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Sample records for a-mediated photodynamic therapy

  1. Pheophorbide a mediated photodynamic therapy against human epidermoid carcinoma cells (A431)

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Li, Wen-Tyng

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the death mechanism of human epidermoid carcinoma cells (A431) triggered by photodynamic therapy (PDT) with pheophorbide a. First of all, significant inhibition on the survival of A431 cells (N-Acetyl cysteine prevented ROS production and increased cell survival thereafter. The decrease in cellular ATP level was also observed at 6 hrs after PDT. Typical apoptotic cellular morphology and a collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential occurred after PDT. The loss of mitochondrial membrane potential led to the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol, followed by activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. The activation of caspase-3 resulted in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage in A431 cells, followed by DNA fragmentation. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that pheophorbide a possessed photodynamic action against A431 cells, mainly through apoptosis mediated by mitochondrial intrinsic pathway triggered by ROS.

  2. Pain in photodynamic therapy

    Mircea Tampa; Maria Isabela Sârbu; Mădălina-Irina Mitran; Cristina-Iulia Mitran; Adrian Dumitru; Vasile Benea; Simona-Roxana Georgescu

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a modern treatment with applications in several medical specialties, which has been intensely studied in the last years. The main indications in dermatology are actinic keratosis, superficial basal cell carcinoma and Bowen's disease- common skin disorders in which photodynamic therapy proved its efficacy. At present, the use of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of other skin disorders is profoundly researched. Pain is the most common and redoubtable adverse effect...

  3. Pain in photodynamic therapy

    Mircea Tampa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy is a modern treatment with applications in several medical specialties, which has been intensely studied in the last years. The main indications in dermatology are actinic keratosis, superficial basal cell carcinoma and Bowen's disease- common skin disorders in which photodynamic therapy proved its efficacy. At present, the use of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of other skin disorders is profoundly researched. Pain is the most common and redoubtable adverse effect of photodynamic therapy and it is the most important factor affecting the patient's adherence to treatment. The aim of this article is to look over the most recent medical studies regarding pain in PDT, with emphasis on the factors affecting the occurrence of pain and the most recent strategies for controlling photodynamic therapy- related pain.

  4. Explicit dosimetry for 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a-mediated photodynamic therapy: macroscopic singlet oxygen modeling

    Penjweini, Rozhin; Liu, Baochang; Kim, Michele M.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-12-01

    Type II photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the photochemical reactions mediated through an interaction between a photosensitizer, ground-state oxygen ([O]), and light excitation at an appropriate wavelength, which results in production of reactive singlet oxygen ([]rx). We use an empirical macroscopic model based on four photochemical parameters for the calculation of []rx threshold concentration ([]rx,sh) causing tissue necrosis in tumors after PDT. For this reason, 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH)-mediated PDT was performed interstitially on mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors. A linear light source at 665 nm with total energy released per unit length of 12 to 100 J/cm and source power per unit length (LS) of 12 to 150 mW/cm was used to induce different radii of necrosis. Then the amount of []rx calculated by the macroscopic model incorporating explicit PDT dosimetry of light fluence distribution, tissue optical properties, and HPPH concentration was correlated to the necrotic radius to obtain the model parameters and []rx,sh. We provide evidence that []rx is a better dosimetric quantity for predicting the treatment outcome than PDT dose, which is proportional to the time integral of the products of the photosensitizer concentration and light fluence rate.

  5. Explicit dosimetry for 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a-mediated photodynamic therapy: macroscopic singlet oxygen modeling.

    Penjweini, Rozhin; Liu, Baochang; Kim, Michele M; Zhu, Timothy C

    2015-12-01

    Type II photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the photochemical reactions mediated through an interaction between a photosensitizer, ground-state oxygen ([(3)O2]), and light excitation at an appropriate wavelength, which results in production of reactive singlet oxygen ([(1)O2]rx). We use an empirical macroscopic model based on four photochemical parameters for the calculation of [(1)O2]rx threshold concentration ([(1)O2]rx,sh) causing tissue necrosis in tumors after PDT. For this reason, 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH)-mediated PDT was performed interstitially on mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors. A linear light source at 665 nm with total energy released per unit length of 12 to 100  J/cm and source power per unit length (LS) of 12 to 150  mW/cm was used to induce different radii of necrosis. Then the amount of [(1)O2]rx calculated by the macroscopic model incorporating explicit PDT dosimetry of light fluence distribution, tissue optical properties, and HPPH concentration was correlated to the necrotic radius to obtain the model parameters and [(1)O2]rx,sh. We provide evidence that [(1)O2]rx is a better dosimetric quantity for predicting the treatment outcome than PDT dose, which is proportional to the time integral of the products of the photosensitizer concentration and light fluence rate. PMID:26720883

  6. Photodynamic therapy in dentistry.

    Konopka, K; Goslinski, T

    2007-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), also known as photoradiation therapy, phototherapy, or photochemotherapy, involves the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer) that is activated by exposure to light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. The transfer of energy from the activated photosensitizer to available oxygen results in the formation of toxic oxygen species, such as singlet oxygen and free radicals. These very reactive chemical species can damage proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and other cellular components. Applications of PDT in dentistry are growing rapidly: the treatment of oral cancer, bacterial and fungal infection therapies, and the photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of the malignant transformation of oral lesions. PDT has shown potential in the treatment of oral leukoplakia, oral lichen planus, and head and neck cancer. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) has been efficacious in the treatment of bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral infections. The absence of genotoxic and mutagenic effects of PDT is an important factor for long-term safety during treatment. PDT also represents a novel therapeutic approach in the management of oral biofilms. Disruption of plaque structure has important consequences for homeostasis within the biofilm. Studies are now leading toward selective photosensitizers, since killing the entire flora leaves patients open to opportunistic infections. Dentists deal with oral infections on a regular basis. The oral cavity is especially suitable for PACT, because it is relatively accessible to illumination. PMID:17652195

  7. Photodynamic therapy in dermatology

    Nayak Chitra

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy is a new modality of therapy being used for the diagnosis and treatment of many tumors. It is now being increasingly used for skin tumors and other dermatological disorders. With its range of application it is certainly the therapy of the future. Its mechanism of action is by the Type II photo-oxidative reaction. The variables are the photosensitizer, the tissue oxygenation and the light source. It has been used to treat various disorders including Bowen′s disease, actinic keratoses, squamous cell carcinomas, basal cell carcinomas, and mycosis fungoides. The side-effects are fortunately mild and transient. Newer photosensitisers like methyl aminolevulinate hold a lot of promise for better therapy.

  8. Photodynamic therapy for epilepsy

    Zusman, Edie; Sidhu, Manpreet; Coon, Valerie; Scott, Nicholas; Bisland, Stuart; Tsukamoto, Tara

    2006-02-01

    Epilepsy is surgically curable if the seizure focus can be localized and does not include areas of eloquent cortex. Because epileptic cells are indistinct from surrounding brain, resection typically includes normal tissue. Using the rat kindling model of epilepsy, we evaluated Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) as a super-selective lesioning technique. We present a series of pilot studies to evaluate: 1) Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence, 2) the efficacy of PDT to raise seizure thresholds, 3) the safety of PDT using behavioral studies, and 4) histologic results. Bipolar electrodes were chronically implanted into the cortex and animals received successive low-level stimulation generating seizures of increasing severity. Following 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) administration, fully kindled rats received electrical stimulation to induce a generalized seizure. Animals were irradiated with laser light focused onto a temporal craniectomy. Our results show: 1) an increase in PpIX fluorescence in the seizure group, 2) PDT treated animals failed to demonstrate seizure activity following repeat stimulation, 3) no statistically significant difference between treated and control animals were observed on behavioral tests, 4) histology showed pyknotic hippocampal pyramidal cells in the CA3 region without areas of obvious necrosis. In conclusion, this is the first report of heightened PpIX-mediated fluorescence in epileptic brain. The selective accumulation of PpIX with laser PDT may provide a less invasive and more precise technique for obliteration of epileptic foci. PDT warrants additional research to determine if this technique may augment or replace existing procedures for the surgical management of epilepsy.

  9. Photodynamic Therapy in Pediatric Dentistry

    Patricia da Silva Barbosa; Danilo Antônio Duarte; Mariana Ferreira Leite; Giselle Rodrigues de Sant’ Anna

    2014-01-01

    Conservation of deciduous teeth with pulp alterations caused by caries and trauma is a major therapeutic challenge in pediatric dentistry as a result of the internal anatomy and life cycle characteristic. It is essential that the root canal procedures sanitizers have a performance in eliminating bacterial. In this context, antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PAT) is promising and emerging as adjuvant therapy in an attempt to eliminate the microorganisms persistent to chemi-mechanical preparat...

  10. Photodynamic therapy in clinical practice

    E. V. Filonenko; L. G. Serova

    2016-01-01

    The review is on opportunities and possibilities of application of photodynamic therapy in clinical practice. The advantages of this method are the targeting of effect on tumor foci and high efficiency along with low systemic toxicity. The results of the set of recent Russian and foreign clinical trials are represented in the review. The method is successfully used in clinical practice with both radical (for early vulvar, cervical cancer and pre-cancer, central early lung cancer, esophageal a...

  11. Can nanotechnology potentiate photodynamic therapy?

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Dai, Tianhong; Chung, Hoon; Yaroslavsky, Anastasia; Garcia-Diaz, Maria; Chang, Julie; Long Y. Chiang; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of non-toxic dyes and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that can kill cancer cells and infectious microorganisms. Due to the tendency of most photosensitizers (PS) to be poorly soluble and to form nonphotoactive aggregates, drug-delivery vehicles have become of high importance. The nanotechnology revolution has provided many examples of nanoscale drug-delivery platforms that have been applied to PDT. These include liposom...

  12. Photodynamic therapy for wound treatment

    Diddens, Heyke; Arp, Niko; Eisenbeiß, Werner

    2006-01-01

    With a combination of photodynamic therapy using the photosensitizer toluidine blue O plus the antiseptic octenisept, it is possible to attain a sufficient bacterial-count reduction with simultaneous low cytotoxicity to human skin cells. This novel concept may find application in various clinical areas, for instance, in burn medicine or in killing antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Using the strategy we developed, it may be possible to prevent the development of resistence to a broad spectrum of...

  13. Clinical Application of Photodynamic Therapy

    LIU Hui-long; LIU Duan-qi

    2005-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy(PDT) is a new medical technology, the study on photodynamic therapy was in full swing in the past two decade. Scientists have made great progress in it. Photosensitizer,oxygen and light source play important role in photodynamic therapy.PDT is a light activated chemotherapy. A photon is adsorbed by a photosensitizer which moves the drug into an excited state. The excited drug can then pass its energy to oxygen to create a chemical radical called "singlet oxygen". Singlet oxygen attacks cellular structures by oxidation. Such oxidative damage might be oxidation of cell membranes or proteins. When the accumulation of oxidative damage exceeds a threshold level,the cell begins to die.Photodynamic therapy allows selective treatment of localized cancer. PDT involves administration of a photosensitizer to the patients, followed by delivery of light to the cancerous region. The light activates the agent which kills the cancer cells. Without light,the agent is harmless.As a new therapy,photodynamic Therapy has great Advantage in treating cancers. 1. PDT avoids systemic treatment. The treatment occurs only where light is delivered, hence the patient does not undergo go needless systemic treatment when treating localized disease. Side-effects are avoided, from losing hair or suffering nausea to more serious complications. 2. PDT is selective. The photosensitizing agent will selectively accumulate in cancer cells and not in surrounding normal tissues.Hence ,there is selective targeting of the cancer and sparing of surrounding tissues.3. when surgery is not possible. PDT kills cancer cells but does not damage collagenous tissue structures,and normal cells will repopulate these structures. Hence,if a patient has cancer in a structure that cannot be removed surgically(eg. ,the upper bronchi of the lung) ,PDT can still treat the site. 4. PDT is repeatable. Unilke radiation therapy, PDT can be used again and again. Hence,it offers a means of longterm management

  14. Nanodrug applications in photodynamic therapy.

    Paszko, Edyta

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has developed over last century and is now becoming a more widely used medical tool having gained regulatory approval for the treatment of various diseases such as cancer and macular degeneration. It is a two-step technique in which the delivery of a photosensitizing drug is followed by the irradiation of light. Activated photosensitizers transfer energy to molecular oxygen which results in the generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn cause cells apoptosis or necrosis. Although this modality has significantly improved the quality of life and survival time for many cancer patients it still offers significant potential for further improvement. In addition to the development of new PDT drugs, the use of nanosized carriers for photosensitizers is a promising approach which might improve the efficiency of photodynamic activity and which can overcome many side effects associated with classic photodynamic therapy. This review aims at highlighting the different types of nanomedical approaches currently used in PDT and outlines future trends and limitations of nanodelivery of photosensitizers.

  15. A history of photodynamic therapy.

    Daniell, M D; Hill, J S

    1991-05-01

    The origins of light as a therapy in medicine and surgery are traced from antiquity to the modern day. Phototherapy began in ancient Greece, Egypt and India but disappeared for many centuries, only being rediscovered by Western civilization at the beginning of the twentieth century through the Dane, Niels Finsen, and the Germans Oscar Raab and Herman von Tappeiner. The discovery of the tumour-localizing ability of haematoporphyrin, together with its phototoxic effect on tumour cells led to the development of photodynamic therapy, a promising tool in modern cancer treatment. PMID:2025186

  16. Photodynamic therapy for wound treatment

    Diddens, Heyke

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available With a combination of photodynamic therapy using the photosensitizer toluidine blue O plus the antiseptic octenisept, it is possible to attain a sufficient bacterial-count reduction with simultaneous low cytotoxicity to human skin cells. This novel concept may find application in various clinical areas, for instance, in burn medicine or in killing antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Using the strategy we developed, it may be possible to prevent the development of resistence to a broad spectrum of pathogens due to too-frequent use of systemic antibiotics, reserving these for life-threatening infections.

  17. Photodynamic therapy for cervical lesions

    E. V. Grebenkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The experience of treatment for precancer and early cervical cancer by photodynamic therapy in 12 patients with primary diagnosis H-SIL (CIN II–III and cancer in situ is described. Chlo-rine photosensitizer Photolon was given intravenously at a dose of 0.75–1.15 mg/kg body weight. 2.5 h later the treatment with polyposition laser exposure (light dose – 150 J/cm2, light power density – 400–500 mW/cm2 was made. Thirty days later conization of the cervix with endocervical curettage assessing therapeutic response of cervical tumor tissue was per-formed. According to histological data complete response was in 4 patients, minute foci of CIN I were determined in 7 patients, 1 patient had foci of CIN II. 8 of 10 HPV-positive patients had complete eradication of HPV after treatment. There were no serious adverse events after light exposure. Marked therapeutic response, high anti-viral activity and good feasibility allow to consider photodynamic therapy as alternative organ-sparing treatment of early cancer and pre-cancer of cervix. 

  18. Photodynamic Cancer Therapy - Recent Advances

    The basic principle of the photodynamic effect was discovered over a hundred years ago leading to the pioneering work on PDT in Europe. It was only during the 1980s, however, when 'photoradiation therapy' was investigated as a possible treatment modality for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemotherapeutic process which requires the use of a photosensitizer (PS) that, upon entry into a cancer cell is targeted by laser irradiation to initiate a series of events that contribute to cell death. PSs are light-sensitive dyes activated by a light source at a specific wavelength and can be classified as first or second generation PSs based on its origin and synthetic pathway. The principle of PS activation lies in a photochemical reaction resulting from excitation of the PS producing singlet oxygen which in turn reacts and damages cell organelles and biomolecules required for cell function and ultimately leading to cell destruction. Several first and second generation PSs have been studied in several different cancer types in the quest to optimize treatment. PSs including haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), aminolevulinic acid (ALA), chlorins, bacteriochlorins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, pheophorbiedes and purpurins all require selective uptake and retention by cancer cells prior to activation by a light source and subsequent cell death induction. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the fluorescence effect exhibited by PSs upon irradiation and is often used concurrently with PDT to detect and locate tumours. Both laser and light emitting diodes (LED) have been used for PDT depending on the location of the tumour. Internal cancers more often require the use of laser light delivery using fibre optics as delivery system while external PDT often make use of LEDs. Normal cells have a lower uptake of the PS in comparison to tumour cells, however the acute cytotoxic effect of the compound on the recovery rate of normal cells is not known. Subcellular

  19. Dye Sensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy

    Harold S. Freeman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Photofrin® was first approved in the 1990s as a sensitizer for use in treating cancer via photodynamic therapy (PDT. Since then a wide variety of dye sensitizers have been developed and a few have been approved for PDT treatment of skin and organ cancers and skin diseases such as acne vulgaris. Porphyrinoid derivatives and precursors have been the most successful in producing requisite singlet oxygen, with Photofrin® still remaining the most efficient sensitizer (quantum yield = 0.89 and having broad food and drug administration (FDA approval for treatment of multiple cancer types. Other porphyrinoid compounds that have received approval from US FDA and regulatory authorities in other countries include benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA, meta-tetra(hydroxyphenylchlorin (m-THPC, N-aspartyl chlorin e6 (NPe6, and precursors to endogenous protoporphyrin IX (PpIX: 1,5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA, methyl aminolevulinate (MAL, hexaminolevulinate (HAL. Although no non-porphyrin sensitizer has been approved for PDT applications, a small number of anthraquinone, phenothiazine, xanthene, cyanine, and curcuminoid sensitizers are under consideration and some are being evaluated in clinical trials. This review focuses on the nature of PDT, dye sensitizers that have been approved for use in PDT, and compounds that have entered or completed clinical trials as PDT sensitizers.

  20. Daylight photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis

    Wiegell, Stine; Wulf, H C; Szeimies, R-M;

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an attractive therapy for non-melanoma skin cancers including actinic keratoses (AKs) because it allows treatment of large areas; it has a high response rate and results in an excellent cosmesis. However, conventional PDT for AKs is associated with inconveniently lon...

  1. Photodynamic therapy, new drugs, new lasers

    In the mid-1970's Dougherty and co-workers reintroduced hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) as tumor localizer and photosensitizer for the detection and treatment of neoplastic disease. The efforts of this group led to the introduction of the combination of HpD and lasers for the treatment of a number of human neoplasms. During the late 1970's and throughout most of the 1980's efforts were made to determine the active component in the mixture of porphyrins which comprise HpO. The standard light source used in HpD was the argon-dye laser. Recently new photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy have been introduced. These newer photosensitizers are pure and not mixtures and are associated with less side effects than HpD. Concomitant with the development of new photosensitizers has been the development of new laser systems for photodynamic therapy. In this paper current developments in new drugs and new lasers for photodynamic therapy are presented

  2. Photodynamic therapy of diseased bone

    Bisland, Stuart K.; Yee, Albert; Siewerdsen, Jeffery; Wilson, Brian C.; Burch, Shane

    2005-08-01

    Objective: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) defines the oxygen-dependent reaction that occurs upon light-mediated activation of a photosensitizing compound, culminating in the generation of cytotoxic, reactive oxygen species, predominantly, singlet oxygen. We are investigating PDT treatment of diseased bone. Methods: Using a rat model of human breast cancer (MT-1)-derived bone metastasis we confirmed the efficacy of benzoporphyrin-derivative monoacid (BPD-MA)-PDT for treating metastatic lesions within vertebrae or long bones. Results: Light administration (150 J) 15 mins after BPDMA (2.5 mg/Kg, i.v.) into the lumbar (L3) vertebra of rats resulted in complete ablation of the tumour and surrounding bone marrow 48 hrs post-PDT without paralysis. Porcine vertebrae provided a model comparable to that of human for light propagation (at 150 J/cm) and PDT response (BPD-MA; 6 mg/m2, i.v.) in non-tumour vertebrae. Precise fibre placement was afforded by 3-D cone beam computed tomography. Average penetration depth of light was 0.16 +/- 0.04 cm, however, the necrotic/non-necrotic interface extended 0.6 cm out from the treatment fiber with an average incident fluence rate of 4.3 mW/cm2. Non-necrotic tissue damage was evident 2 cm out from the treatment fiber. Current studies involving BPD-MA-PDT treatment of primary osteosarcomas in the forelimbs of dogs are very promising. Magnetic resonance imaging 24 hr post treatment reveal well circumscribed margins of treatment that encompass the entire 3-4 cm lesion. Finally, we are also interested in using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) mediated PDT to treat osteomyelitis. Response to therapy was monitored as changes in bioluminescence signal of staphylococcus aureus (SA)-derived biofilms grown onto 0.5 cm lengths of wire and subjected to ALA-PDT either in vitro or in vivo upon implant into the intramedullary space of rat tibia. Transcutaneous delivery of PDT (75 J/cm2) effectively eradicated SAbiofilms within bone. Conclusions: Results support

  3. Pain induced by photodynamic therapy of warts

    Stender, I-M; Borgbjerg, F Molke; Villumsen, J;

    2006-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), followed by irradiation with red light (ALA-PDT), is used for non-melanoma skin cancer and other dermatological diseases. Pain during and after light exposure is a well-known adverse advent that may be a limiting factor for treatment...

  4. Photodynamic therapy for hair removal

    Mohamed H. M. Ali

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unwanted hair is one of the most common medical problems affecting women of reproductive age inducing a lot of psychological stress and threatening their femininity and self-esteem. Old methods of removing unwanted hair include shaving, waxing, chemical depilation, and electrolysis, all of which have temporary results. However laser-assisted hair removal is the most efficient method of long-term hair removal currently available. It is desirable to develop a reduced cost photodynamic therapy (PDT system whose properties should include high efficiency and low side-effects. Method: Mice skin tissues were used in this study and divided into six groups such as controls, free methylene blue (MB incubation, liposome methylene blue (MB incubation, laser without methylene blue (MB, free methylene blue (MB for 3 and 4 hrs and laser, liposome methylene blue (MB for 3 hrs and laser. Methylene blue (MBwas applied to wax epilated areas. The areas were irradiated with CW He-Ne laser system that emits orange-red light with wavelength 632.8 nm and 10 mW at energy density of 5 J/ cm2 for 10 minutes. The UV-visible absorption spectrum was collected by Cary spectrophotometer. Results: Methylene blue (MB is selectively absorbed by actively growing hair follicles due to its cationic property. Methylene blue (MBuntreated sections showed that hair follicle and sebaceous gland are intact and there is no change due to the laser exposure. Free methylene blue (MB sections incubated for 3 hrs showed that He:Ne laser induced destruction in hair follicles, leaving an intact epidermis. Treated section with free methylene blue (MB for 4 hrs showed degeneration and necrosis in hair follicle, leaving an intact epidermis. Liposomal methylene blue (MB sections incubated for 3 hrs showed He:Ne laser induced destruction in hair follicles with intradermal leucocytic infiltration. Conclusions: Low power CW He:Ne laser and methylene blue (MB offered a successful PDT system

  5. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics

    Vivek Kumar; Jolly Sinha; Neelu Verma; Kamal Nayan; Saimbi, C. S.; Amitandra K Tripathi

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is...

  6. Photodynamic therapy with verteporfin for corneal neovascularization

    Abdullah A Al-Torbak

    2012-01-01

    Results: At the last follow-up visit, 22 (66.7% eyes showed a decrease in corneal neovascularization and evidence of vascular thrombosis. Complete vascular occlusion was achieved in 14 (42.4% eyes, partial occlusion was achieved in 8 (24.2% eyes, and the vessels were patent in 11 (33.3% eyes. The corneal neovascularization score and depth of the vessels were found to be significant risk factors for failure (P = 0.0001 and 0.046, respectively. However, the diagnoses or causes of corneal neovascularisation were not statistically significant. No significant systemic or ocular complications associated with photodynamic therapy were observed. Conclusion: Photodynamic therapy with verteporfin was effective for the treatment of corneal neovascularization in the majority of the cases in this study.

  7. Photodynamic therapy for occluded biliary metal stents

    Roche, Joseph V. E.; Krasner, Neville; Sturgess, R.

    1999-02-01

    In this abstract we describe the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to recanalize occluded biliary metal stents. In patients with jaundice secondary to obstructed metal stents PDT was carried out 72 hours after the administration of m THPC. Red laser light at 652 nm was delivered endoscopically at an energy intensity of 50 J/cm. A week later endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram showed complete recanalization of the metal stent.

  8. Photodynamic therapy for pododermatitis in penguins.

    Sellera, Fábio Parra; Sabino, Caetano Padial; Ribeiro, Martha Simões; Fernandes, Loriê Tukamoto; Pogliani, Fabio Celidonio; Teixeira, Carlos Roberto; Dutra, Gustavo Henrique Pereira; Nascimento, Cristiane Lassálvia

    2014-01-01

    Pododermatitis is currently one of most frequent and important clinical complications in seabirds kept in captivity or in rehabilitation centers. In this study, five Magellanic penguins with previous pododermatitis lesions on their footpad were treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT). All PDT treated lesions successfully regressed and no recurrence was observed during the 6-month follow-up period. PDT seems to be an inexpensive and effective alternative treatment for pododermatitis in Magellanic penguins encouraging further research on this topic. PMID:24888264

  9. Animal models for photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    Silva, Zenildo Santos; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs non-toxic dyes called photosensitizers (PSs), which absorb visible light to give the excited singlet state, followed by the long-lived triplet state that can undergo photochemistry. In the presence of ambient oxygen, reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals are formed that are able to kill cancer cells, inactivate microbial pathogens and destroy unwanted tissue. Although there are already several clinically approved PSs for...

  10. Photodynamic therapy for treatment subretinal neovascularization

    Avetisov, Sergey E.; Budzinskaja, Maria V.; Kiseleva, Tatyana N.; Balatskaya, Natalia V.; Gurova, Irina V.; Loschenov, Viktor B.; Shevchik, Sergey A.; Kuzmin, Sergey G.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.

    2007-07-01

    This work are devoted our experience with photodynamic therapy (PDT) with > for patients with choroidal neovascularization (CNV). 18 patients with subfoveal CNV in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), 24 patients with subfoveal CNV in pathological myopia (PM) and 4 patients with subfoveal CNV associated with toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis were observed. CNV was 100% classic in all study patients. Standardized protocol refraction, visual acuity testing, ophthalmologic examinations, biomicroscopy, fluorescein angiography, and ultrasonography were performed before treatment and 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after treatment; were used to evaluate the results of photodynamic therapy with > (0.02% solution of mixture sulfonated aluminium phtalocyanine 0.05 mg/kg, intravenously). A diode laser (>, Inc, Moscow) was used operating in the range of 675 nm. Need for retreatment was based on fluorescein angiographic evidence of leakage at 3-month follow-up intervals. At 3, 6, 9 month 26 (56.5%) patients had significant improvement in the mean visual acuity. At the end of the 12-month minimal fluorescein leakage from choroidal neovascularization was seen in 12 (26.1%) patients and the mean visual acuity was slightly worse than 0.2 which was not statistically significant as compared with the baseline visual acuity. Patients with fluorescein leakage from CNV underwent repeated PDT with >. 3D-mode ultrasound shown the decreasing thickness of chorioretinal complex in CNV area. Photodynamic therapy with > can safely reduce the risk of severe vision loss in patients with predominantly classic subfoveal choroidal neovascularization secondary to AMD, PM and toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis.

  11. Hormonal component of tumor photodynamic therapy response

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush

    2008-02-01

    The involvement of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones in the response of the treatment of solid tumors by photodynamic therapy (PDT) comes from the induction of acute phase response by this modality. This adrenal gland activity is orchestrated through the engagement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal axis incited by stress signals emanating from the PDT-treated tumor. Glucocorticoid hormone activity engendered within the context of PDT-induced acute phase response performs multiple important functions; among other involvements they beget acute phase reactant production, systemic neutrophil mobilization, and control the production of inflammation-modulating and immunoregulatory proteins.

  12. Flexible textile light diffuser for photodynamic therapy

    Selm, Barbel; Camenzind, Martin

    2005-03-01

    In this article a new medical application is introduced using textile production techniques to deliver a defined radiation dose. The advantage for photodynamic therapy (PDT) is that a flat luminous textile structure can homogeneously illuminate unequal body surfaces. The optical properties of this two-dimensional luminous pad are characterized with a set of bench-scale tests. In vitro investigations on petri dishes with cultivated cells and first clinical tests on animal patients are promising. In addition first measurement results are presented together with an outlook to future developments.

  13. [Photodynamic therapy for head and neck cancer

    Lajer, C.B.; Specht, Lena; Kirkegaard, J.;

    2006-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new treatment for head and neck cancer. The principle of the treatment is a photochemical reaction initiated by light activation of a photosensitizer, which causes the death of the exposed tissue. This article presents the modes of action of PDT and the techniques as...... well as the clinical procedure. A critical review of the literature is also presented, regarding treatment results of the different techniques and indications for treatments. The possibilities for PDT for head and neck cancer in Denmark are mentioned Udgivelsesdato: 2006/6/5...

  14. Calreticulin as cancer treatment adjuvant: combination with photodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy-generated vaccines

    Mladen eKorbelik; Judit eBanath; Kyi Min Saw; Wei eZhang; Evaldas eCilpys

    2015-01-01

    Calreticulin is recognized as one of pivotal damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules alerting the host of the presence of distressed cells. In this role, calreticulin becomes exposed on the surface of tumor cells treated by several types of cancer therapy including photodynamic therapy (PDT). The goal of the present study was to examine the potential of externally added calreticulin for augmenting antitumor effect mediated by PDT. Recombinant calreticulin was found to bind to ...

  15. The use of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of keratoacanthomas

    V. N. Galkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is on treatment of keratoacanthomas using photodynamic therapy. The defining characteristic of keratoacanthoma among epithelial tumors is a rapid spontaneous regression in the case of typical keratoacanthoma and long-term persistence, recurrence and common malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma in the case of atypical keratoacanthoma. In recent years, photodynamic therapy which is an effective method of treatment of different types of cancer and pre-cancer diseases of the skin including actinic keratosis, Bowen’s disease, basal cell carcinoma, is increasingly used in clinical practice. There are few data for photodynamic therapy in the treatment of keratoacanthoma. The analysis of the literature shows that using of photodynamic therapy in the set of treatment modalities in patients with keratoacanthoma improves the efficacy and reduces the terms of the therapy. In all investigations except one there was complete tumor regression in 100% patients with keratoacanthoma who underwent photodynamic therapy. In one study complete tumor regression was observed in 66.7% of patients with atypical keratoacanthoma after photodynamic therapy. The follow-up of patients in all analyzed studies accounted for at least 2-3 years. During this time none of the patients had evidence for recurrence. This approach has minimal restrictions for application. Thus, photodynamic therapy may become a therapeutic alternative to surgical treatment of keratoacanthoma with good clinical and cosmetic results.

  16. Drug Carrier for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Tilahun Ayane Debele

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a non-invasive combinatorial therapeutic modality using light, photosensitizer (PS, and oxygen used for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. When PSs in cells are exposed to specific wavelengths of light, they are transformed from the singlet ground state (S0 to an excited singlet state (S1–Sn, followed by intersystem crossing to an excited triplet state (T1. The energy transferred from T1 to biological substrates and molecular oxygen, via type I and II reactions, generates reactive oxygen species, (1O2, H2O2, O2*, HO*, which causes cellular damage that leads to tumor cell death through necrosis or apoptosis. The solubility, selectivity, and targeting of photosensitizers are important factors that must be considered in PDT. Nano-formulating PSs with organic and inorganic nanoparticles poses as potential strategy to satisfy the requirements of an ideal PDT system. In this review, we summarize several organic and inorganic PS carriers that have been studied to enhance the efficacy of photodynamic therapy against cancer.

  17. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics

    Vivek Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a powerful laser-initiated photochemical reaction, involving the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer activated by light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. Application of PDT in periodontics such as pocket debridement, gingivitis, and aggressive periodontitis continue to evolve into a mature clinical treatment modality and is considered as a promising novel approach for eradicating pathogenic bacteria in periodontitis.

  18. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics.

    Kumar, Vivek; Sinha, Jolly; Verma, Neelu; Nayan, Kamal; Saimbi, C S; Tripathi, Amitandra K

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a powerful laser-initiated photochemical reaction, involving the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer) activated by light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. Application of PDT in periodontics such as pocket debridement, gingivitis, and aggressive periodontitis continue to evolve into a mature clinical treatment modality and is considered as a promising novel approach for eradicating pathogenic bacteria in periodontitis. PMID:26481895

  19. Cytotoxic Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy in Osteosarcoma Cells In Vitro

    Meier, Daniela; Campanile, Carmen; Botter, Sander M.; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been the difficulty in finding more effective therapies against cancer with less systemic side effects. Therefore Photodynamic Therapy is a novel approach for a more tumor selective treatment. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) that makes use of a nontoxic photosensitizer (PS), which, upon activation with light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen, generates oxygen radicals that elicit a cytotoxic response(1). Despite its approval almost twenty years ago by th...

  20. Photodynamic Therapy in Non-Gastrointestinal Thoracic Malignancies

    Biniam Kidane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy has a role in the management of early and late thoracic malignancies. It can be used to facilitate minimally-invasive treatment of early endobronchial tumours and also to palliate obstructive and bleeding effects of advanced endobronchial tumours. Photodynamic therapy has been used as a means of downsizing tumours to allow for resection, as well as reducing the extent of resection necessary. It has also been used successfully for minimally-invasive management of local recurrences, which is especially valuable for patients who are not eligible for radiation therapy. Photodynamic therapy has also shown promising results in mesothelioma and pleural-based metastatic disease. As new generation photosensitizers are being developed and tested and methodological issues continue to be addressed, the role of photodynamic therapy in thoracic malignancies continues to evolve.

  1. Photodynamic Therapy in Non-Gastrointestinal Thoracic Malignancies.

    Kidane, Biniam; Hirpara, Dhruvin; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy has a role in the management of early and late thoracic malignancies. It can be used to facilitate minimally-invasive treatment of early endobronchial tumours and also to palliate obstructive and bleeding effects of advanced endobronchial tumours. Photodynamic therapy has been used as a means of downsizing tumours to allow for resection, as well as reducing the extent of resection necessary. It has also been used successfully for minimally-invasive management of local recurrences, which is especially valuable for patients who are not eligible for radiation therapy. Photodynamic therapy has also shown promising results in mesothelioma and pleural-based metastatic disease. As new generation photosensitizers are being developed and tested and methodological issues continue to be addressed, the role of photodynamic therapy in thoracic malignancies continues to evolve. PMID:26805818

  2. Monitoring photodynamic therapy with photoacoustic microscopy

    Shao, Peng; Chapman, David W.; Moore, Ronald B.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2015-10-01

    We present our work on examining the feasibility of monitoring photodynamic therapy (PDT)-induced vasculature change with acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). Verteporfin, an FDA-approved photosensitizer for clinical PDT, was utilized. With a 60-μm-resolution PAM system, we demonstrated the capability of PAM to monitor PDT-induced vasculature variations in a chick chorioallantoic membrane model with topical application and in a rat ear with intravenous injection of the photosensitizer. We also showed oxygen saturation change in target blood vessels due to PDT. Success of the present approach may potentially lead to the application of PAM imaging in evaluating PDT efficacy, guiding treatment, and predicting responders from nonresponders.

  3. Photodynamic therapy: superficial and interstitial illumination

    Svanberg, Katarina; Bendsoe, Niels; Axelsson, Johan; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Svanberg, Sune

    2010-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is reviewed using the treatment of skin tumors as an example of superficial lesions and prostate cancer as an example of deep-lying lesions requiring interstitial intervention. These two applications are among the most commonly studied in oncological PDT, and illustrate well the different challenges facing the two modalities of PDT-superficial and interstitial. They thus serve as good examples to illustrate the entire field of PDT in oncology. PDT is discussed based on the Lund University group's over 20 yr of experience in the field. In particular, the interplay between optical diagnostics and dosimetry and the delivery of the therapeutic light dose are highlighted. An interactive multiple-fiber interstitial procedure to deliver the required therapeutic dose based on the assessment of light fluence rate and sensitizer concentration and oxygen level throughout the tumor is presented.

  4. Liposomal photosensitizers: potential platforms for anticancer photodynamic therapy

    L.A. Muehlmann; G.A. Joanitti; Silva, J.R.; J.P.F. Longo; Azevedo, R B

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a well-established and clinically approved treatment for several types of cancer. Antineoplastic photodynamic therapy is based on photosensitizers, i.e., drugs that absorb photons translating light energy into a chemical potential that damages tumor tissues. Despite the encouraging clinical results with the approved photosensitizers available today, the prolonged skin phototoxicity, poor selectivity for diseased tissues, hydrophobic nature, and extended retention in th...

  5. Interstitial photodynamic laser therapy in interventional oncology

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a well-investigated locoregional cancer treatment in which a systemically administered photosensitizer is activated locally by illuminating the diseased tissue with light of a suitable wavelength. PDT offers various treatment strategies in oncology, especially palliative ones. This article focuses on the development and evaluation of interstitial PDT for the treatment of solid tumors, particularly liver tumors. The PDT is mostly used for superficial and endoluminal lesions like skin or bladder malignancies and also more frequently applied for the treatment of lung, esophageal, and head and neck cancer. With the help of specially designed application systems, PDT is now becoming a practicable option for solid lesions, including those in parenchymal organs such as the liver. After intravenous treatment with the photosensitizer followed by interstitial light activation, contrast-enhanced computed tomography shows the development of therapy-induced necrosis around the light-guiding device. With the use of multiple devices, ablation of liver tumors seems to be possible, and no severe side effects or toxicities related to the treatment are reported. PDT can become a clinically relevant adjunct in the locoregional therapy strategies. (orig.)

  6. Photodynamic therapy for treatment of head and neck cancer.

    Schweitzer, V G

    1990-03-01

    Since 1975, photodynamic therapy has reportedly been effective in a variety of head and neck malignancies that failed traditional (conventional) therapy, including surgery, cryotherapy, chemotherapy, hyperthermia, and radiation therapy. Photodynamic therapy consists of the intravenous administration of (di)hematoporphyrin ether, a chemosensitizing drug selectively retained by neoplastic and reticuloendothelial tissues which, when exposed to a 630-nm argon laser, catalyzes a photochemical reaction to release free oxygen radicals, "the cytotoxic" agents responsible for cell death and tumor necrosis. Preliminary investigations have assessed the efficacy of photodynamic therapy in treatment of: (1) superficial "condemned mucosa" or "field cancerization" of the oral cavity and (2) stage III and IV head and neck carcinomas that had unsuccessful conventional therapy. Complete and/or partial remissions were obtained in 11 of 12 patients (16 treatments) with a variety of carcinomas of the nasopharynx, palate and uvula, retromolar trigone, temporal bone, cervical esophagus, and AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma of the oral cavity. PMID:2108409

  7. Photodynamic Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    Akimoto, Jiro

    2016-04-15

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using talaporfin sodium together with a semiconductor laser was approved in Japan in October 2003 as a less invasive therapy for early-stage lung cancer. The author believes that the principle of PDT would be applicable for controlling the invading front of malignant brain tumors and verified its efficacy through experiments using glioma cell lines and glioma xenograft models. An investigator-initiated clinical study was jointly conducted with Tokyo Women's Medical University with the support of the Japan Medical Association. Patient enrollment was started in May 2009 and a total of 27 patients were enrolled by March 2012. Of 22 patients included in efficacy analysis, 13 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma showed progression-free survival of 12 months, progression-free survival at the site of laser irradiation of 20 months, 1-year survival of 100%, and overall survival of 24.8 months. In addition, the safety analysis of the 27 patients showed that adverse events directly related to PDT were mild. PDT was approved in Japan for health insurance coverage as a new intraoperative therapy with the indication for malignant brain tumors in September 2013. Currently, the post-marketing investigation in the accumulated patients has been conducted, and the preparation of guidelines, holding training courses, and dissemination of information on the safe implementation of PDT using web sites and videos, have been promoted. PDT is expected to be a breakthrough for the treatment of malignant glioma as a tumor cell-selective less invasive therapy for the infiltrated functional brain area. PMID:26888042

  8. Photodynamic therapy of advanced malignant tumors

    Wang, Lian-xing; Dai, Lu-pin; Lu, Wen-qin

    1993-03-01

    Forty patients with advanced tumors were treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT) from May 1991 to August 1991 in our hospital with age ranges from 30 to 81 years old. The pathological diagnosis shows that 13 had tumors in the colon, 3 in the stomach, 2 in the oesophageal, 2 in the palatum, 1 in the cervix, and 19 others with malignant cancers of the skin. The histology was as follows: squamous cell in 20, adenocarcinoma in 19, melanocarcinoma in 1. By TNM classification there were no cases of T1, 5 cases of T2, and 35 cases of T2 - T3. All patients were stage IV. The overall effective rate was 85%, our experience is that the PDT is suitable for the patients with advanced tumor, especially those whose tumor recurrences are hard to treat after conventional treatment (surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy). The PDT appears to be a new and promising possibility to treat advanced tumors and to improve the patients' survival rates.

  9. PDT dose dosimeter for pleural photodynamic therapy

    Kim, Michele M.; Darafsheh, Arash; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    PDT dose is the product of the photosensitizer concentration and the light fluence in the target tissue. For improved dosimetry during plural photodynamic therapy (PDT), a PDT dose dosimeter was developed to measure both the light fluence and the photosensitizer concentration simultaneously in the same treatment location. Light fluence and spectral data were rigorously compared to other methods of measurement (e.g. photodiode, multi-fiber spectroscopy contact probe) to assess the accuracy of the measurements as well as their uncertainty. Photosensitizer concentration was obtained by measuring the fluorescence of the sensitizer excited by the treatment light. Fluence rate based on the intensity of the laser spectrum was compared to the data obtained by direct measurement of fluence rate by a fiber-coupled photodiode. Phantom studies were done to obtain an optical property correction for the fluorescence signal. Measurements were performed in patients treated Photofrin for different locations in the pleural cavity. Multiple sites were measured to investigate the heterogeneity of the cavity and to provide cross-validation via relative dosimetry. This novel method will allow for accurate real-time determination of delivered PDT dose and improved PDT dosimetry.

  10. Photodynamic therapy on normal rabbit mandible

    Fan, Kathleen F.; Hopper, Colin; Speight, Paul M.; Davies, Claire; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been proposed as an intra-operative adjunct to surgical resection of tumors invading bone. To assess this, we studied the effects of PDT in normal bone. Forty- four rabbits were sensitized with Photofrin 3 mg/kg, 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) 400 mg/kg, or meso-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC) 0.3 mg/kg. A mandibular incisor was removed and the socket irradiated with a cylindrical diffusion fiber (630 nm Photofrin and ALA, 650 nm mTHPC, 100 J per treatment). Irradiation was given 1 or 48 hours after Photofrin, 72 hours after mTHPC, whilst 2 doses were given 2.5 and 4 hours after the first fractionated dose of ALA. The socket of the ipsilateral maxillary incisor was used as a nonirradiated control to assess healing without PDT. Other controls assessed healing after irradiation of unsensitized animals. Rabbits were killed 3, 10, and 21 days after treatment. Tooth socket healing appeared to be the same in all groups of animals with evidence of woven bone formation by 10 days. We conclude that PDT is unlikely to have any effect on healing in normal bone, which makes it suitable for treating tumors invading bone.

  11. Photodynamic therapy of symptomatic choroidal nevi

    Luis Amselem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the role of photodynamic therapy (PDT for patients with symptomatic choroidal nevi involving the fovea or located near the fovea with subretinal fluid extending to the fovea. Materials and Methods : Retrospective review of five patients who underwent PDT for choroidal nevi at two separate centers in Ankara and Barcelona. Results : The mean initial logMAR visual acuity was 0.5 (range: 0 to 1.5. The mean largest tumor base diameter was 3.2 mm (range: 2.1-4.5 mm and the mean tumor thickness was 1.1 mm (range: 0.7-1.6 mm. The mean number of PDT sessions was 1.6 (range:1-3. The mean final tumor thickness was 1.0 mm (range: 0-1.6 mm at a mean follow-up of 19 months (range: 12-32 months. The mean final logMAR visual acuity was 0.4 (range: 0-1.5. Subfoveal fluid disappeared or decreased significantly in 4 of 5 eyes (80% after PDT. Conclusions : PDT led to resolution of subretinal fluid with preservation of visual acuity in many symptomatic choroidal nevi in this study. Careful case selection is important as PDT of indeterminate pigmented tumors may delay the diagnosis and treatment of an early choroidal melanoma and thereby increase the risk for metastasis.

  12. Pecularities of clinical photodynamic therapy of cancer

    Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Skobelkin, Oleg K.; Litvin, Grigory D.; Astrakhankina, Tamara A.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of the results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treating malignant neoplasms of the skin, mammary glands, tongue, oral mucous, lower lip, larynx, lungs, urinary bladder rectum and other locations has been made. During 1992 - 1995 478 tumoral foci in 125 patients have been treated with PDT. All patients were previously treated with conventional techniques without effect or they were not treated due to contraindications either because of severe accompanying diseases or because of old age. A part of the patients had PDT because of recurrences or intradermal metastases in 1 - 2 years after surgical, radial or combined treatment. Two home-made preparations were used as photosensitizers: Photohem (hematoporphyrine derivative) and Photosense (aluminum sulfonated phthalocyanine). Light sources were: the argon pumped dye laser (`Innova-200', `Coherent') and home-made laser devices: copper-vapor laser-pumped dye laser (`Yakhroma-2', Frjazino), gas-discharge unit `Ksenon' (wavelength 630 nm), gold-vapor laser (wavelength 627.8 nm) for Photohem; while for Photosense sessions we used solid-state laser on ittrium aluminate `Poljus-1' (wavelength 670 nm). Up to now we have follow-up control data within 2 months and 3 years. Positive effect of PDT was seen in 92% of patients including complete regression of tumors in 66.4% and partial in 25.6%. Currently, this new perspective technique of treating malignant neoplasms is successfully being used in Russia; new photosensitizers and light sources for PDT and fluorescent tumor diagnostics are being developed as well.

  13. Photodynamic laser therapy in tracheo bronchial endoscopy

    Hp and HpD have been found to be accumulated and retained by tumor tissues; intravenous Hp or HpD disseminates throughout the entire body, but it rapidly clears out of the normal cells, while remaining longer in tumor tissue, where it is 5-6 times more concentrated after 48-72 hours. Photo-Dynamic Therapy is based upon specific photosensitization of malignant tissue containing Hp after exposure to a visible activating light in the red region of the spectrum (630 nm). Absorption in the red allows deep penetration into tissue, biological effects of using this wavelength are in the order of 5-15 mm of tumor tissue thickness. Photosensitization produces a photochemical reaction releasing singlet Oxygen, that causes tissue death. The singlet Oxygen damages some biological processes such as replay and repair of nucleic acids, cell respiration, protein synthesis and cell membrane function. How-ever, the tissue damage is caused by involvement of the tumor microvascular system too. Many authors report that effects of PDT are secondary to the destruction of tumor microvasculature and the first observable signs occur in the subendothelial zone of the tumor capillary wall. PDT is effective in tracheobronchial endoscopy in treatment of precancerous lesions and early stage lung cancer. PDT has been employed in treatment of advanced carcinoma associated with YAG-Laser and Radiotherapy. (author). 29 refs., 1 tab

  14. Photodynamic therapy for multi-resistant cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Arjen F. Nikkels

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare group of proliferative disorders. Beside cutaneous involvement, other internal organs can be affected. The treatment of cutaneous lesions is difficult and relies on topical corticosteroids, carmustine, nitrogen mustard, and photochemotherapy. Systemic steroids and vinblastine are used for recalcitrant skin lesions. However, some cases fail to respond. An 18-month old boy presented a CD1a+, S100a+ Langerhans cell histocytosis with cutaneous and severe scalp involvement. Topical corticosteroids and nitrogen mustard failed to improve the skin lesions. Systemic corticosteroids and vinblastine improved the truncal involvement but had no effect on the scalp lesions. Methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL based photodynamic therapy (PDT resulted in a significant regression of the scalp lesions. Control histology revealed an almost complete clearance of the tumor infiltrate. Clinical follow-up after six months showed no recurrence. Although spontaneous regression of cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis is observed, the rapid effect of photodynamic therapy after several failures of other treatment suggests that photodynamic therapy was successful. As far as we know this is the first report of photodynamic therapy for refractory skin lesions. Larger series are needed to determine whether photodynamic therapy deserves a place in the treatment of multiresistant cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

  15. Liposomal photosensitizers: potential platforms for anticancer photodynamic therapy

    L.A. Muehlmann

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy is a well-established and clinically approved treatment for several types of cancer. Antineoplastic photodynamic therapy is based on photosensitizers, i.e., drugs that absorb photons translating light energy into a chemical potential that damages tumor tissues. Despite the encouraging clinical results with the approved photosensitizers available today, the prolonged skin phototoxicity, poor selectivity for diseased tissues, hydrophobic nature, and extended retention in the host organism shown by these drugs have stimulated researchers to develop new formulations for photodynamic therapy. In this context, due to their amphiphilic characteristic (compatibility with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic substances, liposomes have proven to be suitable carriers for photosensitizers, improving the photophysical properties of the photosensitizers. Moreover, as nanostructured drug delivery systems, liposomes improve the efficiency and safety of antineoplastic photodynamic therapy, mainly by the classical phenomenon of extended permeation and retention. Therefore, the association of photosensitizers with liposomes has been extensively studied. In this review, both current knowledge and future perspectives on liposomal carriers for antineoplastic photodynamic therapy are critically discussed.

  16. Photodynamic therapy: Biophysical mechanisms and molecular responses

    Mitra, Soumya

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), photochemical reactions induced by optical activation of sensitizer molecules cause destruction of the target tissue. In this thesis we present results of several related studies, which investigated the influence of photophysical properties and photobleaching mechanisms of sensitizers and oxygen-dependent tissue optical properties on PDT treatment efficacy. The bleaching mechanism of the sensitizer meso-tetra hydroxyphenyl chlorin (mTHPC) is examined indirectly using measurements of photochemical oxygen consumption during PDT irradiation of multicell tumor spheroids. Analysis of the results with a theoretical model of oxygen diffusion that incorporates the effects of sensitizer photobleaching shows that mTHPC is degraded via a singlet-oxygen (1O2)-mediated bleaching process. The analysis allows us to extract photophysical parameters of mTHPC which are used to account for its enhanced clinical photodynamic potency in comparison to that of Photofrin. Evaluation of the spatially-resolved fluorescence in confocal optical sections of intact spheroids during PDT irradiation allows for the direct experimental verification of mTHPC's 1O2-mediated bleaching mechanism. The technique is also used to investigate the complex bleaching kinetics of Photofrin. The results allow us to successfully reconcile apparently contradictory experimental observations and to confirm the predictions of a new theoretical model in which both 1O2 and excited triplet sensitizer molecules are allowed to contribute to photobleaching. Based on studies performed in tissue-simulating erythrocyte phantoms and in a murine tumor model in vivo, we present clinically relevant results which indicate that a shift toward increased hemoglobin-oxygen saturation due to improved tissue oxygenation reduces PDT treatment beam attenuation and may allow for more effective treatment of deeper lesions. Finally, we investigate the induction of the stress protein, heat shock protein 70 (HSP

  17. Mitochondria-targeting for improved photodynamic therapy

    Ngen, Ethel J.

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging cancer therapeutic modality, with great potential to selectively treat surface cancers, thus minimizing systemic side effects. In this dissertation, two approaches to deliver photosensitizers to mitochondria were investigated: 1) Reducing photosensitizer sizes to improve endocytosis and lysosomal localization. Upon irradiation the photosensitizers would then produce singlet oxygen which could rupture the lysosomal membrane releasing the lysosomally trapped photosensitizers to the cytosol, from where they could relocalize to mitochondria by passive diffusion (photochemical internalization). 2) Using delocalized lipophilic cationic dyes (DLCs) to exploit membrane potential differences between the cytoplasm and mitochondria in delivering photosensitizers to mitochondria. To investigate the effects of steric hindrance on mitochondrial localization and photodynamic response, a series of eight thiaporphyrins were studied. Two new thiaporphyrin analogues 6 and 8 with reduced steric hindrance at the 10- and 15- meso positions were studied in comparison to 5,20-diphenyl-10,15-bis[4 (carboxymethyleneoxy)-phenyl]-21,23-dithiaporphyrin 1, previously validated as a potential second generation photosensitizer. Although 6 showed an extraordinarily high uptake (7.6 times higher than 1), it was less potent than 1 (IC 50 = 0.18 muM versus 0.13 muM) even though they both showed similar sub-cellular localization patterns. This low potency was attributed to its high aggregation tendency in aqueous media (4 times higher than 1), which might have affected its ability to generate singlet oxygen in vitro . 8 on the other hand showed an even lower potency than 6 (2.28 vs 0.18 muM). However this was attributed to its low cellular uptake (20 times less than 6) and inefficient generation of singlet oxygen. Overall, although the structural modifications did improve the cellular uptake of 6, 6 was still less potent than the lead photosensitizers 1. Thus

  18. Weather conditions and daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy

    Wiegell, S R; Fabricius, S; Heydenreich, J;

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an attractive therapy for nonmelanoma skin cancers and actinic keratoses (AKs). Daylight-mediated methyl aminolaevulinate PDT (daylight-PDT) is a simple and painless treatment procedure for PDT. All daylight-PDT studies have been performed in the Nordic countries. To...

  19. Choline PET for Monitoring Early Tumor Response to Photodynamic Therapy

    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Wu, Chunying; Chiu, Song-mao

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a relatively new therapy that has shown promise for treating various cancers in both preclinical and clinical studies. The present study evaluated the potential use of PET with radiolabeled choline to monitor early tumor response to PDT in animal models.

  20. Photodynamic therapy for cutaneous metastases of breast cancer

    E. V. Goranskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer death in w omen. Cutaneous metastases are observed in 20 % pa- tients with breast cancer. 36 breast cancer patients with cutaneous metastases were treated with photodynamic therapy in the de partment of laser and photodynamic therapy MRRC. Complete regression was obtained in 33.9 %, partial — in 39 % of cases, the stabilization achieved in 25.4 %, progression noted in 1.7 %. The objective response was obtained in 72.9 % of cases, treatment effect — in 97.4 %. Photodynamic therapy has good treatment results of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer with a small number of side effects.

  1. New strategies to enhance photodynamic therapy for solid tumors

    Gulik, van der, T.; Heger, M.; Broekgaarden, M.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy for cancer uses laser light to specifically activate anti-cancer drugs at the tumor site. However, this potentially effective and patient-friendly therapy has seen limited clinical application due to the inability of these drugs to accumulate at the tumor site and the subsequent survival of the malignancy. The aim of this research was to find out how tumor cells survive this therapy, to develop drug delivery systems that target the anti-cancer drugs towards the tumor site...

  2. Development and optimization of a diode laser for photodynamic therapy

    Lim, Hyun Soo

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims: This study demonstrated the development of a laser system for cancer treatment with photodynamic therapy (PDT) based on a 635 nm laser diode. In order to optimize efficacy in PDT, the ideal laser system should deliver a homogeneous nondivergent light energy with a variable spot size and specific wavelength at a stable output power.

  3. Photochemical predictive analysis of photodynamic therapy in dermatology

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; López-Escobar, M.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2010-02-01

    Photodynamic Therapy is a recent treatment modality that allows malignant tissue destruction. The technique provides a localized effect and good cosmetic results. The application of Photodynamic Therapy is based on the inoculation of a photosensitizer and the posterior irradiation by an optical source. This radiation chemically activates the drug and provokes reactions that lead to tissue necrosis. Nowadays there are fixed clinical Photodynamic Therapy protocols that make use of a particular optical dose and photosensitizer amount. These parameters are independent of the patient and the lesion. In this work we present a Photodynamic Therapy model that tries to predict the effect of the treatment on the skin. First the results of a clinical study in the Dermatology Department of the Marqués de Valdecilla University Hospital are presented. The most common lesions and some unsuccessful cases are stated. The predictive model proposed is based on a 3D optical propagation of radiation by a Monte Carlo approach. Once the optical energy is obtained, a complex photochemical model is employed. This model takes into account the electronic transitions between molecular levels and particles concentrations. As the process of generation of photosensitizer is not homogeneous, the photosensitizer distribution is also taken into account. The optical power of the source, the exposition time and the optochemical characteristics of the tissue can be varied. This implies that these parameters could be adjusted to the particular pathology we are dealing with, so the unsuccessful cases could be better treated.

  4. Fiber Optic Spectroscopy for the Optimization of Photodynamic Therapy

    F. van Leeuwen- van Zaane (Floor)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality for cancer and premalignant lesions that utilizes a photoactive drug, the photosensitizer, in combination with light. PDT has become the treatment of choice for various malignancies. Furthermore, PDT is under investigat

  5. Optical coherence tomography to monitor photodynamic therapy in pathological myopia

    Garcia-Layana, A. (Alfredo); Salinas-Alaman, A. (Ángel); Maldonado, M J; Sainz-Gomez, C. (C.); Fernandez-Hortelano, A. (A.)

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the role of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in determining choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) activity before and after photodynamic therapy (PDT) in patients with pathological myopia. METHODS: 33 patients (33 eyes) with pathological myopia and being treated with PDT were included. Every 3 months all patients were evaluated and presence or absence of leakage on fluorescein angiography, presence of intraretinal or subretinal fluid on...

  6. Enhancement of selectivity for photodynamic therapy

    Bedwell, Joanne

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a technique for producing localised tissue damage with low power light following prior administration of a photosensitising drug. The promise of PDT has been based on the selective retention of photosensitisers by tumours, but this aspect has been over-emphasised with a maximum ratio of photosensitiser concentration of 3:1, tumour to normal, for extracranial tumours and current drugs. This makes selective tumour necrosis difficult to achieve. This thesis explores ways in which selectivity may be improved. Aluminium sulphonated phthalocyanine (AlSPc) has better photochemical properties than the widely used HpD and Photofrin II, but has the same tumour selectivity, although the ratio was improved marginally using its disulphonated component. However, when used in conjunction with the radioprotective drug W7, in a rat colon cancer model, tumour necrosis was the same as without W7 while there was no damage to adjacent normal colon. A radical new approach is to give 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) which induces endogenous production of the photosensitiser protoporphyrin IX. This improves selectivity in the rat colon cancer to 6:1 (tumour to normal mucosa), but also sensitises the mucosa selectively compared with the underlying muscle (10:1), giving a tumour to muscle ratio of 60:1. This has enormous potential for treating small tumours or areas of dysplasia in a range of hollow organs. ALA also has the major advantages of a short optimum drug to light time (typically 4-6 hours), short duration of skin sensitivity (approximately 24 hours) and it can be given orally with minimal systemic toxicity. This work has also shown in vitro that PDT with AlSPc sensitisation can kill helicohacter pylori at doses unlikely to affect gastric mucosa. In conclusion, by careful choice of photosensitising agents and treatment regimes, it is possible to limit PDT effects to abnormal tissues, and even if there is some normal tissue damage, in most cases, this heals

  7. Direct Photocontrol of Peptidomimetics: An Alternative to Oxygen-Dependent Photodynamic Cancer Therapy.

    Babii, Oleg; Afonin, Sergii; Garmanchuk, Liudmyla V; Nikulina, Viktoria V; Nikolaienko, Tetiana V; Storozhuk, Olha V; Shelest, Dmytro V; Dasyukevich, Olga I; Ostapchenko, Liudmyla I; Iurchenko, Volodymyr; Zozulya, Sergey; Ulrich, Anne S; Komarov, Igor V

    2016-04-25

    Conventional photodynamic treatment strategies are based on the principle of activating molecular oxygen in situ by light, mediated by a photosensitizer, which leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species and thereby causes cell death. A diarylethene-derived peptidomimetic is presented that is suitable for photodynamic cancer therapy without any involvement of oxygen. This light-sensitive molecule is not a mediator but is itself the cytotoxic agent. As a derivative of the cyclic amphiphilic peptide gramicidin S, the peptidomimetic exists in two thermally stable photoforms that are interconvertible by light of different wavelengths. The isomer generated by visible light shows much stronger toxicity against tumor cells than the UV-generated isomer. First in vivo applications are demonstrated on a tumor animal model to illustrate how the peptidomimetic can be administered in the less toxic form and then activated locally in a solid tumor by visible light. PMID:27028784

  8. Effects of photodynamic therapy on Enterococcus faecalis biofilms

    López-Jiménez, L.; Fusté, E.; Martínez-Garriga, B.; Arnabat-Domínguez, J.; Vinuesa, T.; Viñas, M

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are involved in almost all infectious pathologies of the oral cavity. This has led to the search for novel therapies specifically aimed at biofilm elimination. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize injuries and to determine surface roughness, as well as confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to enumerate live and dead bacterial cells, to determine the effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. The AFM images showe...

  9. Calreticulin as cancer treatment adjuvant: combination with photodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy-generated vaccines

    Mladen eKorbelik

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Calreticulin is recognized as one of pivotal damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP molecules alerting the host of the presence of distressed cells. In this role, calreticulin becomes exposed on the surface of tumor cells treated by several types of cancer therapy including photodynamic therapy (PDT. The goal of the present study was to examine the potential of externally added calreticulin for augmenting antitumor effect mediated by PDT. Recombinant calreticulin was found to bind to mouse SCCVII tumor cells treated by PDT. Compared to the outcome with PDT alone, cure-rates of SCCVII tumors grown in immunocompetent C3H/HeN mice were elevated when calreticulin (0.4 mg/mouse was injected peritumorally immediately after PDT. Such therapeutic gain with PDT plus calreticulin combination was not obtained with SCCVII tumors growing in immunodeficient NOD-scid mice. In PDT vaccine protocol, where PDT-treated SCCVII cells are used for vaccination of SCCVII tumor-bearing mice, adding recombinant calreticulin to cells before their injection produced improved therapeutic effect. The expression of calreticulin gene was reduced in PDT-treated cells, while no changes were observed with the expression of this gene in tumor, liver, and spleen tissues in PDT vaccine-treated mice. These findings reveal that externally added recombinant calreticulin can boost antitumor responses elicited by PDT or PDT-generated vaccines, and can thus serve as an effective adjuvant for cancer treatment with PDT and probably other cancer cell stress-inducing modalities.

  10. Effects of telomerase expression on photodynamic therapy of Barrett's esophagus

    Wang, Kenneth K.; Anderson, Marlys; Buttar, Navtej; WongKeeSong, Louis-Michel; Borkenhagen, Lynn; Lutzke, Lori

    2003-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been applied to Barrett's esophagus and has been shown in prospective randomized studies to eliminate dysplasia as well as decrease the occurrence of cancer. However, the therapy isnot always effective and there are issues with residual areas of Barrett's mucosa despite therapy. There has not been a good explanation for these residual areas and they seem to imply that there may exist a biological mechanisms by which these cells may be resistant to photodynamic therapy. It was our aim to determine if known abnormalities in Barrett's mucosa could be correlated with the lack of response of some of these tissues. We examined the tissue from mulitpel patients who had resonse to therapy as well as those who did not respond. We assessed the tissue for p53 mutations, inactivatino of p16, ploidy status, cell proliferation, telomerase activity, and degree of dysplasia. Interestingly, the only genetic marker than was found to be correlated with lack of reonse was p53 and telomerase activity. This suggests that cells that have lost mechanisms for cell death such as apoptosis or telomere shortengin may be more resistant to photodynamic therapy. In this study, we examined patients before and after PDT for telomerase activity.

  11. Daylight photodynamic therapy with methyl aminolevulinate cream as a convenient, similarly effective, nearly painless alternative to conventional photodynamic therapy in actinic keratosis treatment

    Rubel, D M; Spelman, L; Murrell, D F; See, J-A; Hewitt, D; Foley, P; Bosc, C; Kerob, D; Kerrouche, N; Wulf, H C; Shumack, S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Daylight photodynamic therapy (DL-PDT) of actinic keratosis (AK) has shown preliminary efficacy and safety results comparable to conventional photodynamic therapy (c-PDT), using methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) cream. OBJECTIVES: To demonstrate the efficacy and safety of DL-PDT vs. c-PDT ...

  12. Nanotechnology; its significance in cancer and photodynamic therapy

    Mohammad Reza Gaeeni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, developments in nanotechnology have provided a new field in medicine called “Nanomedicine”. Nanomedicine has provided new tools for photodynamic therapy. Quantum dots (QDs are approximately spherical nanoparticles that have attracted broad attention and have been used in nanomedicine applications. QDs have high molar extinction coefficients and photoluminescence quantum yield, narrow emission spectra, broad absorption, large effective stokes shifts. QDs are more photostable and resistant to metabolic degradation. These photosensitizing properties can be used as photosensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy (PDT. PDT has been recommended for its unique characteristic, such as low side effect and more efficiency. Therefore, nanomedicine leads a promising future for targeted therapy in cancer tumor. Furthermore, QDs have recently been applied in PDT, which will be addressed in this review letter. Also this review letter evaluates key aspects of nano-particulate design and engineering, including the advantage of the nanometer scale size range, biological behavior, and safety profile.

  13. Evaluation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) procedures using microfluidic system

    Jedrych, Elzbieta, E-mail: ejedrych@ch.pw.edu.pl [Department of Microbioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 300-664 Warsaw (Poland); Pawlicka, Zuzanna; Chudy, Michal; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew [Department of Microbioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 300-664 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-01-10

    A hybrid PDMS/glass microfluidic system for evaluation of the efficiency of photodynamic therapy is presented. 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) was used as a precursor of photosensitizer. The geometry of the microdevice presented in this paper enables to test different concentrations of the photosensitizer in a single assay. The viability of the A549 cells was determined 24 h after PDT procedure (irradiation with light which induced a photosensitizer accumulated in carcinoma cells, {lambda} = 625 nm). The presented results confirmed the possibility to perform the photodynamic therapy process in vitro in microscale and the possibility to assess its effectiveness. Moreover, because two identical microstructures on a single chip were performed, the microchip can be used for examination simultaneously various cell lines (carcinoma and normal) or various photosensitizers.

  14. Photodynamic Therapy for Extramammary Paget's Disease:5 Cases Report

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the therapeutic effect of photodynamic therapy for extramammary Paget's disease.Methods: DIOMED 630 nm diode laser was used as light source and photofrin as photosensitizer. The patient's lesion was irradiated for 24-72 h after administrating of photofrin. The power density was 100-150 mW/cm2 and energy density was 150-300J/cm2. Dosage of photofrin was 2 mg/kg. Results: Lesion darkened 24 h after irradiation and formed a scar 96-120 h after irradiation. One patient's lesion disappeared, three patients' lesion diminished apparently and one patient's lesion was not controlled 3 months later. Conclusion: Photodynamic therapy is an effective modality for extramammary Paget's disease.

  15. Anticancer photodynamic therapy based on the use of a microsystem

    Jastrzebska, E.; Bulka, N.; Zukowski, K.; Chudy, M.; Brzozka, Z.; Dybko, A.

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the evaluation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) procedures with an application of a microsystem. Two cell lines were used in the experiments, i.e. human lung carcinoma - A549 and normal human fetal lung fibroblast MRC5. Mono-, coculture and mixed cultures were performed in a microsystem at the same time. The microsystem consisted of a concentration gradient generator (CGG) which generates different concentrations of a photosensitizer, and a set of microchambers for cells. The microchambers were linked by microchannels of various length in order to allow cells migration and in this way cocultures were created. Transparent materials were used for the chip manufacture, i.e. glass and poly(dimethylsiloxane). A high power LED was used to test photodynamic therapy effectiveness in the microsystem.

  16. Photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis in organ transplant patients

    Basset-Seguin, N; Baumann Conzett, K; Gerritsen, M J P;

    2013-01-01

    immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional therapies for AK, using curettage, cryotherapy, surgical excision, topical therapies and photodynamic therapy (PDT), are often less effective, and may be inappropriate, for treating the greater numbers and extent of lesions in OTRs. Moreover, there are no specific protocols for...... treating OTRs, for a large randomized controlled trial to provide robust data on safety, efficacy and optimal pain control, and to provide pharmaco-economics data that can be used to support extended reimbursement in this patient group. The authors also recommend a second clinical trial to further...

  17. Effect of photodynamic therapy on clinical isolates of Staphylococcus spp

    Michelle Miyabe; Juliana Campos Junqueira; Anna Carolina Borges Pereira da Costa; Antonio Olavo Cardoso Jorge; Martha Simões Ribeiro; Ilíria Salomão Feist

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus spp. are opportunistic microorganisms known for their capacity to develop resistance against antimicrobial agents. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on 20 Staphylococcus strains isolated from the human oral cavity, including S. aureus, S. schleiferi, S. epidermidis, S. capitis, S. haemolyticus, and S. lentus. A suspension of each Staphylococcus strain (10(6) cells/mL) was submitted to PDT using methylene blue and a low power la...

  18. Simultaneous two-photon excitation of photodynamic therapy agents

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Photogen, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Partridge, W.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dees, H.C. [Photogen, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Petersen, M.G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). College of Veterinary Medicine

    1998-01-01

    The spectroscopic and photochemical properties of several photosensitive compounds are compared using conventional single-photon excitation (SPE) and simultaneous two-photon excitation (TPE). TPE is achieved using a mode-locked titanium:sapphire laser, the near infrared output of which allows direct promotion of non-resonant TPE. Excitation spectra and excited state properties of both type 1 and type 2 photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents are examined.

  19. A novel diode laser system for photodynamic therapy

    Samsöe Andersen, Eva; Petersen, PM; Andersen, PE; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Svanberg, Katarina

    2001-01-01

    In this paper a novel diode laser system for photodynamic therapy is demonstrated. The system is based on linear spatial filtering and optical phase conjugate feedback from a photorefractive BaTiO3 crystal. The spatial coherence properties of the diode laser are significantly improved. The system provides an almost diffraction limited output which is efficiently coupled into a 50 mum core diameter fiber. The optical power transmitted through the fiber is increased by a factor of six when the ...

  20. Synergistic antimicrobial effect of photodynamic therapy and ciprofloxacin.

    Ronqui, Maria Rita; de Aguiar Coletti, Tatiana Maria Starck Fogaça; de Freitas, Laura Marise; Miranda, Elaine Toscano; Fontana, Carla Raquel

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence of a variety of pathogens resistant to current antibiotics remains the major problem in medical care, especially when bacterial infections are established as biofilms. In this study, we propose the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a monotherapy and associated with antibiotic as an alternative treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of PDT mediated by methylene blue (MB) on Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) in both biofilm and planktonic phases. Several concentrations of MB and light doses were tested. The bactericidal effects of PDT as a monotherapy did not increase with the concentration of photosensitizer, but were light dose-dependent. In addition, bacteria in biofilms were less affected than cells in the planktonic phase. Although not concentration-dependent, the disruption effect of PDT on biofilms was clearly illustrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We also carried out experiments that evaluated the synergistic effect of photodynamic therapy and the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. The best results were obtained after combination treatment of photodynamic therapy followed by ciprofloxacin on biofilms, which increased bacterial reduction on biofilms, resulting in a 5.4 log reduction for S. aureus biofilm and approximately 7 log for E. coli biofilm. PMID:26971277

  1. Photodynamic therapy for basal cell skin cancer ENT-organs

    V. N. Volgin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of photodynamic therapy in 96 patients with primary and recurrent basal cell skin cancer of ENT-organs are represented. For photodynamic therapy the Russian-made photosensitizer Photoditazine at dose of 0.6–1.4 mg/kg was used. Parameters were selected taking into account type and extent of tumor and were as follows: output power – 0.1–3.0 W, power density – 0.1–1.3 W/cm2, light dose – 100–400 J/cm2. The studies showed high efficacy of treatment for primary and recurrent basal cell skin cancer of nose, ear and external auditory canal – from 87.5 to 94.7% of complete regression. Examples of efficacy of the method are represented in the article. High efficacy and good cosmetic effects allowed to make a conclusion about perspectivity of photodynamic therapy for recurrent basal cell skin cancer of ENT-organs. 

  2. Latex carrier for improving protoporphyrin IX for photodynamic therapy.

    Bui, Brian; Liu, Li; Chen, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Attachment of Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) to poly (styrene-co-4-vinylpyridine) (PS4VP) nanobeads was carried out to improve its properties in aqueous solutions. After using an oil-in-water heated emulsion polymerization technique to synthesize PS4VP, PPIX was bonded to the particles via the carboxylic acid of PPIX hydrogen-bonding to the nitrogen at the surface of PS4VP, thereby preventing self-reactions between the carboxyl groups and the porphyrin core. Refraining the two parts from interacting while attached to the nanobeads prevented PPIX from aggregating, which then increased water solubility, enhanced luminescence and singlet oxygen production. Attachment also improved cell uptake and cell destruction by photodynamic activity. This shows that PS4VP-PPIX may help improve aspects of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of cancer. PMID:27020668

  3. The Recurrence and Cosmetic Results After Topical Photodynamic Therapy

    Alican Kazandı

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Photodynamic therapy (FDT is a photochemotherapy modality which is used frequently and effectively in the treatment of actinic keratosis, Bowen disease and basal cell carcinomas. This study was performed to determine cure rates, cosmetic outcome and recurrence rates after aminolevulinic acid (ALA-based photodynamic therapy for skin lesions showing complete response to treatment procedure. Material and Method: Sixty-eight patients (27 females and 41 males with 78 lesions were included in the study. Among them, 25 were actinic keratosis (AK, 8 were actinic cheilitis (AC, 30 were basal cell carcinomas (BCC, 3 were Bowen disease, 10 were intraepidermal epithelioma (IEE, one lesion was parapsoriasis and one lesion was verruca plantaris. Six to 8 hours after topical administration of ALA (20%, the lesions were exposed to light from a broad-band light source. Skin biopsy specimens were obtained from 74 lesions for histopathological control. Results: At the end of the second month of treatment, fifty-six (72% of seventy-eight lesions showed complete clinical response, whereas fourty-seven of 74 lesions (63.5% exhibited complete histopathological clearance. A total of 9 recurrences (16% was observed during a median follow-up of 36 months. Recurrence rates were 3 (14% in AK, 1 (17% in AC, 1 (8% in superficial BCC, 3 (75% nodular BCC and 1 (12.5% in IEE. Cosmetic outcome was excellent and good in 42 lesions (89%, fair in 3 lesions (6% and poor in 2 lesions (5%. Conclusion: Topical photodynamic therapy is a noninvasive, effective and cosmetic modality of treatment in the selected skin lesions, as an alternative to the conventional procedures.

  4. Photodynamic therapy with laser scanning mode of tumor irradiation

    Chepurna, Oksana; Shton, Irina; Kholin, Vladimir; Voytsehovich, Valerii; Popov, Viacheslav; Pavlov, Sergii; Gamaleia, Nikolai; Wójcik, Waldemar; Zhassandykyzy, Maral

    2015-12-01

    In this study we propose a new version of photodynamic therapy performed by laser scanning. The method consists in tumor treatment by a light beam of a small cross section which incrementally moves through the chosen area with a defined delay at each point and repetitively re-scans a zone starting from the initial position. Experimental evaluation of the method in vitro on murine tumor model showed that despite the dose, applied by scanning irradiation mode, was 400 times lower, the tumor inhibition rate conceded to attained with continuous irradiation mode by only 20%.

  5. HpD Photobiology And Photodynamic Therapy Of Bladder Carcinoma

    Lin, Chi-Wei

    1988-02-01

    Bladder carcinoma is considered one of the most favorable targets for the application of photodynamic therapy (PDT) due to the accessibility of the bladder for light delivery. Examination of the bladder and surgical procedures are routinely performed by the insertion of an optical instrument called cystoscope through the urethra. Thus, the treatment of bladder cancer by PDT can be conducted through the cystoscope with minimal invasion. However, to achieve optimal results from this treatment, one must consider both the structure of the bladder and the nature of the carcinoma.

  6. Three-dimensional illumination procedure for photodynamic therapy of dermatology

    Hu, Xiao-ming; Zhang, Feng-juan; Dong, Fei; Zhou, Ya

    2014-09-01

    Light dosimetry is an important parameter that affects the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, the irregular morphologies of lesions complicate lesion segmentation and light irradiance adjustment. Therefore, this study developed an illumination demo system comprising a camera, a digital projector, and a computing unit to solve these problems. A three-dimensional model of a lesion was reconstructed using the developed system. Hierarchical segmentation was achieved with the superpixel algorithm. The expected light dosimetry on the targeted lesion was achieved with the proposed illumination procedure. Accurate control and optimization of light delivery can improve the efficacy of PDT.

  7. Photodynamic Therapy for Bowen's Disease of the Vulva Area

    Kang, Hong-Kyu; Yun, Jeong-Hwan; Son, Young-Min; Roh, Joo-Young; Lee, Jong-Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bowen's disease is a squamous cell carcinoma in situ and has the potential to progress to a squamous cell carcinoma. The authors treated two female patients (a 39-year-old and a 41-year-old) with Bowen's disease in the vulva area using topical photodynamic therapy (PDT), involving the use of 5-aminolaevulinic acid and a light-emitting diode device. The light was administered at an intensity of 80 mW/cm2 for a dose of 120 J/cm2 biweekly for 6 cycles. The 39-year-old patient showed excellent cl...

  8. 3D Monte Carlo radiation transfer modelling of photodynamic therapy

    Campbell, C. Louise; Christison, Craig; Brown, C. Tom A.; Wood, Kenneth; Valentine, Ronan M.; Moseley, Harry

    2015-06-01

    The effects of ageing and skin type on Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) for different treatment methods have been theoretically investigated. A multilayered Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer model is presented where both daylight activated PDT and conventional PDT are compared. It was found that light penetrates deeper through older skin with a lighter complexion, which translates into a deeper effective treatment depth. The effect of ageing was found to be larger for darker skin types. The investigation further strengthens the usage of daylight as a potential light source for PDT where effective treatment depths of about 2 mm can be achieved.

  9. Photodynamic therapy of arteries: preservation of mechanical integrity

    Grant, William E.; Hopper, Colin; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; Speight, Paul M.; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Fan, Kathleen F.; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of tumors, as a primary treatment or as an adjunctive intra- operative therapy, may expose major vascular structures to injury. PDT has also been proposed to prevent neointimal hyperplasia following angioplasty of stenotic arteries. This study aimed to determine the effect of PDT on the normal rabbit carotid artery, and to determine whether this injury resulted in weakening of the vessel wall. PDT of the carotid arteries of NZW rabbits, using either disulphonated aluminum phthalocyanine or 5- aminolaevulinic acid induced protoporphyrin IX as photosensitizers, was performed using a light dose of 100 J/cm2. Histological examination of the carotids treated with both drugs demonstrated full thickness loss of cellularity 3 days following photodynamic therapy. Treated vessels all remained patent and no inflammatory infiltrate was observed. Elastin van Gieson staining showed preservation of inner and medial elastic laminae and medial and adventitial collagen. Further rabbits were similarly treated with PDT to 1 cm segments of both common carotids and sacrificed at 3, 7, and 21 days. The carotids were exposed and control and treated segments subjected to intraluminal hydrostatic distension until the vessels ruptured. No reduction in the pressure required to rupture the vessels was evident in treated vessels compared with controls. It is concluded that in spite of full thickness cell death, PDT treated arteries are not at risk of thrombotic occlusion or hemorrhage.

  10. Effects of Photodynamic Therapy on the Ultrastructure of Glioma Cells

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the change in ultrastructure of C6 glioma cells after photodynamic therapy (PDT), to compare morphological differences in necrosis and apoptosis before and after PDT treatment, and to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy on the blood brain tumor barrier (BTB) of C6 glioma. Methods The model was produced by transplanting C6 glioma cells cultured in vitro using Peterson method into the caudate nuclei of Wister rats. The experiment group received PDT for two weeks after the operation. The sub-cellular structure, blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and BTB in both groups were observed under electron microscope. Results Apoptosis in different phases and necrosis could be observed in some C6 glioma cells.Swelling occurred on the ultrastructure of cellular organs such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum in most of the cells.Damage to the BTB, reduction of the number of cellular organs in endothelial cells of the capillary blood vessels, stretch of the tight junction, and enlargement of the gaps between endothelial cells were also seen in the experiment group. Meanwhile,limited impact on the normal sub-cellular structures and BBB was observed. Conclusion PDT could induce apoptosis and necrosis of C6 glioma cells due to the damage to the ultrastructure of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. The weakened function of C6 glioma BTB initiated by PDT makes it possible to perform a combined therapy of PDT and chemotherapy for glioma.

  11. Predicting photodynamic therapy efficacy with photoacoustic imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Mai, Zhiming; Khan, Amjad P.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemistry based cytotoxic technique that imparts cellular damage via excitation of a photosensitizer with drug-specific wavelength of light. The dose at the treatment site for type II PDT is determined by three factors: photosensitizer (PS) concentration, oxygenation status and delivered light irradiance. Most of the FDA approved photosensitizers in their triplet-excited state generate cytotoxic species by reacting with the ground state oxygen that is available in the surrounding environment. Given the inter- and intra-subject variability in the uptake of the photosensitizer and the distribution of oxygen in the tumor, understanding the interplay between these dose parameters could aid in determining photodynamic therapy efficacy. Previously several studies have discussed the interplay between the dose parameters using shown point measurements and 2D imaging systems. Using various subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models we will demonstrate the utility of a non-invasive non-ionizing photoacoustic imaging modality to determine efficacy and predict treatment response in Benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD) or Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) based PDT. We further compare the predictive capability of photoacoustic imaging with the more predominantly used fluorescence imaging and immunohistochemistry techniques.

  12. Evaluation of quantum dots for photodynamic therapy (Invited Paper)

    Dayal, Smita; Krolicki, Robert; Burda, Clemens

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging therapy for cancer treatment that shows the greater selectivity towards the malignant cells. Semiconductor nanoparticles are a novel class of photosensitizers with properties that are not easily available with conventional PDT reagents. Their potential properties such as improved luminescence, resistance to photobleaching, and the possibility to modify the surface chemically make them suitable candidates for PDT. In this report, we discuss the synthesis of ternary CdSe1-x Tex nanoparticles along with well known CdSe QDs and their potential in generating the singlet oxygen state by Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) to a PDT reagent or by direct triplet-triplet energy transfer to molecular oxygen.

  13. Physical and mathematical modeling of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    Bürgermeister, Lisa; López, Fernando Romero; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is a promising method to treat local bacterial infections. The therapy is painless and does not cause bacterial resistances. However, there are gaps in understanding the dynamics of the processes, especially in periodontal treatment. This work describes the advances in fundamental physical and mathematical modeling of aPDT used for interpretation of experimental evidence. The result is a two-dimensional model of aPDT in a dental pocket phantom model. In this model, the propagation of laser light and the kinetics of the chemical reactions are described as coupled processes. The laser light induces the chemical processes depending on its intensity. As a consequence of the chemical processes, the local optical properties and distribution of laser light change as well as the reaction rates. The mathematical description of these coupled processes will help to develop treatment protocols and is the first step toward an inline feedback system for aPDT users.

  14. Indocyanine green-mediated photodynamic therapy on glioblastoma cells in vitro

    AK, Ayşe; Kaya, Özgür; Turgut Coşan, Didem; Gülsoy, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an alternative therapy which is administered with non-toxic drugs, called photosensitizers (PSs), along with irradiation at a specific wavelength of light to damage tumor cells. Different wavelengths of light sources and photosensitizers have been investigated in treatment of many cancer types. In this study, we investigated whether photodynamic therapy using indocyanine green (ICG), also a cyanine dye used in medical diagnostics, can be used to inhibit cell prol...

  15. 5-Amino-4-oxopentanoic acid photodynamic diagnosis guided microsurgery and photodynamic therapy on VX2 brain tumour implanted in a rabbit model

    XIAO Hong; LIAO Qiong; CHENG Ming; LI Fei; XIE Bing; LI Mei; FENG Hua

    2009-01-01

    Background Complete tumour resection is important for improving the prognosis of brain tumour patients. However,extensive resection remains controversial because the tumour margin is difficult to be distinguished from surrounding brain tissue. It has been established that 5-amino-4-oxopentanoic acid (5-aminolevulinic acid, ALA) can be used as a photodynamic diagnostic marker and a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy in surgical treatment of brain tumours. We investigated the efficacy of ALA photodynamically guided microsurgery and photodynamic therapy on VX2 brain tumour implanted in a rabbit model.Methods Eighty New Zealand rabbits implanted with VX2 brain tumours were randomly assigned to five groups: control, conventional white light microsurgery, a photodynamic therapy group, a photodynamically guided microsurgery group and a group in which guided microsurgery was followed by photodynamic therapy. The VX2 tumour was resected under a surgical microscope. The tumour resection was confirmed with histological analysis. All animals were examined with MRI for presence of any residual tumour tissue. The survival time of each rabbit was recorded.Results All treatment groups showed a significantly extended survival time compared with the control group.Photodynamically guided microsurgery combined with photodynamic therapy significantly prolonged survival time, compared with guided microsurgery alone. MRI and the autopsy results confirmed removal of most of the tumours.Conclusions Our results suggest that photodynamically guided surgery and photodynamic therapy significantly reduce or delay local recurrence, increase the effectiveness of radical resection and prolong the survival time of tumour bearing rabbits, Their combination has the potential to be used as a rapid and highly effective treatment of metastatic brain tumours.

  16. Photosensitizer nanocarriers modeling for photodynamic therapy applied to dermatological diseases

    Salas-García, I.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; López-Escobar, M.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2011-02-01

    Photodynamic Therapy involves the therapeutic use of photosensitizers in combination with visible light. The subsequent photochemical reactions generate reactive oxygen species which are considered the principal cytotoxic agents to induce cell death. This technique has become widely used in medicine to treat tumors and other nonmalignant diseases. However, there are several factors related to illumination or the photosensitizer that limit an optimal treatment outcome. The use of nanoparticles (NP) for PDT has been proposed as a solution to current shortcomings. In this way, there are NPs that act as carriers for photosensitizers, NPs that absorb the light and transfer the energy to the photosensitizer and NPs that are themselves photodynamically active. In dermatology, the use of topical photosensitizers produces a time dependent inhomogeneous distribution within the tumor, where the stratum corneum is the main barrier to the diffusion of the photosensitizer to the deeper layers of skin. This produces an insufficient photosensitizer accumulation in tumor tissues and therefore, a low therapeutic efficiency in the case of deep lesions. This work focuses in the use of NPs as photosensitizer carriers to improve the actual topical drug distribution in malignant skin tissues. We present a mathematical model of PS distribution in tumor tissue using NPs that takes into account parameters related to nanoparticles binding. Once the concentration profile of NPs into tissue is obtained, we use a photochemical model which allows us to calculate the temporal evolution of reactive oxygen species according to PS distribution calculated previously from NPs profile.

  17. Photodynamic therapy: a review of applications in neurooncology and neuropathology

    Uzdensky, Anatoly B.; Berezhnaya, Elena; Kovaleva, Vera; Neginskaya, Marya; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Sharifulina, Svetlana

    2015-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) effect is a promising adjuvant modality for diagnosis and treatment of brain cancer. It is of importance that the bright fluorescence of most photosensitizers provides visualization of brain tumors. This is successfully used for fluorescence-guided tumor resection according to the principle "to see and to treat." Non-oncologic application of PDT effect for induction of photothrombotic infarct of the brain tissue is a well-controlled and reproducible stroke model, in which a local brain lesion is produced in the predetermined brain area. Since normal neurons and glial cells may also be damaged by PDT and this can lead to unwanted neurological consequences, PDT effects on normal neurons and glial cells should be comprehensively studied. We overviewed the current literature data on the PDT effect on a range of signaling and epigenetic proteins that control various cell functions, survival, necrosis, and apoptosis. We hypothesize that using cell-specific inhibitors or activators of some signaling proteins, one can selectively protect normal neurons and glia, and simultaneously exacerbate photodynamic damage of malignant gliomas.

  18. ALA-Butyrate prodrugs for Photo-Dynamic Therapy

    Berkovitch, G.; Nudelman, A.; Ehenberg, B.; Rephaeli, A.; Malik, Z.

    2010-05-01

    The use of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) administration has led to many applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in cancer. However, the hydrophilic nature of ALA limits its ability to penetrate the cells and tissues, and therefore the need for ALA derivatives became an urgent research target. In this study we investigated the activity of novel multifunctional acyloxyalkyl ester prodrugs of ALA that upon metabolic hydrolysis release active components such as, formaldehyde, and the histone deacetylase inhibitory moiety, butyric acid. Evaluation of these prodrugs under photo-irradiation conditions showed that butyryloxyethyl 5-amino-4-oxopentanoate (ALA-BAC) generated the most efficient photodynamic destruction compared to ALA. ALA-BAC stimulated a rapid biosynthesis of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in human glioblastoma U-251 cells which resulted in generation of intracellular ROS, reduction of mitochondrial activity, leading to apoptotic and necrotic death of the cells. The apoptotic cell death induced by ALA / ALA-BAC followed by PDT equally activate intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signals and both pathways may occur simultaneously. The main advantage of ALA-BAC over ALA stems from its ability to induce photo-damage at a significantly lower dose than ALA.

  19. Porphyrin-based Nanostructure-Dependent Photodynamic and Photothermal Therapies

    Jin, Cheng S.

    This thesis presents the investigation of nanostructure-dependent phototherapy. We reviewed the liposomal structures for delivery of photosensitizers, and introduced a novel class of phototransducing liposomes called "porphysomes". Porphysomes are self-assembled from high packing density of pyropheophorbide alpha-conjugated phospholipids, resulting in extreme self-quenching of porphyrin fluorescence and comparable optical absorption to gold nanoparticles for high photothermal efficiency. We demonstrated this self-assembly of porphyrin-lipid conjugates converts a singlet oxygen generating mechanism (photodynamic therapy PDT activity) of porphyrin to photothermal mechanism (photothermal therapy PTT activity). The efficacy of porphysome-enhanced PTT was then evaluated on two pre-clinical animal models. We validated porphysome-enabled focal PTT to treat orthotopic prostate cancer using MRI-guided focal laser placement to closely mimic the current clinic procedure. Furthermore, porphysome-enabled fluorescence-guided transbronchial PTT of lung cancer was demonstrated in rabbit orthotopic lung cancer models, which led to the development of an ultra-minimally invasive therapy for early-stage peripheral lung cancer. On the other hand, the nanostructure-mediated conversion of PDT to PTT can be switched back by nanoparticle dissociation. By incorporating folate-conjugated phospholipids into the formulation, porphysomes were internalized into cells rapidly via folate receptor-mediated endocytosis and resulted in efficient disruption of nanostructures, which turned back on the photodynamic activity of densely packed porphyrins, making a closed loop of conversion between PDT and PTT. The multimodal imaging and therapeutic features of porphysome make it ideal for future personalized cancer treatments.

  20. An ethylene-glycol decorated ruthenium(ii) complex for two-photon photodynamic therapy.

    Boca, Sanda C; Four, Mickaël; Bonne, Adeline; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Astilean, Simion; Baldeck, Patrice L; Lemercier, Gilles

    2009-08-14

    A novel water-soluble Ru(ii) complex has been prepared, which represents a promising new class of selective two-photon sensitizers for use in photodynamic therapy within a confined space. PMID:19617993

  1. Application of femtosecond ultrashort pulse laser to photodynamic therapy mediated by indocyanine green

    Sawa, M; Awazu, K; Takahashi, T.; Sakaguchi, H; Horiike, H.; Ohji, M; Tano, Y

    2004-01-01

    Backgrounds/aims: To evaluate treatment with high peak power pulse energy by femtosecond ultrashort pulse laser (titanium sapphire laser) delivered at an 800 nm wavelength for corneal neovascularisation using photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated by indocyanine green (ICG).

  2. Endoscopic photodynamic therapy of tumors using gold vapor laser

    Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Mironov, Andrei F.; Ponomarev, Igor V.; Shental, V. V.; Vaganov, Yu. E.; Kondratjeva, T. T.; Trofimova, E. V.

    1996-01-01

    Compact sealed-off gold vapor laser (GVL) with 2 W average power and 628 nm wavelength was used for endoscopic photodynamic therapy in 20 patients with different tumors in respiratory system and upper gastrointestinal tract. Russian-made hematoporphyrin derivative (Hpd) `Photohem' was used as a photosensitizer. It was given intravenously at a dose of 2 - 2.5 mg/kg body weight 48 hours prior to tumor illumination with 628 nm light from GVL. Intermittent irradiation with GVL was done through flexible endoscope always under local anaesthesia at a power of 200 - 400 mW/sm2 and a dose of 150 - 400 J/sm2. 80% patients showed complete or partial response depending on stage of tumor. In cases of early gastric cancer all patients had complete remission with repeated negative biopsies. No major complication occurred.

  3. Photoirradiation system for solid tumors in photodynamic therapy

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinical procedure which induces cell death for destroying cancerous tissues mostly. This is accomplished by photochemical reaction produced by the combined action of three elements: photo sensitizer, light and oxygen. One aspect of the development of PDT is focused on the treatment of solid and deep tumors, where a set of delivering-light probes are placed into the tumor mass. However, this technique still has several challenges, for although certain parameters involved in the procedure may be adjusted, the complex geometry and non-homogeneity of a tumor difficult to establish the appropriate treatment planning. This paper addresses an overview of interstitial PDT and presents our proposal of photo irradiation system. (Author)

  4. Target cell specific antibody-based photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    Rosenblum, Lauren T.; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Kakareka, John W.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2011-03-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), localized monochromatic light is used to activate targeted photosensitizers (PS) to induce cellular damage through the generation of cytotoxic species such as singlet oxygen. While first-generation PS passively targeted malignancies, a variety of targeting mechanisms have since been studied, including specifically activatable agents. Antibody internalization has previously been employed as a fluorescence activation system and could potentially enable similar activation of PS. TAMRA, Rhodamine-B and Rhodamine-6G were conjugated to trastuzumab (brand name Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody with specificity for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), to create quenched PS (Tra-TAM, Tra-RhoB, and Tra-Rho6G). Specific PDT with Tra-TAM and Tra-Rho6G, which formed covalently bound H-dimers, was demonstrated in HER2+ cells: Minimal cell death (SDS-PAGE).

  5. A novel diode laser system for photodynamic therapy

    Samsøe, E.; Andersen, P. E.; Petersen, P.;

    2001-01-01

    In this paper a novel diode laser system for photodynamic therapy is demonstrated. The system is based on linear spatial filtering and optical phase conjugate feedback from a photorefractive BaTiO3 crystal. The spatial coherence properties of the diode laser are significantly improved. The system...... provides an almost diffraction limited output which is efficiently coupled into a 50 mum core diameter fiber. The optical power transmitted through the fiber is increased by a factor of six when the feedback is applied to the diode laser. 85 percent of the power from the freely running laser diode...... is extracted in a high-quality beam and 80 percent of the output power is extracted through the fiber. The power transmitted through tile fiber scales linearly with the power of the laser diode. which means that a laser diode emitting 1.7 W multi-mode radiation would provide 1 W of optical power through a 50...

  6. Photodynamic therapy of cancer with the photosensitizer PHOTOGEM

    Sokolov, Victor V.; Chissov, Valery I.; Filonenko, E. V.; Sukhin, Garry M.; Yakubovskaya, Raisa I.; Belous, T. A.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Kozlov, Dmitrij N.; Smirnov, V. V.

    1995-01-01

    The first clinical trials of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in Russia were started in P. A. Hertzen Moscow Research Oncology Institute in October of 1992. Up to now, 61 patients with primary or recurrent malignant tumors of the larynx (3), trachea (1), bronchus (11), nose (1), mouth (3), esophagus (12), vagina and uterine cervix (3), bladder (2), skin (6), and cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases of breast cancer and melanomas (6) have been treated by PDT with the photosensitizer Photogem. At least partial tumor response was observed in all of the cases, but complete remission indicating no evident tumors has been reached in 51% of the cases. Among 29 patients with early and first stage cancer 14 patients had multifocal tumors. Complete remission of tumors in this group reached 86%.

  7. Mechanisms of vessel damage in photodynamic therapy (Invited Paper)

    Fingar, Victor H.; Wieman, Thomas J.

    1992-06-01

    Vessel constriction and platelet aggregation are observed within the first minutes of light exposure to photosensitized tissues and lead to blood flow stasis, tissue hypoxia, and nutrient depravation. The mechanism for these vessel changes remains unknown, although the release of eicosanoids is implicated. We propose the following hypothesis: Photodynamic therapy results in specific perturbations of endothelial cells which results in a combination of membrane damage, mitochondrial damage, and rearrangement of cytoskeletal proteins. This results in cellular stress which leads to interruption of tight junctions along the endothelium and cell rounding. Cell rounding exposes the basement membrane proteins causing activation of platelets and leukocytes. Activated platelets and leukocytes release thromboxane and other eicosanoids. These eicosanoids induce vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, increases in vessel permeability, and blood flow stasis.

  8. Photodynamic therapy in dermatology: past, present, and future

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Fluhr, Joachim W.

    2013-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive therapeutic method first introduced in the field of dermatology. It is mainly used for the treatment of precancerous and superficial malignant skin tumors. Today PDT finds new applications not only for nononcologic dermatoses but also in the field of other medical specialties such as otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology, neurology, gastroenterology, and urology. We are witnessing a broadening of the spectrum of skin diseases that are treated by PDT. Since its introduction, PDT protocol has evolved significantly in terms of increasing method efficacy and patient safety. In this era of evidence-based medicine, it is expected that much effort will be put into creating a worldwide accepted consensus on PDT. A review on the current knowledge of PDT is given, and the historical basis of the method's evolution since its introduction in the 1900s is presented. At the end, future challenges of PDT are focused on discussing gaps that exist for research in the field.

  9. Inactivation of bovine immunodeficiency virus by photodynamic therapy with HMME

    Huijuan Yin; Yingxin Li; Zhaohui Zou; Wentao Qiao; Xue Yao; Yang Su; Hongyan Guo

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with hematoporphrin monomethyl ether (HMME) on bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) can provide the basis theory for photoinactivation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). To assess the protection of HMME-PDT on the cell line Cf2Th infected with BIVR29 by 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazol-2-yl-3,5-di-phenytetrazolium bromide (MTT) with power density of 5 and 25 mW/cm2 and energy density from 0.6 to 3 J/cm. To observe the inhibition of membrane fusion using a new reporter cell line BIVE by fluorescence microscope. HMME-PDT has significant protectant effects on Cf2Th-BIVR29 with both power densities, especially in the group of high power density. Fluorescent microscope shows that there is no significant difference between the group of PDT and control, which means PDT could not inhibit the BIV-mediated membrane fusion.

  10. Photodynamic therapy of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) high grade

    Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Inada, Natalia M.; Lombardi, Welington; da Silva, Eduardo V.; Belotto, Renata; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-02-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is the precursor of invasive cervical cancer and associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique that has been used for the treatment of tumors. PDT is based on the accumulation of a photosensitizer in target cells that will generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species upon illumination, inducing the death of abnormal tissue and PDT with less damaging to normal tissues than surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy and seems to be a promising alternative procedure for CIN treatment. The CIN high grades (II and III) presents potential indications for PDT due the success of PDT for CIN low grade treatment. The patients with CIN high grade that were treated with new clinic protocol shows lesion regression to CIN low grade 60 days after the treatment. The new clinical protocol using for treatment of CIN high grade shows great potential to become a public health technique.

  11. Light protection of the skin after photodynamic therapy reduces inflammation

    Petersen, B; Wiegell, S R; Wulf, H C

    2014-01-01

    red-light illumination the squares were either left unprotected or protected by inorganic sunscreen [sun protection factor (SPF) 50], foundation (SPF50) or light-blocking plaster. The skin was then illuminated with artificial daylight for 2 h and afterwards covered for 24 h. Fluorescence and erythema......BACKGROUND: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is followed by significant inflammation. Protoporphyrin (Pp)IX is still formed in the skin after PDT and patients are sensitive to daylight 24-48 h after treatment. Exposure to daylight after PDT may therefore increase inflammation. OBJECTIVES: To investigate...... whether protection with inorganic sunscreen, foundation or light-blocking plaster after PDT can reduce inflammation caused by daylight-activated PpIX. METHODS: On the right arm of 15 subjects with sun-damaged skin, four identical squares (3 × 3 cm) were given conventional PDT treatment. Immediately after...

  12. Mitochondria-involved apoptosis induced by MPPa mediated photodynamic therapy

    Numerous new photosensitizers are now in various stages of trials demonstrating the broad applicability of Photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, only a handful of photosensitizers have received regulatory approval. Lack of effective photosensitizers has become a major limit for extensive application of PDT. Our previous study showed MPPa to be a good photosensitizer candidature, MPPa-PDT can lead PC-3M cell line to death mainly via apoptotic way both in vitro and in vivo, and part of the mechanism was investigated. Mitochondria may play a key role in the process, in order to further elucidate the mechanism, we investigated the level of ROS, GSH, NO, Ca2+, mitochondrial membrane potential, as well as cytochrome C. All in all, ROS production, depletion of GSH, and the activation of ROS downstream, such as mitochondria depolarization, cytochrome C release, were detected in our study. The results provide a mechanism by which oxidative stress provokes apoptosis of PC-3M cells

  13. Photodynamic therapy: Theoretical and experimental approaches to dosimetry

    Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is the major cytotoxic species generated during photodynamic therapy (PDT), and 1O 2 reactions with biological targets define the photodynamic dose at the most fundamental level. We have developed a theoretical model for rigorously describing the spatial and temporal dynamics of oxygen (3O 2) consumption and transport and microscopic 1O 2 dose deposition during PDT in vivo. Using experimentally established physiological and photophysical parameters, the mathematical model allows computation of the dynamic variation of hemoglobin-3O 2 saturation within vessels, irreversible photosensitizer degradation due to photobleaching, therapy-induced blood flow decrease and the microscopic distributions of 3O2 and 1O 2 dose deposition under various irradiation conditions. mTHPC, a promising photosensitizer for PDT, is approved in Europe for the palliative treatment of head and neck cancer. Using the theoretical model and informed by intratumor sensitizer concentrations and distributions, we calculated photodynamic dose depositions for mTHPC-PDT. Our results demonstrate that the 1O 2 dose to the tumor volume does not track even qualitatively with long-term tumor responses. Thus, in this evaluation of mTHPC-PDT, any PDT dose metric that is proportional to singlet oxygen creation and/or deposition would fail to predict the tumor response. In situations like this one, other reporters of biological response to therapy would be necessary. In addition to the case study of mTHPC-PDT, we also use the mathematical model to simulate clinical photobleaching data, informed by a possible blood flow reduction during treatment. In a recently completed clinical trial at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, patients with superficial basal cell carcinoma received topical application of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and were irradiated with 633 nm light at 10-150 mW cm-2 . Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photobleaching in the lesion and the adjacent perilesion normal margin was monitored by

  14. Colonic cancer cell polyamine synthesis after photodynamic therapy

    PhotoDynamic Therapy is a new concept for cancer treatment based on the interaction between light and a sensitizer, hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) selectively retained by tumor cells which becomes toxic after light exposure. This effect decreases cell growth, through complex pathways. The aim of this study was to determine whether cellular polyamines, Put (Putrescine), Spd (Spermidine) and Spm (Spermine) were modified after PDT or not. These cations of small molecular weight are essential for cell growth and differentiation of normal and neoplastic cells. In this study intracellular contents of Put, Spd and Spm were determined on 2 sublines of rat colonic cancer cells cloned from the same rat cancer and forming progressive (PROb) and regressive (REGb) tumors. (author). 12 refs., 2 figs

  15. The physics, biophysics and technology of photodynamic therapy

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses light-activated drugs to treat diseases ranging from cancer to age-related macular degeneration and antibiotic-resistant infections. This paper reviews the current status of PDT with an emphasis on the contributions of physics, biophysics and technology, and the challenges remaining in the optimization and adoption of this treatment modality. A theme of the review is the complexity of PDT dosimetry due to the dynamic nature of the three essential components-light, photosensitizer and oxygen. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the problem and in developing instruments to measure all three, so that optimization of individual PDT treatments is becoming a feasible target. The final section of the review introduces some new frontiers of research including low dose rate (metronomic) PDT, two-photon PDT, activatable PDT molecular beacons and nanoparticle-based PDT. (topical review)

  16. The physics, biophysics and technology of photodynamic therapy

    Wilson, Brian C [Division of Biophysics and Bioimaging, Ontario Cancer Institute and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9 (Canada); Patterson, Michael S [Department of Medical Physics, Juravinski Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 699 Concession Street, Hamilton, ON L8V 5C2 (Canada)], E-mail: wilson@uhnres.utoronto.ca, E-mail: mike.patterson@jcc.hhsc.ca

    2008-05-07

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses light-activated drugs to treat diseases ranging from cancer to age-related macular degeneration and antibiotic-resistant infections. This paper reviews the current status of PDT with an emphasis on the contributions of physics, biophysics and technology, and the challenges remaining in the optimization and adoption of this treatment modality. A theme of the review is the complexity of PDT dosimetry due to the dynamic nature of the three essential components-light, photosensitizer and oxygen. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the problem and in developing instruments to measure all three, so that optimization of individual PDT treatments is becoming a feasible target. The final section of the review introduces some new frontiers of research including low dose rate (metronomic) PDT, two-photon PDT, activatable PDT molecular beacons and nanoparticle-based PDT. (topical review)

  17. Nanosized ZSM-5 will improve photodynamic therapy using Methylene blue.

    Kariminezhad, H; Habibi, M; Mirzababayi, N

    2015-07-01

    Nowadays, nanotechnology is growing to improve Photodynamic Therapy and reduce its side effects. In this research, the synthesized co-polymeric Zeolite Secony Mobile-5 (ZSM-5) was employed to modify Methylene Blue (MB) for these reasons. UV-Visible, FTIR, XRD analysis and SEM images were used to investigate obtained nanostructure. The crystal size for these nanostructures were determined 75 nm and maximum adsorption capacity of MB in the nanostructure was estimated 111 (mg g(-1)). Also, the role of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) was studied as a capable non-toxic polymeric coating to overcome biological barriers. Moreover, potential of singlet oxygen production of the synthesized nanostructure was compared with MB and ZSM-5 nanoparticles control samples. Synthesized nanodrugs show impressive light induced singlet oxygen production efficiency. PMID:25900556

  18. Intensified photodynamic therapy of actinic keratoses with fractional CO2 laser

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Haak, C S; Thaysen-Petersen, D;

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with methyl aminolaevulinate (MAL) is effective for thin actinic keratoses (AKs) in field-cancerized skin. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing (AFXL) creates vertical channels that facilitate MAL uptake and may improve PDT efficacy.......Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with methyl aminolaevulinate (MAL) is effective for thin actinic keratoses (AKs) in field-cancerized skin. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing (AFXL) creates vertical channels that facilitate MAL uptake and may improve PDT efficacy....

  19. Breast cancer as photodynamic therapy target: Enhanced therapeutic efficiency by overview of tumor complexity

    Lamberti, María Julia; Vittar, Natalia Belén Rumie; RIVAROLA, VIVIANA ALICIA

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a minimally invasive and clinically approved procedure for eliminating selected malignant cells with specific light activation of a photosensitizer agent. Whereas interstitial and intra-operative approaches have been investigated for the ablation of a broad range of superficial or bulky solid tumors such as breast cancer, the majority of approved photodynamic therapy protocols are for the treatment of superficial lesions of skin and luminal organs. This review article ...

  20. The results of the treatment of various morphological types of ENT skin cancer by photodynamic therapy

    Volgin V.N.; Stranadko E.F.; Kagoyants R.V.

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses one of the urgent problems of modern oncology — the question of treatment of skin cancer (SC). The experience of the new promising method of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of patients with primary and recurrent skin cancer. Aim: to evaluate the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of patients with primary and recurrent skin cancer (SC). Materials. The Main Military Clinical Hospital SC treatment of upper respiratory tract with PDT pe...

  1. Improved results of treatment of purulent wounds with complex use of photodynamic therapy and CO2 laser in the experiment

    TESHAEV OKTYABR RUHULLAEVICH; MURODOV ALIJON SALIMOVICH; SADYKOV RАSUL RUSTAMOVICH; HAMDAMOV BAKHTIYOR ZARIPOVICH

    2016-01-01

    The aim of research was the evaluation of the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy and CO2 laser destructive purulent wounds of soft tissues in the experiment. Photodynamic therapy is a very effective non-invasive and gentle treatment of purulent wounds and serve as justification for the use of the method of photodynamic therapy in clinical practice for the treatment of acute local inflammatory processes combined with CO2 laser and traditional treatments. These laboratory, thermometry, morph...

  2. Exploiting apoptosis in photodynamic therapy: is it possible?

    Rendon, Cesar A.; Lilge, Lothar D.

    2003-06-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme is the most common form of malignant brain tumors and accounts for approximately 25% of all primary brain tumors. Only 5% of these patients survive longer than 2 years. The standard form of treatment is radiation therapy and surgery if the site is accessible. Different forms of adjuvant chemotherapy have been largely proven unsuccessful. Another form of adjuvant therapy, Photodynamic Therapy (PDT), has undergone preliminary trials showing some promising results but at the cost of increased side effects like rise in intracranial blood pressure and neurological deficiency. Apoptotic cell kill used as a biological treatment endpoint can possibly ameliorate these side effects. This study evaluates the significance of apoptotic cell death in the 9L rat gliosarcoma using the aminolevulinic acid (ALA) induced endogenous photosensitizer Protophorphyrin IX (PpIX). A strong influence of drug incubation time with cell kill was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cell death was less than 10% for 2 and 4 hours incubation times and irradiation times ensuring up to 70 and 80% cell kill respectively. Accumulation of PpIX in the mitochondria and cytoplasm was quantified by confocal fluorescence microscopy showing a linear relationship of PpIX fluorescence with concentration. The possibility of an in vitro threshold in the PDT dose is discussed, above which cell repair mechanisms may become exhausted. In conclusion for the range of parameters investigated, apoptotic cell kill may be hard to exploit therapeutically in this tumor model.

  3. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  4. Cell Death Pathways in Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging cancer therapy that uses the combination of non-toxic dyes or photosensitizers (PS) and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species and destroy tumors. The PS can be localized in various organelles such as mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes and this sub-cellular location governs much of the signaling that occurs after PDT. There is an acute stress response that leads to changes in calcium and lipid metabolism and causes the production of cytokines and stress response mediators. Enzymes (particularly protein kinases) are activated and transcription factors are expressed. Many of the cellular responses center on mitochondria and frequently lead to induction of apoptosis by the mitochondrial pathway involving caspase activation and release of cytochrome c. Certain specific proteins (such as Bcl-2) are damaged by PDT-induced oxidation thereby increasing apoptosis, and a build-up of oxidized proteins leads to an ER-stress response that may be increased by proteasome inhibition. Autophagy plays a role in either inhibiting or enhancing cell death after PDT

  5. Layered bismuth oxyhalide nanomaterials for highly efficient tumor photodynamic therapy

    Xu, Yu; Shi, Zhenzhi; Zhang, Ling'e.; Brown, Eric Michael Bratsolias; Wu, Aiguo

    2016-06-01

    Layered bismuth oxyhalide nanomaterials have received much more interest as promising photocatalysts because of their unique layered structures and high photocatalytic performance, which can be used as potential inorganic photosensitizers in tumor photodynamic therapy (PDT). In recent years, photocatalytic materials have been widely used in PDT and photothermal therapy (PTT) as inorganic photosensitizers. This investigation focuses on applying layered bismuth oxyhalide nanomaterials toward cancer PDT, an application that has never been reported so far. The results of our study indicate that the efficiency of UV-triggered PDT was highest when using BiOCl nanoplates followed by BiOCl nanosheets, and then TiO2. Of particular interest is the fact that layered BiOCl nanomaterials showed excellent PDT effects under low nanomaterial dose (20 μg mL-1) and low UV dose (2.2 mW cm-2 for 10 min) conditions, while TiO2 showed almost no therapeutic effect under the same parameters. BiOCl nanoplates and nanosheets have shown excellent performance and an extensive range of applications in PDT.

  6. Cell Death Pathways in Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    Michael R. Hamblin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is an emerging cancer therapy that uses the combination of non-toxic dyes or photosensitizers (PS and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species and destroy tumors. The PS can be localized in various organelles such as mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes and this sub-cellular location governs much of the signaling that occurs after PDT. There is an acute stress response that leads to changes in calcium and lipid metabolism and causes the production of cytokines and stress response mediators. Enzymes (particularly protein kinases are activated and transcription factors are expressed. Many of the cellular responses center on mitochondria and frequently lead to induction of apoptosis by the mitochondrial pathway involving caspase activation and release of cytochrome c. Certain specific proteins (such as Bcl-2 are damaged by PDT-induced oxidation thereby increasing apoptosis, and a build-up of oxidized proteins leads to an ER-stress response that may be increased by proteasome inhibition. Autophagy plays a role in either inhibiting or enhancing cell death after PDT.

  7. Photonanomedicine: a convergence of photodynamic therapy and nanotechnology

    Obaid, Girgis; Broekgaarden, Mans; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Huang, Huang-Chiao; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Liu, Joyce; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-06-01

    As clinical nanomedicine has emerged over the past two decades, phototherapeutic advancements using nanotechnology have also evolved and impacted disease management. Because of unique features attributable to the light activation process of molecules, photonanomedicine (PNM) holds significant promise as a personalized, image-guided therapeutic approach for cancer and non-cancer pathologies. The convergence of advanced photochemical therapies such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) and imaging modalities with sophisticated nanotechnologies is enabling the ongoing evolution of fundamental PNM formulations, such as Visudyne®, into progressive forward-looking platforms that integrate theranostics (therapeutics and diagnostics), molecular selectivity, the spatiotemporally controlled release of synergistic therapeutics, along with regulated, sustained drug dosing. Considering that the envisioned goal of these integrated platforms is proving to be realistic, this review will discuss how PNM has evolved over the years as a preclinical and clinical amalgamation of nanotechnology with PDT. The encouraging investigations that emphasize the potent synergy between photochemistry and nanotherapeutics, in addition to the growing realization of the value of these multi-faceted theranostic nanoplatforms, will assist in driving PNM formulations into mainstream oncological clinical practice as a necessary tool in the medical armamentarium.

  8. Combination of photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy - evolving role in dermatology

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Wang, Hong-Wei; Huang, Zheng

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment modality. It offers alternative options in the treatment of cancer and vascular diseases. In cancer treatment, PDT has been used primarily for localized superficial or endoluminal malignant and premalignant conditions. More recently, its application has also been expanded to solid tumors. However, its antitumor efficacy remains debatable and its acceptance still variable. Pre-clinical studies demonstrate that, in addition to the primary local cytotoxicity, PDT might induce secondary host immune responses, which may further enhance PDT's therapeutic effects on primary tumor as well as metastasis. Therefore, PDT-induced local and systemic antitumor immune response might play an important role in successful control of malignant diseases. Furthermore, PDT's antitumor efficacy might also be enhanced through an effective immunoadjuvant or immunomodulator. Our recent clinical data also indicate that improved clinical outcomes can be obtained by a combination of PDT and immunomodulation therapy for the treatment of pre-malignant skin diseases. For instance, the combination of topical ALA-PDT and Imiquimod is effective for the treatment of genital bowenoid papulosis. This presentation will also report our preliminary data in developing combination approaches of PDT and immunotherapy for actinic keratosis (AK), basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and Bowen's disease.

  9. Photonanomedicine: a convergence of photodynamic therapy and nanotechnology.

    Obaid, Girgis; Broekgaarden, Mans; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Huang, Huang-Chiao; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Liu, Joyce; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-07-01

    As clinical nanomedicine has emerged over the past two decades, phototherapeutic advancements using nanotechnology have also evolved and impacted disease management. Because of unique features attributable to the light activation process of molecules, photonanomedicine (PNM) holds significant promise as a personalized, image-guided therapeutic approach for cancer and non-cancer pathologies. The convergence of advanced photochemical therapies such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) and imaging modalities with sophisticated nanotechnologies is enabling the ongoing evolution of fundamental PNM formulations, such as Visudyne®, into progressive forward-looking platforms that integrate theranostics (therapeutics and diagnostics), molecular selectivity, the spatiotemporally controlled release of synergistic therapeutics, along with regulated, sustained drug dosing. Considering that the envisioned goal of these integrated platforms is proving to be realistic, this review will discuss how PNM has evolved over the years as a preclinical and clinical amalgamation of nanotechnology with PDT. The encouraging investigations that emphasize the potent synergy between photochemistry and nanotherapeutics, in addition to the growing realization of the value of these multi-faceted theranostic nanoplatforms, will assist in driving PNM formulations into mainstream oncological clinical practice as a necessary tool in the medical armamentarium. PMID:27328309

  10. Photosensitizer absorption coefficient modeling and necrosis prediction during Photodynamic Therapy.

    Salas-García, Irene; Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2012-09-01

    The development of accurate predictive models for Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) has emerged as a valuable tool to adjust the current therapy dosimetry to get an optimal treatment response, and definitely to establish new personal protocols. Several attempts have been made in this way, although the influence of the photosensitizer depletion on the optical parameters has not been taken into account so far. We present a first approach to predict the spatio-temporal variation of the photosensitizer absorption coefficient during PDT applied to dermatological diseases, taking into account the photobleaching of a topical photosensitizer. This permits us to obtain the photons density absorbed by the photosensitizer molecules as the treatment progresses and to determine necrosis maps to estimate the short term therapeutic effects in the target tissue. The model presented also takes into account an inhomogeneous initial photosensitizer distribution, light propagation in biological media and the evolution of the molecular concentrations of different components involved in the photochemical reactions. The obtained results allow to investigate how the photosensitizer depletion during the photochemical reactions affects light absorption by the photosensitizer molecules as the optical radiation propagates through the target tissue, and estimate the necrotic tumor area progression under different treatment conditions. PMID:22704663

  11. Combination photodynamic therapy and bevacizumab for choroidal neovascularization associated with toxoplasmosis

    Rishi Pukhraj; Venkataraman Anusha; Rishi Ekta

    2011-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl presenting with visual loss in both eyes was diagnosed to have healed toxoplasma retinochoroiditis in the right eye with active choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to toxoplasmosis in the left. She underwent combination photodynamic therapy (PDT) and intravitreal bevacizumab as primary treatment. PDT was performed as per the ′Treatment of Age-related Macular Degeneration by Photodynamic therapy′ study protocol and was followed by intravitreal bevacizu...

  12. LED Light Source for in vitro Study of Photosensitizing Agents for Photodynamic Therapy

    Shilyagina N.Y.; Plekhanov V.I.; Shkunov I.V.; Shilyagin P.А.; Dubasova L.V.; Brilkina А.А.; Sokolova E.A.; Turchin I.V.; Balalaeva I.V.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to develop a LED light source providing a homogeneous light distribution in 96-well plates and allowing an independent irradiation of individual wells, as well as its experimental testing in in vitro study of photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy. Materials and Methods. The experiments were carried out on human cell lines of epidermoid carcinoma А-431 and human bladder carcinoma Т24. Two photosensitizers for fluorescence diagnostics and photodynamic th...

  13. Interstitial 5-ALA photodynamic therapy and glioblastoma: preclinical model development and preliminary results.

    TETARD, MARIE-CHARLOTTE; Vermandel, Maximilien; Leroy, Henri-Arthur; Leroux, Bertrand; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Lejeune, Jean-Paul; Mordon, Serge; Reyns, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    AbstractOBJECTIVE: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become a well-established modality for the treatment of many cancers. Photodynamic eradication of tumor cells depends on the presence of a photosensitizer, oxygen and light. However, oxygen depletion during PDT is a well known problem. Modulation of light delivery could address this issue by counteracting tumor hypoxia, thereby improving tumor cell killing. This preclinical study was designed to validate an animal model incorporating 5-aminola...

  14. Photodynamic therapy of non-melanoma skin cancers

    Ikram, M.; Khan, R. U.; Firdous, S.; Atif, M.; Nawaz, M.

    2011-02-01

    In this prospective study duly approved from Institutional Ethics Review Committee for research in medicine, PAEC General Hospital Islamabad, Pakistan, we investigate the efficacy, safety and tolerability along with cosmetic outcome of topical 5-aminolaevulinic acid photodynamic therapy for superficial nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) and their precursors. Patients with Histological diagnosis of NMSCs and their precursors were assessed for PDT, after photographic documentation of the lesions and written consent, underwent two (2) sessions of PDT in one month (4 weeks) according to standard protocol. A freshly prepared 20% 5-ALA in Unguentum base was applied under occlusive dressing for 4-6 h as Drug Light Interval (DLI) and irradiated with light of 630 nm wavelength from a diode laser at standard dose of 90 J/cm2. Approximately 11% patients reported pain during treatment which was managed in different simple ways. In our study we regularly followed up the patients for gross as well as histopathological response and recurrence free periods during median follow-up of 24 months. Regarding Basal cell carcinomas complete response was observed in 86.2% (25/29), partial response in 10.3% (3/29) and recurrence during first year in 3.5% (1/29) lesions. All the lesions which showed partial response or recurrence were nBCCs. Regarding Actinic Keratosis complete response was observed in 95.3% (20/21), partial response in 4.7% (1/21) while Bowen's disease showed 100% (2/2) results. 81.8% (9/11) Squamous Cell Carcinomas showed complete, 9% (1/11) partial response and 9% (1/11) presented with recurrence after 3 months. We observed excellent and good cosmetic results along with tumor clearance in our study. Treatment sessions were well tolerated with high level of patient's satisfaction and only minor side effects of pain during treatment sessions and inflammatory changes post photodynamic therapy were observed. We concluded that 5-ALA PDT is an effective and safe emerging

  15. Treatment of bile duct carcinoma using photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    Full text: Biliary papillomatosis, is a rare, benign tumour characterised by extensive mucosal involvement of the bile duct with carcinoma in 30% of cases. Treatment has been largely limited to surgical resection and is often accompanied by tumour recurrence. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was used to treat a 64 year old man with mucous-secreting papillomatosis of the common bile hepatic duct which presented with obstructive jaundice and recurrent cholangitis. The successful use of PDT in treating a case of cholangiocarcinoma and the treatment of similar colonic villous tumours encourage the use of PDT in this patient. Porfimer Sodium (Photofrin), 2 mg/kg was given intravenously 64 hours prior to light exposure. A Spectra Physics argon-ion pumped dye laser was used to provide 50 mW of 630 nm wavelength light at a 3 cm long diffusing tip attached to a 3 m optical fibre. A power density of approximately 15 mW.cm-2 was provided at the tissue surface under illumination at a radial distance of approximately 1.8 mm from the diffusing tip. The dose was designed to give a necrosis depth of 3 mm. A transparent 3.6 mm outer diameter catheter was placed in the duct using fluoroscopy and the fibre and diffusing tip then manoeuvred into position. The transparent catheter was left in place during the treatment and forced a minimum inner diameter on the duct of 3.6 mm and also helped to centre the diffuser within the duct. Repeat endoscopy, 48 hours after treatment revealed little duct mucous; necrosed tissue was removed with a balloon catheter with significant increase in size of the duct lumen. Since then, the patient's bilirubin has remained normal. Repeat endoscopic cholangiography one month later has shown no diminution in the diameter of the bile duct. The use of Photodynamic Therapy in the biliary tree using endoscopic retrograde placement of light source is feasible and the results in this patient encourage a trial of its use in operable bile duct carcinoma

  16. [Photodynamic therapy in combined treatment of stage III non-small cell lung carcinoma].

    Akopov, A L; Rusanov, A A; Molodtsova, V P; Chistiakov, I V; Kazakov, N V; Urtenova, M A; Rait, Makhmud; Papaian, G V

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combined treatment of locally advanced lung cancer with the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery with the use of pre- and intraoperative photodynamic therapy. 20 patients with IIIa (n=7) and IIIb (n=13) stage of non-small cell lung carcinoma were included. At the time of diagnosis the surgical treatment was decided to abstain because of the trachea invasion in 9 patients, wide mediastinal invasion in 2 patients and contralateral mediastinal lymph nodes metastases in 2 patients; pneumonectomy was not possible due to the poor respiratory function in 7 patients. Neoadjuvant therapy included 3 courses of chemotherapy and endobronchial photodynamic therapy. During the operation, along with the lung resection (pneumonectomy - 15, lobectomy - 5), photodynamic therapy of the resection margins were carried out. No adjuvant treatment was done. Preoperative treatment led to partial regress of the disease in all cases; the goal of surgery was the complete tumor removal. No complications of the photodynamic therapy were observed. 18 surgical interventions were radical and two non-complete microscopically (R1). Postoperative morbidity was 20%, one patient died due to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. The average follow-up period was 18 months: 19 patients were alive, of them 18 with no signs of the disease recurrence. The first experience of the combined use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery with pre- and intraoperative photodynamic therapy demonstrates safety and efficacy of the suggested treatment tactics. PMID:23612332

  17. Prevention of Distant Lung Metastasis After Photodynamic Therapy Application in a Breast Cancer Tumor Model.

    Longo, João Paulo Figueiró; Muehlmann, Luis Alexandre; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Portilho, Flávia Arruda; de Souza, Ludmilla Regina; Silva, Jaqueline Rodrigues; Lacava, Zulmira Guerrero Marques; Bocca, Anamelia Lorenzetti; Chaves, Sacha Braun; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the activity of photodynamic therapy mediated by aluminum-chlorophthalocyanine contained in a polymeric nanostructured carrier composed by methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride (PVM/MA) against local subcutaneous breast cancer tumors and its effects against distant metastasis in a mouse tumor model. In our results, we observed a decrease in breast cancer tumor growth, prevention of distant lung metastases, and a significant increased survival in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. In addition to these results, we observed that tumor-bearing mice without treatment developed a significant extension of liver hematopoiesis that was significantly reduced in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. We hypothesized and showed that this reduction in (1) metastasis and (2) liver hematopoiesis may be related to the systemic activity of immature hematopoietic cells, specifically the myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which were suppressed in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. These cells produce a tolerogenic tumor environment that protects tumor tissues from immunological surveillance. Therefore, we suggest that photodynamic therapy could be employed in combination with other conventional therapies; such as surgery and radiotherapy, to improve the overall survival of patients diagnosed with breast cancer, as observed in our experimental resuIts. PMID:27301195

  18. Long-Term Recurrence of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer after Topical Methylaminolevulinate Photodynamic Therapy in a Dermato-Oncology Department

    Cabete, J; Rafael, M; Cravo, M; Moura, C.; Sachse, F; Pecegueiro, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most available studies on the efficacy of topical photodynamic therapy focus on short-to medium-term results. Long-term data are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the long-term efficacy of photodynamic therapy with topical methylaminolevulinate to treat Bowen's disease and basal cell carcinoma in the clinical practice setting of a dermato-oncology department. METHODS: The study included patients diagnosed with Bowen's disease or basal cell carcinoma, and who received photodynam...

  19. Long-term recurrence of nonmelanoma skin cancer after topical methylaminolevulinate photodynamic therapy in a dermato-oncology department*

    Cabete, Joana; Rafael, Margarida; Cravo, Mariana; Moura, Cecília; Sachse, Fernanda; Pecegueiro, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Most available studies on the efficacy of topical photodynamic therapy focus on short-to medium-term results. Long-term data are scarce. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the long-term efficacy of photodynamic therapy with topical methylaminolevulinate to treat Bowen's disease and basal cell carcinoma in the clinical practice setting of a dermato-oncology department. METHODS The study included patients diagnosed with Bowen's disease or basal cell carcinoma, and who received photodynamic therap...

  20. Interaction of acid ceramidase inhibitor LCL521 with tumor response to photodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy-generated vaccine.

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judit; Zhang, Wei; Saw, Kyi Min; Szulc, Zdzislaw M; Bielawska, Alicja; Separovic, Duska

    2016-09-15

    Acid ceramidase has been identified as a promising target for cancer therapy. One of its most effective inhibitors, LCL521, was examined as adjuvant to photodynamic therapy (PDT) using mouse squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII model of head and neck cancer. Lethal effects of PDT, assessed by colony forming ability of in vitro treated SCCVII cells, were greatly enhanced when combined with 10 µM LCL521 treatment particularly when preceding PDT. When PDT-treated SCCVII cells are used to vaccinate SCCVII tumor-bearing mice (PDT vaccine protocol), adjuvant LCL521 treatment (75 mg/kg) resulted in a marked retardation of tumor growth. This effect can be attributed to the capacity of LCL521 to effectively restrict the activity of two main immunoregulatory cell populations (Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, MDSCs) that are known to hinder the efficacy of PDT vaccines. The therapeutic benefit with adjuvant LCL521 was also achieved with SCCVII tumors treated with standard PDT when using immunocompetent mice but not with immunodeficient hosts. The interaction of LCL521 with PDT-based antitumor mechanisms is dominated by immune system contribution that includes overriding the effects of immunoregulatory cells, but could also include a tacit contribution from boosting direct tumor cell kill. PMID:27136745

  1. Photodynamic therapy of condyloma acuminata in pregnant women

    YANG Yu-guang; ZOU Xian-biao; ZHAO Hua; ZHANG Yun-jie; LI Heng-jin

    2012-01-01

    Background Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is an emerging technique for the treatment of genital human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced benign and premalignant lesions.We report here in a case series of condyloma acuminata (CA) in pregnancy successfully treated with ALA-PDT.Methods Five pregnant patients with CA received three to four times treatment respectively.Patients were followed up for 6-23 months after treatment.Results The clearance rate of genital warts was 100%.No recurrence was found during the follow-up period.Major adverse events reported were mild erosion,pain,and local edema.All pregnancies resulted in healthy live births without delivery complications.Conclusions PDT with topical ALA seems to be safe and effective in the treatment of CA in pregnancy.It demonstrated high clearance rate of warts,was well-tolerated by patients,and showed no adverse effects on mothers or fetuses.ALA-PDT may be an ideal strategy of treatment for pregnant women with CA.

  2. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  3. Extended rhodamine photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy of cancer cells.

    Davies, Kellie S; Linder, Michelle K; Kryman, Mark W; Detty, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Extended thio- and selenorhodamines with a linear or angular fused benzo group were prepared. The absorption maxima for these compounds fell between 640 and 700nm. The extended rhodamines were evaluated for their potential as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy in Colo-26 cells. These compounds were examined for their photophysical properties (absorption, fluorescence, and ability to generate singlet oxygen), for their dark and phototoxicity toward Colo-26 cells, and for their co-localization with mitochondrial-specific agents in Colo-26 and HUT-78 cells. The angular extended rhodamines were effective photosensitizers toward Colo-26 cells with 1.0Jcm(-2) laser light delivered at λmax±2nm with values of EC50 of (2.8±0.4)×10(-7)M for sulfur-containing analogue 6-S and (6.4±0.4)×10(-8)M for selenium-containing analogue 6-Se. The linear extended rhodamines were effective photosensitizers toward Colo-26 cells with 5 and 10Jcm(-2) of broad-band light (EC50's⩽2.4×10(-7)M). PMID:27246858

  4. Core - shell upconversion nanoparticle - semiconductor heterostructures for photodynamic therapy

    Dou, Qing Qing; Rengaramchandran, Adith; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Zhang, Yong

    2015-02-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles (CSNPs) with diverse chemical compositions have been attracting greater attention in recent years. However, it has been a challenge to develop CSNPs with different crystal structures due to the lattice mismatch of the nanocrystals. Here we report a rational design of core-shell heterostructure consisting of NaYF4:Yb,Tm upconversion nanoparticle (UCN) as the core and ZnO semiconductor as the shell for potential application in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The core-shell architecture (confirmed by TEM and STEM) enables for improving the loading efficiency of photosensitizer (ZnO) as the semiconductor is directly coated on the UCN core. Importantly, UCN acts as a transducer to sensitize ZnO and trigger the generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) to induce cancer cell death. We also present a firefly luciferase (FLuc) reporter gene based molecular biosensor (ARE-FLuc) to measure the antioxidant signaling response activated in cells during the release of ROS in response to the exposure of CSNPs under 980 nm NIR light. The breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and 4T1) exposed to CSNPs showed significant release of ROS as measured by aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and ARE-FLuc luciferase assays, and ~45% cancer cell death as measured by MTT assay, when illuminated with 980 nm NIR light.

  5. Fluorescence guided evaluation of photodynamic therapy as acne treatment

    Ericson, Marica B.; Horfelt, Camilla; Cheng, Elaine; Larsson, Frida; Larko, Olle; Wennberg, Ann-Marie

    2005-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an attractive alternative treatment for patients with acne because of its efficiency and few side effects. Propionibacterium acnes (P.acnes) are bacteria present in the skin, which produce endogenous porphyrins that act as photosensitisers. In addition, application of aminolaevulinic acid or its methyl ester (mALA) results in increased accumulation of porphyrins in the pilosebaceous units. This makes it possible to treat acne with PDT. This initial study investigates the possibility of fluorescence imaging as assessment tool in adjunct to PDT of patients with acne. Twenty-four patients with acne on the cheeks have been treated with PDT with and without mALA. Fluorescence images have been obtained before and after treatment. The clinical acne score was assessed as base line before PDT, and at every follow up visit. Additionally the amount of P.acnes was determined. The clinical evaluation showed a general improvement of acne, even though no difference between treatment with and without mALA was observed. By performing texture analysis and multivariate data analsysis on the fluorescence images, the extracted texture features were found to correlate with the corresponding clinical assessment (67%) and amount of P.acnes (72%). The analysis showed that features describing the highly fluorescent pores could be related to the clinical assessment. This result suggests that fluorescence imaging can be used as an objective assessment of acne, but further improvement of the technique is possible, for example by including colour images.

  6. Necrosis prediction of photodynamic therapy applied to skin disorders

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Romanov, O. G.; López-Escobar, M.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2009-02-01

    The great selectivity and the lack of side effects of Photodynamic Therapy make it more advantageous than radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The application of PDT to skin diseases is particularly appropriate, due to the accessibility of this tissue. Common disorders like nonmelanoma skin cancer, that includes basocelullar or squamous cell carcinomas, can be treated with PDT. Conventional procedures, like surgery or radiotherapy, are not so efficient and do not, in general, obtain the same favourable results. PDT in dermatology medical praxis uses fixed protocols depending on the photosensitizer and the optical source used. These protocols are usually provided by the photosensitizer laboratory, and every lesion is treated with the same parameters. In this work we present a photo-chemical model of PDT applied to skin disorders treated with topical photosensitizers. Optical propagation inside the tissue is calculated by means of a 3D diffusion equation, solved via a finite difference numerical method. The photosensitizer degradation or photobleaching is taken into account, as the drug looses efficiency with the irradiation time. With these data the necrosis area is estimated, so this model could be used as a predictive tool to adjust the optical power and exposition time for the particular disease under treatment.

  7. Absence of bacterial resistance following repeat exposure to photodynamic therapy

    Pedigo, Lisa A.; Gibbs, Aaron J.; Scott, Robert J.; Street, Cale N.

    2009-06-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria necessitates exploration of alternative approaches to treat hospital and community acquired infections. The aim of this study was to determine whether bacterial pathogens develop resistance to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) during repeated sub-lethal challenge. Antibiotic sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus and antibiotic sensitive E. coli were subjected to repeat PDT treatments using a methylene blue photosensitizer formulation and 670 nm illumination from a non-thermal diode laser. Parameters were adjusted such that kills were Oxacillin resistance was induced in S. aureus using a disc diffusion method. For each experiment, "virgin" and "repeat" cultures were exposed to methylene blue at 0.01% w/v and illuminated with an energy dose of 20.6 J/cm2. No significant difference in killing of E. coli (repeat vs. virgin culture) was observed through 11 repeat exposures. Similar results were seen using MSSA and MRSA, wherein kill rate did not significantly differ from control over 25 repeat exposures. In contrast, complete oxacillin resistance could be generated in S. aureus over a limited number of exposures. PDT is effective in the eradication of pathogens including antibiotic resistance strains. Furthermore, repeated sub-lethal exposure does not induce resistance to subsequent PDT treatments. The absence of resistance formation represents a significant advantage of PDT over traditional antibiotics.

  8. Application of long-circulating liposomes to cancer photodynamic therapy.

    Oku, N; Saito, N; Namba, Y; Tsukada, H; Dolphin, D; Okada, S

    1997-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a cancer treatment is notable for its quite low side effects in comparison with those of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, the accumulation of porphyrin derivatives used in PDT into tumor tissues is rather low. Since long-circulating liposomes are known to accumulate passively into tumor tissues, we liposomalized a porphyrin derivative, benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA), and used these liposomes to investigate the usefulness of PDT for tumor-bearing mice. BPD-MA was liposomalized into glucuronate-modified liposomes, which are known to be long-circulating. These liposomes were injected i.v. into Balb/c mice bearing Meth A sarcoma, and tumor regression and survival time were monitored after irradiation with laser light. Tumor regression and complete curing of tumor (80% cure rate by the treatment with 6 mg/kg BPD-MA) were observed when long circulating liposomalized BPD-MA was injected and laser-irradiated. In contrast, only a 20% cure rate was obtained when the animals were treated with BPD-MA solution or BPD-MA entrapped in conventional liposomes. These results suggest that a long-circulating liposomal formulation of photo-sensitive agents is useful for PDT. PMID:9212988

  9. Photodynamic therapy of oral Candida infection in a mouse model.

    Freire, Fernanda; Ferraresi, Cleber; Jorge, Antonio Olavo C; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    Species of the fungal genus Candida, can cause oral candidiasis especially in immunosuppressed patients. Many studies have investigated the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill fungi in vitro, but this approach has seldom been reported in animal models of infection. This study investigated the effects of PDT on Candida albicans as biofilms grown in vitro and also in an immunosuppressed mouse model of oral candidiasis infection. We used a luciferase-expressing strain that allowed non-invasive monitoring of the infection by bioluminescence imaging. The phenothiazinium salts, methylene blue (MB) and new methylene blue (NMB) were used as photosensitizers (PS), combined or not with potassium iodide (KI), and red laser (660nm) at four different light doses (10J, 20J, 40J and 60J). The best in vitro log reduction of CFU/ml on biofilm grown cells was: MB plus KI with 40J (2.31 log; p<0.001); and NMB without KI with 60J (1.77 log; p<0.001). These conditions were chosen for treating the in vivo model of oral Candida infection. After 5days of treatment the disease was practically eradicated, especially using MB plus KI with 40J. This study suggests that KI can potentiate PDT of fungal infection using MB (but not NMB) and could be a promising new approach for the treatment of oral candidiasis. PMID:27074245

  10. Intratumor temperature measurements during photodynamic therapy and hyperthermia

    Using a mammary adeno-carcinoma implanted in C/sub 3/H mice, tumor temperatures during photodynamic therapy (PDT) and hyperthermic treatments were measured. Microthermocouples made from 0.002'' copper-constantan wires were made into a linear array of 3 sensing points, 2 mm apart. These thermocouples were placed inside the tumors during each treatment. Treatments included: 1) Light (no drug) using a xenon arc lamp or an argon ion pumped dye laser, 2) PDT (with Photofrin II) using the same sources of light as above, and 3) Hyperthermia, using a heated water bath. The hyperthermic ''dose'' was 430C for 1 hour, and the light dose was 100 Joules/cm/sup 2/. Combinations of treatments were studied using light, PDT and hyperthermia. The light or PDT were followed 0 or 1 hours later with hyperthermia. Preliminary experimental data shows a difference in tumor temperature for some treatments. This difference is associated with the presence or absence of the photosensitizing drug (Photofrin II). Tumors reach higher temperatures when the drug is present and during PDT treatment. For combined treatments the intratumor temperature during the hyperthermia phase are also higher, than in identical control (hyperthermia alone) studies. Experimental data showing whether this difference is statistically significant and potential reasons for such differences will be presented

  11. Photodynamic therapy induced vascular damage: an overview of experimental PDT

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been developed as one of the most important therapeutic options in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. By resorting to the photosensitizer and light, which convert oxygen into cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), PDT will induce vascular damage and direct tumor cell killing. Another consequence of PDT is the microvascular stasis, which results in hypoxia and further produces tumor regression. To improve the treatment with PDT, three promising strategies are currently attracting much interest: (1) the combination of PDT and anti-angiogenesis agents, which more effectively prevent the proliferation of endothelial cells and the formation of new blood vessels; (2) the nanoparticle-assisted delivery of photosensitizer, which makes the photosensitizer more localized in tumor sites and thus renders minimal damage to the normal tissues; (3) the application of intravascular PDT, which can avoid the loss of energy during the transmission and expose the target area directly. Here we aim to review the important findings on vascular damage by PDT on mice. The combination of PDT with other approaches as well as its effect on cancer photomedicine are also reviewed. (review)

  12. In vitro studies of the antiherpetic effect of photodynamic therapy.

    Zverev, V V; Makarov, O V; Khashukoeva, A Z; Svitich, O A; Dobrokhotova, Y E; Markova, E A; Labginov, P A; Khlinova, S A; Shulenina, E A; Gankovskaya, L V

    2016-07-01

    The number of viral infection cases in the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics has tended to increase over last few years. Viruses form herpesvirus and cytomegalovirus families are associated with an increased risk for recurrent pregnancy loss. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising new approach to treat viral infections in which viral particles are inactivated. It exhibits great therapeutic potential, particularly among this group of patients. This study examined the use of PDT to treat herpesvirus infection (HVI) using an in vitro model. In this study, we used the Vero сell lineage as a suitable model of HVI, strains of HSV-1 (strain VR-3) and HSV-2 (strain MS) obtained from The National Virus Collection (London, UK), the photosensitizer Fotoditazine (Veta-Grand, Russia), an AFS physiotherapeutic device (Polironic Corporation, Russia). Laser light irradiation and the photosensitizer had different cytotoxic effects on the Vero cell cultures depending on the doses used. The optimal laser light and photosensitizer doses were determined. PDT had an antiviral effect on an in vitro model of HVI in cell culture. PDT has been shown to be effective treatment for HVI in vitro, leading to a reliable decrease of viral titer. PMID:27003896

  13. Treatment of oral leukoplakia with photodynamic therapy: A pilot study

    Niranzena Panneer Selvam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: Oral leukoplakia (OL is the most common potentially malignant disorder that may transform into oral carcinoma. By treating leukoplakia in its incipient stage, the risk of occurrence of oral carcinoma can be prevented. In this aspect, photodynamic therapy (PDT can serve as a useful treatment modality. The aim of the study is to treat patients with OL using PDT in which 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA is used as a photosensitizer. Materials and Methods: Five patients with OL were included in the study. They were treated with 10% ALA mediated PDT (light source: Xenon lamp, power: 0.1 W, wavelength: 630 ± 5 nm, total dose: 100 J/cm 2 per session for 6-8 sessions. Follow-up was done for a period of 1 year. Results: One month (4 weeks after ALA-PDT, the response was evaluated based on clinical examination. It was as follows: Complete response: Two patients; partial response: Two patients; and no response: One patient. There was no recurrence in any of the cases. Conclusion: There was satisfactory reduction in the size of the OL lesion without any side-effects. Thus, ALA mediated PDT seems to be a promising alternative for the treatment of OL.

  14. Photodynamic therapy for melanoma: efficacy and immunologic effects

    Avci, Pinar; Gupta, Gaurav K.; Kawakubo, Masayoshi; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the fastest growing cancers and if it cannot be completely surgically removed the prognosis is bleak. Melanomas are known to be particularly resistant to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Various types of immunotherapy have however been investigated with mixed reports of success. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has also been tested against melanoma, again with mixed effects as the melanin pigment is thought to act as both an optical shield and as an antioxidant. We have been investigating PDT against malignant melanoma in mouse models. We have compared B16F10 melanoma syngenic to C57BL/6 mice and S91 Cloudman melanoma syngenic to DBA2 mice. We have tested the hypothesis that S91 will respond better than B16 because of higher expression of immunocritical molecules such as MHC-1, tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein-2 gp100, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Some of these molecules can act as tumor rejection antigens that can be recognized by antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8 T cells that have been stimulated by PDT. Moreover it is possible that DBA2 mice are intrinsically better able to mount an anti-tumor immune response than C57BL/6 mice. We are also studying intratumoral injection of photosensitzers such as benzoporphyrin monoacid ring A and comparing this route with the more usual route of intravenous administration.

  15. Characterizing light propagation in bone for photodynamic therapy of osteosarcoma

    Rossi, Vincent M.; Gustafson, Scott B.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2009-02-01

    This work aims at characterizing how light propagates through bone in order to efficiently guide treatment of osteosarcoma with photodynamic therapy (PDT). Optical properties of various bone tissues need to be characterized in order to have a working model of light propagation in bone. Bone tissues of particular interest include cortical bone, red and yellow marrow, cancellous bone, and bone cancers themselves. With adequate knowledge of optical properties of osseous tissues, light dosimetry can determine how best to deliver adequate light to achieve phototoxic effects within bone. An optical fiber source-collector pair is used for diffuse reflectance spectroscopic measurements in order to determine the scattering and absorption properties of bone tissues. Native absorbers of interest at visible and near-IR wavelengths include water and oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin. A cylindrically symmetric Monte Carlo model is then used, incorporating these results, in order to predict and guide the delivery of light within bone in order to achieve the desired phototoxic effect in PDT.

  16. Photodynamic Therapy for Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Chenjin Jin; Jian Ge; Shaobo Zhou; Huiyi Chen; Xiaojing Zhong; Ruzhang Jiang; Lingyan Chen; Lirong Chen

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate short-term effects of single photodynamic therapy (PDT) for agerelated macular degeneration (AMD) accompanied with choroidal neovascularization (CNV).Methods: We analyzed retrospectively the effects of single PDT for 20 patients (20 eyes)with CNV caused by AMD. Corrected visual acuity, fluorescein angiography (FA) and optic coherence tomography (OCT) were examined before and after PDT. All patients were followed up at least 3 months.Results: At the end of 3-month follow-up, 5 eyes had vision progress, 15 eyes had vision stable and no eye had vision deterioration. Fluorescein angiography one week post PDT showed cessation of fluorescein leakage in 8 eyes with predominant classic CNV, and reduction of fluorescein leakage in 12 eyes with minimal classic CNV or occult CNV without classic component. At the 3-month following PDT fluorescein angiography showed fluorescein leakage reappeared in 4 of 8 eyes with predominant classic CNV.Among 12 eyes with minimal classic CNV or occult CNV without classic component, 9eyes showed decreased or unchanged fluorescein leakage, 3 eyes had a progression of fluorescein leakage. Optic coherence tomography showed obvious recovery of serous sensory retinal detachment after PDT.Conclusion: PDT may occlude or inhibit CNV caused by AMD in short term. No obvious side effects were noticed.

  17. An update on photodynamic therapies in the treatment of onychomycosis.

    Simmons, B J; Griffith, R D; Falto-Aizpurua, L A; Nouri, K

    2015-07-01

    Onychomycosis is a common fungal infection of the nails that is increasing in prevalence in the old, diabetics and immunocompromised. Onychomycosis presents a therapeutic challenge that can lead to significant reductions in quality of life leading to both physical and psychological consequences. Current treatment modalities are difficult to implement due to the poor penetration of topical treatments to the nail bed, the slow growing nature of nails and the need for prolonged use of topical and/or oral medications. Standard of care medications have cure rates of 63-76% that leads to a high propensity of treatment failures and recurrences. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) offers an alternative treatment for onychomycosis. Methylene blue dye, methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) and aminolevulinic acid (ALA) have been used as photosensitizers with approximately 630 nm light. These modalities are combined with pre-treatment of urea and/or microabrasion for better penetration. PDT treatments are well tolerated with only mild transient pain, burning and erythema. In addition, significant cure rates for patients who have contraindications to oral medications or failed standard medications can be obtained. With further enhancements in photosensitizer permeability, decreased pre-treatment and photosensitizer incubation times, PDT can be a more efficient and cost-effective in office based treatment for onychomycosis. However, more large-scale randomized control clinical trials are needed to access the efficacy of PDT treatments. PMID:25589056

  18. Self-Monitoring Artificial Red Cells with Sufficient Oxygen Supply for Enhanced Photodynamic Therapy

    Luo, Zhenyu; Zheng, Mingbin; Zhao, Pengfei; Chen, Ze; Siu, Fungming; Gong, Ping; Gao, Guanhui; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been increasingly applied in clinical cancer treatments. However, native hypoxic tumoural microenvironment and lacking oxygen supply are the major barriers hindering photodynamic reactions. To solve this problem, we have developed biomimetic artificial red cells by loading complexes of oxygen-carrier (hemoglobin) and photosensitizer (indocyanine green) for boosted photodynamic strategy. Such nanosystem provides a coupling structure with stable self-oxygen supply and acting as an ideal fluorescent/photoacoustic imaging probe, dynamically monitoring the nanoparticle biodistribution and the treatment of PDT. Upon exposure to near-infrared laser, the remote-triggered photosensitizer generates massive cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) with sufficient oxygen supply. Importantly, hemoglobin is simultaneously oxidized into the more active and resident ferryl-hemoglobin leading to persistent cytotoxicity. ROS and ferryl-hemoglobin synergistically trigger the oxidative damage of xenograft tumour resulting in complete suppression. The artificial red cells with self-monitoring and boosted photodynamic efficacy could serve as a versatile theranostic platform.

  19. Epithelial-mesenchymal interaction during photodynamic therapy-induced photorejuvenation.

    Kim, Sue Kyung; Koo, Gi-Bang; Kim, You-Sun; Kim, You Chan

    2016-09-01

    Recently, several clinical studies reported that the photodynamic therapy (PDT) has photorejuvenation effects on the aged skin. Previously, our group introduced evidence of direct effect of PDT on cultured fibroblast (FB). PDT directly stimulated FBs and induced collagen synthesis through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. In this study, we investigated indirect effect of PDT on the human dermal FB during photorejuvenation focused on the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction between keratinocyte (KC) and FB. The "low-level PDT" condition was used for PDT therapy to the cultured KC. Various kinds of cytokines in the supernatants of KC were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. FBs were stimulated with the KC-conditioned medium (KCM) taken after PDT. The mRNA level of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and collagen type Iα in the FB, was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Clinical phtorejuvenation effect was also evaluated from nine patients who had PDT to treat actinic keratoses. Among the FB-stimulating cytokines, a significant elevation of interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α level in KCM was noted after PDT compared with controls. After stimulating FB with KCM, the mRNA of MMP-1 was decreased and the mRNA of collagen type Iα was increased compare to control. Clinically, fine wrinkles significantly reduced after PDT. However, coarse wrinkles were not recovered significantly. In conclusion, increased collagen synthesis may be mediated not only by direct effect of PDT on FB but also by indirect effect of PDT on FB through cytokines from KC, such as IL-1α, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α. PMID:27383261

  20. Photodynamic therapy-generated vaccines prevent tumor recurrence after radiotherapy

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), an established clinical modality for a variety of malignant and non-malignant diseases, inflicts photoreactive drug-mediated oxidative stress that prompts the engagement of host inflammatory and immune responses which contribute to the therapy outcome. Recently, it has become evident that in vitro PDT-treated tumor cells or their lysates can be utilized as an effective vaccine against established tumors of the same origin. The mechanism underlying the vaccine action appears to be based on eliciting immune recognition of the tumor and developing an efficient immune response even against poorly immunogenic tumors. This study examined whether PDT-generated vaccines can be effectively combined with radiotherapy. Subcutaneous SCCVII tumors (squamous cell carcinomas) growing in syngeneic C3H/HeN mice were treated by radiotherapy (60 Gy x-ray dose). PDT-vaccine treatment, done by peritumoral injection of in vitro PDT-treated SCCVII cells (20 million/mouse), was performed either immediately after radiotherapy or ten days later. The mice were then observed for tumor regression/recurrence. The tumors treated with radiotherapy alone shrunk and became impalpable for a brief period after which they all recurred. In contrast, vaccination performed at 10 days post radiotherapy delayed tumor recurrence and prevented it in one of six mice. Even better results were obtained with mice vaccinated immediately after radiotherapy, with mice showing not only a delayed tumor recurrence but also no sign of tumor in 50% of mice. The PDT-vaccine treatment without radiotherapy produced in this trial a significant tumor growth retardation but no complete regressions. These results indicate that PDT-generated vaccines can ensure immune rejection of cancer once the lesion size is reduced by radiotherapy. Even without obtaining a systemic immunity for the elimination of disseminated malignant deposits, these findings suggest that PDT-vaccines can improve local control

  1. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy in the treatment of denture stomatitis

    Denture stomatitis (DS), also called chronic atrophic candidiasis, is the most common oral fungal infection in denture wearers. It has a multifactorial etiology, but the presence of Candida spp. biofilm on the denture is considered the most important factor for the establishment of the DS. This study aimed to evaluate the treatment of DS through the use of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PAT), mediated by methylene blue. For this purpose, preclinical studies and clinical trials were performed. Simulators prototypes dentures were made of methyl methacrylate polymer to serve as a basis for biofilm growth of the following species of Candida: C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. dubliniensis, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii. Methylene blue solution at a concentration of 450 μg/mL was used as a photosensitizer. The prototypes and biofilms were irradiated with a laser of wavelength of 660 nm, potency of 100 mW, for 80 seconds. For the clinical study, subjects were divided into two groups. The first group received conventional treatment based on the use of antifungal Miconazole. The second group received the treatment by PAT. The preclinical results showed that all species of the genus Candida were susceptible to PAT, with a reduction in colonies that ranged from 2.48 to 3.93 log10. Clinical outcomes were evaluated for the reduction of colonies of Candida spp. located in the mucosa and in the prosthesis and relative to the improvement of the clinical aspect of the affected mucosa. Both the conventional therapy and PAT were effective in treating DS. There was no significant statistical difference between PAT and conventional treatment for any of the factors evaluated. Thus, it was concluded that PAT is effective in the treatment of denture stomatitis. (author)

  2. The Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in the Treatment of Peri-Implantitis

    Umberto Romeo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of addition of the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy to the conventional approach in the treatment of peri-implantitis. Materials and Methods. Forty patients were randomly assigned to test or control groups. Patients were assessed at baseline and at six (T1, twelve (T2, and twenty-four (T3 weeks recording plaque index (PlI, probing pocket depth (PPD, and bleeding on probing (BOP; control group received conventional periodontal therapy, while test group received photodynamic therapy in addition to it. Result. Test group showed a 70% reduction in the plaque index values and a 60% reduction in PD values compared to the baseline. BOP and suppuration were not detectable. Control group showed a significative reduction in plaque index and PD. Discussion. Laser therapy has some advantages in comparison to traditional therapy, with faster and greater healing of the wound. Conclusion. Test group showed after 24 weeks a better value in terms of PPD, BOP, and PlI, with an average pocket depth value of 2 mm, if compared with control group (3 mm. Our results suggest that antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with diode laser and phenothiazine chloride represents a reliable adjunctive treatment to conventional therapy. Photodynamic therapy should, however, be considered a coadjuvant in the treatment of peri-implantitis associated with mechanical (scaling and surgical (grafts treatments.

  3. The Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in the Treatment of Peri-Implantitis

    Libotte, Fabrizio; Sabatini, Silvia; Grassi, Felice Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of addition of the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy to the conventional approach in the treatment of peri-implantitis. Materials and Methods. Forty patients were randomly assigned to test or control groups. Patients were assessed at baseline and at six (T1), twelve (T2), and twenty-four (T3) weeks recording plaque index (PlI), probing pocket depth (PPD), and bleeding on probing (BOP); control group received conventional periodontal therapy, while test group received photodynamic therapy in addition to it. Result. Test group showed a 70% reduction in the plaque index values and a 60% reduction in PD values compared to the baseline. BOP and suppuration were not detectable. Control group showed a significative reduction in plaque index and PD. Discussion. Laser therapy has some advantages in comparison to traditional therapy, with faster and greater healing of the wound. Conclusion. Test group showed after 24 weeks a better value in terms of PPD, BOP, and PlI, with an average pocket depth value of 2 mm, if compared with control group (3 mm). Our results suggest that antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with diode laser and phenothiazine chloride represents a reliable adjunctive treatment to conventional therapy. Photodynamic therapy should, however, be considered a coadjuvant in the treatment of peri-implantitis associated with mechanical (scaling) and surgical (grafts) treatments. PMID:27429618

  4. Primary prevention of skin dysplasia in renal transplant recipients with photodynamic therapy

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Omland, S H; Wulf, H C;

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are at high risk of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); prevention includes early treatment of premalignant actinic keratosis (AK). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive field therapy that reduces new AKs in patients with existing AK and...... indicate a novel approach to early prevention of skin dysplasia that may reduce morbidity from multiple AKs and SCCs in OTR....

  5. Quinones as photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy: ROS generation, mechanism and detection methods.

    Rajendran, M

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the dye-sensitized photooxidation of biological matter in the target tissue, and utilizes light activated drugs for the treatment of a wide variety of malignancies. Quinones and porphyrins moiety are available naturally and involved in the biological process. Quinone metabolites perform a variety of key functions in plants which includes pathogen protection, oxidative phosphorylation, and redox signaling. Quinones and porphyrin are biologically accessible and will not create any allergic effects. In the field of photodynamic therapy, porphyrin derivatives are widely used, because it absorb in the photodynamic therapy window region (600-900nm). Hence, researchers synthesize drugs based on porphyrin structure. Benzoquinone and its simple polycyclic derivatives such as naphthaquinone and anthraquinones absorb at lower wavelength region (300-400nm), which is lower than porphyrin. Hence they are not involved in PDT studies. However, higher polycyclic quinones absorb in the photodynamic therapy window region (600-900nm), because of its conjugation and can be used as PDT agents. Redox cycling has been proposed as a possible mechanism of action for many quinone species. Quinones are involved in the photodynamic as well as enzymatic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Generations of ROS may be measured by optical, phosphorescence and EPR methods. The photodynamically generated ROS are also involved in many biological events. The photo-induced DNA cleavage by quinones correlates with the ROS generating efficiencies of the quinones. In this review basic reactions involving photodynamic generation of ROS by quinones and their biological applications were discussed. PMID:26241780

  6. Candida albicans biofilm development in vitro for photodynamic therapy study

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a phototherapy based on the use of a photo sensitizer (PS) in the presence of low intensity light with resonant wavelength of absorption of the PS and biological systems that can raise awareness, generating reactive oxygen species. Studies show that PDT has a lethal effect on Candida albicans. The biofilm formed by C. albicans is the cause of infections associated with medical devices such as catheters, with a proven resistance to antifungal agents, and the removal of the catheter colonized almost always is necessary. However, few studies in literature report the behavior and response of biofilm organized by C. albicans against PDT. The aims of this study were to develop a methodology for in vitro biofilm formation of C. albicans, evaluate the sensitivity of the biofilm of C. albicans to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy using PS as the methylene blue (MB) and hypocrellin B: La+3 (HBLa+3) and analyze the biofilm by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). For biofilm formation, discs were made from elastomeric silicone catheters. The PS were dissolved in solution of PBS, and the MB had two different concentrations tested in the biofilm: 100μM and 1mM; HBLa+3 only one of 10μM. The irradiation of both dyes with the microorganism was done by two different LEDs, one with red emission at λ = 630nm ± 20nm and the other one blue emission at λ = 460nm ± 30nm. We performed a curve of survival fraction versus time of irradiation of each sample with biofilm and suspension of the microorganism in the yeast form to verify the susceptibility of the front PDT. The yeast showed 100% reduction using both PS, but at different times of irradiation (30s to HBLa+3 and 6 min for the MB at 100μM). When the therapy was applied in biofilm, the MB 100μM did not show any significant reduction, while at concentration of 1mM was reduced by 100% after 6 min of irradiation. The HBLa+3 biofilm group showed a lower reduction in the concentration of 10μM in

  7. Analysis of superficial fluorescence patterns in nonmelanoma skin cancer during photodynamic therapy by a dosimetric model

    Salas-García, I.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the superficial fluorescence patterns in different nonmelanoma skin cancers and their photodynamic treatment response are analysed by a fluorescence based dosimetric model. Results show differences of even more than 50% in the fluorescence patterns as photodynamic therapy progresses depending on the malignant tissue type. They demonstrate the great relevance of the biological media as an additional dosimetric factor and contribute to the development of a future customized therapy with the assistance of dosimetric tools to interpret the fluorescence images obtained during the treatment monitoring and the differential photodiagnosis.

  8. Phthalocyanine-labeled LDL for tumor imaging and photodynamic therapy

    Li, Hui; Marotta, Diane; Kim, Soungkyoo; Chance, Britton; Glickson, Jerry D.; Busch, Theresa M.; Zheng, Gang

    2005-01-01

    Current limitation of both near-infrared (NIR) tumor imaging and photodynamic therapy (PDT) is their lack of sufficient tumor-to-tissue contrast due to the relatively non-specific nature of delivering dye to the tumor, which has led to false negatives for NIR imaging and inadequate therapeutic ratio for PDT. Hence, agents targeting "cancer signatures", i.e. molecules that accumulate selectively in cancer cells, are particular attractive. One of these signatures is low-density-lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), which is overexpressed in many tumors. We have developed pyropheophorbide cholesterol oleate reconstituted LDL as a LDLR-targeting photosensitizer (PS) and demonstrated its LDLR-mediated uptake in vitro and in vivo. To improve the labeling efficiency for achieving high probe/protein ratio, tetra-t-butyl silicon phthalocyanine bearing two oleate moieties at its axial positions, (tBu)4SiPcBOA, was designed and synthesized. This compound was designed to 1) prevent the PS aggregation; 2) improve the PS solubility in non-polar solvent; and 3) maximize the PS binding to LDL phospholipid monolayer. Using this novel strategy, (tBu)4SiPcBOA was reconstituted into LDL (r-SiPcBOA-LDL) with a very high payload (500:1 molar ratio). In addition, (tBu)4SiPcBOA reconstituted acetylated LDL (r-SiPcBOA)-AcLDL with similar payload was also prepared. Since Ac-LDL cannot bind to LDLR, (r-SiPcBOA)-AcLDL can serve as the negative control to evaluate LDLR targeting specificity. For biological evaluation of these new agents, confocal microscopy and in vitro PDT protocols were performed using LDLR-overexpressing human hepatoblastoma G2 (HepG2) tumor model. These studies suggest that LDL serves as a delivery vehicle to bring large amount of the NIR/PDT agents selectively to tumor cells overexpressing LDLR.

  9. Investigation of photodynamic therapy on streptococcus mutans of oral biofilm

    Zhaohui Zou; Ping Gao; Huijuan Yin; Yingxin Li

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME) on the viability of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) cells on biofilms in vitro. Streptococcus mutans is the primary etiological agent of human dental caries. Since dental caries are localized infections, such plaque-related diseases would be well suited to PDT. The diode laser used in this study had the wavelength of 635 nm, whose output power was 10 mW and the energy density was 12.74 J/cm2. HMME was used as photosensitizer. Samples were prepared and divided into five groups: (1) HMME; (2) Laser; (3) HMME+Laser; (4) Control group (+) with chlorhexidine; and (5) Control group (-) with sterile physiological saline. Inoculum of S. mutans incubated with HMME also examined with fluorescence microscopy. PDT exhibited a significantly (P < 0.05) increased antimicrobial potential compared with 20 μm/mL HMME only, laser only, 0.05% chlorhexidine, and 0.9% sterile physiological saline, which reduced the S. mutans of the biofilm most effectively. Laser and 0.05% chlorhexidine were caused reduction in the viable counts of S. mutans significantly different (P < 0.05) also, but these two test treatments did not statistically differ from each other. HMME group did not statistically differ with negative control group. Fluorescence microscopy indicated that HMME localized primarily in the S. mutans of the biofilm. It was demonstrated that HMME-mediated PDT was efficient at killing S. mutans of biofilms and a useful approach in the treatment of dental plaque-related diseases.

  10. Canine treatment with SnET2 for photodynamic therapy

    Frazier, Donita L.; Milligan, Andrew J.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Morgan, Alan R.; Overholt, Bergein F.

    1990-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a treatment technique that utilizes the photoactived species of a drug to destroy tumor tissue. To be successful, the drug must localize in tumor tissue preferentially over normal tissue and must be activated by light of a specific wavelength. Currently the only drug to be approved for clinical use is Heinatoporphyrin Derivative (HpD) although a series of new drugs are being developed for use in the near future. One of the drugs belongs to a class called purpurins which display absorp-' tions between 630-711 nm. Along with several other investigators, we are currently exploring the characteristics of a specific purpurin (SnET2) in normal and tumorous canine tissue. The use of this compound has demonstrated increased tumor control rates in spontaneous dog tumors. Preliminary pharmacokinetic studies have been performed on 6 normal beagle dogs. SnET2 (2 mg/kg) was injected intravenously over 10 minutes and blood was collected at 5, 15, 30, 45 minutes and at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours following administration for determination of drug concentration and calculation of pharinacokinetic parameters. Skin biopsies were collected at 1, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours. Dogs were euthanized at 24 hours and tissues (liver, kidney muscle, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileura, colon, adrenal gland, thyroid, heart, lung, urinary bladder, prostate, pancreas, eye, brain) were collected for drug raeasurement. Drug was shown to persist in liver and kidney for a prolonged period of time coiapared to other tissues. Knowledge of the pharmacokinetic properties of the drug will greatly add to the ability to treat patients with effective protocols.

  11. The design of a robotic multichannel platform for photodynamic therapy

    Hu, Yida; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2009-06-01

    A compact robotic platform is designed for simultaneous multichannel motion control for light delivery and dosimetry during interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT). Movements of light sources and isotropic detectors are controlled by individual motors along different catheters for interstitial PDT. The robotic multichannel platform adds feedback control of positioning for up to 16 channels compared to the existing dual-motor system, which did not have positioning encoders. A 16-channel servo motion controller and micro DC motors, each with high resolution optical encoder, are adopted to control the motions of up to 16 channels independently. Each channel has a resolution of 0.1mm and a speed of 5cm/s. The robotic platform can perform light delivery and dosimetry independently, allowing arbitrary positioning of light sources and detectors in each catheter. Up to 16 compact translational channels can be combined according to different operational scheme with real-time optimal motion planning. The characteristic of high speed and coordinating motion will make it possible to use short linear sources (e.g., 1- cm) to deliver uniform PDT treatment to a bulk tumor within reasonable time by source stepping optimization of multiple sources simultaneously. Advanced robotic control algorithm handles the various unexpected circumstance in clinical procedure, e.g., positiontorque/ current control will be applied to prevent excessive force in the case of resistance in the fiber or motorized mechanism. The robotic platform is fully compatible with operation room (OR) environment and improves the light delivery and dosimetry in PDT. It can be adopted for diffusing optical tomography (DOT), spectroscopic DOT and fluorescent spectroscopy.

  12. Modulation of inflammatory response of wounds by antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    Sharma, Mrinalini; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Management of infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is becoming difficult due to the rapid emergence of multi-antibiotic resistant strains. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) has a lot of potential as an alternative approach for inactivation of antibiotic resistant bacteria. In this study we report results of our investigations on the effect of poly-L-lysine conjugate of chlorine p6 (pl-cp6) mediated APDT on the healing of P.aeruginosa infected wounds and the role of Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-kB) induced inflammatory response in this process. Materials and method: Excisional wounds created in Swiss albino mice were infected with ∼107 colony forming units of P.aeruginosa. Mice with wounds were divided into three groups: 1) Uninfected, 2) Infected, untreated control (no light, no pl-cp6), 3) Infected, APDT. After 24 h of infection (day 1 post wounding), the wounds were subjected to APDT [pl-cp6 applied topically and exposed to red light (660 ± 25 nm) fluence of ∼ 60 J/cm2]. Subsequent to APDT, on day 2 and 5 post wounding (p.w), measurements were made on biochemical parameters of inflammation [toll like receptor-4 (TLR-4), NF-kB, Inteleukin (IL)-[1α, IL-β, and IL-2)] and cell proliferation [(fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP)]. Results: In comparison with untreated control, while expression of TLR-4, NF-kB (p105 and p50), and proinflammatory interleukins (IL-1α, IL-1β,IL-2) were reduced in the infected wounds subjected to APDT, the levels of FGF-2 and ALP increased, on day 5 p.w. Conclusion: The measurements made on the inflammatory markers and cell proliferation markers suggest that APDT reduces inflammation caused by P.aeruginosa and promotes cell proliferation in wounds. PMID:26557735

  13. New design of textile light diffusers for photodynamic therapy

    Cochrane, Cédric, E-mail: cedric.cochrane@ensait.fr [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); ENSAIT, GEMTEX, F-59100 Roubaix (France); Mordon, Serge R.; Lesage, Jean Claude [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); INSERM U 703, Lille University Hospital — CHRU (France); Koncar, Vladan [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); ENSAIT, GEMTEX, F-59100 Roubaix (France)

    2013-04-01

    A homogeneous and reproducible fluence delivery rate during clinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) plays a determinant role in preventing under- or overtreatment. PDT applied in dermatology has been carried out with a wide variety of light sources delivering a broad range of more or less adapted light doses. Due to the complexities of the human anatomy, these light sources do not in fact deliver a uniform light distribution to the skin. Therefore, the development of flexible light sources would considerably improve the homogeneity of light delivery. The integration of plastic optical fiber (POF) into textile structures could offer an interesting alternative. In this article, a textile light diffuser (TLD) has been developed using POF and Polyester yarns. Predetermined POF macrobending leads to side emission of light when the critical angle is exceeded. Therefore, a specific pattern based on different satin weaves has been developed in order to improve light emission homogeneity and to correct the decrease of side emitted radiation intensity along POF. The prototyped fabrics (approximately 100 cm{sup 2}: 5 × 20 cm) were woven using a hand loom, then both ends of the POF were coupled to a laser diode (5 W, 635 nm). The fluence rate (mW/cm{sup 2}) and the homogeneity of light delivery by the TLD were evaluated. Temperature evolution, as a function of time, was controlled with an infrared thermographic camera. When using a power source of 5 W, the fluence rate of the TLD was 18 ± 2.5 mw/cm{sup 2}. Due to the high efficiency of the TLD, the optical losses were very low. The TLD temperature elevation was 0.6 °C after 10 min of illumination. Our TLD meets the basic requirements for PDT: homogeneous light distribution and flexibility. It also proves that large (500 cm{sup 2}) textile light diffusers adapted to skin, but also to peritoneal or pleural cavity, PDTs can be easily produced by textile manufacturing processes.

  14. Fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy of skin cancer with alasens

    S. V. Evstifeev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of treatment in patients with skin cancer using the method of photodynamic therapy (PDT with alasens are represented in the article. The study enrolled 25 patients with stage 1 tumor including 23 patients with previously untreated tumors and 2 – with recurrent disease. Superficial tumor was diagnosed in 17 patients and 8 patients had nodal tumor. Alasens was used locally as application of 20% ointment on involved skin area with 6h exposure. The PDT session was performed on a single occasion immediately after the end of exposure (power density of laser irradiation of 50–100 mW/cm2, light dose – 150–200 J/cm2. All patients had fluorescence diagnosis (FD prior to application of the ointment and before PDT. The results of FD showed that intensity of porphyrin fluorescence in tumor prior to administration of alasens had near no difference from intensity of porphyrin fluorescence in normal skin (12.5±0.7 and 10.0±0.7 r.u., respectively. Six hours after application of the ointment with alasens the fluorescence intensity of protoporphyrin IX increased almost 5-fold (59.7±5.3 r.u., the fluorescence intensity in normal skin remained near baseline level during the follow-up period (maximally 11.6±1.0 r.u.. Two months after PDT the complete tumor regression was confirmed in 21 patients, partial – in 3 and stabilization of tumor growth in 1 patient. In addition, patients with superficial disease had complete regression in 94.1% of cases and partial regression in 5.9% while for patients with nodal tumor – 62.5% and 25%, respectively, stabilization – in 12.5%. 

  15. New design of textile light diffusers for photodynamic therapy

    A homogeneous and reproducible fluence delivery rate during clinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) plays a determinant role in preventing under- or overtreatment. PDT applied in dermatology has been carried out with a wide variety of light sources delivering a broad range of more or less adapted light doses. Due to the complexities of the human anatomy, these light sources do not in fact deliver a uniform light distribution to the skin. Therefore, the development of flexible light sources would considerably improve the homogeneity of light delivery. The integration of plastic optical fiber (POF) into textile structures could offer an interesting alternative. In this article, a textile light diffuser (TLD) has been developed using POF and Polyester yarns. Predetermined POF macrobending leads to side emission of light when the critical angle is exceeded. Therefore, a specific pattern based on different satin weaves has been developed in order to improve light emission homogeneity and to correct the decrease of side emitted radiation intensity along POF. The prototyped fabrics (approximately 100 cm2: 5 × 20 cm) were woven using a hand loom, then both ends of the POF were coupled to a laser diode (5 W, 635 nm). The fluence rate (mW/cm2) and the homogeneity of light delivery by the TLD were evaluated. Temperature evolution, as a function of time, was controlled with an infrared thermographic camera. When using a power source of 5 W, the fluence rate of the TLD was 18 ± 2.5 mw/cm2. Due to the high efficiency of the TLD, the optical losses were very low. The TLD temperature elevation was 0.6 °C after 10 min of illumination. Our TLD meets the basic requirements for PDT: homogeneous light distribution and flexibility. It also proves that large (500 cm2) textile light diffusers adapted to skin, but also to peritoneal or pleural cavity, PDTs can be easily produced by textile manufacturing processes

  16. Tetra-triethyleneoxysulfonyl substituted zinc phthalocyanine for photodynamic cancer therapy.

    Kuzyniak, Weronika; Ermilov, Eugeny A; Atilla, Devrim; Gürek, Ayşe Gül; Nitzsche, Bianca; Derkow, Katja; Hoffmann, Björn; Steinemann, Gustav; Ahsen, Vefa; Höpfner, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has emerged as an effective and minimally invasive treatment option for several diseases, including some forms of cancer. However, several drawbacks of the approved photosensitizers (PS), such as insufficient light absorption at therapeutically relevant wavelengths hampered the clinical effectiveness of PDT. Phthalocyanines (Pc) are interesting PS-candidates with a strong light absorption in the favourable red spectral region and a high quantum yield of cancer cell destroying singlet oxygen generation. Here, we evaluated the suitability of tetra-triethyleneoxysulfonyl substituted zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) as novel PS for PDT. ZnPc-induced phototoxicity, induction of apoptosis as well as cell cycle arresting effects was studied in the human gastrointestinal cancer cell lines of different origin. Photoactivation of ZnPc-pretreated (1-10 μM) cancer cells was achieved by illumination with a broad band white light source (400-700 nm) at a power density of 10 J/cm(2). Photoactivation of ZnPc-loaded cells revealed strong phototoxic effects, leading to a dose-dependent decrease of cancer cell proliferation of up to almost 100%, the induction of apoptosis and a G1-phase arrest of the cell cycle, which was associated with decrease in cyclin D1 expression. By contrast, ZnPc-treatment without illumination did not induce any cytotoxicity, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest or decreased cell growth. Antiangiogenic effects of ZnPc-PDT were investigated in vivo by performing CAM assays, which revealed a marked degradation of blood vessels and the capillary plexus of the chorioallantoic membrane of fertilized chicken eggs. Based on our data we think that ZnPc may be a promising novel photosensitizer for innovative PDT. PMID:26162500

  17. Molecular profiling of angiogenesis in hypericin mediated photodynamic therapy

    Ali Seyed M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photodynamic therapy (PDT involves the administration of a tumor-localizing photosensitizing drug, which is activated by light of specific wavelength in the presence of molecular oxygen thus generating reactive oxygen species that is toxic to the tumor cells. PDT selectively destroys photosensitized tissue leading to various cellular and molecular responses. The present study was designed to examine the angiogenic responses at short (0.5 h and long (6 h drug light interval (DLI hypericin-PDT (HY-PDT treatment at 24 h and 30 days post treatment in a human bladder carcinoma xenograft model. As short DLI targets tumor vasculature and longer DLI induces greater cellular damage, we hypothesized a differential effect of these treatments on the expression of angiogenic factors. Results Immunohistochemistry (IHC results showed minimal CD31 stained endothelium at 24 h post short DLI PDT indicating extensive vascular damage. Angiogenic proteins such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, tumor necrosis growth factor-α (TNF-α, interferon-α (IFN-α and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF were expressed to a greater extent in cellular targeting long DLI PDT compared to vascular mediated short DLI PDT. Gene expression profiling for angiogenesis pathway demonstrated downregulation of adhesion molecules – cadherin 5, collagen alpha 1 and 3 at 24 h post treatment. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF and Ephrin-A3 (EFNA3 were upregulated in all treatment groups suggesting a possible activation of c-Met and Ephrin-Eph signaling pathways. Conclusion In conclusion, long DLI HY-PDT induces upregulation of angiogenic proteins. Differential expression of genes involved in the angiogenesis pathway was observed in the various groups treated with HY-PDT.

  18. Hyaluronidase To Enhance Nanoparticle-Based Photodynamic Tumor Therapy.

    Gong, Hua; Chao, Yu; Xiang, Jian; Han, Xiao; Song, Guosheng; Feng, Liangzhu; Liu, Jingjing; Yang, Guangbao; Chen, Qian; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-04-13

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is considered as a safe and selective way to treat a wide range of cancers as well as nononcological disorders. However, as oxygen is required in the process of PDT, the hypoxic tumor microenvironment has largely limited the efficacy of PDT to treat tumors especially those with relatively large sizes. To this end, we uncover that hyaluronidase (HAase), which breaks down hyaluronan, a major component of extracellular matrix (ECM) in tumors, would be able to enhance the efficacy of nanoparticle-based PDT for in vivo cancer treatment. It is found that the administration of HAase would lead to the increase of tumor vessel densities and effective vascular areas, resulting in increased perfusion inside the tumor. As a result, the tumor uptake of nanomicelles covalently linked with chlorine e6 (NM-Ce6) would be increased by ∼2 folds due to the improved "enhanced permeability and retention" (EPR) effect, while the tumor oxygenation level also shows a remarkable increase, effectively relieving the hypoxia state inside the tumor. Those effects taken together offer significant benefits in greatly improving the efficacy of PDT delivered by nanoparticles. Taking advantage of the effective migration of HAase from the primary tumor to its drainage sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs), we further demonstrate that this strategy would be helpful to the treatment of metastatic lymph nodes by nanoparticle-based PDT. Lastly, both enhanced EPR effect of NM-Ce6 and relieved hypoxia state of tumor are also observed after systemic injection of modified HAase, proving its potential for clinical translation. Therefore, our work presents a new concept to improve the efficacy of nanomedicine by modulating the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27022664

  19. Studies of photodynamic therapy: Investigation of physiological mechanisms and dosimetry

    Woodhams, Josephine Helen

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment for a range of malignant and benign lesions using light activated photosensitising drugs in the presence of molecular oxygen. PDT causes tissue damage by a combination of processes involving the production of reactive oxygen species (in particular singlet oxygen). Since the PDT cytotoxic effect depends on oxygen, monitoring of tissue oxygenation during PDT is important for understanding the basic physiological mechanisms and dosimetry of PDT. This thesis describes the use of non-invasive, optical techniques based on visible light reflectance spectroscopy for the measurement of oxy- to deoxyhaemoglobin ratio or haemoglobin oxygen saturation (HbSat). HbSat was monitored at tissue sites receiving different light dose during aluminium disulphonated phthalocyanine (AIS2PC) PDT. Results are presented on real time PDT-induced changes in HbSat in normal tissue (rat liver) and experimental tumours, and its correlation with the final biological effect under different light regimes, including fractionated light delivery. It was found to some extent that changes in HbSat could indicate whether the tissue would be necrotic after PDT and it was concluded that online physiological dosimetry is feasible for PDT. The evaluation of a new photosensitiser for PDT called palladium-bacteriopheophorbide (WST09) has been carried out in normal and tumour tissue in vivo. WST09 was found to exert a strong PDT effect but was active only shortly after administration. WST09 produced substantial necrosis in colonic tumours whilst only causing a small amount of damage to the normal colon under certain conditions indicating a degree of selectivity. Combination therapy with PDT for enhancing the extent of PDT-induced damage has been investigated in vivo by using the photochemical internalisation (PCI) technique and Type 1 mechanism enhanced phototoxicity with indole acetic acid (IAA). PCI of gelonin using AIS2PC PDT in vivo after systemic administration of

  20. Lasers and photodynamic therapy in the treatment of onychomycosis: a review of the literature.

    Becker, Caitlin; Bershow, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a widespread problem. Oral antifungal medications are currently the gold standard of care, but treatment failure is common and oral therapy is contraindicated in many cases. There is a need for effective treatment without the systemic complications posed by oral therapy. Laser and photodynamic therapy may have the potential to treat onychomycosis locally without adverse systemic effects; some small studies have even reported achieving clinical and mycologic cure. However, the...

  1. The relation between methyl aminolevulinate concentration and inflammation after photodynamic therapy in healthy volunteers

    Fabricius, Susanne; Lerche, Catharina Margrethe; Philipsen, Peter Alshede;

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and pain are well known adverse-effects in photodynamic therapy (PDT). There is currently a tendency towards introducing lower concentrations of the photosensitizer than used in the standard treatment for various indications. The aim of this study was to investigate whether reduced c...

  2. Photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolaevulinic acid or placebo for recalcitrant foot and hand warts

    Stender, I M; Na, R; Fogh, H;

    2000-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with topical 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) followed by irradiation with incoherent light (ALA-PDT) for recalcitrant warts have had beneficial results. Therefore, we undertook a randomised, parallel, double-blind clinical trial of ALA-PDT versus placeboPDT for recalcitrant...

  3. Allergic contact dermatitis to methyl aminolevulinate after photodynamic therapy in 9 patients

    Hohwy, Thomas; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Sølvsten, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    This report describes 9 patients who developed allergic contact dermatitis to methyl aminolevulinate used for photodynamic therapy (PDT). The risk of developing contact allergy to methyl aminolevulinate in PDT treated patients was calculated to 1% after an average of 7 treatments (range 2...

  4. Photodynamic therapy and imaging based on tumor-targeted nanoprobe, polymer-conjugated zinc protoporphyrin

    Fang, J.; Liao, L.; Yin, H.; Nakamura, H.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Maeda, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2015, č. 4 (2015), s. 1-13. ISSN 2056-5623 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/12/1254 Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : fluorescent nanoprobe * photodynamic therapy * theranostic nanomedicine Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  5. Photodynamic therapy of oral cancer - A review of basic mechanisms and clinical applications

    Nauta, JM; vanLeengoed, HLLM; Roodenburg, JLN; Witjes, MJH; Vermey, A

    1996-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an experimental cancer treatment modality. PDT is based on the accumulation of a photosensitive dye in premalignant and malignant lesions. A certain period of time after the dye has been administered, tumor tissue may contain more of the sensitizer then the surrounding

  6. Daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy of basal cell carcinomas - an explorative study

    Wiegell, S R; Skødt, V; Wulf, H C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that daylight-photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective treatment of actinic keratoses, nearly pain free and more convenient for both the clinics and patients. Treatment of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) is another main indication for PDT. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this...

  7. Multifunctional gold nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy of cancer

    Khaing Oo, Maung Kyaw

    As an important and growing branch of photomedicine, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is being increasingly employed in clinical applications particularly for the treatment of skin cancer. This dissertation focuses on the synthesis, characterization and deployment of gold nanoparticles for enhanced PDT of fibrosarcoma cancer cells. We have developed robust strategies and methods in fabrication of gold nanoparticles with positively- and negatively-tethered surface charges by photo-reduction of gold chloride salt using branched polyethyleneimine and sodium citrate respectively. An optimal concentration window of gold salt has been established to yield the most stable and monodispersed gold nanoparticles. 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), a photosensitizing precursor, has been successfully conjugated on to positively charged gold nanoparticles through electrostatic interactions. The 5-ALA/gold nanoparticle conjugates are biocompatible and have shown to be preferably taken up by cancer cells. Subsequent light irradiation results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells, leading to their destruction without adverse effects on normal fibroblasts. We have demonstrated for the first time that gold nanoparticles can enhance PDT efficacy by 50% compared to the treatment with 5-ALA alone. Collected evidence has strongly suggested that this enhancement stems from the elevated formation of ROS via the strongly localized electric field of gold nanoparticles. Through single cell imaging using surface-enhanced Raman scattering enabled by the very same gold nanoparticles, we have shown that multifunctionality of gold nanoparticles can be harvested concurrently for biomedical applications in general and for PDT in specific. In other words, gold nanoparticles can be used not only for targeted drug delivery and field-enhanced ROS formation, but also for monitoring cell destructions during PDT. Finally, our COMSOL Multiphysics simulation of the size-dependent electric

  8. Clinical effect of meso-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorine based photodynamic therapy in recurrent carcinoma of the ovary: preliminary results.

    Wierrani, F; Fiedler, D; Grin, W; Henry, M; Dienes, E; Gharehbaghi, K; Krammer, B; Grünberger, W

    1997-03-01

    This article addresses the use of meso-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin-based photodynamic therapy (m-THPC-PDT) to treat recurrent gynaecologic malignancies of the ovary. Photodynamic therapy is an experimental approach in the treatment of neoplasms and results indicate it is a highly tissue selective, relatively simple intervention with few side effects, therefore reducing the overall burden on the patient. Of the three patients involved in the initial study, two were treated solely with photodynamic therapy by laparoscopy, and one underwent additional palliative debulking surgery of metastatic tumours. After a post-operative period of more than two years all three women remained free of relapses. PMID:9091020

  9. Multifunctionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for the in vitro treatment of retinoblastoma: Drug delivery, one and two-photon photodynamic therapy.

    Gary-Bobo, Magali; Mir, Youssef; Rouxel, Cédric; Brevet, David; Hocine, Ouahiba; Maynadier, Marie; Gallud, Audrey; Da Silva, Afitz; Mongin, Olivier; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Richeter, Sébastien; Loock, Bernard; Maillard, Philippe; Morère, Alain; Garcia, Marcel; Raehm, Laurence; Durand, Jean-Olivier

    2012-08-01

    In this work, we focused on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) for one photon excitated photodynamic therapy (OPE-PDT) combined with drug delivery and carbohydrate targeting applied on retinoblastoma, a rare disease of childhood. We demonstrate that bitherapy (camptothecin delivery and photodynamic therapy) performed with MSN on retinoblastoma cancer cells was efficient in inducing cancer cell death. Alternatively MSN designed for two-photon excited photodynamic therapy (TPE-PDT) were also studied and irradiation at low fluence efficiently killed retinoblastoma cancer cells. PMID:22569231

  10. Regulation of miRNA Expression by Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) and Photodynamic Therapy (PDT)

    Miya Ishihara; Shinpei Okawa; Toshihiro Kushibiki; Takeshi Hirasawa

    2013-01-01

    Applications of laser therapy, including low-level laser therapy (LLLT), phototherapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT), have been proven to be beneficial and relatively less invasive therapeutic modalities for numerous diseases and disease conditions. Using specific types of laser irradiation, specific cellular activities can be induced. Because multiple cellular signaling cascades are simultaneously activated in cells exposed to lasers, understanding the molecular responses within cells will a...

  11. Photodynamic Therapy as Novel Treatment for Halitosis in Adolescents: A Case Series Study

    Lopes, Rubia Garcia; de Santi, Maria Eugenia Simões Onofre; Franco, Bruno Edin; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Prates, Renato Araujo; França, Cristiane Miranda; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli Mesquita; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Halitosis is a common problem that affects a large portion of the population worldwide. The origin of this condition is oral in 90% of cases and systemic in 10% of cases. The foul odor is caused mainly by volatile sulfur compounds produced by Gram-negative bacteria. However, it has recently been found that anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria also produce hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the presence of amino acids, such as cysteine. Light with and without the combination of chemical agents has been used to induce therapeutic and antimicrobial effects. In photodynamic therapy, the antimicrobial effect is confined to areas covered by the photosensitizing dye. The aim of the present case series study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of photodynamic therapy on halitosis in adolescents through the analysis of volatile sulfur compounds measured using a sulfide meter (Halimeter®). Methods: Five adolescents aged 14 to 16 years were evaluated using a sulfide meter before and one hour after photodynamic therapy, which involved the use of methylene blue 0.005% on the middle third and posterior thirds of the dorsum of the tongue and nine points of laser irradiation in the red band (660 nm) with an energy dose of 9 J, power output of 100 mW and 90-seconds exposure time. Results: A 31.8% reduction in the concentration of volatile sulfur compounds was found in the comparison of the initial and final readings. The statistically significant reduction (p = 0.0091) led to an absence of halitosis following treatment (mean: 58.2 ppb). Conclusion: Photodynamic therapy seems to be effective on reduction the concentration of volatile sulfur compounds.Considering the positive effects of photodynamic therapy in this case series, further studies involving microbiological analyses should be conducted to allow comparisons of the results. PMID:25653814

  12. Photodynamic Therapy for the Endodontic Treatment of a Traumatic Primary Tooth in a Diabetic Pediatric Patient

    Giselle R. de Sant’Anna

    2014-01-01

    Conservation of deciduous teeth with pulp alterations caused by caries or trauma is a major therapeutic challenge in pediatric dentistry. It is essential that the sanitizers used in root canal procedures perform well in eliminating bacteria. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging and promising adjuvant therapy for endodontic treatment in an attempt to eliminate microorganisms persistent after chemo-mechanical preparation. This paper reports the case of a five-year-ol...

  13. Endonyx toenail onychomycosis caused by Trichophyton rubrum: treatment with photodynamic therapy based on methylene blue dye*

    Souza, Linton Wallis Figueiredo; Souza, Simone Vilas Trancoso; Botelho, Ana Cristina de Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    This study shows the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy based on methylene blue dye for the treatment of endonyx toenail onychomycosis. Four patients with endonyx onychomycosis caused by Trichophyton rubrum were treated with 2% methylene blue aqueous solution irradiated with light emission diode at 630 nm and an energy density of 36 J/cm2 for 6 months at 2-week intervals. The preliminary study showed the effectiveness of this therapy in the treatment of endonyx onychomycosis, and also indi...

  14. Correction: Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted bimodal imaging and photodynamic/hyperthermia combination therapy.

    Kim, Kyoung Sub; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Joo Young; Matsuda, Shofu; Hideshima, Sho; Mori, Yasurou; Osaka, Tetsuya; Na, Kun

    2016-07-01

    Correction for 'Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted bimodal imaging and photodynamic/hyperthermia combination therapy' by Kyoung Sub Kim, et al., Nanoscale, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02273a. PMID:27300478

  15. Correction: Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted bimodal imaging and photodynamic/hyperthermia combination therapy

    Kim, Kyoung Sub; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Joo Young; Matsuda, Shofu; Hideshima, Sho; Mori, Yasurou; Osaka, Tetsuya; Na, Kun

    2016-06-01

    Correction for `Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted bimodal imaging and photodynamic/hyperthermia combination therapy' by Kyoung Sub Kim, et al., Nanoscale, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02273a.

  16. Combination of photodynamic therapy with intravitreal bevacizumab for post-peribulbar anesthesia (penetrating trauma)-persistent choroidal neovascular membrane

    Shah Nikunj; Shah Urmi

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of a choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM) following ocular penetration during peribulbar anesthesia in a 55- year-old male patient. A combination of photodynamic therapy with intravitreal bevacizumab led to resolution of the persistent CNVM.

  17. Concepts and principles of photodynamic therapy as an alternative antifungal discovery platform

    George eTegos

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic fungal pathogens may cause superficial or serious invasive infections, especially in immunocompromised and debilitated patients. Invasive mycoses represent an exponentially growing threat for human health due to a combination of slow diagnosis and the existence of relatively few classes of available and effective antifungal drugs. Therefore systemic fungal infections result in high attributable mortality. There is an urgent need to pursue and deploy novel and effective alternative anti-fungal countermeasures. Photodynamic therapy was established as a successful modality for malignancies and age-related macular degeneration but photodynamic inactivation has only recently been intensively investigated as an alternative antimicrobial discovery and development platform. The concept of photodynamic inactivation requires microbial exposure to either exogenous or endogenous photosensitizer molecules, followed by visible light energy, typically wavelengths in the red/near infrared region that cause the excitation of the photosensitizers resulting in the production of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species that react with intracellular components, and consequently produce cell inactivation and death. Anti-fungal photodynamic therapy is an area of increasing interest, as research is advancing i to identify the photochemical and photophysical mechanisms involved in photoinactivation; ii to develop potent and clinically compatible photosensitizers; iii to understand how photoinactivation is affected by key microbial phenotypic elements multidrug resistance and efflux, virulence and pathogenesis determinants, and formation of biofilms; iv to explore novel photosensitizer delivery platforms and v to identify photoinactivation applications beyond the clinical setting such as environmental disinfectants.

  18. In vitro evaluation of photodynamic therapy using curcumin on Leishmania major and Leishmania braziliensis.

    Pinto, Juliana Guerra; Fontana, Letícia Correa; de Oliveira, Marco Antonio; Kurachi, Cristina; Raniero, Leandro José; Ferreira-Strixino, Juliana

    2016-07-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an infectious disease caused by the Leishmania protozoan. The conventional treatment is long-lasting and aggressive, in addition to causing harmful effect. Photodynamic therapy has emerged as a promising alternative treatment, which allows local administration with fewer side effects. This study investigated the photodynamic activity of curcumin on Leishmania major and Leishmania braziliensis promastigote. Both species were submitted to incubation with curcumin in serial dilutions from 500 μg/ml up to 7.8 μg/ml. Control groups were kept in the dark while PDT groups received a fluency of 10 J/cm(2) at 450 nm. Mitochondrial activity was assessed by MTT assay 18 h after light treatment, and viability was measured by Trypan blue dye exclusion test. Morphological alterations were observed by Giemsa staining. Confocal microscopy showed the uptake of curcumin by both tested Leishmania species. Mitochondrial activity was inconclusive to determine viability; however, Trypan blue test was able to show that curcumin photodynamic treatment had a significant effect on viability of parasites. The morphology of promastigotes was highly affected by the photodynamic therapy. These results indicated that curcumin may be a promising alternative photosensitizer, because it presents no toxicity in the dark; however, further tests in co-culture with macrophages and other species of Leishmania should be conducted to determine better conditions before in vivo tests are performed. PMID:27056699

  19. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy combined with CO2 laser therapy in treatment of laryngeal papilloma: Case report.

    Zhang, Yunjie; Yang, Yuguang; Zou, Xianbiao; Huang, Zheng

    2016-06-01

    This article describes the case of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy (ALA-PDT) via self-retaining laryngoscope under general anesthesia combined with CO2 Laser Therapy in the treatment of three patients with juvenile laryngeal papilloma. Laryngeal papilloma Clinically, it features rapid growth, multi-focus, frequent recurrence and possibility of spreading to the lower respiratory tract. ALA-PDT via self-retaining laryngoscope under general anesthesia combined with CO2 Laser Therapy is safe and effective for clearing laryngeal papilloma, laryngeal papilloma was fully removed from the three patients, with no recurrence during the 6-24 months of follow-up medical examination. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy (ALA-PDT) via self-retaining laryngoscope under general anesthesia combined with CO2 Laser can be used for treating laryngeal papilloma. PMID:27045601

  20. Preclinical studies of photodynamic therapy of intracranial tissues

    Lilge, Lothar D.; Sepers, Marja; Park, Jane; O'Carroll, Cindy; Pournazari, Poupak; Prosper, Joe; Wilson, Brian C.

    1997-05-01

    The applicability and limitations of the photodynamic threshold model were investigated for an intracranial tumor (VX2) and normal brain tissues in a rabbit model. Photodynamic threshold values for four different photosensitizers, i.e., Photofrin, 5(delta) -aminolaevulinic acid (5(delta) -ALA) induced Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), Tin Ethyl Etiopurpurin (SnET2), and chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (AlClPc), were determined based on measured light fluence distributions, macroscopic photosensitizer concentration in various brain structures, and histologically determined extent of tissue necrosis following PDT. For Photofrin, AlClPc, and SnET2, normal brain displayed a significantly lower threshold value than VX2 tumor. For 5(delta) -ALA induced PPIX and SnET2 no or very little white matter damage, equalling to very high or infinite threshold values, was observed. Additionally, the latter two photosensitizers showed significantly lower uptake in white matter compared to other brain structures and VX2 tumor. Normal brain structures lacking a blood- brain-barrier, such as the choroid plexus and the meninges, showed high photosensitizer uptake for all photosensitizers, and, hence, are at risk when exposed to light. Results to date suggest that the photodynamic threshold values iares valid for white matter, cortex and VX2 tumor. For clinical PDT of intracranial neoplasms 5(delta) -ALA induced PPIX and SnET2 appear to be the most promising for selective tumor necrosis.However, the photosensitizer concentration in each normal brain structure and the fluence distribution throughout the treatment volume and adjacent tissues at risk must be monitored to maximize the selectivity of PDT for intracranial tumors.

  1. Soft versus hard nanoparticles in the delivery of aromatic macrocycles for photodynamic therapy of cancer

    Alejandro Díaz-Moscoso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Photodynamic therapy is a medical strategy to treat some types of cancer. It is based on the use of a photosensitiser, usually porphyrin or phthalocyanine derivatives, to generate toxic species in the cells upon light irradiation. Aim: An overview of the different types of nanoparticles already investigated to deliver the photosensitisers until its target is given in this review. Materials and Methods: Previous literature and various scientific search engines were used for the review. Results: A classification of the nanoparticles based on the nature of their components, ‘hard’-inorganic and ‘soft’-organic, is made and several advantages and disadvantages about their uses are pointed out. Also, a comparative summary is outlined. Conclusion: There are still some drawbacks that need to be sorted out for photodynamic therapy to become a generalised cancer treatment. These could be overcome by using nanoparticles as carriers for the photosensitisers.

  2. Spectral matching technology for light-emitting diode-based jaundice photodynamic therapy device

    Gan, Ru-ting; Guo, Zhen-ning; Lin, Jie-ben

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to obtain the spectrum of light-emitting diode (LED)-based jaundice photodynamic therapy device (JPTD), the bilirubin absorption spectrum in vivo was regarded as target spectrum. According to the spectral constructing theory, a simple genetic algorithm as the spectral matching algorithm was first proposed in this study. The optimal combination ratios of LEDs were obtained, and the required LEDs number was then calculated. Meanwhile, the algorithm was compared with the existing spectral matching algorithms. The results show that this algorithm runs faster with higher efficiency, the switching time consumed is 2.06 s, and the fitting spectrum is very similar to the target spectrum with 98.15% matching degree. Thus, blue LED-based JPTD can replace traditional blue fluorescent tube, the spectral matching technology that has been put forward can be applied to the light source spectral matching for jaundice photodynamic therapy and other medical phototherapy.

  3. Review of photodynamic therapy in actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma

    Marica B Ericson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Marica B Ericson1,2, Ann-Marie Wennberg1, Olle Larkö11Department of Dermatology; 2Department of Physics, Göteborg University, Göteborg, SwedenAbstract: The number of non-melanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide, and so also the demand for effective treatment modalities. Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT using aminolaevulinic acid or its methyl ester has recently become good treatment options for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma; especielly when treating large areas and areas with field cancerization. The cure rates are usually good, and the cosmetic outcomes excellent. The only major side effect reported is the pain experienced by the patients during treatment. This review covers the fundamental aspects of topical PDT and its application for treatment of actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. Both potentials and limitations will be reviewed, as well as some recent development within the field.Keywords: photodynamic therapy, actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinoma

  4. Clinical effect of photodynamic therapy on primary carious dentin after partial caries removal.

    Neves, Pierre Adriano Moreno; Lima, Leonardo Abrantes; Rodrigues, Fernanda Cristina Nogueira; Leitão, Tarcisio Jorge; Ribeiro, Cecília Cláudia Costa

    2016-05-20

    This study was conducted to assess the clinical effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the decontamination of the deep dentin of deciduous molars submitted to partial removal of carious tissue. After cavity preparation, dentin samples were taken from the pulp wall of nineteen deciduous molars before and after PDT application. Remaining dentin was treated with 0.01% methylene blue dye followed by irradiation with an InGaAlP diode laser (λ - 660 nm; 40 mW; 120 J/cm2; 120 s). Dentin samples were microbiologically assessed for the enumeration of total microorganisms, Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci. There was no significant difference in the number of colony-forming units (CFU) for any of the microorganisms assessed (p > 0.05). Photodynamic therapy, using 0.01% methylene blue dye at a dosimetry of 120 J/cm2 would not be a viable clinical alternative to reduce bacterial contamination in deep dentin. PMID:27223131

  5. Efficacy of topical photodynamic therapy for keratoacanthomas: A case-series of four patients

    Maria M Farias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT is an excellent treatment option for various non-melanoma skin cancers and precancerous lesions, including actinic keratosis, Bowen′s disease, and basal cell carcinoma. The clinical use of PDT includes a broad range of neoplastic, inflammatory, and infectious skin diseases. There is also anecdotal evidence suggesting the efficacy of PDT for the treatment of keratoacanthomas (KA. We report a case-series of four patients with solitary KA confirmed by histology, treated with topical PDT with methylaminolevulinic acid (MAL cream. After three sessions of PDT, the lesions completely disappeared. There was no evidence of recurrence and excellent cosmetic outcome was achieved after three years of follow-up. Topical photodynamic therapy with MAL can be a therapeutic alternative for KA with good clinical and cosmetic outcomes.

  6. Studying Light Propagation in Bone for Treatment of Bone Cancers with Photodynamic Therapy

    Rossi, Vincent; Gustafson, Scott; Jacques, Steven

    2008-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy makes use of light, photosensitizing agents, and oxygen as a selective means of treating cancer. The work presented is aimed at applying photodynamic therapy towards treatment of osteosarcoma in small animal clinics. To best facilitate clinical treatments, we must first understand how light propagates and how best to deliver adequate light to achieve phototoxic effects within bone. This work aims at characterizing how light propagates through bone and then applying that knowledge towards predicting light distributions in bone. Reflectance spectroscopy using an optical fiber source-collector pair is used to determine the scattering properties of bone tissues, and the absorption due to water and oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin---native absorbers at visible and near-IR wavelengths. Resulting optical characterizations are then applied to a cylindrically symmetric Monte Carlo model in order to predict and guide the delivery of light within bone in order to achieve the desired phototoxic effect.

  7. Photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) in the treatment of pathological states of the cornea

    Switka-Wieclawska, Iwona; Kecik, Tadeusz; Kwasny, Miroslaw; Graczyk, Alfreda

    2003-10-01

    Each year an increasing amount of research is published on the use of photodynamic therapy in medicine. The most recent research has focused mostly on the use of photosensitizer called vertoporphyrin (Visudyne) is the treatment of subretinal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or myopia, following a substantial amount of ophthalmology research mostly experimental on the application of the method in diagnosis and treatment of some eye tumors. In the Department of Ophthalmology of Polish Medical University in Warsaw, PDT was used as supplementary method in a selected group of patients with chronic virus ulcer of the cornea and keratopathies. During the treatment 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) was applied in ointment form as a photosensitizer activated with light wave of 633 nm. It appears, on the basis of the results obtained, that photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) may become in the future a valuable supplement to the methods being used at the present treating pathological states of the cornea.

  8. Spectroscopical study of bacteriopurpurinimide-naphthalimide conjugates for fluorescent diagnostics and photodynamic therapy

    Panchenko, Pavel A.; Sergeeva, Antonina N.; Fedorova, Olga A.; Fedorov, Yuri V.; Reshetnikov, Roman I.; Schelkunova, Anastasiya E.; Grin, Michail A.; Mironov, Andrey F.; Jonusauskas, Gediminas

    2014-01-01

    International audience Two novel bis(chromophoric) dyads ABPI-NI1 and ABPI-NI2 containing 1,8-naphthalimide and bacteriopurpurinimide units linked by p-phenylene-methylene (ABPI-NI1) and pentamethylene (ABPI-NI2) spacers were prepared to test their ability to be used in the design of effective agents for both photodynamic therapy (PDT) and fluorescent tumor imaging. Photophysical studies revealed that the emission from the naphthalimide chromophore in both conjugates was partially quenched...

  9. Photodynamic Therapy: Occupational Hazards and Preventative Recommendations for Clinical Administration by Healthcare Providers

    Breskey, John D.; Lacey, Steven E.; Vesper, Benjamin J.; Paradise, William A.; James A. Radosevich; Colvard, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a medical treatment for cancers is an increasing practice in clinical settings, as new photosensitizing chemicals and light source technologies are developed and applied. PDT involves dosing patients with photosensitizing drugs, and then exposing them to light using a directed energy device in order to manifest a therapeutic effect. Healthcare professionals providing PDT should be aware of potential occupational health and safety hazards posed by these...

  10. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy in the colon: delivering a light punch to the guts?

    Wainwright, Mark; Dai, Tianhong; Michael R Hamblin

    2011-01-01

    A paper in this issue of Photochemistry and Photobiology by Cassidy et al describes the use of a sophisticated drug delivery vehicle prepared by the hot melt extrusion process to deliver photosensitizers to the colon. The smart vehicle protects its cargo through the acidic environment of the stomach but releases the active photosensitizers in the higher pH and anaerobic environment of the colon. The goal is to use photodynamic therapy (PDT) to destroy pathogenic microorganisms that can cause ...

  11. Photodynamic Therapy for Superficial Esophageal Cancer Using an Excimer Dye Laser

    Seishiro Mimura; Toru Otani; Shigeru Okuda

    1994-01-01

    In order to improve the therapeutic effectiveness of photodynamic therapy with Photofrin II and laser light for superficial esophageal cancer, we employed an excimer dye laser instead of an argon dye laser. Eight superficial esophageal cancer lesions (7 cases) were treated. Of these 8 lesions, 6 were cured by initial treatment, while one lesion required another treatment. The final rate of cure was 88% (7/8).

  12. Successful treatment of recalcitrant folliculitis barbae and pseudofolliculitis barbae with photodynamic therapy

    Diernaes, Jon Erik Fraes; Bygum, Anette

    2013-01-01

    Folliculitis and pseudofolliculitis barbae typically affects men with curly hair who shave too close. Treatment modalities vary in effectiveness and include improved hair removal methods, topical corticosteroids, topical and oral antibiotics, and retinoids as well as laser surgery. We report a...... novel treatment of recalcitrant pseudofolliculitis barbae and confirm effectiveness in recalcitrant folliculitis in a 58-year old man who responded completely following photodynamic therapy with methyl aminolevulinate....

  13. Photodynamic therapy for breast cancer in a BALB/c mouse model

    Ahn, Tae-Gyu; Lee, Byoung-Rai; Choi, Eun-Young; Kim, Dong Won; Han, Sei-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Objective Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used for superficial neoplasms and its usage has been recently extended to deeper lesions. The purpose of this study was to observe whether or not PDT can cure breast cancer in the solid tumor model, and to define the critical point of laser amount for killing the cancer cells. Methods Twenty four BALB/c mouse models with subcutaneous EMT6 mammary carcinomas were prepared. Mice were divided into eight groups depending on the amount of illumination...

  14. Photodynamic Therapy for Basal Cell Carcinoma in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    Myn Wee Lee; George Varigos; Peter Foley; Gayle Ross

    2011-01-01

    A 22-year-old male with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa with a large superficial and nodular basal cell carcinoma on his right forehead was treated with photodynamic therapy. The treatment was well tolerated, and the site healed well. Patients with epidermolysis bullosa are at increased risk of developing skin cancers, particularly squamous cell carcinomas. However, basal cell carcinomas are rare in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. As patients with epidermolysis bullosa ...

  15. A fast heterogeneous algorithm for light fluence rate for prostate photodynamic therapy

    Chang, Chang; Wang, Ken K.-H; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2010-01-01

    To accurately calculate light fluence rate distribution in prostate photodynamic therapy (PDT), optical heterogeneity has to be taken into account. Previous study has shown that a kernel based on analytic solution of the diffusion equation can perform the calculation with accuracy comparable to Finite-element method. An assumption is made that light fluence rate detected at a point in the medium is affected primarily by the optical properties of points (or elements) on the line between the so...

  16. Use of Photodynamic Therapy for Treatment of Actinic Keratoses in Organ Transplant Recipients

    Christina Wlodek; Ali, Faisal R; John T. Lear

    2012-01-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients are predisposed to actinic keratoses (AK) and nonmelanoma skin cancers, owing to the lifelong immunosuppression required. Today, increasing numbers of organ transplants are being performed and organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are surviving much longer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is proving a highly effective treatment modality for AK amongst this susceptible group of patients. Following an overview of the pathogenesis of AK amongst OTRs, the authors review ...

  17. Vitamin D3 enhances the apoptotic response of epithelial tumors to aminolevulinate-based photodynamic therapy

    Anand, Sanjay; Wilson, Clara; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy, mediated by exogenously administered aminolevulinic acid (ALA-PDT) followed by exposure to a laser or broadband light source, is a promising modality for treatment of many types of cancers, but it remains inadequate to treat large, deep solid tumors. Here we report that calcitriol, the active form of Vitamin D3, can be administered prior to ALA as a non-toxic preconditioning regimen to markedly increase the efficacy of ALA-PDT. Using mouse models of squamous skin cancer ...

  18. Investigating the effect of photodynamic therapy on nerves using tissue engineered culture models

    Wright, K.E.; Liniker, E; MacRobert, A J; Brown, R A; Saffrey, M. J.; Phillips, J B

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) shows potential as an effective treatment for prostate cancer. Clinical observations indicate that this approach causes fewer nerve damage related side-effects than conventional treatments. The aim here is to investigate the effect of PDT on nerve tissue using engineered 3-dimensional cell culture models. Initial experiments focussed on establishing photosensitiser localisation in neurones and Schwann cells, then developing a model for simulating ne...

  19. 膀胱癌的光动力学治疗%Photodynamic Therapy on Bladder Cancer

    陈伟; 薄隽杰

    2008-01-01

    光动力学疗法(photodynamic therapy,PDT)是一种新兴的治疗肿瘤的方法,近来被应用于膀胱肿瘤的治疗.笔者就PDT治疗膀胱癌的原理、基本技术、适应证及并发症、疗效及发展前景等做一综述.

  20. Effectiveness of Photodynamic Therapy for the Inactivation of Candida spp. on Dentures: In Vitro Study

    Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Ribeiro, Daniela Garcia; Dovigo, Livia Nordi; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study evaluated the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the inactivation of different species of Candida on maxillary complete dentures. Background data: The treatment of denture stomatitis requires the inactivation of Candida spp. on dentures. PDT has been reported as an effective method for Candida inactivation. Methods: Reference strains of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. dubliniensis and C. krusei were tested. Thirty-four dentures were fabr...

  1. Optimum modality for photodynamic therapy of tumors: gels containing liposomes with hydrophobic photosensitizers

    Nekvasil, Miloš; Zadinová, M.; Tahotná, Ludmila; Žáčková, Markéta; Poučková, P.; Ježek, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 5 (2007), s. 235-252. ISSN 0272-4391 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P04OE152; GA MPO 2A-1TP1/026; GA MZd NC6564 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : photodynamic therapy of tumors * liposomal photosensitizer gel * hydroxyl-aluminium phtalocyanine * microfluidizacion Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 0.976, year: 2007

  2. Novel Topical Photodynamic Therapy of Prostate Carcinoma Using Hydroxy-aluminum Phthalocyanine Entrapped in Liposomes

    Sutoris, K.; Rakušan, J.; Karásková, M.; Mattová, J.; Beneš, J.; Nekvasil, Miloš; Ježek, Petr; Zadinová, M.; Poučková, P.; Větvička, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2013), s. 1563-1568. ISSN 0250-7005 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) 2A-1TP1/026; GA MŠk(CZ) OE09026; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01010781 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : PC prostate carcinomas * LNCaP * liposomes * hydroxy- aluminum phthalocyanine * photodynamic therapy Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 1.872, year: 2013

  3. Covalently Assembled Dipeptide Nanospheres as Intrinsic Photosensitizers for Efficient Photodynamic Therapy in Vitro.

    Yang, Xiaoke; Fei, Jinbo; Li, Qi; Li, Junbai

    2016-05-01

    Monodispersed diphenylalanine-based nanospheres with excellent biocompatibility are fabricated through a facile covalent reaction-induced assembly. Interestingly, the nanospheres exhibit red autofluorescence. Most importantly, such assembled dipeptide nanospheres can serve as intrinsic photosensitizer to convert O2 to singlet oxygen ((1) O2 ). Thus, photodynamic therapy in vitro can be achieved effectively. The versatile strategy could be extended to other biomolecules containing a primary amine group for the fabrication of potential intrinsic photosensitizers. PMID:26934079

  4. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Review

    Giovana Maria Fioramonti Calixto; Jéssica Bernegossi; Laura Marise de Freitas; Carla Raquel Fontana; Marlus Chorilli

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative approach for improved cancer treatment. In PDT, a photosensitizer (PS) is administered that can be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which causes selective damage to the tumor and its surrounding vasculature. The success of PDT is limited by the difficulty in administering photosensitizers (PSs) with low water solubility, which compromises the clinical use of several molecules. Incorporation of PSs in nanostructured drug deliver...

  5. Differentiation of colon adenocarcinoma HT29 cells potentiates photodynamic therapy with hypericin

    Mikeš, J.; Kleban, J.; Koval, Ján; Hýžďalová, Martina; Fedoročko, P.

    Košice, 2006. s. 265-270. ISBN 80-8077-026-3. [3. Rádiobiologická konferencia s medzinárodnou účasťou venovanej 20. výročiu jadrovej havárie v Černobyle. 25.05.2006, Košice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : photodynamic therapy * hypericin * differentiation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  6. Susceptibility of planktonic cultures of Streptococcus mutans to photodynamic therapy with a light-emitting diode

    Anna Carolina Borges Pereira a Costa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy with erythrosine and rose bengal using a light-emitting diode (LED on planktonic cultures of S. mutans. Ten S. mutans strains, including nine clinical strains and one reference strain (ATCC 35688, were used. Suspensions containing 10(6 cells/mL were prepared for each strain and were tested under different experimental conditions: a LED irradiation in the presence of rose bengal as a photosensitizer (RB+L+; b LED irradiation in the presence of erythrosine as a photosensitizer (E+L+; c LED irradiation only (P-L+; d treatment with rose bengal only (RB+L-; e treatment with erythrosine only (E+L-; and f no LED irradiation or photosensitizer treatment, which served as a control group (P-L-. After treatment, the strains were seeded onto BHI agar for determination of the number of colony-forming units (CFU/mL. The results were submitted to analysis of variance and the Tukey test (p < 0.05. The number of CFU/mL was significantly lower in the groups submitted to photodynamic therapy (RB+L+ and E+L+ compared to control (P-L-, with a reduction of 6.86 log10 in the RB+L+ group and of 5.16 log10 in the E+L+ group. Photodynamic therapy with rose bengal and erythrosine exerted an antimicrobial effect on all S. mutans strains studied.

  7. Poly(ethylene glycol) conjugated nano-graphene oxide for photodynamic therapy

    Pilger; FRANK

    2010-01-01

    A novel methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) modified nano-graphene oxide(NGO-mPEG) was designed and synthesized as a photosensitizer(PS) carrier for photodynamic therapy of cancer.NGO with a size below 200 nm was prepared using a modified Hummers’ method.NGO was observed by AFM to exhibit a structure with single-layer graphene oxide sheets down to a few nanometers in height.Hydrophilic mPEG conjugation of NGO(NGO-mPEG) was found to enhance solubility in cell culture media.No apparent cytotoxicity of the NGO-mPEG was observed towards MCF-7 carcinoma cell line.Zinc phthalocyanine(ZnPc),a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy,was loaded in the NGO-PEG through π-π stacking and hydrophobic interactions,with the drug loading efficiency up to 14 wt%.Hydrophobic ZnPc was internalized in MCF-7 cells,exhibiting a pronounced phototoxicity in the cells under Xe light irradiation.The results indicate a great potential of NGO-mPEG for photodynamic therapy of cancer.

  8. Comparison of cryotherapy and photodynamic therapy in treatment of oral leukoplakia.

    Kawczyk-Krupka, Aleksandra; Waśkowska, Jadwiga; Raczkowska-Siostrzonek, Agnieszka; Kościarz-Grzesiok, Anna; Kwiatek, Sebastian; Straszak, Dariusz; Latos, Wojciech; Koszowski, Rafał; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2012-06-01

    Oral leukoplakia is a pre-malignant lesion of the oral mucosa. The aim of this study is to compare the curative effects of photodynamic therapy and cryotherapy in the treatment of oral leukoplakia. The first group, treated by photodynamic therapy (δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), 630-635 nm wavelength), consisted of 48 patients suffering from leukoplakia. The second group consisted of 37 patients treated using cryotherapy. Analyses and comparisons of the complete responses, recurrences, numbers of procedures and adverse effects after both PDT and cryotherapy were obtained. In the first group, a complete response was obtained in 35 patients (72.9%), with thirteen recurrences observed (27.1%) over a six-month period. In the second group, a complete response was obtained in 33 patients (89.2%), and recurrence was observed in nine patients (24.3%). Photodynamic therapy and cryotherapy appear to be comparative methods of treatment that may both serve as alternatives for the traditional surgical treatment of oral leukoplakia. The advantages of PDT are connected with minimally invasive and localized character of the treatment and with not damage of collagenous tissue structures, therefore normal cells will repopulate these arrangements. PDT is more convenient for patients, less painful, and more esthetic. PMID:22594985

  9. Murine Model Imitating Chronic Wound Infections for Evaluation of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy

    Fila, Grzegorz; Kasimova, Kamola; Arenas, Yaxal; Nakonieczna, Joanna; Grinholc, Mariusz; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Lilge, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the age of antibiotics could come to an end, due to their widespread, and inappropriate use. Particularly for chronic wounds alternatives are being thought. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (APDT) is a potential candidate, and while approved for some indications, such as periodontitis, chronic sinusitis and other niche indications, its use in chronic wounds is not established. To further facilitate the development of APDT in chronic wounds we present an easy to use animal model exhibiting the key hallmarks of chronic wounds, based on full-thickness skin wounds paired with an optically transparent cover. The moisture-retaining wound exhibited rapid expansion of pathogen colonies up to 8 days while not jeopardizing the host survival. Use of two bioluminescent pathogens; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa permits real time monitoring of the pathogens. The murine model was employed to evaluate the performance of four different photosensitizers as mediators in Photodynamic Therapy. While all four photosensitizers, Rose Bengal, porphyrin TMPyP, New Methylene Blue, and TLD1411 demonstrated good to excellent antimicrobial efficacy in planktonic solutions at 1 to 50 μM concentrations, whereas in in vivo the growth delay was limited with 24–48 h delay in pathogen expansion for MRSA, and we noticed longer growth suppression of P. aeruginosa with TLD1411 mediated Photodynamic Therapy. The murine model will enable developing new strategies for enhancement of APDT for chronic wound infections. PMID:27555843

  10. Development of pH sensitive 2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate based nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy

    Photodynamic therapy is an effective treatment for tumors that involves the administration of light-activated photosensitizers. However, most photosensitizers are insoluble and non-specific. To target the acid environment of tumor sites, we synthesized three poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate-co-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate (PEGMA-co-DPA) copolymers capable of self-assembly to form pH sensitive nanoparticles in an aqueous environment, as a means of encapsulating the water-insoluble photosensitizer, meso-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (m-THPC). The critical aggregation pH of the PEGMA-co-DPA polymers was 5.8-6.6 and the critical aggregation concentration was 0.0045-0.0089 wt% at pH 7.4. Using solvent evaporation, m-THPC loaded nanoparticles were prepared with a high drug encapsulation efficiency (approximately 89%). Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy revealed the spherical shape and 132 nm diameter of the nanoparticles. The in vitro release rate of m-THPC at pH 5.0 was faster than at pH 7.0 (58% versus 10% m-THPC released within 48 h, respectively). The in vitro photodynamic therapy efficiency was tested with the HT-29 cell line. m-THPC loaded PEGMA-co-DPA nanoparticles exhibited obvious phototoxicity in HT-29 colon cancer cells after light irradiation. The results indicate that these pH sensitive nanoparticles are potential carriers for tumor targeting and photodynamic therapy.

  11. Murine Model Imitating Chronic Wound Infections for Evaluation of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy.

    Fila, Grzegorz; Kasimova, Kamola; Arenas, Yaxal; Nakonieczna, Joanna; Grinholc, Mariusz; Bielawski, Krzysztof P; Lilge, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the age of antibiotics could come to an end, due to their widespread, and inappropriate use. Particularly for chronic wounds alternatives are being thought. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (APDT) is a potential candidate, and while approved for some indications, such as periodontitis, chronic sinusitis and other niche indications, its use in chronic wounds is not established. To further facilitate the development of APDT in chronic wounds we present an easy to use animal model exhibiting the key hallmarks of chronic wounds, based on full-thickness skin wounds paired with an optically transparent cover. The moisture-retaining wound exhibited rapid expansion of pathogen colonies up to 8 days while not jeopardizing the host survival. Use of two bioluminescent pathogens; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa permits real time monitoring of the pathogens. The murine model was employed to evaluate the performance of four different photosensitizers as mediators in Photodynamic Therapy. While all four photosensitizers, Rose Bengal, porphyrin TMPyP, New Methylene Blue, and TLD1411 demonstrated good to excellent antimicrobial efficacy in planktonic solutions at 1 to 50 μM concentrations, whereas in in vivo the growth delay was limited with 24-48 h delay in pathogen expansion for MRSA, and we noticed longer growth suppression of P. aeruginosa with TLD1411 mediated Photodynamic Therapy. The murine model will enable developing new strategies for enhancement of APDT for chronic wound infections. PMID:27555843

  12. Activation of photodynamic therapy in vitro with Cerenkov luminescence generated from Yttrium-90 (Conference Presentation)

    Hartl, Brad A.; Hirschberg, Henry; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon R.

    2016-03-01

    Translation of photodynamic therapy to the clinical setting has primarily been limited to easily accessible and/or superficial diseases where traditional light delivery can be performed noninvasively. Cerenkov luminescence, as generated from medically relevant radionuclides, has been suggested as a means to deliver light to deeper tissues noninvasively in order to overcome this depth limitation. We report on the use of Cerenkov luminescence generated from Yttrium-90 as a means to active the photodynamic therapy process in monolayer tumor cell cultures. The current study investigates the utility of Cerenkov luminescence for activating both the clinically relevant aminolevulinic acid at 1.0 mM and also the more efficient photosensitizer TPPS2a at 1.2 µM. Cells were incubated with aminolevulinic acid for 6 hours prior to radionuclide addition, as well as additional daily treatments for three days. TPPS2a was delivered as a single treatment with an 18 hour incubation time before radionuclide addition. Experiments were completed for both C6 glioma cells and MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells. Although aminolevulinic acid proved ineffective for generating a therapeutic effect at any activity for either cell line, TPPS2a produced at least a 20% therapeutic effect at activities ranging from 6 to 60 µCi/well for the C6 cell line. Current results demonstrate that it may be possible to generate a therapeutic effect in vivo using Cerenkov luminescence to activate the photodynamic therapy process with clinically relevant photosensitizers.

  13. Effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on staphylococcus aureus using phenothiazinium dye with red laser

    Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; de Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Pires-Santos, Gustavo M.; Sampaio, Fernando José P.; Zanin, Fátima Antônia A.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the bactericidal effect of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy - AmPDT using a phenothiazinium compound (toluidine blue O and methylene blue, 12.5 μg/mL) on Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 23529) irradiated or not with the red laser (λ 660 nm, 12J/cm2). All tests were performed in triplicate and samples distributed into the following groups: Negative control, Laser, Photosensitizer, and AmPDT. Bactericidal effect of the Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy was assessed by counting of colony-forming units and analyzed statistically (ANOVA, Tukey test, pLaser group with Negative control, a statistically significant increase of counting on the Laser group (p = 0.003). The use of the photosensitizer alone reduced the mean number of CFU (64.8%) and its association with the Laser light resulted in 84.2% of inhibition. The results are indicative that the use of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy presented in vitro bactericidal effect on Staphylococcus aureus.

  14. Cancer therapy improvement with mesoporous silica nanoparticles combining photodynamic and photothermal therapy

    In this work, we develop novel mesoporous silica composite nanoparticles (hm-SiO2(AlC4Pc)@Pd) for the co-delivery of photosensitizer (PS) tetra-substituted carboxyl aluminum phthalocyanine (AlC4Pc) and small Pd nanosheets as a potential dual carrier system to combine photodynamic therapy (PDT) with photothermal therapy (PTT). In the nanocomposite, PS AlC4Pc was covalently conjugated to a mesoporous silica network, and small Pd nanosheets were coated onto the surface of mesoporous silica by both coordination and electrostatic interaction. Since small Pd nanosheets and AlC4Pc display matched maximum absorptions in the 600–800 nm near-infrared (NIR) region, the fabricated hm-SiO2(AlC4Pc)@Pd nanocomposites can generate both singlet oxygen and heat upon 660 nm single continuous wavelength (CW) laser irradiation. In vitro results indicated that the cell-killing efficacy by simultaneous PDT/PTT treatment using hm-SiO2(AlC4Pc)@Pd was higher than PDT or PTT treatment alone after exposure to a 660 nm CW-NIR laser. (paper)

  15. Acute phase response induced following tumor treatment by photodynamic therapy: relevance for the therapy outcome

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush; Stott, Brandon; Cecic, Ivana; Payne, Peter; Sun, Jinghai

    2006-02-01

    Acute phase response is an effector process orchestrated by the innate immune system for the optimal mobilization of the resources of the organism distant from the local insult site needed in the execution of a host-protecting reaction. Our research has shown that mice bearing tumors treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT) exhibit the three major hallmarks of acute phase response: release of acute phase reactants, neutrophilia, and pituitary/adrenal axis activation. Of particular interest in this study were acute phase proteins that have a pivotal role in the clearance of dead cells, since the occurrence of this process in PDT-treated tumors emerges as a critical event in the course of PDT-associated host response. It is shown that this type of acute phase reactants, including complement proteins (C3, C5, C9, mannose-binding lectin, and ficolin A) and related pentraxins (serum amyloid P component and PTX3), are upregulated following tumor PDT and accumulate in the targeted lesions. Based on the recently accumulated experimental evidence it is definitely established that the acute phase response is manifested in the hosts bearing PDT-treated tumors and it is becoming clear that this effector process is an important element of PDT-associated host response bearing in impact on the eventual outcome of this therapy.

  16. Site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies to liposomes enhances photosensitizer uptake and photodynamic therapy efficacy

    Broekgaarden, M.; van Vught, R.; Oliveira, S.; Roovers, R. C.; van Bergen En Henegouwen, P. M. P.; Pieters, R. J.; van Gulik, T. M.; Breukink, E.; Heger, M.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy for therapy-resistant cancers will greatly benefit from targeted delivery of tumor photosensitizing agents. In this study, a strategy for the site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies onto liposomes containing the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine was developed and tested.Photodynamic therapy for therapy-resistant cancers will greatly benefit from targeted delivery of tumor photosensitizing agents. In this study, a strategy for the site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies onto liposomes containing the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine was developed and tested. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00014b

  17. Combination therapy of low-fluence photodynamic therapy and intravitreal ranibizumab for choroidal neovascular membrane in choroidal osteoma

    Morris, Rodney J; Prabhu, Varsha V; Parag K Shah; Narendran, V.

    2011-01-01

    Choroidal osteoma is an unusual form of intraocular calcification seen in otherwise healthy eyes. It is a benign idiopathic osseous tumor of the choroid, typically seen in young females. Choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM) is a complication seen in one-third of these patients and carries a poor visual outcome. We report a case of a 25-year-old hyperthyroid female with choroidal osteoma and subfoveal CNVM in her left eye which was successfully treated using low-fluence photodynamic therapy (...

  18. A combination therapy of half-dose verteporfin photodynamic therapy and intravitreal injection of ranibizumab for chronic central serous chorioretinopathy

    Toklu, Yasin; ÇAKMAK, Hasan Basri; YORGUN, Mücella ARIKAN; ERGUN, Şule Berk; ŞİMŞEK, Şaban

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To study the combination treatment consisting of half-dose verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) and an intravitreal injection of ranibizumab as a potential treatment for patients with chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). Materials and methods: Six eyes of 6 patients were studied with fundus examination, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography to diagnose the maculopathy, monitor the detachments, and localize the choroidal hyperpermeability of the disorder...

  19. Overview on Topical 5-ALA Photodynamic Therapy Use for Non Melanoma Skin Cancers

    Carmen Cantisani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation (UV contributes to a variety of skin diseases including inflammation, degenerative aging, and cancer. Historically, humans have been exposed to UV radiation mainly through occupational exposure; recreational UV exposure, however, has increased dramatically in recent years, because of outdoor leisure activities and to purposely tan for cosmetic purposes. Both UVB and UVA radiation have been shown to cause DNA damage and immunosuppression, the important forms of biological damage that lead to NMSC. Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most common malignancy, whose public health significance is often unrecognized which continues to grow at an alarming rate, becoming an occupational disease. Available treatments alternative to surgery include photodynamic therapy, electrochemotherapy, cryotherapy, ablative lasers, 5-fluorouracil, imiquimod, ingenol mebutate, and diclofenac. Among these, photodynamic therapy is a noninvasive technique with excellent cosmetic outcome and good curative results, when used in initial stages of skin cancers for superficial lesions. It is administered under numerous and significantly varied regimens and there are a wide range of cure rates reported, permitting treatment of large and multiple lesions with excellent cosmetic results. This is an overview of photodynamic applications especially for the treatment of NMSC, with a short focus on daylight modality.

  20. The influence of photodynamic therapy on apoptosis in human melanoma cell line

    T. Banas´

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is the most severe of all skin cancers as it may grow rapidly and metastasize. The application of photodynamic therapy (PDT opens new perspectives in treatment of this cancer. Numerous studies suggest that the exposure of tumor cells to PDT can lead to cell death via two separate processes: apoptosis or necrosis. The aim of this study was to assess in vitro photodynamic therapy which induces apoptosis in the human Beidegröm Melanoma (BM cell line, using neutral comet assay. The cells were incubated with Photofrin II (15 μg/ml and 30 μg/ml 4 h before and 3 h after irradiation for 5 or 10 min with the light intensity of 10 mW/cm2, using a lamp with red filter (632.8 nm. The percentage of apoptotic cells was significantly higher after PDT comparing to control cells. We observed 25% and 70% of apoptotic cells after shorter irradiation and treatment with 15 μg/ml and 30 μg/ml of Ph II, respectively. After longer irradiation, the respective values were 71.9% and 90%. The results suggest that induction of apoptosis is an important determinant of photodynamic sensitivity in the studied cell line and that some types of DNA damage are dependent on photosensitizer concentration and time of irradiation.

  1. Cell Death Pathways and Phthalocyanine as an Efficient Agent for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Ivan Mfouo-Tynga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of cell death can be predetermined (programmed or not and categorized into apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic pathways. The process of Hayflick limits completes the execution of death-related mechanisms. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are associated with oxidative stress and subsequent cytodamage by oxidizing and degrading cell components. ROS are also involved in immune responses, where they stabilize and activate both hypoxia-inducible factors and phagocytic effectors. ROS production and presence enhance cytodamage and photodynamic-induced cell death. Photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT uses non-toxic chemotherapeutic agents, photosensitizer (PS, to initiate a light-dependent and ROS-related cell death. Phthalocyanines (PCs are third generation and stable PSs with improved photochemical abilities. They are effective inducers of cell death in various neoplastic models. The metallated PCs localize in critical cellular organelles and are better inducers of cell death than other previous generation PSs as they favor mainly apoptotic cell death events.

  2. Intracellular Dual Fluorescent Lightup Bioprobes for Image-Guided Photodynamic Cancer Therapy.

    Han, Haijie; Jin, Qiao; Wang, Haibo; Teng, Wenzhuo; Wu, Jina; Tong, Hongxin; Chen, Tingting; Ji, Jian

    2016-07-01

    An intracellular dual fluorescent light-up bioprobe with aggregation-induced emission features and endogenously producing photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) abilities is designed and synthesized. The bioprobe is nonemissive in physiological environment. However, the bioprobe can selectively light up cancer cells with blue fluorescence of tetraphenylene (TPE) and red fluorescence of PpIX, owing to the release of TPE and methyl aminolevulinate after targeted internalization by cancer cells. Moreover, upon endogenous generation and accumulation of PpIX in cancer cells, efficient photodynamic ablation of cancer cells after light irradiation is demonstrated with easy regulation for optimal therapeutic efficacy. The design of such dual fluorescent light-up bioprobes might provide a new opportunity for targeted and image-guided photodynamic cancer therapy. PMID:27322139

  3. Enhanced cellular uptake of protoporphyrine IX/linolenic acid-conjugated spherical nanohybrids for photodynamic therapy.

    Lee, Hye-In; Kim, Young-Jin

    2016-06-01

    Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) has wide applications in photodynamic diagnosis and photodynamic therapy (PDT) in many human diseases. However, poor water solubility and cancer cell localization limit its direct application for PDT. We improved the water-solubility and cellular internalization of PpIX to enhance PDT efficacy by developing biocompatible PpIX/linolenic acid-conjugated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (PPLA) nanohybrids. The resulting PPLA nanohybrids exhibited a quasi-spherical shape with a size of laser irradiation was detected by photoluminescence emission. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis displayed higher cellular internalization of PPLA compared with free PpIX. In addition, PPLA nanohybrids exhibited significantly reduced dark-toxicity and a high phototoxicity mostly because of apoptotic cell death against human gastric cancer cells. These results imply that the PPLA nanohybrid system may be applicable in PDT. PMID:26954084

  4. Topical photodynamic therapy with 5-ALA in the treatment of arsenic-induced skin tumors

    Karrer, Sigrid; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Landthaler, Michael

    1995-03-01

    A case of a 62-year-old woman suffering from psoriasis who was treated orally with arsenic 25 years ago is reported. The cumulative dose of arsenic trioxide was 800 mg. Since 10 years ago arsenic keratoses, basal cell carcinomas, Bowen's disease and invasive squamous cell carcinomas mainly on her hands and feet have developed, skin changes were clearly a sequence of arsenic therapy. Control of disease was poor, her right little finger had to be amputated. Topical photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolevulinic acid was performed on her right hand. Clinical and histological examinations 6 months after treatment showed an excellent cosmetic result with no signs of tumor residue.

  5. Near-infrared light triggered photodynamic therapy in combination with gene therapy using upconversion nanoparticles for effective cancer cell killing

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Kai; Yang, Guangbao; Cheng, Liang; He, Lu; Liu, Yumeng; Li, Yonggang; Guo, Liang; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-07-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have drawn much attention in cancer imaging and therapy in recent years. Herein, we for the first time report the use of UCNPs with carefully engineered surface chemistry for combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs with multilayered polymer coatings are synthesized via a layer by layer strategy, and then loaded simultaneously with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizing molecule, and small interfering RNA (siRNA), which targets the Plk1 oncogene. On the one hand, under excitation by a near-infrared (NIR) light at 980 nm, which shows greatly improved tissue penetration compared with visible light, cytotoxic singlet oxygen can be generated via resonance energy transfer from UCNPs to photosensitizer Ce6, while the residual upconversion luminescence is utilized for imaging. On the other hand, the silencing of Plk1 induced by siRNA delivered with UCNPs could induce significant cancer cell apoptosis. As the result of such combined photodynamic and gene therapy, a remarkably enhanced cancer cell killing effect is realized. Our work thus highlights the promise of UCNPs for imaging guided combination therapy of cancer.Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have drawn much attention in cancer imaging and therapy in recent years. Herein, we for the first time report the use of UCNPs with carefully engineered surface chemistry for combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs with multilayered polymer coatings are synthesized via a layer by layer strategy, and then loaded simultaneously with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizing molecule, and small interfering RNA (siRNA), which targets the Plk1 oncogene. On the one hand, under excitation by a near-infrared (NIR) light at 980 nm, which shows greatly improved tissue penetration compared with visible light, cytotoxic singlet oxygen can be generated via

  6. Pheophorbides as photosensitizers for the photodynamic therapy of tumors

    Tanielian, Charles; Wolff, Christian; Kobayashi, Masami

    1995-01-01

    Quantum yields for formation of singlet molecular oxygen have been measured for sodium pheophorbides (Na-Phdes) a and b in aqueous and non-aqueous media. Measurements have been made for both steady-state and pulsed laser excitation with the resultant singlet molecular oxygen being detected by photo-oxygenation reactions or time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy, respectively. Singlet oxygen production sensitized by Na-Phdes a or b is insignificant in aqueous media but occurs with a good efficiency in organic solvents. Plasmid DNA is efficiently photocleaved by Na-Phdes a and b in the absence of oxygen as well as in the presence of oxygen. Fluorescence microscopic observation shows a rapid incorporation of Na-Phde a into nuclei, mitochondria, and lysosome of human oral mucosa cells. In contrast Na-Phde b is incorporated only into the plasma membrane. The photodynamic activity of these pigments in living tissues is probably determined by the monomeric pigment molecules formed in hydrophobic cellular structures.

  7. Photofrin-mediated photodynamic therapy for treatment of early stage laryngeal malignancies

    Vanessa Gayl Schweitzer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy of PHOTOFRINmediated photodynamic therapy (PDT for the treatment of Tis-T1N0M0 squamous cell carcinoma (SqCCa of the larynx in patients not amenable to or who failed conventional head and neck treatment. This is a retrospective study of 26 patients with early stage Tis-T1 SqCCa of the larynx treated with PHOTOFRIN-mediated PDT. Intravenous PHOTOFRIN (porfimer-sodium (dose 2.0 mg/kg was administered outpatient, followed by intraoperative photoactivation at 630 nm via fiberoptic microlens surface delivery (surgical light dose 50–100 J/cm2 48–60 h later. As much as 16 out of 26 patients (62% have demonstrated complete remission (average follow-up 40 months. There were 10 patients who were noted to have partial remission with recurrence observed 2–33 months subsequently retreated with either repeated PDT therapy or conventional therapy. PHOTOFRIN-mediated photodynamic therapy can be used as a primary modality to treat Tis-T1N0M0 tumors of the larynx or for treatment for those who have failed prior surgery and/or radiation therapy. PDT allows for preservation of function and structure to maintain or improve voice with absence of systemic toxicity. Patients may have multiple drug administrations and laser light retreatment for local disease control.

  8. Long-pulsed dye laser versus long-pulsed dye laser-assisted photodynamic therapy for acne vulgaris: A randomized controlled trial

    Haedersdal, M.; Togsverd, K.; Wiegell, S.R.;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Long-pulsed dye laser (LPDL)-assisted photodynamic therapy has been suggested to be superior to laser alone for acne vulgaris but no evidence is available. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of LPDL alone versus LPDL in photodynamic therapy with methylaminolevulinic acid...

  9. Combination of ablative fractional laser and daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis in organ transplant recipients – a randomized controlled trial

    Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Lei, Ulrikke; Erlendsson, A M;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) for actinic keratoses (AK) is hampered by pain during illumination and inferior efficacy in organ-transplant recipients (OTR). OBJECTIVES: We assessed ablative fractional laser (AFL)-assisted daylight photodynamic therapy (PDT) (AFL-dPDT) compared...

  10. The importance of fluence rate in photodynamic therapy: is there a parallel with ionizing radiation dose-rate effects?

    Several similarities can be found between dose-rate effects in radiotherapy and fluence-rate effects in photodynamic therapy (PDT). At low dose rates repair of sublethal damage can occur, whereas at high dose rates oxygen depletion can decrease the effects of both therapies. The available literature for fluence-rate effects in PDT is discussed here in relation to therapeutic implications