WorldWideScience

Sample records for a-site finger revealed

  1. The PHD finger of human UHRF1 reveals a new subgroup of unmethylated histone H3 tail readers.

    Nada Lallous

    Full Text Available The human UHRF1 protein (ubiquitin-like containing PHD and RING finger domains 1 has emerged as a potential cancer target due to its implication in cell cycle regulation, maintenance of DNA methylation after replication and heterochromatin formation. UHRF1 functions as an adaptor protein that binds to histones and recruits histone modifying enzymes, like HDAC1 or G9a, which exert their action on chromatin. In this work, we show the binding specificity of the PHD finger of human UHRF1 (huUHRF1-PHD towards unmodified histone H3 N-terminal tail using native gel electrophoresis and isothermal titration calorimetry. We report the molecular basis of this interaction by determining the crystal structure of huUHRF1-PHD in complex with the histone H3 N-terminal tail. The structure reveals a new mode of histone recognition involving an extra conserved zinc finger preceding the conventional PHD finger region. This additional zinc finger forms part of a large surface cavity that accommodates the side chain of the histone H3 lysine K4 (H3K4 regardless of its methylation state. Mutation of Q330, which specifically interacts with H3K4, to alanine has no effect on the binding, suggesting a loose interaction between huUHRF1-PHD and H3K4. On the other hand, the recognition appears to rely on histone H3R2, which fits snugly into a groove on the protein and makes tight interactions with the conserved aspartates D334 and D337. Indeed, a mutation of the former aspartate disrupts the formation of the complex, while mutating the latter decreases the binding affinity nine-fold.

  2. Structural dynamics of elbow segment of E.coli ribosomal A-site finger. Comparison of simulations with cryo-EM data and with equivalent segments in other species

    Réblová, Kamila; Rázga, Filip; Li, W.; Gao, H.; Frank, J.; Šponer, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 6 (2009), s. 793. ISSN 0739-1102. [The 17th Conversation. 16.06.2009-20.06.2009, Albany] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : E. coli * A-site finger Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  3. Minimal promoter systems reveal the importance of conserved residues in the B-finger of human transcription factor IIB.

    Thompson, Nancy E; Glaser, Bryan T; Foley, Katherine M; Burton, Zachary F; Burgess, Richard R

    2009-09-11

    The "B-finger" of transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) is highly conserved and believed to play a role in the initiation process. We performed alanine substitutions across the B-finger of human TFIIB, made change-of-charge mutations in selected residues, and substituted the B-finger sequence from other organisms. Mutant proteins were examined in two minimal promoter systems (containing only RNA polymerase II, TATA-binding protein, and TFIIB) and in a complex system, using TFIIB-immunodepleted HeLa cell nuclear extract (NE). Mutations in conserved residues located on the sides of the B-finger had the greatest effect on activity in both minimal promoter systems, with mutations in residues Glu-51 and Arg-66 eliminating activity. The double change-of-charge mutant (E51R:R66E) did not show activity in either minimal promoter system. Mutations in the nonconserved residues at the tip of the B-finger did not significantly affect activity. However, all of the mutations in the B-finger showed at least 25% activity in the HeLa cell NE. Chimeric proteins, containing B-finger sequences from species with conserved residues on the side of the B-finger, showed wild-type activity in a minimal promoter system and in the HeLa cell NE. However, chimeric proteins whose sequence showed divergence on the sides of the B-finger had reduced activity. Transcription factor IIF (TFIIF) partially restored activity of the inactive mutants in the minimal promoter system, suggesting that TFIIF in HeLa cell NE helps to rescue the inactive mutations by interacting with either the B-finger or another component of the initiation complex that is influenced by the B-finger. PMID:19590095

  4. Finger pain

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  5. Minimal Promoter Systems Reveal the Importance of Conserved Residues in the B-finger of Human Transcription Factor IIB*

    Thompson, Nancy E.; GLASER, BRYAN T.; Foley, Katherine M.; Burton, Zachary F.; Burgess, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    The “B-finger” of transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) is highly conserved and believed to play a role in the initiation process. We performed alanine substitutions across the B-finger of human TFIIB, made change-of-charge mutations in selected residues, and substituted the B-finger sequence from other organisms. Mutant proteins were examined in two minimal promoter systems (containing only RNA polymerase II, TATA-binding protein, and TFIIB) and in a complex system, using TFIIB-immunodepleted HeL...

  6. Zinc finger proteins in cancer progression

    Jen, Jayu; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Zinc finger proteins are the largest transcription factor family in human genome. The diverse combinations and functions of zinc finger motifs make zinc finger proteins versatile in biological processes, including development, differentiation, metabolism and autophagy. Over the last few decades, increasing evidence reveals the potential roles of zinc finger proteins in cancer progression. However, the underlying mechanisms of zinc finger proteins in cancer progression vary in different cancer...

  7. Small perturbations in a finger-tapping task reveal inherent nonlinearities of the underlying error correction mechanism.

    Bavassi, M Luz; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Laje, Rodrigo

    2013-02-01

    Time processing in the few hundred milliseconds range is involved in the human skill of sensorimotor synchronization, like playing music in an ensemble or finger tapping to an external beat. In finger tapping, a mechanistic explanation in biologically plausible terms of how the brain achieves synchronization is still missing despite considerable research. In this work we show that nonlinear effects are important for the recovery of synchronization following a perturbation (a step change in stimulus period), even for perturbation magnitudes smaller than 10% of the period, which is well below the amount of perturbation needed to evoke other nonlinear effects like saturation. We build a nonlinear mathematical model for the error correction mechanism and test its predictions, and further propose a framework that allows us to unify the description of the three common types of perturbations. While previous authors have used two different model mechanisms for fitting different perturbation types, or have fitted different parameter value sets for different perturbation magnitudes, we propose the first unified description of the behavior following all perturbation types and magnitudes as the dynamical response of a compound model with fixed terms and a single set of parameter values. PMID:23375111

  8. Finger Stiffness

    Oosterhoff, Thijs C.H.; Nota, Sjoerd P. F. T.; Ring, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Finger stiffness varies substantially in patients with hand and upper extremity illness and can be notably more than expected for a given pathophysiology. In prior studies, pain intensity and magnitude of disability consistently correlate with coping strategies such as catastrophic thinking and kinesiophobia, which can be characterized as overprotectiveness. In this retrospective study we address the primary research question whether patients with finger stiffness are more often ov...

  9. Finger Stiffness.

    Oosterhoff, Thijs C H; Nota, Sjoerd P F T; Ring, David

    2015-06-01

    Background Finger stiffness varies substantially in patients with hand and upper extremity illness and can be notably more than expected for a given pathophysiology. In prior studies, pain intensity and magnitude of disability consistently correlate with coping strategies such as catastrophic thinking and kinesiophobia, which can be characterized as overprotectiveness. In this retrospective study we address the primary research question whether patients with finger stiffness are more often overprotective when the primary pathology is outside the hand (e.g. distal radius fracture) than when it is located within the hand. Methods In an orthopaedic hand surgery department 160 patients diagnosed with more finger stiffness than expected for a given pathophysiology or time point of recovery between December 2006 and September 2012 were analyzed to compare the proportion of patients characterized as overprotective for differences by site of pathology: (1) inside the hand, (2) outside the hand, and (3) psychiatric etiology (e.g. clenched fist). Results Among 160 subjects with more finger stiffness than expected, 132 (82 %) were characterized as overprotective including 88 of 108 (81 %) with pathology in the hand, 39 of 44 (89 %) with pathology outside the hand, and 5 of 8 (63 %) with psychiatric etiology. These differences were not significant. Conclusions Overprotectiveness is common in patients with more finger stiffness than expected regardless the site and type of primary pathology. It seems worthwhile to recognize and treat maladaptive coping strategies early during recovery to limit impairment, symptoms, and disability. PMID:26078497

  10. Finger pain

    ... and bruises Broken finger bones Skier's thumb , an injury to the ligaments in your thumb, such as from a fall ... health care provider. Small fractures or tendon or ligament tears ... have Raynaud's, take steps to protect your hands from the cold.

  11. Fingers Phrase Music Differently: Trial-to-Trial Variability in Piano Scale Playing and Auditory Perception Reveal Motor Chunking.

    van Vugt, Floris Tijmen; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how musical phrasing and motor sequencing interact to yield timing patterns in the conservatory students' playing piano scales. We propose a novel analysis method that compared the measured note onsets to an objectively regular scale fitted to the data. Subsequently, we segment the timing variability into (i) systematic deviations from objective evenness that are perhaps residuals of expressive timing or of perceptual biases and (ii) non-systematic deviations that can be interpreted as motor execution errors, perhaps due to noise in the nervous system. The former, systematic deviations reveal that the two-octave scales are played as a single musical phrase. The latter, trial-to-trial variabilities reveal that pianists' timing was less consistent at the boundaries between the octaves, providing evidence that the octave is represented as a single motor sequence. These effects cannot be explained by low-level properties of the motor task such as the thumb passage and also did not show up in simulated scales with temporal jitter. Intriguingly, this instability in motor production around the octave boundary is mirrored by an impairment in the detection of timing deviations at those positions, suggesting that chunks overlap between perception and action. We conclude that the octave boundary instability in the scale playing motor program provides behavioral evidence that our brain chunks musical sequences into octave units that do not coincide with musical phrases. Our results indicate that trial-to-trial variability is a novel and meaningful indicator of this chunking. The procedure can readily be extended to a variety of tasks to help understand how movements are divided into units and what processing occurs at their boundaries. PMID:23181040

  12. Fingers phrase music differently: trial-to-trial variability in piano scale playing and auditory perception reveal motor chunking

    Floris Tijmen Van Vugt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how musical phrasing and motor sequencing interact to yield timing patterns in the conservatory students' playing piano scales. We propose a novel analysis method that compared the measured note onsets to an objectively regular scale fitted to the data. Subsequently, we segment the timing variability into (i systematic deviations from objective evenness that are perhaps residuals of expressive timing or of perceptual biases and (ii non-systematic deviations that can be interpreted as motor execution errors, perhaps due to noise in the nervous system. The former, systematic deviations, reveal that the two octave scales are played as a single musical phrase. The latter, trial-to-trial variabilities reveal that pianists' timing was less consistent at the boundaries between the octaves, providing evidence that the octave is represented as a single motor sequence. These effects cannot be explained by low-level properties of the motor task such as the thumb-passage and also did not show up in simulated scales with temporal jitter. Intriguingly, this instability in motor production around the octave boundary is mirrored by an impairment in the detection of timing deviations at those positions, suggesting that chunks overlap between perception and action. We conclude that the octave boundary instability in the scale playing motor program provides behavioural evidence that our brain chunks musical sequences into octave units that do not coincide with musical phrases. Our results indicate that trial-to-trial variability is a novel and meaningful indicator of this chunking. The procedure can readily be extended to a variety of tasks to help understand how movements are divided into units and what processing occurs at their boundaries.

  13. Stamen abscission zone transcriptome profiling reveals new candidates for abscission control: enhanced retention of floral organs in transgenic plants overexpressing Arabidopsis ZINC FINGER PROTEIN2.

    Cai, Suqin; Lashbrook, Coralie C

    2008-03-01

    Organ detachment requires cell separation within abscission zones (AZs). Physiological studies have established that ethylene and auxin contribute to cell separation control. Genetic analyses of abscission mutants have defined ethylene-independent detachment regulators. Functional genomic strategies leading to global understandings of abscission have awaited methods for isolating AZ cells of low abundance and very small size. Here, we couple laser capture microdissection of Arabidopsis thaliana stamen AZs and GeneChip profiling to reveal the AZ transcriptome responding to a developmental shedding cue. Analyses focus on 551 AZ genes (AZ(551)) regulated at the highest statistical significance (P Gene Ontology Consortium functional categories for cell wall modifying proteins, extracellular regulators, and nuclear-residing transcription factors. Promoter-beta-glucuronidase expression of one transcription factor candidate, ZINC FINGER PROTEIN2 (AtZFP2), was elevated in stamen, petal, and sepal AZs. Flower parts of transgenic lines overexpressing AtZFP2 exhibited asynchronous and delayed abscission. Abscission defects were accompanied by altered floral morphology limiting pollination and fertility. Hand-pollination restored transgenic fruit development but not the rapid abscission seen in wild-type plants, demonstrating that pollination does not assure normal rates of detachment. In wild-type stamen AZs, AtZFP2 is significantly up-regulated postanthesis. Phenotype data from transgene overexpression studies suggest that AtZFP2 participates in processes that directly or indirectly influence organ shed. PMID:18192438

  14. Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)

    ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ...

  15. Perceiving fingers in single-digit arithmetic problems

    Ilaria eBerteletti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate in children the neural underpinnings of finger representation and finger movement involved in single-digit arithmetic problems. Evidence suggests that finger representation and finger-based strategies play an important role in learning and understanding arithmetic. Because different operations rely on different networks, we compared activation for subtraction and multiplication problems in independently localized finger somatosensory and motor areas and tested whether activation was related to skill. Brain activations from children between 8 and 13 years of age revealed that only subtraction problems significantly activated finger motor areas, suggesting reliance on finger-based strategies. In addition, larger subtraction problems yielded greater somatosensory activation than smaller problems, suggesting a greater reliance on finger representation for larger numerical values. Interestingly, better performance in subtraction problems was associated with lower activation in the finger somatosensory area. Our results support the importance of fine-grained finger representation in arithmetical skill and are the first neurological evidence for a functional role of the somatosensory finger area in proficient arithmetical problem solving, in particular for those problems requiring quantity manipulation. From an educational perspective, these results encourage investigating whether different finger-based strategies facilitate arithmetical understanding and encourage educational practices aiming at integrating finger representation and finger-based strategies as a tool for instilling stronger numerical sense.

  16. Structures of three members of Pfam PF02663 (FmdE) implicated in microbial methanogenesis reveal a conserved α+β core domain and an auxiliary C-terminal treble-clef zinc finger

    The first structures from the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663) reveal that some members of this family form tightly intertwined dimers consisting of two domains (N-terminal α+β core and C-terminal zinc-finger domains), whereas others contain only the core domain. The presence of the zinc-finger domain suggests that some members of this family may perform functions associated with transcriptional regulation, protein–protein interaction, RNA binding or metal-ion sensing. Examination of the genomic context for members of the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663), such as the protein encoded by the fmdE gene from the methanogenic archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, indicates that 13 of them are co-transcribed with genes encoding subunits of molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.99.5), an enzyme that is involved in microbial methane production. Here, the first crystal structures from PF02663 are described, representing two bacterial and one archaeal species: B8FYU2-DESHY from the anaerobic dehalogenating bacterium Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2, Q2LQ23-SYNAS from the syntrophic bacterium Syntrophus aciditrophicus SB and Q9HJ63-THEAC from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum. Two of these proteins, Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS, contain two domains: an N-terminal thioredoxin-like α+β core domain (NTD) consisting of a five-stranded, mixed β-sheet flanked by several α-helices and a C-terminal zinc-finger domain (CTD). B8FYU2-DESHY, on the other hand, is composed solely of the NTD. The CTD of Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS is best characterized as a treble-clef zinc finger. Two significant structural differences between Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS involve their metal binding. First, zinc is bound to the putative active site on the NTD of Q9HJ63-THEAC, but is absent from the NTD of Q2LQ23-SYNAS. Second, whereas the structure of the CTD of Q2LQ23-SYNAS shows four Cys side chains within coordination distance of the Zn atom, the structure

  17. Cloning overlapping DNA fragments from the B95-8 strain of Epstein-Barr virus reveals a site of homology to the internal repetition.

    Buell, G N; Reisman, D; Kintner, C; Crouse, G; Sugden, B

    1981-01-01

    Overlapping, sheared DNA fragments from the B95-8 strain of Epstein-Barr virus were cloned in Charon 4A. Eleven recombinant phages plus one recombinant plasmid contained all of the sequences found in B95-8 virion DNA. Analysis of recombinant DNA molecules revealed a previously undetected site of homology to the internal repetition found in Epstein-Barr virus DNA. This site was adjacent to or at a site which was unstable when the recombinant DNA was propagated as phage DNA in procaryotic hosts.

  18. Rolling friction robot fingers

    Vranish, John M.

    1992-06-01

    A low friction, object guidance, and gripping finger device for a robotic end effector on a robotic arm is disclosed, having a pair of robotic fingers each having a finger shaft slideably located on a gripper housing attached to the end effector. Each of the robotic fingers has a roller housing attached to the finger shaft. The roller housing has a ball bearing mounted centering roller located at the center, and a pair of ball bearing mounted clamping rollers located on either side of the centering roller. The object has a recess to engage the centering roller and a number of seating ramps for engaging the clamping rollers. The centering roller acts to position and hold the object symmetrically about the centering roller with respect to the X axis and the clamping rollers act to position and hold the object with respect to the Y and Z axis.

  19. The creation of the artificial RING finger from the cross-brace zinc finger by α-helical region substitution

    The creation of the artificial RING finger as ubiquitin-ligating enzyme (E3) has been demonstrated. In this study, by the α-helical region substitution between the EL5 RING finger and the Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) PHD finger, the artificial E3 (WSTF PHDRING finger) was newly created. The experiments of the chemical modification of residues Cys and the circular dichroism spectra revealed that the WSTF PHDRING finger binds two zinc atoms and adopts the zinc-dependent ordered-structure. In the substrate-independent ubiquitination assay, the WSTF PHDRING finger functions as E3 and was poly- or mono-ubiquitinated. The present strategy is very simple and convenient, and consequently it might be widely applicable to the creation of various artificial E3 RING fingers with the specific ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2)-binding capability.

  20. Multiple Fingers - One Gestalt.

    Lezkan, Alexandra; Manuel, Steven G; Colgate, J Edward; Klatzky, Roberta L; Peshkin, Michael A; Drewing, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The Gestalt theory of perception offered principles by which distributed visual sensations are combined into a structured experience ("Gestalt"). We demonstrate conditions whereby haptic sensations at two fingertips are integrated in the perception of a single object. When virtual bumps were presented simultaneously to the right hand's thumb and index finger during lateral arm movements, participants reported perceiving a single bump. A discrimination task measured the bump's perceived location and perceptual reliability (assessed by differential thresholds) for four finger configurations, which varied in their adherence to the Gestalt principles of proximity (small versus large finger separation) and synchrony (virtual spring to link movements of the two fingers versus no spring). According to models of integration, reliability should increase with the degree to which multi-finger cues integrate into a unified percept. Differential thresholds were smaller in the virtual-spring condition (synchrony) than when fingers were unlinked. Additionally, in the condition with reduced synchrony, greater proximity led to lower differential thresholds. Thus, with greater adherence to Gestalt principles, thresholds approached values predicted for optimal integration. We conclude that the Gestalt principles of synchrony and proximity apply to haptic perception of surface properties and that these principles can interact to promote multi-finger integration. PMID:26863671

  1. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Sumedha Roy; Shayoni Dutta; Kanika Khanna; Shruti Singla; Durai Sundar

    2012-07-01

    Zinc finger proteins interact via their individual fingers to three base pair subsites on the target DNA. The four key residue positions −1, 2, 3 and 6 on the alpha-helix of the zinc fingers have hydrogen bond interactions with the DNA. Mutating these key residues enables generation of a plethora of combinatorial possibilities that can bind to any DNA stretch of interest. Exploiting the binding specificity and affinity of the interaction between the zinc fingers and the respective DNA can help to generate engineered zinc fingers for therapeutic purposes involving genome targeting. Exploring the structure–function relationships of the existing zinc finger–DNA complexes can aid in predicting the probable zinc fingers that could bind to any target DNA. Computational tools ease the prediction of such engineered zinc fingers by effectively utilizing information from the available experimental data. A study of literature reveals many approaches for predicting DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins. However, an alternative approach that looks into the physico-chemical properties of these complexes would do away with the difficulties of designing unbiased zinc fingers with the desired affinity and specificity. We present a physico-chemical approach that exploits the relative strengths of hydrogen bonding between the target DNA and all combinatorially possible zinc fingers to select the most optimum zinc finger protein candidate.

  2. Fingers that change color

    ... cause fingers or toes to change color: Buerger disease Chilblains. Painful inflammation of small blood vessels. Cryoglobulinemia Frostbite Necrotizing vasculitis Peripheral artery disease Raynaud phenomenon. Sudden change in the ...

  3. Replantation (Finger, Hand, or Arm)

    ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ...

  4. Spiral viscous fingering.

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Atsushi; Kato, Yoshihito; Tada, Yutaka

    2006-11-01

    When a less-viscous fluid displaces a more-viscous fluid in a radial Hele-Shaw cell, viscous fingering pattern is believed to develop in a radial direction. We performed experiments on viscous fingering in a radial Hele-Shaw cell when a polymer solution, a sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution is used as the more-viscous fluid and the trivalent iron (Fe^3+) solution is as the less-viscous fluid. The experiment was done by varying the concentration of Fe^3+, cFe3+. We have found that viscous fingering pattern develops spirally when cFe3+ is larger than a threshold value, while the pattern develops in a radial direction for small cFe3+. We confirmed from different experiments that an instantaneous chemical reaction takes place between SPA solution and Fe^3+ solution. The chemical reaction produces precipitation and significantly reduces the viscosity of the SPA solution. The quantity of the precipitation is increased with cFe3+. We will make a discussion on the relationship between the formation of spiral viscous fingering and the chemical reaction taking place between the two fluids.

  5. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  6. Safe Finger Tourniquet-Ideas.

    Wei, Lin-Gwei; Chen, Chieh-Feng; Hwang, Chun-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Chiu, Wen-Kuan; Li, Chun-Chang; Wang, Hsian-Jenn

    2016-03-01

    Tourniquets are often needed for optimized phalangeal surgeries. However, few surgeons forget to remove them and caused ischemic injuries. We have a modified method to create a safe finger tourniquet for short duration finger surgeries, which can avoid such tragedy. It is done by donning a glove, cutting the tip of the glove over the finger of interest, and rolling the glove finger to the base. From 2010 to 2013, approximately 54 patients underwent digital surgical procedures with our safe finger tourniquet. Because the glove cannot be forgotten to be removed, the tourniquet must be released and removed. This is a simple and efficient way to apply a safe finger tourniquet by using hand rubber glove for a short-term bloodless finger surgery and can achieve an excellent surgical result. PMID:26855166

  7. Handedness and index finger movements performed on a small touchscreen.

    Aoki, Tomoko; Rivlis, Gil; Schieber, Marc H

    2016-02-01

    Many studies of right/left differences in motor performance related to handedness have employed tasks that use arm movements or combined arm and hand movements rather than movements of the fingers per se, the well-known exception being rhythmic finger tapping. We therefore explored four simple tasks performed on a small touchscreen with relatively isolated movements of the index finger. Each task revealed a different right/left performance asymmetry. In a step-tracking Target Task, left-handed subjects showed greater accuracy with the index finger of the dominant left hand than with the nondominant right hand. In a Center-Out Task, right-handed subjects produced trajectories with the nondominant left hand that had greater curvature than those produced with the dominant right hand. In a continuous Circle Tracking Task, slips of the nondominant left index finger showed higher jerk than slips of the dominant right index finger. And in a continuous Complex Tracking Task, the nondominant left index finger showed shorter time lags in tracking the relatively unpredictable target than the dominant right index finger. Our findings are broadly consistent with previous studies indicating left hemisphere specialization for dynamic control and predictable situations vs. right hemisphere specialization for impedance control and unpredictable situations, the specialized contributions of the two hemispheres being combined to different degrees in the right vs. left hands of right-handed vs. left-handed individuals. PMID:26683065

  8. Single active finger IPMC microgripper

    This paper presents a new design for a single active finger ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) microgripper. This design has one stationary finger and one actuating finger. The gripper is tested in comparison with a two fingered gripper (2FG) on its ability to perform pick and place operations. The grippers each use IPMC strips in three widths: 1.25 mm, 2.5 mm and 5.0 mm. The single fingered gripper shows success rates of 86.2%, 89.2%, and 75% respectively versus 78.5%, 93.9% and 75% for a 2FG. The single fingered gripper performance is nearly equivalent to that of a 2FG. Even though a single finger produces half the force, its ability to carry objects is as good as or better than a 2FG. In addition, the stationary finger is considerably stiffer than an active IPMC finger, which helps in positional accuracy. Using half the IPMC, the single fingered gripper is the economical choice. (paper)

  9. Viscous fingering patterns in ferrofluids

    Widom, Michael; Miranda, Jose A.

    1998-01-01

    Viscous fingering occurs in the flow of two immiscible, viscous fluids between the plates of a Hele-Shaw cell. Due to pressure gradients or gravity, the initially planar interface separating the two fluids undergoes a Saffman-Taylor instability and develops finger-like structures. When one of the fluids is a ferrofluid and a perpendicular magnetic field is applied, the labyrinthine instability supplements the usual viscous fingering instability, resulting in visually striking, complex pattern...

  10. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low–high; tempo: slow–fast, dynamics: soft–loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low–high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean) and peak force (Fmax) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  11. Robotic Finger Assembly

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert J., Jr. (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  12. Ultrafast resonance energy transfer from a site-specifically attached fluorescent chromophore reveals the folding of the N-terminal domain of CP29

    van Oort, Bart; Murali, Sukumaran; Wientjes, Emilie; Koehorst, Rob B. M.; Spruijt, Ruud B.; van Hoek, Arie; Croce, Roberta; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2009-02-01

    The photosynthetic minor antenna complex CP29 of higher plants was singly mutated, overexpressed in Escherichia coli, selectively labeled with the fluorescent dye TAMRA at three positions in the N-terminal domain, and reconstituted with its natural pigments. Picosecond fluorescence experiments revealed rapid excitation energy transfer (˜20 ps) from TAMRA covalently attached to a cysteine at either position 4 or 97 (near the beginning and end of the N-terminal domain) to the chlorophylls in the hydrophobic part of the protein. This indicates that the N-terminus is folded back on the hydrophobic core. In 20% of the complexes, efficient transfer was lacking, indicating that the N-terminus can adopt different conformations. Time-resolved polarized fluorescence measurements demonstrate that the non-transferring conformations only allow restricted rotational motion of the dye molecule. When TAMRA was attached to a cysteine at position 40, the overall transfer efficiency was far lower, reflecting a larger distance to the hydrophobic region.

  13. Treatment of degloving injury of three fingers with an anterolateral thigh flap

    YU Guang; LEI Hong-yu; GUO Shuang; YU Hao; HUANG Jian-hua

    2011-01-01

    The degloving injuries of the digits and palm remain a persistent challenge. We used an anterolateral thigh flap to treat an 18-year-old, right-handed male worker with degloving injuries of the index, middle and ring fingers. The flap was designated to wrap the entire circumference of three fingers sustaining degloving injury and to form mitten-hand. The total lengths of the distal phalanxes of three fingers were retained almost complete. The donor defect was covered with split-thickness skin graft. Three months after the first operation, roentgenograms revealed terminal phalanxex resorption in three injured fingers, and the surgical syndactyly between the middle and ring finger was separated at the same time. One month later, the syndactyly between the index and middle fingers was also separated. Good coverage of the soft tissue defects with good function and appearance was achieved. Therefore,we considered that the length of the degloved finger could be preserved using free flap.

  14. Covering the Dorsal Finger Defect with Reverse Cross Finger Flap

    Kaan Gurbuz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of finger extensor zone defects with or without tendon gaps still remains a challenge for surgeons. Although surgical treatments may differ, and range from the use of local, regional, to free flaps, the outcomes for all cases are not satisfactory. In this case report, we present a case of a 3rd finger extensor side crush injury including a defect of Dd (Digit Dorsal 1, Dd2 and Dd3 defects of extensor zones with tendon gap. Tendon gap was reconstructed using m. palmaris longus tendon graft and the defect was covered with reversed cross-finger flap (random pattern with good cosmetic and excellent functional results.

  15. Transfer of tactile perceptual learning to untrained neighboring fingers reflects natural use relationships.

    Dempsey-Jones, Harriet; Harrar, Vanessa; Oliver, Jonathan; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Spence, Charles; Makin, Tamar R

    2016-03-01

    Tactile learning transfers from trained to untrained fingers in a pattern that reflects overlap between the representations of fingers in the somatosensory system (e.g., neurons with multifinger receptive fields). While physical proximity on the body is known to determine the topography of somatosensory representations, tactile coactivation is also an established organizing principle of somatosensory topography. In this study we investigated whether tactile coactivation, induced by habitual inter-finger cooperative use (use pattern), shapes inter-finger overlap. To this end, we used psychophysics to compare the transfer of tactile learning from the middle finger to its adjacent fingers. This allowed us to compare transfer to two fingers that are both physically and cortically adjacent to the middle finger but have differing use patterns. Specifically, the middle finger is used more frequently with the ring than with the index finger. We predicted this should lead to greater representational overlap between the former than the latter pair. Furthermore, this difference in overlap should be reflected in differential learning transfer from the middle to index vs. ring fingers. Subsequently, we predicted temporary learning-related changes in the middle finger's representation (e.g., cortical magnification) would cause transient interference in perceptual thresholds of the ring, but not the index, finger. Supporting this, longitudinal analysis revealed a divergence where learning transfer was fast to the index finger but relatively delayed to the ring finger. Our results support the theory that tactile coactivation patterns between digits affect their topographic relationships. Our findings emphasize how action shapes perception and somatosensory organization. PMID:26631145

  16. Steadily translating parabolic dissolution fingers

    Kondratiuk, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Dissolution fingers (or wormholes) are formed during the dissolution of a porous rock as a result of nonlinear feedbacks between the flow, transport and chemical reactions at pore surfaces. We analyze the shapes and growth velocities of such fingers within the thin-front approximation, in which the reaction is assumed to take place instantaneously with the reactants fully consumed at the dissolution front. We concentrate on the case when the main flow is driven by the constant pressure gradient far from the finger, and the permeability contrast between the inside and the outside of the finger is finite. Using Ivantsov ansatz and conformal transformations we find the family of steadily translating fingers characterized by a parabolic shape. We derive the reactant concentration field and the pressure field inside and outside of the fingers and show that the flow within them is uniform. The advancement velocity of the finger is shown to be inversely proportional to its radius of curvature in the small P\\'{e}clet...

  17. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing.

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low-high; tempo: slow-fast, dynamics: soft-loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low-high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (F mean ) and peak force (F max ) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (F mean = 1.17 N, F max = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (F mean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (F mean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  18. Fingering Instabilities in Dewetting Nanofluids

    Pauliac-Vaujour, E.; Stannard, A.; Martin, C. P.; Blunt, M. O.; Notingher, I.; Moriarty, P. J.; Vancea, I.; Thiele, U.

    2008-05-01

    The growth of fingering patterns in dewetting nanofluids (colloidal solutions of thiol-passivated gold nanoparticles) has been followed in real time using contrast-enhanced video microscopy. The fingering instability on which we focus here arises from evaporatively driven nucleation and growth in a nanoscopically thin precursor solvent film behind the macroscopic contact line. We find that well-developed isotropic fingering structures only form for a narrow range of experimental parameters. Numerical simulations, based on a modification of the Monte Carlo approach introduced by Rabani et al. [Nature (London)NATUAS0028-0836 426, 271 (2003)10.1038/nature02087], reproduce the patterns we observe experimentally.

  19. Interaction of finger enslaving and error compensation in multiple finger force production

    Martin, Joel R.; Mark L. Latash; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have documented two patterns of finger interaction during multi-finger pressing tasks, enslaving and error compensation, which do not agree with each other. Enslaving is characterized by positive correlation between instructed (master) and non-instructed (slave) finger(s) while error compensation can be described as a pattern of negative correlation between master and slave fingers. We hypothesize that pattern of finger interaction, enslaving or compensation, depends on the i...

  20. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  1. The SABS finger ring service

    All radiation workers are required by law to wear personal dosimeters to measure the radiation dose they receive in the course of their work. However, there was a need to measure the radiation dose received by the fingers and hands, because they are much closer to the source of radiation than the rest of the body. In April 1982 a finger ring service was instituted on a routine basis. A thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) is used, which is suitable for both X-rays and gamma rays. Materials that are used for thermoluminescent dosimeters includes LiF:Mg, CaF2:Dy and CaSO4:Dy

  2. Fjords in viscous fingering: selection of width and opening scale

    Mineev-weinstein, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ristroph, Leif [UT-AUSTIN; Thrasher, Matthew [UT-AUSTIN; Swinney, Harry [UT-AUSTIN

    2008-01-01

    Our experiments on viscous fingering of air into oil contained between closely spaced plates reveal two selection rules for the fjords of oil that separate fingers of air. (Fjords are the building blocks of solutions of the zero-surface-tension Laplacian growth equation.) Experiments in rectangular and circular geometries yield fjords with base widths {lambda}{sub c}/2, where {lambda}{sub c} is the most unstable wavelength from a linear stability analysis. Further, fjords open at an angle of 8.0{sup o}{+-}1.0{sup o}. These selection rules hold for a wide range of pumping rates and fjord lengths, widths, and directions.

  3. Cystic Eccrine Spiradenoma of the Finger Mimicking a Ganglion

    Khalid F. Jaber, MBChB

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We report a rare case of cystic eccrine spiradenoma in the finger. A 46-year-old man presented with a cystic mass in his left index finger. Clinical assessment along with the investigation pointed toward a diagnosis of a ganglion. However, excisional biopsy of the mass revealed histopathological findings of cystic eccrine spiradenoma. Very few cases of eccrine spiradenoma have been reported in the hand and none of them were cystic in consistency. We believe that this case will draw the surgeon’s attention to the possibility of unusual differential diagnoses in the evaluation and treatment of cystic lumps in the hand.

  4. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ...

  5. 'Frozen finger' in anal fissures.

    Chintamani; Tandon, Megha; Khandelwal, Rohan

    2009-10-01

    Acute anal fissures are usually managed by various invasive and non-invasive modalities ranging from simple lifestyle changes to chemical and surgical sphincterotomies. Frozen finger, prepared using a water-filled ordinary rubber glove, was successfully used in one hundred patients, thus providing a cost-effective and simple solution to the problem. PMID:19671780

  6. Radiation safety education reduces the incidence of adult fingers on neonatal chest radiographs

    A previous audit revealed a high frequency of adult fingers visualised on neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) chest radiographs—representing an example of inappropriate occupational radiation exposure. Radiation safety education was provided to staff and we hypothesised that the education would reduce the frequency of adult fingers visualised on NICU chest radiographs. Two cross-sectional samples taken before and after the administration of the education were compared. We examined fingers visualised directly in the beam, fingers in the direct beam but eliminated by technologists editing the image, and fingers under the cones of the portable x-ray machine. There was a 46.2% reduction in fingers directly in the beam, 50.0% reduction in fingers directly in the beam but cropped out, and 68.4% reduction in fingers in the coned area. There was a 57.1% overall reduction in adult fingers visualised, which was statistically significant (Z value − 7.48, P < 0.0001). This study supports radiation safety education in minimising inappropriate occupational radiation exposure. (paper)

  7. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section... Lakes. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Finger Lakes.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Finger Lakes viticultural...

  8. Multi-finger interaction during involuntary and voluntary single finger force changes

    J R Martin; Zatsiorsky, V.M.; Latash, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    Two types of finger interaction are characterized by positive co-variation (enslaving) or negative co-variation (error compensation) of finger forces. Enslaving reflects mechanical and neural connections among fingers, while error compensation results from synergic control of fingers to stabilize their net output. Involuntary and voluntary force changes by a finger were used to explore these patterns. We hypothesized that synergic mechanisms will dominate during involuntary force changes, whi...

  9. Does finger sense predict addition performance?

    Newman, Sharlene D

    2016-05-01

    The impact of fingers on numerical and mathematical cognition has received a great deal of attention recently. However, the precise role that fingers play in numerical cognition is unknown. The current study explores the relationship between finger sense, arithmetic and general cognitive ability. Seventy-six children between the ages of 5 and 12 participated in the study. The results of stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated that while general cognitive ability including language processing was a predictor of addition performance, finger sense was not. The impact of age on the relationship between finger sense, and addition was further examined. The participants were separated into two groups based on age. The results showed that finger gnosia score impacted addition performance in the older group but not the younger group. These results appear to support the hypothesis that fingers provide a scaffold for calculation and that if that scaffold is not properly built, it has continued differential consequences to mathematical cognition. PMID:26993292

  10. Gravity-driven fingering in unsaturated fractures

    Gravity-driven wetting-front instability is known to occur in both porous media and Hele-Shaw cells. A systematic investigative procedure for studying gravity-driven fingering in unsaturated, rough-walled fractures is described. As a first step toward understanding this system, experiments were performed in an analogue fracture consisting of two roughened glass plates held in close contact. Results from preliminary experiments in both initially dry and wet analogue fractures are presented, including measurements taken from individual fingers within a fully unstable flow field. For initially dry fractures, increasing the volume of fluid contained in the front leads to increases in both finger width and velocity. Finger velocity also was observed to increase with gravitational gradient. Once a finger structure develops in an initially dry fracture, the structure persists in subsequent infiltration events. In uniformly wet fractures, fingers are found to be more numerous and thinner and to have higher velocity than fingers formed in initially dry fractures

  11. Finger Indexed Sets: New Approaches

    Sioutas, Spyros

    2008-01-01

    In the particular case we have insertions/deletions at the tail of a given set S of $n$ one-dimensional elements, we present a simpler and more concrete algorithm than that presented in [Anderson, 2007] achieving the same (but also amortized) upper bound of $O(\\sqrt{logd/loglogd})$ for finger searching queries, where $d$ is the number of sorted keys between the finger element and the target element we are looking for. Furthermore, in general case we have insertions/deletions anywhere we present a new randomized algorithm achieving the same expected time bounds. Even the new solutions achieve the optimal bounds in amortized or expected case, the advantage of simplicity is of great importance due to practical merits we gain.

  12. FINGER-VEIN RECOGNITION SYSTEMS

    A.Haritha Deepthi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As the Person‟s/Organization‟s Private information‟s are becoming very easy to access, the demand for a Simple, Convenient, Efficient, and a highly Securable Authentication System has been increased. In considering these requirements for data Protection, Biometrics, which uses human physiological or behavioral system for personal Identification has been found as a solution for these difficulties. However most of the biometric systems have high complexity in both time and space. So we are going to use a Real time Finger-Vein recognition System for authentication purposes. In this paper we had implemented the Finger Vein Recognition concept using MATLAB R2013a. The features used are Lacunarity Distance, Blanket Dimension distance. This has more accuracy when compared to conventional methods.

  13. Finger clubbing in cystic fibrosis.

    Pitts-Tucker, T J; Miller, M G; Littlewood, J M

    1986-01-01

    Finger clubbing was measured in 73 of 105 patients with cystic fibrosis undergoing full assessment. The sign correlated well with the chest x ray score and indices of pulmonary function and infection but not with weight, height, age, liver function, or degree of fat malabsorption. The presence of clubbing suggests appreciable pulmonary involvement. Most probably its progression indicates a deterioration in pulmonary state. In both instances increased efforts should be made to treat the infect...

  14. Finger tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    Lakie, M; Mutch, W J

    1989-01-01

    Finger tremor was investigated in 20 patients (age range 54-88 yr) diagnosed as suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease and six controls of a similar age and no known neurological abnormality. In nine of the patients tremor was not clinically obvious. When the tremor of these patients was recorded immediately after voluntary movement and subjected to instrumental analysis there were consistently observable differences from the controls. Such analysis may have diagnostic potential when t...

  15. Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia: magnetic resonance imaging of finger lesions

    Sung, Jinkyeong; Kim, Jee-Young [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Changyoung [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Hospital Pathology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (IPEH), to identify findings differentiating IPEH of the finger from that of other locations, and to correlate these with pathology. Nineteen patients with 20 I.E. masses of the finger (n = 13) and other locations (n = 7) were evaluated. All patients underwent MRI, and the results were correlated with pathology. Seventeen IPEHs, including all IPEHs of the finger, were located in the subcutis, the three other lesions in the muscle layer. On T1WI, all masses were isointense or slightly hyperintense. IPEHs of the finger (n = 13) revealed focal hyperintense nodules (n = 2) or central hypointensity (n = 2) on T1WI, hypointensity with a hyperintense rim (n = 7), hyperintensity with hypointense nodules (n = 5), or isointensity with a hypointense rim (n = 1) on T2WI, and rim enhancement (n = 5), heterogeneous enhancement with nodular nonenhanced areas (n = 6), peripheral nodular enhancement (n = 1), or no enhancement (n = 1) on gadolinium-enhanced T1WI. IPEHs of other locations (n = 7) demonstrated focal hyperintense nodules (n = 5) on T1WI, hyperintensity with hypointense nodules (n = 5) or heterogeneous signal intensity (n = 2) on T2WI, and rim or rim and septal enhancement (n = 6) or peripheral nodular enhancement (n = 1). Microscopically, IPEHs were composed of thrombi that were hypointense on T2WI and papillary endothelial proliferations that showed T2 hyperintensity and enhancement. MRI of finger IPEH reveals well-demarcated subcutaneous masses with hypointensity or hypointense nodules with peripheral hyperintensity on T2WI, as well as peripheral enhancement. T1 hyperintense nodules, internal heterogeneity on T2WI, and septal enhancement are more common in IPEH of other locations. (orig.)

  16. On the fly finger knuckle print authentication

    Abe, Narishige; Shinzaki, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    Finger knuckle print authentication has been researched not only as a supplemental authentication modality to fingerprint recognition but also as a method for logging into a PC or entering a building. However, in previous works, some specific devices were necessary to capture a finger knuckle print and users had to keep their fingers perfectly still to capture their finger knuckle. In this paper, we propose a new on the fly finger knuckle print authentication system using a general web camera. In our proposed authentication system, users can input their finger knuckle prints without needing their hand to remain motionless during image capture. We also evaluate the authentication accuracy of the proposed system, achieving an 7% EER under best conditions.

  17. Application of autoradiography in finger print analysis

    In order to broaden the possibilities of developing latent finger prints a tracer technique has been developed using sup(110m)Ag and autoradiographic imaging. This method has been tested on glass, paper and certain plastics. On paper it is possible to visualize finger prints even after previous development using Ninhydrin. It is shown that usable finger prints may be obtained also from materials from which they cannot be obtained using classical methods, e.g., polyethylene and simulated leather. (author)

  18. Nodular fasciitis of the finger

    Kijima, Hiroaki; Okada, Kyoji; Ito, Hiroki; Shimada, Yoichi; Itoi, Eiji [Akita University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Akita (Japan); Nanjo, Hiroshi [Akita University Hospital, Department of Clinical Pathology, Akita (Japan)

    2005-02-01

    Nodular fasciitis is a benign reactive lesion, often mistaken for a soft tissue sarcoma in clinical practice. Involvement of the finger is very rare and, as a result, in this location the lesion has sometimes been treated by ray amputation because of misdiagnosis. We report on the clinical and histological features of nodular fasciitis in a 30-year-old man who was treated by excisional biopsy. There has been no evidence of local recurrence at the recent follow-up 8 years after surgery. The importance of careful histological examination to avoid radical surgery should be emphasized because marginal excision can provide good results in the treatment of nodular fasciitis. (orig.)

  19. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    Christian Elsner; Bernd Abel

    2014-01-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record ‘three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent fin...

  20. Hydrodynamic fingering instability of driven wetting films: hindrance by diffusion

    Carles, P.; Troian, S. M.; Cazabat, A. M.; Heslot, F.

    1990-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical efforts have revealed the existence of a fingering instability at the moving front of thin liquid films forced to spread under gravitational, rotational or surface shear stresses, as for example by using the Marangoni effect. The authors describe how the presence of a precursor film in front of the spreading macroscopic film, whether it is by prewetting the substrate or by surface diffusion or multilayer absorption, can prevent the development of the instab...

  1. Reversed cross finger subcutaneous flap: A rapid way to cover finger defects

    Fejjal Nawfal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate coverage of dorsal finger wounds is often a challenge. The reversed cross finger subcutaneous flap to cover defects on the dorsum of phalanx constitutes an excellent option for coverage of wounds over the middle and distal phalanges of the index, middle, ring, and small fingers. It′s an easy flap and represents our first choice to cover those defects.

  2. Fluid Mixing from Viscous Fingering

    Jha, Birendra; Juanes, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    We study, by means of numerical simulation, the mixing of two fluids of different viscosities in advection-dominated flows in a porous medium. It is well known that when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the displacement front is unstable and leads to the formation of a pattern known as viscous fingering. We present a high-resolution simulation approach that is stable for arbitrary viscosity ratios, and study mixing under different configurations with viscosity contrasts up to M = 400. We observe, in agreement with lab experiments, that for high-M displacements, the growth of new fingers follows the trace of previous ones. This channeling effect, which is a result of the nonlocal coupling through the pressure field, greatly reduces mixing. A two-equation mixing model using the scalar variance and its dissipation rate is derived from the advection-diffusion equation. It provides a measure of effective diffusivity due to convective and diffusive mixing processes. Our analysis predicts the opt...

  3. Finger Seal: A Novel Approach to Air to Air Sealing

    Arora, Gul; Steinetz, Bruce; Proctor, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    The gas turbine industry used a variety of sealing mechanisms to contain and direct secondary flows into and around components for cooling, and to limit leakage into and from bearing and disk cavities. The function of these seals is very important to the component efficiencies and attendant engine performance. Most of these seals are labyrinth seals, which are high-leakage seals that are costly to manufacture. In recent years, brush seals have been introduced which have demonstrated significantly reduced leakage, although they are still expensive and have exhibited wear and hysteresis difficulties. A new innovative concept called finger seal, patented by AlliedSignal, has demonstrated leakage similar to brush seals and is cheaper. The finger seal is comprised of a stack of precision photo-etched sheet metal elements, which allows intricate features to be made at very low cost and with the potential to resist wear and provide the compliance necessary to accomodate rotor excursions. Initial testing in the high-speed/high-temperature seal test facility, at the NASA Lewis Research Center, has corroborated the finger seal performance. The testing also revealed hysteresis problems with the current design. A NASA funded research project is in progress to correct the functional deficiencies of the finger seal and to refine its features to provide sufficient seal life for commercial transport engines and other long-life applications. This research will benefit the aeronautical gas turbine industry as a whole in terms of fuel consumption, operational characteristics, and cost. The first phase of this research to reduce finger seal hysteresis has been in progress for the last one year. This paper presents the results of this research to date. In future the research program will address seal performance, manufacturing, cost and life issues. The research program is expected to be completed by December 1998.

  4. Surgical Treatment of Trigger Finger: Open Release

    Firat Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, open A1 pulley release results were evaluated in patients with a trigger finger diagnosis. 45 patients (29 females, 16 males, mean age 50.7 ± 11.9; range (24-79, 45 trigger fingers were released via open surgical technique. On the 25 of 45 cases were involved in the right hand and 16 of them were at the thumb, 2 at index, 6 at the middle and 1 at ring finger. Similarly, at the left hand, 15 of 20 cases were at the thumb, 1 at the index finger, 2 at middle finger and 2 at ring finger. Average follow-up time was 10.2 ± 2.7 (range, 6-15 months. Comorbidities in patients were; diabetes mellitus at 6 cases (13.3%, hypertension at 11 cases (24.4%, hyperthyroidism at 2 cases (4.4%, dyslipidemia at 2 cases (4.4% and lastly 2 cases had carpal tunnel syndrome operation. The mean time between the onset of symptoms to surgery was 6.9 ± 4.8 (range, 2-24 months. Patient satisfaction was very good in 34 cases (75.4% and good in 11 (24.6% patients. The distance between the pulpa of the operated finger and the palm was normal in every case postoperatively. We have not encountered any postoperative complications. We can recommend that; A1 pulley release via open incision is an effective and reliable method in trigger finger surgery.

  5. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in wat

  6. Finger gnosis predicts a unique but small part of variance in initial arithmetic performance.

    Wasner, Mirjam; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Martignon, Laura; Roesch, Stephanie; Moeller, Korbinian

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies indicated that finger gnosis (i.e., the ability to perceive and differentiate one's own fingers) is associated reliably with basic numerical competencies. In this study, we aimed at examining whether finger gnosis is also a unique predictor for initial arithmetic competencies at the beginning of first grade-and thus before formal math instruction starts. Therefore, we controlled for influences of domain-specific numerical precursor competencies, domain-general cognitive ability, and natural variables such as gender and age. Results from 321 German first-graders revealed that finger gnosis indeed predicted a unique and relevant but nevertheless only small part of the variance in initial arithmetic performance (∼1%-2%) as compared with influences of general cognitive ability and numerical precursor competencies. Taken together, these results substantiated the notion of a unique association between finger gnosis and arithmetic and further corroborate the theoretical idea of finger-based representations contributing to numerical cognition. However, the only small part of variance explained by finger gnosis seems to limit its relevance for diagnostic purposes. PMID:26895483

  7. LAXS investigation of finger phantoms

    Osteoporosis is a bone condition that is caused mainly by the degradation of trabecular and cortical bone resulting in the decrease of bone strength and eventually leads to bone fracture. A low angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) system that uses mainly the coherent scattering process for the characterisation of materials was constructed to study such bone conditions. Several finger phantoms were fabricated to simulate bone of varying densities. The LAXS method was able to identify the changes in bone density quite well by comparing energy dispersive X-ray diffraction patterns as well as the angular patterns. Quantitative information can be extracted from such patterns that relate to bone loss. Signature patterns at low exposure times were produced in order to reduce the dose received with reasonable identification power but at slightly higher statistical errors compared with long exposure patterns. Use of other parameters to increase the sensitivity was attempted

  8. Biased wrist and finger coordination in Parkinsonian patients during performance of graphical tasks.

    Dounskaia, Natalia; Van Gemmert, Arend W A; Leis, Berta C; Stelmach, George E

    2009-10-01

    Handwriting impairments in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been associated with micrographia, i.e. diminished letter size. However, dyscoordination of the wrist and fingers may also contribute to handwriting deterioration in PD. To investigate this hypothesis, right-handed PD patients and controls were tested in performance of three types of cyclic wrist and finger movements: drawing of two lines and a circle. The line drawing was performed with either simultaneous flexion and extension of the wrist and fingers (equivalent pattern resulting in a right-tilted line) or with wrist flexion/extension accompanied with finger extension/flexion (nonequivalent pattern resulting in a left-tilted line). Circle drawing required a specific phase difference between wrist and finger motions. Movements were performed with an inkless pen on a digitizer-tablet at two frequency levels. Consistent deformations of the circle into right-tilted ovals and lower variability in equivalent compared with nonequivalent lines revealed preference to produce right-tilted shapes. This preference became more apparent with increased movement speed and it was amplified in PD patients. Analysis revealed that the circle deformation emerged mainly due to reduction in relative phase, while wrist and finger amplitudes remained unchanged. The results suggest that PD causes deficit characterized by strong tendency to produce certain coordination patterns between wrist and finger motions. This deficit may significantly contribute to handwriting impairments in PD by reducing the dexterity in the production of the variety of shapes of the cursive letters. Furthermore, the deficiency revealed in wrist and finger coordination may represent a more general deficit affecting control of various multi-joint movements in PD. PMID:19410590

  9. EEG Resolutions in Detecting and Decoding Finger Movements from Spectral Analysis

    Ran eXiao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mu/beta rhythms are well-studied brain activities that originate from sensorimotor cortices. These rhythms reveal spectral changes in alpha and beta bands induced by movements of different body parts, e.g. hands and limbs, in electroencephalography (EEG signals. However, less can be revealed in them about movements of different fine body parts that activate adjacent brain regions, such as individual fingers from one hand. Several studies have reported spatial and temporal couplings of rhythmic activities at different frequency bands, suggesting the existence of well-defined spectral structures across multiple frequency bands. In the present study, spectral principal component analysis (PCA was applied on EEG data, obtained from a finger movement task, to identify cross-frequency spectral structures. Features from identified spectral structures were examined in their spatial patterns, cross-condition pattern changes, detection capability of finger movements from resting, and decoding performance of individual finger movements in comparison to classic mu/beta rhythms. These new features reveal some similar, but more different spatial and spectral patterns as compared with classic mu/beta rhythms. Decoding results further indicate that these new features (91% can detect finger movements much better than classic mu/beta rhythms (75.6%. More importantly, these new features reveal discriminative information about movements of different fingers (fine body-part movements, which is not available in classic mu/beta rhythms. The capability in decoding fingers (and hand gestures in the future from EEG will contribute significantly to the development of noninvasive brain computer interface (BCI and neuroprosthesis with intuitive and flexible controls.

  10. Comparative analysis of zinc finger proteins involved in plant disease resistance.

    Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Rai, Amit Kumar; Kanwar, Shamsher Singh; Sharma, Tilak R

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to understand the role of zinc finger domains in proteins of resistance (R) genes cloned from different crops. We analyzed protein sequences of seventy R genes of various crops in which twenty six proteins were found to have zinc finger domains along with nucleotide binding sites - leucine rice repeats (NBS-LRR) domains. We identified thirty four zinc finger domains in the R proteins of nine crops and were grouped into 19 types of zinc fingers. The size of individual zinc finger domain within the R genes varied from 11 to 84 amino acids, whereas the size of proteins containing these domains varied from 263 to 1305 amino acids. The biophysical analysis revealed that molecular weight of Pi54 zinc finger was lowest whereas the highest one was found in rice Pib zinc finger named as Transposes Transcription Factor (TTF). The instability (R(2) =0.95) and the aliphatic (R(2) =0.94) indices profile of zinc finger domains follows the polynomial distribution pattern. The pairwise identity analysis showed that the Lin11, Isl-1 & Mec-3 (LIM) zinc finger domain of rice blast resistance protein pi21 have 12.3% similarity with the nuclear transcription factor, X-box binding-like 1 (NFX) type zinc finger domain of Pi54 protein. For the first time, we reported that Pi54 (Pi-k(h)-Tetep), a rice blast resistance (R) protein have a small zinc finger domain of NFX type located on the C-terminal in between NBS and LRR domains of the R-protein. Compositional analysis depicted by the helical wheel diagram revealed the presence of a hydrophobic region within this domain which might help in exposing the LRR region for a possible R-Avr interaction. This domain is unique among all other cloned plant disease resistance genes and might play an important role in broad-spectrum nature of rice blast resistance gene Pi54. PMID:22916136

  11. A Site Rediscovered

    Mailhot, Sarah Anne

    2013-01-01

    This is a site-driven project located in my hometown of Lewiston, Maine, a point along the Androscoggin River.  Driving over the bridge as a child, I was intrigued by the waterfall, but it always seemed unattainable; the mills and abandoned buildings prevented access.  When my dad said that the last mill burned down at Great Falls in 2009, I was saddened but knew this provided a new opportunity for the community. This project is not about placing a building, but rather intervening and creatin...

  12. Double dislocation of finger interphalangeal joints

    Jahangiri, Saqib Aziz; Mestha, Prabhakar; McNally, Scarlett

    2012-01-01

    A 62-year-old, right-hand-dominant man who had dementia and lived in an Elderly Mentally Infirm (EMI) nursing home was admitted through Accident & Emergency (A&E) department following unwitnessed injury to the left little finger.

  13. Stainless steel quadralatch finger test report

    The design of the quadralatch on the universal samplers was changed in response to flammable gas operating constraints. Additional redesign of the fingers was included to facilitate manufacturability. The new design was tested to assure satisfactory performance. It was shown that the fingers can hold a sampler in place with an upward force of at least 2200 N (500 pounds) and that the mechanical remote latch unit can release the quadralatch under this condition of maximum upward force

  14. Surface tension and dynamics of fingering patterns

    Magdaleno, F. X.; Casademunt, J.

    1997-01-01

    We study the minimal class of exact solutions of the Saffman-Taylor problem with zero surface tension, which contains the physical fixed points of the regularized (non-zero surface tension) problem. New fixed points are found and the basin of attraction of the Saffman-Taylor finger is determined within that class. Specific features of the physics of finger competition are identified and quantitatively defined, which are absent in the zero surface tension case. This has dramatic consequences f...

  15. Finger Search in the Implicit Model

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Nielsen, Jesper Asbjørn Sindahl; Truelsen, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    We address the problem of creating a dictionary with the finger search property in the strict implicit model, where no information is stored between operations, except the array of elements. We show that for any implicit dictionary supporting finger searches in q(t) = Ω(logt) time, the time to move...... the finger to another element is Ω(q− 1(logn)), where t is the rank distance between the query element and the finger. We present an optimal implicit static structure matching this lower bound. We furthermore present a near optimal implicit dynamic structure supporting search, change-finger, insert......, and delete in times $\\mathcal{O}(q(t))$, $\\mathcal{O}(q^{-1}(\\log n)\\log n)$, $\\mathcal{O}(\\log n)$, and $\\mathcal{O}(\\log n)$, respectively, for any q(t) = Ω(logt). Finally we show that the search operation must take Ω(logn) time for the special case where the finger is always changed to the element...

  16. Finger multibiometric cryptosystems: fusion strategy and template security

    Peng, Jialiang; Li, Qiong; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2014-03-01

    We address two critical issues in the design of a finger multibiometric system, i.e., fusion strategy and template security. First, three fusion strategies (feature-level, score-level, and decision-level fusions) with the corresponding template protection technique are proposed as the finger multibiometric cryptosystems to protect multiple finger biometric templates of fingerprint, finger vein, finger knuckle print, and finger shape modalities. Second, we theoretically analyze different fusion strategies for finger multibiometric cryptosystems with respect to their impact on security and recognition accuracy. Finally, the performance of finger multibiometric cryptosystems at different fusion levels is investigated on a merged finger multimodal biometric database. The comparative results suggest that the proposed finger multibiometric cryptosystem at feature-level fusion outperforms other approaches in terms of verification performance and template security.

  17. OUTFLOWS FROM EVOLVED STARS: THE RAPIDLY CHANGING FINGERS OF CRL 618

    Balick, Bruce [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Huarte-Espinosa, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Frank, Adam; Gomez, Thomas [Astronomy Department, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78731-2330 (United States); Alcolea, Javier [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional (IGN), E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Corradi, Romano L. M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Vinkovic, Dejan, E-mail: balick@uw.edu, E-mail: martinHE@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: afrank@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: gomezt@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: j.alcolea@oan.es, E-mail: rcorradi@iac.es, E-mail: vinkovic@pmfst.hr [Physics Department, University of Split, Teslina 12/III, HR-21000 Split (Croatia)

    2013-07-20

    Our ultimate goal is to probe the nature of the collimator of the outflows in the pre-planetary nebula CRL 618. CRL 618 is uniquely suited for this purpose owing to its multiple, bright, and carefully studied finger-shaped outflows east and west of its nucleus. We compare new Hubble Space Telescope images to images in the same filters observed as much as 11 yr ago to uncover large proper motions and surface brightness changes in its multiple finger-shaped outflows. The expansion age of the ensemble of fingers is close to 100 yr. We find strong brightness variations at the fingertips during the past decade. Deep IR images reveal a multiple ring-like structure of the surrounding medium into which the outflows propagate and interact. Tightly constrained three-dimensional hydrodynamic models link the properties of the fingers to their possible formation histories. We incorporate previously published complementary information to discern whether each of the fingers of CRL 618 are the results of steady, collimated outflows or a brief ejection event that launched a set of bullets about a century ago. Finally, we argue on various physical grounds that fingers of CRL 618 are likely to be the result of a spray of clumps ejected at the nucleus of CRL 618 since any mechanism that form a sustained set of unaligned jets is unprecedented.

  18. OUTFLOWS FROM EVOLVED STARS: THE RAPIDLY CHANGING FINGERS OF CRL 618

    Our ultimate goal is to probe the nature of the collimator of the outflows in the pre-planetary nebula CRL 618. CRL 618 is uniquely suited for this purpose owing to its multiple, bright, and carefully studied finger-shaped outflows east and west of its nucleus. We compare new Hubble Space Telescope images to images in the same filters observed as much as 11 yr ago to uncover large proper motions and surface brightness changes in its multiple finger-shaped outflows. The expansion age of the ensemble of fingers is close to 100 yr. We find strong brightness variations at the fingertips during the past decade. Deep IR images reveal a multiple ring-like structure of the surrounding medium into which the outflows propagate and interact. Tightly constrained three-dimensional hydrodynamic models link the properties of the fingers to their possible formation histories. We incorporate previously published complementary information to discern whether each of the fingers of CRL 618 are the results of steady, collimated outflows or a brief ejection event that launched a set of bullets about a century ago. Finally, we argue on various physical grounds that fingers of CRL 618 are likely to be the result of a spray of clumps ejected at the nucleus of CRL 618 since any mechanism that form a sustained set of unaligned jets is unprecedented

  19. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-11-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record `three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals.

  20. Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling

    Gardiner, Bennett P. J.

    2015-02-23

    © 2015 American Physical Society. The mathematical model of a steadily propagating Saffman-Taylor finger in a Hele-Shaw channel has applications to two-dimensional interacting streamer discharges which are aligned in a periodic array. In the streamer context, the relevant regularization on the interface is not provided by surface tension but instead has been postulated to involve a mechanism equivalent to kinetic undercooling, which acts to penalize high velocities and prevent blow-up of the unregularized solution. Previous asymptotic results for the Hele-Shaw finger problem with kinetic undercooling suggest that for a given value of the kinetic undercooling parameter, there is a discrete set of possible finger shapes, each analytic at the nose and occupying a different fraction of the channel width. In the limit in which the kinetic undercooling parameter vanishes, the fraction for each family approaches 1/2, suggesting that this "selection" of 1/2 by kinetic undercooling is qualitatively similar to the well-known analog with surface tension. We treat the numerical problem of computing these Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling, which turns out to be more subtle than the analog with surface tension, since kinetic undercooling permits finger shapes which are corner-free but not analytic. We provide numerical evidence for the selection mechanism by setting up a problem with both kinetic undercooling and surface tension and numerically taking the limit that the surface tension vanishes.

  1. A reverse flow cross finger pedicle skin flap from hemidorsum of finger.

    Mishra, Satyanarayan; Manisundaram, S

    2010-04-01

    A reverse-flow cross-finger pedicle skin flap raised from the hemidorsum has been used, which is a modification of the distally based dorsal cross-finger flap. The flap is raised from the hemidorsum at a plane above the paratenon, the distal-most location of the base being at the level of the distal interphalangeal joint. Thirty-two flaps were used from as many fingers of as many patients. Of these, 31 (97%) flaps survived fully; there was stiffness of finger in one (3%) patient and the two-point discrimination was 4-8mm (n=14). Follow-up period was 2 months to 3 years, the median being 1 year and 3 months. The advantages of this flap are that there is less disruption of veins and less visible disfigurement of the dorsum of the finger when compared to other pedicled cross-finger skin flaps. The disadvantage of this flap is its restricted width. It is recommended as the cross-finger pedicle skin flap of choice when the defect is not wide. PMID:19386561

  2. Autonomous control of multi-fingered hand

    JIANG Li; LIU Hong

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a novel autonomous control strategy of multi-fingered hand based on a modular control system of dexterous manipulation. A simple proportional-integral-derivative(PID) position control with friction compensation, which requires few friction parameters, is used to realize accurate and smooth trajectory tracking in pregrasp phase. In grasp and manipulation phases, an event-driven switcher is adopted to determine the switching between unconstrained position control and constrained torque control, and an improved explicit integral force control strategy is implemented to realize simultaneously stable contact transition and accurate force tracking. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness of the proposed autonomous control strategy of multi-fingered hand.

  3. Chromatographic finger print analysis of Naringi crenulata by HPTLC technique

    Subramanian Sampathkumar; Ramakrishnan N

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To establish the fingerprint profile of Naringi crenulata (N. crenulata) (Roxb.) Nicols. using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) technique. Methods: Preliminary phytochemical screening was done and HPTLC studies were carried out. CAMAG HPTLC system equipped with Linomat V applicator, TLC scanner 3, Reprostar 3 and WIN CATS-4 software was used. Results: The results of preliminary phytochemical studies confirmed the presence of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, reducing sugar, phenol, tannin, flavonoid, saponin, triterpenoid, alkaloid, anthraquinone and quinone. HPTLC finger printing of ethanolic extract of stem revealed 10 spots with Rf values in the range of 0.08 to 0.65;bark showed 8 peaks with Rf values in the range of 0.07 to 0.63 and the ethanol extract of leaf revealed 8 peaks with Rf values in the range of 0.09 to 0.49, respectively. The purity of sample was confirmed by comparing the absorption spectra at start, middle and end position of the band. Conclusions:It can be concluded that HPTLC finger printing of N. crenulata may be useful in differentiating the species from the adulterant and act as a biochemical marker for this medicinally important plant in the pharmaceutical industry and plant systematic studies.

  4. Double-V block fingers with cruciform recess

    Voellmer, George M.

    1993-01-01

    In a robot having a gripper including a pair of fingers and a drive motor for driving the fingers toward and away from one another while the fingers remain parallel to each other, the fingers consist of finger pads, which interface with a handle on an object to be grasped, and a shank, which attaches the fingers to the robot gripper. The double-V finger has two orthogonal V-grooves forming in the center of the finger pads and recessed cruciform. The double-V finger is used with a handle on the object to be grasped which is the negative of the finger pads. The handle face consists of V-shaped pads capped with a rectangular cruciform. As the gripper is brought into place near the handle, the finger pads are lined up facing the handle pads. When the finger pad and the handle pad are in proper alignment, the rectangular ridges on the handle fall inside the rectangular grooves on the finger, and the grip is complete.

  5. ANALYSIS WITH MSC ADAMS OF A 5-FINGER AND 3-PHALANX /FINGER UNDER-ACTUATEDMECHANICAL HAND

    Gheorghe POPESCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the analysis with MSC ADAMS of a 5-fingered and 3-phalanx/finger underactuatedmechanical hand, designed by the author to work on industrial robots. Moreover, in order to increasegrasping safety in the automated handling process, the author has fitted each finger with a locking sequence inthe final phase of grasping. Thus, the mechanism of mechanical hand is considered to be a mechanical systemand is treated like a set of rigid bodies connected by mechanical linkages and elastic elements. To model andsimulate this mechanism with MSC ADAMS programme, the author covered the following stages: constructionof the model, testing-simulation, validation, finishing, parameterization, and optimization

  6. Finger tapping analysis in patients with Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism.

    Djurić-Jovičić, Milica; Petrović, Igor; Ječmenica-Lukić, Milica; Radovanović, Saša; Dragašević-Mišković, Nataša; Belić, Minja; Miler-Jerković, Vera; Popović, Mirjana B; Kostić, Vladimir S

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate repetitive finger tapping patterns in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy-Richardson syndrome (PSP-R), or multiple system atrophy of parkinsonian type (MSA-P). The finger tapping performance was objectively assessed in PD (n=13), PSP-R (n=15), and MSA-P (n=14) patients and matched healthy controls (HC; n=14), using miniature inertial sensors positioned on the thumb and index finger, providing spatio-temporal kinematic parameters. The main finding was the lack or only minimal progressive reduction in amplitude during the finger tapping in PSP-R patients, similar to HC, but significantly different from the sequence effect (progressive decrement) in both PD and MSA-P patients. The mean negative amplitude slope of -0.12°/cycle revealed less progression of amplitude decrement even in comparison to HC (-0.21°/cycle, p=0.032), and particularly from PD (-0.56°/cycle, p=0.001), and MSA-P patients (-1.48°/cycle, p=0.003). No significant differences were found in the average finger separation amplitudes between PD, PSP-R and MSA-P patients (pmsa-pd=0.726, pmsa-psp=0.363, ppsp-pd=0.726). The lack of clinically significant sequence effect during finger tapping differentiated PSP-R from both PD and MSA-P patients, and might be specific for PSP-R. The finger tapping kinematic parameter of amplitude slope may be a neurophysiological marker able to differentiate particular forms of parkinsonism. PMID:27343040

  7. Finger reconstruction for the radiation-induced brachial plexus paralysis. A case report

    The patient is a 70-year-old woman. She received right mastectomy and irradiation (4000 rad) for breast cancer 17 years ago. She was referred with numbness of right fingers, muscle weakness and hypoaesthesia. X-ray photography revealed atrophy of the claviculus and the humerus and osteolysis. No recurrence or metastasis of the tumor was found on MRI and bone scintigraphy. She was diagnosed of radiation-induced brachial plexus paralysis. The finger reconstruction was performed and the function recovered. (H.O.)

  8. Finger reconstruction for the radiation-induced brachial plexus paralysis. A case report

    Tanaka, Ryuji; Ikuta, Yoshikazu; Ishida, Osamu; Takata, Haruhiko; Kimori, Kenji; Ochi, Mitsuo [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-01-01

    The patient is a 70-year-old woman. She received right mastectomy and irradiation (4000 rad) for breast cancer 17 years ago. She was referred with numbness of right fingers, muscle weakness and hypoaesthesia. X-ray photography revealed atrophy of the claviculus and the humerus and osteolysis. No recurrence or metastasis of the tumor was found on MRI and bone scintigraphy. She was diagnosed of radiation-induced brachial plexus paralysis. The finger reconstruction was performed and the function recovered. (H.O.)

  9. Stress Responsive Zinc-finger Protein Gene of Populus euphratica in Tobacco Enhances Salt Tolerance

    2008-01-01

    The Populus euphratica stress responsive zinc-finger protein gene PSTZ, which encodes a protein including typical Cys2/His2 zinc finger structure, was isolated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction from P. euphratica.Northern hybridization revealed that its expression was induced under drought and salt stress conditions. To examine its function, cDNA of the PSTZ gene, driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, was cloned into a plant expression vector pBin438 and introduced into tobacco plants. Transgenic tobacco showed an enhanced salt tolerance, suggesting that PSTZ may play a role in plant responsiveness to salt stress.

  10. YIELD, QUALITY AND NUTRIENT UPTAKE AS INFLUENCED BY ORGANIC MANURES AND INORGANIC FERTILIZERS IN FINGER MILLET

    B.Vajantha; Subbarao, M.; L Madhvilatha

    2015-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the influence of organic manures and chemical fertilizers on yield, nutrient uptake by finger millet and soil fertility status at harvest during kharif 2013 at Agricultural Research Station, Perumallapalle, ANGRAU. The results revealed that significantly highest grain yield (37.21 q ha-1), protein content (8.82%), N uptake (84.80 kg ha-1), P uptake (12.04 kg ha-1), No. of tillers/plant (2.5), No. of fingers/ear head (13) were recorded in inorganic tre...

  11. Tangible Widgets for a Multiplayer Tablet Game in Comparison to Finger Touch

    Christensen, Mads Bock; Fisker, Martin; Topp, Kasper Steen Fischer;

    2015-01-01

    Tangible widgets are graspable physical objects that can be detected by a capacitive touch screen. These are used as an interaction method in the tablet game "Hover Wars", a 2-player competitive combat game. Hover Wars was designed to work mainly with tangible widgets and the affordances thereof in...... mind. A version using finger touch was also implemented and the controls were changed to work optimally with this interaction method. The two versions were compared to each other in a user study, revealing that players tend to prefer the usage of tangible widgets over finger touch. The study also...

  12. Effective Length Design of Humanoid Robot Fingers Using Biomimetic Optimization

    Byoung-Ho Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose an effective design method for the phalangeal parameters and the total size of humanoid robot fingers based on a biomimetic optimization. For the optimization, an interphalangeal joint coordination parameter and the length constraints inherent in human fingers are considered from a biomimetic perspective. A reasonable grasp formulation is also taken into account from the viewpoint of power grasping, where the grasp space of a humanoid robot finger is importantly considered to determine the phalangeal length parameters. The usefulness of the devised biomimetic optimization method is shown through the design examples of various humanoid robot fingers. In fact, the optimization-based finger design method enables us to determine effectively the proper phalangeal size of humanoid robot fingers for human-like object handling tasks. In addition, we discuss its contribution to the structural configuration and coordinated motion of a humanoid robot finger, and address its practical availability in terms of effective finger design.

  13. Acceleration Workspace of Cooperating Multi-Finger Robot Systems

    Hyungwon Shim; Jihong Lee

    2008-01-01

    We present a mathematical method for acceleration workspace analysis of cooperating multi-finger robot systems using a model of point-contact with friction. A new unified formulation from dynamic equations of cooperating multi-finger robots is derived considering the force and acceleration relationships between the fingers and the object to be handled. From the dynamic equation, maximum translational and rotational acceleration bounds of an object are calculated under given constraints of contact conditions, configurations of fingers, and bounds on the torques of joint actuators for each finger. Here, the rotational acceleration bounds can be applied as an important manipulability index when the multi-finger robot grasps an object. To verify the proposed method, we used a set of case studies with a simple multi-finger mechanism system. The achievable acceleration boundary in task space can be obtained successfully with the proposed method and the acceleration boundary depends on the configurations of fingers.

  14. Finger-jointed beams in bending

    Andreasen, Lotte; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1997-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamic and static fatique of finger-jointed beams in bending was carried out. Results were obtained for five different frequencies from static loading to a load cycle period of two minutes. A total of seven series were long-term tested and five series were short-term tested...

  15. Clubbed fingers: the claws we lost?

    Brouwers, A.A.M.; Vermeij-Keers, C.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van; Gooren, L.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Clubbed digits resemble the human embryonic fingers and toes, which took like the digits of a claw. Clubbed digits, thus, may represent the return of the embryonic claw and may even represent the claws man has lost during evolution, if ontogenesis realty recapitulates phylogenesis. We put forward th

  16. Evaluation of endothelial function using finger plethysmography

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of endothelial function using finger plethysmography A. K. Faizi, D. W. Kornmo and S. Agewall Department of Medicine, Aker University Hospital and Oslo University, Oslo, Norway Correspondence to Stefan Agewall, Department of Medicine, Aker University Hospital and Oslo University, 0514 Oslo, Norway E-mail: Copyright Journal compilation © 2009 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine KEYWORDS endothelial functio...

  17. Finger cold-induced vasodilation : a review

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) in the finger tips generally occurs 5-10 min after the start of local cold exposure of the extremities. This phenomenon is believed to reduce the risk of local cold injuries. However, CIVD is almost absent during hypothermia, when survival of the organism takes prece

  18. Zinc finger structure-function in Ikaros

    Marvin; A; Payne

    2011-01-01

    The zinc finger motif was used as a vehicle for the initial discovery of Ikaros in the context of T-cell differentiation and has been central to all subsequent analyses of Ikaros function.The Ikaros gene is alternately spliced to produce several isoforms that confer diversity of function and consequently have complicated analysis of the function of Ikaros in vivo.Key features of Ikaros in vivo function are associated with six C2H2 zinc fingers;four of which are alternately incorporated in the production of the various Ikaros isoforms.Although no complete structures are available for the Ikaros protein or any of its family members,considerable evidence has accumulated about the structure of zinc fingers and the role that this structure plays in the functions of the Ikaros family of proteins.This review summarizes the structural aspects of Ikaros zinc fingers,individually,and in tandem to provide a structural context for Ikaros function and to provide a structural basis to inform the design of future experiments with Ikaros and its family members.

  19. Periosteal chondroma of the proximal phalanx of the ring finger

    Full text: Introduction: Periosteal chondroma is an uncommon benign chondroid tumour of bone that was first described by Lichtenstein and Hall in 1952. The more common sites of involvement are the metaphyseal region of a long tubular bone, especially the proximal humerus, femur, and phalanges. Roentgenographically this benign tumor can mimic chondrosarcoma. Awareness of this fact is important in order to avoid over diagnosis and resultant overtreatment of the benign lesion. Objectives and tasks: In this report, we aimed to present clinical, radiological and pathological findings of a case with periosteal chondroma. Material and methods: A 20-year-old man presented with a small painless mass on the radial side of his right ring finger of 3 months duration. Results: Physical examination revealed a slightly protuberant, subcutaneous mass, located in the radial aspect of the proximal phalanx of the right ring finger Radiographs of the ring finger showed a mild cortical irregularity in the dorso-radial aspect of the proximal phalanx. There was soft tissue calcification. There was a lucent lesion that eroded the underlying cortex and caused a reactive sclerosis at the base of the saucershaped defect in the bone. In Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesion was isointense to the muscle tissue in T1WI and high intensity in T2WI. Based on the clinical, radiological and histological findings, a diagnosis of periosteal chondroma was made. Conclusion: Periosteal chondroma is a slow growing, benign, chondroid tumor that arises under or in the periosteum on the surface of cortical bone. In considering the differential diagnosis perhaps the most important tumour to distinguish from periosteal chondroma is periosteal chondrosarcoma. Treatment of these lesions is surgical, with a wide excision performed for chondrosarcoma and a local (marginal or intralesional) excision for chondroma. Differentiation from a malignant lesion is therefore crucial to prevent more extensive unnecessary

  20. Linguistic and perceptual-motor contributions to the kinematic properties of the braille reading finger.

    Hughes, Barry; Van Gemmert, Arend W A; Stelmach, George E

    2011-08-01

    Recordings of the dominant finger during the reading of braille sentences by experienced readers reveal that the velocity of the finger changes frequently during the traverse of a line of text. These changes, not previously reported, involve a multitude of accelerations and decelerations, as well as reversals of direction. We investigated the origin of these velocity intermittencies (as well as movement reversals) by asking readers to twice read out-loud or silently sentences comprising high- or low-frequency words which combined to make grammatical sentences that were either meaningful or nonmeaningful. In a control condition we asked braille readers to smoothly scan lines of braille comprised of meaningless cell combinations. Word frequency and re-reading each contribute to the kinematics of finger movements, but neither sentence meaning nor the mode of reading do so. The velocity intermittencies were so pervasive that they are not easily attributable either to linguistic processing, text familiarity, mode of reading, or to sensory-motor interactions with the textured patterns of braille, but seem integral to all braille finger movements except reversals. While language-related processing can affect the finger movements, the effects are superimposed on a highly intermittent velocity profile whose origin appears to lie in the motor control of slow movements. PMID:20691490

  1. Torque control of underactuated tendon-driven fingers

    M. E. Abdallah; Wampler, C. W.

    2011-01-01

    Given an underactuated tendon-driven finger, the finger posture is underdetermined and can move freely ("flop") in a region of slack tendons. This work shows that such an underactuated finger can be operated in tendon force control (rather than position control) with effective performance. The force control eliminates the indeterminate slack while commanding a parameterized space of desired torques. The torque will either push the finger to the joint limits or wrap around an external object w...

  2. Ten Trigger Fingers in an Adult Man : A Case Report

    Lee, Young-Keun; Kam, Byung-Sup; Lee, Kwang-Won; Kim, Whoan-Jeang; Choy, Won-Sik

    2007-01-01

    Trigger finger is a common disease particularly in the middle aged women. A very rare case in which an adult man had 10 trigger fingers was experienced. He was treated with local steroid injections in both thumbs, but trigger finger disease has been aggravated in every digit of both hands. We performed an early operative treatment. Three months after the operation, the patient could perform his work without discomfort in his hands and showed normal range of motion in all fingers.

  3. Directed evolution of improved zinc finger methyltransferases.

    Brian Chaikind

    Full Text Available The ability to target DNA methylation toward a single, user-designated CpG site in vivo may have wide applicability for basic biological and biomedical research. A tool for targeting methylation toward single sites could be used to study the effects of individual methylation events on transcription, protein recruitment to DNA, and the dynamics of such epigenetic alterations. Although various tools for directing methylation to promoters exist, none offers the ability to localize methylation solely to a single CpG site. In our ongoing research to create such a tool, we have pursued a strategy employing artificially bifurcated DNA methyltransferases; each methyltransferase fragment is fused to zinc finger proteins with affinity for sequences flanking a targeted CpG site for methylation. We sought to improve the targeting of these enzymes by reducing the methyltransferase activity at non-targeted sites while maintaining high levels of activity at a targeted site. Here we demonstrate an in vitro directed evolution selection strategy to improve methyltransferase specificity and use it to optimize an engineered zinc finger methyltransferase derived from M.SssI. The unusual restriction enzyme McrBC is a key component of this strategy and is used to select against methyltransferases that methylate multiple sites on a plasmid. This strategy allowed us to quickly identify mutants with high levels of methylation at the target site (up to ∼80% and nearly unobservable levels of methylation at a off-target sites (<1%, as assessed in E. coli. We also demonstrate that replacing the zinc finger domains with new zinc fingers redirects the methylation to a new target CpG site flanked by the corresponding zinc finger binding sequences.

  4. Error compensation during finger force production after oneand four-finger voluntarily fatiguing exercise

    Kruger, Eric S.; Hoopes, Josh A.; Cordial, Rory J.; Li, Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The effect of muscle fatigue on error compensation strategies during multi-finger ramp force production tasks was investigated. Thirteen young, healthy subjects were instructed to produce a total force with four fingers of the right hand to accurately match a visually displayed template. The template consisted of a 3-s waiting period, a 3-s ramp force production (from 0 to 30% maximal voluntary contraction, MVC), and a 3-s constant force production. A series of twelve ramp trials was performe...

  5. Robot-assisted Guitar Hero for finger rehabilitation after stroke.

    Taheri, Hossein; Rowe, Justin B; Gardner, David; Chan, Vicky; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Wolbrecht, Eric T

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a robotic device for finger therapy after stroke: FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot). FINGER makes use of stacked single degree-of-freedom mechanisms to assist subjects in moving individual fingers in a naturalistic grasping pattern through much of their full range of motion. The device has a high bandwidth of control (-3dB at approximately 8 Hz) and is backdriveable. These characteristics make it capable of assisting in grasping tasks that require precise timing. We therefore used FINGER to assist individuals with a stroke (n= 8) and without impairment (n= 4) in playing a game similar to Guitar Hero©. The subjects attempted to move their fingers to target positions at times specified by notes that were graphically streamed to popular music. We show here that by automatically adjusting the robot gains, it is possible to use FINGER to modulate the subject's success rate at the game, across a range of impairment levels. Modulating success rates did not alter the stroke subject's effort, although the unimpaired subjects exerted more force when they were made less successful. We also present a novel measure of finger individuation that can be assessed as individuals play Guitar Hero with FINGER. The results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to provide controlled levels of assistance during an engaging computer game, and to quantify finger individuation after stroke. PMID:23366783

  6. Unveiling the Biometric Potential of Finger-Based ECG Signals

    André Lourenço

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ECG signal has been shown to contain relevant information for human identification. Even though results validate the potential of these signals, data acquisition methods and apparatus explored so far compromise user acceptability, requiring the acquisition of ECG at the chest. In this paper, we propose a finger-based ECG biometric system, that uses signals collected at the fingers, through a minimally intrusive 1-lead ECG setup recurring to Ag/AgCl electrodes without gel as interface with the skin. The collected signal is significantly more noisy than the ECG acquired at the chest, motivating the application of feature extraction and signal processing techniques to the problem. Time domain ECG signal processing is performed, which comprises the usual steps of filtering, peak detection, heartbeat waveform segmentation, and amplitude normalization, plus an additional step of time normalization. Through a simple minimum distance criterion between the test patterns and the enrollment database, results have revealed this to be a promising technique for biometric applications.

  7. Finger and Palmar Ridge Pattern in NIDDM Patients and Controls

    Jyoti Ratan Ghosh, Ph.D.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dermatoglyphics is a heritable, durable, and age-independent trait in man and widely used as a model trait for population genetics and medical research. Present study is an attempt to understand the association of finger and hypothenar pattern types with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM. To achieve the purpose bilateral palm prints of 30 clinically diagnosed adult female NIDDM patients and 60 healthy adult females without having the history of diabetes as non-diabetic were incorporated from the Bengalee Hindu caste population of West Bengal, India. The result demonstrated higher frequency of ulnar loop, radial loop, composite and plain arch in NIDDM patients than non-diabetic individuals. The result also revealed higher occurrence of hypothenar pattern in NIDDM patients than that of non-diabetic individuals. There were significant (p<0.05 differences in finger ridge and hypothenar patterns between NIDDM and non-diabetic individuals. Therefore, the present study indicated that higher frequency unlar loop and hypothenar pattern as well as lower frequency of whorl may be used as a screening tool to identify the person at risk of developing NIDDM.

  8. Dynamic analysis of C/C composite finger seal

    Chen Guoding; Wang Li’na; Yu Qiangpeng; Su Hua

    2014-01-01

    A seal device as an important component of aeroengines has decisive influence on per-formance, reliability, and working life of aeroengines. With the development of aeroengines, demands on the performance characteristics of seal devices are made strictly. Finger seal as a novel kind of sealing device, recently attracts more and more attentions in academic circles and engineer-ing fields at home and abroad. Research on finger seals has been extensively developed, especially on leakage and wear performances under dynamic conditions. However, it is a pity that the work on finger seals has been limited with a single approach that is improving the performance by structural optimization;in addition, the technology of dynamic analysis on finger seals is weak. Aiming at the problems mentioned above, a distributed mass equivalent dynamic model of finger seals considering the coupling effect of overlaid laminates is established in the present paper, the dynamic perfor-mance of 2.5 dimension C/C composite finger seal is analyzed with the model, and then the effects of fiber bundle density and fiber bundle preparation direction on finger seal’s dynamic performance are discussed, as well as compared with those of Co-based alloy finger seal. The current work is about dynamic analysis of finger seals and application of C/C composite in this paper may have much academic significance and many engineering values for improving research level of finger seal dynamics and exploring feasibility of C/C composite being used for finger seals.

  9. Dynamic analysis of C/C composite finger seal

    Chen Guoding

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A seal device as an important component of aeroengines has decisive influence on performance, reliability, and working life of aeroengines. With the development of aeroengines, demands on the performance characteristics of seal devices are made strictly. Finger seal as a novel kind of sealing device, recently attracts more and more attentions in academic circles and engineering fields at home and abroad. Research on finger seals has been extensively developed, especially on leakage and wear performances under dynamic conditions. However, it is a pity that the work on finger seals has been limited with a single approach that is improving the performance by structural optimization; in addition, the technology of dynamic analysis on finger seals is weak. Aiming at the problems mentioned above, a distributed mass equivalent dynamic model of finger seals considering the coupling effect of overlaid laminates is established in the present paper, the dynamic performance of 2.5 dimension C/C composite finger seal is analyzed with the model, and then the effects of fiber bundle density and fiber bundle preparation direction on finger seal’s dynamic performance are discussed, as well as compared with those of Co-based alloy finger seal. The current work is about dynamic analysis of finger seals and application of C/C composite in this paper may have much academic significance and many engineering values for improving research level of finger seal dynamics and exploring feasibility of C/C composite being used for finger seals.

  10. Nylon-muscle-actuated robotic finger

    Wu, Lianjun; Jung de Andrade, Monica; Rome, Richard S.; Haines, Carter; Lima, Marcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Tadesse, Yonas

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental analysis of novel artificial muscles, made of twisted and coiled nylon fibers, for powering a biomimetic robotic hand. The design is based on circulating hot and cold water to actuate the artificial muscles and obtain fast finger movements. The actuation system consists of a spring and a coiled muscle within a compliant silicone tube. The silicone tube provides a watertight, expansible compartment within which the coiled muscle contracts when heated and expands when cooled. The fabrication and characterization of the actuating system are discussed in detail. The performance of the coiled muscle fiber in embedded conditions and the related characteristics of the actuated robotic finger are described.

  11. A Color Based Touchless Finger Mouse

    Kah-Meng Kwong; Chin-Poo Lee; Kian-Ming Lim; Siew-Chin Chong; Siti Fatimah Abdul Razak

    2012-01-01

    People work with computers almost anytime, everywhere  in the current trend. However, continuously controlling a computer with mouse for a long time might cause much strains to people’s wrist. This work proposes a touchless finger mouse using webcam. A marker with different colours representing different actions is used. The webcam will capture the information on the marker and trigger the associated actions. This prototype is proven to be able to perform most of the actions a normal mouser c...

  12. Viscous fingering in volatile thin films

    Agam, Oded

    2008-01-01

    A thin water film on a cleaved mica substrate undergoes a first order phase transition between two values of film thickness. By inducing a finite evaporation rate of the water, the interface between the two phases develops a fingering instability similar to that observed in the Saffman-Taylor problem. We draw the connection between the two problems, and construct solutions describing the dynamics of evaporation in this system.

  13. Erosion waves: transverse instabilities and fingering

    Malloggi, F.; Lanuza, J.; Andreotti, B.; Clément, E.

    2005-01-01

    Two laboratory scale experiments of dry and under-water avalanches of non-cohesive granular materials are investigated. We trigger solitary waves and study the conditions under which the front is transversally stable. We show the existence of a linear instability followed by a coarsening dynamics and finally the onset of a fingering pattern. Due to the different operating conditions, both experiments strongly differ by the spatial and time scales involved. Nevertheless, the quantitative agree...

  14. Genome Engineering With Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    Carroll, Dana

    2011-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are targetable DNA cleavage reagents that have been adopted as gene-targeting tools. ZFN-induced double-strand breaks are subject to cellular DNA repair processes that lead to both targeted mutagenesis and targeted gene replacement at remarkably high frequencies. This article briefly reviews the history of ZFN development and summarizes applications that have been made to genome editing in many different organisms and situations. Considerable progress has been mad...

  15. Ferritin, finger clubbing, and lung disease.

    Shneerson, J M; Jones, B M

    1981-01-01

    The serum ferritin concentration has been determined by an immunoradiometric assay in 90 subjects with a variety of pulmonary diseases. No association between ferritin concentrations and finger clubbing has been found in any of the diseases studied. Ferritin levels were significantly raised in the subjects with bronchial carcinoma, but were not useful in monitoring recurrence of the tumour. Pulmonary artery and pulmonary vein ferritin concentrations were similar to systemic venous concentrati...

  16. Angiolipoma of index finger: A case report

    Muzaffer Durmus

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Angiolipomas are usually found in the upper extremities, shoulder and back. They are seldom found in the hands, face and lower extremities. They usually occur as painful soft tissue masses or they may compress the neighboring structures (e.g. nerves depending on the size and location. In this report we present an angiolipoma case located in the finger and discuss related recent cases described in the literature. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(1.000: 22-25

  17. Angiolipoma of index finger: A case report

    Muzaffer Durmus; Nuri Yigit; Abdul Kerim Yapici

    2016-01-01

    Angiolipomas are usually found in the upper extremities, shoulder and back. They are seldom found in the hands, face and lower extremities. They usually occur as painful soft tissue masses or they may compress the neighboring structures (e.g. nerves) depending on the size and location. In this report we present an angiolipoma case located in the finger and discuss related recent cases described in the literature. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(1.000): 22-25

  18. Pacifier Use, Finger Sucking, and Infant Sleep.

    Butler, Rachel; Moore, Melisa; Mindell, Jodi A

    2016-01-01

    Few studies to date have investigated the relationship between pacifier use or finger sucking and infant sleep. One hundred and four mothers of infants (ages 0-11 months) completed the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire (BISQ). Infants who engaged in finger sucking had fewer night wakings and longer stretches of nighttime sleep, although less daytime sleep. There were no significant differences in sleep patterns between pacifier users and infants who did not engage in nonnutritive sucking. Furthermore, no significant differences were found across groups for sleep ecology, including parental involvement at bedtime and following night wakings. Finally, infants were consistently able to retrieve their pacifiers independently by 7 months of age, although this did not appear to be associated with sleep outcomes. Results suggest that when parents are deciding whether to give their infant a pacifier, sleep may not be a critical factor. In contrast, parents of finger and thumb suckers should be reassured that this nonnutritive sucking is beneficial to sleep, at least in the first year of life. PMID:26548755

  19. Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling

    Gardiner, Bennett P J; Dallaston, Michael C; Moroney, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    The mathematical model of a steadily propagating Saffman-Taylor finger in a Hele-Shaw channel has applications to two-dimensional interacting streamer discharges which are aligned in a periodic array. In the streamer context, the relevant regularisation on the interface is not provided by surface tension, but instead has been postulated to involve a mechanism equivalent to kinetic undercooling, which acts to penalise high velocities and prevent blow-up of the unregularised solution. Previous asymptotic results for the Hele-Shaw finger problem with kinetic undercooling suggest that for a given value of the kinetic undercooling parameter, there is a discrete set of possible finger shapes, each analytic at the nose and occupying a different fraction of the channel width. In the limit in which the kinetic undercooling parameter vanishes, the fraction for each family approaches 1/2, suggesting that this 'selection' of 1/2 by kinetic undercooling is qualitatively similar to the well-known analogue with surface tens...

  20. Writing in the Air: Contributions of Finger Movement to Cognitive Processing.

    Yoshihiro Itaguchi

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the interactions between motor action and cognitive processing with particular reference to kanji-culture individuals. Kanji-culture individuals often move their finger as if they are writing when they are solving cognitive tasks, for example, when they try to recall the spelling of English words. This behavior is called kusho, meaning air-writing in Japanese. However, its functional role is still unknown. To reveal the role of kusho behavior in cognitive processing, we conducted a series of experiments, employing two different cognitive tasks, a construction task and a stroke count task. To distinguish the effects of the kinetic aspects of kusho behavior, we set three hand conditions in the tasks; participants were instructed to use either kusho, unrelated finger movements or do nothing during the response time. To isolate possible visual effects, two visual conditions in which participants saw their hand and the other in which they did not, were introduced. We used the number of correct responses and response time as measures of the task performance. The results showed that kusho behavior has different functional roles in the two types of cognitive tasks. In the construction task, the visual feedback from finger movement facilitated identifying a character, whereas the kinetic feedback or motor commands for the behavior did not help to solve the task. In the stroke count task, by contrast, the kinetic aspects of the finger movements influenced counting performance depending on the type of the finger movement. Regardless of the visual condition, kusho behavior improved task performance and unrelated finger movements degraded it. These results indicated that motor behavior contributes to cognitive processes. We discussed possible mechanisms of the modality dependent contribution. These findings might lead to better understanding of the complex interaction between action and cognition in daily life.

  1. Small-scale behavior of single gravity-driven fingers in an initially dry fracture

    Experiments investigating the behavior of individual, gravity-driven fingers in an initially dry, rough-walled analog fracture are presented. Fingers were initiated from constant flow to a point source. Finger structure is described in detail; specific phenomena observed include: desaturation behind the finger-tip, variation in finger path, intermittent flow structures, finger-tip bifurcation, and formation of dendritic sub-fingers. Measurements were made of finger-tip velocity, finger width, and finger-tip length. Non-dimensional forms of the measured variables are analyzed relative to the independent parameters, flow rate and gravitational gradient

  2. VISIONS FOR FOOTWEAR TIP SHAPE ACCORDING TO THE CONFIGURATION FINGER

    MALCOCI Marina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Compatibility between the consumer and the interior leg permanent footwear raises a number of issues. And any new form of footwear is time for a new silhouette last. Fashion is a factor in determining the shape of the last significant role. The most important influence on fashion in footwear that has at one time is found in peak shape. During registered a variety of forms leading to the last, for example, pointed, oval, round, square, asymmetrical, curved, trapezoidal, etc. Each has added a tip top recommended. The paper analyzes the morphofunctional characteristic, namely, finger configuration. The configuration of the fingers is determined from the positions of all the fingers of one another, as are six variants. Analysis of the shape and configuration of the arm fingers allow us to make the following recommendations to consumers: people showing finger configuration as in variant V and VI are advised not to wear pointy shoes because of the limited movement of the foot, which favors the diversion finger I exterior and deformed finger V; persons who fall within I-IV variant can procure pointy shoes; a round-tipped shoes, square, curved or asymmetric may be purchased by any consumer regardless of the configuration of the fingers; shoes with cut edge must be present only in garderopa people in variant I and II; consumers whose configuration is like finger-VI and III variants are awkwardly shaped fingers can buy shoes closed in the previous summer, but of different perforations or overlapping strips.

  3. The role of fingers in number processing in young children

    Anne eLafay

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between finger counting and numerical processing in 4- to 7-year-old children. Children were assessed on a variety of numerical tasks and we examined the correlations between their rates of success and their frequency of finger use in a counting task. We showed that children’s performance on finger pattern comparison and identification tasks did not correlate with the frequency of finger use. However, this last variable correlated with the percentages of correct responses in an enumeration task (i.e., Give-N task, even when the age of children was entered as a covariate in the analysis. Despite this correlation, we showed that some children who never used their fingers in the counting task were able to perform optimally in the enumeration task. Overall, our results support the conclusion that finger counting is useful but not necessary to develop accurate symbolic numerical skills. Moreover, our results suggest that the use of fingers in a counting task is related to the ability of children in a dynamic enumeration task but not to static tasks involving recognition or comparison of finger patterns. Therefore, it could be that the link between fingers and numbers remain circumscribed to counting tasks and do not extent to static finger montring situations.

  4. Torque Control of Underactuated Tendon-driven Robotic Fingers

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Wampler, Charles W. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a robot having a total number of degrees of freedom (DOF) equal to at least n, an underactuated tendon-driven finger driven by n tendons and n DOF, the finger having at least two joints, being characterized by an asymmetrical joint radius in one embodiment. A controller is in communication with the robot, and controls actuation of the tendon-driven finger using force control. Operating the finger with force control on the tendons, rather than position control, eliminates the unconstrained slack-space that would have otherwise existed. The controller may utilize the asymmetrical joint radii to independently command joint torques. A method of controlling the finger includes commanding either independent or parameterized joint torques to the controller to actuate the fingers via force control on the tendons.

  5. Comparison of the plaque removal efficacy of a new flossing aid (Quik Floss) to finger flossing.

    Carter-Hanson, C; Gadbury-Amyot, C; Killoy, W

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to compare the effectiveness and safety of a new dental flossing device (Quik Floss) to finger flossing in plaque removal, reduction of gingival inflammation and patient preference. 30 healthy, non-flossing adults with 20 natural teeth, a plaque index (PI) of at least 1.8 and a gingival index (GI) of 1.3 or greater participated in this two-phase crossover design study. Patients were randomly assigned to use either the new flossing device or finger flossing first in the sequence. At baseline, data were collected and patients were given flossing method instructions. The Silness & Löe GI, Quigley-Hein PI, Eastman Bleeding Index (BI) and trauma were assessed at baseline, 15 and 30 days for each treatment period. After the initial 30-day treatment phase, patients were instructed to cease all flossing during a 14-day "washout" period. Subjects were then assigned to the opposite treatment group during the 2nd treatment phase. A 3-factor repeated measures ANOVA analyzed data for differences within and between groups over time. Results revealed statistically significant (p Floss was as effective as finger flossing. Subjects preferred (55%) Quik Floss over finger flossing. In conclusion, Quik Floss is a safe and effective oral hygiene measure for reducing plaque, inflammation and bleeding over time. PMID:8891940

  6. Cells in the monkey ponto-medullary reticular formation modulate their activity with slow finger movements.

    Soteropoulos, Demetris S; Williams, Elizabeth R; Baker, Stuart N

    2012-08-15

    Recent work has shown that the primate reticulospinal tract can influence spinal interneurons and motoneurons involved in control of the hand. However, demonstrating connectivity does not reveal whether reticular outputs are modulated during the control of different types of hand movement. Here, we investigated how single unit discharge in the pontomedullary reticular formation (PMRF) modulated during performance of a slow finger movement task in macaque monkeys. Two animals performed an index finger flexion–extension task to track a target presented on a computer screen; single units were recorded both from ipsilateral PMRF (115 cells) and contralateral primary motor cortex (M1, 210 cells). Cells in both areas modulated their activity with the task (M1: 87%, PMRF: 86%). Some cells (18/115 in PMRF; 96/210 in M1) received sensory input from the hand, showing a short-latency modulation in their discharge following a rapid passive extension movement of the index finger. Effects in ipsilateral electromyogram to trains of stimuli were recorded at 45 sites in the PMRF. These responses involved muscles controlling the digits in 13/45 sites (including intrinsic hand muscles, 5/45 sites). We conclude that PMRF may contribute to the control of fine finger movements, in addition to its established role in control of more proximal limb and trunk movements. This finding may be especially important in understanding functional recovery after brain lesions such as stroke. PMID:22641776

  7. Forced ventilation increases variability of isometric finger forces

    Li, Sheng; Yasuda, Nobuo

    2006-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the effects of forced ventilation on variability of the index finger force at the submaximal levels. Fourteen (6 men, 8 women) healthy subjects were instructed to perform self-initiated forced inspiration and forced expiration, the Valsalva maneuver and normal breathing while sustaining 15%, 30%, and 45% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) by the index finger. Standard deviation (S.D.) of finger forces increased significantly with the level of force. At each level...

  8. Fingering instabilities in Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids

    Kennedy, Kristi E.

    Fingering has been studied in different fluid systems. Viscous fingering, which is driven by a difference in viscosity between fluids, has been studied by both experiments and numerical simulations. We used a single fluid with a temperature-dependent viscosity and studied the instability for a range of inlet pressures and viscosity ratios. The spreading and fingering of a fluid drop subjected to a centrifugal force, known as spin coating, has also been studied for a range of drop volumes and rotation speeds, both for a Newtonian and a non-Newtonian fluid. Experiments on viscous fingering with a single fluid, glycerine, show that an instability occurs at the boundary separating hot and cold fluid. The results indicate that the instability is similar to that which occurs between two miscible fluids. Fingering only occurs for high enough values of the inlet pressure and viscosity ratio. The wavelength of the fingering pattern is found to be proportional to the cell width for the two smallest cell widths used. The fingering patterns seen in the simulations are very similar to the experimental patterns, although there are some quantitative differences. In particular, the wavelength of the instability is seen to depend only weakly on the cell width. The spreading of silicone oil, a Newtonian fluid, during spin coating follows the time dependence predicted theoretically, although with a shift in the scaled time variable. Once the radius of the spreading silicone oil drop becomes large enough, fingers form around the perimeter of the drop for all experimental conditions studied. The number of fingers and the growth rate of the fingers are in agreement with theoretical predictions. Fingers are also observed to form for high enough drop volumes and rotation speeds during the spinning of a non-Newtonian fluid drop, Carbopol, which possesses a yield stress. In this case the fingering is a localized effect, occuring once the stress on the drop exceeds the yield stress, rather

  9. Effective Length Design of Humanoid Robot Fingers Using Biomimetic Optimization

    Byoung-Ho Kim

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we propose an effective design method for the phalangeal parameters and the total size of humanoid robot fingers based on a biomimetic optimization. For the optimization, an interphalangeal joint coordination parameter and the length constraints inherent in human fingers are considered from a biomimetic perspective. A reasonable grasp formulation is also taken into account from the viewpoint of power grasping, where the grasp space of a humanoid robot finger is importantly cons...

  10. Improving esthetics of finger prosthesis by glove silicone

    Laxman Singh Kaira; Esha Dabral

    2014-01-01

    Finger and partial finger amputations are some of the most frequently encountered forms of partial hand loss. A high quality esthetic prosthesis with passive function can be helpful to the patient since loss or congenital absence or malformation have both a social and psychological impact on the patient. Prosthetics is an art and science, which provides lifelike appearance to the lost structures of the patient. This case report presents the fabrication of a silicone finger prosthesis, which h...

  11. Finteraction : Finger Interaction with Mobile Phone

    Jenabi, Mahsa; Reiterer, Harald

    2008-01-01

    Touch interaction with mobile phones enable users to have a more natural interaction with the device, since touch is a natural way of direct accessing an ob ject of interest. But one disadvantage is occlusion; i.e., the user loses a high percentage of information presented on the small screen of the mobile phone during the interaction using his big finger . On the other hand, interaction enhanced with accelerometers can react according to the device movements, e.g., while the user is tilting...

  12. A Color Based Touchless Finger Mouse

    Kah-Meng Kwong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available People work with computers almost anytime, everywhere  in the current trend. However, continuously controlling a computer with mouse for a long time might cause much strains to people’s wrist. This work proposes a touchless finger mouse using webcam. A marker with different colours representing different actions is used. The webcam will capture the information on the marker and trigger the associated actions. This prototype is proven to be able to perform most of the actions a normal mouser can perform.

  13. Effect of Finger Joint on Flexural Strength of Teak Wood

    Bharatesh A. Danawade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the flexural properties of rectangular Burma teak wood beam without finger joint and with finger joint. Finger joints enable full utilization of wood. Finger jointing technique is also used to eliminate wood defects which weaken the strength of wood. This paper considers finger joint as defined defect and its effect on the flexural strength is determined. Teakwood is hard and heavy, seasons rapidly and has good durability. The specimens were studied under three point bending test. Both edge wise and flat wise tests were carried out. It is observed that Burma teakwood beam without finger joint is stronger than beams with finger joints. Because of finger jointing the flexural strength reduces. It can be concluded that the strength loss can improved upon by selecting suitable geometry of finger joint and a suitable adhesive. It is recognized that further studies are necessary on jointing techniques of wood and type of adhesive so as to equal the flexural strength properties of clear teak wood beams.

  14. Tetanus following replantation of an amputated finger: a case report

    Hayashida Kenji

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tetanus is an infectious disease caused by tetanus toxin produced by Clostridium tetani and induces severe neurological manifestations. We treated a patient who developed tetanus during hospitalization for replantation of an amputated finger. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case report of such an entity. Case presentation A 49-year-old Japanese man had an amputation of his right middle finger at the distal interphalangeal joint region in an accident at work. His middle finger was successfully replanted, but his fingertip was partially necrotized because of crushing and so additional reconstruction with a reverse digital arterial flap was performed 15 days after the injury. Tetanus developed 21 days after replantation of the middle finger, but symptoms remitted via rapid diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions In replantation after finger trauma with exposure of nerve and blood vessel bundles, concern over injuring nerves and blood vessels may prevent irrigation and debridement from being performed sufficiently; these treatments may have been insufficiently performed in this patient. It is likely that the replanted middle finger partially adhered, and Clostridium tetani colonized the partially necrotized region. Even when there is only limited soil contamination, administration of tetanus toxoid and anti-tetanus immunoglobulin is necessary when the fingers are injured outdoors and the finger nerves and blood vessels are exposed. The drugs should be administered just after replantation if the finger has been amputated. However, if clinicians pay attention to the possibility of tetanus development, treatment can be rapidly initiated.

  15. The design and development of a finger joint simulator.

    Joyce, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    Artificial finger joints lack the long-term clinical success seen with hip and knee prostheses. In part, this can be explained by the challenges of rheumatoid arthritis, a progressive disease which attacks surrounding tissues as well as the joint itself. Therefore, the natural finger joints' biomechanics are adversely affected, and consequently, this imbalance due to subluxing forces further challenges any prosthesis. Many different designs of finger prosthesis have been offered over a period of greater than 50 years. Most of these designs have failed, and it is likely that many of these failures could have been identified had the prostheses been appropriately tested prior to implantation into patients. While finger joint simulators have been designed, arguably only those from a single centre have been able to reproduce clinical-type failures of the finger prostheses tested in them. This article describes the design and development of a finger simulator at Durham University, UK. It explains and justifies the engineering decisions made and thus the evolution of the finger simulator. In vitro results and their linkage to clinical-type failures are outlined to help to show the effectiveness of the simulator. Failures of finger implants in vivo continue to occur, and the need for appropriate in vitro testing of finger prostheses remains strong. PMID:26833697

  16. Extrinsic versus intrinsic hand muscle dominance in finger flexion.

    Al-Sukaini, A; Singh, H P; Dias, J J

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to identify the patterns of dominance of extrinsic or intrinsic muscles in finger flexion during initiation of finger curl and mid-finger flexion. We recorded 82 hands of healthy individuals (18-74 years) while flexing their fingers and tracked the finger joint angles of the little finger using video motion tracking. A total of 57 hands (69.5%) were classified as extrinsic dominant, where the finger flexion was initiated and maintained at proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints. A total of 25 (30.5%) were classified as intrinsic dominant, where the finger flexion was initiated and maintained at the metacarpophalangeal joint. The distribution of age, sex, dominance, handedness and body mass index was similar in the two groups. This knowledge may allow clinicians to develop more efficient rehabilitation regimes, since intrinsic dominant individuals would not initiate extrinsic muscle contraction till later in finger flexion, and might therefore be allowed limited early active motion. For extrinsic dominant individuals, by contrast, initial contraction of extrinsic muscles would place increased stress on the tendon repair site if early motion were permitted. PMID:26744509

  17. Cells in the monkey ponto-medullary reticular formation modulate their activity with slow finger movements

    Soteropoulos, Demetris S.; Williams, Elizabeth R.; Baker, Stuart N.

    2012-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the primate reticulospinal tract can influence spinal interneurons and motoneurons involved in control of the hand. However, demonstrating connectivity does not reveal whether reticular outputs are modulated during the control of different types of hand movement. Here, we investigated how single unit discharge in the pontomedullary reticular formation (PMRF) modulated during performance of a slow finger movement task in macaque monkeys. Two animals performed an inde...

  18. Dorso-palmar triangular finger flap-A new advancement flap for cover of finger amputations-A preliminary report

    Mishra Satyanarayan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A triangular V-Y type advancement flap on the finger has been designed, which advances skin from over the whole circumference of the finger, which includes both palmar and dorsal skin. The flap is sensate too. It is indicated for finger and thumb amputations proximal to the body of the nail. Six flaps were raised with five successes and one partial necrosis. This is a preliminary report on a new flap.

  19. Lipid Gymnastics: Tethers and Fingers in membrane

    Tayebi, Lobat; Miller, Gregory; Parikh, Atul

    2009-03-01

    A significant body of evidence now links local mesoscopic structure (e.g., shape and composition) of the cell membrane with its function; the mechanisms by which cellular membranes adopt the specific shapes remain poorly understood. Among all the different structures adopted by cellular membranes, the tubular shape is one of the most surprising one. While their formation is typically attributed to the reorganization of membrane cytoskeleton, many exceptions exist. We report the instantaneous formation of tubular membrane mesophases following the hydration under specific thermal conditions. The shapes emerge in a bimodal way where we have two distinct diameter ranges for tubes, ˜20μm and ˜1μm, namely fat fingers and narrow tethers. We study the roughening of hydrated drops of 3 lipids in 3 different spontaneous curvatures at various temp. and ionic strength to figure out the dominant effect in selection of tethers and fingers. Dynamics of the tubes are of particular interest where we observe four distinct steps of birth, coiling, uncoiling and retraction with different lifetime on different thermal condition. These dynamics appear to reflect interplay between membrane elasticity, surface adhesion, and thermal or hydrodynamic gradient.

  20. Cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in human fingers

    The effect of a cholinergic agonist and antagonist on finger blood flow (FBF) was studied in 10 normal subjects. Total finger blood flow was measured by venous occlusion, air plethysmography, and capillary blood flow (FCF) by the disappearance rate of a radio-isotope from a fingertip injection. Methacholine in doses of 10-80 μg/min was given by constant infusion via a brachial artery catheter. Average FBF and vascular resistance were not significantly affected. However, the half time (t/sub 1/2/) of the disappearance rate decreased from 50.8 +/- 13.4 to 11.1 +/- 1.5 min; a decrease occurred in all subjects. In seven subjects, atropine (0.2 mg) had no affect alone but inhibited the effect of methacholine on FCF and prevented the redness and sweating of the forearm and hand that occurs with this agent. This study demonstrates a muscarinic cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in the fingertip that uniquely increase capillary blood flow

  1. Cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in human fingers

    Coffman, J.D.; Cohen, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    The effect of a cholinergic agonist and antagonist on finger blood flow (FBF) was studied in 10 normal subjects. Total finger blood flow was measured by venous occlusion, air plethysmography, and capillary blood flow (FCF) by the disappearance rate of a radio-isotope from a fingertip injection. Methacholine in doses of 10-80 ..mu..g/min was given by constant infusion via a brachial artery catheter. Average FBF and vascular resistance were not significantly affected. However, the half time (t/sub 1/2/) of the disappearance rate decreased from 50.8 +/- 13.4 to 11.1 +/- 1.5 min; a decrease occurred in all subjects. In seven subjects, atropine (0.2 mg) had no affect alone but inhibited the effect of methacholine on FCF and prevented the redness and sweating of the forearm and hand that occurs with this agent. This study demonstrates a muscarinic cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in the fingertip that uniquely increase capillary blood flow.

  2. Teleoperation of Robonaut Using Finger Tracking

    Champoux, Rachel G.; Luo, Victor

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of new finger tracking systems, the idea of a more expressive and intuitive user interface is being explored and implemented. One practical application for this new kind of interface is that of teleoperating a robot. For humanoid robots, a finger tracking interface is required due to the level of complexity in a human-like hand, where a joystick isn't accurate. Moreover, for some tasks, using one's own hands allows the user to communicate their intentions more effectively than other input. The purpose of this project was to develop a natural user interface for someone to teleoperate a robot that is elsewhere. Specifically, this was designed to control Robonaut on the international space station to do tasks too dangerous and/or too trivial for human astronauts. This interface was developed by integrating and modifying 3Gear's software, which includes a library of gestures and the ability to track hands. The end result is an interface in which the user can manipulate objects in real time in the user interface. then, the information is relayed to a simulator, the stand in for Robonaut, at a slight delay.

  3. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Stapanian, Adrienne M.P.; Staley, Keith E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  4. Finger-like voids induced by viscous fingering during phase inversion of alumina/PES/NMP suspensions

    Wang, Bo

    2012-07-01

    The formation mechanism of phase-inversion ceramic hollow fibre membranes has not been well understood. In this paper, we report on the formation of finger-like macrovoids during non-solvent-induced phase inversion of alumina/PES/NMP suspensions. A membrane structure without such finger-like macrovoids was observed when the suspension was slowly immersed into pure ethanol or a mixture of 70. wt% NMP and 30. wt% water, whereas finger-like macrovoids occurred when the suspension was slid into the non-solvents at higher speeds. We found that the formation process of finger-like macrovoids could be fully or partially reversed when nascent membranes were taken out from water shortly after immersion, depending on the duration of the immersion. Splitting of the fingers during the formation of the macrovoids was also observed during the phase inversion of two alumina/PES/NMP suspensions. These experimental observations were not predicted by current theories of finger-like macrovoid formation in polymer membranes, but appear to mimic the well-known viscous fingering phenomenon. We therefore propose that in the phase inversion of ceramic suspensions, the viscous fingering phenomenon is an important mechanism in the formation of finger-like voids. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Finger curvature movement recognition interface technique using SEMG signals

    Y. Itoh

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Until recently, keyboard has been used as the primary input method for machinery operation system. But in recent years, numerous methods related to direct input interface have been developed. One of them is to measure the surface electric potential that generates on the skin surface during muscle contraction. Based on this fact, hand finger operation can also be recognized with the help of the surface muscle electric potential. The purpose of this study is to identify the hand finger operation using surface electromyogram (SEMG during crookedness state of the finger.Design/methodology/approach: Two electrodes (Ag-AgCl electrode were sticked randomly on the forearm muscles and the intensity of EMG signals at different muscles were measured for each crooked finger. Then depending on the intensity of the obtained electric potentials, a position was located and considered to have participated most actively during the crookedness state of that finger. Thus five locations on the forearm muscles were identified for five different fingers. Moreover, four different types of crookedness states were considered for each finger.Findings: In this experimental study, the electric current that generates on the skin during muscle activity was measured for different hand finger operations. As a result, it is found that there is a specified position related to the maximum intensity of EMG signals for each finger. Practical implications: This paper cleared that the amount of crookedness of each finger can also be recognized with the help of surface EMG. It could be used as a machine interface technology in the field of welfare equipments, robot hand operation, virtual reality, etc.Originality/value: The objective of this research project was to develop the method of recognizing the hand finger operation and their crookedness states from surface electromyogram (SEMG.

  6. Identification of SNP and SSR Markers in Finger Millet Using Next Generation Sequencing Technologies

    Gimode, Davis; Odeny, Damaris A.; de Villiers, Etienne P.; Wanyonyi, Solomon; Dida, Mathews M.; Mneney, Emmarold E.; Muchugi, Alice; Machuka, Jesse; de Villiers, Santie M.

    2016-01-01

    Finger millet is an important cereal crop in eastern Africa and southern India with excellent grain storage quality and unique ability to thrive in extreme environmental conditions. Since negligible attention has been paid to improving this crop to date, the current study used Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies to develop both Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Genomic DNA from cultivated finger millet genotypes KNE755 and KNE796 was sequenced using both Roche 454 and Illumina technologies. Non-organelle sequencing reads were assembled into 207 Mbp representing approximately 13% of the finger millet genome. We identified 10,327 SSRs and 23,285 non-homeologous SNPs and tested 101 of each for polymorphism across a diverse set of wild and cultivated finger millet germplasm. For the 49 polymorphic SSRs, the mean polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.42, ranging from 0.16 to 0.77. We also validated 92 SNP markers, 80 of which were polymorphic with a mean PIC of 0.29 across 30 wild and 59 cultivated accessions. Seventy-six of the 80 SNPs were polymorphic across 30 wild germplasm with a mean PIC of 0.30 while only 22 of the SNP markers showed polymorphism among the 59 cultivated accessions with an average PIC value of 0.15. Genetic diversity analysis using the polymorphic SNP markers revealed two major clusters; one of wild and another of cultivated accessions. Detailed STRUCTURE analysis confirmed this grouping pattern and further revealed 2 sub-populations within wild E. coracana subsp. africana. Both STRUCTURE and genetic diversity analysis assisted with the correct identification of the new germplasm collections. These polymorphic SSR and SNP markers are a significant addition to the existing 82 published SSRs, especially with regard to the previously reported low polymorphism levels in finger millet. Our results also reveal an unexploited finger millet genetic resource that can be included in the regional

  7. Finger-powered microfluidic systems using multilayer soft lithography and injection molding processes.

    Iwai, Kosuke; Shih, Kuan Cheng; Lin, Xiao; Brubaker, Thomas A; Sochol, Ryan D; Lin, Liwei

    2014-10-01

    Point-of-care (POC) and disposable biomedical applications demand low-power microfluidic systems with pumping components that provide controlled pressure sources. Unfortunately, external pumps have hindered the implementation of such microfluidic systems due to limitations associated with portability and power requirements. Here, we propose and demonstrate a 'finger-powered' integrated pumping system as a modular element to provide pressure head for a variety of advanced microfluidic applications, including finger-powered on-chip microdroplet generation. By utilizing a human finger for the actuation force, electrical power sources that are typically needed to generate pressure head were obviated. Passive fluidic diodes were designed and implemented to enable distinct fluids from multiple inlet ports to be pumped using a single actuation source. Both multilayer soft lithography and injection molding processes were investigated for device fabrication and performance. Experimental results revealed that the pressure head generated from a human finger could be tuned based on the geometric characteristics of the pumping system, with a maximum observed pressure of 7.6 ± 0.1 kPa. In addition to the delivery of multiple, distinct fluids into microfluidic channels, we also employed the finger-powered pumping system to achieve the rapid formation of both water-in-oil droplets (106.9 ± 4.3 μm in diameter) and oil-in-water droplets (75.3 ± 12.6 μm in diameter) as well as the encapsulation of endothelial cells in droplets without using any external or electrical controllers. PMID:25102160

  8. Detection of finger gesture using singular spectrum transformation

    The purpose of this study is to detect finger movement using a singular spectrum transformation method. Human gesture recognition is essential for realizing natural user interfaces. However, constructing a robust, easily installable interface is extremely difficult. Our proposed method uses singular spectrum transformation to classify finger movements. This method robustly classifies gestures and behavior

  9. Melorheostosis of the index finger: a case report

    Quarles, Ellen K.; Richardson, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of melorheostosis involving multiple bones of the left index finger. This patient presented with a many-year history of a finger mass, and demonstrated the typical radiographic findings of melorheostosis on radiographs and computed tomography (CT) of the hand. Following excisional biopsy and bone grafting, this patient is doing well and undergoing physical therapy.

  10. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended... generic type of device includes prostheses that consist of a single flexible across-the-joint...

  11. Effect of bending pattern on finger joint bending strength

    Džinčić Igor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited information is available on end gluing hardwoods in contrast to softwoods, which have been extensively investigated. The objective of this study was to examine the influence of bending patern on bending strength of finger jointed beech wood. In structural uses finger jointing is finally the major method to end joint timber for the production of glue-laminated elements. There are no bending strength experimental results for finger-jointed hardwoods for investigations conducted in Serbia. Two finger jointed profiles were studied in accordance with DIN68140. The finger joints were made by side and by face of beam. Length jointed samples were loaded at the side and in the face. The obtained results led to the conclusion that the direction of load, gluing surface and the position of joint influence on the strength of continued longitudinal beams.

  12. A new algorithmic approach for fingers detection and identification

    Mubashar Khan, Arslan; Umar, Waqas; Choudhary, Taimoor; Hussain, Fawad; Haroon Yousaf, Muhammad

    2013-03-01

    Gesture recognition is concerned with the goal of interpreting human gestures through mathematical algorithms. Gestures can originate from any bodily motion or state but commonly originate from the face or hand. Hand gesture detection in a real time environment, where the time and memory are important issues, is a critical operation. Hand gesture recognition largely depends on the accurate detection of the fingers. This paper presents a new algorithmic approach to detect and identify fingers of human hand. The proposed algorithm does not depend upon the prior knowledge of the scene. It detects the active fingers and Metacarpophalangeal (MCP) of the inactive fingers from an already detected hand. Dynamic thresholding technique and connected component labeling scheme are employed for background elimination and hand detection respectively. Algorithm proposed a new approach for finger identification in real time environment keeping the memory and time constraint as low as possible.

  13. Geometric approach to viscous fingering on a cone

    We study fluid flow and the formation of viscous fingering patterns on a two-dimensional conical background space, defined as the conical Hele-Shaw cell. We approach the problem geometrically and study how the nontrivial topological structure of the conical cell affects the evolution of the interface separating two viscous fluids. We perform a perturbative weakly nonlinear analysis of the problem and derive a mode-coupling differential equation which describes fluid-fluid interface behaviour. Our nonlinear study predicts the formation of fingering structures in which fingers of different lengths compete and split at their tips. The shape of the emerging patterns show a significant sensitivity to variations in the cell's topological features, which can be monitored by changing the cone opening angle. We find that for increasingly larger values of the opening angle, finger competition is inhibited while finger tip-splitting is enhanced

  14. Surface Tension and Fingering of Miscible Interfaces

    Abib, Mohammed; Liu, Jian-Bang; Ronney, Paul D.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments on miscible, buoyantly unstable reaction-diffusion fronts and non-reacting displacement fronts in Hele-Shaw cells show a fingering-type instability whose wavelengths (lambda*) are consistent with an interfacial tension (sigma) at the front caused by the change in chemical composition, even though the solutions are miscible in all proportions. In conjunction with the Saffman-Taylor model, the relation sigma = K/tau, where tau is the interface thickness and K approximately equal 4 +/- 2 x 10(exp -6) dyne, enables prediction of our measured values of lambda* as well as results from prior experiments on miscible interfaces. These results indicate that even for miscible fluids, surface tension is generally a more significant factor than diffusion in interfacial stability and flow characteristics.

  15. The Silent Language of Fingers and Hands-The Role of Finger and Hand Motions in Non-verbal Communication

    周樱

    2013-01-01

    This paper engages in the discussion about nonverbal intercultural communication from the perspective of hand and finger gestures, probing into the functions of non-verbal cues in cross-cultural interaction, talking over two different attitudes to⁃ward gestures, and giving a detailed analysis about the silent language of some specific gestures with fingers and hands in different cultures.

  16. Increasing substrate resistance to improve the turn-on uniformity of a high-voltage multi-finger GG-nLDMOS

    He Chuan; Jiang Lingli; Fan Hang; Zhang Bo

    2013-01-01

    With the impact of the non-uniform turn-on phenomenon,the ESD robustness of high-voltage multi-finger devices is limited.This paper describes the operational mechanism of a GG-nLDMOS device under ESD stress conditions and analyzes the reason that causes the non-uniform turn-on characteristics of a multi-finger GG-nLDMOS device.By means of increasing substrate resistance,an optimized device structure is proposed to improve the turn-on uniformity of a high-voltage multi-finger GG-nLDMOS.This approach has been successfully verified in a 0.35 μm 40 V BCD process.The TLP test results reveal that increasing the substrate resistance can effectively enhance the turn-on uniformity of the 40 V multi-finger GG-nLDMOS device and improve its ESD robustness.

  17. Torque control of underactuated tendon-driven fingers

    M. E. Abdallah

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Given an underactuated tendon-driven finger, the finger posture is underdetermined and can move freely ("flop" in a region of slack tendons. This work shows that such an underactuated finger can be operated in tendon force control (rather than position control with effective performance. The force control eliminates the indeterminate slack while commanding a parameterized space of desired torques. The torque will either push the finger to the joint limits or wrap around an external object with variable torque – behavior that is sufficient for primarily gripping fingers. In addition, introducing asymmetric joint radii to the design allows the finger to command an expanded range of joint torques and to scan an expanded set of external surfaces. This study is motivated by the design and control of the secondary fingers of the NASA-GM R2 humanoid hand.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  18. A reduced model for fingering instability in miscible displacement

    The classical problem of fingering instability in miscible displacement is revisited. The finger-forming dynamics is considered as a multiple-scale process involving a thin inter-diffusion layer and large-scale background flow affected by the viscosity and/or density stratification. Upon an appropriate separation of 'fast' and 'slow' variables one ends up with a reduced model dealing directly with the evolving displacement front. As an illustration, the new model is applied for description of fingering in a source-supported flow and in a flow within a vertical channel

  19. Dorsal finger texture recognition: Investigating fixed-length SURF

    Hartung, Daniel; Kückelhahn, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We seek to create fixed-length features from dorsal finger skin images extracted by the SURF interest point detector to combine it in the privacy enhancing helper data scheme. The source of the biometric samples is the GUC45 database which features finger vein, fingerprint and dorsal finger skin...... images for modality fusion. First, the region of interest (ROI) is extracted, after which SURF features are extracted, and finally two different approaches for creating fixed length feature vectors are applied. SURF performance on the ROI is comparable to the PolyU database reported in the literature...

  20. A hierarchical classification method for finger knuckle print recognition

    Kong, Tao; Yang, Gongping; Yang, Lu

    2014-12-01

    Finger knuckle print has recently been seen as an effective biometric technique. In this paper, we propose a hierarchical classification method for finger knuckle print recognition, which is rooted in traditional score-level fusion methods. In the proposed method, we firstly take Gabor feature as the basic feature for finger knuckle print recognition and then a new decision rule is defined based on the predefined threshold. Finally, the minor feature speeded-up robust feature is conducted for these users, who cannot be recognized by the basic feature. Extensive experiments are performed to evaluate the proposed method, and experimental results show that it can achieve a promising performance.

  1. Finger Movement Based Wearable Communication & Navigation Aid for partially disabled

    Jobin Jose

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The FMBWCN Aid is a portable and wearable multi-purpose system for the partially disabled. The Aid is a glove-based system in which different trained finger movements leads to different modes of operation of the system such as APR Voice Module and Wheelchair Controller Module. The finger movements (bending movement leads to the flexion of the flex sensor attached to the glove. Flexion leads to change in resistance of the flex sensors, which will be recorded via a microcontroller (Arduino Uno and different sets of movement of the fingers will lead to different modules of operation as specified in the default settings of the FMBWCN Aid.

  2. Narrow fingers in the Saffman-Taylor instability

    Couder, Y.; Gerard, N.; Rabaud, M.

    1986-12-01

    Saffman-Taylor fingers with a relative width much smaller than the classical limit lambda = 0.5 are found when a small isolated bubble is located at their tip. These solutions are members of a family found by Saffman and Taylor (1958) neglecting superficial tension. Recent theories have shown that when capillary forces are taken into account an unphysical cusplike singularity would appear at the tip of all the fingers with lambda less than 0.5. Conversely, here the replacement of the tip by a small bubble makes these solutions possible. At large velocity these fingers show dendritic instability.

  3. Finger Length Ratios in Serbian Transsexuals

    Vujović, Svetlana; Popović, Srdjan; Mrvošević Marojević, Ljiljana; Ivović, Miomira; Tančić-Gajić, Milina; Stojanović, Miloš; Marina, Ljiljana V.; Barać, Marija; Barać, Branko; Kovačević, Milena; Duišin, Dragana; Barišić, Jasmina; Djordjević, Miroslav L.; Micić, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Atypical prenatal hormone exposure could be a factor in the development of transsexualism. There is evidence that the 2nd and 4th digit ratio (2D : 4D) associates negatively with prenatal testosterone and positively with estrogens. The aim was to assess the difference in 2D : 4D between female to male transsexuals (FMT) and male to female transsexuals (MFT) and controls. We examined 42 MFT, 38 FMT, and 45 control males and 48 control females. Precise measurements were made by X-rays at the ventral surface of both hands from the basal crease of the digit to the tip using vernier calliper. Control male and female patients had larger 2D : 4D of the right hand when compared to the left hand. Control male's left hand ratio was lower than in control female's left hand. There was no difference in 2D : 4D between MFT and control males. MFT showed similar 2D : 4D of the right hand with control women indicating possible influencing factor in embryogenesis and consequently finger length changes. FMT showed the lowest 2D : 4D of the left hand when compared to the control males and females. Results of our study go in favour of the biological aetiology of transsexualism. PMID:24982993

  4. YIELD, QUALITY AND NUTRIENT UPTAKE AS INFLUENCED BY ORGANIC MANURES AND INORGANIC FERTILIZERS IN FINGER MILLET

    B Vajantha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted to study the influence of organic manures and chemical fertilizers on yield, nutrient uptake by finger millet and soil fertility status at harvest during kharif 2013 at Agricultural Research Station, Perumallapalle, ANGRAU. The results revealed that significantly highest grain yield (37.21 q ha-1, protein content (8.82%, N uptake (84.80 kg ha-1, P uptake (12.04 kg ha-1, No. of tillers/plant (2.5, No. of fingers/ear head (13 were recorded in inorganic treated plot when compared with organic treated plot (35.08 q ha-1 of grain yield, 8.61% of protein content,75.29 kg ha-1 of N uptake, 11.58 kg ha-1 of P uptake, 2.2 tillers/plant, 11 fingers/earhead. Organic carbon content in soil was increased in organic plot (0.02% only when compared with intial value. In both the treatments available N was reduced and available K was increased when compared with initial available N and K.

  5. An analysis of issues in biometric finger identification

    Nanda Kumar Veerasamy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A Person's identity is an essential factor in this vastly connected society. Biometric Finger has wide acceptance as a genuine method for determining an individual’s identity. Biometric Finger authentication is reliable, since physical characteristics in humans are difficult to forge, harder to change or make copies. Biometric fingerprinting is one of the most popular and legally accepted biometrics used in person identification. Finger print authentication applications include Computer Applications, Network Access, Data Protection, Transaction Security, and Web Security. E-commerce and E-governments can carry out strong authentication rules. This paper analyzes issues related to Fingerprint identification to suggest viable alternatives. Keywords: Fingerprint Identification, Optical Sensors, Ultrasound Sensors, Issues in Finger Print Identification.

  6. Online Credit Card Transaction Using Finger Print Recognition

    S.Sivasubramanian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Internet shopping, a strong alternative to traditional “go, see, touch and buy” shopping, has been one of the mostly used facilities of the Internet. Security in online payment systems has been a wide research area since the early days of the Internet and several approaches have been devised by various Organizations. But, none of the system overcome the weakness in those system. Several online shopping systems serve internet users all around the world and enable people to get the products they need with a small effort. This paper proposes a new solution that combines finger print recognition with online credit card transactions. Here the proposed system provides more security then existing system with finger print recognitionbecause of finger print is unique. Here no need to remember the more passwords, your finger is your password.

  7. Possible Gigantic Variations on the Width of Viscoelastic Fingers

    Poire, E C; Poire, Eugenia Corvera

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the effect of frequency on the width of a single finger displacing a viscoelastic fluid. We derive a generalized Darcy's law in the frequency domain for a linear viscoelastic fluid flowing in a Hele Shaw cell. This leads to an analytic expression for the dynamic permeability that has maxima which are several orders of magnitude larger than the static permeability. We then follow an argument of de Gennes to obtain the smallest possible finger width when viscoelasticity is important. Using this, and a conservation law, we obtain a lowest bound for the width of a single finger displacing a viscoelastic fluid. Our results indicate that when a small amplitude signal of the frequency that maximizes the permeability is overimposed to a constant pressure drop, gigantic variations are obtained for the finger width.

  8. Dose-response patterns for vibration-induced white finger

    Griffin, M; Bovenzi, M.; Nelson, C

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To investigate alternative relations between cumulative exposures to hand-transmitted vibration (taking account of vibration magnitude, lifetime exposure duration, and frequency of vibration) and the development of white finger (Raynaud's phenomenon).

  9. Viscous and Gravitational Fingering in Multiphase Compositional and Compressible Flow

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Viscous and gravitational fingering refer to flow instabilities in porous media that are triggered by adverse mobility or density ratios, respectively. These instabilities have been studied extensively in the past for 1) single-phase flow (e.g., contaminant transport in groundwater, first-contact-miscible displacement of oil by gas in hydrocarbon production), and 2) multi-phase immiscible and incompressible flow (e.g., water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection in oil reservoirs). Fingering in mul...

  10. Finger blood content, light transmission, and pulse oximetry errors.

    Craft, T M; Lawson, R A; Young, J D

    1992-01-01

    The changes in light emitting diode current necessary to maintain a constant level of light incident upon a photodetector were measured in 20 volunteers at the two wavelengths employed by pulse oximeters. Three states of finger blood content were assessed; exsanguinated, hyperaemic, and normal. The changes in light emitting diode current with changes in finger blood content were small and are not thought to represent a significant source of error in saturation as measured by pulse oximetry. PMID:1536406

  11. Unveiling the Biometric Potential of Finger-Based ECG Signals

    André Lourenço; Hugo Silva; Ana Fred

    2011-01-01

    The ECG signal has been shown to contain relevant information for human identification. Even though results validate the potential of these signals, data acquisition methods and apparatus explored so far compromise user acceptability, requiring the acquisition of ECG at the chest. In this paper, we propose a finger-based ECG biometric system, that uses signals collected at the fingers, through a minimally intrusive 1-lead ECG setup recurring to Ag/AgCl electrodes without gel as interface with...

  12. Finger avulsion injuries: A report of four cases

    Fejjal N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury that occurs to a finger wearing a ring though rare can have grave consequences. It is a preventable injury which has a peculiar mode of trauma that is usually occupational. Injury ranges from simple contusion to degloving of soft tissues to traumatic amputation. We hereby report our experience of four cases of finger avulsion injuries due to a ring and discuss their variable clinical presentation and individualized management.

  13. Prevalence of finger sucking at preschool children in Bitola

    Domnika Rajchanovska; Beti Zafirova Ivanovska

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish the prevalence of the habit,finger sucking at pre school children in Bitola. observational cross-sectional study conducted and 1607 children from 3 to 5 years old were included. The following methods were applied: psychological testing (Test of Chuturik), clinical pediatric examination, interview with the parents and survey Child Behavior Checklist-Achenbach, 1981. The results shows that the prevalence of the habit finger sucking at the examinees was 24...

  14. Dynamic analysis of C/C composite finger seal

    Chen Guoding; Wang Li’na; Yu Qiangpeng; Su Hua

    2014-01-01

    A seal device as an important component of aeroengines has decisive influence on performance, reliability, and working life of aeroengines. With the development of aeroengines, demands on the performance characteristics of seal devices are made strictly. Finger seal as a novel kind of sealing device, recently attracts more and more attentions in academic circles and engineering fields at home and abroad. Research on finger seals has been extensively developed, especially on leakage and wear p...

  15. Speed-stability paradox in DNA-scanning by zinc-finger proteins

    Iwahara, Junji; Levy, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Extensive contact with DNA via multiple zinc fingers allows highly specific DNA-binding of zinc-finger-class transcription factors, but can also slow the target search process. Here we introduce recent insights into how zinc-finger proteins can rapidly scan DNA. Potential application of the new knowledge to the zinc-finger-based technology is also discussed.

  16. Stress Distribution in Implant Retained Finger Prosthesis: A Finite Element Study

    Amornvit, Pokpong; Rokaya, Dinesh; Keawcharoen, Konrawee; Thongpulsawasdi, Nimit

    2013-01-01

    Background: Finger amputation may result from congenital cause, trauma, infection and tumours. The finger amputation may be rehabilitated with dental implant-retained finger prosthesis. The success of implant-retained finger prosthesis is determined by the implant loading. The type of the force is a determining factor in implant loading.

  17. A comprehensive assessment of cardiovascular autonomic control using photoplethysmograms recorded from the earlobe and fingers.

    Kiselev, A R; Mironov, S A; Karavaev, A S; Kulminskiy, D D; Skazkina, V V; Borovkova, E I; Shvartz, V A; Ponomarenko, V I; Prokhorov, M D

    2016-04-01

    We compare the spectral indices of photoplethysmogram variability (PPGV) estimated using photoplethysmograms recorded from the earlobe and the middle fingers of the right and left hand and analyze their correlation with similar indices of heart rate variability (HRV) in 30 healthy subjects (26 men) aged 27 (25, 29) years (median with inter-quartile ranges) at rest and under the head-up tilt test. The following spectral indices of PPGV and HRV were compared: mean heart rate (HR), total spectral power (TP), high-frequency (HF) and low-frequency (LF) ranges of TP in percents (HF% and LF%), LF/HF ratio, and spectral coherence. We assess also the index S of synchronization between the LF oscillations in HRV and PPGV. The constancy of blood pressure (BP) and moderate increase of HR under the tilt test indicate the presence of fast processes of cardiovascular adaptation with the increase of the sympathetic activity in studied healthy subjects. The impact of respiration on the PPGV spectrum (accessed by HF%) is less than on the HRV spectrum. It is shown that the proportion of sympathetic vascular activity (accessed by LF%) is constant in the PPGV of three analyzed PPGs during the tilt test. The PPGV for the ear PPG was less vulnerable to breathing influence accessed by HF% (independently from body position) than for PPGs from fingers. We reveal the increase of index S under the tilt test indicating the activation of interaction between the heart and distal vessels. The PPGV spectra for finger PPGs from different hands are highly coherent, but differ substantially from the PPGV spectrum for the ear PPG. We conclude that joint analysis of frequency components of PPGV (for the earlobe and finger PPGs of both hands) and HRV and assessment of their synchronization provide additional information about cardiovascular autonomic control. PMID:27027461

  18. Enhancement of finger motion range with compliant anthropomorphic joint design.

    Çulha, Utku; Iida, Fumiya

    2016-04-01

    Robotic researchers have been greatly inspired by the human hand in the search to design and build adaptive robotic hands. Especially, joints have received a lot of attention upon their role in maintaining the passive compliance that gives the fingers flexibility and extendible motion ranges. Passive compliance, which is the tendency to be employed in motion under the influence of an external force, is the result of the stiffness and the geometrical constraints of the joints that define the direction of the motion. Based on its building elements, human finger joints have multi-directional passive compliance which means that they can move in multiple axis of motion under external force. However, due to their complex anatomy, only simplified biomechanical designs based on physiological analysis are preferred in present day robotics. To imitate the human joints, these designs either use fixed degree of freedom mechanisms which substantially limit the motion axes of compliance, or soft materials that can deform in many directions but hinder the fingers' force exertion capacities. In order to find a solution that lies between these two design approaches, we are using anatomically correct finger bones, elastic ligaments and antagonistic tendons to build anthropomorphic joints with multi-directional passive compliance and strong force exertion capabilities. We use interactions between an index finger and a thumb to show that our joints allow the extension of the range of motion of the fingers up to 245% and gripping size to 63% which can be beneficial for mechanical adaptation in gripping larger objects. PMID:26891473

  19. Biomechanical Analysis of Force Distribution in Human Finger Extensor Mechanisms

    Dan Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexities of the function and structure of human fingers have long been recognised. The in vivo forces in the human finger tendon network during different activities are critical information for clinical diagnosis, surgical treatment, prosthetic finger design, and biomimetic hand development. In this study, we propose a novel method for in vivo force estimation for the finger tendon network by combining a three-dimensional motion analysis technique and a novel biomechanical tendon network model. The extensor mechanism of a human index finger is represented by an interconnected tendinous network moving around the phalanx’s dorsum. A novel analytical approach based on the “Principle of Minimum Total Potential Energy” is used to calculate the forces and deformations throughout the tendon network of the extensor mechanism when subjected to an external load and with the finger posture defined by measurement data. The predicted deformations and forces in the tendon network are in broad agreement with the results obtained by previous experimental in vitro studies. The proposed methodology provides a promising tool for investigating the biomechanical function of complex interconnected tendon networks in vivo.

  20. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events

    Jennifer eMacRitchie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterisation of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction.

  1. Elastic fingering in rotating Hele-Shaw flows

    Carvalho, Gabriel D.

    2014-05-21

    The centrifugally driven viscous fingering problem arises when two immiscible fluids of different densities flow in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell. In this conventional setting an interplay between capillary and centrifugal forces makes the fluid-fluid interface unstable, leading to the formation of fingered structures that compete dynamically and reach different lengths. In this context, it is known that finger competition is very sensitive to changes in the viscosity contrast between the fluids. We study a variant of such a rotating flow problem where the fluids react and produce a gellike phase at their separating boundary. This interface is assumed to be elastic, presenting a curvature-dependent bending rigidity. A perturbative weakly nonlinear approach is used to investigate how the elastic nature of the interface affects finger competition events. Our results unveil a very different dynamic scenario, in which finger length variability is not regulated by the viscosity contrast, but rather determined by two controlling quantities: a characteristic radius and a rigidity fraction parameter. By properly tuning these quantities one can describe a whole range of finger competition behaviors even if the viscosity contrast is kept unchanged. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  2. Fluidic Channels Produced by Electro Hydrodynamic Viscous Fingering

    Behler, Kristopher; Wetzel, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Viscous fingering is a term describing fingerlike extensions of liquid from a column of low viscosity liquid that has been injected into a more viscous liquid. The modification of viscous fingering, known as electro hydrodynamic viscous fingering (EHVF), utilizes large electrical potentials of 10-60 kV. The fingers see a reduction in size and increase in branching behavior due to the potential applied to the system. The resulting finely structured patterns are analogous to biological systems such as blood vessels and the lymphatic system. In this study silicone oils and water were studied in thin channel Hele-Shaw cells. The interfacial tension was optimized by altering the surfactant concentration in the silicone oils. EHVF of liquid filled packed beds consisting of beads and silicone oils showed retardation of the relaxation of the fingers after the voltage was turned off. Decreased relaxation provides a means to solidify patterns into a curable material, such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). After the water is evacuated from the fingers, the cured materials then possess hollow channels that can be refilled and emptied, thus creating an artificial circulatory system.

  3. Fingering induced by a solid sphere impact to viscous fluid

    Katsuragi, H

    2014-01-01

    The number of splashed fingers generated by a solid projectile's impact onto a viscous liquid layer is experimentally studied. A steel sphere is dropped onto a viscous liquid pool. Then, a fingering instability occurs around the crater's rim, depending on the experimental conditions such as projectile's inertia and the viscosity of the target liquid. When the impact inertia is not sufficient, any fingering structure cannot be observed. Contrastively, if the impact inertia is too much, the random splashing is induced and the counting of fingers becomes difficult. The clear fingering instability is observable in between these two regimes. The number of fingers $N$ is counted by using high-speed video data. The scaling of $N$ is discussed on the basis of dimensionless numbers. By assuming Rayleigh-Taylor instability, scaling laws for $N$ can be derived using Reynolds number $Re$, Weber number $We$, and Froude number $Fr$. Particularly, the scaling $N=(\\rho_r Fr)^{1/4}We^{1/2}/3^{3/4}$ is obtained for the gravity...

  4. Fingering induced by a solid sphere impact to viscous fluid

    Katsuragi Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of splashed fingers generated by a solid projectile’s impact onto a viscous liquid layer is experimentally studied. A steel sphere is dropped onto a viscous liquid pool. Then, a fingering instability occurs around the crater’s rim, depending on the experimental conditions such as projectile’s inertia and the viscosity of the target liquid. When the impact inertia is not sufficient, any fingering structure cannot be observed. Contrastively, if the impact inertia is too much, the random splashing is induced and the counting of fingers becomes difficult. The clear fingering instability is observable in between these two regimes. The number of fingers N is counted by using high-speed video data. The scaling of N is discussed on the basis of dimensionless numbers. By assuming Rayleigh-Taylor instability, scaling laws for N can be derived using Reynolds number Re, Weber number We, and Froude number Fr. Particularly, the scaling N = (ρrFr1/4We1/2/33/4 is obtained for the gravity-dominant cratering regime, where ρr is the density ratio between a projectile and a target. Although the experimental data considerably scatters, the scaling law is consistent with the global trend of the data behavior. Using one of the scaling laws, planetary nano crater’s rim structure is also evaluated.

  5. Automated FingerPrint Background removal: FPB

    Morgante Michele

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The construction of a whole-genome physical map has been an essential component of numerous genome projects initiated since the inception of the Human Genome Project. Its usefulness has been proved for whole-genome shotgun projects as a post-assembly validation and recently it has also been used in the assembly step to constrain on BACs positions. Fingerprinting is usually the method of choice for construction of physical maps. A clone fingerprint is composed of true peaks representing real fragments and background peaks, mainly composed of E. coli genomic DNA, partial digestions, star activity by-products, and machine background. High-throughput fingerprinting leads to the production of thousands of BAC clone fingerprints per day. That is why background peaks removal has become an important issue and needs to be automatized, especially in capillary electrophoresis based fingerprints. Results At the moment, the only tools available for such a task are GenoProfiler and its descendant FPMiner. The large variation in the quality of fingerprints that is usually present in large fingerprinting projects represents a major difficulty in the correct removal of background peaks that has only been partially addressed by the methods so far adopted that all require a long manual optimization of parameters. Thus, we implemented a new data-independent tool, FPB (FingerPrint Background removal, suitable for large scale projects as well as mapping of few clones. Conclusion FPB is freely available at http://www.appliedgenomics.org/tools.php. FPB was used to remove the background from all fingerprints of three grapevine physical map projects. The first project consists of about 50,000 fingerprints, the second one consists of about 70,000 fingerprints, and the third one consists of about 45,000 fingerprints. In all cases a successful assembly was built.

  6. Analysis of Coordinated Motions of Humanoid Robot Fingers Using Interphalangeal Joint Coordination

    Byoung-Ho Kim

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we analyse the coordinated motions of humanoid robot fingers using an interphalangeal joint coordination. For this purpose, four humanoid robot fingers with different sizes have been considered. A biomimetic interphalangeal joint coordination (IJC) formulation based on the grasp configuration of human fingers has been presented for humanoid robot fingers. The usefulness of the specified IJC formulation for human-like finger motion has been verified through comparative demonstra...

  7. Evaluation of finger millet incorporated noodles for nutritive value and glycemic index

    Shukla, Kamini; Srivastava, Sarita

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to develop finger millet incorporated noodles for diabetic patients. Finger millet variety VL-149 was taken. The finger millet flour and refined wheat flour (RWF) were evaluated for nutrient composition. The finger millet flour (FMF) was blended in various proportions (30 to 50%) in refined wheat flour and used for the preparation of noodles. Control consisted of RWF noodles. Sensory quality and nutrient composition of finger millet noodles was evaluated. The ...

  8. Thermal stability improvement of a multiple finger power SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor under different power dissipations using non-uniform finger spacing

    Chen Liang; Zhang Wan-Rong; Jin Dong-Yue; Shen Pei; Xie Hong-Yun; Ding Chun-Bao; Xiaa Ying; Sun Bo-Tao; Wang Ren-Qing

    2011-01-01

    method of non-uniform finger spacing is proposed to enhance thermal stability of a multiple finger power SiGe hererojunction bipolar transistor under different power dissipations. Temperature distribution on the emitter fingers of a multi-finger SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor is studied using a numerical electro-thermal model. The results show that the SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor with non-uniform finger spacing has a small temperature difference between fingers compared with a traditional uniform finger spacing heterojunction bipolar transistor at the same power dissipation. What is most important is that the ability to improve temperature non-uniformity is not weakened as power dissipation increases. So the method of non-uniform finger spacing is very effective in enhancing the thermal stability and the power handing capability of power device. Experimental results verify our conclusious.

  9. Thermal stability improvement of a multiple finger power SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor under different power dissipations using non-uniform finger spacing

    A method of non-uniform finger spacing is proposed to enhance thermal stability of a multiple finger power SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor under different power dissipations. Temperature distribution on the emitter fingers of a multi-finger SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor is studied using a numerical electro-thermal model. The results show that the SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor with non-uniform finger spacing has a small temperature difference between fingers compared with a traditional uniform finger spacing heterojunction bipolar transistor at the same power dissipation. What is most important is that the ability to improve temperature non-uniformity is not weakened as power dissipation increases. So the method of non-uniform finger spacing is very effective in enhancing the thermal stability and the power handing capability of power device. Experimental results verify our conclusions. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  10. 指背筋膜瓣或筋膜蒂岛状皮瓣的临床应用%Clinical application of the finger dorsum fascia pedicle flap or fascia flap

    张全荣; 芮永军; 薛明宇; 陈政; 钱俊; 张志海; 吴权; 魏苏明; 杨凯

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical effect that the finger dorsum fascia pedicle flap or fascia flap for repairing Finger skin defects in 8 cases. Methods 3 fingers in 3 cases with finger bone reveal were repaired with the dorsum fascia flap and skin graft. 11 fingers in 5 cases with finger bone reveal were repaired with the dorsum fascia pedicle flap. Results All 14 flaps survived, the bone reveal were repaired excellently. The flaps obtained good texture and flexibility. Fingers extended function was reconstructeal. Conclusion The finger dorsum fascia pedicle flap or fascia flap is a simple and reliable method to repair defects of fingers.%目的 报道8例14指应用指背筋膜瓣或筋膜蒂岛状皮瓣修复手指皮肤缺损的临床治疗效果.方法 采用指背筋膜瓣方法修复3例3指,指背筋膜蒂岛状皮瓣移植5例11指,皮瓣面积:2.0 cm×2.0 cm~4.0 cm×3.0 cm.结果 术后皮瓣全部成活,皮瓣质地及外形好,患指伸指功能得到重建,功能恢复满意,供区功能基本无影响.结论 指背筋膜瓣或筋膜蒂岛状皮瓣是修复手指指背皮肤缺损的较好方法.

  11. Three finger palpation technique of vas deferens for keyhole vasectomy in spotted (Axis axis and sambar deer (Cervus unicolor

    B. J. William

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Vasectomy is performed in deer for population control, maintain pedigreed animals and prevent inbreeding. Conventional procedure of vasectomy required a long-term anesthesia and longer duration of hospitalization, which often result in stress, morbidity and mortality. A study was conducted to capture, neuter and release the deer with minimal hospitalization and stress by adopting three finger palpation technique of vas deferens and performing vasectomy through a key-hole incision. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on three spotted male deer and three sambar male deer, which were immobilized with a mixture of xylazine at the dose of 1.00 mg/kg and ketamine at the dose of 5.00 mg/kg. The vas deferens could be palpated as a piece of cooked spaghetti at the neck of the scrotum on the anterior aspect by three finger palpation technique and was able to fix the vas deferens between the thumb and middle finger. Through a key-hole incision of <5 mm length, the vas deferens was exteriorized and resected using electrocautery and the skin incision was sealed with methyl methacrylate. The deer were released on the same day, and no post-operative complication was noticed. Conclusion: The study revealed that three finger palpation technique of vas deferens provided guidance for easy access to vas deferens for vasectomy in deer with less hospitalization, and the deer could be released on the same day.

  12. Ring finger protein 43 expression is associated with genetic alteration status and poor prognosis among patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    Talabnin, Chutima; Janthavon, Patcharee; Thongsom, Sunisa; Suginta, Wipa; Talabnin, Krajang; Wongkham, Sopit

    2016-06-01

    Ring finger E3 ligases have roles in processes central to maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular homeostasis. Many ring finger E3 ligases are implicated in malignancy. Ring finger protein 43 (RNF43) is a ring finger E3 ligase that negatively regulates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. RNF43 is frequently mutated in several types of malignancy, including intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). The significance of its expression in ICC has not, however, been reported. We determined RNF43 expression and identified RNF43 polymorphisms in ICC tissues. We also investigated the correlation between RNF43 expression and RNF43 mutation status, RNF43 polymorphisms, clinicopathological features, and prognosis of ICC patients. RNF43 reduced expression in ICC, and the reduction of RNF43 messenger RNA expression was significantly correlated with the presence of rs2257205 and RNF43 somatic mutations, confirming that all RNF43 somatic mutations in ICC are inactivating. Overall survival was worst in patients with down-regulation of RNF43. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that RNF43 expression was an independent prognostic factor. There was no statistically significant association between RNF43 messenger RNA and protein expression nor any clinicopathological features or RNF43 polymorphisms. The results imply that RNF43 is down-regulated in ICC and may play a crucial role during development of ICC. PMID:26980022

  13. Magic Ring: A Finger-Worn Device for Multiple Appliances Control Using Static Finger Gestures

    Tongjun Huang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available An ultimate goal for Ubiquitous Computing is to enable people to interact with the surrounding electrical devices using their habitual body gestures as they communicate with each other. The feasibility of such an idea is demonstrated through a wearable gestural device named Magic Ring (MR, which is an original compact wireless sensing mote in a ring shape that can recognize various finger gestures. A scenario of wireless multiple appliances control is selected as a case study to evaluate the usability of such a gestural interface. Experiments comparing the MR and a Remote Controller (RC were performed to evaluate the usability. From the results, only with 10 minutes practice, the proposed paradigm of gestural-based control can achieve a performance of completing about six tasks per minute, which is in the same level of the RC-based method.

  14. Hybrid-Actuated Finger Prosthesis with Tactile Sensing

    Cheng Yee Low

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Finger prostheses are devices developed to emulate the functionality of natural human fingers. On top of their aesthetic appearance in terms of shape, size and colour, such biomimetic devices require a high level of dexterity. They must be capable of gripping an object, and even manipulating it in the hand. This paper presents a biomimetic robotic finger actuated by a hybrid mechanism and integrated with a tactile sensor. The hybrid actuation mechanism comprises a DC micromotor and a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA wire. A customized test rig has been developed to measure the force and stroke produced by the SMA wire. In parallel with the actuator development, experimental investigations have been conducted on Quantum Tunnelling Composite (QTC and Pressure Conductive Rubber (PCR towards the development of a tactile sensor for the finger. The viability of using these materials for tactile sensing has been determined. Such a hybrid actuation approach aided with tactile sensing capability enables a finger design as an integral part of a prosthetic hand for applications up to the transradial amputation level.

  15. Zinc Finger Nuclease-Mediated Gene Targeting in Plants

    Zinc finger nucleases were used to facilitate homology driven repair and site-specific transgene integration in transgenic tobacco cell cultures. A target DNA sequence containing a non-functional, partial 3' PAT gene sequence flanked by zinc finger binding sites was stably integrated into BY2 suspension cultures using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A transgenic event containing a single integrated copy of the target sequence was used for gene targeting through co-transformation with two different Agrobacterium strains containing: i) donor DNA sequences comprising the 5' partial DNA fragment necessary to correct the non-functional PAT gene flanked by sequences homologous to the pre-integrated target DNA and ii) DNA that encoded a zinc finger nuclease that specifically recognized binding sites within the pre-integrated target. Two gene targeting strategies differing with respect to the distance between the zinc finger binding site and the homologous sequences were used. Gene targeting was demonstrated for both strategies as evidenced by the re-constitution of a functional PAT gene and was confirmed via molecular and biochemical analyses. Sequencing of recombined DNA confirmed that PAT gene reconstitution resulted from homology-driven repair at the zinc finger nuclease cleavage site. However, imperfect recombination resulting from non-homologous processes was also observed. (author)

  16. Evaluation of electron beam irradiation for disinfection of turmeric fingers

    Turmeric finger as one of the most popular spices has been widely used for food manufacturing. However, it has also been a major cause of bacterial infestation of food materials especially in curry, ham and sausage manufacturing. In this study decontamination of bacteria in turmeric finger by electron beam irradiation was evaluated by comparing with several other decontamination methods: i.e., boiling, microwave irradiation, treatment by twin screw extruder and gamma-ray irradiation. By estimation of colony counting on nutrient agar plate, turmeric finger without any treatment gave total viable cell at 108/g. Turmeric finger which was irradiated by electron beam at 10kGy dose dramatically reduced thermotolerant cell population below self restriction level (<1000/g), which has been required by food hygiene law. The same level of sterilization effect was obtained only by gamma-ray irradiation at 10kGy and 20kGy. On the other hand, although treatment through twin screw extruder slightly reduced bacterial numbers, neither boiling nor microwave irradiation gave sufficient decontamination effect on turmeric fingers

  17. Evaluation of electron beam irradiation for disinfection of turmeric fingers

    Turmeric finger as one of the most popular spices has been widely used for food manufacturing. However, it has also been a major cause of bacterial infestation of food materials especially in curry, ham and sausage manufacturing. In this study decontamination of bacteria in turmeric finger by electron beam irradiation was evaluated by comparing with several other decontamination methods: i.e., boiling, microwave irradiation, treatment by twin screw extruder and gamma-ray irradiation. By estimation of colony counting on nutrient agar plate, turmeric finger without any treatment gave total viable cell at 108/g. Turmeric finger which was irradiated by electron beam at 10 kGy dose dramatically reduced thermotolerant cell population below self restriction level (<1000/g), which has been required by food hygiene law. The same level of sterilization effect was obtained only by gamma-ray irradiation at 10 kGy and 20 kGy. On the other hand, although treatment through twin screw extruder slightly reduced bacterial numbers, neither boiling nor microwave irradiation gave sufficient decontamination effect on turmeric fingers. (author)

  18. The biometric recognition on contactless multi-spectrum finger images

    Kang, Wenxiong; Chen, Xiaopeng; Wu, Qiuxia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel multimodal biometric system based on contactless multi-spectrum finger images, which aims to deal with the limitations of unimodal biometrics. The chief merits of the system are the richness of the permissible texture and the ease of data access. We constructed a multi-spectrum instrument to simultaneously acquire three different types of biometrics from a finger: contactless fingerprint, finger vein, and knuckleprint. On the basis of the samples with these characteristics, a moderate database was built for the evaluation of our system. Considering the real-time requirements and the respective characteristics of the three biometrics, the block local binary patterns algorithm was used to extract features and match for the fingerprints and finger veins, while the Oriented FAST and Rotated BRIEF algorithm was applied for knuckleprints. Finally, score-level fusion was performed on the matching results from the aforementioned three types of biometrics. The experiments showed that our proposed multimodal biometric recognition system achieves an equal error rate of 0.109%, which is 88.9%, 94.6%, and 89.7% lower than the individual fingerprint, knuckleprint, and finger vein recognitions, respectively. Nevertheless, our proposed system also satisfies the real-time requirements of the applications.

  19. Evaluation of electron beam irradiation for disinfection of turmeric fingers

    Yasumoto, Kyoden; Fujino, Masayuki; Supriyadi (Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Research Inst. for Food Science); Suzuki, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Toru

    1991-08-01

    Turmeric finger as one of the most popular spices has been widely used for food manufacturing. However, it has also been a major cause of bacterial infestation of food materials especially in curry, ham and sausage manufacturing. In this study decontamination of bacteria in turmeric finger by electron beam irradiation was evaluated by comparing with several other decontamination methods: i.e., boiling, microwave irradiation, treatment by twin screw extruder and gamma-ray irradiation. By estimation of colony counting on nutrient agar plate, turmeric finger without any treatment gave total viable cell at 10{sup 8}/g. Turmeric finger which was irradiated by electron beam at 10 kGy dose dramatically reduced thermotolerant cell population below self restriction level (<1000/g), which has been required by food hygiene law. The same level of sterilization effect was obtained only by gamma-ray irradiation at 10 kGy and 20 kGy. On the other hand, although treatment through twin screw extruder slightly reduced bacterial numbers, neither boiling nor microwave irradiation gave sufficient decontamination effect on turmeric fingers. (author).

  20. An unusual case of finger clubbing

    Akhavani, Mohammed A. [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, St. Georges Hospital, Blackshaw Road, Tooting, London SW17 0QT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mo@doctors.org.uk; Sojitra, Nilesh M. [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, St. Georges Hospital, Blackshaw Road, Tooting, London SW17 0QT (United Kingdom); Gateley, David R. [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, St. Georges Hospital, Blackshaw Road, Tooting, London SW17 0QT (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-01

    A 33-yr-old man presented with a short history of a rapidly expanding hard mass on the left middle fingertip that clinically appeared to be an enchondroma. This was excised and histopathology revealed an epidermal inclusion cyst.

  1. An unusual case of finger clubbing

    A 33-yr-old man presented with a short history of a rapidly expanding hard mass on the left middle fingertip that clinically appeared to be an enchondroma. This was excised and histopathology revealed an epidermal inclusion cyst

  2. Prediction of contact forces of underactuated finger by adaptive neuro fuzzy approach

    Petković, Dalibor; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Abbasi, Almas; Kiani, Kourosh; Al-Shammari, Eiman Tamah

    2015-12-01

    To obtain adaptive finger passive underactuation can be used. Underactuation principle can be used to adapt shapes of the fingers for grasping objects. The fingers with underactuation do not require control algorithm. In this study a kinetostatic model of the underactuated finger mechanism was analyzed. The underactuation is achieved by adding the compliance in every finger joint. Since the contact forces of the finger depend on contact position of the finger and object, it is suitable to make a prediction model for the contact forces in function of contact positions of the finger and grasping objects. In this study prediction of the contact forces was established by a soft computing approach. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was applied as the soft computing method to perform the prediction of the finger contact forces.

  3. Initial results of finger imaging using Photoacoustic Computed Tomography

    van Es, Peter; Moens, Hein J Bernelot; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2014-01-01

    We present a photoacoustic computed tomography investigation on a healthy human finger, to image blood vessels with a focus on vascularity across the interphalangeal joints. The cross-sectional images were acquired using an imager specifically developed for this purpose. The images show rich detail of the digital blood vessels with diameters between 100 $\\mu$m and 1.5 mm in various orientations and at various depths. Different vascular layers in the skin including the subpapillary plexus could also be visualized. Acoustic reflections on the finger bone of photoacoustic signals from skin were visible in sequential slice images along the finger except at the location of the joint gaps. Not unexpectedly, the healthy synovial membrane at the joint gaps was not detected due to its small size and normal vascularization. Future research will concentrate on studying digits afflicted with rheumatoid arthritis to detect the inflamed synovium with its heightened vascularization, whose characteristics are potential marke...

  4. Trigger finger presenting secondary to leiomyoma: a case report

    Harb Ziad

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a previously undescribed entity: trigger finger secondary to a leiomyoma. This is the first time such a case has been reported and highlights the fact that common conditions can sometimes present secondary to rare diseases. Case presentation A 39-year-old Caucasian man presented with a fairly typical presentation of trigger finger. During surgical treatment, the lesion was excised and sent for histology, which showed tissue consistent with a leiomyoma. The patient made an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Trigger finger is a common condition that is usually easily diagnosed and managed. However, it is important to appreciate that uncommon conditions, such as leiomyoma, can present with what is sometimes considered trivial disease, and one should always consider the differential diagnoses even when faced with relatively benign conditions.

  5. High-Speed, High-Temperature Finger Seal Test Results

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Kumar, Arun; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2002-01-01

    Finger seals have significantly lower leakage rates than conventional labyrinth seals used in gas turbine engines and are expected to decrease specific fuel consumption by over 1 percent and to decrease direct operating cost by over 0.5 percent. Their compliant design accommodates shaft growth and motion due to thermal and dynamic loads with minimal wear. The cost to fabricate these finger seals is estimated to be about half the cost to fabricate brush seals. A finger seal has been tested in NASA's High Temperature, High Speed Turbine Seal Test Rig at operating conditions up to 1200 F, 1200 ft/s, and 75 psid. Static, performance and endurance test results are presented. While seal leakage and wear performance are acceptable, further design improvements are needed to reduce the seal power loss.

  6. Reference values for the nickel concentration in human finger nails

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Peters, K; Menné, T

    1991-01-01

    A reference value for the nickel concentration in finger nails from people who are not occupationally exposed to nickel was determined on the basis of nail samples from 95 healthy individuals. The mean +/- standard deviation was 1.19 +/- 1.61 mg/kg and the median was 0.49 mg/kg (range 0.042-7.50 mg....../kg). The 95% confidence interval of the population mean was 0.51-1.26 mg/kg and the 95% confidence interval of the population median was 0.39-0.74 mg/kg. The random sample consisted of 59 women and 36 men. No significant difference between the nickel levels in finger nails from men and women could...... be demonstrated. The age of the subjects varied from 16 to 66 years. There was no correlation between age and nickel concentration in finger nails....

  7. Analysis of Coordinated Motions of Humanoid Robot Fingers Using Interphalangeal Joint Coordination

    Byoung-Ho Kim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyse the coordinated motions of humanoid robot fingers using an interphalangeal joint coordination. For this purpose, four humanoid robot fingers with different sizes have been considered. A biomimetic interphalangeal joint coordination (IJC formulation based on the grasp configuration of human fingers has been presented for humanoid robot fingers. The usefulness of the specified IJC formulation for human-like finger motion has been verified through comparative demonstrations. As a result, a proper coordination of humanoid robot fingertips can be achieved by applying our IJC formulation. Also the IJC formulation can be used to design of humanoid robot fingers.

  8. Continuous non-invasive finger blood pressure monitoring in children.

    Tanaka, H; Thulesius, O; Yamaguchi, H; Mino, M; Konishi, K

    1994-06-01

    We evaluated the performance of continuous non-invasive finger arterial pressure measurement using the volume-clamp technique (Finapres). This study was designed to compare finger arterial pressure with brachial blood pressure estimated by the auscultatory method in 217 children (90 boys and 127 girls) aged 4-16 years and in 38 adults (aged 18-45 years). Finger and brachial artery pressure readings were obtained consecutively from the ipsilateral side in the supine position. Finger arterial pressure waveforms were recorded in all children except 4 with small and thin fingers. There was good agreement for systolic pressure with only a slight underestimation of 1.9 mmHg and 5.1 mmHg lower for diastolic pressure. This difference most probably reflects inaccuracy of the auscultatory cuff method rather than an error in the Finapres. There was large inter-individual variability in Finapres recordings which might be due to differences in vasomotor tone, as demonstrated by systolic amplification in 5 patients with anorexia. However, Finapres showed a small within-subject variability (3.8 mmHg for systolic and 4.1 mmHg for diastolic pressure) determined in 5 patients during phenylephrine infusion, and as good reproducibility as the auscultatory method. These results suggest that finger arterial pressure measurement in children older than 6 years of age has similar accuracy as that in adults, and that this method is useful for clinical applications in children, especially for the non-invasive evaluation of autonomic control and cardiovascular reflexes involving transient and rapid blood pressure changes. PMID:7919764

  9. Hvad fanden er der egentlig i vejen med Salad Fingers?

    Pedersen, Lykke Buhl; Fagerstrøm, Erik; Rasmussen, Ditte Wiberg; Alrø, Thore Birkkjær; Lyborg, Mie; Jensen, Thea Sjøholm; Videriksen, Caroline Sylvang

    2015-01-01

    Salad Fingers is an animated YouTube series, created by the director David Firth. There are 10 episodes in which we follow the character Salad Fingers. From the very beginning of the series, there are signs that he is struggling with some sort of mental problems. We seek to understand Salad Fingers’ perception of reality and the cause of this perception. We have divided the analysis of our projects into three parts. The first part is an analysis based on the terms denotation and connotatio...

  10. Pattern formation of frictional fingers in a gravitational potential

    Eriksen, Jon Alm; Måløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik; Sandnes, Bjørnar

    2016-01-01

    Aligned finger structures, with a characteristic width, emerges during the slow drainage of a liquid/granular mixture in a tilted Hele-Shaw cell. A transition from vertical to horizontal alignment of the finger structures is observed as the tilting angle and the granular density are varied. An analytical model is presented, demonstrating that the alignment properties is the result of the competition between fluctuating granular stresses and the hydrostatic pressure. The dynamics is reproduced in simulations. We also show how the system explains patterns made during dyke formations.

  11. Finger Vein Recognition Using Local Line Binary Pattern

    Bakhtiar Affendi Rosdi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a personal verification method using finger vein is presented. Finger vein can be considered more secured compared to other hands based biometric traits such as fingerprint and palm print because the features are inside the human body. In the proposed method, a new texture descriptor called local line binary pattern (LLBP is utilized as feature extraction technique. The neighbourhood shape in LLBP is a straight line, unlike in local binary pattern (LBP which is a square shape. Experimental results show that the proposed method using LLBP has better performance than the previous methods using LBP and local derivative pattern (LDP.

  12. [Seal finger in Denmark diagnosed by PCR-technique].

    Jansen, Louise Charlotte; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Roos, Signe Moeslund; Dargis, Rimtas; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Kemp, Michael

    2012-02-13

    Seal finger is an unusual infection in Denmark but is seen quite often in Greenland. A 69 year-old Danish man developed severe infection after cutting his finger on a sea urchin while handling a fishing net. Treatment with beta-lactam antibiotics had no effect. Standard culture from the lesion was negative. A Mycoplasma species was detected by PCR and DNA sequencing and subsequently cultured on special media. Specifically asked about exposure to sea mammals the patient could inform that a dead seal had also been trapped in the fishing net. PMID:22331047

  13. Non-Gaussian buoyancy statistics in fingering convection

    von Hardenberg, Jost

    2010-01-01

    We examine the statistics of active scalar fluctuations in high-Rayleigh number fingering convection with high-resolution three-dimensional numerical experiments. The one-point distribution of buoyancy fluctuations is found to present significantly non-Gaussian tails. A modified theory based on an original approach by Yakhot (1989) is used to model the active scalar distributions as a function of the conditional expectation values of scalar dissipation and fluxes in the flow. Simple models for these two quantities highlight the role of blob-like coherent structures for scalar statistics in fingering convection.

  14. Non-Gaussian buoyancy statistics in fingering convection

    Hardenberg, Jost von, E-mail: j.vonhardenberg@isac.cnr.i [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Torino (Italy); Paparella, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.paparella@unisalento.i [Dip. di Matematica, Universita del Salento and CMCC, Lecce (Italy)

    2010-06-07

    We examine the statistics of active scalar fluctuations in high-Rayleigh number fingering convection with high-resolution three-dimensional numerical experiments. Marked non-Gaussian tails are found in the one-point distribution of buoyancy fluctuations. A modified theory based on an original approach by Yakhot (1989) is used to model the active scalar distributions as a function of the conditional expectation values of scalar dissipation and fluxes in the flow. Simple models for these two quantities highlight the role of blob-like coherent structures for scalar statistics in fingering convection.

  15. Nutritional, technological, and medical approach of finger millet (Eleusine coracana)

    Amir Gull; Gulzar Ahmad Nayik; Kamlesh Prasad; Pradyuman Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Finger millet (Eleusine coracana L.) is also known as African millet and is commonly called “ragi” in India. It has excellent nutritional value and is even superior to other common cereals. It is a richest source of calcium (344 mg) and magnesium (408 mg) than other millets. Predominant fatty acids of this millet are oleic (49%), linoleic (25%), and palmitic acids (25%). Finger millet contains both water-soluble and lipo-soluble vitamins. Emerging bakery products prepared from this millet are...

  16. Real-Time Hand Gesture Recognition Using Finger Segmentation

    Zhi-hua Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hand gesture recognition is very significant for human-computer interaction. In this work, we present a novel real-time method for hand gesture recognition. In our framework, the hand region is extracted from the background with the background subtraction method. Then, the palm and fingers are segmented so as to detect and recognize the fingers. Finally, a rule classifier is applied to predict the labels of hand gestures. The experiments on the data set of 1300 images show that our method performs well and is highly efficient. Moreover, our method shows better performance than a state-of-art method on another data set of hand gestures.

  17. Statistical mechanics of covariant systems with multi-fingered time

    Chirco, Goffredo

    2016-01-01

    Recently, in [Class. Quantum Grav. 33 (2016) 045005], the authors proposed a new approach extending the framework of statistical mechanics to reparametrization-invariant systems with no additional gauges. In this work, the approach is generalized to systems defined by more than one Hamiltonian constraints (multi-fingered time). We show how well known features as the Ehrenfest- Tolman effect and the J\\"uttner distribution for the relativistic gas can be consistently recovered from a covariant approach in the multi-fingered framework. Eventually, the crucial role played by the interaction in the definition of a global notion of equilibrium is discussed.

  18. Trace element finger printing of emeralds by PIXE and PIGE

    The concentrations of 18 major- and minor-elements in 12 Emeralds from different mines and two synthetic ones are measured with proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and γ-ray emission (PIGE). The concentration and distribution of 18 elements are used to establish the characteristic finger print pattern of each Emerald. With the help of cluster analysis of SYSTAT statistical package for IBMPC, these finger prints are analysed, from which a quantitative description of the dissimilarities between Emeralds can be given

  19. Two-Fingered Haptic Device for Robot Hand Teleoperation

    Futoshi Kobayashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A haptic feedback system is required to assist telerehabilitation with robot hand. The system should provide the reaction force measured in the robot hand to an operator. In this paper, we have developed a force feedback device that presents a reaction force to the distal segment of the operator's thumb, middle finger, and basipodite of the middle finger when the robot hand grasps an object. The device uses a shape memory alloy as an actuator, which affords a very compact, lightweight, and accurate device.

  20. PARAMETRIC SENSITIVITY STUDY OF A FUSION REACTOR DIVERTOR COOLING FINGER

    Martin, Oliver; SIMONOVSKI IGOR

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the results of coupled thermal-mechanical Finite Element (FE) analysis on the design of a fusion reactor divertor cooling finger are presented. Beside its main purpose, to remove alpha particles, helium and other impurities from the plasma stream, a divertor has to remove approximately 15% of the total thermal power of the fusion reactor. The aim of the analysis is to assess the influence of a number of physical properties of the brazing layer (BL) of the cooling finger on the o...

  1. Management of intra-articular fracture of the fingers via mini external fixator combined with limited internal fixation

    LI Wen-jun; TIAN Wen; TIAN Guang-lei; CHEN Shan-lin; ZHANG Chang-qing; XUE Yun-hao; LI Zhong-zhe; ZHU Yin

    2009-01-01

    Background Intra-articular fractures of the fingers are common problems to emergency physicians and hand surgeons.Inappropriate management of these injuries may result in chronic pain,stiffness,deformity,or post traumatic arthritis.Ideal treatment necessitates the restoration of a stable and congruent joint that will allow early mobilization.The purpose of this study was to investigate the results of intra-articular fracture of the fingers by mini external fixator combined with limited internal fixation.Methods From May 2005 to May 2007,a total of 26 patients with intra-articular fracture of the fingers were treated by mini external fixator combined with limited internal fixation.Of the 26 cases,11 involved in metacarpophalangeal joint,and 15 interphalangeal joint in proximal interphalangeal.Kirschner wire,mini wire and absorbable suture were used for limited internal fixation.All patients were followed up and patients were accomplished with total active motion(TAM)of fingers.Results All patients were reviewed by an independent observer.The mean follow up was 13 months(range 9 to 24 months).Subjective,objective and radiographic results were evaluated.X-ray films revealed fracture union and the average radiographic union time was 7 weeks with a range of 5-12 weeks and the phalange shortening or rotation in 2 cases,joint incongruity(less than 1 mm)and joint space narrowing in 3 cases respectively.Phalangeal shortening or rotation was observed in 2 cases and joint incongruity or joint space narrowing was observed in 3 cases.An artificial implant was performed on one case for traumatic arthritis 1.5 years after surgery.Based on TAM the overall good-excellent rate of joint motion function was 80.8%.Conclusion Mini external fixator combined with limited internal fixation is a reliable and effective method for treatment of intra-articular fracture of the fingers.

  2. Load-induced changes in older individual's hand-finger tremor are ameliorated with targeting.

    Kavanagh, Justin J; Cross, Troy J; Newell, Karl M; Morrison, Steven

    2014-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate hand-finger tremor dynamics when a load was applied to the finger in a group of healthy older adults. Moreover, we sought to determine if projecting a representation of the subject's finger tremor on a target was capable of overcoming the effects of loading so that hand-finger interactions returned to a state that was similar to normal tremor. Eight healthy older males (67 ± 1 year) performed a postural pointing task, where tremor was assessed using lightweight accelerometers attached to the hand and finger. Tremor was then assessed when a laser pointer was attached to the finger and switched off (the load), and then with the laser pointer attached and switched on pointing at targets of 40 mm and 20mm in diameter. The main findings of this study were that 1) loading the finger resulted in a reduction in finger tremor amplitude and increased finger tremor regularity, but no change in hand tremor, 2) loading caused increased hand-finger 8-12 Hz cross wavelet coherence and phase synchrony, and 3) pointing at different targets while the finger was loaded resulted in an increase in finger tremor amplitude, and changes in inter-segmental coupling to the extent that hand-finger dynamics reflected normal unloaded conditions. Overall, these results illustrate that the damping effects of limb loading can be offset, in part, by altering the accuracy demands of the task to make the pointing action more challenging. PMID:24503237

  3. 78 FR 68907 - Agency Information Collection (Hand and Finger Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Hand and Finger Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under... Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Crystal Rennie... and Finger Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)''. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Hand...

  4. Formal Verification of Finger Print ATM Transaction through Real Time Constraint Notation RTCN

    Vivek Kumar Singh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose the Formal Verification of existing models like in banking sector ie ATM Transaction through biometric (Finger Print with the help of Real Time Constraint Notation. Finger print recognition is most popular and commonest method of using the biometrics. In the finger print technology, the uniqueness of epidermis of fingers is utilized for identification of user. The user has to keep its finger on a sensory pad, which reads the ridges of epidermis of finger and try to match it with available data of the finger with the bank. Sequence Diagrams (SDs, Finite State Machine (FSM have proven useful for describing transaction-oriented systems, and can form a basis for creating state charts. However, Finger Print ATM system require special support for branching, state information, and composing SDs.

  5. Viscous-fingering experiments with periodic boundary conditions

    Zhao, H.; Maher, J.V. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

    1990-11-15

    Experimental realization of a Hele-Shaw cell with periodic boundary conditions (PBC's) is achieved by building an azimuthal cell with two coaxial cylinders separated by a small gap. The development of viscous-fingering patterns formed by a critical binary liquid mixture at very low viscosity contrast has been observed and recorded from the onset of instability to very late stages. Comparison with the experimental results measured in cells which have sidewalls shows that PBC's yield few differences of results. At the early stage there is no sidewall disturbance so the Fourier transforms show less noise in the low-wave-number modes. Because the annular cell is larger than the earlier cells, it was possible to follow the flow to a very late nonlinear stage where, instead of showing steadily lengthening and broadening fingers, the necks of the longer fingers, crowded by fattening bulbs of the tips of the less-long fingers, constrict until their width is no longer negligible in comparison to the cell gap, at which point the pattern breaks up into a rich variety of bubbles.

  6. Port-Hamiltonian modeling for soft-finger manipulation

    Ficuciello, F.; Carloni, R.; Visser, L.C.; Stramigioli, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a port-Hamiltonian model of a multi-fingered robotic hand, with soft-pads, while grasping and manipulating an object. The algebraic constraints of the interconnected systems are represented by a geometric object, called Dirac structure. This provides a powerful way to descr

  7. Analyses results of the EHF FW Panel with welded fingers

    Sviridenko, M.N., E-mail: sviridenko@nikiet.ru [Open Joint-Stock Company “N.A. Dollezhall Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering”, (OJSC “NIKIET”), 107140, Malaya Krasnoselskaya 2/8, Moscow (Russian Federation); Leshukov, A.Yu.; Razmerov, A.V. [Open Joint-Stock Company “N.A. Dollezhall Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering”, (OJSC “NIKIET”), 107140, Malaya Krasnoselskaya 2/8, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tomilov, S.N.; Danilov, I.V. [Open Joint-Stock Company “N.A. Dollezhall Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering”, (OJSC “NIKIET”), 107140, Malaya Krasnoselskaya 2/8, Moscow (Russian Federation); D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Strebkov, Yu.S. [Open Joint-Stock Company “N.A. Dollezhall Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering”, (OJSC “NIKIET”), 107140, Malaya Krasnoselskaya 2/8, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mazul, I.V.; Labusov, A.; Gervash, A.A.; Belov, A.V.; Semichev, D. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The design of FW panel with welded fingers has been developed. • The FW panel with welded fingers has been analyzed. • The pressure drop in FW panel coolant path do not exceed allowable one. • The mass flow rate distribution between finger pairs are on acceptable level. • Temperatures in FW components do not exceed allowable one. - Abstract: According to Procurement Arrangement (PA) Russian Federation will procure 40% of enhanced heat flux first wall (FW) panels. The signing of PA is scheduled on November 2013. In framework of PA preparation the RF specialists perform EHF FW design optimization in order to provide the ability to operation of EHF FW panel under ITER conditions. This article contains the design description of EHF FW 14 developed by RF and following analysis have been performed: • Hydraulic analysis; • Transient thermal analysis; • Structural analysis. Analyses results show that new design of FW panel with two straight welds for finger fixation on FW beam developed by RF specialists can be used as a reference design for ITER blanket EHF FW panel loaded by 5 MW/m{sup 2} peak heat flux.

  8. Abnormalities of Rhythmic Finger-Tapping in ADHD

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A finger-tapping test requiring rhythmic responses to frequencies from 1 to 6Hz was performed in 27 children (21 males, 6 females; aged 6 to 14 years, mean 11 years diagnosed with ADHD, and in 33 controls at the Shaare Zedeck Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.

  9. Zinc finger recombinases with adaptable DNA sequence specificity.

    Chris Proudfoot

    Full Text Available Site-specific recombinases have become essential tools in genetics and molecular biology for the precise excision or integration of DNA sequences. However, their utility is currently limited to circumstances where the sites recognized by the recombinase enzyme have been introduced into the DNA being manipulated, or natural 'pseudosites' are already present. Many new applications would become feasible if recombinase activity could be targeted to chosen sequences in natural genomic DNA. Here we demonstrate efficient site-specific recombination at several sequences taken from a 1.9 kilobasepair locus of biotechnological interest (in the bovine β-casein gene, mediated by zinc finger recombinases (ZFRs, chimaeric enzymes with linked zinc finger (DNA recognition and recombinase (catalytic domains. In the "Z-sites" tested here, 22 bp casein gene sequences are flanked by 9 bp motifs recognized by zinc finger domains. Asymmetric Z-sites were recombined by the concomitant action of two ZFRs with different zinc finger DNA-binding specificities, and could be recombined with a heterologous site in the presence of a third recombinase. Our results show that engineered ZFRs may be designed to promote site-specific recombination at many natural DNA sequences.

  10. Viscous and gravitational fingering in multiphase compositional and compressible flow

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Viscous and gravitational fingering refer to flow instabilities in porous media that are triggered by adverse mobility or density ratios, respectively. These instabilities have been studied extensively in the past for (1) single-phase flow (e.g., contaminant transport in groundwater, first-contact-miscible displacement of oil by gas in hydrocarbon production), and (2) multi-phase immiscible and incompressible flow (e.g., water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection in oil reservoirs). Fingering in multiphase compositional and compressible flow has received much less attention, perhaps due to its high computational complexity. However, many important subsurface processes involve multiple phases that exchange species. Examples are carbon sequestration in saline aquifers and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by gas or WAG injection below the minimum miscibility pressure. In multiphase flow, relative permeabilities affect the mobility contrast for a given viscosity ratio. Phase behavior can also change local fluid properties, which can either enhance or mitigate viscous and gravitational instabilities. This work presents a detailed study of fingering behavior in compositional multiphase flow in two and three dimensions and considers the effects of (1) Fickian diffusion, (2) mechanical dispersion, (3) flow rates, (4) domain size and geometry, (5) formation heterogeneities, (6) gravity, and (7) relative permeabilities. Results show that fingering in compositional multiphase flow is profoundly different from miscible conditions and upscaling techniques used for the latter case are unlikely to be generalizable to the former.

  11. Finger image quality based on singular point localization

    Wang, Jinghua; Olsen, Martin A.; Busch, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Singular points are important global features of fingerprints and singular point localization is a crucial step in biometric recognition. Moreover the presence and position of the core point in a captured fingerprint sample can reflect whether the finger is placed properly on the sensor. Therefor...

  12. Tensile Strength of Finger Joints at Elevated Temperatures

    Nielsen, Peter C.; Olesen, Frits Bolonius

    A series of test s aimed a t establishing the effect of temperature upon the tensile strength parallel-to-grain of finger jointed laminae for glulam has been conducted in the Fire Research Laboratory at Aalborg University Centre. The objective of this report is to present the background to and the...

  13. Gold Finger: Metal Jewellery as a Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Therapy!

    T. Hlaing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyarticular psoriatic arthritis is a chronic, progressive and disabling auto-immune disease often affecting the small joints of the hands in a symmetrical fashion. The disease can progress rapidly causing joint swelling and damaging cartilage and bone around the joints resulting in severe deformities. We report a very unusual case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with polyarticular psoriatic arthritis affecting all proximal interphalangeal (PIP joints of both hands except the left ring finger PIP joint. On clinical examination there was no evidence of arthritis in the left ring finger PIP joint. We confirmed the paucity of joint damage in the PIP joint of the left ring finger using more modern imaging modalities such as musculoskeletal ultrasound and MRI scan of the small joints of the hands. All other PIP joints in both hands demonstrated advanced degrees of joint damage secondary to chronic psoriatic inflammatory arthritis. We postulated that wearing a gold wedding ring has helped protecting the PIP joint of the left ring finger from the damaging effect of inflammatory arthritis. The possible mechanisms by which metal jewellery (gold ring confer protection to adjacent joints was discussed.

  14. Multi-finger haptic interaction within the MIAMM project

    Michelitsch, G.; Ruf, A.; Veen, H.A.H.C. van; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we provide a brief introduction to MIAMM - a multimodal system for exploration of music databases. Among the modalities supported, haptics plays a central role. In particula1; multi-finger haptic interaction techniques for data shaping and exploration win be investigated. We explain ou

  15. Singing Greeting Card Beeper as a Finger Pulse Sensor

    Belusic, Gregor; Zupancic, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    We constructed a robust and low-priced finger pulse sensor from a singing greeting card beeper. The beeper outputs the plethysmographic signal, which is indistinguishable from that of commercial grade sensors. The sensor can be used in school for a number of experiments in human cardiovascular physiology.

  16. Radiographically ossified ganglion cyst of finger in a swimmer

    Ganglion cysts are fibrous-walled cystic lesions closely associated with joint or tendon sheaths and contain gelatinous mucinous fluid. The radiographic appearance is usually normal. Calcification or ossification in these cysts is extremely unusual. We report on an unusual appearing ganglion cyst of the little finger in a swimmer with ossification resembling myositis ossificans. (orig.)

  17. Radiographically ossified ganglion cyst of finger in a swimmer

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Anavim, A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Orange (United States); Lin, F. [Department of Pathology, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange (Canada)

    1998-12-01

    Ganglion cysts are fibrous-walled cystic lesions closely associated with joint or tendon sheaths and contain gelatinous mucinous fluid. The radiographic appearance is usually normal. Calcification or ossification in these cysts is extremely unusual. We report on an unusual appearing ganglion cyst of the little finger in a swimmer with ossification resembling myositis ossificans. (orig.) With 3 figs., 8 refs.

  18. Fabrication of a Functional Finger Prosthesis With Simple Attachment

    Pattanaik, Bikash; Pattanaik, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Finger prosthesis is more acceptable by the patient when it allows some of the movement in the prosthesis along with the restoration of a natural appearance to the lost structures of the patient. This article describes a custom-fabricated, custom-colored prostheses made from silicone elastomers with a simple attachment to make the prosthesis functional to imitate some of the movement.

  19. Finger millet (Eleucine coracana) flour as a vehicle for fortification with zinc.

    Tripathi, Bhumika; Platel, Kalpana

    2010-01-01

    Millets, being less expensive compared to cereals and the staple for the poorer sections of population, could be the choice for fortification with micronutrients such as zinc. In view of this, finger millet, widely grown and commonly consumed in southern India, was explored as a vehicle for fortification with zinc in this investigation. Finger millet flour fortified with either zinc oxide or zinc stearate so as to provide 50mg zinc per kg flour, was specifically examined for the bioaccessibility of the fortified mineral, as measured by in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion procedure and storage stability. Addition of the zinc salts increased the bioaccessible zinc content by 1.5-3 times that of the unfortified flour. Inclusion of EDTA along with the fortified salt significantly enhanced the bioaccessibility of zinc from the fortified flours, the increase being three-fold. Inclusion of citric acid along with the zinc salt and EDTA during fortification did not have any additional beneficial effect on zinc bioaccessiblity. Moisture and free fatty acid contents of the stored fortified flours indicated the keeping quality of the same, up to 60 days. Both zinc oxide and zinc stearate were equally effective as fortificants, when used in combination with EDTA as a co-fortificant. The preparation of either roti or dumpling from the fortified flours stored up to 60 days did not result in any significant compromise in the bioaccessible zinc content. Thus, the present study has revealed that finger millet flour can effectively be used as a vehicle for zinc fortification to derive additional amounts of bioaccessible zinc, with reasonably good storage stability, to combat zinc deficiency. PMID:20122580

  20. Finger ridge-count asymmetry and diversity in Andean Indians and interpopulation comparisons.

    Dittmar, M

    1998-03-01

    A separate analysis of ulnar and radial finger ridge-counts, obtained from 115 Aymara Indians (55 males and 60 females) of northern Chile, was performed. From these variables, directional asymmetry, fluctuating asymmetry, indices of bilateral asymmetry (square root of A2), and intraindividual diversity (s/square root of 5) were calculated for each sex. The results show that most bimanual differences for the ridge-counts are not statistically significant in the Aymara, except for radial counts in female first and second fingers (right hand means are larger), while most ulnar-radial differences are highly significant in both sexes (radial values exceed ulnar ones). Most sex differences do not reach statistical significance, although males have more ridge-counts, lower directional asymmetry, somewhat lower fluctuating asymmetry, and lower indices of asymmetry and diversity than females. As fluctuating asymmetry is not larger in males, the dermatoglyphic findings do not indicate support for the hypothesis that males are less canalized than females. In accordance with the findings of other authors, interpopulation comparisons in the indices of asymmetry and diversity show ethnic differences. Both indices tend to be low in samples of African ancestry, high in samples of European origin, and intermediate in the Aymara, while Indian groups are characterized by high asymmetry and low diversity values. Moreover, the data reveal a geographical trend in that asymmetry and diversity values tend to decrease from the northern to the southern hemisphere in populations of Europe, the Middle East, and Africa, thus indicating greater ridge-count variability and heterogeneity among fingers in northern populations. It is assumed that this gradient primarily reflects different degrees of miscegenation and heterozygosity. PMID:9545079

  1. An endophytic fungus isolated from finger millet (Eleusine coracana) produces anti-fungal natural products

    Mousa, Walaa K.; Schwan, Adrian; Davidson, Jeffrey; Strange, Philip; Liu, Huaizhi; Zhou, Ting; Auzanneau, France-Isabelle; Raizada, Manish N

    2015-01-01

    Finger millet is an ancient African cereal crop, domesticated 7000 years ago in Ethiopia, reaching India at 3000 BC. Finger millet is reported to be resistant to various fungal pathogens including Fusarium sp. We hypothesized that finger millet may host beneficial endophytes (plant-colonizing microbes) that contribute to the antifungal activity. Here we report the first isolation of endophyte(s) from finger millet. Five distinct fungal species were isolated from roots and predicted taxonomica...

  2. Improving Finger Coordination in Young and Elderly Persons

    Wu, Yen-Hsun; Pazin, Nemanja; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effects of a single practice session of a variable task with subject specific adjustments of task difficulty (instability) on indices of multi-finger coordination in young and elderly persons. The main hypothesis was that practicing such a task would lead to contrasting changes in the amounts of two components of variance estimated across repetitive trials within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis: VUCM that had no effect on total force and VORT that affected total force. In addition, we also expected to see strong transfer effects to a different task. A variable task with graded instability was designed to encourage use of variable solutions during the accurate production of total force with two fingers. The subjects practiced with the index and middle fingers pressing on individual force sensors. Overall, the older subjects showed lower indices of performance and higher indices of both VUCM and VORT. After about one hour of practice, both groups showed an increase in the index of involuntary force production by non-task fingers (enslaving). Both groups improved the indices of performance. The two variance indices showed opposite effects of practice: VORT dropped with practice while VUCM increased leading to an increase in the total amount of variance in the space of commands to fingers and in the index of force-stabilizing synergy. Performance in a simpler, non-practiced task improved, but there was no transfer of the changes in the structure of variance. Specifically, both variance components, VORT and VUCM, dropped in the non-practiced task. The results show that the neural system responsible for synergies stabilizing important features of performance is highly adaptable to practice of tasks designed to encourage use of variable solutions. We view the results as highly promising for future use in populations with impaired coordination characterized by low synergy indices. PMID:23411675

  3. Multi-finger prehension: control of a redundant mechanical system.

    Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2009-01-01

    The human hand has been a fascinating object of study for researchers in both biomechanics and motor control. Studies of human prehension have contributed significantly to the progress in addressing the famous problem of motor redundancy. After a brief review of the hand mechanics, we present results of recent studies that support a general view that the apparently redundant design of the hand is not a source of computational problems but a rich apparatus that allows performing a variety of tasks in a reliable and flexible way (the principle of abundance). Multi-digit synergies have been analyzed at two levels of a hypothetical hierarchy involved in the control of prehensile actions. At the upper level, forces and moments produced by the thumb and virtual finger (an imagined finger with a mechanical action equal to the combined mechanical action of all four fingers of the hand) co-vary to stabilize the gripping action and the orientation of the hand-held object. These results support the principle of superposition suggested earlier in robotics with respect to the control of artificial grippers. At the lower level of the hierarchy, forces and moments produced by individual fingers co-vary to stabilize the magnitude and direction of the force vector and the moment of force produced by the virtual finger. Adjustments to changes in task constraints (such as, for example, friction under individual digits) may be local and synergic. The latter reflect multi-digit prehension synergies and may be analyzed with the so-called chain effects: Sequences of relatively straightforward cause-effect links directly related to mechanical constraints leading to non-trivial strong co-variation between pairs of elemental variables. Analysis of grip force adjustments during motion of hand-held objects suggests that the central nervous system adjusts to gravitational and inertial loads differently. The human hand is a gold mine for researchers interested in the control of natural human

  4. 78 FR 35098 - Proposed Information Collection (Hand and Finger Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    2013-06-11

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Hand and Finger Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Hand or Finger Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any.... Title: Hand and Finger Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-7. OMB Control Number:...

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma of the finger masquerading as an abscess. Case report.

    O'Sullivan, S T

    2012-02-03

    A 43-year-old man presented with an abscess on his left ring finger, which recurred despite multiple drainage procedures. Histological examination of the lesion was unhelpful; it was only on histopathological examination of the finger after ray amputation that the diagnosis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma was established. This case illustrates the need to consider malignancy when dealing with chronic finger infections.

  6. The conservative treatment of mallet finger with a simple splint: a case report.

    Maitra, A.; Dorani, B

    1993-01-01

    Sixty patients with mallet finger deformity were randomly treated with either a Stack or a custom-made padded aluminium alloy malleable finger splint. Both splints were equally effective in correcting the deformity but the aluminium alloy splint was able to be fitted to a wider variety of finger shapes and sizes and caused significantly fewer skin complications.

  7. Miller scaling of finger properties in sandy soils: An indirect method for estimating finger width and velocity

    Wetting front instability is gravity driven and breaks a uniform flat front into vertically moving fingers. Linear stability analysis, dimensional analysis, and experimentation have yielded formulations in two-dimensional systems. Nondimensionalizing the flow equations yields scaled forms of the conductivity and moisture characteristics containing the microscopic length scale; fluid density; fluid dynamic viscosity; and fluid surface tension. 39 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. A new family of zinc finger proteins in petunia: structure, DNA sequence recognition, and floral organ-specific expression.

    Takatsuji, H; Nakamura, N; Katsumoto, Y

    1994-07-01

    We have previously cloned a gene for a zinc finger protein (EPF1) that is expressed specifically in petals and interacts with the promoter region of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase gene in petunia. In an attempt to isolate genes encoding additional factors that interact with this promoter, we cloned four novel genes encoding zinc finger proteins (EPF2-5a, EPF2-5b, EPF2-4, and EPF2-7). Sequence analyses revealed that overall similarity between the EPF1 and the EPF2 protein family, except in the zinc finger motifs and the basic amino acid cluster, was very low, suggesting that the two groups belong to different subfamilies. DNA binding specificities of EPF1, EPF2-5, and EPF2-4 were very similar, as expected from the conserved zinc finger motifs. However, EPF2-7 showed no binding to the probes tested in spite of having the conserved motifs. DNA binding studies using a series of spacing mutant probes suggested a binding mechanism in which the EPF proteins recognize spacings in target DNA. RNA gel blot analyses and histochemical analyses with a promoter and beta-glucuronidase fusion revealed that expression of the EPF2-5 gene (EPF2-5) was petal and stamen specific. Expression of the EPF2-7 gene (EPF2-7) was sepal and petal specific and localized in vascular tissues. The preferential expression in two adjacent floral organs raises the possibility that these genes are downstream transcription factors of floral homeotic genes. PMID:8069106

  9. Schlieren Imaging of Gravitational Instabilities during Miscible Viscous Fingering of Glycerol-Water Systems

    Marin, Daniela; Stewart, Simone; Bunton, Patrick; Meiburg, Eckart; de Wit, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Viscous fingering occurs when a lower viscosity fluid displaces a higher viscosity fluid causing interfacial instabilities creating finger-like patterns. In a typical flow, the less viscous fluid is injected into the higher viscous fluid that is between the plates of a Hele-Shaw cell. In most cases for transparent flows, dye is dissolved into the displacing fluid in order to observe it. This work uses Schlieren imaging of miscible fluid displacements in a horizontal Hele-Shaw Cell, which reveals new information about the three-dimensional nature of VF. A Schlieren system is composed of a parallel light beam, a lens that brings the light to a focus, a cutoff of some type, and a camera. Schlieren does not require dye, ensuring the natural flow of the fluids is undisturbed. Here the imaging system is described followed by results of miscible flows of water in to aqueous glycerol solutions. Structures attributable to three-dimensional buoyancy-driven flows are readily observed. These results are interpreted in light of recent three-dimensional calculations. Supported by National Science Foundation CBET-1335739.

  10. Schlieren imaging of viscous fingering in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell

    Bunton, P.; Marin, D.; Stewart, S.; Meiburg, E.; De Wit, A.

    2016-02-01

    Interfaces between different fluids can be unstable with regard to hydrodynamic instabilities such as viscous fingering or buoyancy-driven convection. To study such instabilities experimentally for transparent fluids, dyes or chemical indicators are most often used to track the dynamics. While the interfacial deformation can easily be tracked by color changes, it is difficult to have access to the internal flow structure for comparison with theoretical predictions. To overcome this problem, a modification of a Schlieren technique is introduced to image 3D flows during viscously driven instabilities in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell without using any dye or chemical indicator. The method is exquisitely sensitive, readily yielding information about 3D flows in gaps under a millimeter and allowing imaging of the flow structure internal to the fingers, rather than merely imaging the flow boundary. Following a description of the technique, visualization of dynamics for nonreactive water-glycerol and reactive displacements is presented revealing previously unobserved internal flows. These flows are tentatively interpreted in terms of known theoretical predictions.