of S. maltophilia were constructed and evaluated for conversion of tryptophan to IAA at the University of Calgary, Canada, during 2013-2014. About 1800 trans-conjugants were constructed that were unable to produce IAA in the presence of tryptophan. The results suggest that tryptophan assisted S. maltophilia in the amelioration of salt stress, and that IAA played positive role in induction of salt tolerance. PMID:27263526

  7. A Comparative Study of Prevalence of Iron Deficiency Anaemia in Antenatal Women from Urban and Rural Area of Pune, India

    Kundap RP

    2016-05-01

    Material and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in urban and rural health training centres of a medical college in Pune. The antenatal women were the study subjects. A total of 180 ANC cases were recruited and studies from both the field practice area attending the outpatient clinics. Sociodemographic profile was recorded and anaemia was assessed using recently done haemoglobin reports in the present pregnancy. The study duration was 6 months. GCP and ethical guidelines were followed as advised for human studies. Results: The prevalence of IDA in the study population was 66%. (rural=81%, urban=51%. IDA prevalence was 54% in primigravida and the prevalence increased as gravid status increased. Iron deficiency anaemia was seen statistically significantly associated with residence, illiteracy, type of diet, and gravida status of the pregnant women. Conclusion: IDA has strong relation with residence (urban/rural, literacy level, social status, monthly income and dietary habits. " [Natl J Community Med 2016; 7(5.000: 351-354

  8. Comparative study of efficacy, tolerability and compliance of oral iron preparations (iron edetate, iron polymatose complex) and intramuscular iron sorbitol in iron deficiency anaemia in children

    To compare the efficacy, tolerability and compliance of oral iron preparations(iron edetate and Iron polymaltose complex) with each other and with intramuscular iron sorbitol in iron deficiency anaemia in children. A Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) was carried out at the Paediatric Department of Combined Military Hospital (CMH) from January 2006 to December 2007. In total 146 children, up to 12 years age having haemoglobin (Hb%) less than 8 gm% were included. They were randomly distributed into three groups. Group A(64 cases) received oral sodium iron edetate (SIE), Group B (40 cases) received oral iron polymaltose complex (IPC) and group C (42 cases) received intramuscular iron sorbitol (IS) in recommended dosages. Rise in Hb%>10 gm% was kept as desired target. Maximum duration of treatment planned was 2 weeks for parenteral iron (group C) and 12 weeks for oral iron (groups A and B). Haematological parameters- Hb%, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were measured at induction followed at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 weeks after start of treatment. Compliance and drop out rates were determined on each visit. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 10. ANOVA was used to analyze difference in rise in Hb% at various intervals. Statistically significant increase in mean Hb%, MCV, MCHC after 02 weeks was observed in group C (IS). Rise in these parameters became significant in group A (SIE) and B (IPC) after 04 weeks. Persistent rise was observed in oral groups at 08 and 12 weeks. Rise in Hb% was much faster in group C (IS). It took 2 weeks to achieve mean Hb% > 10 gm% and compliance rate was 40.5%, while to achieve same target, duration required was 8 weeks in group A (SIE) and 12 weeks in group B (IPC) and compliance rate was 39% and 30% respectively. Adverse effects were much more common with group A (SIE) as compared to other two groups. Intramuscular iron sorbitol is a reliable and

  9. To compare the efficacy of two kinds of Zhizhu pills in the treatment of functional dyspepsia of spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome:a randomized group sequential comparative trial

    Huang Luqi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM theory, functional dyspepsia (FD can be divided into different syndromes according to different clinical symptoms and signs, and the most common one is spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome that can be treated by Chinese traditional patent medicine ---- two kinds of Zhizhu pills, between which the primary difference in ingredients is that one contains immature orange fruit of Citrus aurantium L.(IFCA and the other contains that of Citrus sinensis Osbeck (IFCS. The trial's objective was to compare the efficacy of two kinds of Zhizhu pills on symptom changes in patients with FD of spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome. Methods A randomized, group sequential, double-blinded, multicenter trial was conducted in patients with FD of spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome at 3 hospitals in Beijing between June 2003 and May 2005. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups (IFCA group and IFCS group in a 1:1 ratio, and respectively took one of the two kinds of Zhizhu pills orally, 6 g each time, 3 times a day, for 4 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed with use of a group sequential method, the triangular test (TT. Results A total of 163 patients were randomized, and 3 patients were excluded from analysis because of early dropouts, leaving 160 patients (IFCA group: n = 82; IFCS group: n = 78 for statistical analysis. Three interim analyses were done after 62, 116, and 160 patients had completed their 4-week treatment, respectively. At the third interim analysis, the sample path crossed the upper boundary and the trial was stopped, the cure-markedly effective rates were 45% for IFCS group and 67% for IFCA group, respectively, the one-sided p-value was 0.0036, the median unbiased estimate of the odds ratio (OR for the benefit of IFCA relative to IFCS was 2.91 with 95%CI: 1.40 to 6.06. No adverse events were observed in the two groups. Conclusions Zhizhu pills

  10. Angular Distribution and Angular Dispersion in Collision of 19F+27A1 at 114 MeV

    WANG Qi; Li Zhi-Chang; LU Xiu-Qin; ZHAO Kui; LIU Jian-Cheng; SERGEY Yu-Kun; DONG Yu-Chuan; LI Song-Lin; DUAN Li-Min; XU Hu-Shan; XU Hua-Gen; CHEN Ruo-Fu; WU He-Yu; HAN Jian-Long

    2004-01-01

    Angular distributions of fragments B, C, N, O, F, Ne, Na, Mg and Al induced by the collision of 19F+27 A1 at 114MeV have been measured. Angular dispersion parameters are extracted from the experimental data and compared with the theoretical ones. The dynamic dispersions for dissipative products depend strongly on the charge number Z of the fragments.

  11. Iron deficiency

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES...... understand iron metabolism in elderly HF patients....

  12. VLCAD deficiency

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N; Ibrahim, M; Tzanakos, N; Peters, H; Yaplito-Lee, J; Pitt, J J

    2006-01-01

    We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood sa...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    ... deficiency dwarfism, pituitary growth hormone deficiency dwarfism isolated GH deficiency isolated HGH deficiency isolated human growth hormone deficiency isolated somatotropin deficiency isolated somatotropin deficiency disorder ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia Explore Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ...

  15. Organophosphates and monocyte esterase deficiency.

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To examine the possibility that monocyte esterase deficiency (MED) could be caused by exposure to organophosphates. METHODS--Pseudocholinesterase, paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured in the serum and acetylcholinesterase activity was measured in the red cells of a group of monocyte esterase deficient subjects and compared with the enzyme activities of a control group of monocyte esterase positive subjects. RESULTS--No significant difference was found between the enzyme...

  16. Comparing prevalence of Iron Deficiency Anemia and Beta Thalassemia Trait in microcytic and non-microcytic blood donors: suggested algorithm for donor screening

    Tiwari Aseem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of microcytosis in donors and Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA and Beta-Thalassemia trait (BTT in microcytic and non-microcytic donors has not been studied in India. The present study aims at finding the same. Materials and Methods: Initially 925 donor samples were evaluated on cell-counter. Of these, 50 were found to be microcytic. These were subjected to Ferritin and HbA2 determination. Subsequently, an additional 51, age-and-sex matched non-microcytic donor samples were selected to serve as controls. These were subjected to the same tests. Results: The prevalence of microcytosis was 5.4% (50/925. Among the microcytic donors, 52% were IDA, 36% BTT, 8% both, and 4% none. In case of non-microcytic donors 29.4% were IDA, 3.9% BTT, and 66.7% none. Conclusions: The study revealed a high prevalence of IDA and BTT in blood donors and a higher probability of finding these in the microcytic samples. This prompted authors to suggest an algorithm for screening of blood donors for IDA and BTT. The algorithm recommends doing an hemogram on all donor samples, routinely. Ferritin could be done only in microcytic samples. At levels lower than15 ng/ml, it is diagnosed as IDA, and therefore, HPLC is performed only for non-IDA samples with Ferritin levels higher than 15 ng/ml. By employing this algorithm, a substantial number of IDA and BTT could be diagnosed while keeping the number of Ferritin tests small and the number of HPLC tests even smaller and thus making it cost efficient.

  17. Comparative genomics of aldehyde dehydrogenase 5a1 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase and accumulation of gamma-hydroxybutyrate associated with its deficiency

    Malaspina Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH; aldehyde dehydrogenase 5A1 [ALDH5A1]; locus 6p22 occupies a central position in central nervous system (CNS neurotransmitter metabolism as one of two enzymes necessary for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA recycling from the synaptic cleft. Its importance is highlighted by the neurometabolic disease associated with its inherited deficiency in humans, as well as the severe epileptic phenotype observed in Aldh5a1-/- knockout mice. Expanding evidence now suggests, however, that even subtle decreases in human SSADH activity, associated with rare and common single nucleotide polymorphisms, may produce subclinical pathological effects. SSADH, in conjunction with aldo-keto reductase 7A2 (AKR7A2, represent two neural enzymes responsible for further catabolism of succinic semialdehyde, producing either succinate (SSADH or γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB; AKR7A2. A GABA analogue, GHB is a short-chain fatty alcohol with unusual properties in the CNS and a long pharmacological history. Moreover, SSADH occupies a further role in the CNS as the enzyme responsible for further metabolism of the lipid peroxidation aldehyde 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE, an intermediate known to induce oxidant stress. Accordingly, subtle decreases in SSADH activity may have the capacity to lead to regional accumulation of neurotoxic intermediates (GHB, 4-HNE. Polymorphisms in SSADH gene structure may also associate with quantitative traits, including intelligence quotient and life expectancy. Further population-based studies of human SSADH activity promise to reveal additional properties of its function and additional roles in CNS tissue.

  18. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Targeted Testing and Augmentation Therapy: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    DD Marciniuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Severe A1AT deficiency occurs in one in 5000 to one in 5500 of the North American population. While the exact prevalence of A1AT deficiency in patients with diagnosed COPD is not known, results from small studies provide estimates of 1% to 5%. The present document updates a previous Canadian Thoracic Society position statement from 2001, and was initiated because of lack of consensus and understanding of appropriate patients suitable for targeted testing for A1AT deficiency, and for the use of A1AT augmentation therapy. Using revised guideline development methodology, the present clinical practice guideline document systematically reviews the published literature and provides an evidence-based update. The evidence supports the practice that targeted testing for A1AT deficiency be considered in individuals with COPD diagnosed before 65 years of age or with a smoking history of <20 pack years. The evidence also supports consideration of A1AT augmentation therapy in nonsmoking or exsmoking patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 25% to 80% predicted attributable to emphysema and documented A1AT deficiency (level ≤11 μmol/L who are receiving optimal pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies (including comprehensive case management and pulmonary rehabilitation because of benefits in computed tomography scan lung density and mortality.

  19. Comparative study of safety and efficacy of intravenous iron sucrose and ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of postpartum iron deficiency anaemia

    Alpana Singh

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: Ferric carboxymaltose has a greater safety profile (p and offers faster elevation of haemoglobin and iron stores with lesser hospital stay as compared to iron sucrose. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(4.000: 1130-1133

  20. Estudo comparativo do uso de prednisolona versus acetato de hidrocortisona no tratamento da hiperplasia adrenal congênita por deficiência da 21-hidroxilase forma clássica Comparative study of prednisolone versus hydrocortisone acetate for treatment of patients with the classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    Flavia M. Leite

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O tratamento da hiperplasia adrenal congênita (HAC por deficiência da 21-hidroxilase forma clássica é habitualmente realizado com acetato de hidrocortisona. A hidrocortisona oral, em nosso meio, só está disponível em farmácias de manipulação. A prednisolona possui solução oral estável, comercialmente disponível, e tem como vantagem poder ser utilizada em dose única diária. O objetivo desse estudo foi comparar a eficácia da prednisolona aos resultados obtidos com o acetato de hidrocortisona. Foram estudados 15 pacientes, idade cronológica média (DP de 7,2 anos (3,6, em dois períodos consecutivos de um ano, inicialmente utilizando a hidrocortisona (17,5 mg/m²/dia, divididos em três doses, seguida do uso de prednisolona (3 mg/m²/dia, dose única matinal. A avaliação dos tratamentos foi realizada por meio das variações do escore Z de estatura para idade cronológica (deltaZE, do escore Z de estatura para a idade óssea (deltaZEIO e do escore Z do Índice de massa corporal (IMC (deltaZIMC, bem como os valores da androstenediona em cada período. Não houve diferença na deltaZE, na deltaZEIO e na deltaZIMC entre os dois períodos, assim como nos valores de androstenediona. Concluiu-se que a prednisolona em dose única diária apresenta eficácia semelhante à obtida com a hidrocortisona utilizada três vezes ao dia, podendo ser considerada uma opção terapêutica nos pacientes com HAC por deficiência da 21-hidroxilase.Hydrocortisone acetate is usually employed in the treatment of classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. In Brazil, however, oral hydrocortisone acetate is only available from manipulation pharmacies. Prednisolone has stable oral pharmaceutical formulations commercially available, with the advantage of a single daily dose. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of oral prednisolone and oral hydrocortisone in the treatment of CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency

  1. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    Anouk de Bruyn; Yves Jacquemyn; Kristof Kinget; François Eyskens

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, su...

  2. Comparative in vivo safety and efficacy of a glycoprotein G-deficient candidate vaccine strain of infectious laryngotracheitis virus delivered via eye drop.

    Coppo, Mauricio J C; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Hartley, Carol A; Gilkerson, James R; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M

    2011-08-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute respiratory disease in poultry that is commonly controlled by vaccination with conventionally attenuated virus strains. Despite the use of these vaccines, ILT remains a threat to the intensive poultry industry. Our laboratory has developed a novel candidate vaccine strain of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) lacking glycoprotein G (ΔgG-ILTV). The aim of the present study was to directly compare this candidate vaccine with three currently available commercial vaccines in vivo. Five groups of specific-pathogen-free chickens were eye-drop inoculated with one of the three commercial vaccine strains (SA2-ILTV, A20-ILTV or Serva-ILTV), or ΔgG-ILTV, or sterile medium. Vaccine safety was assessed by examining clinical signs, weight gain and persistence of virus in the trachea. Vaccine efficacy was assessed by scoring clinical signs and conducting post-mortem analyses following challenge with virulent virus. Following vaccination, birds that received ΔgG-ILTV had the highest weight gain among the vaccinated groups and had clinical scores that were significantly lower than birds vaccinated with SA2-ILTV or A20-ILTV, but not significantly different from those of birds vaccinated with Serva-ILTV. Analysis of clinical scores, weight gain, tracheal pathology and virus replication after challenge revealed a comparable level of efficacy for all vaccines. Findings from this study further demonstrate the suitability of ΔgG-ILTV as a vaccine to control ILT. PMID:21812721

  3. Comparative Temporal Proteomics of a Response Regulator (SO2426)-Deficient Strain and Wild-Type Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 During Chromate Transformation

    Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Thompson, Melissa R [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Zhang, Bing [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Thompson, Dorothea K. [Purdue University; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Predicted orphan response regulators encoded in the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 genome are poorly understood from a cellular function perspective. Our previous transcriptomic and proteomic analyses demonstrated that an annotated DNA-binding response regulator, SO2426, was significantly up-regulated in wild-type S. oneidensis cells at both themRNAand protein levels in response to acute chromate [Cr(VI)] challenge, suggesting a potential regulatory role for this protein in metal stress pathways. To investigate the impact of SO2426 activity on chromate stress response at a genome-wide scale, we describe here comparative and temporal proteome characterizations using multidimensional HPLC-MS/MS and statistical analysis to identify differentially expressed proteins in biological replicates of wild-type S. oneidensis MR-1 and a so2426 deletion ( so2426) strain, which exhibited an impaired Cr(VI) transformation rate compared to that of the parental strain. Global protein profiles were examined at different time intervals (0, 1, 3, 4 h) following exogenous chromate challenge. Results indicated that deletion of the so2426 gene negatively affected expression of a small protein subset (27 proteins) including those with annotated functions in siderophore biosynthesis (SO3032), Fe uptake (SO4743), intracellular Fe storage (Bfr1), and other transport processes. Cr(VI) exposure and subsequent ransformation dramatically increased the number of differentially expressed proteins detected,with up-regulated bundance patterns observed largely for proteins involved in general stress protection and detoxification trategies, cell motility, and protein fate. In addition, the proteome data sets were mined for amino acids with otential post-translational modifications (PTMs) indicative of a level of gene expression regulation extending eyond the transcriptional control imposed by SO2426.

  4. SEAWEED SUPPLEMENTATION TO PREVENT IODINE DEFICIENCY

    Juhi Agarwal; Sirimavo Nair

    2012-01-01

    Iodine is considered as one of the essential elements for the proper functioning of the hormones of human and animal thyroid glands. In many parts of the world iodine deficiency disorders develop because of deficiency of iodine in water and food supply. An iodine deficient goitrous mother may give birth to a cretinous baby because the fetus requires an adequate secretion of thyroxine during the later stages of pregnancy. Seaweed has such a large proportion of iodine compared to dietary minimu...

  5. A comparative study of age-related hearing loss in wild type and insulin-like growth factor I deficient mice

    Raquel Riquelme

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I belongs to the family of insulin-related peptides that fulfils a key role during the late development of the nervous system. Human IGF1 mutations cause profound deafness, poor growth and mental retardation. Accordingly, Igf1−/− null mice are dwarfs that have low survival rates, cochlear alterations and severe sensorineural deafness. Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss is a common disorder associated with aging that causes social and cognitive problems. Aging is also associated with a decrease in circulating IGF-I levels and this reduction has been related to cognitive and brain alterations, although there is no information as yet regarding the relationship between presbycusis and IGF-I biodisponibility. Here we present a longitudinal study of wild type Igf1+/+ and null Igf1−/− mice from 2 to 12 months of age comparing the temporal progression of several parameters: hearing, brain morphology, cochlear cytoarchitecture, insulin-related factors and IGF gene expression and IGF-I serum levels. Complementary invasive and non-invasive techniques were used, including auditory brainstem-evoked response (ABR recordings and in vivo MRI brain imaging. Igf1−/− null mice presented profound deafness at all the ages studied, without any obvious worsening of hearing parameters with aging. Igf1+/+ wild type mice suffered significant age-related hearing loss, their auditory thresholds and peak I latencies augmenting as they aged, in parallel with a decrease in the circulating levels of IGF-I. Accordingly, there was an age-related spiral ganglion degeneration in wild type mice that was not evident in the Igf1 null mice. However, the Igf1−/− null mice in turn developed a prematurely aged stria vascularis reminiscent of the diabetic strial phenotype. Our data indicate that IGF-I is required for the correct development and maintenance of hearing, supporting the idea that IGF-I-based therapies could contribute to

  6. Treatment of carnitine deficiency.

    Winter, S C

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a secondary complication of many inborn errors of metabolism. Pharmacological treatment with carnitine not only corrects the deficiency, it facilitates removal of accumulating toxic acyl intermediates and the generation of mitochondrial free coenzyme A (CoA). The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of carnitine for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism in 1992. This approval was based on retrospective chart analysis of 90 patients, with 18 in the untreated cohort and 72 in the treated cohort. Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. Compelling data included increased excretion of disease-specific acylcarnitine derivatives in a dose-response relationship, decreased levels of metabolites in the blood, and improved clinical status with decreased hospitalization frequency, improved growth and significantly lower mortality rates as compared to historical controls. Complications of carnitine treatment were few, with gastrointestinal disturbances and odour being the most frequent. No laboratory or clinical safety issues were identified. Intravenous carnitine preparations were also approved for treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency. Since only 25% of enteral carnitine is absorbed and gastrointestinal tolerance of high doses is poor, parenteral carnitine treatment is an appealing alternative therapeutic approach. In 7 patients treated long term with high-dose weekly to daily venous boluses of parenteral carnitine through a subcutaneous venous port, benefits included decreased frequency of decompensations, improved growth, improved muscle strength and decreased reliance on medical foods with liberalization of protein intake. Port infections were the most troubling complication. Theoretical concerns continue to be voiced that carnitine might result in fatal arrhythmias in patients with long-chain fat metabolism defects. No published clinical studies substantiate these

  7. Factor VII deficiency

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000548.htm Factor VII deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Factor VII (seven) deficiency is a disorder caused by a ...

  8. Folate-deficiency anemia

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  9. Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) LAD is an immune deficiency in ... are slow to heal also may have LAD. Treatment and Research Doctors prescribe antibiotics to prevent and ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can ...

  11. Factor V deficiency

    Factor V deficiency is a condition that is passed down through families, which affects the ability of the blood ... These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor V deficiency is caused by a lack of Factor ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully ... With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ... treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics ...

  14. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000408.htm Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency is a group of rare genetic disorders ...

  15. Iron deficiency and cognition

    Hulthén, Lena

    2003-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional disorder in the world. One of the most worrying consequences of iron deficiency in children is the alteration of behaviour and cognitive performance. In iron-deficient children, striking behavioural changes are observed, such as reduced attention span, reduced emotional responsiveness and low scores on tests of intelligence. Animal studies on nutritional iron deficiency show effects on learning ability that parallel the human studies. Despite ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented ...

  19. Gene targeted therapeutics for liver disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    McLean, Caitriona

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is a 52 kDa serine protease inhibitor that is synthesized in and secreted from the liver. Although it is present in all tissues in the body the present consensus is that its main role is to inhibit neutrophil elastase in the lung. A1AT deficiency occurs due to mutations of the A1AT gene that reduce serum A1AT levels to <35% of normal. The most clinically significant form of A1AT deficiency is caused by the Z mutation (Glu342Lys). ZA1AT polymerizes in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells and the resulting accumulation of the mutant protein can lead to liver disease, while the reduction in circulating A1AT can result in lung disease including early onset emphysema. There is currently no available treatment for the liver disease other than transplantation and therapies for the lung manifestations of the disease remain limited. Gene therapy is an evolving field which may be of use as a treatment for A1AT deficiency. As the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency may represent a gain of function possible gene therapies for this condition include the use of ribozymes, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and RNA interference (RNAi), which by decreasing the amount of aberrant protein in cells may impact on the pathogenesis of the condition.

  20. Folate Deficiency in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Gopalakrishna Rajesh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, While there has been a spurt of interest in genetic alterations associated with pancreatitis in the past few years, interest in the role of environmental factors has largely focused on alcoholism and smoking with insufficient attention being paid to the contributions of nutritional deficiency, and the role of environmental toxins in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Braganza and Dormandy [1] argue convincingly about the role played by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (especially CYP1A enzyme induction by xenobiotics and the resultant oxidative stress, as also the now increasingly recognized reductive stress posed by the metabolites in initiating pancreatic injury. Their article underlines the important part played by the deficiency of methyl and thiol molecules in different stages of the progression of pancreatic damage. Furthermore, they attempt to establish a link between environmental and genetic factors and bring in a holistic view on the etiopathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis. We have recently demonstrated lower plasma methionine levels in two cohorts of chronic pancreatitis patients; one of tropical chronic pancreatitis and the other, of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis as compared to healthy controls [2] which suggests that deficiency of methyl groups may be a factor in various forms of pancreatitis. Similarly, we have shown lower red cell glutathione levels in chronic pancreatitis patients with tropical chronic pancreatitis and alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, indicating deficiency of thiol molecules. In addition, we have demonstrated significantly higher levels of plasma total homocysteine in chronic pancreatitis patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, our study has shown that there is a deficiency of red cell folate in the majority of chronic pancreatitis patients, more so in tropical chronic pancreatitis; and that folate deficiency appeared to be the key factor in hyperhomocysteinemia in chronic pancreatitis patients

  1. G6PD Deficiency

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that is most common in males. About 1 in 10 African American males in the United States has it. G6PD deficiency mainly affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen ...

  2. Deficiently Extremal Gorenstein Algebras

    Pavinder Singh

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this article is to study the homological properties of deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebras. We prove that if / is an odd deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebra with pure minimal free resolution, then the codimension of / must be odd. As an application, the structure of pure minimal free resolution of a nearly extremal Gorenstein algebra is obtained.

  3. Iron deficiency anemia

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  4. Nutritional iron deficiency

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  5. Vitamin deficiencies and excesses

    Vitamins are essential nutrients that must be supplied exogenously either as part of a well balanced diet or as supplements. Deficiency states are uncommon in developed countries except, perhaps, among some food insecure families. In contrast, deficiency states are quite common in many developing ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  7. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A; Laforet, P; Lonsdorfer-Wolf, E; Doutreleau, S; Geny, B; Akman, H O; Dimauro, S; Vissing, J

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  8. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency.

    Shankar K; Bava H; Shetty J; Joshi M

    1997-01-01

    A rare case of a 3 month old child with lipoprotein lipase deficiency who presented with bronchopneumonia is reported. After noticing lipaemic serum and lipaemia retinalis, a diagnosis of hyperlipoproteinaemia was considered. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency was confirmed with post heparin lipoprotein lipase enzyme activity estimation.

  9. Mortality and GH deficiency

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided into...... childhood onset (CO) and adult onset (AO), discriminated by an age cutoff below or above 18 years at onset of GHD. METHOD: Data on death were identified in national registries. Sex- and cause-specific mortalities were identified in CO and AO GHD when compared with controls. RESULTS: Mortality was increased...... in CO and AO GHD in both genders, when compared with controls. The hazard ratio (HR) for CO males was 8.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.5-15.1) and for females 9.4 (CI 4.6-19.4). For AO males, HR was 1.9 (CI 1.7-2.2) and for females 3.4 (CI 2.9-4.0). We found a significantly higher HR in AO females...

  10. Deficiency of α-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    Ghio AJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrew J Ghio,1 Joleen M Soukup,1 Judy H Richards,1 Bernard M Fischer,2 Judith A Voynow,2 Donald E Schmechel31US Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2Division of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics,3Joseph and Kathleen Bryan Alzheimer Disease Research Center, Department of Medicine (Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: There is evidence that proteases and antiproteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that α-1 antitrypsin (A1AT polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this antiprotease in humans are associated with a systemic disruption in iron homeostasis. Archived plasma samples from Alpha-1 Foundation (30 MM, 30 MZ, and 30 ZZ individuals were analyzed for A1AT, ferritin, transferrin, and C-reactive protein (CRP. Plasma samples were also assayed for metals using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES. Plasma levels of A1AT in MZ and ZZ individuals were approximately 60% and 20% of those for MM individuals respectively. Plasma ferritin concentrations in those with the ZZ genotype were greater relative to those individuals with either MM or MZ genotype. Plasma transferrin for MM, MZ, and ZZ genotypes showed no significant differences. Linear regression analysis revealed a significant (negative relationship between plasma concentrations of A1AT and ferritin while that between A1AT and transferrin levels was not significant. Plasma CRP concentrations were not significantly different between MM, MZ, and ZZ individuals. ICPAES measurement of metals confirmed elevated plasma concentrations of nonheme iron among ZZ individuals. Nonheme iron concentrations correlated (negatively with levels of A1AT. A1AT deficiency is associated with evidence of a disruption in iron homeostasis with plasma ferritin and nonheme iron concentrations being elevated among those with the ZZ genotype.Keywords: α-1

  11. Thiamine deficiency and delirium.

    Osiezagha, Kenneth; Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C; Barker, Narviar C; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K

    2013-04-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke's encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  12. Reticulocyte maturity indices in iron deficiency anemia

    Muriel Wollmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the reticulocyte maturity indices (low, medium, and high fluorescence ratios in iron deficient 1- to 6-year-old children, and identify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in this population. Methods: The present study included 39 subjects, divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 33, and subjects with iron deficiency anemia (n = 6. The results were analyzed by Student's t-test for comparison of means. Differences were considered significant when two-tailed p-value < 0.05. Results: Subjects with iron deficiency anemia presented increases in the proportion of mean (10.3 ± 4.7% vs. 6.0 ± 3.4%; p-value = 0.003, and high fluorescence reticulocytes (2.3 ± 0.87% vs. 0.9 ± 0.9%; p-value = 0.03 compared to the control group. The prevalence of anemia in this population was 15% (n = 6. Conclusion: The indices related to immaturity of reticulocytes are higher in the presence of iron deficiency, thus demonstrating a deficiency in the raw material to form hemoglobin and are, therefore, possible early markers of iron deficiency and anemia. We emphasize the need to standardize these indices for use in clinical practice and lab test results.

  13. Corneal proteoglycan changes under vitamin A deficiency

    The vitamin A-deficient keratinized cornea is very susceptible to ulceration possibly due to altered stromal components. In this study the proteoglycans present in the corneal stroma of vitamin A-deficient, pair-fed and normal rabbits were compared. Rabbits after weaning were placed on a vitamin A deficient diet, the same diet with retinyl palmitate added (pair-fed) or normal rabbit chow. After 5 months, the corneas of the vitamin A-deficient animals became keratinized. The corneal components were then labeled by injection of 3H-leucine and Na35SO4 into the anterior chamber of the eyes on 3 successive days. On the 4th day the animals were sacrificed the corneas removed and dissected. The labeled corneal stromas were extracted with 4 M GuHCl and the components separated on a DEAE-Sepharose column. The proteoglycans were eluted with 0.5 M and 1.0 M NaCl. The 1.0 M NaCl fraction (mainly keratin sulfate proteoglycans) was increased 25% in the vitamin A-deficient corneas over that for the pair-fed and normal corneas. These proteoglycans from the deficient corneas gave a different elution pattern on Octyl-Sepharose eluted with a Triton X-100 gradient than those from the pair-fed corneas. The total labeled proteoglycans were similar in the stromas from the 3 types of rabbits. These results indicate the various corneal proteoglycan ratios differ under vitamin A deficiency conditions

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ... 18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Public Health Topics Education & Awareness Resources Contact The Health ... Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, ...

  16. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) due to a lack of folate. Folate is a type ... B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body does ...

  17. Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency? Sleep deprivation (DEP-rih-VA- ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: February 22, 2012 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ... 2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Education & Awareness Resources Contact The Health Information Center Health Professionals Systematic Evidence Reviews & Clinical Practice ... and see the benefits of treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Contact Us FAQs Home » ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood ...

  5. Clinical significance of complement deficiencies.

    Pettigrew, H David; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2009-09-01

    The complement system is composed of more than 30 serum and membrane-bound proteins, all of which are needed for normal function of complement in innate and adaptive immunity. Historically, deficiencies within the complement system have been suspected when young children have had recurrent and difficult-to-control infections. As our understanding of the complement system has increased, many other diseases have been attributed to deficiencies within the complement system. Generally, complement deficiencies within the classical pathway lead to increased susceptibility to encapsulated bacterial infections as well as a syndrome resembling systemic lupus erythematosus. Complement deficiencies within the mannose-binding lectin pathway generally lead to increased bacterial infections, and deficiencies within the alternative pathway usually lead to an increased frequency of Neisseria infections. However, factor H deficiency can lead to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, deficiencies within the terminal complement pathway lead to an increased incidence of Neisseria infections. Two other notable complement-associated deficiencies are complement receptor 3 and 4 deficiency, which result from a deficiency of CD18, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, and CD59 deficiency, which causes paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Most inherited deficiencies of the complement system are autosomal recessive, but properidin deficiency is X-linked recessive, deficiency of C1 inhibitor is autosomal dominant, and mannose-binding lectin and factor I deficiencies are autosomal co-dominant. The diversity of clinical manifestations of complement deficiencies reflects the complexity of the complement system. PMID:19758139

  6. Adult growth hormone deficiency

    Vishal Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) is being recognized increasingly and has been thought to be associated with premature mortality. Pituitary tumors are the commonest cause for AGHD. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) has been associated with neuropsychiatric-cognitive, cardiovascular, neuromuscular, metabolic, and skeletal abnormalities. Most of these can be reversed with growth hormone therapy. The insulin tolerance test still remains the gold standard dynamic test to diagnose AGHD. Growth...

  7. Iron deficiency anemia Review

    Yıldız, İnci

    2009-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most frequent and widespread anemia around the world Its prevalence is increased in infants and adolescent girls The etiologic factors may vary but anemia is essentially related to iron deficient nutrition blood loss and malabsorption Children may have paleness cardiovascular and neurologic impacts of anemia pica epithelial changes as koilonychia glossitis angular stomatitis Treatment is by oral or parenteral supplementation of iron Turk Arch Ped 2009; 44 Suppl: ...

  8. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif;

    1995-01-01

    -deficiency may be at risk for developing hyperthermia. To pursue this, we performed a controlled study on sweating and body temperature regulation during exercise in the heat in 16 GH-treated GH-deficient patients with normalized insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor/binding protein-3 serum...... levels [11 with multiple pituitary deficiency (MPD) and 5 with isolated GH deficiency] and in 10 healthy subjects as controls (CTs). Each subject exercised on a bicycle ergometer for 60 min at a workload corresponding to 45% of their individual maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), in a room maintained at...... 35 C. GH serum concentrations increased significantly after approximately 10 min of exercise in the CTs (P <0.001) but remained low in the patients. Body heat storage was significantly higher in the patients compared with the CTs [89 (SE +/- 10) watts (MPD) vs. 37 (SE +/- 8) watts (CTs), P <0...

  9. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  10. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    G-6-PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... G6PD deficiency occurs when a person is missing or doesn't have enough of an enzyme called glucose- ...

  11. Gene targeted therapeutics for liver disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    Caitriona McLean

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Caitriona McLean*, Catherine M Greene*, Noel G McElvaneyRespiratory Research Division, Dept. Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Education and Research Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland; *Each of these authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT is a 52 kDa serine protease inhibitor that is synthesized in and secreted from the liver. Although it is present in all tissues in the body the present consensus is that its main role is to inhibit neutrophil elastase in the lung. A1AT deficiency occurs due to mutations of the A1AT gene that reduce serum A1AT levels to <35% of normal. The most clinically significant form of A1AT deficiency is caused by the Z mutation (Glu342Lys. ZA1AT polymerizes in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells and the resulting accumulation of the mutant protein can lead to liver disease, while the reduction in circulating A1AT can result in lung disease including early onset emphysema. There is currently no available treatment for the liver disease other than transplantation and therapies for the lung manifestations of the disease remain limited. Gene therapy is an evolving field which may be of use as a treatment for A1AT deficiency. As the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency may represent a gain of function possible gene therapies for this condition include the use of ribozymes, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs and RNA interference (RNAi, which by decreasing the amount of aberrant protein in cells may impact on the pathogenesis of the condition.Keywords: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, siRNA, peptide nucleic acid, ribozymes

  12. Antepartum ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Maeda, Tadashi; Takeda, Masako; Hara, Noriko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Urita, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Risa; Miura, Ken; Taniguchi, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left. PMID:25759629

  13. Elevated Serum S-Adenosylhomocysteine in Cobalamin Deficient Megaloblastic Anemia

    Guerra-Shinohara, Elvira M.; Morita, Olga E.; Regina A. Pagliusi; Blaia-d’Avila, Vera L.; Allen, Robert H.; Stabler, Sally P.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired methylation due to accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) may contribute to the pathophysiology of cobalamin deficient anemia. We assayed serum S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), SAH, total homocysteine (tHcy), and methylmalonic acid (MMA) in 15 subjects with cobalamin deficient megaloblastic anemia and compared results to 19 subjects with anemia/pancytopenia due to other causes. Cobalamin deficient subjects had a median hematocrit of 20% and mean cell volume of 111.7 fL. The median s...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... Institutes of Health—shows how Susan, a full-time worker and student, has coped with having iron- ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  16. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    biennially to exchange views and research findings. The fourth biennial meeting was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 2-3 June 2005. This review covers the wide range of AAT deficiency-related topics that were addressed encompassing advances in genetic characterization, risk factor identification, clinical...... epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques....

  17. MCAD deficiency in Denmark

    Andresen, Brage Storstein; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Hougaard, David Michael; Christensen, Ernst; Gahrn, Birthe; Christensen, Mette; Bross, Peter; Vested, Anne; Simonsen, Henrik; Skogstrand, Kristin; Olpin, Simon; Brandt, Niels Jacob; Skovby, Flemming; Nørgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Gregersen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common defect of fatty acid oxidation. Many countries have introduced newborn screening for MCADD, because characteristic acylcarnitines can easily be identified in filter paper blood spot samples by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/M...

  18. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition ...

  19. Urinary iron excretion test in iron deficiency anemia.

    Kimura,Ikuro; Yamana,Masatoshi; NNishishita,Akira; Sugiyama,Motoharu; Miyata, Akira

    1980-01-01

    A urinary iron excretion test was carried out in 22 patients with iron deficiency anemia. The iron excretion index was significantly higher in patients with intractable iron deficiency anemia compared with normal subjects and anemic patients who were responsive to iron therapy. The findings suggest that iron excretion may be a factor that modulates the response of patients to iron therapy.

  20. Vitamin B12 And Folate Deficiency In a Hospital Population

    Wadia RS

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a study of B12 and folate deficiency in a hospital population. We studied the incidence of their deficiency by evaluating blood levels in every tenth hospital admission. Among the 450 patients chosen, 417 had normal levels of both, 2 had deficiency of folate alone (folate < 3ng.ml, 3 had B12 deficiency alone (B12<200pg/mland 11 had deficiency of both (total 3.5%. In addition 12 had borderline b12 level(200-300pg/ml, 2 had borderline folate level (3-4ng/ml(0.44%and 3 had borderline levels for both (0.66% . Thus 33% had definite or borderline deficiency. This deficiency was more common in the elderly and in patients on vegetarian diet (5.7% definite deficiency, 8.8% borderline levels compared to those on a non-vegetarian diet. During the 2 1/2 years of the study a total of 99 definite deficiency and 69 borderline deficiency were seen. In the definite deficiency group, 22.3% had neuropathy, 6.1% had evidence of myelopathy, 18.2% had neuropsychiatric changes (memory defect, dementia, behavioural abnormalities, depression and 4.1% had cerebellar signs. The neurologic findings in the borderline group were almost similar (neuropathy 29%, myelopathy 8.6% and neuropsychiatric changes 18.4%. High mean corpuscular volume (MCV> 95 was seen in 69% of those with both B12 and folate deficiency, 43.4% with B12 deficiency and 61.15 with folate deficiency. Hypersegmented polymorphs were seen in 21.7% with B12 deficiency, 27.5% with folate both B12 and folate deficiency had either megaloblastosis or dimorphic picture. It is to be noted that B12 and folate deficiency in this population was more frequent than we previously considered and reliance on haematologic parameters will miss half to one third of all cases. As expected B12 deficiency is more frequent in vegetarians than non-vegetarians.

  1. Transient partial growth hormone deficiency due to zinc deficiency.

    Nishi, Y; Hatano, S; Aihara, K; Fujie, A; Kihara, M

    1989-04-01

    We present here a 13-year-old boy with partial growth hormone deficiency due to chronic mild zinc deficiency. When zinc administration was started, his growth rate, growth hormone levels, and plasma zinc concentrations increased significantly. His poor dietary intake resulted in chronic mild zinc deficiency, which in turn could be the cause of a further loss of appetite and growth retardation. There was also a possibility of renal zinc wasting which may have contributed to zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency should be carefully ruled out in patients with growth retardation. PMID:2708733

  2. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  3. Biotin and biotinidase deficiency

    Zempleni, Janos; Hassan, Yousef I.; Wijeratne, Subhashinee SK

    2008-01-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that serves as an essential coenzyme for five carboxylases in mammals. Biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze the fixation of bicarbonate in organic acids and play crucial roles in the metabolism of fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Carboxylase activities decrease substantially in response to biotin deficiency. Biotin is also covalently attached to histones; biotinylated histones are enriched in repeat regions in the human genome and appear to play a role...

  4. Vitamin B12 deficiency and gastric histopathology in older patients

    KR Dholakia; TS Dharmarajan; D Yadav; S Oiseth; EP Norkus; CS Pitchumoni

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare upper gastric endoscopic and histopathologic findings in older adults in the presence and absence of B12 deficiency.METHODS: A prospective analysis of upper gastric endoscopic and gastric histopathologic findings from 30 newly identified B12-deficient patients (11 males,19 females) and 16 controls with normal B12 status (6males, 10 females) was performed. For all subjects, the indication for upper endoscopy and gastric biopsy were unrelated to B12 status. A single pathologist, blinded to B12 status, processed and interpreted the biopsy samples. Endoscopic and histopathologic findings were correlated with age, gender, hematocrit (Hct), MCV and B12 status.RESULTS: The B12-deficient group had significantly lower mean serum B12 levels compared to the controls (P<0.00005) while their mean Hct, MCV and serum albumin levels were similar. Iron deficiency (ferritinbased) was present in 21% of B12-deficient patients and intrinsic factor antibodies were present in29% (5/17) of B12-deficient patients. The endoscopic findings revealed significantly different rates of gastritis and atrophy between the B12-deficient and control groups (P= 0.017).B12-deficient patients had significantly less superficial gastritis (62% vs 94%) and significantly more atrophic gastritis (28% vs 0%) as compared to the controls (P= 0.039). Intestinal metaplasia was similar in both groups. Helicobacter pyloriinfection rates were similar in the B12-deficient patients and controls (40% vs31%).CONCLUSION: Significantly different endoscopic findings and types of gastritis could often be observed in the presence and absence of B12 deficiency. Atrophy,based on endoscopy, and atrophic gastritis, based on histopathology, suggest the presence of B12 deficiency.Gastric histopathology is not influenced by the age,gender, Hct or MCV of the patients.

  5. Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Hassan Ahari

    1965-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to draw attention to iron deficiency anemia which is the most common nutritional disturbance in infants and children. Iron deficiency anemia constitutes the most prevalent form of anemia in this age group. The records of infants and children admitted to the Pediatric Department of Tehran University Puhlavi Hospital for various ailments during a one year period (Mnrch l!l63 - HHi-t were analyzed. 262 infants and children out of a total number of an5, or 7t•/., showed iron deficiency anemia detect cd by blood film studies and hemoglobin determination, The majority, 123 or 4{.!t•/., of these patients were infants and children between six months and two years of age. The etiology indicates that faulty feeding is the main cause. Infections, parnsitcs, and hemorrhage were among other causes observed. ,'('itll regard to treatment, parenteral iron was preferred because cf its ef., Icctivcncss in short periods of hospital stay. In conclusion, the routine study of blood films and hemoglobin determiualion, especially in the low socio _ economic group of medically less organized countries is advised

  6. Vitamin D Deficiency in Patients with Tuberculosis

    Objective: To determine the frequency and association of Vitamin D deficiency in patients with tuberculosis. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical Department, Combined Military Hospital, Kharian, from July 2010 to June 2012. Methodology: One hundred and five outdoor patients of tuberculosis were selected with 255 gender matched controls. Tuberculosis was diagnosed by presence of acid fast bacilli in sputum smears, positive culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis or demonstration of chronic caseating granulomatous inflammation in tissue specimens. Controls were drawn randomly from general population. Serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D [25 (OH) D3] levels < 25 ng/ml was considered Vitamin D deficiency. The results were analyzed on SPSS version 17. Results: Mean Vitamin D levels were 23.23 A+- 6.81 ng/ml in cases, 29.27 A+- 8.89 ng/ml in controls (p < 0.0001). Vitamin D deficiency was found in 57% of cases and 33% controls (p < 0.0001). Mean Vitamin D levels were significantly lower in females with tuberculosis (20.84 ng/ml) as compared to males (25.03 ng/ml, p = 0.002). Mean BMI in patients of tuberculosis with Vitamin D deficiency were 19.51 A+- 1.77 kg/m2 and in patients with normal Vitamin D were 21.65 A+- 1.79 kg/m2 (p < 0.0001). Mean Vitamin D levels in patients with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis was lower to a mean of 15.41 A+- 4.67 ng/ml (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: There is significant deficiency of Vitamin D in patients with tuberculosis as compared to controls. This deficiency is more pronounced in females, individuals with low BMI, extra pulmonary and MDR tuberculosis. (author)

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  8. Vitamin D Deficiency Among Professional Basketball Players

    Fishman, Matthew P.; Lombardo, Stephen J.; Kharrazi, F. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D plays an important role in several systems of the human body. Various studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to stress and insufficiency fractures, muscle recovery and function, and athletic performance. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the elite athletic population has not been extensively studied, and very few reports exist among professional athletes. Hypothesis: There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency among players attending the National Basketball Association (NBA) Combine. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This is a retrospective review of data previously collected as part of the routine medical evaluation of players in the NBA Combines from 2009 through 2013. Player parameters evaluated were height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and vitamin D level. Statistical analysis using t tests and analysis of variance was used to detect any correlation between the player parameters and vitamin D level. Vitamin D levels were categorized as deficient (32 ng/mL). Results: After institutional review board approval was submitted to the NBA, the NBA released deidentified data on 279 players who participated in the combines from 2009 through 2013. There were 90 players (32.3%) who were deficient, 131 players (47.0%) who were insufficient, and 58 players (20.8%) who were sufficient. A total of 221 players (79.3%) were either vitamin D deficient or insufficient. Among all players included, the average vitamin D level was 25.6 ± 10.2 ng/mL. Among the players who were deficient, insufficient, and sufficient, the average vitamin D levels were 16.1 ± 2.1 ng/mL, 25.0 ± 3.4 ng/mL, and 41.6 ± 8.6 ng/mL, respectively. Player height and weight were significantly increased in vitamin D–sufficient players compared with players who were not sufficient (P = .0008 and .009, respectively). Player age and BMI did not significantly differ depending on vitamin D status (P = .15 and .77

  9. 当归-红花不同配比对血虚小鼠补血作用的比较研究%Comparing tonifying blood effects of Danggui-Honghua with different proportions on blood deficiency mice

    李淑娇; 唐于平; 李伟霞; 沈娟; 郭建明; 段金廒

    2014-01-01

    Aim To observe the differences of tonify-ing blood effect for the combination of Danggui and Honghua ( GH) with different proportions on blood de-ficiency mice, and choose the proportion of GH which has the optimal tonifying blood effect. Methods The blood deficient mice model was induced by injection of phenylhydrazine and cyclophosphamide. On the basis of multi-attribute comprehensive index method, the op-timal dose was determined through three doses of GH 1: 1 , which was the highest frequency proportion of GH used in the “Dictionary of Chinese Medicine Prescrip-tions”. According to the optimal dose, the change reg-ulation of tonifying blood effect of GH with different proportions was observed. Results Among three do- ses (1, 3 and 5 times of clinical dose), the tonifying blood effect of GH was best when the dosing concentra-tion of GH was clinical dose. Among nine proportions (1 : 0, 4 : 1, 2 : 1, 3 : 2, 1 : 1, 2 : 3, 1 : 2, 1 : 4 and 0 : 1), GH 1 : 1 had the best effect. Conclusion The results are consistent with regulations of medi-cine usage that GH 1 : 1 has the highest frequency used in Herbal Formulae, which could provide scientif-ic basis for more effective application of Danggui and Honghua in modern clinic medicine.%目的:观察当归、红花两药味不同配比对血虚小鼠的补血作用差异,优选当归-红花配伍补血作用的最佳配比。方法采用乙酰苯肼与环磷酰胺联合造模法复制小鼠血虚模型。基于多指标综合指数法,首先以《中医方剂大辞典》数据库中出现频次最高的当归-红花1:1配比为代表,优选当归、红花配伍补血作用的最佳浓度;然后采用优选的最佳浓度来观察当归、红花不同配比的补血作用变化规律。结果在3个不同浓度(分别为当归、红花临床等效量的1、3、5倍)下,当归-红花剂量为临床等效量时的总补血效应最好;在当归、红花的9个不同配比(1:0、4:1、2:1、3:2、1

  10. A link between premenopausal iron deficiency and breast cancer malignancy

    Young breast cancer (BC) patients less than 45 years old are at higher risk of dying from the disease when compared to their older counterparts. However, specific risk factors leading to this poorer outcome have not been identified. One candidate is iron deficiency, as this is common in young women and a clinical feature of young age. In the present study, we used immuno-competent and immuno-deficient mouse xenograft models as well as hemoglobin as a marker of iron status in young BC patients to demonstrate whether host iron deficiency plays a pro-metastatic role. We showed that mice fed an iron-deficient diet had significantly higher tumor volumes and lung metastasis compared to those fed normal iron diets. Iron deficiency mainly altered Notch but not TGF-β and Wnt signaling in the primary tumor, leading to the activation of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). This was revealed by increased expression of Snai1 and decreased expression of E-cadherin. Importantly, correcting iron deficiency by iron therapy reduced primary tumor volume, lung metastasis, and reversed EMT markers in mice. Furthermore, we found that mild iron deficiency was significantly associated with lymph node invasion in young BC patients (p<0.002). Together, our finding indicates that host iron deficiency could be a contributor of poor prognosis in young BC patients

  11. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  12. Antithrombin deficiency in pregnancy.

    Durai, Shivani; Tan, Lay Kok; Lim, Serene

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 39-year-old, gravida 3 para 2, Chinese female with a history of inherited type 1 Antithrombin deficiency and multiple prior episodes of venous thromboembolism. She presented at 29+4 weeks' gestation with severe pre-eclampsia complicated by haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome. She subsequently underwent an emergency caesarean section for non-reassuring fetal status, which was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony, requiring a B-Lynch suture intraoperatively. PMID:27207982

  13. Nasal Tip Deficiency.

    Cerkes, Nazim

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tip deficiency can be congenital or secondary to previous nasal surgeries. Underdeveloped medial crura usually present with underprojected tip and lack of tip definition. Weakness or malposition of lateral crura causes alar rim retraction and lateral nasal wall weakness. Structural grafting of alar cartilages strengthens the tip framework, reinforces the disrupted support mechanisms, and controls the position of the nasal tip. In secondary cases, anatomic reconstruction of the weakened or interrupted alar cartilages and reconstitution of a stable nasal tip tripod must be the goal for a predictable outcome. PMID:26616702

  14. Evaluation of Ferric and Ferrous Iron Therapies in Women with Iron Deficiency Anaemia

    Ilhami Berber; Halit Diri; Mehmet Ali Erkurt; Ismet Aydogdu; Emin Kaya; Irfan Kuku

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Different ferric and ferrous iron preparations can be used as oral iron supplements. Our aim was to compare the effects of oral ferric and ferrous iron therapies in women with iron deficiency anaemia. Methods. The present study included 104 women diagnosed with iron deficiency anaemia after evaluation. In the evaluations performed to detect the aetiology underlying the iron deficiency anaemia, it was found and treated. After the detection of the iron deficiency anaemia aetiolog...

  15. Phenotypic Studies of Natural Killer Cell Subsets in Human Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing Deficiency

    Zimmer, Jacques; Bausinger, Huguette; Andrès, Emmanuel; Donato, Lionel; Hanau, Daniel; Hentges, François; Moretta, Alessandro; de la Salle, Henri

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cells from patients with transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) deficiency are hyporesponsive. The mechanism of this defect is unknown, but the phenotype of TAP-deficient NK cells is almost normal. However, we noticed a high percentage of CD56bright cells among total NK cells from two patients. We further investigated TAP-deficient NK cells in these patients and compared them to NK cells from two other TAP-deficient patients with no clinical ...

  16. Comparative study on 2,2′,4,5,5′-pentachlorobiphenyl-mediated decrease in serum thyroxine level between C57BL/6 and its transthyretin-deficient mice

    The relationships between the changes in the levels of serum total thyroxine (T4), serum T4-transthyretin (TTR) complex, and accumulation of T4 in tissues by 2,2′,4,5,5′-pentachlorobiphenyl (PentaCB) were examined using wild-type C57BL/6 (WT) and its TTR-deficient (TTR-null) mice. The constitutive level of serum total T4 was much higher in WT mice than in TTR-null mice. In WT mice 4 days after a single intraperitoneal injection with PentaCB (112 mg/kg), serum total T4 level was significantly decreased along with a decrease in serum T4–TTR complex, and the levels of serum total T4 in the PentaCB-treated WT mice were almost the same to those in PentaCB-untreated (control) TTR-null mice. In addition, a slight decrease in serum total T4 by PentaCB treatment was observed in TTR-null mice. Furthermore, clearance of [125I]T4 from the serum after [125I]T4-administration was promoted by the PentaCB-pretreatment in either strain of mice, especially WT mice. On the other hand, accumulation level of [125I]T4 in the liver, but not in extrahepatic tissues, was strikingly enhanced in the PentaCB-pretreated WT and TTR-null mice. Furthermore, in both strains of mice, PentaCB-pretreatment led to significant increases in the steady-state distribution volume of [125I]T4 and the concentration ratio of the liver to serum. The present findings demonstrate that PentaCB-mediated decrease in serum T4 level occurs mainly through increase in accumulation level of T4 in the liver and further indicate that the increased accumulation of T4 in the liver of WT mice is primarily dependent on the PentaCB-mediated inhibition of serum T4–TTR complex formation.

  17. Comparative study on 2,2′,4,5,5′-pentachlorobiphenyl-mediated decrease in serum thyroxine level between C57BL/6 and its transthyretin-deficient mice

    Kato, Yoshihisa, E-mail: kato@kph.bunri-u.ac.jp [Kagawa School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Sanuki, Kagawa 769-2193 (Japan); Tamaki, Sekihiro [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Haraguchi, Koichi [Daiichi College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka 815-8511 (Japan); Ikushiro, Shin-ichi [Faculty of Engineering, Toyama Prefectural University, Toyama 939-0398 (Japan); Sekimoto, Masashi [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Ohta, Chiho [Faculty of Nutritional Sciences, Nakamura Gakuen University, Fukuoka 814-0198 (Japan); Endo, Tetsuya [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Health Science University of Hokkaido, Hokkaido 061-0293 (Japan); Koga, Nobuyuki [Faculty of Nutritional Sciences, Nakamura Gakuen University, Fukuoka 814-0198 (Japan); Yamada, Shizuo; Degawa, Masakuni [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    The relationships between the changes in the levels of serum total thyroxine (T{sub 4}), serum T{sub 4}-transthyretin (TTR) complex, and accumulation of T{sub 4} in tissues by 2,2′,4,5,5′-pentachlorobiphenyl (PentaCB) were examined using wild-type C57BL/6 (WT) and its TTR-deficient (TTR-null) mice. The constitutive level of serum total T{sub 4} was much higher in WT mice than in TTR-null mice. In WT mice 4 days after a single intraperitoneal injection with PentaCB (112 mg/kg), serum total T{sub 4} level was significantly decreased along with a decrease in serum T{sub 4}–TTR complex, and the levels of serum total T{sub 4} in the PentaCB-treated WT mice were almost the same to those in PentaCB-untreated (control) TTR-null mice. In addition, a slight decrease in serum total T{sub 4} by PentaCB treatment was observed in TTR-null mice. Furthermore, clearance of [{sup 125}I]T{sub 4} from the serum after [{sup 125}I]T{sub 4}-administration was promoted by the PentaCB-pretreatment in either strain of mice, especially WT mice. On the other hand, accumulation level of [{sup 125}I]T{sub 4} in the liver, but not in extrahepatic tissues, was strikingly enhanced in the PentaCB-pretreated WT and TTR-null mice. Furthermore, in both strains of mice, PentaCB-pretreatment led to significant increases in the steady-state distribution volume of [{sup 125}I]T{sub 4} and the concentration ratio of the liver to serum. The present findings demonstrate that PentaCB-mediated decrease in serum T{sub 4} level occurs mainly through increase in accumulation level of T{sub 4} in the liver and further indicate that the increased accumulation of T{sub 4} in the liver of WT mice is primarily dependent on the PentaCB-mediated inhibition of serum T{sub 4}–TTR complex formation.

  18. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  19. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life aft...

  20. Iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency.

    Holland, E J; Schwartz, G S

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a group of patients with limbal stem cell (SC) deficiency without prior diagnosis of a specific disease entity known to be causative of SC deficiency. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of the records of all patients with ocular surface disease presenting to the University of Minnesota between 1987 and 1996. Patients were categorized according to etiology of limbal deficiency. Patients who did not have a specific diagnosis previously described as being causative...

  1. Zinc deficiency and eating disorders.

    Humphries, L; Vivian, B; Stuart, M; McClain, C J

    1989-12-01

    Decreased food intake, a cyclic pattern of eating, and weight loss are major manifestations of zinc deficiency. In this study, zinc status was evaluated in 62 patients with bulimia and 24 patients with anorexia nervosa. Forty percent of patients with bulimia and 54% of those with anorexia nervosa had biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency. The authors suggest that for a variety of reasons, such as lower dietary intake of zinc, impaired zinc absorption, vomiting, diarrhea, and binging on low-zinc foods, patients with eating disorders may develop zinc deficiency. This acquired zinc deficiency could then add to the chronicity of altered eating behavior in those patients. PMID:2600063

  2. Behavioral impairments in animal models for zinc deficiency

    Simone eHagmeyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apart from teratogenic and pathological effects of zinc deficiency such as the occurrence of skin lesions, anorexia, growth retardation, depressed wound healing, altered immune function, impaired night vision, and alterations in taste and smell acuity, characteristic behavioral changes in animal models and human patients suffering from zinc deficiency have been observed. Given that it is estimated that about 17% of the worldwide population are at risk for zinc deficiency and that zinc deficiency is associated with a variety of brain disorders and disease states in humans, it is of major interest to investigate, how these behavioral changes will affect the individual and a putative course of a disease. Thus, here, we provide a state of the art overview about the behavioral phenotypes observed in various models of zinc deficiency, among them environmentally produced zinc deficient animals as well as animal models based on a genetic alteration of a particular zinc homeostasis gene. Finally, we compare the behavioral phenotypes to the human condition of mild to severe zinc deficiency and provide a model, how zinc deficiency that is associated with many neurodegenerative and neuropsychological disorders might modify the disease pathologies.

  3. SEAWEED SUPPLEMENTATION TO PREVENT IODINE DEFICIENCY

    Juhi Agarwal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is considered as one of the essential elements for the proper functioning of the hormones of human and animal thyroid glands. In many parts of the world iodine deficiency disorders develop because of deficiency of iodine in water and food supply. An iodine deficient goitrous mother may give birth to a cretinous baby because the fetus requires an adequate secretion of thyroxine during the later stages of pregnancy. Seaweed has such a large proportion of iodine compared to dietary minimum requirements, that it is primarily known as a source of this nutrient. A trial study on supplementation of iodine rich seaweed Caulerpa racemosa availed from Gujarat coast was conducted on iodine-deficient or thyroid-insufficient (n=10 pregnant women. They were supplemented daily with 0.17 g of algae in 20 g wheat flour ladoo for one month so as to provide 50μg/day of iodine and 0.343 mg/day of iron. A slight non-significant increase (104.75 to 121.05 μg/L in median urinary iodine concentration (UIC was observed after one month of supplementation. No significant effect of supplementation was observed on thyroid function parameters of the subjects. They also showed slight increase in hemoglobin level. Prolonged supplementation needs to be carried out further to opine on the impact of algae.

  4. Prospective Safety Surveillance of GH-Deficient Adults: Comparison of GH-Treated vs Untreated Patients.

    Hartman, Mark L.; Xu, Rong; Crowe, Brenda J; Robison, Leslie L.; Erfurth, Eva Marie; Kleinberg, David L; Zimmermann, Alan G.; Woodmansee, Whitney W.; Cutler, Gordon B.; Chipman, John J; Melmed, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    Context: In clinical practice, the safety profile of GH replacement therapy for GH-deficient adults compared with no replacement therapy is unknown. Objective: The objective of this study was to compare adverse events (AEs) in GH-deficient adults who were GH-treated with those in GH-deficient adults who did not receive GH replacement. Design and Setting: This was a prospective observational study in the setting of US clinical practices. Patients and Outcome Measures: AEs were compared between...

  5. Cleft palate and gonadotrophin deficiency.

    Gillis, P H; Peeters, R.

    1984-01-01

    A boy who had previously had a cleft lip and palate repaired and bilateral orchiopexies presented at 16 years of age with delayed puberty. Isolated gonadotrophin deficiency and testicular hyporesponsiveness to human chorionic gonadotrophin were found. The possibility of bilateral cryptorchidism due to gonadotrophin deficiency should be considered in boys with either cleft lip or palate, or both.

  6. How prevalent is vitamin B(12) deficiency among vegetarians?

    Pawlak, Roman; Parrott, Scott James; Raj, Sudha; Cullum-Dugan, Diana; Lucus, Debbie

    2013-02-01

    Vegetarians are at risk for vitamin B(12) (B12) deficiency due to suboptimal intake. The goal of the present literature review was to assess the rate of B12 depletion and deficiency among vegetarians and vegans. Using a PubMed search to identify relevant publications, 18 articles were found that reported B12 deficiency rates from studies that identified deficiency by measuring methylmalonic acid, holo-transcobalamin II, or both. The deficiency rates reported for specific populations were as follows: 62% among pregnant women, between 25% and almost 86% among children, 21-41% among adolescents, and 11-90% among the elderly. Higher rates of deficiency were reported among vegans compared with vegetarians and among individuals who had adhered to a vegetarian diet since birth compared with those who had adopted such a diet later in life. The main finding of this review is that vegetarians develop B12 depletion or deficiency regardless of demographic characteristics, place of residency, age, or type of vegetarian diet. Vegetarians should thus take preventive measures to ensure adequate intake of this vitamin, including regular consumption of supplements containing B12. PMID:23356638

  7. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  8. INCIDENCE OF ERYTHROCYTE GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE- DEHYDROGENASE DEFICIENCY

    Sh. Rahbar

    1974-06-01

    The fluorescent spot technique was used for screening and qualitative determination of G-6-PD in erythrocytes. This technique was compared with other methods of G-6-PD enzyme assay and proved to be very reliable. Qualitative enzyme estimation was carried out with spectrophotometer methods. A total of 738 specimens tested and some degree of enzyme deficiencies were detected. In 20 specimens there was a complete enzyme deficiency and in 5 cases the enzyme activity was between 15 to 50 percent of normal subject. The data suggests, the blood bank should be warned of transfusion of enzyme deficient bloods to the patients with fauvism.

  9. Iodine deficiency in pregnant women of Lahore

    To know extent of iodine deficiency (ID), role of thyroid enlargement (goiter) as marker of ID and current status of iodized salt intake in pregnant women of Lahore. A cross sectional study was carried out at Institute of Chemistry, University of the Punjab, during March 2002 to September 2005. Pregnant women (n = 254) during first trimester attending antenatal clinic participated voluntarily. Iodine intake status was determined by urinary iodine (UI) excretion. UI excretion ranged from 34 to 142 >g/L and median value was 67>g/L. According to international criteria, 202 (79.5%) pregnant women were iodine deficient (UI <100 mu g/L) mostly (68.8%) of mild (UI: 50-99 mu g/L) degree. Moderate iodine deficiency (MID; UI <50 mu g/L) was found in 63 (24.8%) pregnant women. Among all pregnant women 80 (31.5%) had slightly visible goiter and only 87(34.2%) were currently taking iodized salt. The difference in UI excretion between goitrous and non-goitrous pregnant women was not significant. Among iodized salt users percentage of women with MID was less, though not significant, as compared to non-users (20.7% Vs 26.9%). About one-fourth of pregnant women screened in this study are moderately iodine deficient in Lahore. These women and their neonates are at increased risk of iodine deficiency disorders. Goiter is not a good indicator of low iodine intake while iodized salt consumption is beneficial in this regard (JPMA 59:741; 2009). (author)

  10. Interactions between copper deficiency, selenium deficiency and adriamycin toxicity

    Fischer, J.; Tackett, R.; Johnson, M.A. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there are interactions between copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) status, and adriamycin (ADR) toxicity. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed Cu,Se adequate; Cu deficient, Se adequate ({minus}Cu); Cu adequate, Se deficient; or Cu,Se deficient diets for 38-41 days. ADR or saline (SAL) were administered weekly for the last 4 weeks of the study. Cu deficiency was confirmed by a 3-fold decrease in liver Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and liver Cu, and a 5-fold decrease in RBC Cu,Zn-SOD. Se deficiency was confirmed by a 10-fold decrease in liver glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). ADR, Cu deficiency and Se deficiency all caused EKG abnormalities. However, Cu and Se deficiencies did not enhance ADR's influence on EKGs. ADR increased lipid peroxidation in liver by 15% and in heart by 18% (NS). Cu deficiency decreased ADR-induced lipid peroxidation in heart tissue by 25%. ADR influenced Se status by significantly increasing heart GSH-Px, and Cu status by increasing liver Cu, plasma ceruloplasmin and liver Cu, Zn-SOD. These elevations in Cu,Zn-SOD and GSH-Px may be a consequence of the increased lipid peroxidation initiated by ADR. In {minus}Cu rats, ADR caused severe hemolytic anemia characterized by a 19% decrease in hematocrit and a 17-fold increase in splenic Fe. These data suggest that there are numerous interactions between ADR toxicity and Cu and Se status.

  11. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Diagnosed?

    ... Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Diagnosed? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency usually is diagnosed after you develop a ... related to the condition. Your doctor may suspect AAT deficiency if you have signs or symptoms of ...

  12. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated?

    ... Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency has no cure, but its related lung ... pulmonary disease). If you have symptoms related to AAT deficiency, your doctor may recommend: Medicines called inhaled ...

  13. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Overview

    ... Drugs GARD Information Navigator FAQs About Rare Diseases Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Title Other Names: G6PD ... G6PD deficiency Categories: Newborn Screening Summary Summary Listen Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a hereditary ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: factor V deficiency

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions factor V deficiency factor V deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Print All Open All Close All Description Factor V deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder. The signs ...

  15. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: leptin receptor deficiency

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions leptin receptor deficiency leptin receptor deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Leptin receptor deficiency is a condition that causes severe ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: congenital leptin deficiency

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital leptin deficiency congenital leptin deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Print All Open All Close All Description Congenital leptin deficiency is a condition that causes severe obesity ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CPT I deficiency carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) deficiency is a condition ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: factor XIII deficiency

    ... InfoSearch: Factor XIII deficiency Factor XIII Registry Database: Introduction to Factor XIII Deficiency MalaCards: factor xiii deficiency ... Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions combined pituitary hormone deficiency combined pituitary hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Combined pituitary hormone deficiency is a condition that causes ...

  1. Iodine deficiency disorders.

    Elliott, T C

    1987-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD) affects 800 million people in the world, yet iodine supplementation is one of the most cost-effective nutritional interventions known. Iodine is incorporated into thyroid hormones, necessary for regulating metabolic rate, growth, and development of the brain and nervous system. IDD may appear as goiter in adults, usually not a serious problem, or in cretinism in children, which is marked by severe mental and physical retardation, with irreversible hearing and speech defects and either deaf-mutism, squint and paralysis, or stunting and edema. Children supplemented by age 1 or 2 can sometimes be helped. Foods contain variable amounts of iodine dependent on the soil where they are grown, hence mountainous and some inland regions have high goiter and IDD incidence. There are also goitrogenic foods, typically those of the cabbage family. Diagnosis is clinical or by blood tests for thyroid hormone levels and ratios. Finger-stick methods are available. Prevention of IDD is simple with either iodized salt or flour, iodinated central water supplies, injectable or oral iodine-containing oil. All cost about $.04 per person per year, except injections, which cost about $1 per person, but have the advantage that they could be combined with immunizations. Local problems with supplements are loss of iodine in salt with storage in tropics, and local production of cheaper uniodinated salt. Emphasis should be given to pregnant women and young children. There is no harm in giving pregnant women iodine injections in 2nd or 3rd trimester. PMID:12343033

  2. Clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency.

    Prasad, A S

    1985-01-01

    The essentiality of zinc for humans was recognized in the early 1960s. The causes of zinc deficiency include malnutrition, alcoholism, malabsorption, extensive burns, chronic debilitating disorders, chronic renal diseases, following uses of certain drugs such as penicillamine for Wilson's disease and diuretics in some cases, and genetic disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica and sickle cell disease. In pregnancy and during periods of growth the requirement of zinc is increased. The clinical manifestations in severe cases of zinc deficiency include bullous-pustular dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhea, emotional disorder, weight loss, intercurrent infections, hypogonadism in males; it is fatal if unrecognized and untreated. A moderate deficiency of zinc is characterized by growth retardation and delayed puberty in adolescents, hypogonadism in males, rough skin, poor appetite, mental lethargy, delayed wound healing, taste abnormalities, and abnormal dark adaptation. In mild cases of zinc deficiency in human subjects, we have observed oligospermia, slight weight loss, and hyperammonemia. Zinc is a growth factor. Its deficiency adversely affects growth in many animal species and humans. Inasmuch as zinc is needed for protein and DNA synthesis and for cell division, it is believed that the growth effect of zinc is related to its effect on protein synthesis. Whether or not zinc is required for the metabolism of somatomedin needs to be investigated in the future. Testicular functions are affected adversely as a result of zinc deficiency in both humans and experimental animals. This effect of zinc is at the end organ level; the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is intact in zinc-deficient subjects. Inasmuch as zinc is intimately involved in cell division, its deficiency may adversely affect testicular size and thus affect its functions. Zinc is required for the functions of several enzymes and whether or not it has an enzymatic role in steroidogenesis is not known at present

  3. [Immune deficiencies in nutritional anemias].

    Bonnet Gajdos, M; Navarro, J; Belas, F; Traineau, R

    1982-12-16

    A transient cellular immunologic defect caused by folic acid deficiency was seen in a goat-milk-fed infant with severe enterocolitis. Data on the immunologic consequences of folic acid, protein and iron deficiencies were reviewed in the medical literature. Investigations are difficult because of the patients' poor general condition. Results are difficult to interpret as many etiologic factors are often combined and mechanisms of immunologic responses are complex. Attention is drawn to the danger of iron therapy in patients with transferrin deficiency. PMID:6297076

  4. Iron deficiency - a global problem

    Iron deficiency is an important nutritional global problem. This paper contains summery of information gathered from a dietary survey as iron deficiency anaemia is major public health problem in many developing countries including Pakistan. Comparison of anaemia in different age group and sex versus various regions in the world are given. In Pakistan also anaemia is widespread. According to the report of Micro-Nutrient survey of Pakistan 40% of the population are found to have low level of haemoglobin, more than half of pregnant women suffered from marginal or deficient haemoglobin. (A.B.)

  5. Alpha-1-antitripsin deficiency: the need of a new diagnostic algorithm for improving the diagnostic ability of perinatologists and pediatricians

    Gavino Faa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Caution should be taken in considering immunoelectrofocusing (IEF as the best method for the diagnosis of alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT deficiency, particularly in some population, including Sardinians, in which a M-like variant represents the most frequent pathological A1AT variant. Regarding the future, my opinion is that the algorithm generally suggested for reaching a proper diagnosis of this disease should be completely changed. The cut-off of the A1AT serum values should be reconsidered, not to avoid the diagnosis of a number of heterozygous subjects who may be affected by liver and/or lung disease. Given that the two A1AT alleles are co-dominant, and since A1AT is a phase acute protein, in all heterozygous PiMZ or PiM/M-Cagliari subjects carrying an inflammation, the M allele is induced to produce high quantities of A1AT, whose serum levels may reach normal values. In these cases, PCR serum levels should be evaluated and, when increased, the diagnosis of A1AT deficiency should not be excluded even in the presence of serum A1AT levels within the normal range. Gene sequencing should be included, on the basis of our experience, in all neonates and pediatric patients with liver or lung disease of unknown origin, including asthma, avoiding IEF. Finally, for a screening in the perinatal period, I suggest the accurate examination of the electrophoresis of serum proteins. With a similar new approach, I think that we will transform A1AT deficiency from a rare disease into a previously rarely diagnosed disease, changing completely the epidemiology of this complex and fascinating metabolic disease.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    ... links) CLIMB: Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases Muscular Dystrophy Association: Myoadenylate Deaminase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Muscle AMP deaminase deficiency ...

  7. Determining Functional Vitamin B12 Deficiency in the Elderly

    Khodabandehloo, Niloofar; Vakili, Masoud; Hashemian, Zahra; Zare Zardini, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elevated concentration of serum total homocysteine usually occurs in vitamin B-12 deficiency. This metabolite can be measured and used for screening functional vitamin B-12 deficiency. Objectives: We assessed functional vitamin B12 deficiency in Tehranian elderly admitted to elderly research center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences. Patients and Materials: A cross-sectional study was performed on 232 elderly admitted to elderly research center in Tehran, Iran in 2012. According to other studies, individuals were classified into two groups: high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency (homocysteine (> 15 micmol/L). Results: Cut-off of 15.0 pmol/L for homocysteine was identified for persons with normal or elevated concentrations. Among persons aged 65–74 and ≥ 75 years, respectively, 56% and 93% were at high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency. Conclusions: The prevalence of B12 deficiency was higher in this study compared to other studies, so more attention and massive efficacious policy should be designed to reduce the deficiency of this vitamin. PMID:26430518

  8. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  9. Evolutionary Processes and Mental Deficiency

    Spitz, Herman H.

    1973-01-01

    The author hypothesizes that central nervous system damage of deficiency associated with mental retardation affects primarily those cortical processes which developed at a late stage in man's evolutionary history. (Author)

  10. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity. PMID:25765687

  11. Cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies in children.

    Goskowicz, M; Eichenfield, L F

    1993-08-01

    Nutritional deficiencies may be associated with a variety of cutaneous findings in children. This review emphasizes new developments relating to cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies. Zinc deficiency, acrodermatitis enteropathica, and acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruptions are seen with a variety of conditions including cystic fibrosis, anorexia nervosa, and breastfeeding. Similar cutaneous findings not related to zinc deficiency may also occur with such metabolic disorders as methylmalonic aciduria, multiple carboxylase deficiency, essential fatty acid deficiency and other amino acid deficiencies. Vitamin K deficiency is associated with hemorrhagic disease of the newborn and coagulopathy. Vitamin A deficiency presents with a variety of systemic findings and distinctive dermatologic findings. Acute vitamin A deficiency may be seen in children infected with measles and is associated with more severe disease. The systemic and cutaneous findings of vitamin C deficiency, scurvy, are discussed. PMID:8374671

  12. Health Consequences of Iodine Deficiency

    Kapil, Umesh

    2007-01-01

    Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) are one of the biggest worldwide public health problem of today. Their effect is hidden and profoundly affects the quality of human life. Iodine deficiency occurs when the soil is poor in iodine, causing a low concentration in food products and insufficient iodine intake in the population. When iodine requirements are not met, the thyroid may no longer be able to synthesize sufficient amounts of thyroid hormone. The resulting low-level of thyroid hormones in ...

  13. Zinc and its deficiency diseases.

    Evans, G W

    1986-01-01

    The pervasive role of zinc in the metabolic function of the body results from its function as a cofactor of a multitude of enzymes. Zinc is found in every tissue in the body, and because zinc metalloenzymes are found in every known class of enzymes, the metal has a function in every conceivable type of biochemical pathway. Symptoms resulting from zinc deficiency are as diverse as the enzymes with which the metal is associated. If chronic, severe, and untreated, zinc deficiency can be fatal. Less drastic symptoms include infections, hypogonadism, weight loss, emotional disturbance, dermatitis, alopecia, impaired taste acuity, night blindness, poor appetite, delayed wound healing, and elevated blood ammonia levels. Many symptoms of zinc deficiency result from poor diet consumption, but often the most severe symptoms result from other factors including excessive alcohol use, liver diseases, malabsorption syndromes, renal disease, enteral or parenteral alimentation, administration of sulfhydryl-containing drugs, and sickle cell disease. The most severe symptoms of zinc deficiency occur in young children affected with the autosomal-recessive trait, acrodermatitis enteropathica. This disease results in decreased synthesis of picolinic acid which causes an impaired ability to utilize zinc from common food. Because simple laboratory analyses are often not reliable in determining zinc nutriture of a patient, those symptoms caused by suspected zinc deficiency are best verified by the oral administration of zinc dipicolinate. This zinc compound is efficacious and safe and would provide an accurate means of identifying symptoms that do result from zinc deficiency. PMID:3514057

  14. The Role of 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D Deficiency in Iron Deficient Children of North India.

    Sharma, Shikha; Jain, Rahul; Dabla, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Extensive data from animal and human studies indicate a role of vitamin D in erythropoiesis. Iron and vitamin D deficiencies are implicated with adverse health effects in children even if they are asymptomatic. The potential relationship between the two remains poorly understood. A cross-sectional study was performed in the period from 1st May 2012 through 30th April 2013 and subjects were classified into vitamin D deficiency (VDD), vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) and vitamin D sufficiency (VDS) groups according to their 25(OH) D levels. A total of 263 children were included in the analysis. Anaemia was present in 66 % of 25(OH) D deficient subjects compared with 35 % in vitamin D sufficient individuals (p < 0.0001). The association of breast feeding and development of VDD was also significant (p < 0.05). Serum levels of 25(OH) D were found lower in female sex and if the analysis was performed in the winter/spring season. Physicians should therefore assess vitamin D levels in all anaemic children and ensure adequate supplementation to prevent deficiencies. PMID:26089618

  15. Efficiency and deficiency considerations in the symmetry problem

    Albers, W.

    1975-01-01

    Usually, two statistical procedures A and B are compared by means of their asymptotic relative efficiency e. If e= 1, however, it is more informative to compare A and B by means of the concept of deficiency, which was introduced by Hodges and Lehmann [7]. In the present paper we use this concept for

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Nigerian children.

    Olatundun Williams

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and in Sub-Saharan Africa, is a significant cause of infection- and drug-induced hemolysis and neonatal jaundice. Our goals were to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Nigerian children of different ethnic backgrounds and to identify predictors of G6PD deficiency by analyzing vital signs and hematocrit and by asking screening questions about symptoms of hemolysis. We studied 1,122 children (561 males and 561 females aged 1 month to 15 years. The mean age was 7.4 ± 3.2 years. Children of Yoruba ethnicity made up the largest group (77.5% followed by those Igbo descent (10.6% and those of Igede (10.2% and Tiv (1.8% ethnicity. G6PD status was determined using the fluorescent spot method. We found that the overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency was 15.3% (24.1% in males, 6.6% in females. Yoruba children had a higher prevalence (16.9% than Igede (10.5%, Igbo (10.1% and Tiv (5.0% children. The odds of G6PD deficiency were 0.38 times as high in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children (p=0.0500. The odds for Igede and Tiv children were not significantly different from Yoruba children (p=0.7528 and 0.9789 respectively. Mean oxygen saturation, heart rate and hematocrit were not significantly different in G6PD deficient and G6PD sufficient children. The odds of being G6PD deficient were 2.1 times higher in children with scleral icterus than those without (p=0.0351. In conclusion, we determined the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Nigerian sub-populations. The odds of G6PD deficiency were decreased in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children. There was no association between vital parameters or hematocrit and G6PD deficiency. We found that a history of scleral icterus may increase the odds of G6PD deficiency, but we did not exclude other common causes of icterus such as sickle cell disease or malarial infection.

  17. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Nigerian children.

    Williams, Olatundun; Gbadero, Daniel; Edowhorhu, Grace; Brearley, Ann; Slusher, Tina; Lund, Troy C

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and in Sub-Saharan Africa, is a significant cause of infection- and drug-induced hemolysis and neonatal jaundice. Our goals were to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Nigerian children of different ethnic backgrounds and to identify predictors of G6PD deficiency by analyzing vital signs and hematocrit and by asking screening questions about symptoms of hemolysis. We studied 1,122 children (561 males and 561 females) aged 1 month to 15 years. The mean age was 7.4 ± 3.2 years. Children of Yoruba ethnicity made up the largest group (77.5%) followed by those Igbo descent (10.6%) and those of Igede (10.2%) and Tiv (1.8%) ethnicity. G6PD status was determined using the fluorescent spot method. We found that the overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency was 15.3% (24.1% in males, 6.6% in females). Yoruba children had a higher prevalence (16.9%) than Igede (10.5%), Igbo (10.1%) and Tiv (5.0%) children. The odds of G6PD deficiency were 0.38 times as high in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children (p=0.0500). The odds for Igede and Tiv children were not significantly different from Yoruba children (p=0.7528 and 0.9789 respectively). Mean oxygen saturation, heart rate and hematocrit were not significantly different in G6PD deficient and G6PD sufficient children. The odds of being G6PD deficient were 2.1 times higher in children with scleral icterus than those without (p=0.0351). In conclusion, we determined the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Nigerian sub-populations. The odds of G6PD deficiency were decreased in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children. There was no association between vital parameters or hematocrit and G6PD deficiency. We found that a history of scleral icterus may increase the odds of G6PD deficiency, but we did not exclude other common causes of icterus such as sickle cell disease or malarial infection. PMID:23874768

  18. Maternal micronutrient deficiency leads to alteration in the kidney proteome in rat pups.

    Ahmad, Shadab; Basak, Trayambak; Anand Kumar, K; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Lalitha, A; Yadav, Dilip K; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Raghunath, Manchala; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2015-09-01

    Maternal nutritional deficiency significantly perturbs the offspring's physiology predisposing them to metabolic diseases during adulthood. Vitamin B12 and folate are two such micronutrients, whose deficiency leads to elevated homocysteine levels. We earlier generated B12 and/or folate deficient rat models and using high-throughput proteomic approach, showed that maternal vitamin B12 deficiency modulates carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in the liver of pups through regulation of PPAR signaling pathway. In this study, using similar approach, we identified 26 differentially expressed proteins in the kidney of pups born to mothers fed with vitamin B12 deficient diet while only four proteins were identified in the folate deficient group. Importantly, proteins like calreticulin, cofilin 1 and nucleoside diphosphate kinase B that are involved in the functioning of the kidney were upregulated in B12 deficient group. Our results hint towards a larger effect of vitamin B12 deficiency compared to that of folate presumably due to greater elevation of homocysteine in vitamin B12 deficient group. In view of widespread vitamin B12 and folate deficiency and its association with several diseases like anemia, cardiovascular and renal diseases, our results may have large implications for kidney diseases in populations deficient in vitamin B12 especially in vegetarians and the elderly people.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:25982389

  19. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Diabetes Mellitus with Severe Retinal Complications in a Sardinian Population, Italy

    Pinna, Antonio; Contini, Emma Luigia; Carru, Ciriaco; Solinas, Giuliana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human genetic abnormalities, with a high prevalence in Sardinia, Italy. Evidence indicates that G6PD-deficient patients are protected against vascular disease. Little is known about the relationship between G6PD deficiency and diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to compare G6PD deficiency prevalence in Sardinian diabetic men with severe retinal vascular complications and in age-matched non-d...

  20. The role of the endogenous opiates in zinc deficiency anorexia.

    Essatara, M B; Morley, J E; Levine, A S; Elson, M K; Shafer, R B; McClain, C J

    1984-03-01

    Anorexia is a major symptom of zinc deficiency, but the mechanism(s) for this anorexia are poorly defined. Recent studies have suggested an integral role for endogenous opiate peptides in appetite regulation. Dynorphin, a leucine-enkephalin containing opiate peptide, is a potent inducer of spontaneous feeding. In this study we showed that zinc deficient animals were relatively resistant to dynorphin-induced feeding. Measurement of dynorphin levels using a highly sensitive radioimmunoassay showed that zinc deficient animals had lower levels of dynorphin in the hypothalamus than did ad lib fed animals, with weight restricted animals having intermediate values. [3H]-naloxone binding was significantly increased to isolated brain membranes from zinc deficient animals using 1 nM unlabeled naloxone when compared to ad lib fed controls with the weight restricted animals again having intermediate values. These data suggest that abnormalities in endogenous opiate regulation of appetite may well play a role in the anorexia of zinc deficiency. The effects of zinc deficiency on endogenous opiate action appear to include alterations in receptor affinity, a post-receptor defect and alterations in the synthesis and/or release of dynorphin. PMID:6146993

  1. Gender affects skin wound healing in plasminogen deficient mice.

    Birgitte Rønø

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic activity of plasmin plays a fundamental role in resolution of blood clots and clearance of extravascular deposited fibrin in damaged tissues. These vital functions of plasmin are exploited by malignant cells to accelerate tumor growth and facilitate metastases. Mice lacking functional plasmin thus display decreased tumor growth in a variety of cancer models. Interestingly, this role of plasmin has, in regard to skin cancer, been shown to be restricted to male mice. It remains to be clarified whether gender also affects other phenotypic characteristics of plasmin deficiency or if this gender effect is restricted to skin cancer. To investigate this, we tested the effect of gender on plasmin dependent immune cell migration, accumulation of hepatic fibrin depositions, skin composition, and skin wound healing. Gender did not affect immune cell migration or hepatic fibrin accumulation in neither wildtype nor plasmin deficient mice, and the existing differences in skin composition between males and females were unaffected by plasmin deficiency. In contrast, gender had a marked effect on the ability of plasmin deficient mice to heal skin wounds, which was seen as an accelerated wound closure in female versus male plasmin deficient mice. Further studies showed that this gender effect could not be reversed by ovariectomy, suggesting that female sex-hormones did not mediate the accelerated skin wound healing in plasmin deficient female mice. Histological examination of healed wounds revealed larger amounts of fibrotic scars in the provisional matrix of plasmin deficient male mice compared to female mice. These fibrotic scars correlated to an obstruction of cell infiltration of the granulation tissue, which is a prerequisite for wound healing. In conclusion, the presented data show that the gender dependent effect of plasmin deficiency is tissue specific and may be secondary to already established differences between genders, such as skin

  2. Correlation between vivax malaria infection and iron deficiency in children

    Desmansyah Desmansyah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Iron deficiency is considered to be a major public health problem around the world due to its high prevalence as well as its effect on growth, development, and infection-resistance in children. In malaria-endemic areas, malaria infection is thought to contribute to the occurrence of iron deficiency, by means of hepcidin and hemolysis mechanisms. Objective To assess the prevalence of asymptomatic vivax malaria, compare hemoglobin levels and iron status parameters between vivax malaria-infected and uninfected children, assess the prevalence of iron deficiency, and evaluate a possible correlation between vivax malaria infection and iron deficiency. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted from February to April 2013 at Sanana City of Sula Islands District, North Maluku. Six parameters were evaluated in 5-11-year-old children: malaria parasite infection, hemoglobin level, serum iron concentration, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC, serum transferrin saturation, and serum ferritin concentration. Results Among 296 children aged 5-11 years, 75 (25.3% were infected with Plasmodium vivax. In infected children, hemoglobin, serum iron, transferrin saturation, TIBC and serum ferritin were significantly lower than in non-infected children (P<0.01. Using a serum ferritin cut-off of <15 μg/dL, 142 (48.0% of the children were found to be iron deficient. There was a strong correlation between vivax malaria infection and iron deficiency (OR 3.573; 95%CI 2.03-6.29. ConclusionThe prevalence of asymptomatic vivax malaria infection was 25.3%. The hemoglobin level and iron status parameters in vivax malaria-infected subjects were significantly lower than in uninfected children. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 48.0% for all study subjects. Malaria vivax infection was correlated with iron deficiency in 5-11-year-old children at Sanana City.

  3. G6PD deficiency in Vataliya prajapati community settled in Surat

    Gupte Snehalata; Patel Pratima; Ranat Jasmine

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A Study on Vataliya Prajapati was published earlier but heterozygous females were not identified. AIMS: To compare incidence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in random and unrelated subjects, present and previous study and as per their original habitat. Incidence of heterozygous deficiency and clinical implication of deficiency was also determined. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Camps were organized in Katargaon and Amroli regions. Blood specimens, with relevant demogr...

  4. Iron Deficiency in Young Children: A Risk Marker for Early Childhood Caries

    Iranna Koppal, Pushpa; Sakri, Mohan Ravishankar; Akkareddy, Basavaprabhu; Hinduja, Dharam M; Gangolli, Raviraj Annayya; Patil, Basanagouda C

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: Evaluate the coexistence of iron deficiency and early childhood caries. Evaluate whether iron deficiency can be considered as a risk marker for early childhood caries. Estimate the incidence of iron deficiency in children with early childhood caries. To evaluate and compare the iron status of children with and without severe early childhood caries. Materials and methods: Sixty children of age 2 to 6 years in whom blood investigations are advised by pediatricians are selected for...

  5. The Comparison of Serum Vitamin D Level in Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia and Minor Thalassemia

    Royani, S. (MSc); Alijanpor, S. (BSc); Shirbaghaei, Z. (BSc); Khorasaninejad, R. (BSc); Roshandel, GH. (MSc); Ayatollahi, AA. (MD); Joshaghani, HR. (PhD)

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: Of the most common hypochromic microcytic anemia are iron deficiency anemia and minor thalassemia, which are common in Iran and their differential diagnosis is extremely important. The level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D is the indication of vitamin D blood status. The aim of this study was to compare serum levels of vitamin D in people with minor thalassemia and iron deficiency anemia with healthy subjects in order to investigate the relationship between vitamin D deficie...

  6. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  7. Effect of magnesium deficiency on bone metabolism in female rats

    E. M. Al-Khshab

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study undertakes the deficiency effect of dietary magnesium on bone metabolism and some biochemical parameters in female rats. Experimental diets included control diet (65 mg magnesium / 100 g and the deficient magnesium (3 mg/100g diet. Deionized water was supplied for drinking. Forty six albino female rats were divided into two main groups, the first group included 18 adult female rats, divided into 9 control and 9 animals given magnesium deficient diet. The second group included young female rats divided into two groups, the first group was treated from dams،and included 14 young female rats. They were divided into 7 control and 7 magnesium deficient group. The other one was treated at 28 days old and included 14 young female rats, which were divided into 7 control and 7 magnesium deficient group. Blood samples were obtained at specific times from each group for biochemical parameters: magnesium, alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP, albumin, calcium and phosphorus were estimated. At the end of the experimental period, rats were anesthetized and killed. The right femurs were obtained for mineral analysis in bone ash (Ca, Mg. The results of adult female (Mg deficient group showed a significant decrease in magnesium, ALP activity, albumin, calcium (within normal range. Both young female rat groups showed a significant decrease in magnesium, ALP and albumin compared with control group. The mineral analysis in bone ash showed no significant differences in calcium level where a significant decrease in magnesium level was observed compared with the control groups. It was concluded from this study, that magnesium deficiency could be used for detection of osteoporosis and defect of bone formation in adult and young female rats, respectively.

  8. Iodine deficiency in vegetarians and vegans.

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Bucková, K; Klimes, I; Seboková, E

    2003-01-01

    Iodine content in food of plant origin is lower in comparison with that of animal origin due to a low iodine concentration in soil. Urinary iodine excretion was assessed in 15 vegans, 31 lacto- and lacto-ovovegetarians and 35 adults on a mixed diet. Iodine excretion was significantly lower in alternative nutrition groups - 172 microg/l in vegetarians and 78 microg/l in vegans compared to 216 microg/l in subjects on a mixed diet. One fourth of the vegetarians and 80% of the vegans suffer from iodine deficiency (iodine excretion value below 100 microg/l) compared to 9% in the persons on a mixed nutrition. The results show that under conditions of alternative nutrition, there is a higher prevalence of iodine deficiency, which might be a consequence of exclusive or prevailing consumption of food of plant origin, no intake of fish and other sea products, as well as reduced iodine intake in the form of sea salt. PMID:12748410

  9. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Senard Jean-Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS. Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance.

  10. A question mark on iron deficiency in 185 million people of Pakistan: its outcomes and prevention.

    Ahmed, Anwaar; Ahmad, Asif; Khalid, Nauman; David, Angel; Sandhu, Mansoor Abdullah; Randhawa, Muhammad Atif; Suleria, Hafiz Ansar Rasul

    2014-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiency especially the iron deficiency is the bane of our lives, affecting all strata of society. Unfortunately, the women during pregnancy, adolescence, and children are under this curse particularly in developing countries like Pakistan. It is one of the biggest reasons of complications during pregnancy and malnourished children under five years of age. Maternal death, still-births, and underweight births are most common consequences of iron deficiency and these outbreaks as iron-deficiency anemia in Pakistan. Disastrous nature of iron deficiency requires an urgent call to eradicate it. Hence, the solution should not be frail comparing with the huge economic loss and other incompatibilities. Flour fortification, supplementation, dietary diversification, and especially maternal education are possible solutions for combating this micronutrient deficiency. PMID:24580562

  11. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    HU, Rehman

    1984-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency occurs primarily as a result  of insufficient dietary intake or poor absorp-tion. There is widespread global prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, resulting in considerable morbidity.

  12. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) ... develop. The most common faulty gene that can cause AAT deficiency is called PiZ. If you inherit ...

  13. Diagnosis of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    HU, Rehman

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency occurs primarily as a result  of insufficient dietary intake or poor absorp-tion. There is widespread global prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, resulting in considerable morbidity.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions TH deficiency tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency ...

  15. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Overview

    ... Information Center (GARD) Print friendly version Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Table of Contents Overview Symptoms Cause ... National Institutes of Health. Overview Listen Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a hereditary condition in ...

  16. G6PD deficiency in Vataliya prajapati community settled in Surat

    Gupte Snehalata

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A Study on Vataliya Prajapati was published earlier but heterozygous females were not identified. AIMS: To compare incidence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency in random and unrelated subjects, present and previous study and as per their original habitat. Incidence of heterozygous deficiency and clinical implication of deficiency was also determined. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Camps were organized in Katargaon and Amroli regions. Blood specimens, with relevant demographic information, were collected from those who attended the camp. METHODS AND MATERIAL: A total of 1644 random blood samples were collected from 404 families participating in the camps. Nitroblue tetrazolium dye test was used for G6PD deficiency screening and quantitative assay for measurement of G6PD enzyme activity. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: 2 test was used to evaluate significance and mean values were compared by the Student′s "t" test. RESULTS: Incidence of G6PD deficiency was found as 22% among all the random samples tested. However, the G6PD deficiency among unrelated members was 27.9% in males and 12.4% (P<0.001,df 1. The 13.9% of the females with heterozygous G6PD deficient status, together with the homozygous deficient phenotype makes the incidence comparable with males. Incidence of deficiency was comparable with previous study, in Katargam and Amroli and in Amerli and Bhavganar districts. Deficient subjects had mild anemia and hemolytic crisis rarely occurred. CONCLUSION: Vataliya Prajapatis have high incidence of G6PD deficiency without severe chronic hemolytic anemia. However before prescribing medicines physician should know the G6PD status of a Vataliya Prajapati patient.

  17. INTRAVENOUS IRON VERSUS ORAL IRON IN ANTENATAL WOMEN WITH IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA IN SUB - HIMALAYAN SETTINGS

    Shraddha; Anup

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Compare Intravenous Iron sucrose and Oral Ferrous sulphate in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia during pregnancy. METHOD: 100 sub - himalayan antenatal women between 12 to 36 weeks gestation from Central Referral Hospital with Iron deficiency anemia; hemoglobin 6 – 9 gm/dl, MCV

  18. Vitamin D deficiency in Crohn's disease: prevalence, risk factors and supplement use in an outpatient setting.

    Suibhne, Treasa Nic

    2012-03-01

    Vitamin D deficiency impacts on bone health and has potential new roles in inflammation. We aimed to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for vitamin D deficiency and to explore vitamin D supplement usage in patients with Crohn\\'s disease (CD) in an outpatient setting, compared with controls.

  19. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    Steven F Werder

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven F Werder1,21Kansas University School of Medicine – Wichita, Wichita, KS, USA; 2Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas, Pittsburg, KS, USAIntroduction: Although consensus guidelines recommend checking serum B12 in patients with dementia, clinicians are often faced with various questions: (1 Which patients should be tested? (2 What test should be ordered? (3 How are inferences made from such testing? (4 In addition to serum B12, should other tests be ordered? (5 Is B12 deficiency compatible with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type? (6 What is to be expected from treatment? (7 How is B12 deficiency treated?Methods: On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia. After limiting the search terms, all abstracts and/or articles and other references were categorized into six major groups (general, biochemistry, manifestations, associations and risks, evaluation, and treatment and then reviewed in answering the above questions.Results: The six major groups above are described in detail. Seventy-five key studies, series, and clinical trials were identified. Evidence-based suggestions for patient management were developed.Discussion: Evidence is convincing that hyperhomocysteinemia, with or without hypovitaminosis B12, is a risk factor for dementia. In the absence of hyperhomocysteinemia, evidence is less convincing that hypovitaminosis B12 is a risk factor for dementia. B12 deficiency manifestations are variable and include abnormal psychiatric, neurological, gastrointestinal, and hematological findings. Radiological images of individuals with hyperhomocysteinemia frequently demonstrate leukoaraiosis. Assessing serum B12 and treatment of B12 deficiency is crucial for those cases in which pernicious anemia is suspected and may be useful for mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia. The serum B12 level is the standard initial test

  20. G6PD Deficiency in Turkish Cypriots

    SÖZÜÖZ, Ayşe

    1998-01-01

    1108 Turkish Cypriot men and 318 male labourers from mainland Turkey were screened for G6PD deficiency and haemoglobinopathy traits. The results revealed a 6.7% G6PD deficiency rate in the Turkish Cypriot men and a 1.6% prevalance rate in the Turkish men. The mean haemoglobin level of the G6PD deficient males was approximately 1g/dl lower than that of the non-deficient males.

  1. Congenital longitudinal deficiency of the tibia

    Spiegel, D. A.; Loder, R T; Crandall, R. C.

    2003-01-01

    We performed a clinical and radiographic review of 15 patients (19 limbs) with longitudinal deficiency of the tibia treated between 1981 and 2001. Ten limbs with Kalamchi type I deficiencies were managed by through-knee amputation. Five type II deficiencies were treated by foot ablation and tibiofibular synostosis, either at the same time or staged, but prosthetic problems may arise from varus alignment and prominence of the proximal fibula. Patients with type III deficiencies (four cases) we...

  2. Cobalamin deficiency in children: A literature review

    Moen, Synne Helland

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review is to present cobalamin deficiency in children with a specific focus on infants. Background: Cobalamin deficiency is caused by inadequate intake, malabsorption or inborn errors of vitamin B12 metabolism. Cobalamin deficiency in infants is usually caused by deficiency in the mother. There is often a diagnostic delay among infants because the most frequent symptoms are unspecific, e.g., developmental delay, apathy, hypotonia, anorexia and failure to thrive. Chi...

  3. Shell Model Description of Neutron-Deficient Sn Isotopes

    Erdal Dikmen

    2009-01-01

    The shell model calculations in the sdgh major shell for the neutron-deficient 106,107,108,109Sn isotopes have been carried out by using CD-Bonn and Nijmegenl two-body effective nucleon-nucleon interactions. The single-shell states and the corresponding matrix elements needed for describing Sn isotopes are reconstructed to calculate the coefficient of fractional parantage by reducing the calculation requirements. This reconstruction allows us to do the shell model calculations of the neutron deficient Sn isotopes in very reasonable time. The results are compared to the recent high-resolution experimental data and found to be in good agreement with experiments.

  4. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  5. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...... base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby...

  6. Vitamin D deficiency in Europe

    Cashman, Kevin D.; Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency has been described as being pandemic, but serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] distribution data for the European Union are of very variable quality. The NIH-led international Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing existing...... 25(OH)D values from national health/nutrition surveys. OBJECTIVE: This study applied VDSP protocols to serum 25(OH)D data from representative childhood/teenage and adult/older adult European populations, representing a sizable geographical footprint, to better quantify the prevalence of vitamin D...... deficiency in Europe. DESIGN: The VDSP protocols were applied in 14 population studies [reanalysis of subsets of serum 25(OH)D in 11 studies and complete analysis of all samples from 3 studies that had not previously measured it] by using certified liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry on biobanked...

  7. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    Highlights: ► Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. ► Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in Δyfh1 cells. ► Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. ► Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in Δyfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron–sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin (Δyfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in Δyfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  8. TWO RELATED CASES OF PRIMARY COMPLEMENT DEFICIENCY

    A. Farhoudi

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary complement deficiencies are rare and two related patients are reported here. The first patient is a 41- year- old man with eighteen episodes of pneumo¬coccal meningitis and other purulent infections. The serum C3 level was checked at three separate times, showing that this was a primary C3 deficient case; other immunological tests were however normal. This patient now takes prophylactic antibiotics and the meningitis has not recurred, but he does have glomerulone¬phritis. The second case is a 40 - year-old woman with repeated episodes of orofacial and laryngeal edema and dyspnea. The serum C1INH levels were 4.3 to 7 mg/dL which were very low compared with normal healthy subjects (C,INH was 40-50 mg/dL in ten normal controls and C4 was lower than normal but other immunological tests were normal. Other causes of angioedema such as lymphoproliferative disorders were excluded. She had hereditary angioedema with¬out a family background. The condition may be due to genetic mutation. The angioedema was controlled with Danazol and Stanasol. As our patients are re¬lated, this may suggest a genetic relationship between these two disorders.

  9. A rare case of vitamin B12 deficiency with ascites.

    Rajsekhar, Putta; Reddy, Mugannagari Maheshwar; Vaddera, Sameeraja; Rajini, G; Tikeli, Vinil

    2014-07-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is widespread than assumed in population. At risk are older people, pregnant women, vegans, patients with renal and intestinal diseases. Vitamin B12 deficiency can present with various hematological, gastrointestinal and neurological manifestations. In the population, the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in younger people is 5% to 7% which is less compared to elderly people. In developing countries, deficiency is much more common, starting in early life and persisting across the life span. Here, we present a 16-year-old female patient presenting with ascites since 2 months who was subsequently investigated and diagnosed to have nutritional megaloblastic anaemia secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency after exclusion of other infective, neoplastic, autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Inspite, patient was treated with antitubercular drugs but she did not respond. After supplementation of Vitamin B12, ascites responded well. Inadequate intake due to low consumption of animal source foods is the main cause of low serum vitamin B12 in younger adults and likely the main cause in poor population worldwide. PMID:25177593

  10. RNA-sequencing of WFS1-deficient pancreatic islets.

    Ivask, Marilin; Hugill, Alison; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-04-01

    Wolfram syndrome, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy, is caused by mutations in theWFS1gene.WFS1encodes an endoplasmic reticulum resident transmembrane protein. TheWfs1-null mice exhibit progressive insulin deficiency and diabetes. The aim of this study was to describe the insulin secretion and transcriptome of pancreatic islets inWFS1-deficient mice.WFS1-deficient (Wfs1KO) mice had considerably less pancreatic islets than heterozygous (Wfs1HZ) or wild-type (WT) mice. Wfs1KOpancreatic islets secreted less insulin after incubation in 2 and 10 mmol/L glucose and with tolbutamide solution compared toWTand Wfs1HZislets, but not after stimulation with 20 mmol/L glucose. Differences in proinsulin amount were not statistically significant although there was a trend that Wfs1KOhad an increased level of proinsulin. After incubation in 2 mmol/L glucose solution the proinsulin/insulin ratio in Wfs1KOwas significantly higher than that ofWTand Wfs1HZRNA-seq from pancreatic islets found melastatin-related transient receptor potential subfamily member 5 protein gene (Trpm5) to be downregulated inWFS1-deficient mice. Functional annotation ofRNAsequencing results showed thatWFS1 deficiency influenced significantly the pathways related to tissue morphology, endocrine system development and function, molecular transport network. PMID:27053292

  11. Posterior glenoid rim deficiency in recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability

    Objective. To assess the shape of the posterior glenoid rim in patients with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability.Design and patients. CT examinations of 15 shoulders with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability were reviewed in masked fashion with regard to abnormalities of the glenoid shape, specifically of its posterior rim. The glenoid version was also assessed. The findings were compared with the findings in 15 shoulders with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and 15 shoulders without instability. For all patients, surgical correlation was available.Results. Fourteen of the 15 (93%) shoulders with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability had a deficiency of the posteroinferior glenoid rim. In patients with recurrent anterior instability or stable shoulders such deficiencies were less common (60% and 73%, respectively). The craniocaudal length of the deficiencies was largest in patients with posterior instability. When a posteroinferior deficiency with a craniocaudal length of 12 mm or more was defined as abnormal, sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability were 86.7% and 83.3%, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in glenoid version between shoulders with posterior instability and stable shoulders (P=0.01).Conclusion. Recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability should be considered in patients with a bony deficiency of the posteroinferior glenoid rim with a craniocaudal length of more than 12 mm. (orig.)

  12. Muscle phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency revisited

    Naini, Ali; Toscano, Antonio; Musumeci, Olimpia; Vissing, John; Akman, Hasan O; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phosphoglycerate mutase (PGAM) deficiency (glycogen storage disease type X) has been reported in 12 patients of whom 9 were African American. OBJECTIVE: To describe 2 patients, 1 of Pakistani and 1 of Italian ethnic origin, with typical clinical and biochemical changes of glycogen...... type X is not confined to the African American population, is often associated with sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) proliferation, and is genetically heterogeneous....

  13. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong; Chen, Shubao

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affec...

  14. Vitamin D deficiency in Fibromyalgia

    Objective: To check the Vitamin D levels in patients diagnosed as fibromyagia in our population. Methods: Study was done at Medical OPD of Civil Hospital Karachi, from January to March 2009. Female patients diagnosed as Fibromyalgia according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and exclusion of systemic illness on examination, and normal reports of blood CP, ESR, serum calcium, phosphate and Alkaline Phosphatase, were asked to get Vitamin D levels in their serum. Vitamin D deficiency is defined as 30 ng/ml. Result: Forty female patients were included in the study. The mean age was 37.65 +- 11.5 years. Mean Vitamin D level was 17.41 +- 5.497 ng/ml. Thirty two (80%) of patients had Vitamin D deficiency, mean levels of 15.855 +- 4.918 ng/ml and 8(20%) had Vitamin D insufficiency, mean levels of 23.64 +- 2.39 ng/ml. Patients with vitamin D deficiency and age less than 45 years were 22 (68.75%), had mean vitamin D level 16.87 +- 4.48 ng/ml whereas in age ranging from 46-75 years were 10 (31.25%) had mean vitamin D level 16.09 +- 6.45 ng/ml. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency is frequently seen in patients diagnosed as fibromyalgia and nonspecific musculoskeletal pain in our population. Although the sample size of the study is small, but the figures are so alarming that it is an eye opener towards the need of a population based study, including normal population as well as those presenting with musculoskeletal pain. (author)

  15. New Data on Vaccine Antigen Deficient Bordetella pertussis Isolates

    Valérie Bouchez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of Bordetella pertussis is driven by natural and vaccine pressures. Isolates circulating in regions with high vaccination coverage present multiple allelic and antigenic variations as compared to isolates collected before introduction of vaccination. Furthermore, during the last epidemics reported in regions using pertussis acellular vaccines, isolates deficient for vaccine antigens, such as pertactin (PRN, were reported to reach high proportions of circulating isolates. More sporadic filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA or pertussis toxin (PT deficient isolates were also collected. The whole genome of some recent French isolates, deficient or non-deficient in vaccine antigens, were analyzed. Transcription profiles of the expression of the main virulence factors were also compared. The invasive phenotype in an in vitro human tracheal epithelial (HTE cell model of infection was evaluated. Our genomic analysis focused on SNPs related to virulence genes known to be more likely to present allelic polymorphism. Transcriptomic data indicated that isolates circulating since the introduction of pertussis vaccines present lower transcription levels of the main virulence genes than the isolates of the pre-vaccine era. Furthermore, isolates not producing FHA present significantly higher expression levels of the entire set of genes tested. Finally, we observed that recent isolates are more invasive in HTE cells when compared to the reference strain, but no multiplication occurs within cells.

  16. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in ...

  17. Primary Carnitine (OCTN2) Deficiency Without Neonatal Carnitine Deficiency

    de Boer, L.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Morava, E.

    2012-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a primary carnitine deficiency is usually based on a very low level of free and total carnitine (free carnitine: 1–5 μM, normal 20–55 μM) (Longo et al. 2006), we detected a patient via newborn screening with a total carnitine level 67 % of the normal value. At the age of 1 year, after interruption of carnitine supplementation for a 4-week period the carnitine profile was assessed and the free carnitine level had dropped to 10.4 μmol/l (normal: 20–55 μM) and total car...

  18. Deficiencies in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Childhood.

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Daniel, Catherine L; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2016-04-01

    Limited high-quality evidence supports the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). To assess our institutional performance in this area, we retrospectively reviewed IDA treatment practices in 195 consecutive children referred to our center from 2006 to mid-2010. The majority of children were ≤4 years old (64%) and had nutritional IDA (74%). In 11- to 18-year-old patients (31%), the primary etiology was menorrhagia (42%). Many were referred directly to the emergency department and/or prescribed iron doses outside the recommended range. Poor medication adherence and being lost-to-follow-up were common. Substantial improvements are required in the management of IDA. PMID:26728130

  19. Protective effects of zinc on oxidative stress enzymes in liver of protein-deficient rats.

    Sidhu, Pardeep; Garg, M L; Dhawan, D K

    2005-01-01

    Persons afflicted with protein malnutrition are generally deficient in a variety of essential micronutrients like zinc, copper, iron, and selenium, which in turn affects number of metabolic processes in the body. To evaluate the protective effects of zinc on the enzymes involved in oxidative stress induced in liver of protein-deficient rats, the current study was designed. Zinc sulfate at a dose level of 227 mg/L zinc in drinking water was administered to female Sprague-Dawley normal control as well as protein-deficient rats for a total duration of 8 weeks. The effects of zinc treatment in conditions of protein deficiency were studied on rat liver antioxidant enzymes, which included catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reduced (GSH), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Protein deficiency in normal rats resulted in a significant increase in hepatic activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione-S-transferase and the levels of lipid peroxidation. A significant inhibition in the levels of reduced glutathione and the enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase has been observed after protein deficiency in normal rats. Interestingly, Zn treatment to protein-deficient animals lowered already raised activity catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase and levels of lipid peroxidation to significant levels when compared to protein-deficient animals. Also, Zn treatment to the protein-deficient animals resulted in a significant elevation in the levels of GSH and SOD activity as compared to their respective controls, thereby indicating its effectiveness in regulating their levels in adverse conditions. It has also been observed that concentrations of zinc, copper, iron, and selenium were found to be decreased significantly in protein-deficient animals. However, the levels of these elements came back to within normal limits when zinc was administrated

  20. Comparative study of relevant factors of dampness-heat stagnation type and yin deficiency with dryness heat type primary Sjogren syndrome%湿阻热郁型与阴虚燥热型原发性干燥综合征相关因素对比研究

    胡建东; 袁旭; 薛鸾

    2012-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the difference between dampness - heat stagnation type and yin deficiency with dryness heat type primary Sjogren syndrome in such factors as life habits,salivary glands secretion,organ involvement, β2 ~ MG. Methods A questionaire to investigate the habit for drinking and smoking,eating heavy taste food was conducted in thirty - five dampness - heat stagnation type Sjogren syndrome ( DHS - PSS) and eighty - two yin deficiency with dryness heat type Sjogren syndrome ( YDDH - PSS). The number of dental caries, oral sugar clearance time,14C breath test for detection of Hp infection rate,chest CT detection of interstitial lung disease incidence; serum uric acid,creatinine,and blood, urine, saliva, β2 ~ microglobulin ( β2 - MG) detection of all the patients was elevated. Results There was no significant difference in age,duration of disease,gender ratio,the habit for smoking and drinking between the two types of primary Sjogren syndrome. Compared with the YDDH - PSS group, the DHS - SS group had more serious bad food habit in eating greasy,sweet and heavy - taste food,higher BMI,higher frequency interstitial pneumonia. Time of oral Sugar clearance in DHS - PSS group was significantly longer than that in YDDH - PSS group. The serum and salivary β2 ~ MG were significantly higher in DHS - PSS group than that in YDDH - PSS group. Conclusion There are differences between dampness - heat stagnation type and yin deficiency with dryness heat type primary Sjogren syndrome in the duration of disease,BMI,diet,the number of dental caries,in- volved organs and β2 - MG in, etc. The analysis of these projects contribute to the understanding of the PSS traditional Chinese medicine syndrome differentiation clinical features, and provide the evidence base for the objective of the tradi- tional Chinese medicine syndrome differentiation.%目的 对比原发性干燥综合征(PSS)湿阻热郁型与阴虚燥热型在生活习惯、唾液腺分泌及脏器

  1. XPC deficiency is related to APE1 and OGG1 expression and function.

    de Melo, Julliane Tamara Araújo; de Souza Timoteo, Ana Rafaela; Lajus, Tirzah Braz Petta; Brandão, Juliana Alves; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja Cristhina; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins; Campalans, Anna; Radicella, J Pablo; Vessoni, Alexandre Teixeira; Muotri, Alysson Renato; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is considered to be a major cause of neurodegeneration and internal tumors observed in syndromes that result from nucleotide excision repair (NER) deficiencies, such as Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne Syndrome (CS). Recent evidence has shown that NER aids in removing oxidized DNA damage and may interact with base excision repair (BER) enzymes. Here, we investigated APE1 and OGG1 expression, localization and activity after oxidative stress in XPC-deficient cells. The endogenous APE1 and OGG1 mRNA levels were lower in XPC-deficient fibroblasts. However, XPC-deficient cells did not show hypersensitivity to oxidative stress compared with NER-proficient cells. To confirm the impact of an XPC deficiency in regulating APE1 and OGG1 expression and activity, we established an XPC-complemented cell line. Although the XPC complementation was only partial and transient, the transfected cells exhibited greater OGG1 expression and activity compared with XPC-deficient cells. However, the APE1 expression and activity did not significantly change. Furthermore, we observed a physical interaction between the XPC and APE1 proteins. Together, the results indicate that the responses of XPC-deficient cells under oxidative stress may not only be associated with NER deficiency per se but may also include new XPC functions in regulating BER proteins. PMID:26811994

  2. Milk versus medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in hospitalised infants

    Wall, C.; Grant, C.; Taua, N; C. Wilson; Thompson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To compare iron fortified follow-on milk (iron follow-on), iron fortified partially modified cows' milk (iron milk), and iron medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) in hospitalised infants.

  3. Zinc deficiency is common in several psychiatric disorders.

    Ole Grønli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mounting evidence suggests a link between low zinc levels and depression. There is, however, little knowledge about zinc levels in older persons with other psychiatric diagnoses. Therefore, we explore the zinc status of elderly patients suffering from a wide range of psychiatric disorders. METHODS: Clinical data and blood samples for zinc analyzes were collected from 100 psychogeriatric patients over 64 of age. Psychiatric and cognitive symptoms were assessed using the Montgomery and Aasberg Depression Rating Scale, the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Clockdrawing Test, clinical interviews and a review of medical records. In addition, a diagnostic interview was conducted using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview instrument. The prevalence of zinc deficiency in patients with depression was compared with the prevalence in patients without depression, and the prevalence in a control group of 882 older persons sampled from a population study. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in zinc deficiency prevalence between the control group (14.4% and the patient group (41.0% (χ(2 = 44.81, df = 1, p<0.001. In a logistic model with relevant predictors, zinc deficiency was positively associated with gender and with serum albumin level. The prevalence of zinc deficiency in the patient group was significantly higher in patients without depression (i.e. with other diagnoses than in patients with depression as a main diagnosis or comorbid depression (χ(2 = 4.36, df = 1, p = 0.037. CONCLUSIONS: Zinc deficiency is quite common among psychogeriatric patients and appears to be even more prominent in patients suffering from other psychiatric disorders than depression. LIMITATIONS: This study does not provide a clear answer as to whether the observed differences represent a causal relationship between zinc deficiency and psychiatric symptoms. The blood sample collection time points

  4. Carnitine deficiency disorders in children.

    Stanley, Charles A

    2004-11-01

    Mitochondrial oxidation of long-chain fatty acids provides an important source of energy for the heart as well as for skeletal muscle during prolonged aerobic work and for hepatic ketogenesis during long-term fasting. The carnitine shuttle is responsible for transferring long-chain fatty acids across the barrier of the inner mitochondrial membrane to gain access to the enzymes of beta-oxidation. The shuttle consists of three enzymes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, carnitine acylcarnitine translocase, carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 2) and a small, soluble molecule, carnitine, to transport fatty acids as their long-chain fatty acylcarnitine esters. Carnitine is provided in the diet (animal protein) and also synthesized at low rates from trimethyl-lysine residues generated during protein catabolism. Carnitine turnover rates (300-500 micromol/day) are benefit in genetic or acquired disorders of energy production to improve fatty acid oxidation, to remove accumulated toxic fatty acyl-CoA metabolites, or to restore the balance between free and acyl-CoA. Two disorders have been described in children where the supply of carnitine becomes limiting for fatty acid oxidation: (1) A recessive defect of the muscle/kidney sodium-dependent, plasma membrane carnitine symporter, which presents in infancy with cardiomyopathy or hypoketotic hypoglycemia; treatment with oral carnitine is required for survival. (2) Chronic administration of pivalate-conjugated antibiotics in which excretion of pivaloyl-carnitine can lead to carnitine depletion; tissue levels may become low enough to limit fatty acid oxidation, although no cases of illness due to carnitine deficiency have been described. There is speculation that carnitine supplements might be beneficial in other settings (such as genetic acyl-CoA oxidation defects--"secondary carnitine deficiency", chronic ischemia, hyperalimentation, nutritional carnitine deficiency), but efficacy has not been documented. The formation of abnormal

  5. Anti-thrombin III, Protein C, and Protein S deficiency in acute coronary syndrome

    Dasnan Ismail

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The final most common pathway for the majority of coronary artery disease is occlusion of a coronary vessel. Under normal conditions, antithrombin III (AT III, protein C, and protein S as an active protein C cofactor, are natural anticoagulants (hemostatic control that balances procoagulant activity (thrombin antithrombin complex balance to prevent thrombosis. If the condition becomes unbalanced, natural anticoagulants and the procoagulants can lead to thrombosis. Thirty subjects with acute coronary syndrome (ACS were studied for the incidence of antithrombin III (AT III, protein C, and protein S deficiencies, and the result were compare to the control group. Among patients with ACS, the frequency of distribution of AT-III with activity < 75% were 23,3% (7 of 30, and only 6,7% ( 2 of 30 in control subject. No one of the 30 control subject have protein C activity deficient, in ACS with activity < 70% were 13,3% (4 of 30. Fifteen out of the 30 (50% control subjects had protein S activity deficiency, while protein S deficiency activity < 70% was found 73.3.% (22 out of 30. On linear regression, the deterministic coefficient of AT-III activity deficiency to the development ACS was 13,25 %, and the deterministic coefficient of protein C activity deficient to the development of ACS was 9,06 %. The cut-off point for AT-III without protein S deficiency expected to contribute to the development of vessel disease was 45%. On discriminant analysis, protein C activity deficiency posed a risk for ACS of 4,5 greater than non deficient subjects, and AT-III activity deficiency posed a risk for ACS of 3,5 times greater than non deficient subjects. On binary logistic regression, protein S activity acted only as a reinforcing factor of AT-III activity deficiency in the development of ACS. Protein C and AT III deficiency can trigger ACS, with determinant coefficients of 9,06% and 13,25% respectively. Low levels of protein C posed a greater risk of

  6. Survey of the Prevalence of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency in Admitted Men for Premarriage Tests in Zahedan-Iran Reference Laboratory

    Nakhaee Ali Reza; Dabiri Soroush; Noora Mehrangiz

    2009-01-01

    Background: GLucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common known enzymopathy in human. G6PD deficiency is usually asymptomatic, however, deficient individuals are at increased risk of developing acute hemolytic anemia and hyperbilirubinemia following intake of oxidative agents and fava. The objective of present study was to detect prevalence of G6PD deficiency in admitted males for premarriage tests in Zahedan Reference Laboratory. Also, we compared blood indices of no...

  7. Vitamin D deficiency and stroke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D comprises a group of fat-soluble pro-hormones, obtained from sun exposure, food, and supplements, and it must undergo two hydroxylation reactions to be activated in the body. Several studies have shown the role of vitamin D in mineral metabolism regulation, especially calcium, phosphorus, and bone metabolism. Some factors such as inadequate vitamin intake and liver or kidney disorders can lead to vitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, vitamin D malnutrition may also be linked to susceptibility to chronic diseases such as heart failure, peripheral artery disease, high blood pressure, cognitive impairment including foggy brain and memory loss, and autoimmune diseases including diabetes type I. Recent research has revealed that low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of cardiovascular-related morbidity (Sato et al., 2004 and mortality (Pilz et al., 2008. Also, hypertension contributes to a reduction in bone mineral density and increase in the incidence of stroke and death. This article reviews the function and physiology of vitamin D and examines the effects of vitamin D deficiency on susceptibility to stroke, as a cardiovascular event, and its morbidity and subsequent mortality.

  8. Vitamin B12 deficiency and depression

    Milanlıoğlu, Aysel

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency may cause psychiatric manifestations preceding the hematological and neurological symptoms. Despite a variety of symptoms, data on the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in depression are sparse. We report a case with B12 deficiency that is diagnosed with psychotic depression and treated successively with vitamin B12 replacement instead of using conventional therapy. Future investigations should focus on the role of vitamin B12 status in depression and other neurops...

  9. Atypical B12 Deficiency with Nonresolving Paraesthesia

    Haider, S.; Ahmad, N; Anaissie, E J; Abdel Karim, N.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can present with various hematological, gastrointestinal and neurological manifestations. We report a case of elderly female who presented with neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency where the final work-up revealed polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes (POEMS). This case suggests that, although POEMS syndrome is a rare entity, it can present with vitamin-B12 deficiency and thus specific work up for early diagnosis of P...

  10. Multispectral Analysis of Color Vision Deficiency Tests

    Sergejs FOMINS; Ozolinsh, Maris

    2011-01-01

    Color deficiency tests are usually produced by means of polygraphy technologies and help to diagnose the type and severity of the color deficiencies. Due to different factors, as lighting conditions or age of the test, standard characteristics of these tests fail, thus not allowing diagnosing unambiguously the degree of different color deficiency. Multispectral camera was used to acquire the spectral images of the Ishihara and Rabkin pseudoisochromatic plates in the visible spectrum. Spectral...

  11. Prevalence of Color Vision Deficiency in Qazvin

    Mohammad khalaj; Ameneh Barikani; Mozhgan Mohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Color vision deficiency (CVD) is an X chromosome-linked recessive autosomal dominant. Determine the prevalence of color blindness in Qazvin population. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study color vision deficiency examined in 1853 individuals with age 10-25 years old who participated in private clinics and eye clinic of Bu-Ali hospital in Qazvin in 2010. The screening of color vision deficiency was performed using Ishihara test. Data were analyzed by SPSS-16 with χP...

  12. Vitamin B12 deficiency and depression

    Aysel Milanlıoğlu

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency may cause psychiatric manifestations preceding the hematological and neurological symptoms. Despite a variety of symptoms, data on the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in depression are sparse.We report a case with B12 deficiency that is diagnosed with psychotic depression and treated successively with vitamin B12 replacement instead of using conventional therapy.Future investigations should focus on the role of vitamin B12 status in depression and other neuropsychiatric ...

  13. Treatment of Iron Deficiency in Women

    Breymann, C; Römer, T.; Dudenhausen, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency with and without anaemia is a common cause of morbidity, particularly in women. Iron deficiency is generally the result of an imbalance between iron loss and iron absorption. In women with symptoms suspicious for iron deficiency, it is important to confirm or exclude the suspicion using proper tests. The use of serum ferritin levels is considered the gold standard for diagnosis. Although the ideal ferritin levels are not unknown the current consent is that le...

  14. Vitamin D Deficiency in Early Pregnancy

    Flood-Nichols, Shannon K.; Tinnemore, Deborah; Huang, Raywin R.; Napolitano, Peter G.; Ippolito, Danielle L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D deficiency is a common problem in reproductive-aged women in the United States. The effect of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is unknown, but has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between vitamin D deficiency in the first trimester and subsequent clinical outcomes. Study Design This is a retrospective cohort study. Plasma was collected in the first trimester from 310 nulliparous women with singlet...

  15. Vitamin D Deficiency in Children and Adolescents

    Andıran, Nesibe; Çelik, Nurullah; AKÇA, Halise; Doğan, Güzide

    2012-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D deficiency is an important health problem in both developed and developing countries. Recent reports on the extraskeletal effects of vitamin D have led to increased interest in prevalence studies on states of deficiency/insufficiency of vitamin D. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in children and adolescents residing in Ankara, Turkey and to investigate the factors associated with low vitamin D status. Methods: A...

  16. Observation on Therapeutic Effect of the Depression of Heart-spleen Deficiency with Wuling Capsule

    To evaluate the effect on the treatment of depression belong to the type of heart-spleen deficiency with Wuling capsule, 37 patients were assigned into two groups: the deficiency of both the heart and spleen group (I) and the non deficiency of both the heart and spleen group (II). The efficacy of two groups was surveyed and compared after taken Wuling capsule 2 and 4 weeks,respectively. After treatment, there was a difference (P0.05). The satisfactory effects were showed on various kinds of depressions using wuling capsules,while deficiency of both the heart and spleen group effects were better than that of the non deficiency of both the heart and spleen group. (authors)

  17. Genetics Home Reference: common variable immune deficiency

    ... 2 links) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Immune System National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Educational Resources (8 links) Boston Children's ...

  18. Congenital longitudinal deficiency of the tibia.

    Spiegel, D A; Loder, R T; Crandall, R C

    2003-01-01

    We performed a clinical and radiographic review of 15 patients (19 limbs) with longitudinal deficiency of the tibia treated between 1981 and 2001. Ten limbs with Kalamchi type I deficiencies were managed by through-knee amputation. Five type II deficiencies were treated by foot ablation and tibiofibular synostosis, either at the same time or staged, but prosthetic problems may arise from varus alignment and prominence of the proximal fibula. Patients with type III deficiencies (four cases) were treated by foot ablation. Prosthetic problems relating to proximal or distal tibiofibular instability may necessitate additional surgical intervention. PMID:12879290

  19. Impact of the Method of G6PD Deficiency Assessment on Genetic Association Studies of Malaria Susceptibility

    Johnson, Marla K.; Clark, Tamara D; Njama-Meya, Denise; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Parikh, Sunil

    2009-01-01

    Background Clinical association studies have yielded varied results regarding the impact of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency upon susceptibility to malaria. Analyses have been complicated by varied methods used to diagnose G6PD deficiency. Methodology/Prinicipal Findings We compared the association between uncomplicated malaria incidence and G6PD deficiency in a cohort of 601 Ugandan children using two different diagnostic methods, enzyme activity and G6PD genotype (G202A, ...

  20. Intracellular in vitro probe acylcarnitine assay for identifying deficiencies of carnitine transporter and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1.

    Purevsuren, Jamiyan; Kobayashi, Hironori; Hasegawa, Yuki; Yamada, Kenji; Takahashi, Tomoo; Takayanagi, Masaki; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Seiji; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) disorders are caused by defects in one of the FAO enzymes that regulates cellular uptake of fatty acids and free carnitine. An in vitro probe acylcarnitine (IVP) assay using cultured cells and tandem mass spectrometry is a tool to diagnose enzyme defects linked to most FAO disorders. Extracellular acylcarnitine (AC) profiling detects carnitine palmitoyltransferase-2, carnitine acylcarnitine translocase, and other FAO deficiencies. However, the diagnosis of primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) or carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1) deficiency using the conventional IVP assay has been hampered by the presence of a large amount of free carnitine (C0), a key molecule deregulated by these deficiencies. In the present study, we developed a novel IVP assay for the diagnosis of PCD and CPT1 deficiency by analyzing intracellular ACs. When exogenous C0 was reduced, intracellular C0 and total AC in these deficiencies showed specific profiles clearly distinguishable from other FAO disorders and control cells. Also, the ratio of intracellular to extracellular C0 levels showed a significant difference in cells with these deficiencies compared with control. Hence, intracellular AC profiling using the IVP assay under reduced C0 conditions is a useful method for diagnosing PCD or CPT1 deficiency. PMID:23143007

  1. Combating micronutrient deficiency disorders amongst children

    Umesh Kapil

    2014-11-01

    further deteriorates their micronutrients nutritional status. The direct supplementation of Micronutrients like Vitamin A, Iron   are beneficial in short term but they are not sustainable. We do not know for how many years or generations we need to continue with direct supplementation. The families also develop a culture of dependence on the “state” for nutrition support. We need to look in to the long term but sustainable strategies. There is a need to strengthen the family resources so that family may able to look after the diet of children and prevent micronutrient deficiencies.The Food Fortification is an important intervention. It is sustainable as the cost of fortification is borne by the beneficiaries who consume the fortified foods like the case of Iodized salt. However, an important consideration for the food fortification strategy is that it increases the cost of foods as compared to non-fortified foods. The poor families who do not have resources to buy raw food, they are more constraint for   availability of foods. There is a need of developing Food Fortification strategies which are scientifically sound, operationally feasible and with proven effectiveness before they are implemented in developing countries. We need to assess this food fortification interventions carefully before we launch them.  We also need   to ensure that the poorest to the poor, including families which are below the poverty line   are covered on priority basis.  The issue of implementation of targeted versus universal fortification of foods needs to be considered based on the epidemiological evidence of prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies in the region for   judicious utilization of resources. To achieve this, there is a need of joining hands amongst the nutrition scientists, public health specialists and food fortification technologists to shoulder responsibility towards devising effective and practical strategies to overcome the emergent challenges of

  2. Selected Systems Engineering Process Deficiencies and Their Consequences

    Thomas, Lawrence Dale

    2006-01-01

    The systems engineering process is well established and well understood. While this statement could be argued in the light of the many systems engineering guidelines and that have been developed, comparative review of these respective descriptions reveal that they differ primarily in the number of discrete steps or other nuances, and are at their core essentially common. Likewise, the systems engineering textbooks differ primarily in the context for application of systems engineering or in the utilization of evolved tools and techniques, not in the basic method. Thus, failures in systems engineering cannot credibly be attributed to implementation of the wrong systems engineering process among alternatives. However, numerous systems failures can be attributed to deficient implementation of the systems engineering process. What may clearly be perceived as a system engineering deficiency in retrospect can appear to be a well considered system engineering efficiency in real time - an efficiency taken to reduce cost or meet a schedule, or more often both. Typically these efficiencies are grounded on apparently solid rationale, such as reuse of heritage hardware or software. Over time, unintended consequences of a systems engineering process deficiency may begin to be realized, and unfortunately often the consequence is system failure. This paper describes several actual cases of system failures that resulted from deficiencies in their systems engineering process implementation, including the Ariane 5 and the Hubble Space Telescope.

  3. Phenylbutyrate Therapy for Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency and Lactic Acidosis

    Ferriero, Rosa; Manco, Giuseppe; Lamantea, Eleonora; Nusco, Edoardo; Ferrante, Mariella I.; Sordino, Paolo; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Lee, Brendan; Zeviani, Massimo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a build-up of lactic acid in the blood and tissues, which can be due to several inborn errors of metabolism as well as nongenetic conditions. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. Phosphorylation of specific serine residues of the E1α subunit of PDHC by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inactivates the enzyme, whereas dephosphorylation restores PDHC activity. We found that phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of PDK. Phenylbutyrate given to C57B6/L wild-type mice results in a significant increase in PDHC enzyme activity and a reduction of phosphorylated E1α in brain, muscle, and liver compared to saline-treated mice. By means of recombinant enzymes, we showed that phenylbutyrate prevents phosphorylation of E1α through binding and inhibition of PDK, providing a molecular explanation for the effect of phenylbutyrate on PDHC activity. Phenylbutyrate increases PDHC activity in fibroblasts from PDHC-deficient patients harboring various molecular defects and corrects the morphological, locomotor, and biochemical abnormalities in the noam631 zebrafish model of PDHC deficiency. In mice, phenylbutyrate prevents systemic lactic acidosis induced by partial hepatectomy. Because phenylbutyrate is already approved for human use in other diseases, the findings of this study have the potential to be rapidly translated for treatment of patients with PDHC deficiency and other forms of primary and secondary lactic acidosis. PMID:23467562

  4. HSF1-deficiency affects gait coordination and cerebellar calbindin levels.

    Ingenwerth, Marc; Estrada, Veronica; Stahr, Anna; Müller, Hans Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in cell homeostasis and protect against cell damage. They were previously identified as key players in different ataxia models. HSF1 is the main transcription factor for HSP activation. HSF1-deficient mice (HSF1-/-) are known to have deficiencies in motor control test. However, little is known about effects of HSF1-deficiency on locomotor, especially gait, coordination. Therefore, we compared HSF-deficient (HSF1-/-) mice and wildtype littermates using an automated gait analysis system for objective assessment of gait coordination. We found significant changes in gait parameters of HSF1-/- mice reminiscent of cerebellar ataxia. Immunohistochemical analyses of a cerebellum revealed co-localization of HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis of a potential interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Calbindin levels were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, respectively. While quantitative PCR revealed no differences in calbindin mRNA levels between HSF1+/+ and HSF1-/- mice, calbindin protein levels, however, were significantly decreased in a cerebellum of HSF1-/- mice. A pathway analysis supports the hypothesis of an interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin. In summary, the targeted deletion of HSF1 results in changes of locomotor function associated with changes in cerebellar calbindin protein levels. These findings suggest a role of HSF1 in regular Purkinje cell calcium homeostasis. PMID:27173427

  5. Generation and characterization of P gene-deficient rabies virus

    Rabies virus (RV) deficient in the P gene was generated by reverse genetics from cDNA of HEP-Flury strain lacking the entire P gene. The defective virus was propagated and amplified by rescue of virus, using a cell line that complemented the functions of the deficient gene. The P gene-deficient (def-P) virus replicated its genome and produced progeny viruses in the cell lines that constitutively expressed the P protein, although it grew at a slightly retarded rate compared to the parental strain. In contrast, no progeny virus was produced in the infected host when the def-P virus-infected cells that did not express the P protein. However, we found that the def-P virus had the ability to perform primary transcription (by the virion-associated polymerase) in the infected host without de novo P protein synthesis. The def-P virus was apathogenic in adult and suckling mice, even when inoculated intracranially. Inoculation of def-P virus in mice induced high levels of virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) and conferred protective immunity against a lethal rabies infection. These results demonstrate the potential utility of gene-deficient virus as a novel live attenuated rabies vaccine

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Malaria: Cytochemical Detection of Heterozygous G6PD Deficiency in Women

    Peters, Anna L.; Van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a X-chromosomally transmitted disorder of the erythrocyte that affects 400 million people worldwide. Diagnosis of heterozygously-deficient women is complicated: as a result of lyonization, these women have a normal and a G6PD-deficient population of erythrocytes. The cytochemical assay is the only reliable assay to discriminate between heterozygously-deficient women and non-deficient women or homozygously-deficient women. G6PD deficiency ...

  7. Photodissociation of neutron deficient nuclei

    Sonnabend, K.; Babilon, M.; Hasper, J.; Mueller, S.; Zarza, M.; Zilges, A. [TU Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    The knowledge of the cross sections for photodissociation reactions like e.g. ({gamma}, n) of neutron deficient nuclei is of crucial interest for network calculations predicting the abundances of the so-called p nuclei. However, only single cross sections have been measured up to now, i.e., one has to rely nearly fully on theoretical predictions. While the cross sections of stable isotopes are accessible by experiments using real photons, the bulk of the involved reactions starts from unstable nuclei. Coulomb dissociation (CD) experiments in inverse kinematics might be a key to expand the experimental database for p-process network calculations. The approach to test the accuracy of the CD method is explained. (orig.)

  8. Photodissociation of neutron deficient nuclei

    Sonnabend, K.; Babilon, M.; Hasper, J.; Müller, S.; Zarza, M.; Zilges, A.

    2006-03-01

    The knowledge of the cross sections for photodissociation reactions like e.g. (γ, n) of neutron deficient nuclei is of crucial interest for network calculations predicting the abundances of the so-called p nuclei. However, only single cross sections have been measured up to now, i.e., one has to rely nearly fully on theoretical predictions. While the cross sections of stable isotopes are accessible by experiments using real photons, the bulk of the involved reactions starts from unstable nuclei. Coulomb dissociation (CD) experiments in inverse kinematics might be a key to expand the experimental database for p-process network calculations. The approach to test the accuracy of the CD method is explained.

  9. [Iron deficiency in the elderly].

    Helsen, Tuur; Joosten, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common diagnosis in the geriatric population, especially in institutionalized and hospitalized elderly. Most common etiologies for anemia in elderly people admitted to a geriatric ward are iron-deficiency anemia and anemia associated with chronic disease.Determination of serum ferritin is the most used assay in the differential diagnosis, despite low sensitivity and moderate specificity. New insights into iron homeostasis lead to new diagnostic assays such as serum hepcidin, serum transferrin receptor and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent.Importance of proper diagnosis and treatment for this population is large since there is a correlation between anemia and morbidity - mortality. Anemia is usually defined as hemoglobin less than 12 g/dl for women and less than 13 g/dl for men. There is no consensus for which hemoglobinvalue an investigation into underlying pathology is obligatory. This needs to be evaluated depending on functional condition of the patient. PMID:27106490

  10. Academic Deficiency: Student Experiences of Institutional Labeling

    Barouch-Gilbert, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Limited existing research examines how undergraduate students in the United States experience the process of being identified as deficient due to their academic performance. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of college students on academic probation who were labeled academically deficient. Students…

  11. Short Stature and Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Matemi, Sezer

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the importance of measurements of height and weight in normal children and emphasizes the role of growth increments for the diagnosis of short stature Causes of short stature methods for diagnosis of GH hormone deficiency actions of growth hormone treatment of growth hormone deficiency and doses for biosynthetic GH treatment are described Key words: Short Stature Growth Hormone

  12. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  13. Genetics Home Reference: beta-ketothiolase deficiency

    ... Test Genetic Testing Registry: Deficiency of acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the ... Testing Registry (1 link) Deficiency of acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase ACT Sheets (1 link) Elevated C5-OH Acylcarnitine ...

  14. Acquired Zinc Deficiency in an Adult Female

    Mohanan Saritha; Divya Gupta; Laxmisha Chandrashekar; Devinder M Thappa; Nachiappa G Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of zinc absorption. Acquired cases are reported occasionally in patients with eating disorders or Crohn′s disease. We report a 24-year-old housewife with acquired isolated severe zinc deficiency with no other comorbidities to highlight the rare occurrence of isolated nutritional zinc deficiency in an otherwise normal patient.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate kinase deficiency

    ... National (UK) Information Centre for Metabolic Diseases National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Pyruvate kinase deficiency of red cells Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    ... the most common cause of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency , accounting for approximately 80 percent of cases. These mutations ... deficiency ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (5 links) ...

  17. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  18. Genetics Home Reference: complement factor I deficiency

    ... the complement system decreases blood levels of another complement protein called C3, reducing the immune system's ability to fight infections. ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition C3 inactivator deficiency complement component 3 inactivator deficiency Related Information How are ...

  19. How common is vitamin B12 deficiency?

    In considering the vitamin B-12 fortification of flour, it is important to know who is at risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency and whether those individuals would benefit from flour fortification.This article reviews current knowledge of the prevalence and causes of vitamin B-12 deficiency and considers ...

  20. Breath hydrogen test and sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

    Ford, R P; Barnes, G L

    1983-01-01

    Sucrose breath hydrogen tests were performed on 7 children with proved sucrase isomaltase deficiency. All children had raised breath hydrogen excretion. The amount of hydrogen produced and symptoms experienced increased with increasing sucrose loads. The sucrose breath hydrogen test appears to be a reliable indicator of sucrose malabsorption in sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

  1. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif;

    1995-01-01

    Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH-deficiency ...

  2. Impaired hepcidin expression in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency associated with iron overload and progressive liver disease.

    Schaefer, Benedikt; Haschka, David; Finkenstedt, Armin; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Theurl, Igor; Henninger, Benjamin; Janecke, Andreas R; Wang, Chia-Yu; Lin, Herbert Y; Veits, Lothar; Vogel, Wolfgang; Weiss, Günter; Franke, Andre; Zoller, Heinz

    2015-11-01

    Liver disease due to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is associated with hepatic iron overload in a subgroup of patients. The underlying cause for this association is unknown. The aim of the present study was to define the genetics of this correlation and the effect of alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) on the expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Full exome and candidate gene sequencing were carried out in a family with A1ATD and hepatic iron overload. Regulation of hepcidin expression by A1AT was studied in primary murine hepatocytes. Cells co-transfected with hemojuvelin (HJV) and matriptase-2 (MT-2) were used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanism of this regulation. Observed familial clustering of hepatic iron overload with A1ATD suggests a genetic cause, but genotypes known to be associated with hemochromatosis were absent. Individuals homozygous for the A1AT Z-allele with environmental or genetic risk factors such as steatosis or heterozygosity for the HAMP non-sense mutation p.Arg59* presented with severe hepatic siderosis. In hepatocytes, A1AT induced hepcidin mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Experiments in overexpressing cells show that A1AT reduces cleavage of the hepcidin inducing bone morphogenetic protein co-receptor HJV via inhibition of the membrane-bound serine protease MT-2. The acute-phase protein A1AT is an inducer of hepcidin expression. Through this mechanism, A1ATD could be a trigger of hepatic iron overload in genetically predisposed individuals or patients with environmental risk factors for hepatic siderosis. PMID:26310624

  3. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly].

    Leischker, A H; Kolb, G F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age. Patients with dementia and spouses of patients with dementia are at special risk for the development of vitamin B12 deficiency. In a normal diet this vitamin is present only in animal source foods; therefore, vegans frequently develop vitamin B12 deficiency if not using supplements or foods fortified with cobalamin. Apart from dementia, most of these manifestations are completely reversible under correct therapy; therefore it is crucial to identify and to treat even atypical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency as early as possible. This article deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of vitamin B12 metabolism. A practice-oriented algorithm which also considers health economic aspects for a rational laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is presented. In cases with severe neurological symptoms, therapy should be parenteral, especially initially. For parenteral treatment, hydroxocobalamin is the drug of choice. PMID:25586321

  4. Prevalence of Color Vision Deficiency in Qazvin

    Mohammad khalaj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Color vision deficiency (CVD is an X chromosome-linked recessive autosomal dominant. Determine the prevalence of color blindness in Qazvin population. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study color vision deficiency examined in 1853 individuals with age 10-25 years old who participated in private clinics and eye clinic of Bu-Ali hospital in Qazvin in 2010. The screening of color vision deficiency was performed using Ishihara test. Data were analyzed by SPSS-16 with χP2P test with p<0.05. Results: Mean age of participant was 17.86±4.48 years. 59.5% of them were female. 3.49% of the total population had color vision deficiency that 0.93% and 2.56% were female and male respectively. Conclusion: color vision deficiency must be noticed by decision makers in health field for screen planning.

  5. [Effect of zinc deficiency on 3',5'-cyclic-AMP content and parameters of energy metabolism in the rat].

    Roth, H P; Kirchgessner, M

    1983-06-01

    Loss of appetite, strongly reduced feed intake, and stop in weight gain are characteristic signs of alimentary zinc deficiency. The present paper investigates some parameters of the energy metabolism of Zn-deficient rats in order to obtain information on possible disturbances. The blood of Zn-deficient rats showed an increased activity of adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) in comparison to ad-libitum- and pair-fed control animals. Therefore the concentration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was reduced and the concentration of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) increased in deficient animals. As a consequence, the ratio ATP/ADP was strongly reduced in Zn-deficient rats compared with both control groups. The concentration of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) was reduced in the blood of Zn-deficient rats. The levels of c-AMP in serum and urine were markedly increased in Zn-deficient rats in comparison with both control groups. Key enzymes of energetic utilization of carbohydrates such as fructose-1.6-biphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were reduced in their activities in livers and kidneys of Zn-deficient animals. The results show that alimentary Zn deficiency impairs some parameters of the energy metabolism. The problems of reduced feed intake in Zn deficiency still remain unsolved. PMID:6308919

  6. Evaluation of a Rapid Qualitative Enzyme Chromatographic Test for Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    Tinley, Kathleen E.; LOUGHLIN, ANITA M.; Jepson, Anne; Barnett, Elizabeth D

    2010-01-01

    Rapid determination of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) status is desirable when it is necessary to use a drug contraindicated in G6PD-deficient persons, such as use of primaquine for malaria prevention or treatment. The purpose of this study was to compare a new, rapid, qualitative enzyme chromatographic test for deficiency of G6PD to a standard reference method. Samples from 196 G6PD-normal persons and 50 G6PD-deficient persons were evaluated. The sensitivity of the experimental rap...

  7. Hemolysis Induced by Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Its Association with Sex in Children

    Esmaeel Sadeghi; Perikala Vijayananda Kumar; Mansour Haghshenas; Hamed Jalaeian

    2010-01-01

    Background: Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)deficiency is the most common enzyme disorder in human.The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence ofG6PD deficiency among children and evaluate its associationwith ABO/Rh blood groups.Method: Blood samples of 3401 asymptomatic children wereanalyzed and compared with 317 children who were admitted tohospital because of hemolysis resulted fromG6PD deficiency.Results: Among asymptomatic children 375 (11%) were G6PDdeficient. Male to ...

  8. Copper deficiency in YBa2Cu3O7-x ceramics, textured and single crystals

    Copper deficiency is studied in YBa2Cu3O7-δ phase. We compare polycrystals formed by sintering with textured and single crystals. The experimental method uses electron probe micro-analysis and X-ray structural determinations on single crystals. We show that YBa2Cu3O7-δ phase accommodates Cu deficiency up to several percent. Copper vacancies are located at the Cu(1) site (in the chains). Copper deficiency is evidenced when a liquid phase is involved in the chemical process. The implications of copper vacancies on the physical properties has probably to be reconsidered in future. (orig.)

  9. A population-based study of morbidity and mortality in mannose-binding lectin deficiency

    Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Schnohr, Peter;

    2004-01-01

    homozygotes (P = 0.53). Death incidence per 10,000 person. yr was 235 in noncarriers compared with 244 in heterozygotes (P = 0.44) and 274 in deficiency homozygotes (P = 0.12). After stratification by specific cause of hospitalization or death, only hospitalization from cardiovascular disorders was increased...... conclusion, in this large study in an ethnically homogeneous Caucasian population, there was no evidence for significant differences in infectious disease or mortality in MBL-deficient individuals versus controls. Our results suggest that MBL deficiency is not a major risk factor for morbidity or death in...

  10. Vitamin-D Deficiency and Comorbidities in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    Jackson, Tara Christine; Krauss, Melissa Jo; DeBaun, Michael Rutledge; Strunk, Robert Charles; Arbeláez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin-D deficiency is known to be common among patients with Sickle Cell Anemia (SCA). Vitamin-D levels were measured in 139 children (aged 7.9-15.1 years) to study its association with SCA morbidities; severe deficiency (30 ng/mL). Vitamin-D levels were associated with pulmonary function (FEV1), but not associated with either rates of acute pain or acute chest syndrome episodes. Further studies are needed to be able to compare outcomes in those with deficiency to those with sufficiency, as...

  11. Relationship between iron deficiency anemia and febrile convulsion in infants

    Youn Soo Jun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The association between iron deficiency anemia and febrile convulsion in infants has been examined in several studies with conflicting results. Therefore, the authors aimed to evaluate the precise relationship involved. Methods : In this case-control study, the authors assessed 100 children with a diagnosis of febrile convulsion, aged between 9 months and 2 years, during January 2007 to July 2009. The control group consisted of 100 febrile children without convulsion; controls were closely matched to the cases by age, gender, and underlying disease. Results : The mean ages of the febrile convulsion and control group were 16.3¡?#?.4 ;and 15.8¡?#?.1 ;months, respectively, and the two groups had no differences in clinical features. Iron deficiency anemia (Hb &lt;10.5 gm/dL was more frequent in the febrile convulsion group than in the control group, although there was no statistical significance. Unexpectably, the RDW (red blood cell distribution width was significantly lower and the MCNC (mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration was significantly higher among seizure cases than among the controls (P&lt;0.05. There is no statistical difference between simple and complex febrile groups in the clinical and laboratory profiles. On multiple logistic regression analysis, iron deficiency anemia was more frequent, but the RDW was lower, among the cases with febrile convulsion, compared with the controls. Conclusions : Our study suggests that the iron deficiency anemia is associated with febrile convulsion, and screening for iron deficiency anemia should be considered in children with febrile convulsions.

  12. Possible association between vitamin D deficiency and restless legs syndrome

    Oran M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mustafa Oran,1 Cuneyt Unsal,2 Yakup Albayrak,2 Feti Tulubas,3 Keriman Oguz,4 Okan Avci,1 Nilda Turgut,4 Recep Alp,4 Ahmet Gurel3 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, 3Department of Biochemistry, 4Department of Neurology, Namik Kemal University, Faculty of Medicine, Tekirdağ, Turkey Background and aim: Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a distressing sleep disorder that occurs worldwide. Although there have been recent developments in understanding the pathophysiology of RLS, the exact mechanism of the disease has not been well elucidated. An increased prevalence of neurologic and psychiatric diseases involving dopaminergic dysfunction in vitamin D-deficient patients led us to hypothesize that vitamin D deficiency might result in dopaminergic dysfunction and consequently, the development of RLS (in which dopaminergic dysfunction plays a pivotal role. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and RLS. Methods: One hundred and fifty-five consecutive patients, 18–65 years of age, who were admitted to the Department of Internal Medicine with musculoskeletal symptoms and who subsequently underwent neurological and electromyography (EMG examination by the same senior neurologist, were included in this study. The patients were divided into two groups according to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD (a vitamin D metabolite used as a measure of vitamin D status level: 36 patients with serum 25(OHD levels ≥20 ng/mL comprised the normal vitamin D group, and 119 patients with serum 25(OHD levels <20 ng/mL comprised the vitamin D deficiency group. The two groups were compared for the presence of RLS and associated factors. Results: The two groups were similar in terms of mean age, sex, mean body mass index (BMI, and serum levels of calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and ferritin. The presence of RLS was significantly higher in the vitamin D deficiency group (χ2=12.87, P<0

  13. Red cell distribution width in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia trait

    To evaluate diagnostic importance of Red Cell Distribution Width (RDW) in differentiating iron deficiency anemia from Thalassemia trait. A total of 100 cases aged 5 months to 50 years of either sex with diagnosed iron deficiency anemia or thalassemia trait were compared with respect to their RDW value. RDW value in iron deficiency anemia was between 36.2% to 55.2% (Mean 44.1%). The range of RDW in Thalassemia trait was 14.7% to 24.9% (Mean 19.8%). Conclusions The very high range of RDW in iron deficiency anemia as compared to slight elevation of the value in thalassemia trait in our study suggests that RDW value obtained from simple Complete Blood Counts (CBC) can help in differentiating the two pathologies. (author)

  14. Effect of estradiol on the oxalate metabolism in vitamin B6-deficient male rats.

    Sharma, V; Thind, S K; Nath, R

    1984-10-01

    Estradiol-implanted (EB) and sham-operated (SB) male rats (100-120 g Fody wt) were kept on a vitamin B6-deficient diet for 1 month along (Formula: see text) with their respective estradiol pair-fed (EPF) and sham-operated pair-fed (SPF) controls. Pyridoxine-deficient animals had higher kidney weights and increased activities of liver glycolic acid oxidase (GAO) and glycolic acid dehydrogenase (GAD) as compared to their pair-fed control animals. Kidney weights, GAO, and GAD levels in these animals are negatively correlated with erythrocyte alanine transaminase (EALT) levels, indicating that pyridoxine status regulates these two major enzymes of oxalate biosynthesis. Estradiol-treated animals showed a lower reduction in EALT levels after feeding them a pyridoxine-deficient diet for 1 month as compared to untreated animals. Estradiol administration decreased GAO levels in both normal and pyridoxine-deficient animals. PMID:6391478

  15. Folate deficiency affects histone methylation.

    Garcia, Benjamin A; Luka, Zigmund; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Bhanu, Natarajan V; Wagner, Conrad

    2016-03-01

    that the bound THF serves to protect the FAD class of histone demethylases from the destructive effects of formaldehyde generation by formation of 5,10-methylene-THF. We present pilot data showing that decreased folate in livers as a result of dietary folate deficiency is associated with increased levels of methylated lysine 4 of histone 3. This can be a result of decreased LSD1 activity resulting from the decreased folate available to scavenge the formaldehyde produced at the active site caused by the folate deficiency. Because LSD1 can regulate gene expression this suggests that folate may play a more important role than simply serving as a carrier of one-carbon units and be a factor in other diseases associated with low folate. PMID:26880641

  16. Responses of barley root and shoot proteomes to long‐term nitrogen deficiency, short‐term nitrogen starvation and ammonium

    Laurell Blom Møller, Anders; Pedas, Pai; Andersen, Birgit;

    2011-01-01

    plants grown hydroponically for 33 d with 5 mm nitrate, plants grown under N deficiency (0.5 mm nitrate, 33 d) or short‐term N starvation (28 d with 5 mm nitrate followed by 5 d with no N source) were compared. N deficiency caused changes in C and N metabolism and ascorbate‐glutathione cycle enzymes...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Dopamine beta (β)-hydroxylase deficiency is a condition that ...

  18. Who Is at Risk for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    ... for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency occurs in all ethnic groups. However, the ... most often in White people of European descent. AAT deficiency is an inherited condition. "Inherited" means the ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: mannose-binding lectin deficiency

    ... Health Conditions mannose-binding lectin deficiency mannose-binding lectin deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Mannose-binding lectin deficiency is a condition that affects the immune ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    ... Home Health Conditions ataxia with vitamin E deficiency ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is a disorder that ...

  2. Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency

    ... Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency Share | Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency This ... is the best tool for prevention of the flu, should patients with immune deficiency be given the ...

  3. Growth hormone replacement therapy in adults with growth hormone deficiency; thrice weekly low dose administration.

    Y.S. Chung; Lee, H C; S.K. Hwang; Paik, I. K.; Lee, J.H.; Huh, K. B.

    1994-01-01

    Recent reports on growth hormone (GH) therapy have shown that GH has various beneficial effects in GH deficient adults. In most of these studies, GH was administered daily. Because GH is still expensive and has to be delivered by subcutaneous injection, we studied the 6-month therapeutic effects of thrice weekly GH injection therapy and compared it with daily therapy. Twenty eight adult patients with GH deficiency were randomly assigned into group 1 (ten cases, thrice weekly injections of GH)...

  4. Urinary reducing substances in neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency

    Ajmal Kader; Christina Ong; Veena Logarajah; Kong Boo Phua; Ee Shien Tan

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis due to citrin deficiency is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by mutations in SLC25A13 gene. Mutations in this gene have a relatively high prevalence in East-Asian races compared to European or Afro-Caribbean races. Mutations in both sets of chromosomes often lead to self-limiting early onset cholestasis and growth retardation referred as neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD). It is associated with a wide range of metabolic d...

  5. Association of B12 deficiency and clinical neuropathy with metformin use in type 2 diabetes patients

    Singh, A.K.; Kumar, A.; D Karmakar; R K Jha

    2013-01-01

    Context: Long-term metformin use has been hypothesized to cause B12 deficiency and neuropathy in Type 2 diabetes patients. However, there is a paucity of Indian data regarding the same. Aim: To compare the prevalence of B12 deficiency and peripheral neuropathy in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with or without metformin. Materials and Methods: We recruited patients with Type 2 diabetes and divided them into metformin exposed and nonmetformin exposed groups. We measured baseline...

  6. High Prevalence of Iron Deficiency among Educated Hospital Employees in Switzerland

    Schuepbach, R A; Bestmann, L; Bechir, M; Fehr, J; Bachli, E B

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency is known to cause symptoms such as fatigue, depression and restless legs syndrome resulting in impaired quality of life and working capacity. We sought to examine the iron status of reportedly healthy individuals by a framed study design in 58 highly educated Swiss hospital employees and to compare the use of non invasive tests for assessing iron deficiency (ID). A structured interview was used to assess health status, nutritional intake and potential blood loss, blood counts ...

  7. Palm Tocotrienol Supplementation Enhanced Bone Formation in Oestrogen-Deficient Rats

    Ima Nirwana Soelaiman; Wang Ming; Roshayati Abu Bakar; Nursyahrina Atiqah Hashnan; Hanif Mohd Ali; Norazlina Mohamed; Norliza Muhammad; Ahmad Nazrun Shuid

    2012-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the commonest cause of osteoporosis. It is associated with increased free radical activity induced by the oestrogen-deficient state. Therefore, supplementation with palm-oil-derived tocotrienols, a potent antioxidant, should be able to prevent this bone loss. Our earlier studies have shown that tocotrienol was able to prevent and even reverse osteoporosis due to various factors, including oestrogen deficiency. In this study we compared the effects of supplementa...

  8. Iron and Ferritin Levels in Saliva of Patients with Thalassemia and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Canatan, Duran; Akdeniz, Sevgi Kosaci

    2012-01-01

    Most of the techniques for measuring iron stores such as serum iron concentration, iron binding capacity, serum ferritin level, liver biopsy can be troublesome or invasive for patients with thalassemia. The salivary iron measurement could be of potential advantage being an easy and non invasive approach for diagnosis of iron deficiency and iron overload . The aim of this study was to compare the levels of iron and ferritin in saliva and serum of patients affected by thalassemia or iron defici...

  9. Iron therapy for the treatment of iron deficiency in chronic heart failure: intravenous or oral?

    McDonagh, Theresa; Macdougall, Iain C.

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the use and modality of iron therapy to treat iron deficiency in patients with heart failure, an aspect of care which has received relatively little attention compared with the wider topic of anaemia management. Iron deficiency affects up to 50% of heart failure patients, and is associated with poor quality of life, impaired exercise tolerance, and mortality independent of haematopoietic effects in this patient population. The European Society of Cardiology Guidelines f...

  10. Primary Immuno-deficiencies (PID

    Javad Ghaffari1

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 6 June, 2009 ; Accepted 22 July, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Primary immune-deficiencies (PID are associated with a wide range of clinical disorders along with variable symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate and improve our knowledge regarding PID from patients that were referred to Booali Sina Hospital.Materials and methods: We evaluated all of PID`s that were referred to Booali Sina Hospital from their data records. Demography, clinical and laboratory data were recorded and then analyzed.Results: In the duration of 3 years, we had 10 patients with PID (7 males and 3 females. Of these cases, 5 had hum oral (50%, 1case had phagocytic (10%, 3 cases had cellular (30% and 1 case had hyper IgE syndrome (10%. Many of them had respiratory and otitis media infections, while a few patients had adenitis, gastroenteritis, liver abscesses, bleedings and malignancy.Conclusion: PID is a diverse disorder that involves different immune systems. Knowledge from patient’s clinical symptoms and consideration in their differential diagnosis can be helpful in early diagnosis and an effective treatment.J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(70: 76-80 (Persian

  11. Cernunnos deficiency: a case report.

    Turul, T; Tezcan, I; Sanal, O

    2011-01-01

    B cell-negative severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is caused by molecules involved in the variable (diversity) joining (V[D]J) recombination process. Four genes involved in the nonhomologous end joining pathway--Artemis, DNA-PKcs, DNA ligase 4, and Cernunnos--are involved in B cell-negative radiosensitive SCID. Deficiencies in DNA ligase 4 and the recently described Cernunnos gene result in microcephaly, growth retardation, and typical bird-like facies. Lymphopenia and hypogammaglobulinemia with normal or elevated immunoglobulin (Ig) M levels indicate a defect in V(D)J recombination. We present a case with recurrent postnatal pulmonary infections leading to chronic lung disease, disseminated molluscum contagiosum, lymphopenia, low IgG, IgA and normal IgM levels. Our patient had phenotypic features such as microcephaly and severe growth retardation. Clinical presentation in patients with the B cell-negative subtype ranges from SCID to atypical combined immunodeficiency, occasionally associated with autoimmune manifestations and cytomegalovirus infection. Our patient survived beyond infancy with combined immunodeficiency and no autoimmune manifestations. PMID:21721379

  12. Perinatal iron deficiency and neurocognitive development

    Emily Clare Radlowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is the most common form of nutrient deficiency worldwide. It is highly prevalent due to the limited availability of high quality food in developing countries, and poor dietary habits in industrialized countries. According to the World Health Organization, it affects nearly 2 billion people and up to 50% of women who are pregnant. Maternal anemia during pregnancy is especially burdensome to healthy neurodevelopment in the fetus because iron is needed for proper neurogenesis, development, and myelination. Maternal anemia also increases the risk of low birth weight, either due to premature birth or fetal growth restriction, which is associated with delayed neurocognitive development and even psychiatric illness. As rapid neurodevelopment continues after birth infants that received sufficient iron in utero, but that receive a low iron diet after 6 months of age, also show deficits in neurocognitive development, including impairments in learning and memory. Unfortunately, the neurocognitive complications of iron deficiency during critical pre- and postnatal periods of brain development are difficult to remedy, persisting into adulthood. Thus, preventing iron deficiency in the pre- and postnatal periods is critical as is devising new means to recapture cognitive function in individuals who experienced early iron deficiency. This review will discuss the prevalence of pre- and postnatal iron deficiency, the mechanism, and effects of iron deficiency on brain and cognitive development.

  13. SURF1 deficiency: a multi-centre natural history study

    Wedatilake, Y; Brown, R; Mcfarland, R.; Yaplito-Lee, J.; Morris, A.A.; Champion, M; Jardine, P E; Clarke, A.; Thorburn, D R; Taylor, R. W.; Land, J M; Forrest, K.; Dobbie, A.; Simmons, L; Aasheim, E. T.

    2013-01-01

    Background SURF1 deficiency, a monogenic mitochondrial disorder, is the most frequent cause of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficient Leigh syndrome (LS). We report the first natural history study of SURF1 deficiency. Methods We conducted a multi-centre case notes review of 44 SURF1-deficient patients from ten different UK centres and two Australian centres. Survival data for LRPPRC-deficient LS and nuclear-encoded complex I-deficient LS patients were obtained from previous publications. The su...

  14. Viable offspring obtained from Prm1-deficient sperm in mice

    Takeda, Naoki; Yoshinaga, Kazuya; Furushima, Kenryo; Takamune, Kazufumi; Li, Zhenghua; Abe, Shin-ichi; Aizawa, Shin-ichi; Yamamura, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Protamines are expressed in the spermatid nucleus and allow denser packaging of DNA compared with histones. Disruption of the coding sequence of one allele of either protamine 1 (Prm1) or Prm2 results in failure to produce offspring, although sperm with disrupted Prm1 or Prm2 alleles are produced. Here, we produced Prm1-deficient female chimeric mice carrying Prm1-deficient oocytes. These mice successfully produced Prm1+/− male mice. Healthy Prm1+/− offspring were then produced by transferring blastocysts obtained via in vitro fertilization using zona-free oocytes and sperm from Prm1+/− mice. This result suggests that sperm lacking Prm1 can generate offspring despite being abnormally shaped and having destabilised DNA, decondensed chromatin and a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. Nevertheless, these mice showed little derangement of expression profiles. PMID:27250771

  15. SCID patients with ARTEMIS vs RAG deficiencies following HCT: increased risk of late toxicity in ARTEMIS-deficient SCID

    Schuetz, Catharina; Neven, Benedicte; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Leroy, Sandrine; Ege, Markus J.; Pannicke, Ulrich; Schwarz, Klaus; Schulz, Ansgar S.; Hoenig, Manfred; Sparber-Sauer, Monika; Gatz, Susanne A.; Denzer, Christian; Blanche, Stephane; Moshous, Despina; Picard, Capucine

    2014-01-01

    No difference in survival, early toxicity, or occurrence of tumors between ARTEMIS and RAG-deficient SCID.ARTEMIS-deficient patients develop late toxicity following HCT: growth retardation, endocrinologic deficiencies, and dental abnormalities.

  16. C3 Deficiency – A Case Report

    Carreiro-Martins, P; Gaspar, A.; Rosado-Pinto, J.

    2006-01-01

    O sistema do complemento é um componente essencial do sistema imunitário inato, pelo que as deficiências de proteínas da sua complexa cascata podem ter consequências mais ou menos graves, de acordo com a importância do factor afectado. As complicações mais usuais das deficiências do complemento são infecções recorrentes a bactérias encapsuladas e distúrbios autoimunes. Os autores apresentam um caso clínico de deficiência do factor C3, situação extremamente rara, discutindo a fisiopatolo...

  17. Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony in Biotinidase Deficiency

    Yaghini, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is a disorder inherited autosomal recessively showing evidence of hearing loss and optic atrophy in addition to seizures, hypotonia, and ataxia. In the present study, a 2-year-old boy with Biotinidase deficiency is presented in which clinical symptoms have been reported with auditory neuropathy/auditory dyssynchrony (AN/AD). In this case, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions showed bilaterally normal responses representing normal function of outer hair cells. In contrast, acoustic reflex test showed absent reflexes bilaterally, and visual reinforcement audiometry and auditory brainstem responses indicated severe to profound hearing loss in both ears. These results suggest AN/AD in patients with Biotinidase deficiency. PMID:27144235

  18. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Causing Kyphoscoliosis.

    Singhai, Abhishek; Banzal, Subodh

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among Indian population. Women are especially at risk for severe vitamin D deficiency. The risk is higher for those who are multiparous and postmenopausal. Poor exposure to sunlight, higher latitude, winter season, inadequate diet, older age, obesity and malabsorption are also important risk factors. Symptoms of hypovitaminosis D, including diffuse or migratory pain affecting several sites (especially the shoulder, pelvis, ribcage and lower back) have also been misdiagnosed as musculoskeletal disorders, including fibromyalgia, polymyalgia rheumatica and ankylosing spondylitis. Here, we report two cases presented with kyphoscoliosis, diagnosed to have severe vitamin D deficiency. PMID:26664847

  19. Composition of proteoglycans in the aortas of copper-deficient rats

    Radhakrishnamurthy, B.; Ruiz, H.; Dalferes, E.R. Jr.; Klevay, L.M. (Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans (USA)); Berenson, G. (Department of Agriculture, Grand Forks, ND (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Copper deficiency adversely affects the extracellular matrix of the arterial wall, leading to cardiovascular lesions. To study the lesions resulting from copper deficiency, the composition of proteoglycans from aortas of copper-deficient rats was compared with proteoglycans of aortas from copper-supplemented rats. Copper deficiency in rats was verified by copper levels in adrenal glands (mean {plus minus} SE, 0.37 {plus minus} 0.07 vs 1.03 {plus minus} 0.17 {mu}g/g wet wt in supplemented rats). Total uronate in the aortas from copper-deficient rats was 25% greater than in aortas from copper-supplemented rats, and the proteoglycans from copper-deficient rat aortas were of greater molecular size. Among the glycosaminoglycans the concentration ({mu}g/mg tissue) of isomeric chondroitin sulfates, particularly dermatan sulfate, was greater in copper-deficient animals than in copper-supplemented animals. These observations are similar to earlier findings in experimental atherosclerosis and to a response of cardiovascular connective tissue to injury.

  20. In Vivo Evaluation of Transdermal Iodide Microemulsion for Treating Iodine Deficiency Using Sprague Dawley Rats.

    Alayoubi, Alaadin; Sullivan, Ryan D; Lou, Hao; Patel, Hemlata; Mandrell, Timothy; Helms, Richard; Almoazen, Hassan

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the transdermal efficiency of iodide microemulsion in treating iodine deficiency using rats as an animal model. Animals were fed either iodine-deficient diet (20 μg/kg iodide) or control diet (200 μg/kg iodide) over a 17-month period. At month 14, iodide microemulsion was applied topically in iodine-deficient group and physiological evaluations of thyroid gland functions were characterized by monitoring the thyroid hormones (T3, T4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), iodide ion excretion in urine, and the overall rat body weights in both groups. Moreover, morphological evaluations of thyroid gland before and after treatment were performed by ultrasound imaging and through histological assessment. Prior to microemulsion treatment, the levels of T3, T4, and TSH in iodine-deficient group were statistically significant as compared to that in the control group. The levels of T3 and T4 increased while TSH level decreased significantly in iodine-deficient group within the first 4 weeks of treatment. After treatment, iodide concentration in urine increased significantly. There was no statistical difference in weight between the two groups. Ultrasound imaging and histological evaluations showed evidence of hyperplasia in iodine-deficient group. Topical iodide microemulsion has shown a promising potential as a novel delivery system to treat iodine deficiency. PMID:26288943

  1. Sex-specific attentional deficits in adult vitamin D deficient BALB/c mice.

    Groves, Natalie J; Burne, Thomas H J

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an association between vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment. However, there is a paucity of preclinical data showing that vitamin D deficiency is a causal factor for impaired cognitive processing. The aim of this study was to assess two cognitive tasks, the 5 choice-serial reaction task and the 5 choice-continuous performance task in adult vitamin D (AVD) deficient BALB/c mice. Ten-week old male and female BALB/c mice were fed a control or vitamin D deficient diet for 10 weeks prior to, and during behavioural testing. We found sex-dependent impairments in attentional processing and showed that male AVD-deficient mice were less accurate, took longer to respond when making a correct choice and were more likely to make an omission, without a change in the motivation to collect reward. By contrast, female AVD-deficient mice had a reduced latency to collect reward, but no changes on any other measures compared to controls. Therefore, we have shown that in otherwise healthy adult mice, vitamin D deficiency led to mild cognitive impairment in male but not female mice and therefore this model will be useful for future investigations into unravelling the mechanism by which vitamin D affects the adult brain and cognitive function. PMID:26836278

  2. The effects of MyD88 deficiency on disease phenotype in dysferlin-deficient A/J mice: role of endogenous TLR ligands.

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ampong, Beryl; Sali, Arpana; Vandermeulen, Jack; Wei, Benjamin; Creeden, Brittany; Huynh, Tony; Quinn, James; Tatem, Kathleen; Rayavarapu, Sree; Hoffman, Eric P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-10-01

    An absence of dysferlin leads to activation of innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and skeletal muscle inflammation. Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) is a key mediator of TLR-dependent innate immune signalling. We hypothesized that endogenous TLR ligands released from the leaking dysferlin-deficient muscle fibres engage TLRs on muscle and immune cells and contribute to disease progression. To test this hypothesis, we generated and characterized dysferlin and MyD88 double-deficient mice. Double-deficient mice exhibited improved body weight, grip strength, and maximum muscle contractile force at 6-8 months of age when compared to MyD88-sufficient, dysferlin-deficient A/J mice. Double-deficient mice also showed a decrease in total fibre number, which contributed to the observed increase in the number of central nuclei/fibres. These results indicate that there was less regeneration in the double-deficient mice. We next tested the hypothesis that endogenous ligands, such as single-stranded ribonucleic acids (ssRNAs), released from damaged muscle cells bind to TLR-7/8 and perpetuate the disease progression. We found that injection of ssRNA into the skeletal muscle of pre-symptomatic mice (2 months old) resulted in a significant increase in degenerative fibres, inflammation, and regenerating fibres in A/J mice. In contrast, characteristic histological features were significantly decreased in double-deficient mice. These data point to a clear role for the TLR pathway in the pathogenesis of dysferlin deficiency and suggest that TLR-7/8 antagonists may have therapeutic value in this disease. PMID:23857504

  3. Investigation of suspected growth hormone deficiency

    Milner, R. D. G.; Burns, E C

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes views of the Health Services Human Growth Hormone Committee on how a child suspected of growth hormone deficiency should be investigated in a district general hospital or in a regional growth centre.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    ... elevated acidity in the blood and tissues (metabolic acidosis). In addition to the features present in moderate ... Kaabachi N, Hachicha M. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency. Fetal Pediatr Pathol. ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency

    ... Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) (UK) Muscular Dystrophy Association National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Resource list from the University of Kansas Medical Center: Metabolic Conditions Genetic Testing Registry (2 links) Deficiency of phosphoglycerate kinase ...

  6. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Anemia or Iron Deficiency Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 237,000 ...

  7. Vitamin D Deficiency (Beyond the Basics)

    ... of Use ©2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient education: Vitamin D deficiency (Beyond the Basics) Author Marc K Drezner, ... topic last updated: Jun 09, 2015. INTRODUCTION — Vitamin D plays an important role in many places throughout ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: sepiapterin reductase deficiency

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions sepiapterin reductase deficiency sepiapterin reductase ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome dopamine ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency

    ... the body is unable to use the vitamin biotin effectively. This disorder is classified as a multiple ... impaired activity of certain enzymes that depend on biotin. The signs and symptoms of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: familial glucocorticoid deficiency

    ... Clark AJ, Metherell LA. ACTH resistance: genes and mechanisms. Endocr Dev. 2013;24:57-66. doi: 10. ... Metherell LA. Familial glucocorticoid deficiency: New genes and mechanisms. Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2013 May 22;371(1- ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: mevalonate kinase deficiency

    ... net Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) Autoinflammatory Alliance National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Hyper ... Haas D, Hoffmann GF. Mevalonate kinase deficiency and autoinflammatory disorders. N Engl J Med. 2007 Jun 28; ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    ... resulting in a shortage of red blood cells ( anemia ). Chronic hemolytic anemia can lead to unusually pale skin (pallor), yellowing ... ducts (gallstones) may also occur in this disorder. Hemolytic anemia in GPI deficiency can range from mild to ...

  14. Somatomedin C deficiency in Asian sisters.

    McGraw, M E; Price, D A; D. J. Hill

    1986-01-01

    Two sisters of Asian origin showed typical clinical and biochemical features of primary somatomedin C (SM-C) deficiency (Laron dwarfism). Abnormalities of SM-C binding proteins were observed, one sister lacking the high molecular weight (150 Kd) protein.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: deoxyguanosine kinase deficiency

    ... or mtDNA, which is essential for the normal function of these structures. Deoxyguanosine kinase is involved in producing and maintaining the ... DNA (known as mitochondrial DNA depletion) impairs mitochondrial function ... deficiency . Learn more about the gene associated ...

  16. Antibody deficiency in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    Herriot, R; Miedzybrodzka, Z

    2016-03-01

    The developmental disorder Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is frequently complicated by recurrent respiratory infections. In many cases this is likely to be the result of microaspiration or gastro-oesophageal reflux but, in a proportion, underlying antibody deficiency is a potentially modifiable susceptibility factor for infection. Relatively subtle, specific defects of pneumococcal antibody production have previously been described in the context of RTS. Here, we report a rare association between the syndrome and an overt, major primary antibody deficiency disorder (common variable immune deficiency) which was successfully managed with immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Early recognition and investigation for antibody deficiency associated with RTS allied to effective and optimized treatment are essential to minimize morbidity and mortality and improve quality and duration of life. PMID:26307339

  17. Genetics Home Reference: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    ... genetic conditions treated or managed? What is genetic testing? How can I find a genetics professional in my area? Other Names for This Condition De Vivo disease encephalopathy due to GLUT1 deficiency G1D glucose ...

  18. Sepiapterin Reductase Deficiency: Mimic of Cerebral Palsy

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at University of California at San Diego, and 22 other US national and international centers studied the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in a cohort of 38 patients with sepiapterin reductase deficiency (SRD).

  19. Colour vision deficiency and physics teaching

    Maule, Louise; Featonby, David

    2016-05-01

    1 in 12 males suffer from some form of colour vision deficiency (CVD) which in the present colour dominated world of education presentation can be a severe disadvantage. Although aware of ‘colourblindness’ most teachers make little or no adjustment for these pupils for whom tasks may be more difficult. This article examines colour vision deficiency and looks at ways in which we can help the many students who have this problem.

  20. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Review

    Şaşmaz, İlgen

    2009-01-01

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase G6PD is the first enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway providing reducing power to all cells in the form of reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate G6PD deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect being present in more than 400 million people worldwide G6PD deficiency is an X linked hereditary genetic defect caused by mutations in the G6PD gene Clinical presentations include acute hemolytic anemia chronic hemolytic anemia neonatal...

  1. Androgen deficiency and aging in men.

    Swerdloff, R S; Wang, C

    1993-01-01

    Androgen levels decrease with age in men. Androgen deficiency in men older than 65 years leads to asthenia, a decrease in muscle mass, osteoporosis, and a decrease in sexual activity. Androgen deficiency has been reported to cause changes in mood and cognitive function. The combination of these factors results in impaired quality of life in older men. Androgen replacement therapy in hypogonadal men increases bone and muscle mass, enhances muscle and cardiovascular function, and improves sexua...

  2. Cobalamin Deficiency: Clinical Picture and Radiological Findings

    Chiara Briani; Chiara Dalla Torre; Valentina Citton; Renzo Manara; Sara Pompanin; Gianni Binotto; Fausto Adami

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency causes a wide range of hematological, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological disorders. Hematological presentation of cobalamin deficiency ranges from the incidental increase of mean corpuscular volume and neutrophil hypersegmentation to symptoms due to severe anemia, such as angor, dyspnea on exertion, fatigue or symptoms related to congestive heart failure, such as ankle edema, orthopnea and nocturia. Neuropsychiatric symptoms may precede hematologic signs and...

  3. Congenital leptin deficiency and thyroid function

    Paz-Filho Gilberto; Delibasi Tuncay; Erol Halil K; Wong Ma-Li; Licinio Julio

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Thyroid function is closely related to leptin's secretion by the adipose tissue. In states of leptin-deficiency, the circadian rhythm of TSH is altered, leading to central hypothyroidism in animal models. In humans, central hypothyroidism has also been described in rare cases of congenital leptin deficiency. However, the thyroid phenotype in these cases is heterogeneous, with the occurrence of central hypothyroidism in a minority of cases. Here we describe thyroid function in four l...

  4. Study of neutron-deficient Sn isotopes

    The formation of neutron deficient nuclei by heavy ion reactions is investigated. The experimental technique is presented, and the results obtained concerning Sn et In isotopes reported: first excited states of 106Sn, high spin states in 107Sn and 107In; Yrast levels of 106Sn, 107Sn, 108Sn; study of neutron deficient Sn and In isotopes formed by the desintegration of the compound nucleus 112Xe. All these results are discussed

  5. Targeting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Heart Failure.

    Saraon, Tajinderpal; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is common in heart failure (HF) patients, and is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes. Clinical trials of intravenous iron supplementation in iron-deficient HF patients have demonstrated short-term improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. In some trials, the benefits of iron supplementation were independent of the hemoglobin levels. Additional investigations of iron supplementation are needed to characterize the mechanisms contributing to clinical benefit and long-term safety in HF. PMID:26657161

  6. Deficiently Extremal Cohen-Macaulay Algebras

    Chanchal Kumar; Pavinder Singh

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to study homological properties of deficiently extremal Cohen–Macaulay algebras. Eagon–Reiner showed that the Stanley–Reisner ring of a simplicial complex has a linear resolution if and only if the Alexander dual of the simplicial complex is Cohen–Macaulay. An extension of a special case of Eagon–Reiner theorem is obtained for deficiently extremal Cohen–Macaulay Stanley–Reisner rings.

  7. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Causing Kyphoscoliosis

    Singhai, Abhishek; Banzal, Subodh

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among Indian population. Women are especially at risk for severe vitamin D deficiency. The risk is higher for those who are multiparous and postmenopausal. Poor exposure to sunlight, higher latitude, winter season, inadequate diet, older age, obesity and malabsorption are also important risk factors. Symptoms of hypovitaminosis D, including diffuse or migratory pain affecting several sites (especially the shoulder, pelvis, ribcage and lower back) have also been ...

  8. Vitamin D Deficiency: Time for Inaction?

    Plotnikoff, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    In 1998, the British Medical Journal boldly stated in an editorial headline, “Vitamin D Deficiency: Time for Action.” 1 The urgency was clear: vitamin D deficiency was going undiagnosed and untreated in large numbers of people. Patients were at risk and suffering needlessly. A simple, extremely low-cost, low-toxicity intervention was readily available. All that was required was vitamin D advocacy.

  9. Pregnant phenotype in aquaporin 8-deficient mice

    Xiao-yan SHA; Zheng-fang XIONG; Hui-shu LIU; Zheng ZHENG; Tong-hui MA

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Aquaporin 8 (AQP8) is expressed within the female reproductive system but its physiological function reminds to be elucidated.This study investigates the role of AQP8 during pregnancy using AQP8-knockout (AQP8-KO) mice.Methods: Homozygous AQP8-KO mice were mated, and the conception rate was recorded. AQP8-KO pregnant mice or their offspring were divided into 5 subgroups according to fetal gestational day (7, 13, 16, 18 GD) and newborn. Wild type C57 pregnant mice served as the control group. The number of pregnant mice, total embryos and atrophic embryos, as well as fetal weight, placental weight and placental area were recorded for each subgroup. The amount of amniotic fluid in each sac at 13, 16, and 18 GD was calculated. Statistical significance was determined by analysis of variance of factorial design and chi-square tests.Results: Conception rates did not differ significantly between AQP8-KO and wild type mice. AQP8-KO pregnant mice had a significantly higher number of embryos compared to wild type controls. Fetal/neonatal weight was also significantly greater in the AQP8-KO group compared to age-matched wild type controls. The amount of amniotic fluid was greater in AQP8-KO pregnant mice than wild type controis, although the FM/AFA (fetal weight/amniotic fluid amount) did not differ. While AQP8-KO placental weight was significantly larger than wild type controls, there was no evidence of placental pathology in either group.Conclusion: The results suggest that AQP8 deficiency plays an important role in pregnancy outcome.

  10. Pregnant phenotype in aquaporin 8-deficient mice

    Sha, Xiao-yan; Xiong, Zheng-fang; Liu, Hui-shu; Zheng, Zheng; Ma, Tong-hui

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Aquaporin 8 (AQP8) is expressed within the female reproductive system but its physiological function reminds to be elucidated. This study investigates the role of AQP8 during pregnancy using AQP8-knockout (AQP8-KO) mice. Methods: Homozygous AQP8-KO mice were mated, and the conception rate was recorded. AQP8-KO pregnant mice or their offspring were divided into 5 subgroups according to fetal gestational day (7, 13, 16, 18 GD) and newborn. Wild type C57 pregnant mice served as the control group. The number of pregnant mice, total embryos and atrophic embryos, as well as fetal weight, placental weight and placental area were recorded for each subgroup. The amount of amniotic fluid in each sac at 13, 16, and 18 GD was calculated. Statistical significance was determined by analysis of variance of factorial design and chi-square tests. Results: Conception rates did not differ significantly between AQP8-KO and wild type mice. AQP8-KO pregnant mice had a significantly higher number of embryos compared to wild type controls. Fetal/neonatal weight was also significantly greater in the AQP8-KO group compared to age-matched wild type controls. The amount of amniotic fluid was greater in AQP8-KO pregnant mice than wild type controls, although the FM/AFA (fetal weight/amniotic fluid amount) did not differ. While AQP8-KO placental weight was significantly larger than wild type controls, there was no evidence of placental pathology in either group. Conclusion: The results suggest that AQP8 deficiency plays an important role in pregnancy outcome. PMID:21602842

  11. Sustained beta-cell dysfunction but normalized islet mass in aged thrombospondin-1 deficient mice.

    Carl Johan Drott

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islet endothelial cells have in recent years been shown to support beta-cell mass and function by paracrine interactions. Recently, we identified an islets endothelial-specific glycoprotein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1, that showed to be of importance for islet angiogenesis and beta-cell function in young mice. The present study aimed to investigate long-term consequences for islet morphology and beta-cell function of TSP-1 deficiency. Islet and beta-cell mass were observed increased at 10-12 weeks of age in TSP-1 deficient mice, but were normalized before 16 weeks of age when compared to wild-type controls. Islet vascularity was normal in 10-12 and 16-week-old TSP-1 deficient animals, whereas islets of one-year-old animals lacking TSP-1 were hypervascular. Beta-cell dysfunction in TSP-1 deficient animals was present at similar magnitudes between 10-12 and 52 weeks of age, as evaluated by glucose tolerance tests. The insulin secretion capacity in vivo of islets in one-year-old TSP-1 deficient animals was only ∼15% of that in wild-type animals. Using a transplantation model, we reconstituted TSP-1 in adult TSP-deficient islets. In contrast to neonatal TSP-1 deficient islets that we previously reported to regain function after TSP-1 reconstitution, adult islets failed to recover. We conclude that TSP-1 deficiency in islets causes changing vascular and endocrine morphological alterations postnatally, but is coupled to a chronic beta-cell dysfunction. The beta-cell dysfunction induced by TSP-1 deficiency is irreversible if not substituted early in life.

  12. Phenotypic studies of natural killer cell subsets in human transporter associated with antigen processing deficiency.

    Jacques Zimmer

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood natural killer (NK cells from patients with transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP deficiency are hyporesponsive. The mechanism of this defect is unknown, but the phenotype of TAP-deficient NK cells is almost normal. However, we noticed a high percentage of CD56(bright cells among total NK cells from two patients. We further investigated TAP-deficient NK cells in these patients and compared them to NK cells from two other TAP-deficient patients with no clinical symptoms and to individuals with chronic inflammatory diseases other than TAP deficiency (chronic lung diseases or vasculitis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from venous blood were stained with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies and the phenotype of NK cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, (51Chromium release assays were performed to assess the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. In the symptomatic patients, CD56(bright NK cells represented 28% and 45%, respectively, of all NK cells (higher than in healthy donors. The patients also displayed a higher percentage of CD56(dimCD16(- NK cells than controls. Interestingly, this unusual NK cell subtype distribution was not found in the two asymptomatic TAP-deficient cases, but was instead present in several of the other patients. Over-expression of the inhibitory receptor CD94/NKG2A by TAP-deficient NK cells was confirmed and extended to the inhibitory receptor ILT2 (CD85j. These inhibitory receptors were not involved in regulating the cytotoxicity of TAP-deficient NK cells. We conclude that expansion of the CD56(bright NK cell subtype in peripheral blood is not a hallmark of TAP deficiency, but can be found in other diseases as well. This might reflect a reaction of the immune system to pathologic conditions. It could be interesting to investigate the relative distribution of NK cell subsets in various respiratory and autoimmune diseases.

  13. Deficiency of the natural anticoagulant proteins in women with pregnancy related venous thromboembolism

    Mitić Gorana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited thrombophilia can be defined as a predisposition to thrombosis caused by heritable defects, such as mutations in genes encoding the natural anticoagulants or clotting factors. Pregnancy related risk of VTE is sixfold increased comparing to non pregnant age matched women. Pregnancy is an independent risk factor for the development of venous thromboembolism and this risk is further increased by the presence of thrombophilia. Aim of the study: The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between deficiency of natural anticoagulants: antithrombin, protein C and protein S and pregnancy related thromboembolism. We have determined the activities of antithrombin, proten C and protein S in 74 women with pregnancy related thrombosis and in 45 healthy women who had at least two uncomplicated pregnancies. Among the women with the history of venous thromboembolism antithrombin deficiency was found in 4 (5.4%, protein C deficiency in 2 (2.7% and protein S deficiency in 5 (6.76%. The total of 11 (14.6% women was found to be deficient. Not a single woman in the control group was found to be deficient in natural anticoagulants. Deficiencies of coagulation inhibitors are associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis during pregnancy and puerperium (p= 0.006. Antithrombin, protein C and protein S deficient women are at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism during antepartal period (p= 0.0097. Prophylactic treatment with heparin should be recommended from the very beginning of the following pregnancy in women with antithrombin, protein C or protein S deficiency.

  14. Low Prevalence of Iron and Vitamin A Deficiency among Cambodian Women of Reproductive Age.

    Wieringa, Frank T; Sophonneary, Prak; Whitney, Sophie; Mao, Bunsoth; Berger, Jacques; Conkle, Joel; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine A; Laillou, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of women of reproductive age (WRA) in Cambodia are anemic. To guide interventions, national data on nutritional causes of anemia, including iron deficiency and vitamin A deficiency, are needed. In 2012, a national household survey in WRA on antibodies to routine vaccine-preventable disease immunity was performed. We used serum samples from this survey to estimate the prevalence of iron and vitamin A deficiency in 2112 Cambodian WRA, aged 15 to 39 years. Iron deficiency was classified as low or marginal iron stores (ferritin concentrations corrected for inflammation Fer), iron deficient erythropoiesis (soluble transferrin receptor concentrations >8.3 mg/L; sTfR), or low total body iron (TBI) derived from Fer and sTfR concentrations (<0 mg/kg). Vitamin A status was classified using retinol binding protein (RBP) concentrations corrected for inflammation as deficient (<0.70 μmol/L) or marginal (<1.05 μmol/L. Overall, the prevalence of low iron stores, low TBI and iron deficient erythropoiesis was 8.1%, 5.0% and 9.3% respectively. Almost 40% of the women had marginal iron stores. Iron status was better in women living in urban areas compared to rural areas (p < 0.05 for TBI and sTfR). The prevalence of vitamin A deficiency was <1%. These findings suggest that the contribution of iron and vitamin A deficiency to the high prevalence of anemia in Cambodian WRA may be limited. The etiology of anemia in Cambodia needs to be elucidated further to guide current policies on anemia. PMID:27043624

  15. Bach1 Deficiency and Accompanying Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 Do Not Influence Aging or Tumorigenesis in Mice

    Kazushige Ota

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress contributes to both aging and tumorigenesis. The transcription factor Bach1, a regulator of oxidative stress response, augments oxidative stress by repressing the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 gene (Hmox1 and suppresses oxidative stress-induced cellular senescence by restricting the p53 transcriptional activity. Here we investigated the lifelong effects of Bach1 deficiency on mice. Bach1-deficient mice showed longevity similar to wild-type mice. Although HO-1 was upregulated in the cells of Bach1-deficient animals, the levels of ROS in Bach1-deficient HSCs were comparable to those in wild-type cells. Bach1−/−; p53−/− mice succumbed to spontaneous cancers as frequently as p53-deficient mice. Bach1 deficiency significantly altered transcriptome in the liver of the young mice, which surprisingly became similar to that of wild-type mice during the course of aging. The transcriptome adaptation to Bach1 deficiency may reflect how oxidative stress response is tuned upon genetic and environmental perturbations. We concluded that Bach1 deficiency and accompanying overexpression of HO-1 did not influence aging or p53 deficiency-driven tumorigenesis. Our results suggest that it is useful to target Bach1 for acute injury responses without inducing any apparent deteriorative effect.

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Reveals Populus cathayana Females Are More Sensitive and Respond More Sophisticatedly to Iron Deficiency than Males.

    Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Yunxiang; Cao, Yanchun; Lei, Yanbao; Jiang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that there are significant sexual differences in the morphological and physiological responses of Populus cathayana Rehder to nitrogen and phosphorus deficiencies, but little is known about the sex-specific differences in responses to iron deficiency. In this study, the effects of iron deficiency on the morphology, physiology, and proteome of P. cathayana males and females were investigated. The results showed that iron deficiency (25 days) significantly decreased height growth, photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll content, and tissue iron concentration in both sexes. A comparison between the sexes indicated that iron-deficient males had less height inhibition and photosynthesis system II or chloroplast ultrastructural damage than iron-deficient females. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis revealed that 144 and 68 proteins were decreased in abundance (e.g., proteins involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, and gene expression regulation) and 78 and 39 proteins were increased in abundance (e.g., proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and stress response) according to the criterion of ratio ≥1.5 in females and males, respectively. A comparison between the sexes indicated that iron-deficient females exhibited a greater change in the proteins involved in photosynthesis, carbon and energy metabolism, the redox system, and stress responsive proteins. This study reveals females are more sensitive and have a more sophisticated response to iron deficiency compared with males and provides new insights into differential sexual responses to nutrient deficiency. PMID:26842668

  17. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in adults

    Objective: To determine the frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in adults presented with anemia. Subjects and Methods: Eighteen months admission data was reviewed for G6PD deficiency as a cause of anemia. Anemia was defined by world health organization (WHO) criteria as haemoglobin less than 11.3 gm%. G6PD activity was measured by Sigma dye decolorisation method. All patients were screened for complications of hemolysis and its possible cause. Patients with more than 13 years of age were included in the study. Results: Out of 3600 patients admitted, 1440 were found anaemic and 49 as G6PD deficient. So the frequency of G6PD deficiency in anaemic patients was 3.4% and the overall frequency is 1.36%. G6PD deficiency among males and females was three and six percent respectively. Antimalarials and antibiotics containing sulphonamide group were the most common precipitating factors for hemolysis. Anemia and jaundice were the most common presentations while malaria was the most common associated disease. Acute renal failure was the most severe complication occurring in five patients with two deaths. Conclusion: G6PD deficiency is a fairly common cause of anemia with medicine as common precipitating factor for hemolysis. Such complications can be avoided with early recognition of the disease and avoiding indiscriminate use of medicine. (author)

  18. Iron deficiency: from diagnosis to treatment.

    Polin, Vanessa; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Dhooge, Marion; Abitbol, Vered; Leblanc, Sarah; Prat, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2013-10-01

    Iron deficiency is the most frequent cause of anaemia worldwide. It impairs quality of life, increases asthenia and can lead to clinical worsening of patients. In addition, iron deficiency has a complex mechanism whose pathologic pathway is recently becoming better understood. The discovery of hepcidin has allowed a better clarification of iron metabolism regulation. Furthermore, the ratio of concentration of soluble transferrin receptor to the log of the ferritin level, has been developed as a tool to detect iron deficiency in most situations. The cause of iron deficiency should always be sought because the underlying condition can be serious. This review will summarize the current knowledge regarding diagnostic algorithms for iron deficiency anaemia. The majority of aetiologies occur in the digestive tract, in men and postmenopausal women, and justify morphological examination of the gut. First line investigations are upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy, and when negative, the small bowel should be explored; newer tools such as video capsule endoscopy have also been developed. The treatment of iron deficiency is aetiological if possible and iron supplementation whether in oral or in parenteral form. New parenteral formulations are available and seem to have promising results in terms of efficacy and safety. PMID:23582772

  19. [Approaches to vitamin B12 deficiency].

    Russcher, Henk; Heil, Sandra G; Slobbe, Lennert; Lindemans, Jan

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old female vegetarian was referred to a specialist in internal medicine with persistent iron deficiency. Laboratory analysis revealed microcytic anaemia with low ferritin levels but normal total vitamin B12 levels. The red blood cell distribution width, however, showed a very wide variation in red blood cell sizes, indicating a coexisting vitamin B12 deficiency, which was confirmed by the low concentration of active vitamin B12. Another patient, a 69-year-old woman with a history of previous gastric surgery and renal insufficiency as a complication of diabetes mellitus, was suspected to be deficient in vitamin B12, as she had low total vitamin B12 levels and an accumulation of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine in her blood. Testing the total concentration of vitamin B12 alone has insufficient diagnostic accuracy and no accepted gold standard is available for diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency. With the development of newer tests, such as measuring holotranscobalamin II (concentration of active vitamin B12), atypical and subclinical deficiency states can be recognized. A new approach to diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency is presented, based upon these 2 case descriptions. PMID:22217304

  20. Multispectral colour analysis for quantitative evaluation of pseudoisochromatic color deficiency tests

    Ozolinsh, Maris; Fomins, Sergejs

    2010-11-01

    Multispectral color analysis was used for spectral scanning of Ishihara and Rabkin color deficiency test book images. It was done using tunable liquid-crystal LC filters built in the Nuance II analyzer. Multispectral analysis keeps both, information on spatial content of tests and on spectral content. Images were taken in the range of 420-720nm with a 10nm step. We calculated retina neural activity charts taking into account cone sensitivity functions, and processed charts in order to find the visibility of latent symbols in color deficiency plates using cross-correlation technique. In such way the quantitative measure is found for each of diagnostics plate for three different color deficiency carrier types - protanopes, deutanopes and tritanopes. Multispectral color analysis allows to determine the CIE xyz color coordinates of pseudoisochromatic plate design elements and to perform statistical analysis of these data to compare the color quality of available color deficiency test books.

  1. Iron deficiency anemia's effect on bone formation in zebrafish mutant.

    Bo, Lin; Liu, Zhichun; Zhong, Yingbin; Huang, Jian; Chen, Bin; Wang, Han; Xu, Youjia

    2016-07-01

    Iron is one of the essential elements of life. Iron metabolism is related to bone metabolism. Previous studies have confirmed that iron overload is a risk factor for osteoporosis. But the correlation between iron deficiency and bone metabolism remains unclear. Ferroportin 1 is identified as a cellular iron exporter and required for normal iron cycling. In zebrafish, the mutant of ferroportin 1 gene (fpn1), weh(tp85c) exhibited the defective iron transport, leading to developing severe hypochromic anemia. We used weh(tp85c) as a model for investigating iron deficiency and bone metabolism. In this study, we examined the morphology of the developing cartilage and vertebrae of the Weh(tp85) compared to the wild type siblings by staining the larvae with alcian blue for cartilage and alizarin red for the bone. In addition, we evaluated the expression patterns of the marker genes of bone development and cell signaling in bone formation. Our results showed that weh(tp85c) mutant larvae exhibited the defects in bone formation, revealing by decreases in the number of calcified vertebrae along with decreased expression of osteoblast novel genes: alpl, runx2a and col1a1a and BMPs signaling genes in osteoblast differentiation: bmp2a and bmp2b. Our data suggest that iron deficiency anemia affects bone formation, potentially through the BMPs signaling pathway in zebrafish. PMID:27184405

  2. Class switch recombination in selective IgA-deficient subjects

    Jensen, Lone Hummelshøj; Ryder, L P; Nielsen, L K;

    2006-01-01

    Selective IgA deficiency is a common immunodeficiency in Caucasians, but the molecular basis of the disorder remains elusive. To address this issue we examined the molecular events leading to IgA production. Naive IgD positive B cells were purified from four donors with IgA deficiency and four...... control donors, all Caucasians. Stimulation of B cells from IgA-deficient donors with the cytokines transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, interferon (IFN)-gamma or interleukin (IL)-10 in the presence of anti-CD40 antibodies showed reduced expression of both activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and...... alpha germline transcripts (GLT) compared to controls. It was possible, however, to induce AID and alpha GLT when stimulating the cells with anti-CD40 antibody and TGF-beta in the combination with IL-10. Moreover, in anti-CD40 antibody-stimulated cultures, addition of IL-10 or IL-10 + TGF-beta in...

  3. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    Lefevre, Sophie [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); ED515 UPMC, 4 place Jussieu 75005 Paris (France); Sliwa, Dominika [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Rustin, Pierre [Inserm, U676, Physiopathology and Therapy of Mitochondrial Disease Laboratory, 75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot, Faculte de Medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France); Camadro, Jean-Michel [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Santos, Renata, E-mail: santos.renata@ijm.univ-paris-diderot.fr [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  4. Risks of iron deficiency among vegetarian college women

    Kimberly Grage Englehardt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia is the most common nutritional deficiency disease worldwide and poses a major threat in women of child-bearing age and those who follow a vegetarian diet. The objective of this study was to ascertain whether differences exist in iron status markers between female university students following a vegetarian and non-vegetarian diet. This study took a cross sectional analysis of 39 female students at California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly State University in San Luis Obispo, CA between the ages of 18 and 22. Of the participants, 19 followed a vegetarian diet and 20 followed a nonvegetarian diet. Characteristic, demographic, and anthropometric data were collected and analyzed. The results showed no significant difference in iron intake between the two groups. However, nearly 66% of vegetarians and 65% of non-vegetarians failed to meet the Recommended Daily Allowance for iron. No significant difference was found for serum iron, serum ferritin, transfer-rin saturation, and total iron binding capacity between subjects. Serum ferritin tended to be lower for vegetarians compared to non-vegetarians. Both vegetarians and non-vegetarians were in stage IV negative iron balance, with more vegetarians tending to be in stage IV negative iron balance than non-vegetarians. Thus, female college students, irrespective of their meat intake, may be at higher risk of developing negative iron balance and should be educated about iron deficiency anemia and the prevention of iron depletion.

  5. Survey of the Prevalence of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD Deficiency in Admitted Men for Premarriage Tests in Zahedan-Iran Reference Laboratory

    Nakhaee Ali Reza

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: GLucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is the most common known enzymopathy in human. G6PD deficiency is usually asymptomatic, however, deficient individuals are at increased risk of developing acute hemolytic anemia and hyperbilirubinemia following intake of oxidative agents and fava. The objective of present study was to detect prevalence of G6PD deficiency in admitted males for premarriage tests in Zahedan Reference Laboratory. Also, we compared blood indices of normal and G6PD deficient individuals.Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was carried out on 1340 admitted males in Zahedan Reference Laboratory from February 2008 to March 2009. G6PD activity was determined in EDTA containing blood samples by qualitative fluorescence spot test, then G6PD deficiency was confirmed by quantitative spectrophotometric method. Total leukocyte count and RBC indices of G6PD deficient samples and the same number of normal samples were compared. The differences between two groups were compared using Sigmaplot software and t-Student test. A P-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: G6PD deficiency was found in 84 individuals of total 1340 by fluorescence spot test and confirmed in 79 by quantitative method. Therefore, prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Zahedan was estimated to be 5.9%. Comparison of deficient and normal individuals did not show significant difference in WBC count, RBC count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH and RDW-SD. However, mean corpuscular volume (MCV was significantly high and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC and RDW-CV were significantly low in G6PD deficient individuals compared to those with normal enzyme level.Discussion: Present study revealed that the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Zahedan is 5.9%. Severity of G6PD deficiency in quantitative assay indicated that class I and II are probably dominant variants in

  6. Adaptive gene regulation in the Striatum of RGS9-deficient mice.

    Kathy Busse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RGS9-deficient mice show drug-induced dyskinesia but normal locomotor activity under unchallenged conditions. RESULTS: Genes related to Ca2+ signaling and their functions were regulated in RGS9-deficient mice. CONCLUSION: Changes in Ca2+ signaling that compensate for RGS9 loss-of-function can explain the normal locomotor activity in RGS9-deficient mice under unchallenged conditions. SIGNIFICANCE: Identified signaling components may represent novel targets in antidyskinetic therapy. The long splice variant of the regulator of G-protein signaling 9 (RGS9-2 is enriched in striatal medium spiny neurons and dampens dopamine D2 receptor signaling. Lack of RGS9-2 can promote while its overexpression prevents drug-induced dyskinesia. Other animal models of drug-induced dyskinesia rather pointed towards overactivity of dopamine receptor-mediated signaling. To evaluate changes in signaling pathways mRNA expression levels were determined and compared in wild-type and RGS9-deficient mice. Unexpectedly, expression levels of dopamine receptors were unchanged in RGS9-deficient mice, while several genes related to Ca2+ signaling and long-term depression were differentially expressed when compared to wild type animals. Detailed investigations at the protein level revealed hyperphosphorylation of DARPP32 at Thr34 and of ERK1/2 in striata of RGS9-deficient mice. Whole cell patch clamp recordings showed that spontaneous synaptic events are increased (frequency and size in RGS9-deficient mice while long-term depression is reduced in acute brain slices. These changes are compatible with a Ca2+-induced potentiation of dopamine receptor signaling which may contribute to the drug-induced dyskinesia in RGS9-deficient mice.

  7. Hospital Compare

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Compare has information about the quality of care at over 4,000 Medicare-certified hospitals across the country. You can use Hospital Compare to find...

  8. Intestinal Irradiation and Fibrosis in a Th1-Deficient Environment

    Purpose: Changes in the Th1/Th2 immune balance may play a role in increasing the incidence of radiation-induced toxicity. This study evaluates the consequences of Th1 deficiency on intestinal response (fibrosis and T cell trafficking) to abdominal irradiation and examines in mucosa and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) the differential involvement of the two Th1 pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, in controlling this balance in mice. Methods and Materials: Using T-bet-deficient mice (T-bet−/−), we evaluated the mRNA and protein expression of the Th1 pathways (IFN-γ, T-bet/STAT1, and IL-12/STAT4) and the CD4+ and CD8+ populations in ileal mucosa and MLN during the first 3 months after 10 Gy abdominal irradiation. Results: The T-bet-deficient mice showed an increased fibrotic response to radiation, characterized by higher TGF-β1, col3a1 expression, and collagen deposition in mucosa compared with wild-type mice. This response was associated with drastically lower expression of IFN-γ, the hallmark Th1 cytokine. Analysis of the Th1 expression pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, showed their equal involvement in the failure of Th1 polarization. A minimal IFN-γ level depended on the IL-23-p19/STAT4 level. In addition, the radiation-induced deficiency in the priming of Th1 by IFN-γ was related to the defective homing capacity of CD8+ cells in the mucosa. Conclusion: Irradiation induces Th2 polarization, and the Th2 immune response may play a role in potentiating irradiation-induced intestinal collagen deposition.

  9. Intestinal Irradiation and Fibrosis in a Th1-Deficient Environment

    Linard, Christine, E-mail: christine.linard@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Billiard, Fabienne; Benderitter, Marc [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Changes in the Th1/Th2 immune balance may play a role in increasing the incidence of radiation-induced toxicity. This study evaluates the consequences of Th1 deficiency on intestinal response (fibrosis and T cell trafficking) to abdominal irradiation and examines in mucosa and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) the differential involvement of the two Th1 pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, in controlling this balance in mice. Methods and Materials: Using T-bet-deficient mice (T-bet{sup -/-}), we evaluated the mRNA and protein expression of the Th1 pathways (IFN-{gamma}, T-bet/STAT1, and IL-12/STAT4) and the CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} populations in ileal mucosa and MLN during the first 3 months after 10 Gy abdominal irradiation. Results: The T-bet-deficient mice showed an increased fibrotic response to radiation, characterized by higher TGF-{beta}1, col3a1 expression, and collagen deposition in mucosa compared with wild-type mice. This response was associated with drastically lower expression of IFN-{gamma}, the hallmark Th1 cytokine. Analysis of the Th1 expression pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, showed their equal involvement in the failure of Th1 polarization. A minimal IFN-{gamma} level depended on the IL-23-p19/STAT4 level. In addition, the radiation-induced deficiency in the priming of Th1 by IFN-{gamma} was related to the defective homing capacity of CD8{sup +} cells in the mucosa. Conclusion: Irradiation induces Th2 polarization, and the Th2 immune response may play a role in potentiating irradiation-induced intestinal collagen deposition.

  10. The epidemiology of global micronutrient deficiencies.

    Bailey, Regan L; West, Keith P; Black, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients are essential to sustain life and for optimal physiological function. Widespread global micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs) exist, with pregnant women and their children under 5 years at the highest risk. Iron, iodine, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiencies are the most widespread MNDs, and all these MNDs are common contributors to poor growth, intellectual impairments, perinatal complications, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is the most common MND worldwide and leads to microcytic anemia, decreased capacity for work, as well as impaired immune and endocrine function. Iodine deficiency disorder is also widespread and results in goiter, mental retardation, or reduced cognitive function. Adequate zinc is necessary for optimal immune function, and deficiency is associated with an increased incidence of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections, major causes of death in those <5 years of age. Folic acid taken in early pregnancy can prevent neural tube defects. Folate is essential for DNA synthesis and repair, and deficiency results in macrocytic anemia. Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of blindness worldwide and also impairs immune function and cell differentiation. Single MNDs rarely occur alone; often, multiple MNDs coexist. The long-term consequences of MNDs are not only seen at the individual level but also have deleterious impacts on the economic development and human capital at the country level. Perhaps of greatest concern is the cycle of MNDs that persists over generations and the intergenerational consequences of MNDs that we are only beginning to understand. Prevention of MNDs is critical and traditionally has been accomplished through supplementation, fortification, and food-based approaches including diversification. It is widely accepted that intervention in the first 1,000 days is critical to break the cycle of malnutrition; however, a coordinated, sustainable commitment to scaling up nutrition at the

  11. Effects of cellular iron deficiency on the formation of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis. Iron deficiency and angiogenesis

    Eckard Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young women diagnosed with breast cancer are known to have a higher mortality rate from the disease than older patients. Specific risk factors leading to this poorer outcome have not been identified. In the present study, we hypothesized that iron deficiency, a common ailment in young women, contributes to the poor outcome by promoting the hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF formation. This hypothesis was tested in an in vitro cell culture model system. Results Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1 shRNA to constitutively impair iron uptake. Cellular iron status was determined by a set of iron proteins and angiogenesis was evaluated by levels of VEGF in cells as well as by a mouse xenograft model. Significant decreases in ferritin with concomitant increases in VEGF were observed in TfR1 knockdown MDA-MB-231 cells when compared to the parental cells. TfR1 shRNA transfectants also evoked a stronger angiogenic response after the cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. The molecular mechanism appears that cellular iron deficiency elevates VEGF formation by stabilizing HIF-1α. This mechanism is also true in human breast cancer MCF-7 and liver cancer HepG2 cells. Conclusions Cellular iron deficiency increased HIF-1α, VEGF, and angiogenesis, suggesting that systemic iron deficiency might play an important part in the tumor angiogenesis and recurrence in this young age group of breast cancer patients.

  12. [Diagnostic criteria for vitamin D-deficient rickets and hypocalcemia-].

    Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency causes rickets or osteomalacia, which is associated with hypomineralization of bone and chondrocytes, and/or hypocalcemia. Accumulating evidence indicates increase in frequency of vitamin D deficiency due to insufficient intake of vitamin D and calcium and decrease in sunshine. It is necessary for clinician to diagnose vitamin D deficiency accurately and treat patients with vitamin D deficiency adequately. For the purpose, clinical guideline or expert opinion on vitamin D deficiency has been reported. PMID:26813501

  13. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms “iron deficiency” and “iron deficiency anemia” are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake toge...

  14. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in blood does not decrease in proportion of the Zn deficiency. Adverse effects of Zn deficiency vary with age: low weight gain, diarrhoea, aneroxia and neurobehavioral disturbances are observed in infants, while skin changes and dwarfism are frequent in toddlers and adolescents. Common manifestations of Zn deficiency among elderly include hypogeusia, chronic non-healing ulcers and recurrent infections.Ameliorative measures of Zn deficiency in humans can be classified in two groups, namely, nutraceutical and biofortification of food grains. Nutraceutical interventions include pharmaceutical supplements, dietary supplements and dietary diversification, while biofortification of food grains can be achieved by genetic modification (GM of crops or by agronomic techniques that include soil or/and foliar fertilization of crops.The major disadvantage of nutraceutical approaches is that the major beneficiaries are urban people and the poor rural masses that need adequate Zn nutrition most are left out. Genetic biofortification of food grains requires large amounts of funds and a fairly long-period of time. Further, a large number of countries have not yet accepted genetically modified (GM foods. On the other hand agronomic biofortification of food grains yields immediate effects and rural and urban people are equally benefitted. Our studies have shown that Zn concentration in cereals (rice, wheat etc and pulses can be considerably increased by soil or/and foliar

  15. Clinical implications of vitamin D deficiency

    Beata Matyjaszek-Matuszek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a common medical problem worldwide and its prevalence rises along with latitude, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, limited sunlight exposure and aging. A great body of evidence has shown that patients with vitamin D deficiency have increased cardiovascular risks and total mortality. Conversely, the presence of comorbidities progressive with age such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and hypertension places the patients at an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency. The multidirectional effect of vitamin D deficiency is present in different phases of the aging process. Based on the literature review, the risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency most often found in post-menopausal women include limited sun exposure and time spent outdoors, inadequate dietary vitamin D intake, winter season and increased age. Vitamin D supplementation in this group might offer prevention of falls and fractures and may be beneficial for cardiovascular health, what may be especially important in osteoporotic and elderly populations. Prevention and treatment processes involve education regarding sunlight exposure and pharmacological cholecalciferol supplementation according to the recommendations for Central Europe. This manuscript reviews the role of vitamin D and its deficiency and considers their clinical implications, with particular regard to peri- and postmenopausal women.

  16. Kinetics and thermodynamics of exonuclease-deficient DNA polymerases

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    A kinetic theory is developed for exonuclease-deficient DNA polymerases, based on the experimental observation that the rates depend not only on the newly incorporated nucleotide, but also on the previous one, leading to the growth of Markovian DNA sequences from a Bernoullian template. The dependencies on nucleotide concentrations and template sequence are explicitly taken into account. In this framework, the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of DNA replication, in particular, the mean growth velocity, the error probability, and the entropy production are calculated analytically in terms of the rate constants and the concentrations. Theory is compared with numerical simulations for the DNA polymerases of T7 viruses and human mitochondria.

  17. Adult growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients demonstrate heterogeneity between childhood onset and adult onset before and during human GH treatment. Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency Study Group

    Attanasio, A F; Lamberts, S W; Matranga, A M;

    1997-01-01

    The onset of adult GH deficiency may be during either adulthood (AO) or childhood (CO), but potential differences have not previously been examined. In this study the baseline and GH therapy (12.5 micrograms/kg per day) data from CO (n = 74; mean age 29 yr) and AO (n = 99; mean age 44 yr) GH......-deficient adult patients have been compared. The first 6 months comprised randomized, double-blind treatment with GH or placebo, then all patients were GH-treated for a further 12 months. At baseline the height, body weight, body mass index, lean body mass, and waist/hip ratio of AO patients were significantly (P...

  18. Association of B12 deficiency and clinical neuropathy with metformin use in type 2 diabetes patients

    A K Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Long-term metformin use has been hypothesized to cause B12 deficiency and neuropathy in Type 2 diabetes patients. However, there is a paucity of Indian data regarding the same. Aim: To compare the prevalence of B12 deficiency and peripheral neuropathy in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with or without metformin. Materials and Methods: We recruited patients with Type 2 diabetes and divided them into metformin exposed and nonmetformin exposed groups. We measured baseline demographic variables like age, sex, vegetarian status, and HbA1c levels in both groups. We compared vitamin B12 levels and severity of peripheral neuropathy (using Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS in both groups. Definite B12 deficiency was defined as B12 <150 pg/ml and possible B12 deficiency as <220 pg/ml. The difference in vitamin B12 levels and TCSS was calculated in both groups using independent samples t-test. Spearman′s rank correlation between cumulative metformin use and B12 level was calculated. Odds ratio of vitamin B12 deficiency in metformin exposed group was also estimated. Results: Mean serum B12 levels was significantly lower in metformin exposed group (n=84 compared with nonmetformin exposed group (n=52 (410±230.7 versus 549.2±244.7, P=0.0011. Mean neuropathy score was significantly higher in metformin exposed group. (5.72±2.04 versus 4.62±2.12, P=0.0064. Odds ratio for possible B12 deficiency was 4.45 (95% CI 1.24-15.97. There was significant negative correlation between cumulative metformin dose and vitamin B12 level (r=−0.68, P<0.0001. Conclusion: Metformin use is associated with vitamin B12 deficiency and clinical neuropathy in Type 2 diabetes patients.

  19. Prevalence and cut-off point of vitamin D deficiency among secondary students of Arak, Iran in 2010

    Afsaneh Talaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vitamin D has a basic role in bone growth and metabolism and has been noticed for its important role in many diseases, such as diabetes, depression, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Regarding some studies, detection of vitamin D deficiency in different places has important implication for health. This study determined prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Arak, a centrally located city in Iran. Materials and Methods: Based upon a cross-sectional study in 2010, 420 students 10--16 years old including 220 girls and 200 boys, studied at Arak secondary schools, were selected by a multistage sampling. The level of 25 (OH D and PTH (parathormone was measured and also the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in different intensities was evaluated and compared between girls and boys by the Student t-test. Vitamin D deficiency for the students was categorized into three intensities based on three levels of 25 (OH D: mild deficiency - 15 ≤ 25 (OH D < 20 ng/ml, moderate deficiency -- 8 ≤ 25 (OH < 15 ng/ml, severe deficiency - 25 (OH <8 ng/ml. The relationship between the 25 (OH D and PTH was assessed by Scatter chart to define cut-off points for vitamin D deficiency. Results: Based on 25 (OH D < 20 ng/ml, 84% of the students had vitamin D deficiency including 60.7% mild, 22.4% moderate, and 0.7% severe. Three local cut-off points including 13, 21, and 33 ng/ml were defined in the Scatter chart. The results showed that the deficiency of vitamin D in girls is much more than that in boys (P = 0.05. Conclusion: The high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency could be probably a result of different etiologies. We recommended that people should be encouraged to take vitamin D and calcium supplements and also they should have more exposure to the sunlight.

  20. Effect of polaprezinc on taste disorders in zinc-deficient rats.

    Hamano, Hiroki; Yoshinaga, Koji; Eta, Runa; Emori, Yutaka; Kawasaki, Daisuke; Iino, Yuka; Sawada, Miwa; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Takei, Mineo

    2006-01-01

    The effect of polaprezinc, a chelate compound consisting of zinc ion and L-carnosine, on abnormalities of taste sensation induced by feeding a zinc-deficient diet to rats was examined by using the two-bottle preference test (quinine hydrochloride as a bitter taste and sodium chloride as a salty taste). Rats were fed either a zinc-deficient or a zinc-sufficient diet. The zinc-deficient diet increased the preference for both taste solutions, while polaprezinc (at doses of 3 and 10 mg/kg) restored the altered taste preferences. We also evaluated the proliferation of taste bud cells using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). The BrdU incorporation into taste bud cells was significantly reduced in rats fed a zinc-deficient diet compared with rats fed a zinc-sufficient diet (from 50.8% to 45.0%, pzinc deficiency induces the delayed of proliferation of taste bud cells, while polaprezinc improves cell proliferation. In conclusion, polaprezinc had a therapeutic effect in a rat model of abnormal taste sensation. Its mechanism of action was suggested to involve improvement of the decrease in taste bud cell proliferation caused by zinc deficiency. PMID:17473379

  1. Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency diagnosed by clinical metabolomic profiling of plasma.

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Donti, Taraka R; Cardon, Aaron L; Bacino, C A; Sun, Qin; Emrick, L; Reid Sutton, V; Elsea, Sarah H

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism affecting the biosynthesis of serotonin, dopamine, and catecholamines. We report a case of AADC deficiency that was detected using the Global MAPS platform. This is a novel platform that allows for parallel clinical testing of hundreds of metabolites in a single plasma specimen. It uses a state-of-the-art mass spectrometry platform, and the resulting spectra are compared against a library of ~2500 metabolites. Our patient is now a 4 year old boy initially seen at 11 months of age for developmental delay and hypotonia. Multiple tests had not yielded a diagnosis until exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous variants of uncertain significance (VUS), c.286G>A (p.G96R) and c.260C>T (p.P87L) in the DDC gene, causal for AADC deficiency. CSF neurotransmitter analysis confirmed the diagnosis with elevated 3-methoxytyrosine (3-O-methyldopa). Metabolomic profiling was performed on plasma and revealed marked elevation in 3-methoxytyrosine (Z-score +6.1) consistent with the diagnosis of AADC deficiency. These results demonstrate that the Global MAPS platform is able to diagnose AADC deficiency from plasma. In summary, we report a novel and less invasive approach to diagnose AADC deficiency using plasma metabolomic profiling. PMID:25956449

  2. STUDY OF PREVALENCE OF IRON DEFICIENCY OF ANEMIA IN SCHOOL GOING CHILDREN IN RURAL INDIA

    Vidya P.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Micro nutritional deficiencies are common in developing countries like India. Nutritional deficiency anemia is more prevalent in children and young adolescent male and females. The objective of present study was to determine the prevalence of Iron deficiency anemia in children age group 8 – 12 years in our locality. AIM: to estimate the prevalence of IDA in Bhojapur, Taluka Sinnar of Maharashtra. METHODS: this Cross Sectional study was conducted in school going children of Bhojapur, Taluka Sinnar of Maharashtra, age group 8 – 12 year boys and girls. Hemoglobin, Serum Ferritin, Total Iron Binding Capacity [TIBC] and Transferrin levels were analyzed. RESULTS: 185 males and 174 female school going children were examined, IDA was prevalent in 58.9% of males and 63.2 % in females, there was significant decrease in parameters of Hemoglobin, Serum Ferritin and Transferrin saturation and increase in Total Iron Binding Capacity in this group of population indicating prevalence of the Iron deficiency. CONCLUSIONS: within limitations of the present study it was found that Iron deficiency anemia was common in children in rural India. IDA was slightly more prevalent in girls of the same age group as compared to boys. Lower socioeconomic status was linked with decreased Hemoglobin levels probably due to nutritional deficiencies. This calls for a comprehensive micro nutritional policy in addition to food security to address the problem.

  3. From the proteomic point of view: Integration of adaptive changes to iron deficiency in plants

    Hans-Jörg Mai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the proteomic adaptations to iron deficiency in plants may contribute to find possible new research targets in order to generate crop plants that are more tolerant to iron deficiency, to increase the iron content or to enhance the bioavailability of iron in food plants. We provide this update on adaptations to iron deficiency from the proteomic standpoint. We have mined the data and compared ten studies on iron deficiency-related proteomic changes in six different Strategy I plant species. We summarize these results and point out common iron deficiency-induced alterations of important biochemical pathways based on the data provided by these publications, deliver explanations on the possible benefits that arise from these adaptations in iron-deficient plants and present a concluding model of these adaptations. Furthermore, we demonstrate the close interdependence of proteins which were found regulated across multiple studies, and we pinpoint proteins with yet unknown function, which may play important roles in iron homeostasis.

  4. Is vitamin B12 deficiency a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in vegetarians?

    Pawlak, Roman

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in cardiovascular disease development among vegetarians. Vegetarians have a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Deficiency of this vitamin is associated with a variety of atherogenic processes that are mainly, but not exclusively, due to vitamin B12 deficiency-induced hyperhomocysteinemia. Each 5-μmol/L increase above 10 μmol/L of serum homocysteine is associated with a 20% increased risk of circulatory health problems. Mean homocysteine concentration >10 μmol/L among vegetarians was reported in 32 of 34 reports. Macrocytosis associated with vitamin B12 deficiency is also associated with fatal and non-fatal coronary disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, and other circulatory health problems. Compared with non-vegetarians, vegetarians have an improved profile of the traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, including serum lipids, blood pressure, serum glucose concentration, and weight status. However, not all studies that assessed cardiovascular disease incidence among vegetarians reported a protective effect. Among studies that did show a lower prevalence of circulatory health problems, the effect was not as pronounced as expected, which may be a result of poor vitamin B12 status due to a vegetarian diet. Vitamin B12 deficiency may negate the cardiovascular disease prevention benefits of vegetarian diets. In order to further reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, vegetarians should be advised to use vitamin B12 supplements. PMID:25998928

  5. Folic acid deficiency increases sensitivity to genome damage by ionising radiation

    Folic acid deficiency can lead to uracil misincorporation and disable DNA repair, by decreasing thymidine concentration. It is hypothesized that folic acid is an important micronutrient in the prevention of chromosome damage induced by gamma-irradiation. In this study the impact of folic acid deficiency on the chromosome damage and chromosome 21 aneuploidy by gamma-radiation was determined using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in long term WIL2-NS cultures in cell culture medium with 4 different folic acid concentrations (0.2 nM, 2 nM, 20 nM and 200 nM). The study showed a significant increase of 55.5% in micronucleus frequency with decreasing folic acid concentration (P < 0.0001). Additionally, there was a significant difference of 46.5% and 50.1% in micronucleus frequency and of nucleoplasmic bridge frequency, respectively, between the control and irradiated (1.5 Gy) group (P < 0.05). Folic acid deficiency caused an increase of 51.7% in micronucleus frequency (P < 0.0001) and of 7.1% nucleoplasmic bridge frequency (P = 0.0280) in irradiated cultures when compared to irradiated folic acid replete cultures. Folic acid deficiency and gamma-radiation were shown to have a significant interactive effect on micronucleus frequency (Two-way ANOVA, P < 0.0001). Apoptosis and necrosis were increased by folic acid deficiency but they were not significantly altered by ionising radiation exposure. Chromosome 21 aneuploidy was significantly increased (P <0.05) by folic acid deficiency but not by ionising radiation and there was no significant interaction between these two factors. The results show that folic acid deficiency induces chromosome 21 aneuploidy by non-disjunction as well as inducing chromosome breaks and chromosome rearrangements. In conclusion, folic acid deficiency interacts significantly with ionising radiation in inducing chromosome damage that leads to the formation of micronuclei (e.g. chromosome breaks and chromosome loss)

  6. Patient reported outcome in posttraumatic pituitary deficiency

    Klose, Marianne; Stochholm, Kirstine; Janukonyté, Jurgita;

    2015-01-01

    with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in relation to deficiencies identified upon pituitary assessment. DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study. Participants were Danish patients with a head trauma diagnosis recorded in the Danish Board of Health diagnostic code registry...... were observed with declining total testosterone concentrations (men), but not free testosterone concentrations or any other hormone concentrations. Total testosterone was not independently related to impaired QoL and fatigue, after adjustment for demographics, and treatment with antidiabetics, opioids......, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants. CONCLUSIONS: Only a very limited relationship between pituitary hormone deficiencies and QoL/fatigue was demonstrated. Due to the dominating influence of concurrent comorbidities, pituitary deficiencies were not independently related to QoL/fatigue. Causality is still to be...

  7. Multispectral Analysis of Color Vision Deficiency Tests

    Sergejs FOMINS

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Color deficiency tests are usually produced by means of polygraphy technologies and help to diagnose the type and severity of the color deficiencies. Due to different factors, as lighting conditions or age of the test, standard characteristics of these tests fail, thus not allowing diagnosing unambiguously the degree of different color deficiency. Multispectral camera was used to acquire the spectral images of the Ishihara and Rabkin pseudoisochromatic plates in the visible spectrum. Spectral data was converted to cone signals, and successive mathematics applied to provide a simple simulation of the test performance. Colorimetric data of the each pixel of the test image can be calculated and distribution of color coordinates is presented.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.1.259

  8. Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency in Iranian Children

    HR Joshaghani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is a toxic material for mammalians. It is detoxificated and converted to urea in the urea cycle in liver. Each defect in the urea cycle cause increase in blood ammonia level. Ornithine transcarbamylase enzyme (OTC is the second enzyme in the urea cycle that exists in mitochondria. OTC deficiency is the most common hereditary disorder in the urea cycle. In this study, 45 hyper ammonia patients were selected (2-13 years old and assayed for serum OTC, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT. Four patients (n=45, 8.9% suffered from OTC deficiency. One patient was male (n=29, 3.4% and the others were female (n=16, 18.8%. About half of children (53.3 with hyper ammonia have liver disease. Further studies on OTC deficiency and OTC gene mutations in Iran are recommended.

  9. Vitamin D deficiency in early pregnancy.

    Shannon K Flood-Nichols

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a common problem in reproductive-aged women in the United States. The effect of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is unknown, but has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between vitamin D deficiency in the first trimester and subsequent clinical outcomes.This is a retrospective cohort study. Plasma was collected in the first trimester from 310 nulliparous women with singleton gestations without significant medical problems. Competitive enzymatic vitamin D assays were performed on banked plasma specimens and pregnancy outcomes were collected after delivery. Logistic regression was performed on patients stratified by plasma vitamin D concentration and the following combined clinical outcomes: preeclampsia, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, gestational diabetes, and spontaneous abortion.Vitamin D concentrations were obtained from 235 patients (mean age 24.3 years, range 18-40 years. Seventy percent of our study population was vitamin D insufficient with a serum concentration less than 30 ng/mL (mean serum concentration 27.6 ng/mL, range 13-71.6 ng/mL. Logistic regression was performed adjusting for age, race, body mass index, tobacco use, and time of year. Adverse pregnancy outcomes included preeclampsia, growth restriction, preterm delivery, gestational diabetes, and spontaneous abortion. There was no association between vitamin D deficiency and composite adverse pregnancy outcomes with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.01 (p value 0.738, 95% confidence intervals 0.961-1.057.Vitamin D deficiency did not associate with adverse pregnancy outcomes in this study population. However, the high percentage of affected individuals highlights the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in young, reproductive-aged women.

  10. Comparison of Once a Day and Three Times a Day Iron Treatment in 9-12 Year Old Elementary School Children with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Gunadi, Dedy; Rosdiana, Nelly; Lubis, Bidasari

    2009-01-01

    Background The compliance of iron deficiency anemia treatment that is administered three times daily in children is low. The compliance will be better if therapy is administered once daily. Objective To compare the iron therapy response of once per day vs. three times a day administration in 9-12 year old children with iron deficiency anemia. Methods Children with iron deficiency anemia were randomly allocated into a ferrous sulfate once-daily group or a ferrous sulfate three times-...

  11. Measurement of contents in organs of selenium- or vitamin E-deficient rat using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Yamazaki, Megumi; Endo, Kazutoyo [Showa Pharmaceutical Univ., Machida, Tokyo (Japan). School of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Satoh, Kazue [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Ushio, Fusao [Tokyo Metropolitan Research Lab. of Public Health (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    The contents of iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), zinc (Zn), and selenium (Se) in the organs (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lung, and brain) and the liver cell fractions (nuclear, mitochondrial, microsomal, and cytosolic fractions) of Se- or vitamin E (VE)-deficient rats were measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The contents of Fe in the liver of Se-deficient rats, and in the liver and the spleen of VE-deficient rats were increased compared with those in normal rats. Fe contents increased mainly in the microsomal fraction. Contents of Co in the organs and liver cell fractions of Se- and VE-deficient rats were markedly low, reflecting the Co contents in both diets. Contents of Zn in the organs and liver cell fractions of Se- and VE-deficient rats decreased to 60-80% of the contents in normal rats. The Se contents in Se-deficient rat organs except for the kidney, spleen, and brain were below the detectable level under the present conditions. Se contents in VE-deficient rat decreased to 50-80% of those in normal rats in all organs and fractions. It is suggested that oxidative stress due to Se- or VE-deficiency affects the dynamics of Fe and Zn. (author)

  12. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency: diagnosis and management guideline.

    Vockley, Jerry; Andersson, Hans C; Antshel, Kevin M; Braverman, Nancy E; Burton, Barbara K; Frazier, Dianne M; Mitchell, John; Smith, Wendy E; Thompson, Barry H; Berry, Susan A

    2014-02-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, traditionally known as phenylketonuria, results in the accumulation of phenylalanine in the blood of affected individuals and was the first inborn error of metabolism to be identified through population screening. Early identification and treatment prevent the most dramatic clinical sequelae of the disorder, but new neurodevelopmental and psychological problems have emerged in individuals treated from birth. The additional unanticipated recognition of a toxic effect of elevated maternal phenylalanine on fetal development has added to a general call in the field for treatment for life. Two major conferences sponsored by the National Institutes of Health held >10 years apart reviewed the state of knowledge in the field of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, but there are no generally accepted recommendations for therapy. The purpose of this guideline is to review the strength of the medical literature relative to the treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency and to develop recommendations for diagnosis and therapy of this disorder. Evidence review from the original National Institutes of Health consensus conference and a recent update by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality was used to address key questions in the diagnosis and treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency by a working group established by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. The group met by phone and in person over the course of a year to review these reports, develop recommendations, and identify key gaps in our knowledge of this disorder. Above all, treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency must be life long, with a goal of maintaining blood phenylalanine in the range of 120-360 µmol/l. Treatment has predominantly been dietary manipulation, and use of low protein and phenylalanine medical foods is likely to remain a major component of therapy for the immediate future. Pharmacotherapy for phenylalanine

  13. Sleep Transitions in Hypocretin-Deficient Narcolepsy

    Sorensen, Gertrud Laura; Knudsen, Stine; Jennum, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by instability of sleep-wake, tonus, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. It is associated with severe hypothalamic hypocretin deficiency, especially in patients with cataplexy (loss of tonus). As the hypocretin neurons coordinate and stabilize the brain......'s sleep-wake pattern, tonus, and REM flip-flop neuronal centers in animal models, we set out to determine whether hypocretin deficiency and/or cataplexy predicts the unstable sleep-wake and REM sleep pattern of the human phenotype....

  14. Serum thymulin in human zinc deficiency.

    Prasad, A S; Meftah, S; J. Abdallah; Kaplan, J.; Brewer, G J; Bach, J F; Dardenne, M

    1988-01-01

    The activity of thymulin (a thymic hormone) is dependent on the presence of zinc in the molecule. We assayed serum thymulin activity in three models of mildly zinc-deficient (ZD) human subjects before and after zinc supplementation: (a) two human volunteers in whom a specific and mild zinc deficiency was induced by dietary means; (b) six mildly ZD adult sickle cell anemia (SCA) subjects; and (c) six mildly ZD adult non-SCA subjects. Their plasma zinc levels were normal and they showed no over...

  15. Tumoral calcinosis with vitamin D deficiency

    Kannan Subramanian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old woman presented with recurrent calcified mass in the left gluteal region. The clinical, radiological, and biochemical profile confirmed the diagnosis of tumoral calcinosis. She also had associated vitamin D deficiency. The patient underwent surgical removal of the mass to relieve the sciatic nerve compression and was managed with acetazolamide, calcium carbonate, and aluminium hydroxide gel with which she showed significant improve-ment. The management implications and effect of vitamin D deficiency on phosphate metabolism in the setting of tumoral calcinosis is discussed.

  16. Hyperaldosteronism in Klotho-deficient mice

    Fischer, Stephanie S.; Kempe, Daniela S.; Leibrock, Christina B.; Rexhepaj, Rexhep; Siraskar, Balasaheb; Boini, Krishna M.; Ackermann, Teresa F.; Föller, Michael; Hocher, Berthold; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Kuro-o, Makoto; Lang, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Klotho is a membrane protein participating in the inhibitory effect of FGF23 on the formation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D3 [1,25(OH)2D3]. It participates in the regulation of renal tubular phosphate reabsorption and stimulates renal tubular Ca2+ reabsorption. Klotho hypomorphic mice (klothohm) suffer from severe growth deficit, rapid aging, and early death, events largely reversed by a vitamin D-deficient diet. The present study explored the role of Klotho deficiency in mineral and electrolyte...

  17. Corneal wound healing is compromised by immunoproteasome deficiency.

    Deborah A Ferrington

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed roles for immunoproteasome in regulating cell processes essential for maintaining homeostasis and in responding to stress and injury. The current study investigates how the absence of immunoproteasome affects the corneal epithelium under normal and stressed conditions by comparing corneas from wildtype (WT mice and those deficient in two immunoproteasome catalytic subunits (lmp7(-/-/mecl-1(-/-, L7M1. Immunoproteasome expression was confirmed in WT epithelial cells and in cells of the immune system that were present in the cornea. More apoptotic cells were found in both corneal explant cultures and uninjured corneas of L7M1 compared to WT mice. Following mechanical debridement, L7M1 corneas displayed delayed wound healing, including delayed re-epithelialization and re-establishment of the epithelial barrier, as well as altered inflammatory cytokine production compared to WT mice. These results suggest that immunoproteasome plays an important role in corneal homeostasis and wound healing.

  18. BRCA1/BRCA2-deficient cells are sensitive to mitomycin C and tirapazamine

    Full text: BRCA1- and BRCA2- deficient cells have defective repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) via homologous recombination (HR). The toxicity profiles of these cells is of interest in the treatment of breast and ovarian cancer arising in mutation carriers. We focused on Mitomycin C (MMC), which produces DNA interstrand crosslinks, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), which is activated by hypoxia, and inhibits DNA replication and topoisomerase II. BRCA1-deficient HCC1937 cells, derived from a breast cancer in a BRCA1 carrier, were compared to cells corrected with wild-type (wt) BRCA1. BRCA2-deficient Capan-1 cells, derived from a pancreatic cancer in a BRCA2 carrier, were compared to a wt BRCA2-corrected clone. Expressing the BRC4 peptide in MCF-7 cells disrupted the association of BRCA2 with Rad51, thereby inactivating the function of BRCA2. Clonogenic cell survival was measured in response to X-rays, MMC, and TPZ (under hypoxia). BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells were moderately sensitive to X-rays, consistent with defective DSB repair. Sensitivity to MMC often reveals cells with a defect in HR, but also defines the phenotype of Fanconi anemia, which has no major HR defect. Both BRCA1 and BRCA2 deficiency resulted in marked MMC sensitivity. After 0.5μM MMC, survival was reduced >100-fold without wt BRCA1 and 10-fold in BRCA2-inactivated MCF-7 cells. Based on a screen of yeast mutants that showed HR-deficient yeast were sensitive to TPZ, TPZ hypersensitivity was also observed in BRCA1/2-deficient cells. After 5μM TPZ, wt BRCA1 survival was 0.3, whereas BRCA1-deficient survival was <0.001. Similarly, BRCA2-deficient Capan-1 cells showed a ∼100-fold increased sensitivity to TPZ. The marked sensitivity of BRCA-deficient cancer cells to MMC and TPZ has important implications for the optimum systemic therapy of these tumors in the clinic. The critical damage that leads to this marked sensitivity, and how it depends on HR, is the subject of ongoing studies

  19. Chronic vitamin C deficiency does not accelerate oxidative stress in ageing brains of guinea pigs

    Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Andersen, Stine Hasselholt; Miyashita, Namiyo;

    2012-01-01

      Increased oxidative stress in the brain has consistently been implied in ageing and in several degenerative brain disorders. Acting as a pivotal antioxidant in the brain, vitamin C is preferentially retained during deficiency and may play an essential role in neuroprotection during ageing. Thus......, a lack of vitamin C could be associated with an increase in redox imbalance in the ageing brain. The present study compared oxidative stress of ageing to that of a long-term non-scorbutic vitamin C deficiency in guinea pigs. Adults (3-9 months old) were compared to old (36-42 months old) animals...... during a six-month dietary intervention by assessing vitamin C transport and redox homeostasis in the brain. In contrast to our hypothesis, chronic vitamin C deficiency did not affect the measured markers of oxidative stress in the brains of adult and aged animals. However, aged animals generally showed...

  20. Physician Compare

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Physician Compare, which meets Affordable Care Act of 2010 requirements, helps you search for and select physicians and other healthcare professionals enrolled in...

  1. comparative Advertising

    Anderson, Simon P.; Régis Renault

    2006-01-01

    Consumer information on products affects competition and profits. We analyze firms' decisions to impart product information through advertising: comparative advertising also allows them to impart information about rivals' products. If firms sell products of similar qualities, both want to advertise detailed product information that enables consumers to determine their matches: there is no role for comparative advertising. If qualities are sufficiently dissimilar, the high-quality one will not...

  2. Evaluation of the blue formazan spot test for screening glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Pujades, A; Lewis, M; Salvati, A M; Miwa, S; Fujii, H; Zarza, R; Alvarez, R; Rull, E; Corrons, J L

    1999-06-01

    Several screening tests for glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency have been reported thus far, and a standardized method of testing was proposed by the International Council for Standardization in Hematology (ICSH). The screening test used in any particular laboratory depends upon a number of factors such as cost, time required, temperature, humidity, and availability of reagents. In this study, a direct comparison between three different G6PD screening methods has been undertaken. In 71 cases (50 hematologically normal volunteers, 9 hemizygous G6PD-deficient males, and 12 heterozygous deficient females), the blue formazan spot test (BFST) was compared with the conventional methemoglobin reduction test (HiRT) and the ICSH-recommended fluorescent spot test (FST-ICSH). In all cases, the results obtained with the three screening tests were correlated with the enzyme activity assayed spectrophotometrically. In hemizygous G6PD-deficient males, all cases were equally detected with the three methods: BFST (4.7-6.64, controls: 11.1-13.4), BMRT (score +3 in all 9 cases), and FST (no fluorescence in 9 cases). In heterozygous G6PD-deficient females, two methods detected 7 out of 12 cases (BFST: 8.71-11.75, controls: 11.1-13.4; and BMRT: score +3 in 7 cases), whereas the FST-ICSH missed all 12 cases that presented a variable degree of fluorescence. Although the sensitivity for G6PD-deficient carrier detection is the same for the BMRT and the BFST, the latter has the advantage of being semiquantitative and not merely qualitative. Unfortunately, none of the three screening tests compared here allowed the detection of the 100% heterozygote carrier state of G6PD deficiency. PMID:10407579

  3. Carbon Monoxide Interacts with Auxin and Nitric Oxide to Cope with Iron Deficiency in Arabidopsis

    Yang, Liming; Ji, Jianhui; Wang, Hongliang; Harris-Shultz, Karen R.; Abd_Allah, Elsayed F.; Luo, Yuming; Guan, Yanlong; Hu, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the roles of carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and auxin in the plant response to iron deficiency (–Fe), and to establish how the signaling molecules interact to enhance Fe acquisition, we conducted physiological, genetic, and molecular analyses that compared the responses of various Arabidopsis mutants, including hy1 (CO deficient), noa1 (NO deficient), nia1/nia2 (NO deficient), yuc1 (auxin over-accumulation), and cue1 (NO over-accumulation) to –Fe stress. We also generated a HY1 over-expression line (named HY1-OX) in which CO is over-produced compared to wild-type. We found that the suppression of CO and NO generation using various inhibitors enhanced the sensitivity of wild-type plants to Fe depletion. Similarly, the hy1, noa1, and nia1/nia2 mutants were more sensitive to Fe deficiency. By contrast, the yuc1, cue1, and HY1-OX lines were less sensitive to Fe depletion. The hy1 mutant with low CO content exhibited no induced expression of the Fe uptake-related genes FIT1 and FRO2 as compared to wild-type plants. On the other hand, the treatments of exogenous CO and NO enhanced Fe uptake. Likewise, cue1 and HY1-OX lines with increased endogenous content of NO and CO, respectively, also exhibited enhanced Fe uptake and increased expression of bHLH transcriptional factor FIT1as compared to wild-type plants. Furthermore, we found that CO affected auxin accumulation and transport in the root tip by altering the PIN1 and PIN2 proteins distribution that control lateral root structure under –Fe stress. Our results demonstrated the integration of CO, NO, and auxin signaling to cope with Fe deficiency in Arabidopsis. PMID:27014280

  4. Carbon Monoxide Interacts with Auxin and Nitric Oxide to Cope with Iron Deficiency in Arabidopsis.

    Yang, Liming; Ji, Jianhui; Wang, Hongliang; Harris-Shultz, Karen R; Abd Allah, Elsayed F; Luo, Yuming; Guan, Yanlong; Hu, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the roles of carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and auxin in the plant response to iron deficiency (-Fe), and to establish how the signaling molecules interact to enhance Fe acquisition, we conducted physiological, genetic, and molecular analyses that compared the responses of various Arabidopsis mutants, including hy1 (CO deficient), noa1 (NO deficient), nia1/nia2 (NO deficient), yuc1 (auxin over-accumulation), and cue1 (NO over-accumulation) to -Fe stress. We also generated a HY1 over-expression line (named HY1-OX) in which CO is over-produced compared to wild-type. We found that the suppression of CO and NO generation using various inhibitors enhanced the sensitivity of wild-type plants to Fe depletion. Similarly, the hy1, noa1, and nia1/nia2 mutants were more sensitive to Fe deficiency. By contrast, the yuc1, cue1, and HY1-OX lines were less sensitive to Fe depletion. The hy1 mutant with low CO content exhibited no induced expression of the Fe uptake-related genes FIT1 and FRO2 as compared to wild-type plants. On the other hand, the treatments of exogenous CO and NO enhanced Fe uptake. Likewise, cue1 and HY1-OX lines with increased endogenous content of NO and CO, respectively, also exhibited enhanced Fe uptake and increased expression of bHLH transcriptional factor FIT1as compared to wild-type plants. Furthermore, we found that CO affected auxin accumulation and transport in the root tip by altering the PIN1 and PIN2 proteins distribution that control lateral root structure under -Fe stress. Our results demonstrated the integration of CO, NO, and auxin signaling to cope with Fe deficiency in Arabidopsis. PMID:27014280

  5. Inner ear dysfunction in caspase-3 deficient mice

    Woo Minna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caspase-3 is one of the most downstream enzymes activated in the apoptotic pathway. In caspase-3 deficient mice, loss of cochlear hair cells and spiral ganglion cells coincide closely with hearing loss. In contrast with the auditory system, details of the vestibular phenotype have not been characterized. Here we report the vestibular phenotype and inner ear anatomy in the caspase-3 deficient (Casp3-/- mouse strain. Results Average ABR thresholds of Casp3-/- mice were significantly elevated (P Casp3+/- mice and Casp3+/+ mice at 3 months of age. In DPOAE testing, distortion product 2F1-F2 was significantly decreased (P Casp3-/- mice, whereas Casp3+/- and Casp3+/+ mice showed normal and comparable values to each other. Casp3-/- mice were hyperactive and exhibited circling behavior when excited. In lateral canal VOR testing, Casp3-/- mice had minimal response to any of the stimuli tested, whereas Casp3+/- mice had an intermediate response compared to Casp3+/+ mice. Inner ear anatomical and histological analysis revealed gross hypomorphism of the vestibular organs, in which the main site was the anterior semicircular canal. Hair cell numbers in the anterior- and lateral crista, and utricle were significantly smaller in Casp3-/- mice whereas the Casp3+/- and Casp3+/+ mice had normal hair cell numbers. Conclusions These results indicate that caspase-3 is essential for correct functioning of the cochlea as well as normal development and function of the vestibule.

  6. Sequential growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly.

    Heffernan, A.

    1988-01-01

    This is the case of a patient with a pituitary tumour presenting initially with growth hormone deficiency and requiring treatment with human growth hormone. Eight years later he represented with acromegaly. This sequence of events has not to my knowledge been reported previously.

  7. Cobalamin Deficiency: Clinical Picture and Radiological Findings

    Chiara Briani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12 deficiency causes a wide range of hematological, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological disorders. Hematological presentation of cobalamin deficiency ranges from the incidental increase of mean corpuscular volume and neutrophil hypersegmentation to symptoms due to severe anemia, such as angor, dyspnea on exertion, fatigue or symptoms related to congestive heart failure, such as ankle edema, orthopnea and nocturia. Neuropsychiatric symptoms may precede hematologic signs and are represented by myelopathy, neuropathy, dementia and, less often, optic nerve atrophy. The spinal cord manifestation, subacute combined degeneration (SCD, is characterized by symmetric dysesthesia, disturbance of position sense and spastic paraparesis or tetraparesis. The most consistent MRI finding is a symmetrical abnormally increased T2 signal intensity confined to posterior or posterior and lateral columns in the cervical and thoracic spinal cord. Isolated peripheral neuropathy is less frequent, but likely overlooked. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been correlated negatively with cognitive functioning in healthy elderly subjects. Symptoms include slow mentation, memory impairment, attention deficits and dementia. Optic neuropathy occurs occasionally in adult patient. It is characterized by symmetric, painless and progressive visual loss. Parenteral replacement therapy should be started soon after the vitamin deficiency has been established.

  8. Loss of LRPPRC causes ATP synthase deficiency.

    Mourier, Arnaud; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Brandt, Tobias; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-05-15

    Defects of the oxidative phosphorylation system, in particular of cytochrome-c oxidase (COX, respiratory chain complex IV), are common causes of Leigh syndrome (LS), which is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with severe progressive neurological symptoms that usually present during infancy or early childhood. The COX-deficient form of LS is commonly caused by mutations in genes encoding COX assembly factors, e.g. SURF1, SCO1, SCO2 or COX10. However, other mutations affecting genes that encode proteins not directly involved in COX assembly can also cause LS. The leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein (LRPPRC) regulates mRNA stability, polyadenylation and coordinates mitochondrial translation. In humans, mutations in Lrpprc cause the French Canadian type of LS. Despite the finding that LRPPRC deficiency affects the stability of most mitochondrial mRNAs, its pathophysiological effect has mainly been attributed to COX deficiency. Surprisingly, we show here that the impaired mitochondrial respiration and reduced ATP production observed in Lrpprc conditional knockout mouse hearts is caused by an ATP synthase deficiency. Furthermore, the appearance of inactive subassembled ATP synthase complexes causes hyperpolarization and increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. Our findings shed important new light on the bioenergetic consequences of the loss of LRPPRC in cardiac mitochondria. PMID:24399447

  9. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report

    L.M. Griffith (Linda); M. Cowan (Morton); L.D. Notarangelo (Luigi Daniele); R. Kohn (Robert); J. Puck (Jennifer); S.-Y. Pai (Sung-Yun); B. Ballard (Barbara); S.C. Bauer (Sarah); J. Bleesing (Jack); M. Boyle (Marcia); R.W. Brower (Ronald); R.H. Buckley (Rebecca); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); L.M. Burroughs (Lauri); F. Candotti (Fabio); A. Cant (Andrew); T. Chatila (Talal); C. Cunningham-Rundles (Charlotte); M.C. Dinauer (Mary); J. Dvorak (Jennie); A. Filipovich (Alexandra); L.A. Fleisher (Lee); H.B. Gaspar (Bobby); T. Gungor (Tayfun); E. Haddad (Elie); E. Hovermale (Emily); F. Huang (Faith); A. Hurley (Alan); M. Hurley (Mary); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.M. Kang (Elizabeth); B.R. Logan (Brent); J.R. Long-Boyle (Janel); H. Malech (Harry); S.A. McGhee (Sean); S. Modell (Sieglinde); S. Modell (Sieglinde); H.D. Ochs (Hans); R.J. O'Reilly (Richard); R. Parkman (Robertson); D. Rawlings (D.); J.M. Routes (John); P. Shearer (P.); T.N. Small (Trudy); H. Smith (H.); K.E. Sullivan (Kathleen); P. Szabolcs (Paul); A.J. Thrasher (Adrian); D. Torgerson; P. Veys (Paul); K. Weinberg (Kenneth); J.C. Zuniga-Pflucker (Juan Carlos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SC

  10. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often develops shortly ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often have a ...

  11. Hyperglucagonemia during insulin deficiency accelerates protein catabolism

    Hyperglucagonemia coexists with insulin deficiency or insulin resistance in many conditions where urinary nitrogen excretion is increased, but the precise role of glucagon in these conditions is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hyperglucagonemia on protein metabolism in insulin-deficient subjects. The authors used the stable isotope of an essential amino acid (L-[1-13C]leucine) as a tracer of in vivo protein metabolism. A combined deficiency of insulin and glucagon was induced by intravenous infusion of somatostatin. Hyperglucagonemia and hypoinsulinemia were induced by infusions of somatostatin and glucagon. When somatostatin alone was infused leucine flux increased, indicating a 6-17% increase in proteolysis. When somatostatin and glucagon were infused, leucine flux increased, indicating a 12-32% increase in proteolysis. The increase in leucine flux during the infusion of somatostatin and glucagon was higher than the increase during infusion of somatostatin alone. Somatostatin alone did not change leucine oxidation, whereas the somatostatin plus glucagon increased leucine oxidation 100%. They conclude that hyperglucagonemia accelerated proteolysis and leucine oxidation in insulin-deficient humans

  12. DEFICIENT FUNCTIONS OF RANDOM DIRICHLET SERIES

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the uniqueness theorem of Dirichlet series is proved. Then the random Dirichlet series in the right half plane is studied, and the result that the random Dirichlet series of finite order has almost surely(a.s.) no deficient functions is proved.

  13. Fitzgerald factor deficiency in an Australian aborigine.

    Exner, T; Barber, S; Naujalis, J

    1987-05-18

    This case reports the first description of Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) deficiency in Australia. Since this homozygous abnormality was found in an Aborigine it is suggested that the defective gene may be prevalent in some tribes and that abnormal results of clotting tests in Aborigines should be investigated carefully. PMID:3574180

  14. Iron deficiency anaemia in Sri Lanka

    The commonest cause of nutritional anaemia in the Sri Lankan population is iron deficiency. The diets of the population belonging to the lower socio-economic groups contain little food of animal origin. Thus, their diets are deficient in easily absorbable (haem) iron; and are also heavily cereal-based. Therefore interference in the absorption of dietary iron also occurs. Iron-deficiency anaemia is not restricted to the so-called ''vulnerable groups'' in Sri Lanka, however, their greater demands make the problem not only commoner but also more severe. Among pregnant and lactating women anaemia is often associated with folate deficiency. It must also be noted that the low availability of dietary iron is compounded in large population groups. Malaria, presently raging on an epidemic scale is also a major contributory factor to the incidence of anaemia. The purpose of this study was to examine the iron status of pre-school children and pregnant women; to establish normal levels of biochemical indices at different trimesters; to record the effect of iron supplementation during pregnancy; and to record the bioavailability of iron from weaning foods and common adult diets. 6 figs, 14 tabs

  15. Color Vision Deficiencies in Children. United States.

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    Presented are prevalence data on color vision deficiencies (color blindness) in noninstitutionalized children, aged 6-11, in the United States, as estimated from the Health Examination Survey findings on a representative sample of over 7,400 children. Described are the two color vision tests used in the survey, the Ishihara Test for Color…

  16. Iron Deficiency in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Risser, William L.; Risser, Jan M. H.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the prevalence, natural history, causes, impact on performance, diagnosis, and treatment of iron deficiency in adolescent and young adult athletes. All athletes should be screened and treated. The best diagnosis involves determining serum ferritin and hemoglobin levels. Treatment requires therapeutic doses of oral ferrous iron for several…

  17. Farber's disease (lysosomal acid ceramidase deficiency).

    Jameson, R. A.; Holt, P.J.; Keen, J H

    1987-01-01

    The patient presented with progressive joint deformity, a hoarse voice, subsequent cachexia, and myoclonic seizures. She was first seen aged 22 months and died aged 6 years. A diagnosis of Farber's disease was made by demonstrating a deficiency of acid ceramidase both in leucocytes and fibroblasts.

  18. Methionine deficiency leads to hepatic fat accretion via impairment of fatty acid import by carnitine palmitoyltransferase I.

    Kikusato, M; Sudo, S; Toyomizu, M

    2015-04-01

    1. To clarify the underlying mechanism of hepatic fat accretion due to methionine (Met) deficiency in broiler chickens, the present study investigated the effect of Met deficiency on the hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) system, which imports fatty acids into mitochondria. 2. Fifteen-d-old male meat-type chickens were fed on either a control diet (containing 0.52 g/100 g Met) or a Met-deficient diet (containing 0.27 g Met/100 g). After a 10-d feeding period, the birds were killed by decapitation and their livers excised to determine hepatic CPT1 and CPT2 mRNA levels and for the related hepatic fatty acid-supported mitochondrial respiration to be measured. 3. Met deficiency decreased body weight gain and feed efficiency and increased hepatic lipid content compared to the control group. Whereas the hepatic CPT2 mRNA level in the Met-deficient group remained unchanged compared to that of the control group, the CPT1 mRNA level was decreased in the Met-deficient group and CPT1-dependent hepatic mitochondrial respiration was impaired. 4. Our results suggest that the hepatic lipid accretion that occurs in response to Met deficiency might be attributable to the impairment of CPT1-mediated fatty acid import into mitochondria. PMID:25561085

  19. Skeletal Characterization of Smurf2-Deficient Mice and In Vitro Analysis of Smurf2-Deficient Chondrocytes.

    Huang, Henry; Veien, Eric S; Zhang, Hong; Ayers, David C; Song, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2) in chondrocytes was reported to cause spontaneous osteoarthritis (OA) in mice. However, it is unclear whether Smurf2 is involved in bone and cartilage homeostasis and if it is required for OA pathogenesis. Here we characterized age-related changes in the bone and articular cartilage of Smurf2-deficient (MT) mice by microCT and histology, and examined whether reduced Smurf2 expression affected the severity of OA upon surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM). Using immature articular chondrocytes (iMAC) from MT and wild-type (WT) mice, we also examined how Smurf2 deficiency affects chondrogenic and catabolic gene expressions and Smurf2 and Smurf1 proteins upon TGF-β3 or IL-1β treatment in culture. We found no differences in cortical, subchondral and trabecular bone between WT and MT in young (4 months) and old mice (16-24 months). The articular cartilage and age-related alterations between WT and MT were also similar. However, 2 months following DMM, young MT showed milder OA compared to WT (~70% vs ~30% normal or exhibiting only mild OA cartilage phenotype). The majority of the older WT and MT mice developed moderate/severe OA 2 months after DMM, but a higher subset of aged MT cartilage (27% vs. 9% WT) remained largely normal. Chondrogenic gene expression (Sox9, Col2, Acan) trended higher in MT iMACs than WT with/without TGF-β3 treatment. IL-1β treatment suppressed chondrgenic gene expression, but Sox9 expression in MT remained significantly higher than WT. Smurf2 protein in WT iMACs increased upon TGF-β3 treatment and decreased upon IL-1β treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Smurf1 protein elevated more in MT than WT upon TGF-β3 treatment, suggesting a potential, but very mild compensatory effect. Overall, our data support a role of Smurf2 in regulating OA development but suggest that inhibiting Smurf2 alone may not be sufficient to prevent or consistently mitigate post-traumatic OA

  20. Skeletal Characterization of Smurf2-Deficient Mice and In Vitro Analysis of Smurf2-Deficient Chondrocytes.

    Henry Huang

    Full Text Available Overexpression of Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2 in chondrocytes was reported to cause spontaneous osteoarthritis (OA in mice. However, it is unclear whether Smurf2 is involved in bone and cartilage homeostasis and if it is required for OA pathogenesis. Here we characterized age-related changes in the bone and articular cartilage of Smurf2-deficient (MT mice by microCT and histology, and examined whether reduced Smurf2 expression affected the severity of OA upon surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM. Using immature articular chondrocytes (iMAC from MT and wild-type (WT mice, we also examined how Smurf2 deficiency affects chondrogenic and catabolic gene expressions and Smurf2 and Smurf1 proteins upon TGF-β3 or IL-1β treatment in culture. We found no differences in cortical, subchondral and trabecular bone between WT and MT in young (4 months and old mice (16-24 months. The articular cartilage and age-related alterations between WT and MT were also similar. However, 2 months following DMM, young MT showed milder OA compared to WT (~70% vs ~30% normal or exhibiting only mild OA cartilage phenotype. The majority of the older WT and MT mice developed moderate/severe OA 2 months after DMM, but a higher subset of aged MT cartilage (27% vs. 9% WT remained largely normal. Chondrogenic gene expression (Sox9, Col2, Acan trended higher in MT iMACs than WT with/without TGF-β3 treatment. IL-1β treatment suppressed chondrgenic gene expression, but Sox9 expression in MT remained significantly higher than WT. Smurf2 protein in WT iMACs increased upon TGF-β3 treatment and decreased upon IL-1β treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Smurf1 protein elevated more in MT than WT upon TGF-β3 treatment, suggesting a potential, but very mild compensatory effect. Overall, our data support a role of Smurf2 in regulating OA development but suggest that inhibiting Smurf2 alone may not be sufficient to prevent or consistently mitigate post

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency.

    Cannell, J J; Hollis, B W; Zasloff, M; Heaney, R P

    2008-01-01

    The recent discovery--in a randomised, controlled trial--that daily ingestion of 1100 IU of colecalciferol (vitamin D) over a 4-year period dramatically reduced the incidence of non-skin cancers makes it difficult to overstate the potential medical, social and economic implications of treating vitamin D deficiency. Not only are such deficiencies common, probably the rule, vitamin D deficiency stands implicated in a host of diseases other than cancer. The metabolic product of vitamin D is a potent, pleiotropic, repair and maintenance, secosteroid hormone that targets > 200 human genes in a wide variety of tissues, meaning it has as many mechanisms of action as genes it targets. A common misconception is that government agencies designed present intake recommendations to prevent or treat vitamin D deficiency. They did not. Instead, they are guidelines to prevent particular metabolic bone diseases. Official recommendations were never designed and are not effective in preventing or treating vitamin D deficiency and in no way limit the freedom of the physician--or responsibility--to do so. At this time, assessing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D is the only way to make the diagnosis and to assure that treatment is adequate and safe. The authors believe that treatment should be sufficient to maintain levels found in humans living naturally in a sun-rich environment, that is, > 40 ng/ml, year around. Three treatment modalities exist: sunlight, artificial ultraviolet B radiation or supplementation. All treatment modalities have their potential risks and benefits. Benefits of all treatment modalities outweigh potential risks and greatly outweigh the risk of no treatment. As a prolonged 'vitamin D winter', centred on the winter solstice, occurs at many temperate latitudes, < or = 5000 IU (125 microg) of vitamin D/day may be required in obese, aged and/or dark-skinned patients to maintain adequate levels during the winter, a dose that makes many physicians uncomfortable. PMID

  2. Microarray data on altered transcriptional program of Phgdh-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts caused by ʟ-serine depletion.

    Hamano, Momoko; Sayano, Tomoko; Kusada, Wataru; Kato, Hisanori; Furuya, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    Inherent ʟ-Ser deficiency culminates in intrauterine growth retardation, severe malformation of multiple organs particularly the central nervous system, and perinatal or early postnatal death in human and mouse. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth-arrested phenotypes of l-Ser deficiency, we compared gene expression profiles of mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh), the first enzyme of de novo ʟ-Ser synthetic pathway, between ʟ-Ser-depleted and -supplemented conditions. The datasets (CEL and CHP files) from this study are publicly available on the Gene Expression Omnibus repository (accession number GEO: GSE55687). PMID:27222860

  3. Vitamin C deficiency in early postnatal life impairs spatial memory and reduces the number of hippocampal neurons in guinea pigs

    Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille Yde; Johansen, Louise Kruse; Raida, Zindy;

    2009-01-01

    was assessed by the Morris Water Maze, and hippocampal neuron numbers were quantified by stereologic techniques. RESULTS: The results showed a reduction in spatial memory (P < 0.05) and an increased time to first platform hit (P < 0.05) in deficient animals compared with controls. The deficient...... animals had a lower total number of neurons in hippocampal subdivisions (dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis 1, and cornu ammonis 2-3) than did the normal controls (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that vitamin C deficiency in early postnatal life results in impaired neuronal development and a functional...

  4. Low-grade haemolysis and assessment of iron status during the steady state in G6PD-deficient subjects.

    Ragusa, R; Di Cataldo, A; Gangarossa, S; Lo Nigro, L; Schilirò, G

    1993-01-01

    We evaluated the iron status of 50 Sicilian patients with G6PD deficiency under steady-state conditions and compared our results with those for 50 control patients. We studied haemolysis and iron indices to evaluate the iron balance. These patients could be considered to be at risk of iron overload as a result of increased bone marrow activity. Reticulocytosis and macrocytosis with reduced levels of haptoglobin were found in the G6PD-deficient subjects, both of which are evidence of a moderate haemolysis. Iron status within the normal range, without iron overload or iron deficiency, was found. PMID:8237270

  5. From isolated GH deficiency to multiple pituitary hormone deficiency: an evolving continuum - a KIMS analysis

    Klose, M.; Jonsson, B.; Abs, R.;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe baseline clinical presentation, treatment effects and evolution of isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) to multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD) in adult-onset (AO) GHD. DESIGN: Observational prospective study. METHODS: Baseline characteristics were recorded in 4110 patients...... with organic AO-GHD, who were GH naive prior to entry into the Pfizer International Metabolic Database (KIMS; 283 (7%) IGHD, 3827 MPHD). The effect of GH replacement after 2 years was assessed in those with available follow-up data (133 IGHD, 2207 MPHD), and development of new deficiencies in those...... with available data on concomitant medication (165 IGHD, 3006 MPHD). RESULTS: IGHD and MPHD patients had similar baseline clinical presentation, and both groups responded similarly to 2 years of GH therapy, with favourable changes in lipid profile and improved quality of life. New deficiencies were...

  6. Comparative Advantage

    Zhang, Jie; Jensen, Camilla

    2007-01-01

    typically explained from the supply-side variables, the comparative advantage of the exporting countries. A simple model is proposed and tested. The results render strong support for the relevance of supply-side factors such as natural endowments, technology, and infrastructure in explaining international...

  7. Prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding in breastfed infants: lessons from the Dutch and Danish biliary atresia registries

    Hasselt, P.M. van; Koning, T.J. de; Vries, E. de; Lundin, C.R.; Berger, R.; Kimpen, J.L.; Houwen, R.H.; Jorgensen, M.H.; Verkade, H.J.; Kvist, Nina Eva

    2008-01-01

    vitamin K at birth followed by 1 mg of weekly oral prophylaxis (Denmark, 1994 to May 2000), or 2 mg of intramuscular prophylaxis at birth (Denmark, June 2000-2005) or were fed by formula. We determined the absolute and relative risk of severe vitamin K deficiency and vitamin K deficiency bleeding on...... prophylaxis at birth, and in 1 of 98 formula-fed infants (P < .001). The relative risk of a bleeding in breastfed compared with formula-fed infants was 77.5 for 25 microg of daily oral prophylaxis, 7.2 for 1 mg of weekly oral prophylaxis, and 9.3 for 2 mg of intramuscular prophylaxis at birth. CONCLUSIONS: A......OBJECTIVE: Newborns routinely receive vitamin K to prevent vitamin K deficiency bleeding. The efficacy of oral vitamin K administration may be compromised in infants with unrecognized cholestasis. We aimed to compare the risk of vitamin K deficiency bleeding under different prophylactic regimens in...

  8. Stromal cells and osteoclasts are responsible for exacerbated collagen-induced arthritis in interferon-beta-deficient mice

    Treschow, Alexandra P; Teige, Ingrid; Nandakumar, Kutty S;

    2005-01-01

    -deficient and control mice. The role of IFNbeta was investigated in both the priming and effector phases of the disease. The effect of IFNbeta deficiency on synovial cells, macrophages, and fibroblasts from preimmunized mice was analyzed by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent...... assay. Differences in osteoclast maturation were determined in situ by histology of arthritic and naive paws and by in vitro maturation studies of naive bone marrow cells. The importance of IFNbeta-producing fibroblasts was determined by transferring fibroblasts into mice at the time of CIA immunization....... RESULTS: Mice lacking IFNbeta had a prolonged disease with a higher incidence compared with control mice. IFNbeta deficiency was found to influence the effector phase, but not the priming phase, of arthritis. Compared with control mice, IFNbeta-deficient mice had greater infiltration of CD11b+ cells and...

  9. Membrane effects of Vitamin E deficiency: bioenergetic and surface-charge-density studies of skeletal muscle and liver mitochondria

    Quintanilha, A.T.; Packer, L.; Szyszlo Davies, J.M.; Racanelli, T.L.; Davies, K.J.A.

    1981-12-01

    Vitamin E (dl-..cap alpha..-tocopherol) deficiency in rats increased the sensitivity of liver and muscle mitochondria to damage during incubation at various temperatures, irradiation with visible light, or steady state respiration with substrates. In all cases, vitamin E deficient mitochondria exhibited increased lipid peroxidation, reduced transmembrane potential, decreased respiratory coupling, and lower rates of electron transport, compared to control mitochondria. Muscle mitochondria always showed greater negative inner membrane surface charge density, and were also more sensitive to damage than were liver mitochondria. Vitamin E deficient mitochondria also showed slightly more negative inner membrane surface charge density compared to controls. The relationship between greater negative surface potential and increased sensitivity to damage observed, provides for a new and sensitive method to further probe the role of surface charge in membrane structure and function. Implications of these new findings for the well known human muscle myopathies and those experimentally induced by Vitamin E deficiency in animals, are discussed.

  10. Tolerance to water deficiency between two soybean cultivars: transgenic versus conventional Tolerância à deficiência hídrica entre dois cultivares de soja: transgênico versus convencional

    Tiago Aranda Catuchi; Hílton Fabrício Vítolo; Suzana Chiari Bertolli; Gustavo Maia Souza

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of the study was to evaluate the effects on the development and physiological aspects of soybean plants grown under water deficiency at greenhouse conditions, comparing the levels of tolerance to water deficiency between one transgenic and one conventional cultivar, enabling a systematic way to carried out physiological comparisons between soybean cultivars under drought. The study was divided into completely randomized using a factorial 2×2 design, with five replicates. T...

  11. Prevalence and risk factors for vitamin D deficiency in children with iron deficiency anemia

    Jung Won Yoon; Sung Woo Kim; Eun Gyong Yoo; Moon Kyu Kim

    2012-01-01

    &lt;b&gt;Purpose:&lt;/b&gt; The increasing prevalence of breast feeding has led to concerns about vitamin D deficiency (VDD) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in children. We evaluated the prevalence of VDD in a population of Korean children with IDA and assessed the risk factors for VDD in these children. &lt;b&gt;Methods:&lt;/b&gt; A total of 79 children who...

  12. What Is Combined Deficiency of Vitamin K-Dependent Clotting Factors?

    ... Pool Deficiencies Home About Bleeding Disorders What is combined deficiency of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors? Inherited combined deficiency of the vitamin K-dependent clotting factors ( ...

  13. Lipoteichoic acid-deficient Lactobacillus acidophilus regulates downstream signals.

    Saber, Rana; Zadeh, Mojgan; Pakanati, Krishna C; Bere, Praveen; Klaenhammer, Todd; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2011-03-01

    The trillions of microbes residing within the intestine induce critical signals that either regulate or stimulate host immunity via their bacterial products. To better understand the immune regulation elicited by lipoteichoic acid (LTA)-deficient Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM in steady state and induced inflammation, we deleted phosphoglycerol transferase gene, which synthesizes LTA in L. acidophilus NCFM. In vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted in order to compare the immune regulatory properties of the L. acidophilus strain deficient in LTA (NCK2025) with its wild-type parent (NCK56) in C57BL/6, C57BL/6 recombination-activation gene 1-deficient (Rag1 (-/-)) and C57BL/6 Rag1(-/-)IL-10(-/-) mice. We demonstrate that NCK2025 significantly activates the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 but downregulates the phosphorylation of Akt1, cytosolic group IV PLA2 and p38 in mouse dendritic cells. Similarly, mice treated orally with NCK2025 exhibit decreased phosphorylation of inflammatory signals (Akt1, cytosolic group IV PLA2 or P38) but upregulate Erk1/2-phosphorylation in colonic epithelial cells in comparison with mice treated with NCK56. In addition, regulation of pathogenic CD4+ T cell induced colitis by NCK2025 was observed in Rag1 (-/-) but not Rag1(-/-)IL-10 (-/-) mice suggests a critical role of IL-10 that may be tightly regulated by Erk1/2 signaling. These data highlight the immunosuppressive properties of NCK2025 to deliver regulatory signals in innate cells, which results in the mitigation of T-cell-induced colitis in vivo. PMID:21395377

  14. Reticulocyte parameters in hemoglobinopathies and iron deficiency anemia

    Cortellazzi Laura C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric reticulocyte analysis allows the evaluation of reticulocyte maturity. New reticulocyte parameters have been used in the diagnosis and management of anemias, in the bone marrow transplant setting and in the monitoring of iron replacement or erythropoiet in therapy. Reticulocyte numbers and maturation levels have been studied in different hemoglobinopathies and the results have been correlated with the degree of ineffective erythropoiesis. In order to verify differences in reticulocyte parameters in various types of anemias and to test the absolute number of immature reticulocytes as a possible discriminating factor among various types of anemias, reticulocyte counts were performed on 219 samples from patients with sickle cell anemia (SS (n= 62, hemoglobin S trait (n=9, Sbeta thalassemia (n=7, hemoglobin SC disease (n=11, beta thalassemia trait (n=33 and iron deficiency anemia (n= 47, and non-anemic individuals (n= 50. Mean fluorescence index (MFI was defined as representative of the degree of reticulocyte immaturity and it was evaluated as a percentage and in absolute values. Reticulocyte counts and MFI values were significantly higher in SS, Sbeta thalassemic and SC groups when compared to controls, but not different among the three anemia groups. Patients with hemoglobin S trait, iron deficiency anemia and beta thalassemia trait showed reticulocyte parameters similar to the non-anemic group. There was no difference between the b thalassemic trait and iron deficiency anemia in relation to any parameters. MFI in absolute numbers were significantly higher in anemias that develop with the hemolytic process, although this was not evident in MFI percentage values. Our results showed that the erythoid expansion in sickle cell diseases (SS, SC and Sb thalassemia leads to an enhanced immature reticulocyte release from bone marrow and that the phenomena is more evident by the MFI counting in absolute figures than in percentages. We

  15. Alterations of proteins in MDCK cells during acute potassium deficiency.

    Peerapen, Paleerath; Ausakunpipat, Nardtaya; Chanchaem, Prangwalai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-06-01

    Chronic K(+) deficiency can cause hypokalemic nephropathy associated with metabolic alkalosis, polyuria, tubular dilatation, and tubulointerstitial injury. However, effects of acute K(+) deficiency on the kidney remained unclear. This study aimed to explore such effects by evaluating changes in levels of proteins in renal tubular cells during acute K(+) deficiency. MDCK cells were cultivated in normal K(+) (NK) (K(+)=5.3mM), low K(+) (LK) (K(+)=2.5mM), or K(+) depleted (KD) (K(+)=0mM) medium for 24h and then harvested. Cellular proteins were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and visualized by SYPRO Ruby staining (5 gels per group). Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed a total 48 protein spots that had significantly differential levels among the three groups. Among these, 46 and 30 protein spots had differential levels in KD group compared to NK and LK groups, respectively. Comparison between LK and NK groups revealed only 10 protein spots that were differentially expressed. All of these differentially expressed proteins were successfully identified by Q-TOF MS and/or MS/MS analyses. The altered levels of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), ezrin, lamin A/C, tubulin, chaperonin-containing TCP1 (CCT1), and calpain 1 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Global protein network analysis showed three main functional networks, including 1) cell growth and proliferation, 2) cell morphology, cellular assembly and organization, and 3) protein folding in which the altered proteins were involved. Further investigations on these networks may lead to better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of low K(+)-induced renal injury. PMID:26976750

  16. Vitamin D deficiency in postmenopausal women with pelvic floor disorders

    Preethi Raja Navaneethan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Findings suggest association of vitamin D deficiency and PFD in postmenopausal women. In addition, postmenopausal women have a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency indicating a need to evaluate vitamin D levels in these women.

  17. How Can Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Be Prevented?

    ... Prevented? You can't prevent alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency because the condition is inherited (passed from ... children through genes). If you inherit two faulty AAT genes, you'll have AAT deficiency. Even so, ...

  18. Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases: Talking to Your Doctor

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Talking to Your Doctor Take Action: When Your ... repeat infections in the future. People with primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDDs), however, have defects in one or more ...

  19. Absorption of plutonium in the iron-deficient rat

    Iron deficiency did not enhance absorption of plutonium following intragastric gavage of rats. Absorption of plutonium citrate in both control and iron-deficient rats was about 0.03% of the administered dose

  20. High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Cambodian Women: A Common Deficiency in a Sunny Country.

    Smith, Geoffry; Wimalawansa, Sunil J; Laillou, Arnaud; Sophonneary, Prak; Un, Samoeurn; Hong, Rathavuth; Poirot, Etienne; Kuong, Khov; Chamnan, Chhoun; De Los Reyes, Francisco N; Wieringa, Frank T

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that in spite of being generally close to the equator; vitamin D deficiency is common in South East Asian countries. In order to quantify micronutrient status for women and children in Cambodia; a nationally-representative survey was conducted in 2014 linked to the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey. The countrywide median of 25(OH)D was, respectively, 64.9 and 91.1 nmol/L for mothers and children. Based on The Endocrine Society cutoffs (>50children had plasma vitamin D concentrations indicating insufficiency or deficiency. For deficiency alone, 29% of the mothers were found to be vitamin D deficient, but only 13.4% of children. Children who live in urban areas had a 43% higher rate of vitamin D insufficiency versus those who live in rural areas (OR; 1.434; 95% CI: 1.007; 2.041). However, such differences were not observed in their mothers. The high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is likely in part due to lifestyle choices, including sun avoidance, increasingly predominant indoor work, and covered transport. These survey findings support the need for a broader national Cambodian study incorporating testing of adult men, adolescents and the elderly, and encompassing other parameters such as skeletal health. However, the data presented in this study already show significant deficiencies which need to be addressed and we discuss the benefit of establishing nationally-mandated food fortification programs to enhance the intake of vitamin D. PMID:27187456

  1. Efficient and reproducible identification of mismatch repair deficient colon cancer

    Joost, Patrick; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Halvarsson, Britta;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The identification of mismatch-repair (MMR) defective colon cancer is clinically relevant for diagnostic, prognostic and potentially also for treatment predictive purposes. Preselection of tumors for MMR analysis can be obtained with predictive models, which need to demonstrate ease of...... and efficiently identifies MMR defective colon cancers with high sensitivity and specificity. The model shows stable performance with low inter-observer variability and favorable performance when compared to other MMR predictive models....... application and favorable reproducibility. METHODS: We validated the MMR index for the identification of prognostically favorable MMR deficient colon cancers and compared performance to 5 other prediction models. In total, 474 colon cancers diagnosed ≥ age 50 were evaluated with correlation between...

  2. Ferrous bisglycinate 25 mg iron is as effective as ferrous sulfate 50 mg iron in the prophylaxis of iron deficiency and anemia during pregnancy in a randomized trial

    Milman, Nils; Jønsson, Lisbeth; Dyre, Pernille;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of oral ferrous bisglycinate 25 mg iron/day vs. ferrous sulfate 50 mg iron/day in the prevention of iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in pregnant women. Design: Randomized, double-blind, intention-to-treat study. Setting: Antenatal care clinic...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infancy and Social Emotional Development in Preschool-Aged Chinese Children

    Chang, S.; Wang, L.; Wang, Y.; Brouwer, I.D.; Kok, F.J.; Lozoff, B.; Chen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to compare affect and behavior of 3 groups of nonanemic 4-year-old children: children with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in infancy whose anemia was not corrected before 24 months (chronic IDA) (n = 27); children with IDA in infancy whose anemia was corrected before 24 months (cor

  4. Differential programming of p53-deficient embryonic cells during rotenone block

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in chemical toxicities. The present study used an in vitro model to investigate the differential expression of metabolic pathways during cellular stress in p53- efficient embryonic fibroblasts compared to p53-deficient cells. These c...

  5. Characterization of the stress response in 17a-hydroxylase deficient common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    Nematollahi, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we describe interrenal hyperplasia in a teleost fish, the common carp, Cyprinus carpio L, caused by 17α-hydroxylase deficiency. Two homozygous, XX male inbred strains, “E5” and “E7”, consistently show 5-10 fold less plasma cortisol in response to net confinement compared to normal mal

  6. Zinc deficiency increases miR-34a expression in mice

    miRNAs play a significant role in the regulation of gene expression in a plethora of eukaryotic systems by binding to complementary regions of specific target mRNAs. To explore the possible changes of miRNA expression induced by zinc deficiency, we compared the global miRNA expression in small intes...

  7. Carbon monoxide interacts with auxin and nitric oxide to cope with iron deficiency in Arabidopsis

    To clarify the roles of CO, NO and auxin in the plant response to iron deficiency and to establish how the signaling molecules interact to enhance Fe acquisition, we conducted physiological, genetic, and molecular analyses that compared the responses of various Arabidopsis mutants, including hy1 (CO...

  8. Neonatal screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: sex distribution.

    Kaplan, M.; Hammerman, C; Kvit, R; Rudensky, B; Abramov, A.

    1994-01-01

    Eight hundred and six newborn infants at high risk for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency were screened; 30.2% of the boys and 10.4% of the girls had severe G-6-PD deficiency. Surprisingly, 14% of the enzyme deficient girls had a father from a low risk ethnic group. Girls of high risk mothers should be screened for G-6-PD deficiency regardless of paternal origin.

  9. Hypothalamic signaling in anorexia induced by indispensable amino acid deficiency

    Zhu, Xinxia; Krasnow, Stephanie M.; Roth-Carter, Quinn R.; Levasseur, Peter R.; Braun, Theodore P.; Grossberg, Aaron J.; Marks, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Animals exhibit a rapid and sustained anorexia when fed a diet that is deficient in a single indispensable amino acid (IAA). The chemosensor for IAA deficiency resides within the anterior piriform cortex (APC). Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which the APC detects IAA deficiency are well established, the efferent neural pathways that reduce feeding in response to an IAA-deficient diet remain to be fully characterized. In the present work, we investigated whether 1) central m...

  10. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) in alcoholic cirrhosis: a kinetic study

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Grønbaek, M; Møller, Søren;

    1997-01-01

    controls (n = 8), which indicates a slow turnover rate of carbohydrate deficient transferrin. Food ingestion did not affect the circulating level of carbohydrate deficient transferrin, and the analysis of carbohydrate deficient transferrin was almost unaffected by the presence of ethanol in plasma within...... alcohol intake, but the overlap is substantial in patients with cirrhosis. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin has a low turnover rate in both patients with cirrhosis and normals....

  11. How I treat cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency

    Carmel, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    The challenges in medical management of cobalamin deficiency lie in attention to the unique pathophysiology that underlies cobalamin deficiency, more than in the mechanics of therapy. The central physiologic principles are that clinically important deficiency is more likely to occur (and progress) when intrinsic factor–driven absorption fails than when diet is poor and that most causes take years to produce clinically obvious deficiency. Transient defects have little clinical impact. The key ...

  12. Obesity modulate serum hepcidin and treatment outcome of iron deficiency anemia in children: A case control study

    Osman Mohammed; Sanad Mohammed; Gharib Amal

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Recently, hepcidin expression in adipose tissue has been described and shown to be increased in patients with severe obesity. We tried to assess the effect of obesity on hepcidin serum levels and treatment outcome of iron deficiency anemia in children. Methods This was a case control study included 70 children with iron deficiency anemia "IDA" (35 obese and 35 non-obese) and 30 healthy non-obese children with comparable age and sex(control group). Parameters of iron status...

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of ferric carboxymaltose in iron-deficient patients with chronic heart failure in Sweden.

    Hofmarcher, Thomas; Borg, Sixten

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Iron deficiency is a common but treatable comorbidity in chronic heart failure (CHF) that is associated with impaired health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL). This study evaluates the cost-effectiveness of the intravenous iron preparation ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) for the treatment of iron deficiency in CHF from a Swedish healthcare perspective. METHODS: A cost-effectiveness analysis with a time horizon of 24 weeks was performed to compare FCM treatment with p...

  14. Comparative hemorheology

    Başkurt, Oğuz K.; Meiselman, Herbert J.

    2013-01-01

    Comparative data on blood composition and blood flow properties indicate different levels of interspecies variation for several parameters. Hematocrit and hemoglobin levels have relatively low variability among mammals, while mean cell volume and red blood cell (RBC) count are more variable. There is also a difference of variability between high and low shear rate blood viscosity in mammals, with low shear rate viscosity having a higher degree of interspecies variation. This observation paral...

  15. Correlation between Hemolysis and Jaundice in Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficient Neonates

    Marzban Asghar

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is an enzyme deficiency of the red blood cells and the most important disease of hexose monophosphate pathway. The role of hemolysis in the pathophysiology of neonatal jaundice due to G6PD deficiency is in contencious. Our aim is to study the role of hemolysis in neonatal jaundice associated with G6PD deficiency. This prospective descriptive study has been done on 244 neonates who were admitted with the symptoms and signs of icter to the Ali-Asghar Children Hospital, affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, during April 2006 to April 2007. Two groups of the babies, G6PD-defcient with neonatal jaundice and G6PD-normal with neonatal jaundice, were compared based on the parameters related to hemolysis such as hemoglobin, reticulocyte count and bilirubin level. The criteria of hemolysis in our study were reticulocyte count more than >5% and hemoglobin less than <14 mg/dl. Our data have shown that 14 (5.7% of 244 neonates with the chief complain of icter suffered G6PD-deficiency with high male to female ratio (3.6 to 1. The mean hemoglobin levels and reticulocyte counts (16.72 vs. 16.97 and %2.48 vs. %2.79 respectively did not differ significantly between both groups (P>0.05. The present study indicate, G6PD- deficiency as a major cause of neonatal jaundice "nand hemolysis is not a main determinant of neonatal jaundice in G6PD-deficient babies and most of them have non hemolytic jaundice.

  16. Screening of Wild Strawberry Genotypes against Iron Deficiency under Greenhouse Conditions

    Ayfer Alkan TORUN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The cultivated strawberry Fragaria × ananassa Duch. is the natural hybrid of F. chiloensis (L. Mill. and F. virginiana Mill. The progenitor species have high genetic diversity compared with the cultivated genotypes; therefore, the use of wild relative in F. chiloensis breeding could provide a good for broadening the available genetic variations of cultivated species. In present study, 13 genotypes selected from strawberry super core collection were tested under Fe (- and Fe (+ conditions for their response against Fe deficiency conditions in a growth medium (GM (soil + sand + perlite, potentially able to simulate the actual GM in nature. SPAD-meter readings indicating chlorophyll levels of the leaf, shoot dry matter yield, Fe-efficiency rate, shoot total and active Fe concentrations were determined to evaluate the resistance levels of strawberry genotypes against Fe deficiency. Results of this study indicated that different response for strawberry subspecies and genotypes of the same subspecies grown in GM against Fe deficiency. Symptom for Fe deficiency of genotypes varied between 1-5, SPAD-meter readings 3, shoot dry matter yields and shoot Fe concentrations varied between 6.5-38, 1.02-6.06 g plant-1 and 41.8-233.1 mg kg-1 respectively. Iron-efficiencies of genotypes were found between 58–98%. Strawberry subspecies, F. virginiana spp. glauca, F. chiloensis ssp. chiloensis and F. chiloensis ssp. pacifica showed Fe-efficiency values of 93.8, 79.5 and 79.1% respectively. We concluded that shoot growth performance, Fe intake from GM, transfer of Fe from roots to shoots, shoot Fe-use efficiency, Fe deficiency symptom levels and SPAD-meter readings indicating chlorophyll levels were significant parameters to evaluate the resistance of strawberry genotypes against Fe deficiency. The most Fe-efficient genotypes belonging to F. virginiana spp. glauca could be used in breeding programs aiming at developing new strawberry genotypes suitable for

  17. Blood and hair lead in children with different extents of iron deficiency in Karachi

    Childhood iron deficiency has a high incidence in Pakistan. Some but not all studies have shown that dietary iron deficiency may cause increased absorption of lead as both compete for the same transporters in the small intestine. Therefore, children in Pakistan, residing in heavily polluted cities like Karachi may be prone to lead poisoning. This hypothesis was tested by investigating blood and hair lead concentrations in children from Karachi who were divided into four groups of iron status; normal, borderline iron deficiency, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia. A prospective observational study was conducted where 269 children were categorized into four groups of iron status using the World Health Organization criteria and one based on soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood iron status was determined using a full blood count, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation and soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood lead was determined by graphite atomic absorption spectroscopy, whereas hair lead was assessed using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher in children with iron deficiency anaemia (mean [95% confidence intervals] were 24.9 [22.6–27.2] μg/dL) compared to those with normal iron status (19.1 [16.8–21.4] μg/dL) using WHO criteria. In contrast, hair lead content was not significantly different in children of different iron status. Our findings reinforce the importance of not only reducing environmental lead pollution but also the development of national health strategies to reduce childhood iron deficiency in Pakistan.

  18. Iron deficiency anaemia -a risk factor for febrile seizures in children

    Background: Iron deficiency anaemia and febrile seizures are two common diseases in children worldwide as well as in our country. Iron insufficiency is known to cause neurological symptoms like behavioural changes, poor attention span and learning deficits in children. Therefore, it may also be associated with other neurological disturbances like febrile seizures in children. Objective of our case-control study was to find association between iron deficiency anaemia and febrile seizures in children. Methods: This multicentre study was conducted in Department of Paediatrics HIT Hospital Taxila Cantt, Department of Paediatrics CMH Mangla and Department of Paediatrics POF Hospital Wah Cantt, from June 2008 to June 2010. Three hundred and ten children aged between 6 months to 6 years were included in the study. One hundred and fifty-seven children who presented with febrile seizures were our cases, while, 153 children who presented with febrile illnesses without seizures were recruited as controls. All patients were assessed for iron deficiency anaemia by measuring haemoglobin level, serum ferritin level, Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin Concentration (MCHC) and Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV). Patients with iron deficiency anaemia amongst controls and cases were documented. Percentages and Odds ratio were derived from the collected data. Results: 31.85% of cases (50 out of 157) had iron deficiency anaemia whereas, 19.6% of controls (30 out of 153) were found to have iron deficiency anaemia as revealed by low levels of haemoglobin level, serum ferritin level, Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin Concentration and Mean Corpuscular Volume. Odds ratio was 1.93. Conclusion: Patients with febrile seizures are 1.93 times more likely to have iron deficiency anaemia compared to febrile patients without seizures. (author)

  19. Blood and hair lead in children with different extents of iron deficiency in Karachi

    Ataur Rahman, Muhammad; Rahman, Bushra [Karachi Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270 (Pakistan); Saeed Ahmad, Muhammad [School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom); Blann, Andrew [Department of Medicine, City Hospital, Birmingham B18 7QH, United Kingdom. (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Nessar, E-mail: N.Ahmed@mmu.ac.uk [School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    Childhood iron deficiency has a high incidence in Pakistan. Some but not all studies have shown that dietary iron deficiency may cause increased absorption of lead as both compete for the same transporters in the small intestine. Therefore, children in Pakistan, residing in heavily polluted cities like Karachi may be prone to lead poisoning. This hypothesis was tested by investigating blood and hair lead concentrations in children from Karachi who were divided into four groups of iron status; normal, borderline iron deficiency, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia. A prospective observational study was conducted where 269 children were categorized into four groups of iron status using the World Health Organization criteria and one based on soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood iron status was determined using a full blood count, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation and soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood lead was determined by graphite atomic absorption spectroscopy, whereas hair lead was assessed using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher in children with iron deficiency anaemia (mean [95% confidence intervals] were 24.9 [22.6-27.2] {mu}g/dL) compared to those with normal iron status (19.1 [16.8-21.4] {mu}g/dL) using WHO criteria. In contrast, hair lead content was not significantly different in children of different iron status. Our findings reinforce the importance of not only reducing environmental lead pollution but also the development of national health strategies to reduce childhood iron deficiency in Pakistan.

  20. Strategies to rescue the consequences of inducible arginase-1 deficiency in mice.

    Laurel L Ballantyne

    Full Text Available Arginase-1 catalyzes the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea, which is the final step of the urea cycle used to remove excess ammonia from the body. Arginase-1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia in mice and man with severe lethal consequences in the former and progressive neurological impairment to varying degrees in the latter. In a tamoxifen-induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model, mice succumb to the enzyme deficiency within 2 weeks after inducing the knockout and retain <2 % enzyme in the liver. Standard clinical care regimens for arginase-1 deficiency (low-protein diet, the nitrogen-scavenging drug sodium phenylbutyrate, ornithine supplementation either failed to extend lifespan (ornithine or only minimally prolonged lifespan (maximum 8 days with low-protein diet and drug. A conditional, tamoxifen-inducible arginase-1 transgenic mouse strain expressing the enzyme from the Rosa26 locus modestly extended lifespan of neonatal mice, but not that of 4-week old mice, when crossed to the inducible arginase-1 knockout mouse strain. Delivery of an arginase-1/enhanced green fluorescent fusion construct by adeno-associated viral delivery (rh10 serotype with a strong cytomegalovirus-chicken β-actin hybrid promoter rescued about 30% of male mice with lifespan prolongation to at least 6 months, extensive hepatic expression and restoration of significant enzyme activity in liver. In contrast, a vector of the AAV8 serotype driven by the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter led to weaker liver expression and did not rescue arginase-1 deficient mice to any great extent. Since the induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model displays a much more severe phenotype when compared to human arginase-1 deficiency, these studies reveal that it may be feasible with gene therapy strategies to correct the various manifestations of the disorder and they provide optimism for future clinical studies.

  1. Vitamin D deficiency in hemodialysis patients

    Beena Bansal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Vitamin D [(25(OHD] deficiency and insufficiency is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. 25(OHD has been found to have beneficial effects on bone, cardiovascular and immune functions. There are little data about vitamin D levels in Indian patients on dialysis. This study was undertaken to determine the vitamin D status of Indian CKD patients on hemodialysis. Materials and Methods : We included 45 patients on maintenance hemodialysis coming to Medanta, Medicity, Gurgaon. 25(OHD levels were measured with radioimmunoassay (Diasorin method and parathyroid hormone (PTH was measured using electrochemiluminiscence immunoassay (ECLIA. Results : The mean age of patients was 55 ± 13 years. 32/45 (71% were males. 23/45 (51% were diabetics. The median duration of hemodialysis was 5.5 months (range 1-74 months. 33/45 (74% patients were on thrice weekly hemodialysis. The mean level of vitamin D was 10.14 ± 8.7 ng/ml. Majority of the patients [43/45 (95.5%] were either vitamin D deficient or had insufficient levels. 40/45 (88.9% were vitamin D deficient (levels <20 ng/ml; of these, 29/40 (64.4% had severe vitamin D deficiency (levels <10 ng/ml and 3/45 (6.7% had insufficient levels (20-30 ng/ml of vitamin D. Only 2/45 (4.4% patients had normal levels of vitamin D. 23/45 (51% of patients were receiving calcitriol. The mean levels of serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and albumin were 8.8 ± 0.64 mg/dl, 5.0 ± 0.7 mg/dl, 126 ± 10.3 IU/l and 3.6 ± 0.62 g/dl, respectively. PTH levels ranged from 37 to 1066 pg/ml, and the median was 195.8 pg/ml. There was a weak correlation between 25(OHD levels and weight, sex, hemoglobin, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, and presence of diabetes. There was, however, no correlation with duration of dialysis or PTH levels. Conclusion : Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are universal in our hemodialysis patients, with severe vitamin D deficiency in two-third of patients.

  2. The Relationship between Iron Deficiency and Febrile Convulsion: A Case-Control Study

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Kheirkhah, Davood; Madani, Mahla; Kashani, Hamed Haddad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Febrile seizure is among the most common convulsion disorders in children, which strikes 2% to 5% of children between 3 to 60 months of age. Some studies have reported that iron deficiency could be a risk factor for febrile seizure. The present study was conducted to compare the rate of iron deficiency anemia in febrile children with and without seizure. Materials and Methods: This case-control study evaluated 200 children aged 6-60 month in two 100 person groups (febrile seizur...

  3. Rank-deficient robust Capon filter-bank approach to complex spectral estimation

    Wang, Yanwei; Li, Jian; Stoica, Petre

    2004-09-01

    We consider nonparametric complex spectral estimation using an adaptive filtering based approach where the finite impulse response (FIR) filter-bank is obtained via a rank-deficient robust Capon beamformer. We show that by allowing the sample covariance matrix to be rank-deficient, we can achieve much higher resolution than existing approaches, which is useful in many applications including radar target detection and feature extraction. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the performance of the new approach as compared to existing data-adaptive and data-independent FIR filtering based spectral estimation methods.

  4. Purpura fulminans due to acquired protein C deficiency

    Devdeep Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpura fulminans (PF may be the presenting symptom in a patient with protein C (PC deficiency. It is a hematological emergency and presents with extensive areas of hemorrhagic necrosis of the skin. PC deficiency is usually genetically inherited. However, we report a 1 year and 4 months boy, who presented with acquired PC deficiency possibly of postinfectious etiology and developed PF.

  5. Obsessive compulsive disorder as early manifestation of b12 deficiency

    Maryam Valizadeh; Nasim Valizadeh

    2011-01-01

    B12 acts as a cofactor in synthesis of neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine, thus B12 deficiency affects mood, emotions and sleeping and can lead to psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric manifestations of B12 deficiency are varied. They seldom precede anemia. We want to present a case of B12 deficiency which was presented with obsessive compulsive disorder.

  6. 30 CFR 57.8527 - Oxygen-deficiency testing.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxygen-deficiency testing. 57.8527 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.8527 Oxygen-deficiency testing. Flame safety lamps or other suitable devices shall be used to test for acute oxygen deficiency....

  7. To study prevalence of incipient iron deficiency in primary hypothyroidism

    Tanveer Hassan Banday

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Iron deficiency was present in a significant portion of patients with primary hypothyroidism. It also concluded that frequency of iron deficiency (with or without anemia was higher than iron deficiency anemia. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 472-475

  8. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in High-School Girl Students of Yazd

    M Noori Shadkam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is generally assumed that 50% of the cases of anemia are due to iron deficiency. The most severe consequence of iron depletion is iron deficiency anemia (IDA, and it is still considered the most common nutrition deficiency worldwide. The main risk factors for IDA include: inadequate iron intake, impaired absorption or transport, physiologic losses associated with chronological or reproductive age, or acute or chronic blood loss, parasite infections such as hookworms, acute and chronic infections, including malaria, cancer, tuberculosis, HIV and other micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins A and B12, folate, riboflavin, and copper deficiency. Methods: This work as a cross-sectional study was done in 2007-2008 in Yazd. Two hundred girls who participated in the study were selected randomly from eight girl high schools. Five ml venous blood was collected for determination of serum ferritin and cell blood count (CBC. Serum ferritin was determined by using ECLIA method and CBC by cell counter SYSMEX KX21N. Iron deficiency was defined as having serum ferritin values below 12 μ/l. Anemia was defined as having Hemoglobin levels below12 g/dl. Iron-deficiency anemia was considered to be the combination of both. Results: The3 mean ageyears and body mass index (kg/m2 were 15.19±0.7years and 21.5±4.2, respectively. Distribution in the 14, 15 and 16 years and more age groups were 13, 58.5 and 28.5 percent, respectively. Mean of Hemoglobin(g/dl, Hematocrit(%, MCV (fl, MCH (pg, MCHC (g/dl and ferritin(μ/l were 12.8±0.9, 38.9±3.0, 80.7±4.3, 26.6±1.8, 33.2±3.6 and 23±18.2, respectively. Of the total, 13.5% were anemic, 68% of which had Iron Deficiency Anemia (9.3% of the total. Iron deficiency was present in 34.7% of the population under study. Conclusion: According to world health organization criteria, anemia is a mild public health problem in this region, but iron deficiency is a significant problem and suitable measures for

  9. Primary Carnitine deficiency in the Faroe Islands

    Rasmussen, Jan; Køber, Lars; Lund, Allan M; Nielsen, Olav W

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carnitine deficiency can cause cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmia. The prevalence in the Faroe Islands is the highest reported in the world (1:300). A nationwide screening program identified 76 Faroese adult patients (15-80 years) with Primary Carnitine Deficiency (PCD). We describe...... prior and current health status and symptoms in these patients, especially focusing on cardiac characteristics. METHODS: Upon identification, patients were immediately admitted for physical examination, ECG, blood tests and initiation of L-carnitine supplementation. Medical records were reviewed and...... patients were interviewed. Echocardiography and blood tests were performed in 35 patients before and after L-carnitine supplementation. RESULTS: All patients were either asymptomatic or had minor symptoms when diagnosed. Echocardiography including LVEF, global longitudinal strain and dimensions were normal...

  10. Biotinidase deficiency and our champagne legacy.

    Wolf, Barry

    2016-09-10

    Biotinidase is the enzyme that is necessary for the recycling of the vitamin, biotin. Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorder. If untreated, individuals with biotinidase deficiency usually develop neurological and cutaneous symptoms that can result in coma or death. Symptomatic individuals can be markedly improved by treating them with pharmacological doses of biotin; however, some clinical features may be irreversible. Fortunately, essentially all symptoms can be prevented if treatment is initiated at birth or before the symptoms develop. Because of this, the disorder is currently screened for in newborns in all states in the United States and in many countries around the world. This is the story of one laboratory's work in bringing basic science research from the discovery of the disorder to its translation into clinical medicine and its impact on the individuals with the disorder and their families. PMID:26456103

  11. Model of how plants sense zinc deficiency

    Assuncao, Ana G.L.; Persson, Daniel Olof; Husted, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    Plants are capable of inducing a range of physico-chemical and microbial modifications of the rhizosphere which can mobilize mineral nutrients or prevent toxic elements from entering the roots. Understanding how plants sense and adapt to variations in nutrient availability is essential in order to...... develop plant-based solutions addressing nutrient-use-efficiency and adaptation to nutrient-limited or -toxic soils. Recently two transcription factors of the bZIP family (basic-region leucine zipper) have been identified in Arabidopsis and shown to be pivotal in the adaptation response to zinc deficiency....... They represent not only the first regulators of zinc homeostasis identified in plants, but also a very promising starting-point that can provide new insights into the molecular basis of how plants sense and adapt to the stress of zinc deficiency. Considering the available information thus far we...

  12. Mismatch repair deficiency testing in clinical practice.

    Buza, Natalia; Ziai, James; Hui, Pei

    2016-05-01

    Lynch syndrome, an autosomal dominant inherited disorder, is caused by inactivating mutations involving DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. This leads to profound genetic instability, including microsatellite instability (MSI) and increased risk for cancer development, particularly colon and endometrial malignancies. Clinical testing of tumor tissues for the presence of MMR gene deficiency is standard practice in clinical oncology, with immunohistochemistry and PCR-based microsatellite instability analysis used as screening tests to identify potential Lynch syndrome families. The ultimate diagnosis of Lynch syndrome requires documentation of mutation within one of the four MMR genes (MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6) or EPCAM, currently achieved by comprehensive sequencing analysis of germline DNA. In this review, the genetic basis of Lynch syndrome, methodologies of MMR deficiency testing, and current diagnostic algorithms in the clinical management of Lynch syndrome, are discussed. PMID:26895074

  13. Antagonist muscle moment is increased in ACL deficient subjects during maximal dynamic knee extension

    Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Magnusson, S Peter; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Aagaard, Per

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Coactivation of the hamstring muscles during dynamic knee extension may compensate for increased knee joint laxity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient subjects. This study examined if antagonist muscle coactivation during maximal dynamic knee extension was elevated in...... subjects with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency compared to age-matched healthy controls. METHODS: Electromyography (EMG) and net knee joint moments were recorded during maximal concentric quadriceps and eccentric hamstring contractions, performed in an isokinetic dynamometer (ROM: 90......-10°, angular speed: 30°/s). Hamstring antagonist EMG recorded during concentric quadriceps contraction was converted into antagonist moment based on the EMG-moment relationship observed during eccentric agonist contractions. RESULTS: The magnitude of antagonist hamstring EMG was 65.5% higher in ACL deficient...

  14. Ferrous versus Ferric Oral Iron Formulations for the Treatment of Iron Deficiency: A Clinical Overview

    Palacios Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anaemia represents a major public health problem, particularly in infants, young children, pregnant women, and females with heavy menses. Oral iron supplementation is a cheap, safe, and effective means of increasing haemoglobin levels and restoring iron stores to prevent and correct iron deficiency. Many preparations are available, varying widely in dosage, formulation (quick or prolonged release, and chemical state (ferrous or ferric form. The debate over the advantages of ferrous versus ferric formulations is ongoing. In this literature review, the tolerability and efficacy of ferrous versus ferric iron formulations are evaluated. We focused on studies comparing ferrous sulphate preparations with ferric iron polymaltose complex preparations, the two predominant forms of iron used. Current data show that slow-release ferrous sulphate preparations remain the established and standard treatment of iron deficiency, irrespective of the indication, given their good bioavailability, efficacy, and acceptable tolerability demonstrated in several large clinical studies.

  15. Anxiety- and depression-like phenotype of hph-1 mice deficient in tetrahydrobiopterin

    Nasser, Arafat; Birk Møller, Lisbeth; Olesen, Jess Have;

    2014-01-01

    Decreased tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) biosynthesis has been implicated in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression. The aim of this study was therefore to characterise the phenotype of homozygous hph-1 (hph) mice, a model of BH4 deficiency, in behavioural tests of anxiety and depression as well...... female mice. This study provides the first evidence that congenital BH4 deficiency regulates anxiety- and depression-like behaviours. The altered responses observed possibly reflect decreased hippocampal serotonin and dopamine found in hph mice compared to wild-type mice, but also reduced nitric oxide...... formation. We propose that the hph-1 mouse may be a novel tool to investigate the role of BH4 deficiency in anxiety and depression....

  16. Hormone-sensitive lipase deficiency suppresses insulin secretion from pancreatic islets of Lepob/ob mice

    It has long been a matter of debate whether the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL)-mediated lipolysis in pancreatic β-cells can affect insulin secretion through the alteration of lipotoxicity. We generated mice lacking both leptin and HSL (Lepob/ob/HSL-/-) and explored the role of HSL in pancreatic β-cells in the setting of obesity. Lepob/ob/HSL-/- developed elevated blood glucose levels and reduced plasma insulin levels compared with Lepob/ob/HSL+/+ in a fed state, while the deficiency of HSL did not affect glucose homeostasis in Lep+/+ background. The deficiency of HSL exacerbated the accumulation of triglycerides in Lepob/ob islets, leading to reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The deficiency of HSL also diminished the islet mass in Lepob/ob mice due to decreased cell proliferation. In conclusion, HSL affects insulin secretary capacity especially in the setting of obesity.

  17. Is metformin-induced vitamin B12 deficiency responsible for cognitive decline in type 2 diabetes?

    Deepti Khattar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus has its deleterious effects on various aspects of cognition such as memory function, executive function, and information-processing speed. The present study aims to assess cognition in diabetes patients and also tries to find its association with Vitamin B12 deficiency induced by metformin. Materials and Methods: Thirty diabetics taking metformin and thirty nondiabetic controls were enrolled. Event-related potentials (ERPs and serum Vitamin B12 levels were evaluated in them. Results: Vitamin B12 levels were found to be deficient, and latencies of waves P200 and P300 were prolonged in the diabetics as compared to the controls. The dose and duration of metformin had no association with the ERPs. Conclusions: Although the Vitamin B12 levels were deficient in diabetics on metformin, this is not the reason behind the cognitive impairment found in them.

  18. Evaluation of immunological responses to a glycoprotein G deficient candidate vaccine strain of infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    Devlin, Joanne M; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Browning, Glenn F; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Gilkerson, James R; Alcami, Antonio; Hartley, Carol A

    2010-02-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), an alphaherpesvirus, causes severe respiratory disease in poultry. Glycoprotein G (gG) is a virulence factor in ILTV. Recent studies have shown that gG-deficient ILTV is an effective attenuated vaccine however the function of ILTV gG is unknown. This study examined the function and in vivo relevance of ILTV gG. The results showed that ILTV gG binds to chemokines with high affinity and inhibits leukocyte chemotaxis. Specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens infected with gG-deficient virus had altered tracheal leukocyte populations and lower serum antibody levels compared with those infected with the parent virus. The findings suggest that the absence of chemokine-binding activity during infection with gG-deficient ILTV results in altered host immune responses. PMID:19932672

  19. Reticulocyte hemoglobin content as a predictor of iron deficiency anemia

    Ni Made Rini Suari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA is the most common form of anemia in developing countries, such as Indonesia. Iron deficiency anemia in children is a serious problem because it affects their growth and development. Early detection of IDA and subsequent treatment in childhood may prevent future health problems. Objective To assess the use of reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr to detect IDA in children aged 6-60 months. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study to measure the sensitivity and specificity of CHr compared to serum ferritin which is considered to be the gold standard for IDA diagnosis. The study was conducted from September 2011 to March 2013 in children aged 6-60 months who visited the Pediatric Outpatient Clinic, Sanglah Hospital, and Puskesmas II in West Denpasar. Data analysis was performed by 2x2 table. The results were assessed by area under the curve (AUC and receiver operating characteristic (ROC. Results Of 121 children underwent blood testing during the study period, 69 children were excluded because they did not have hypochromic microcytic anemia, leaving 52 subjects eligible for the study. The prevalence of IDA in this study was 31%. Reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr ≤ 23.1 pg had 88% (95%CI 71 to 100% sensitivity and 25% (95%CI 11 to 39% specificity. Conclusion Reticulocyte hemoglobin content < 23.1 pg may be a good predictor of IDA. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:171-5.].

  20. Calcium Deficient Hydroxyapatite for Medical Application Prepared by Hydrothermal Method

    Ioku, Koji; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Ikeda, Tohru

    2010-11-01

    Hydrothermal processing plays a key role in the synthesis of biomaterials with excellent biocompatibility in the physiological environment. Especially, calcium phosphates are paid to much attention for the regenerative medicine. Two kinds of porous materials of hydroxyapatite with 70% porosity were prepared. One of them is a newly developed calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite composed of rod-shaped particles of about 20 μm in length synthesized hydrothermally (HHA) and the other one is the stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (SHA) prepared by the conventional sintering method. These materials were used for animal implantation tests to compare these biological responses. In the rabbit femur, implanted HHA was slowly resorbed and then most of the implanted HHA was resorbed after 72 weeks. The implanted SHA was unresorbed throughout the experimental period. The volume of newly formed bone and the number of osteoclasts in the implanted region were significantly larger in HHA than in SHA after 24 weeks. Results in the present research suggested that the activity of osteoclasts correlated to the bone forming activity of osteoblasts. The method to synthesize biodegradable pure calcium-deficient HA is expected to provide adequate biodegradability and bone replaceability.

  1. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Williams, Declan; Wang, Hansen; Arnould, Hélène; Schneider, Benoit; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP), best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types. PMID:27327609

  2. Clinical utility of serum tests for iron deficiency in hospitalized patients.

    Burns, E R; Goldberg, S N; Lawrence, C; Wenz, B

    1990-02-01

    Serum iron and ferritin measurements lack the requisite sensitivity and/or specificity to accurately diagnose iron deficiency. To determine their utility in hospitalized patients, the authors compared the results of these tests with the presence of stainable iron in bone marrow aspirates of 301 patients. Forty (13.3%) had absent marrow iron. The serum diagnosis of iron deficiency was accepted on the basis of the following: iron less than 11 mumol/L, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) greater than 45 mumol/L, transferrin saturation (%Sat) less than 0.20, and ferritin less than 13 micrograms/L for females and less than 25 micrograms/L for males. Using these criteria, iron deficiency was correctly diagnosed by serum iron in 41%, TIBC in 84%, %Sat in 50%, and ferritin in 90% of the patients. The serum ferritin is clearly the only useful serum test for diagnosing iron deficiency in hospitalized patients but is limited by a low sensitivity. The bone marrow examination is the most sensitive test for diagnosing iron deficiency in hospitalized patients. PMID:2242107

  3. Selenium and/or iodine deficiency alters hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities in rats.

    Erkekoglu, Pinar; Giray, Belma Kocer; Caglayan, Aydan; Hincal, Filiz

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of iodine (I(2)) and/or selenium (Se) deficiency on thyroid hormones and hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme systems using a triple animal model. Three-week-old male Wistar rats were fed for seven weeks. Se deficiency was introduced by a diet containing perchlorate containing drinking water. The levels of plasma thyroid hormones [total T(4) (TT(4)), total T(3) (TT(3))], thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH); total microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP450) and cytochrome b5 (CYP b5) levels; activities of microsomal NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (P450R), microsomal aniline hydroxylase (CYP2E1), microsomal 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), microsomal 7-pentoxyresorufin O-depentylase (PROD) and cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) were determined. In I(2) deficiency total CYP450 levels, activities of CYP2E1, EROD and GST decreased, and CYP b5 content increased significantly. In Se-deficient rats, total CYP450 level and CYP2E1 activity increased, and EROD and GST activities and CYP b5 level decreased significantly. In combined I(2) and Se deficiency, except for CYP450 content and CYP2E1 activity, all enzyme activities and CYP b5 content decreased significantly compared to control group. Overall results of this study have suggested that metabolism of xenobiotics as well as endogenous compounds is affected by Se and I(2) status. PMID:22366236

  4. Heat shock protein B1-deficient mice display impaired wound healing.

    Jonathan Crowe

    Full Text Available There is large literature describing in vitro experiments on heat shock protein (hspB1 but understanding of its function in vivo is limited to studies in mice overexpressing human hspB1 protein. Experiments in cells have shown that hspB1 has chaperone activity, a cytoprotective role, regulates inflammatory gene expression, and drives cell proliferation. To investigate the function of the protein in vivo we generated hspB1-deficient mice. HspB1-deficient fibroblasts display increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, compared to wild-type cells, but reduced proliferation. HspB1-deficient fibroblasts exhibit reduced entry into S phase and increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p27(kip1 and p21(waf1. The expression of hspB1 protein and mRNA is also controlled by the cell cycle. To investigate the physiological function of hspB1 in regulating inflammation and cell proliferation we used an excisional cutaneous wound healing model. There was a significant impairment in the rate of healing of wounds in hspB1-deficient mice, characterised by reduced re-epithelialisation and collagen deposition but also increased inflammation. HspB1 deficiency augments neutrophil infiltration in wounds, driven by increased chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 1 expression. This appears to be a general mechanism as similar results were obtained in the air-pouch and peritonitis models of acute inflammation.

  5. Tensin2-deficient mice on FVB/N background develop severe glomerular disease

    UCHIO-YAMADA, Kozue; MONOBE, Yoko; AKAGI, Ken-ichi; YAMAMOTO, Yoshie; OGURA, Atsuo; MANABE, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Tensin2 (Tns2) is an essential component for the maintenance of glomerular basement membrane (GBM) structures. Tns2-deficient mice were previously shown to develop mild glomerular injury on a DBA/2 background, but not on a C57BL/6J or a 129/SvJ background, suggesting that glomerular injury by the deletion of Tns2 was strongly dependent on the genetic background. To further understand the mechanisms for the onset and the progression of glomerular injury by the deletion of Tns2, we generated Tns2-deficient mice on an FVB/N (FVB) strain, which is highly sensitive to glomerular disease. Tns2-deficient mice on FVB (FVBGN) developed severe nephrotic syndrome, and female FVBGN mice died within 8 weeks. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that FVBGN mice exhibited severe glomerular defects with mesangial process invasion of glomerular capillary tufts, lamination and thickening of the GBM and subsequent podocyte foot process effacement soon after birth. Aberrant laminin components containing α1, α2 and β1 chains, which are normally expressed in the mesangium, accumulated in the GBM of FVBGN, suggesting that these components originated from mesangial cells that invaded glomerular capillary tufts. Compared to Tns2-deficient mice on the other backgrounds in previous reports, FVBGN mice developed earlier onset of glomerular defects and rapid progression of renal failure. Thus, this study further extended our understanding of the possible genetic background effect on the deterioration of nephrotic syndrome by Tns2 deficiency. PMID:26854109

  6. A comprehensive analysis of membrane and morphology of erythrocytes from patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Fang, Zishui; Jiang, Chengrui; Tang, Jia; He, Ming; Lin, Xiaoying; Chen, Xiaodan; Han, Luhao; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Feng, Yi; Guo, Yibin; Li, Hongyi; Jiang, Weiying

    2016-06-01

    Acute hemolytic anemia could be triggered by oxidative stress in the patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. However, the underlying hemolytic mechanism is unknown. To make clear the hemolytic mechanisms, a systematic study on membrane ultrastructure had been undertaken. A comprehensive method was used including atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, flow cytometer and fluorescence microscopy to analyze the membrane ultrastructure, externalized phosphatidylserine (PS), intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, morphology and the distributions of band 3 protein in G6PD deficient red blood cells (RBCs) after tert-butyl-hydroperoxide (t-BHP) oxidation. The results showed that erythrocyte shrinkage, annexin-V binding to externalized PS on the membrane of early-stage apoptotic cells, the increased membrane roughness and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, as well as the change of distributions of band 3 protein in RBCs. Compared with the control RBCs, as the concentration of t-BHP up to 0.1mM, the membrane roughness of G6PD deficient RBCs showed significant difference (pG6PD deficient groups. Oxidative stress induced more serious erythrocyte apoptosis and resulted in increased roughness of erythrocyte membrane and abnormal distributed band 3 protein in G6PD deficient RBCs. Echinocytes are the predominant abnormal erythrocyte shape occurring in the peripheral blood from patients with G6PD deficiency, which may shorten the RBCs lifespan. The results in the present study will give an increased understanding for the hemolytic mechanism of G6PD deficiency. PMID:26496826

  7. Differences in sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents between XRCC4- and artemis-deficient human cells

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. XRCC4 is indispensable to NHEJ and functions together with DNA ligase IV in the rejoining of broken DNA ends. Artemis is a nuclease required for trimming of some, but not all, types of broken DNA ends prior to rejoining by the DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 complex. To better understand the roles of these factors, we generated XRCC4- and Artemis-deficient cells from the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HCT116 by gene targeting and examined their cellular responses to several DNA-damaging agents including X-rays. As anticipated, kinetic analyses of γ-H2AX foci and chromosomal aberrations after ionizing radiation (IR) demonstrated a serious incompetence of DSB repair in the XRCC4-deficient cells, and relatively moderate impairment in the Artemis-deficient cells. The XRCC4-deficient cells were highly sensitive to etoposide and 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine as well as IR, and moderately sensitive to camptothecin, methyl methanesulfonate, cisplatin, mitomycin C, aphidicolin and hydroxyurea, compared to the parental HCT116 cells. The Artemis-deficient cells were not as sensitive as the XRCC4-deficient cells, except to cisplatin and mitomycin C. By contrast, the Artemis-deficient cells were significantly more resistant to hydroxyurea than the parental cells. These observations suggest that Artemis also functions in some DNA damage response pathways other than NHEJ in human cells. (author)

  8. A Case of Idiopathic Thyrotropin (TSH) Deficiency

    Ichida, Tatsuya; Kajita, Yoshihiro

    1997-01-01

    The first case of idiopathic thyrotropin (TSH) deficiency in an old woman with thyroid functioning adenoma was reported. She got subtotal thyroidectomy before about four years of her admission to our hospital because of fatigability, puffy face and leg edema. At that time, she had low TSH and free T4 levels despite replacement therapy with desiccated thyroid. No response of only serum TSH after adminstration of combined stimulant containing TRH and repeated TRH suggested the failure of TSH se...

  9. Loss of LRPPRC causes ATP synthase deficiency

    Mourier, Arnaud; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Brandt, Tobias; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-01-01

    Defects of the oxidative phosphorylation system, in particular of cytochrome-c oxidase (COX, respiratory chain complex IV), are common causes of Leigh syndrome (LS), which is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with severe progressive neurological symptoms that usually present during infancy or early childhood. The COX-deficient form of LS is commonly caused by mutations in genes encoding COX assembly factors, e.g. SURF1, SCO1, SCO2 or COX10. However, other mutations affecting genes that encode...

  10. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency: a urea cycle defect.

    Gordon, Neil

    2003-01-01

    The symptoms and signs of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency are discussed. When the condition occurs among males in the neonatal period it is likely to be lethal. Pathological findings are non-specific. The diagnosis should be considered if coma with cerebral oedema and respiratory alkalosis occurs for no obvious reason. When hyperammonaemia is found, enzyme assay on a liver biopsy should be considered. A useful clue in an asymptomatic patient is a voluntary adoption of a vegetarian diet. Provocative tests, such as the allopurinol test can be used, but the method most frequently applied is mutation analysis. In the case of prenatal diagnosis this is possible on a chorionic villus sample. The prognosis of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is better for those with an onset after infancy, but morbidity from brain damage does not appear to be linked to the number of episodes of hyperammonaemia that have occurred. The syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase which catalyses the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrulline. The gene responsible for this enzyme is located on Xp21.1, and is expressed in the liver and gut. Mutations can be divided into two groups: those with neonatal onset with all enzyme activity abolished, and those with later onset with partial and varying enzyme deficiency. There can be a variety of precipitating causes, for example sodium valproate. Treatment can be given with a low protein diet, and with alternate pathway drugs such as sodium benzoate and phenylbutyrate. Liver transplant can be considered when symptoms are life-threatening, although there may be severe complications.Gene replacement therapy is the hope of the future. PMID:12788037

  11. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  12. CRIMINALITY AT MINORS WITH MENTAL DEFICIENCY

    Zoran Kitkanj

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present, from penological aspect, the involvement and structure of recidivism at minors with mental deficiency within the whole area of juvenile criminality in Macedonia. The research covers 62 subjects who pay the penalty in juvenile penitentiary or institutional measure directing to correctional institution for minors. Of the total number of minors who hold one of the above-mentioned sanctions, minors with lower average IQ are presented with 56.4%. The shown invo...

  13. Music-reading deficiencies and the brain

    Cuddy, Lola L.; Sylvie Hébert

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on brain damage and music-reading for the past 25 years. Acquired patterns of selective loss and sparing are described, including both the association and dissociation of music and text reading, and association and dissociation among components of music reading. As well, we suggest that developmental music - reading deficiencies may be isolated in a form analogous to developmental dyslexia for text or congenital amusia for auditory music processing. Finally, ...

  14. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency with visceral xanthomas

    Servaes, Sabah; Bellah, Richard [Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Verma, Ritu [Department of Gastroenterology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pawel, Bruce [Department of Pathology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Lipoprotein lipase deficiency (LLD) is a rare metabolic disorder that typically presents with skin xanthomas and pancreatitis in childhood. We report a case of LLD in an infant who presented with jaundice caused by a pancreatic head mass. Abdominal imaging also incidentally revealed hyperechoic renal masses caused by renal xanthomas. This appearance of the multiple abdominal masses makes this a unique infantile presentation of LLD. (orig.)

  15. #614962 LEPTIN DEFICIENCY OR DYSFUNCTION; LEPD [OMIM

    Full Text Available FIELD NO 614962 FIELD TI #614962 LEPTIN DEFICIENCY OR DYSFUNCTION; LEPD ;;OBESITY, MORBID, NONSY ... at a test meal was reduced from 152 to 64 kJ/kg of lean ... mass and from 169 to 98 kJ/kg of lean ... mass in subj ... and 2, respectively. Normal was 54 +/- 12 kJ/kg of lean ... mass in age-related controls. Farooqi et al. (2007 ...

  16. Deficiency tracking system, conceptual business process requirements

    The purpose of this document is to describe the conceptual business process requirements of a single, site-wide, consolidated, automated, deficiency management tracking, trending, and reporting system. This description will be used as the basis for the determination of the automated system acquisition strategy including the further definition of specific requirements, a ''make or buy'' determination and the development of specific software design details

  17. Recombination-deficient mutant of Streptococcus faecalis.

    Yagi, Y; Clewell, D B

    1980-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation-sensitive derivative of Streptococcus faecalis strain JH2-2 was isolated and found to be deficient in recombination, using a plasmid-plasmid recombination system. The strain was sensitive to chemical agents which interact with deoxyribonucleic acid and also underwent deoxyribonucleic acid degradation after ultraviolet irradiation. Thus, the mutant has properties similar to those of recA strains of Escherichia coli.

  18. Lessons from Loricrin-Deficient Mice

    Koch, Peter J.; de Viragh, Pierre A.; Scharer, Elisabeth; Bundman, Donnie; Longley, Mary Ann; Bickenbach, Jackie; Kawachi, Yasuhiro; Suga, Yasushi; Zhou, Zhijian,; Huber, Marcel; Hohl, Daniel; Kartasova, Tonja; Jarnik, Michal; Steven, Alasdair C.; Roop, Dennis R.

    2000-01-01

    The epidermal cornified cell envelope (CE) is a complex protein–lipid composite that replaces the plasma membrane of terminally differentiated keratinocytes. This lamellar structure is essential for the barrier function of the skin and has the ability to prevent the loss of water and ions and to protect from environmental hazards. The major protein of the epidermal CE is loricrin, contributing ∼70% by mass. We have generated mice that are deficient for this protein. These mice showed a delay ...

  19. Vitamin D deficiency and posterior subcapsular cataract

    Brown, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Craig J Brown,1 Faical Akaichi21The Eye Center, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 2Scotland’s Rural College, Edinburgh, UKPurpose: To evaluate risk factors associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) development and the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and etiology of PSC.Methods: Of 195 consecutive patients from a private ophthalmology practice, diagnosed with PSC, serum vitamin D3 (25-OH D) levels were obtained for 175, and associations among risk factors, comorbidities, an...

  20. Vitamin D deficiency and posterior subcapsular cataract

    Brown CJ; Akaichi F

    2015-01-01

    Craig J Brown,1 Faical Akaichi21The Eye Center, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 2Scotland’s Rural College, Edinburgh, UKPurpose: To evaluate risk factors associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) development and the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and etiology of PSC.Methods: Of 195 consecutive patients from a private ophthalmology practice, diagnosed with PSC, serum vitamin D3 (25-OH D) levels were obtained for 175, and associations among risk factors, comorbidities, and PS...

  1. Vitamin D deficiency in hemodialysis patients

    Beena Bansal; Shyam Bansal; Ambrish Mithal; Vijay Kher; Raman Marwaha

    2012-01-01

    Background : Vitamin D [(25(OH)D] deficiency and insufficiency is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). 25(OH)D has been found to have beneficial effects on bone, cardiovascular and immune functions. There are little data about vitamin D levels in Indian patients on dialysis. This study was undertaken to determine the vitamin D status of Indian CKD patients on hemodialysis. Materials and Methods : We included 45 patients on maintenance hemodialysis coming to Medanta, Medicity,...

  2. Vitamin D deficiency in pediatric critical illness

    Kiran B. Hebbar, MD, FCCM; Michael Wittkamp, MD, FAAP; Jessica A. Alvarez, PhD, RD; Courtney E. McCracken, PhD; Vin Tangpricha, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The potential role for vitamin D in infection has been well described in adults. The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and to evaluate the relationship between vitamin D status and markers of innate immunity and infection in critically ill children. Hypothesis: Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in children with critical illness and correlates with the severity of illness and dysfunction in innate immunity. Methods: We ...

  3. In HepG2 Cells, Coexisting Carnitine Deficiency Masks Important Indicators of Marginal Biotin Deficiency123

    Bogusiewicz, Anna; Boysen, Gunnar; Mock, Donald M

    2014-01-01

    Background: A large number of birth defects are related to nutrient deficiencies; concern that biotin deficiency is teratogenic in humans is reasonable. Surprisingly, studies indicate that increased urinary 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (3HIAc), a previously validated marker of biotin deficiency, is not a valid biomarker in pregnancy.

  4. Dengue virus type 2 (DENV2-induced oxidative responses in monocytes from glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD-deficient and G6PD normal subjects.

    Abdullah Ahmed Al-Alimi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue virus is endemic in peninsular Malaysia. The clinical manifestations vary depending on the incubation period of the virus as well as the immunity of the patients. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is prevalent in Malaysia where the incidence is 3.2%. It has been noted that some G6PD-deficient individuals suffer from more severe clinical presentation of dengue infection. In this study, we aim to investigate the oxidative responses of DENV2-infected monocytes from G6PD-deficient individuals. METHODOLOGY: Monocytes from G6PD-deficient individuals were infected with DENV2 and infection rate, levels of oxidative species, nitric oxide (NO, superoxide anions (O2-, and oxidative stress were determined and compared with normal controls. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Monocytes from G6PD-deficient individuals exhibited significantly higher infection rates compared to normal controls. In an effort to explain the reason for this enhanced susceptibility, we investigated the production of NO and O2- in the monocytes of individuals with G6PD deficiency compared with normal controls. We found that levels of NO and O2- were significantly lower in the DENV-infected monocytes from G6PD-deficient individuals compared with normal controls. Furthermore, the overall oxidative stress in DENV-infected monocytes from G6PD-deficient individuals was significantly higher when compared to normal controls. Correlation studies between DENV-infected cells and oxidative state of monocytes further confirmed these findings. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altered redox state of DENV-infected monocytes from G6PD-deficient individuals appears to augment viral replication in these cells. DENV-infected G6PD-deficient individuals may contain higher viral titers, which may be significant in enhanced virus transmission. Furthermore, granulocyte dysfunction and higher viral loads in G6PD-deificient individuals may result in severe form of dengue infection.

  5. An interactive app for color deficient viewers

    Lau, Cheryl; Perdu, Nicolas; Rodríguez-Pardo, Carlos E.; Süsstrunk, Sabine; Sharma, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Color deficient individuals have trouble seeing color contrasts that could be very apparent to individuals with normal color vision. For example, for some color deficient individuals, red and green apples do not have the striking contrast they have for those with normal color vision, or the abundance of red cherries in a tree is not immediately clear due to a lack of perceived contrast. We present a smartphone app that enables color deficient users to visualize such problematic color contrasts in order to help them with daily tasks. The user interacts with the app through the touchscreen. As the user traces a path around the touchscreen, the colors in the image change continuously via a transform that enhances contrasts that are weak or imperceptible for the user under native viewing conditions. Specifically, we propose a transform that shears the data along lines parallel to the dimension corresponding to the affected cone sensitivity of the user. The amount and direction of shear are controlled by the user's finger movement over the touchscreen allowing them to visualize these contrasts. Using the GPU, this simple transformation, consisting of a linear shear and translation, is performed efficiently on each pixel and in real-time with the changing position of the user's finger. The user can use the app to aid daily tasks such as distinguishing between red and green apples or picking out ripe bananas.

  6. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) update.

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Shearer, William T; Burroughs, Lauri M; Torgerson, Troy R; Decaluwe, Hélène; Haddad, Elie

    2016-08-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a collaboration of 41 North American centers studying therapy for rare primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDs), including severe combined immune deficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). An additional 3 European centers have partnered with the PIDTC to study CGD. Natural history protocols of the PIDTC analyze outcomes of treatment for rare PIDs in multicenter longitudinal retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. Since 2009, participating centers have enrolled more than 800 subjects on PIDTC protocols for SCID, and enrollment in the studies on WAS and CGD is underway. Four pilot projects have been funded, and 12 junior investigators have received fellowship awards. Important publications of the consortium describe the outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation for SCID during 2000-2009, diagnostic criteria for SCID, and the pilot project of newborn screening for SCID in the Navajo Nation. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshops provide an opportunity to strengthen collaborations with junior investigators, patient advocacy groups, and international colleagues. Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Office of Rare Diseases Research, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, the PIDTC has recently received renewal for another 5 years. Here we review accomplishments of the group, projects underway, highlights of recent workshops, and challenges for the future. PMID:27262745

  7. Homologous recombination deficiency and ovarian cancer.

    Ledermann, Jonathan A; Drew, Yvette; Kristeleit, Rebecca S

    2016-06-01

    The discovery that PARP inhibitors block an essential pathway of DNA repair in cells harbouring a BRCA mutation has opened up a new therapeutic avenue for high-grade ovarian cancers. BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are essential for high-fidelity repair of double-strand breaks of DNA through the homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway. Deficiency in HRR (HRD) is a target for PARP inhibitors. The first PARP inhibitor, olaparib, has now been licensed for BRCA-mutated ovarian cancers. While mutated BRCA genes are individually most commonly associated with HRD other essential HRR proteins may be mutated or functionally deficient potentially widening the therapeutic opportunities for PARP inhibitors. HRD is the first phenotypically defined predictive marker for therapy with PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancer. Several different PARP inhibitors are being trialled in ovarian cancer and this class of drugs has been shown to be a new selective therapy for high-grade ovarian cancer. Around 20% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers harbour germline or somatic BRCA mutations and testing for BRCA mutations should be incorporated into routine clinical practice. The expanded use of PARP inhibitors in HRD deficient (non-BRCA mutant) tumours using a signature of HRD in clinical practice requires validation. PMID:27065456

  8. VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY AND THE CLINICAL CONSEQUENCES.

    Galesanu, Corina; Mocanu, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D is important for good health, growth and strong bones. Vitamin D is mostly made in the skin by exposure to sunlight. Most foods contain very little vitamin D naturally, though some are fortified with added vitamin D. Hypovitaminosis D is associated with cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer as well as with increased mortality. Further, Vitamin D deficiency is related to depression and impaired cognitive function. Increasing age and elevated body fat mass contribute to an increased risk of Vitamin D deficiency. A mild lack of vitamin D may not cause symptoms but can cause tiredness and general aches and pains. A more severe lack can cause s rious problems such as rickets (in children) and osteomalacia in adults). During menopause, the decline of estrogens results in increased bone turnover, a decrease in bone mineral density and elevated fracture risk. Treatment is with vitamin D supplements. Some people are more at risk of vitamin D deficiency, and so are recommended to take vitamin D supplements routinely. These include all pregnant and breastfeeding women, all infants (babies) and young children aged 6 months to 5 years, people aged 65 and over, and people who are not exposed to much sun. There are precise recommendations regarding a sufficient Vitamin D intake in order to prevent bone loss in peri- and postmenopausal women. It is also recommend routine supplements for certain people with darker skin, and for people with certain gut, liver or kidney diseases. PMID:26204630

  9. Sertraline-induced pseudocholinesterase enzyme deficiency

    Beyazit Zencirci

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Beyazit ZencirciMOSTAS Private Health Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Kahramanmaras, TurkeyAbstract: A 47-year-old Turkish male was scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. The patient had 2 operations 28 and 19 years ago under general anesthesia. It was learned that the patient was administered succinylcholine during both of these previous operations and that he did not have a history of prolonged recovery or postoperative apnea. The patient had been using sertraline for 3 years before the operation. Pseudocholinesterase is a drug-metabolizing enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of the muscle-relaxant drugs mivacurium and succinylcholine. Deficiency of this enzyme from any cause can lead to prolonged apnea and paralysis following administration of mivacurium and succinylcholine. The diagnosis of pseudocholinesterase enzyme deficiency can be made after careful clinic supervision and peripheral nerve stimulator monitoring. A decrease in the activity of pseudocholinesterase enzyme and a decline in the block effect over time will help verify the diagnosis. Our patient’s plasma cholinesterase was found to have low activity. Instead of pharmacological interventions that may further complicate the situation in such cases, the preferred course of action should be to wait until the block effect declines with the help of sedation and mechanical ventilation. In our case, the prolonged block deteriorated in the course of time before any complications developed.Keywords: mivacurium, pseudocholinesterase deficiency, sertraline

  10. Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies Are Highly Prevalent in Newly Diagnosed Celiac Disease Patients

    Ad A. van Bodegraven

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Malabsorption, weight loss and vitamin/mineral-deficiencies characterize classical celiac disease (CD. This study aimed to assess the nutritional and vitamin/mineral status of current “early diagnosed” untreated adult CD-patients in the Netherlands. Newly diagnosed adult CD-patients were included (n = 80, 42.8 ± 15.1 years and a comparable sample of 24 healthy Dutch subjects was added to compare vitamin concentrations. Nutritional status and serum concentrations of folic acid, vitamin A, B6, B12, and (25-hydroxy D, zinc, haemoglobin (Hb and ferritin were determined (before prescribing gluten free diet. Almost all CD-patients (87% had at least one value below the lower limit of reference. Specifically, for vitamin A, 7.5% of patients showed deficient levels, for vitamin B6 14.5%, folic acid 20%, and vitamin B12 19%. Likewise, zinc deficiency was observed in 67% of the CD-patients, 46% had decreased iron storage, and 32% had anaemia. Overall, 17% were malnourished (>10% undesired weight loss, 22% of the women were underweight (Body Mass Index (BMI 25. Vitamin deficiencies were barely seen in healthy controls, with the exception of vitamin B12. Vitamin/mineral deficiencies were counter-intuitively not associated with a (higher grade of histological intestinal damage or (impaired nutritional status. In conclusion, vitamin/mineral deficiencies are still common in newly “early diagnosed” CD-patients, even though the prevalence of obesity at initial diagnosis is rising. Extensive nutritional assessments seem warranted to guide nutritional advices and follow-up in CD treatment.

  11. Congenital factor XI deficiency in a domestic shorthair cat.

    Troxel, Mark T; Brooks, Marjory B; Esterline, Meredith L

    2002-01-01

    A 6-month-old, female, domestic shorthair cat was examined after onychectomy and ovariohysterectomy because of bleeding from the paws. Prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time was discovered, Coagulation factor analyses revealed deficiency of factor XI coagulant activity. Plasma mixing studies indicated factor deficiency or dysfunction rather than factor inhibition. Feline factor XI deficiency in one adult cat has been previously reported but was attributed to factor XI inhibitors. The signalment, lack of primary disease, and the finding of persistent factor XI deficiency in the absence of coagulation inhibitors were considered compatible with congenital factor XI deficiency in the cat of this report. PMID:12428887

  12. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children.

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-03-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms "iron deficiency" and "iron deficiency anemia" are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake together with rapid growth, low birth weight and gastrointestinal losses related to excessive intake of cow's milk. If insufficient intake can be excluded and there is insufficient response to oral iron treatment in patients with iron deficiency especially in older children, blood loss should be considered as the underlying cause. The main principles in management of iron deficiency anemia include investigation and elimination of the cause leading to iron deficiency, replacement of deficiency, improvement of nutrition and education of the patient and family. In this article, the practical approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and the experience of our center have been reviewed. PMID:26078692

  13. Investigation of ferromagnetism in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films

    Oxygen deficient thin films of hafnium oxide were grown on single crystal r-cut and c-cut sapphire by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. RF-activated oxygen was used for the in situ oxidation of hafnium oxide thin films. Oxidation conditions were varied substantially in order to create oxygen deficiency in hafnium oxide films intentionally. The films were characterized by X-ray and magnetic measurements. X-ray diffraction studies show an increase in lattice parameter with increasing oxygen deficiency. Oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films also showed a decreasing bandgap with increase in oxygen deficiency. The magnetisation studies carried out with SQUID did not show any sign of ferromagnetism in the whole oxygen deficiency range. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements also confirmed the absence of ferromagnetism in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films

  14. Relationship between unexplained arthralgia and vitamin D deficiency: a case control study.

    Behzad Heidari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Arthralgia is a common presenting symptom of many rheumatic diseases. Vitamin D deficiency may lead to progression of skeletal symptoms to definite disease in susceptible subjects. This study was conducted to determine the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and unexplained arthralgia. Patients with arthralgia not related to a definite clinical condition were selected prospectively among subjects presented to a rheumatology clinic. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD was measured by ELISA method and levels less than 20 ng/ml were considered as deficient levels. Serum 25-OHD levels and proportion of 25-OHD deficiency was compared in patients versus control. The association of serum 25-OHD and arthralgia was assessed by calculation of odds ratio (OR using regression analysis. 167 patients with mean age of 38 ± 13.3 and 283 controls with mean age of 42.6±14.37 years (P=0.001 were studied. In patients mean serum 25-OHD was lower and proportion of deficiency was higher (P=0.001 for both.Serum 25-OHD deficiency was associated with 3.01 times increased risk of arthralgia (OR=3.01, 95% CI, 2.0- 4.25, P=0.001. After adjusment for age and sex, the risk of arthralgia remained significan at OR= 2.71(95%CI, 1.79-4.11,P=0.001.The odds of arthralgia decreased with increasing serum 25-OHD from OR=3.48 (95% CI,197-6,P=0.001 at serum <10 ng/ml to 3.39 (95%CI,1.93-5.98, P=0.001 at 10-19.9; and 1.31 (95%CI, 0.69-2.5, P=0.42 at 20-29.9 ng/ml. These findings indicate significant association of vitamin D deficiency and arthralgia. Regarding vitamin D deficiency as an environmental factor for development or progression of rheumatic diseases, this study justifies identification and correction of vitamin D deficiency in patients with arthralgia.

  15. Effect of Dietary Selenium Deficiency on the Cell Apoptosis and the Level of Thyroid Hormones in Chicken.

    Huang, Yunmao; Li, Wanyan; Xu, Danning; Li, Bingxin; Tian, Yunbo; Zan, Linsen

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed the effect of dietary selenium (Se) deficiency on male reproductive function in chicken. A total of 180 Hy-line laying cocks (1 day old; Weiwei) were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 90) of Se-deficient chickens and control chickens. The control group was fed a basic diet (containing 0.15 mg of Se/kg). The Se-deficient group was fed a Se-deficient corn-soy basal diet (containing 0.033 mg of Se/kg). Fifteen chickens were killed in each group on days 30, 60, and 90, respectively. Then, serum and testes were collected and used in the detection of experimental index. Results indicated that GSH-Px activity and Bcl-2 mRNA level in the testes and thyroidal triiodothyronine (T3) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) levels in serum by dietary Se deficiency were significantly decreased compared to the corresponding control groups. Se deficiency-treated group showed a significant increase in MDA concent, TUNEL-positive cells, and mRNA level of Bax, Caspase3, and p53 in the testes and thyroidal thyroxine (T4), free thyroxine (FT4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels in serum. Histopathologically, Se deficiency caused impairments in the testes. These results suggested that dietary Se deficiency exerts significant harmful effects on male reproductive organ and that the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways and the upstream regulators such as p53, Bax, and Bcl-2 were all involved in Se deficiency-induced testicular apoptosis. PMID:26507440

  16. Vitamin A-Deficient Diet Accelerated Atherogenesis in Apolipoprotein E−/− Mice and Dietary β-Carotene Prevents This Consequence

    Noa Zolberg Relevy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A is involved in regulation of glucose concentrations, lipid metabolism, and inflammation, which are major risk factors for atherogenesis. However, the effect of vitamin A deficiency on atherogenesis has not been investigated. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to examine whether vitamin A deficiency accelerates atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice (apoE−/−. ApoE−/− mice were allocated into the following groups: control, fed vitamin A-containing chow diet; BC, fed chow diet fortified with Dunaliella powder containing βc isomers; VAD, fed vitamin A-deficient diet; and VAD-BC group, fed vitamin A-deficient diet fortified with a Dunaliella powder. Following 15 weeks of treatment, liver retinol concentration had decreased significantly in the VAD group to about 30% that of control group. Vitamin A-deficient diet significantly increased both plasma cholesterol concentrations and the atherosclerotic lesion area at the aortic sinus (+61% compared to the control group. Dietary βc fortification inhibited the elevation in plasma cholesterol and retarded atherogenesis in mice fed the vitamin A-deficient diet. The results imply that dietary vitamin A deficiency should be examined as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and that dietary βc, as a sole source of retinoids, can compensate for vitamin A deficiency.

  17. Magnesium deficiency induces anxiety-and depression-like behavior and metabolic dysfunction in C57Bl/6J mice

    Winther, G.; Wang, T.; Singewald, N.;

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are indications that balance of magnesium (Mg) ions may regulate mood. Magnesium deficiency is also linked with altered glucose metabolism and an inflammatory response in the gut. In addition, mood disorders have been linked to a dysfunctional metabolism. Aim: In this study we...... investigated the involvement of Mg in regulating depression-and anxiety-like behaviour and metabolism, by using mice that have been deprived of dietary Mg and studying several behavioral and metabolic markers. Methods: We examined the behavioral effects of Mg deficiency (deprival of dietary Mg for 6 weeks...... metabolic function in Mg deficient mice. Results: We found that, compared to control (n=10), mice receiving Mg deficient diet (n=10) (10 % RDA), were more immobile in the forced swim test....

  18. [GPI-Pr Deficiency and Apoptosis of PNH Granulocytes

    Liu, Hai-Li; Xu, Cai-Min; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Lu, Zhao-Jiang; Pan, Hua-Zhen; Zhang, Zhi-Nan

    2001-09-01

    To study the relationship of Glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchored proteins (GIP-Pr) and apoptosis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells, we isolated peripheral granulocytes from 10 patients with PNH and 10 normal controls and measured apoptosis induced by serum starvation. The FCM analysis of phosphotidylserine (ps) externalization in granulocytes was determined using Annexin-V-FLUOS labeling. After the cells were induced for apoptosis in serum-free medium for 20 hours, the percentage of externalization was 78.6% in normal control cells but 39.5% in PNH cells. The results of FCM analysis of PI stained granulocytes showed that the PI positive rate was 51.5% in control cells and 30.2% in PNH cells. The gel electrophoresis analysis of DNA fragmentation all indicate that PNH granulocytes were relatively resistant to apoptosis as compared with normal controls. This resistance to apoptosis might not be related to the percentage of CD59 deficient granulocytes. PMID:12578597

  19. Deficiência de ferro na adolescência Iron deficiency in adolescence

    Marlene P. Garanito

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência de ferro é o distúrbio nutricional mais comum no mundo e constitui a maior causa de anemia associada às condições onde há erro alimentar, perda crônica de sangue ou quando ocorre o crescimento rápido, como na infância, na gravidez e na adolescência. Esta deficiência acarreta prejuízos no desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor, na capacidade de aprendizagem, no apetite, no crescimento e na resposta do sistema imunológico. Na adolescência, além de com frequência observarmos hábitos alimentares inadequados, estão presentes intensas mudanças fisiológicas e psicossociais que, em associação, podem comprometer o crescimento e aumentar o risco do desenvolvimento de deficiência de ferro e outras carências nutricionais, sobretudo na fase púbere. Desta forma, o diagnóstico de deficiência de ferro entre os adolescentes deve ser lembrado a fim de que medidas possam ser tomadas para diminuir a incidência de anemia, do comprometimento do rendimento escolar e do sistema imunológico, neste período da vida.Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder in the world and is a major cause of anemia associated with situations involving chronic blood loss or rapid growth such as during infancy, pregnancy and adolescence. This deficiency leads to impairment in psychomotor development, learning ability, appetite, growth and immune response. In adolescence, inadequate dietary habits are often observed and intensive physiological and psychological changes are seen that when combined can impair growth and increase the risk of developing iron deficiency or other nutritional disorders, especially during puberty. Thus, the diagnosis of iron deficiency among adolescents should always be considered so that measures can be taken to reduce the incidence of anemia, impairment of the immune system and improve school performance.

  20. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD-deficient epithelial cells are less tolerant to infection by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Yi-Ting Hsieh

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD is a key enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway and provides reducing energy to all cells by maintaining redox balance. The most common clinical manifestations in patients with G6PD deficiency are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia. The effects of microbial infection in patients with G6PD deficiency primarily relate to the hemolytic anemia caused by Plasmodium or viral infections and the subsequent medication that is required. We are interested in studying the impact of bacterial infection in G6PD-deficient cells. G6PD knock down A549 lung carcinoma cells, together with the common pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, were employed in our cell infection model. Here, we demonstrate that a lower cell viability was observed among G6PD-deficient cells when compared to scramble controls upon bacterial infection using the MTT assay. A significant increase in the intracellular ROS was detected among S. aureus-infected G6PD-deficient cells by observing dichlorofluorescein (DCF intensity within cells under a fluorescence microscope and quantifying this signal using flow cytometry. The impairment of ROS removal is predicted to enhance apoptotic activity in G6PD-deficient cells, and this enhanced apoptosis was observed by annexin V/PI staining under a confocal fluorescence microscope and quantified by flow cytometry. A higher expression level of the intrinsic apoptotic initiator caspase-9, as well as the downstream effector caspase-3, was detected by Western blotting analysis of G6PD-deficient cells following bacterial infection. In conclusion, we propose that bacterial infection, perhaps the secreted S. aureus α-hemolysin in this case, promotes the accumulation of intracellular ROS in G6PD-deficient cells. This would trigger a stronger apoptotic activity through the intrinsic pathway thereby reducing cell viability when compared to wild type cells.

  1. Matrine ameliorates spontaneously developed colitis in interleukin-10-deficient mice.

    Wu, Cong; Xu, Zheng; Gai, Renhua; Huang, Kehe

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10)-deficient mice spontaneously develop T cell-mediated colitis. Previous reports have shown that Matrine may reduce the symptoms of acute colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). However, whether Matrine impacts chronic colitis remains unknown. In this study, we investigated whether Matrine could limit the symptoms of spontaneously developed colitis and its potential molecular mechanisms. IL-10 deficient mice were given Matrine or a PBS control by oral gavage daily for 4weeks and were euthanized at week 2 or week 4. We measured body weight, colon length and weight, and histological scores. We also evaluated the spontaneous secretion of IL-12/23p40, IFN-γ and IL-17 in colon explant cultures as well as IFN-γ and IL-17 secretion in unseparated mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells, and assessed IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expression in colon tissue. In addition, we analyzed the proportions of CD4-positive and CD8-positive cells in unseparated MLN cells. Our results show that Matrine-treated mice exhibited better body weight recovery than controls and that histological scores and spontaneously secreted IL-12/23p40, IFN-γ and IL-17 in colon tissue were significantly decreased in treated mice compared with controls. The proportion of CD4-positive cells of MLNs in treated mice was significantly smaller than that in controls at week 4. Both cytokine production and mRNA expression of IFN-γ and IL-17 were significantly reduced in treated mice compared with controls. Taken together, our results indicate that Matrine may ameliorate spontaneously developed chronic colitis and could be considered as a therapeutic alternative for chronic colitis. PMID:27179305

  2. Vitamin D deficiency at pediatric intensive care admission

    Corsino Rey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess whether 25hydroxivitaminD or 25(OHvitD deficiency has a high prevalence at pediatric intensive care unit (PICU admission, and whether it is associated with increased prediction of mortality risk scores. METHOD: prospective observational study comparing 25(OHvitD levels measured in 156 patients during the 12 hours after critical care admission with the 25(OHvitD levels of 289 healthy children. 25(OHvitD levels were also compared between PICU patients with pediatric risk of mortality III (PRISM III or pediatric index of mortality 2 (PIM 2 > p75 [(group A; n = 33 vs. the others (group B; n = 123]. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as < 20 ng/mL levels. RESULTS: median (p25-p75 25(OHvitD level was 26.0 ng/mL (19.2-35.8 in PICU patients vs. 30.5 ng/mL (23.2-38.6 in healthy children (p = 0.007. The prevalence of 25(OHvitD < 20 ng/mL was 29.5% (95% CI: 22.0-37.0 vs. 15.6% (95% CI: 12.2-20.0 (p = 0.01. Pediatric intensive care patients presented an odds ratio (OR for hypovitaminosis D of 2.26 (CI 95%: 1.41-3.61. 25(OHvitD levels were 25.4 ng/mL (CI 95%: 15.5-36.0 in group A vs. 26.6 ng/mL (CI 95%: 19.3-35.5 in group B (p = 0.800. CONCLUSIONS: hypovitaminosis D incidence was high in PICU patients. Hypovitaminosis D was not associated with higher prediction of risk mortality scores.

  3. MG-132 inhibits the TCDD-mediated induction of Cyp1a1 at the catalytic activity but not the mRNA or protein levels in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Elbekai, Reem H; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2008-11-10

    Previous studies have shown that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced degradation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is inhibited by MG-132, a potent inhibitor of the 26S proteasome. Therefore, the current study aims to address the effect of MG-132 on the AhR-regulated gene, cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), using murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Our results showed that MG-132 at the highest concentration tested, 10 microM significantly increased the Cyp1a1 at mRNA, protein and catalytic activity levels through a transcriptional mechanism. On the other hand, MG-132 further potentiated the TCDD-mediated induction of Cyp1a1 at mRNA but not at protein level. In contrast, MG-132 significantly inhibited the TCDD-mediated induction of Cyp1a1 catalytic activity. In addition, we showed that the decrease in Cyp1a1 catalytic activity is not Cyp specific, as MG-132 significantly inhibited Cyp2b1 and total cytochrome P450 catalytic activities. These results prompted us to examine the effect of MG-132 on total cellular heme content and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA, a rate limiting enzyme of heme degradation. Our results showed that MG-132 significantly induced HO-1 mRNA in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, MG-132 potentiated the induction of HO-1 mRNA by TCDD in a concentration-dependent manner. The induction of HO-1 mRNA level coincided with a decrease in total cellular heme content. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates for the first time that MG-132, despite of increasing Cyp1a1 mRNA expression, it decreases its activity probably through decreasing its heme content. PMID:18835339

  4. Genetically Determined MBL Deficiency Is Associated with Protection against Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Chagas Disease.

    Paola Rosa Luz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose sugar moieties are recognized by mannan binding lectin (MBL, a soluble pattern-recognition molecule that activates the lectin pathway of complement. MBL levels and protein activity are affected by polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. We sequenced the MBL2 promoter and exon 1 in 196 chronic CD patients and 202 controls. The MBL2*C allele, which causes MBL deficiency, was associated with protection against CD (P = 0.007, OR = 0.32. Compared with controls, genotypes with this allele were completely absent in patients with the cardiac form of the disease (P = 0.003. Furthermore, cardiac patients with genotypes causing MBL deficiency presented less heart damage (P = 0.003, OR = 0.23, compared with cardiac patients having the XA haplotype causing low MBL levels, but fully capable of activating complement (P = 0.005, OR = 7.07. Among the patients, those with alleles causing MBL deficiency presented lower levels of cytokines and chemokines possibly implicated in symptom development (IL9, p = 0.013; PDGFB, p = 0.036 and RANTES, p = 0.031. These findings suggest a protective effect of genetically determined MBL deficiency against the development and progression of chronic CD cardiomyopathy.

  5. Proteomic analyses provide new insights into the responses of Pinus massoniana seedlings to phosphorus deficiency.

    Fan, Fuhua; Ding, Guijie; Wen, Xiaopeng

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development. Plants can respond defensively to phosphorus deficiency by modifying their morphology and metabolic pathways via the differential expression of low phosphate responsive genes. To better understand the mechanisms by which the Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) adapts to phosphorus deficiency, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis using an elite line exhibiting high tolerance to phosphorus deficiency. The selected seedlings were treated with 0.5 mM KH2 PO4 (control), 0.01 mM KH2 PO4 (P1), or 0.06 mM KH2 PO4 (P2) for 48 days. Total protein samples were separated via 2DE. A total of 98 differentially expressed proteins, which displayed at least 1.7-fold change expression compared to the control levels (p ≤ 0.05), were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. These phosphate starvation responsive proteins were implicated in photosynthesis, defense, cellular organization, biosynthesis, energy metabolism, secondary metabolism, signal transduction etc. Therefore, these proteins might play important roles in facilitating internal phosphorus homeostasis. Additionally, the obtained data may be useful for the further characterization of gene function and may provide a foundation for a more comprehensive understanding of the adaptations of the Masson pine to phosphorus-deficient conditions. PMID:26603831

  6. Iron homeostasis and nutritional iron deficiency.

    Theil, Elizabeth C

    2011-04-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins encoded in iron responsive element (IRE)-mRNA. The noncoding IRE-mRNA structures bind protein repressors, IRP1 or 2, during iron deficiency. Integration of the IRE-RNA in translation regulators (near the cap) or turnover elements (after the coding region) increases iron uptake (DMT1/TRF1) or decreases iron storage/efflux (FTN/FPN) when IRP binds. An antioxidant response element in FTN DNA binds Bach1, a heme-sensitive transcription factor that coordinates expression among antioxidant response proteins like FTN, thioredoxin reductase, and quinone reductase. FTN, an antioxidant because Fe(2+) and O(2) (reactive oxygen species generators) are consumed to make iron mineral, is also a nutritional iron concentrate that is an efficiently absorbed, nonheme source of iron from whole legumes. FTN protein cages contain thousands of mineralized iron atoms and enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, an absorption mechanism distinct from transport of nonheme iron salts (ferrous sulfate), iron chelators (ferric-EDTA), or heme. Recognition of 2 nutritional nonheme iron sources, small and large (FTN), will aid the solution of iron deficiency, a major public health problem, and the development of new policies on iron nutrition. PMID:21346101

  7. Low Phosphorus Tolerance Mechanisms: Phosphorus Recycling and Photosynthate Partitioning in the Tropical Forage Grass, Brachiaria Hybrid cultivar Mulato Compared with Rice

    Nanamori, Masahiko; Shinano, Takuro; Wasaki, Jun; Yamamura, Takuya; Rao, Idupulapati M.; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2004-01-01

    The Brachiaria hybrid cv. Mulato is well adapted to low-fertility acid soils deficient in phosphorus (P). To study the grassy forage’s mechanisms for tolerating low P supply, we compared it with rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Kitaake). We tested by using nutrient solution cultures, and quantified the effects of P deficiency on the enzymatic activities of phosphohydrolases and on carbon metabolism in P-deficient leaves. While P deficiency markedly induced activity of phosphohydrolases in both crop...

  8. Metabolite profiling of Arabidopsis seedlings in response to exogenous sinalbin and sulfur deficiency.

    Zhang, Jixiu; Sun, Xiumei; Zhang, Zhiping; Ni, Yuwen; Zhang, Qing; Liang, Xinmiao; Xiao, Hongbin; Chen, Jiping; Tokuhisa, James G

    2011-10-01

    In order to determine how plant uptake of a sulfur-rich secondary metabolite, sinalbin, affects the metabolic profile of sulfur-deficient plants, gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS), in combination with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), was used to survey the metabolome of Arabidopsis seedlings grown in nutrient media under different sulfur conditions. The growth media had either sufficient inorganic sulfur for normal plant growth or insufficient inorganic sulfur in the presence or absence of supplementation with organic sulfur in the form of sinalbin (p-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate). A total of 90 metabolites were identified by GC-TOF-MS and their levels were compared across the three treatments. Of the identified compounds, 21 showed similar responses in plants that were either sulfur deficient or sinalbin supplemented compared to sulfur-sufficient plants, while 12 metabolites differed in abundance only in sulfur-deficient plants. Twelve metabolites accumulated to higher levels in sinalbin-supplemented than in the sulfur-sufficient plants. Secondary metabolites such as flavonol conjugates, sinapinic acid esters and glucosinolates, were identified by LC-MS and their corresponding mass fragmentation patterns were determined. Under sinalbin-supplemented conditions, sinalbin was taken up by Arabidopsis and contributed to the endogenous formation of glucosinolates. Additionally, levels of flavonol glycosides and sinapinic acid esters increased while levels of flavonol diglycosides with glucose attached to the 3-position were reduced. The exogenously administered sinalbin resulted in inhibition of root and hypocotyl growth and markedly influenced metabolite profiles, compared to control and sulfur-deficient plants. These results indicate that, under sulfur deficient conditions, glucosinolates can be a sulfur source for plants. This investigation defines an opportunity to elucidate the mechanism of glucosinolate degradation in

  9. Assessment of iron deficiency in pregnant women by determining iron status

    Background: Pregnant women constitute a high risk group for iron deficiency. Maternal iron deficiency and particularly iron deficiency anaemia may be associated with detrimental effects on maternal and infant function and particularly with a higher risk of preterm delivery and delivery of low birth weight neonates. Objective of this study was to assess and compare the iron status of normal healthy non-pregnant women with that of pregnant women of Hazara Division. Methods: This study was conducted at Faculty of Health Sciences, Hazara University, and Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from first March to /31 August 2006. Altogether 120 women, 90 pregnant at various stages of pregnancy and 30 non-pregnant women as control group were included in this study by convenience sampling. Their iron status was assessed by determination of haemoglobin (Hb), Serum ferritin, Serum-iron, Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC), Unsaturated Iron Binding Capacity (UIBC), and Percentage saturation of transferrin. Data generated on these variables were subjected to ANOVA and correlation analysis. Results: The salient finding of this study is a significant decrease in Hb, Serum ferritin, Serum iron, percentage saturation of transferrin and a significant increase in values of TIBC and a pronounced increase in UIBC in second and third trimester compared to first trimester in iron deficient pregnant women. The mean values of Hb, SF, and Fe/TIBC% were significantly lower in the cases than in the control and significantly higher values of TIBC and UIBC were observed in the cases compared to controls. Significant correlations were observed for TIBC, UIBC and Fe/TIBC% against serum iron in different trimesters of pregnancy. Conclusion: A high percentage of the pregnant women are iron deficient due to factors such as high parity, poor dietary habits and socioeconomic status. (author)

  10. Molecular basis of hereditary C3 deficiency.

    Botto, M.; Fong, K. Y.; So, A K; Rudge, A; Walport, M.J. (Mark J.)

    1990-01-01

    Hereditary deficiency of complement component C3 in a 10-yr-old boy was studied. C3 could not be detected by RIA of serum from the patient. Segregation of C3 S and C3 F allotypes within the family confirmed the presence of a null gene for C3, for which the patient was homozygous. 30 exons have been characterized, spanning the entire beta chain of C3 and the alpha chain as far as the C3d region. Sequence analysis of the exons derived from the C3 null gene showed no abnormalities in the coding ...

  11. Selective deficiency of immunoglobulin A2.

    van Loghem, E; Zegers, B J; Bast, E J; KATER, L

    1983-01-01

    A case of familial selective IgA2 deficiency is described. The mother had no detectable IgA2, but a low level of IgA1. She had anti-alpha 2 antibodies of the IgG class. One of her daughters also lacked IgA2 with a normal level of IgA1. The analysis of the immunoglobulin haplotypes of the family suggested the deletion of the alpha 2-gene. In addition, the analysis of B lymphocytes of mother and daughter showed the absence of IgA2-bearing cells. Upon stimulation with pokeweed mitogen, the B cel...

  12. Partial muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A deficiency

    Ross, N.S.; Hoppel, C.L.

    1987-01-02

    After initiation of ibuprofen therapy, a 45-year-old woman developed muscle weakness and tenderness with rhabdomyolysis, culminating in respiratory failure. A muscle biopsy specimen showed a vacuolar myopathy, and markedly decreased muscle carnitine content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity. Following recovery, muscle carnitine content was normal but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was still abnormally low. The ratio of palmitoyl-coenzyme A plus carnitine to palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by muscle mitochondria isolated from the patient was markedly decreased. The authors conclude that transiently decreased muscle carnitine content interacted with partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A to produce rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure and that ibuprofen may have precipitated the clinical event.

  13. Music-reading deficiencies and the brain

    Lola L. Cuddy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature on brain damage and music-reading for the past 25 years. Acquired patterns of selective loss and sparing are described, including both the association and dissociation of music and text reading, and association and dissociation among components of music reading. As well, we suggest that developmental music - reading deficiencies may be isolated in a form analogous to developmental dyslexia for text or congenital amusia for auditory music processing. Finally, we propose that the results of brain damage studies can contribute to the development of a model of normal music reading.

  14. Partial muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A deficiency

    After initiation of ibuprofen therapy, a 45-year-old woman developed muscle weakness and tenderness with rhabdomyolysis, culminating in respiratory failure. A muscle biopsy specimen showed a vacuolar myopathy, and markedly decreased muscle carnitine content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity. Following recovery, muscle carnitine content was normal but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was still abnormally low. The ratio of palmitoyl-coenzyme A plus carnitine to palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by muscle mitochondria isolated from the patient was markedly decreased. The authors conclude that transiently decreased muscle carnitine content interacted with partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A to produce rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure and that ibuprofen may have precipitated the clinical event

  15. Morbidity and GH deficiency: a nationwide study

    Stochholm, K.; Laursen, T.; Green, A.;

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). Design: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...... identified in the National Patient Registry. Lag time until first admission was used as a measure of morbidity. Patients were divided into childhood onset (CO) and adult onset (AO), discriminated by an age cut-off of 18 years at onset of GHD. Method: Sex- and cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs) in CO and AO...

  16. Iron Deficiency Anemia and School Participation

    Gustavo J Bobonis

    2004-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is among the worldç—´ most widespread health problems, especially for children, but it is rarely studied by economists. This paper evaluates the impact of a health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to 2-6 year old children through an existing pre-school network in the slums of Delhi, India. At baseline 69 percent of sample children were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Sample pre-schools were randomly divided into grou...

  17. Diagnosis and management of iron deficiency anemia.

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Buchanan, George R

    2014-08-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a common hematologic condition, affecting a substantial proportion of the world's women and young children. Optimal management of IDA requires an accurate diagnosis, identification and correction of the underlying cause, provision of medicinal iron therapy, and confirmation of treatment success. There are limited data to support current treatment approaches regarding oral iron preparation, dosing, monitoring, and duration of therapy. New intravenous iron agents have improved safety profiles, which may foster their increased utilization in the treatment of patients with IDA. Clinical trials focused on improving current treatment standards for IDA are sorely needed. PMID:25064710

  18. Repair deficient and hypersensitive diseases of man

    Many diseases are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents but only xeroderma pigmentosum is consistently DNA repair deficient. Groups A to G exhibit reduction in excision of pyrimidine dimers and other lesions, the variant and alteration in polymerization or ligation. Pulse chase experiments indicate that excision defective and variant cells suffer increased blocking of replication forks during semiconservative replication after irradiation; but later bypass of such blocks is completely normal in all cell types. Thus, the variant is not defective in ''post-replication repair,'' and even the definition of such a system comes under question. (author)

  19. Symptomatic zinc deficiency in experimental zinc deprivation.

    Taylor, C M; Goode, H F; Aggett, P J; Bremner, I; Walker, B E; Kelleher, J.

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of indices of poor zinc status was undertaken in five male subjects in whom dietary zinc intake was reduced from 85 mumol d-1 in an initial phase of the study to 14 mumol d-1. One of the subjects developed features consistent with zinc deficiency after receiving the low zinc diet for 12 days. These features included retroauricular acneform macullo-papular lesions on the face, neck, and shoulders and reductions in plasma zinc, red blood cell zinc, neutrophil zinc and plasma alkal...

  20. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M;

    2000-01-01

    elderly subjects, especially women, with risk of cardiac arrhythmias, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. The hyperthyroidism is caused by autonomous nodular growth and function of the thyroid gland and it is accompanied by a high frequency of goiter. Pregnant women and small children are not immediately...... endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine...