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Sample records for a-dependent lysophosphatidic acid

  1. [Lysophosphatidic acid and human erythrocyte aggregation].

    Sheremet'ev, Iu A; Popovicheva, A N; Levin, G Ia

    2014-01-01

    The effects of lysophosphatidic acid on the morphology and aggregation of human erythrocytes has been studied. Morphology of erythrocytes and their aggregates were studied by light microscopy. It has been shown that lysophosphatidic acid changes the shape of red blood cells: diskocyte become echinocytes. Aggregation of red blood cells (rouleaux) was significantly reduced in autoplasma. At the same time there is a strong aggregation of echinocytes. This was accompanied by the formation of microvesicles. Adding normal plasma to echinocytes restores shape and aggregation of red blood cells consisting of "rouleaux". A possible mechanism of action of lysophosphatidic acid on erythrocytes is discussed. PMID:25509147

  2. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Signaling in Vertebrate Reproduction

    Ye, Xiaoqin; Chun, Jerold

    2010-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a cell membrane phospholipid metabolite that can act as an extracellular signal. Its effects are mediated through at least five G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), LPA1-5, and likely others as well. Studies in multiple species including LPA receptor-deficient mice and humans have identified or implicated important roles for receptor-mediated LPA signaling in multiple aspects of vertebrate reproduction. These include ovarian function, spermatogenesis, fertilizat...

  3. Lysophosphatidic acid effects on atherosclerosis and thrombosis

    Cui, Mei-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been found to accumulate in high concentrations in atherosclerotic lesions. LPA is a bioactive phospholipid produced by activated platelets and formed during the oxidation of LDL. Accumulating evidence suggests that this lipid mediator may serve as an important risk factor for development of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. The role of LPA in atherogenesis is supported by the evidence that LPA: stimulates endothelial cells to produce adhesion molecules and chemo...

  4. Spiroguanidine rhodamines as fluorogenic probes for lysophosphatidic acid

    Wang, Lei; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Escobedo, Jorge O.; Wang, Jialu; Moore, Richard G.; Strongin, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Direct determination of total lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was accomplished using newly developed spiroguanidines derived from rhodamine B as universal fluorogenic probes. Optimum conditions for the quantitative analysis of total LPA were investigated. The linear range for the determination of total LPA is up to 5 μM with a limit of detection of 0.512 μM.

  5. Simple enrichment and analysis of plasma lysophosphatidic acids

    Wang, Jialu; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Escobedo, Jorge O.; Lowry, Mark; Wang, Lei; Chu, Yu-Hsuan; Moore, Richard G.; Strongin, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    A simple and highly efficient technique for the analysis of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) subspecies in human plasma is described. The streamlined sample preparation protocol furnishes the five major LPA subspecies with excellent recoveries. Extensive analysis of the enriched sample reveals only trace levels of other phospholipids. This level of purity not only improves MS analyses, but enables HPLC post-column detection in the visible region with a commercially available fluorescent phospholip...

  6. Lysophosphatidic acid is a chemoattractant for Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae.

    Jalink, K.; Moolenaar, W H; Duijn, B., Van

    1993-01-01

    The naturally occurring phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) can induce a number of physiological responses in vertebrate cells, including platelet aggregation, smooth muscle contraction, and fibroblast proliferation. LPA is thought to activate a specific G-protein-coupled receptor, thereby triggering classic second messenger pathways such as stimulation of phospholipase C and inhibition of adenylate cyclase. Here we report that 1-oleoyl-LPA, at submicromolar concentrations, evokes a chem...

  7. Lysophosphatidic Acid Signaling through the Lysophosphatidic Acid-1 Receptor Is Required for Alveolarization.

    Funke, Manuela; Knudsen, Lars; Lagares, David; Ebener, Simone; Probst, Clemens K; Fontaine, Benjamin A; Franklin, Alicia; Kellner, Manuela; Kühnel, Mark; Matthieu, Stephanie; Grothausmann, Roman; Chun, Jerold; Roberts, Jesse D; Ochs, Matthias; Tager, Andrew M

    2016-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling through one of its receptors, LPA1, contributes to both the development and the pathological remodeling after injury of many organs. Because we found previously that LPA-LPA1 signaling contributes to pulmonary fibrosis, here we investigated whether this pathway is also involved in lung development. Quantitative assessment of lung architecture of LPA1-deficient knock-out (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice at 3, 12, and 24 weeks of age using design-based stereology suggested the presence of an alveolarization defect in LPA1 KO mice at 3 weeks, which persisted as alveolar numbers increased in WT mice into adulthood. Across the ages examined, the lungs of LPA1 KO mice exhibited decreased alveolar numbers, septal tissue volumes, and surface areas, and increased volumes of the distal airspaces. Elastic fibers, critical to the development of alveolar septa, appeared less organized and condensed and more discontinuous in KO alveoli starting at P4. Tropoelastin messenger RNA expression was decreased in KO lungs, whereas expression of matrix metalloproteinases degrading elastic fibers was either decreased or unchanged. These results are consistent with the abnormal lung phenotype of LPA1 KO mice, being attributable to reduced alveolar septal formation during development, rather than to increased septal destruction as occurs in the emphysema of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Peripheral septal fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, which direct septation in late alveolarization, demonstrated reduced production of tropoelastin and matrix metalloproteinases, and diminished LPA-induced migration, when isolated from LPA1 KO mice. Taken together, our data suggest that LPA-LPA1 signaling is critically required for septation during alveolarization. PMID:27082727

  8. Spontaneous curvature of phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid.

    Kooijman, Edgar E; Chupin, Vladimir; Fuller, Nola L; Kozlov, Michael M; de Kruijff, Ben; Burger, Koert N J; Rand, Peter R

    2005-02-15

    The formation of phosphatidic acid (PA) from lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), diacylglycerol, or phosphatidylcholine plays a key role in the regulation of intracellular membrane fission events, but the underlying molecular mechanism has not been resolved. A likely possibility is that PA affects local membrane curvature facilitating membrane bending and fission. To examine this possibility, we determined the spontaneous radius of curvature (R(0p)) of PA and LPA, carrying oleoyl fatty acids, using well-established X-ray diffraction methods. We found that, under physiological conditions of pH and salt concentration (pH 7.0, 150 mM NaCl), the R(0p) values of PA and LPA were -46 A and +20 A, respectively. Thus PA has considerable negative spontaneous curvature while LPA has the most positive spontaneous curvature of any membrane lipid measured to date. The further addition of Ca(2+) did not significantly affect lipid spontaneous curvature; however, omitting NaCl from the hydration buffer greatly reduced the spontaneous curvature of PA, turning it into a cylindrically shaped lipid molecule (R(0p) of -1.3 x 10(2) A). Our quantitative data on the spontaneous radius of curvature of PA and LPA at a physiological pH and salt concentration will be instrumental in developing future models of biomembrane fission. PMID:15697235

  9. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA Signaling in Human and Ruminant Reproductive Tract

    Izabela Wocławek-Potocka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA through activating its G protein-coupled receptors (LPAR 1–6 exerts diverse cellular effects that in turn influence several physiological processes including reproductive function of the female. Studies in various species of animals and also in humans have identified important roles for the receptor-mediated LPA signaling in multiple aspects of human and animal reproductive tract function. These aspects range from ovarian and uterine function, estrous cycle regulation, early embryo development, embryo implantation, decidualization to pregnancy maintenance and parturition. LPA signaling can also have pathological consequences, influencing aspects of endometriosis and reproductive tissue associated tumors. The review describes recent progress in LPA signaling research relevant to human and ruminant reproduction, pointing at the cow as a relevant model to study LPA influence on the human reproductive performance.

  10. Inhibition of lysophospholipase D activity by unsaturated lysophosphatidic acids or seed extracts containing 1-linoleoyl and 1-oleoyl lysophosphatidic acid.

    Liu, Xi-Wen; Sok, Dai-Eun; Yook, Hong-Sun; Sohn, Cheon-Bae; Chung, Young-Jin; Kim, Mee Ree

    2007-10-17

    Lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD), generating lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) from lysophosphatidyclcholine (LPC), is known to be inhibited by lysophosphatidic acids. Meanwhile, some plant lipids are known to contain lysophospholipids as minor components. Therefore, it is interesting to test whether edible seed samples, rich in phospholipids, may contain lysophospholipids, which express a strong inhibition of lysoPLD activity. First, the structural importance of fatty acyl group in LPAs was examined by determining the inhibitory effect of various LPAs on bovine lysoPLD activity. The most potent in the inhibition of lysoPLD activity was linoleoyl-LPA ( K i, 0.21 microM), followed by arachidonoyl-LPA ( K i, 0.55 microM), oleoyl-LPA ( K i, 1.2 microM), and palmitoyl-LPA ( K i, 1.4 microM), based on the fluoresecent assay. The same order of inhibitory potency among LPA analogs with different acyl chains was also found in the spectrophotometric assay. Subsequently, the extracts of 12 edible seeds were screened for the inhibition of lysoPLD activity using both spectrophotometric and fluorescent assays. Among seed extracts tested, the extract from soybean seed, sesame seed, or sunflower seed (30 mg seed weight/mL) was found to exhibit a potent inhibition (>80%) of lysoPLD activity. In further study employing ESI-MS/MS analysis, major LPA components in seed extracts were identified to be 1-linoleoyl LPA, 1-oleoyl LPA, and 1-palmitoyl LPA with 1-linoleoyl LPA being more predominant. Thus, the potent inhibition of lysoPLD activity by seed extracts might be ascribed to the presence of LPA with linoleoyl group rather than other acyl chains. PMID:17887800

  11. Lysophosphatidic acid metabolism and elimination in cardiovascular disease

    Salous, Abdelghaffar Kamal

    The bioactive lipids lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) are present in human and mouse plasma at a concentration of ~0.1-1 microM and regulate physiological and pathophysiological processes in the cardiovascular system including atherothrombosis, intimal hyperplasia, and immune function, edema formation, and permeability. PPAP2B, the gene encoding LPP3, a broad activity integral membrane enzyme that terminates LPA actions in the vasculature, has a single nucleotide polymorphism that been recently associated with coronary artery disease risk. The synthesis and signaling of LPA and S1P in the cardiovascular system have been extensively studied but the mechanisms responsible for their elimination are less well understood. The broad goal of this research was to examine the role of LPP3 in the termination of LPA signaling in models of cardiovascular disease involving vascular wall cells, investigate the role of LPP3 in the elimination of plasma LPA, and further characterize the elimination of plasma LPA. The central hypothesis is that LPP3 plays an important role in attenuating the pathological responses to LPA signaling and that it mediates the elimination of exogenously applied bioactive lipids from the plasma. These hypotheses were tested using molecular biological approaches, in vitro studies, synthetic lysophospholipid mimetics, modified surgical procedures, and mass spectrometry assays. My results indicated that LPP3 played a critical role in attenuating LPA signaling mediating the pathological processes of intimal hyperplasia and vascular leak in mouse models of disease. Additionally, enzymatic inactivation of lysophospholipids by LPP and PLA enzymes in the plasma was not a primary mechanism for the rapid elimination of plasma LPA and S1P. Instead, evidence strongly suggested a transcellular uptake mechanism by hepatic non-parenchymal cells as the predominant mechanism for elimination of these molecules. These results support a model in

  12. What makes the bioactive lipids phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid so special?

    Kooijman, Edgar E; Carter, Karen M; van Laar, Emma G; Chupin, Vladimir; Burger, Koert N J; de Kruijff, Ben

    2005-12-27

    Phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid are minor but important anionic bioactive lipids involved in a number of key cellular processes, yet these molecules have a simple phosphate headgroup. To find out what is so special about these lipids, we determined the ionization behavior of phosphatidic acid (PA) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in extended (flat) mixed lipid bilayers using magic angle spinning 31P NMR. Our data show two surprising results. First, despite identical phosphomonoester headgroups, LPA carries more negative charge than PA when present in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. Dehydroxy-LPA [1-oleoyl-3-(phosphoryl)propanediol] behaves in a manner identical to that of PA, indicating that the difference in negative charge between LPA and PA is caused by the hydroxyl on the glycerol backbone of LPA and its interaction with the phosphomonoester headgroup. Second, deprotonation of phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid was found to be strongly stimulated by the inclusion of phosphatidylethanolamine in the bilayer, indicating that lipid headgroup charge depends on local lipid composition and will vary between the different subcellular locations of (L)PA. Our findings can be understood in terms of a hydrogen bond formed within the phosphomonoester headgroup of (L)PA and its destabilization by competing intra- or intermolecular hydrogen bonds. We propose that this hydrogen bonding property of (L)PA is involved in the various cellular functions of these lipids. PMID:16363814

  13. Pleiotropic activity of lysophosphatidic acid in bone metastasis.

    Peyruchaud, Olivier; Leblanc, Raphael; David, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a common metastatic site for solid cancers. Bone homeostasis is tightly regulated by intimate cross-talks between osteoblast (bone forming cells) and osteoclasts (bone resorbing cells). Once in the bone microenvironment, metastatic cells do not alter bone directly but instead perturb the physiological balance of the bone remodeling process controlled by bone cells. Tumor cells produce growth factors and cytokines stimulating either osteoclast activity leading to osteolytic lesions or osteoblast function resulting in osteoblastic metastases. Growth factors, released from the resorbed bone matrix or throughout osteoblastic bone formation, sustain tumor growth. Therefore, bone metastases are the sites of vicious cycles wherein tumor growth and bone metabolism sustain each other. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) promotes the growth of primary tumors and metastatic dissemination of cancer cells. We have shown that by acting on cancer cells via the contribution of blood platelets and the LPA-producing enzyme Autotaxin (ATX), LPA promotes the progression of osteolytic bone metastases in animal models. In the light of recent reports it would appear that the role of LPA in the context of bone metastases is complex involving multiple sources of lipid combined with direct and indirect effects on target cells. This review will present our current knowledge on the LPA/ATX axis involvement in osteolytic and osteoblastic skeletal metastases and will discuss the potential activity of LPA upstream and downstream metastasis seeding of cancer cells to bone as well as its implication in cancer induced bone pain. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Advances in Lysophospholipid Research. PMID:22710393

  14. The autotaxin-lysophosphatidic acid–lysophosphatidic acid receptor cascade: proposal of a novel potential therapeutic target for treating glioblastoma multiforme

    Tabuchi, Sadaharu

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant tumor of the central nervous system (CNS). Its prognosis is one of the worst among all cancer types, and it is considered a fatal malignancy, incurable with conventional therapeutic strategies. As the bioactive multifunctional lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is well recognized to be involved in the tumorigenesis of cancers by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors, LPA receptor (LPAR) antagonists and LPA synthesis inhibitors have b...

  15. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Is a Functional Marker of Adult Hippocampal Precursor Cells

    Tara L. Walker; Rupert W. Overall; Steffen Vogler; Alex M. Sykes; Susann Ruhwald; Daniela Lasse; Muhammad Ichwan; Klaus Fabel; Gerd Kempermann

    2016-01-01

    Summary Here, we show that the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPA1) is expressed by a defined population of type 1 stem cells and type 2a precursor cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus. LPA1, in contrast to Nestin, also marks the quiescent stem cell population. Combining LPA1-GFP with EGFR and prominin-1 expression, we have enabled the prospective separation of both proliferative and non-proliferative precursor cell populations. Transcriptional profiling of the isolated proliferative pre...

  16. Platelet activation and platelet-monocyte aggregate formation by the atherosclerotic plaque lipid lysophosphatidic acid

    Haserück, Nadine

    2007-01-01

    Oxidized LDL and platelets play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and ischemic cardiovascular diseases. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a thrombogenic substance that accumulates in mildly-oxidized LDL and in human atherosclerotic lesions, and is responsible for the initial platelet activation, shape change, induced by mildly-oxidized LDL and extracts of lipid-rich atherosclerotic plaques (Siess et al., 1999 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1999). LPA directly induced platelet shape c...

  17. Mechanisms of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediated stimulation of intestinal apical Cl−/OH− exchange

    Singla, Amika; Dwivedi, Alka; Saksena, Seema; Gill, Ravinder K.; Alrefai, Waddah A.; RAMASWAMY, KRISHNAMURTHY; Dudeja, Pradeep K.

    2009-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a potent bioactive phospholipid, is a natural component of food products like soy and egg yolk. LPA modulates a number of epithelial functions and has been shown to inhibit cholera toxin-induced diarrhea. Antidiarrheal effects of LPA are known to be mediated by inhibiting chloride secretion. However, the effects of LPA on chloride absorption in the mammalian intestine are not known. The present studies examined the effects of LPA on apical Cl−/OH− exchangers known...

  18. G-Protein-Coupled Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptors and Their Regulation of AKT Signaling

    Anjum Riaz; Ying Huang; Staffan Johansson

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is their ability to recognize and respond to chemically diverse ligands. Lysophospholipids constitute a relatively recent addition to these ligands and carry out their biological functions by activating G-proteins coupled to a large family of cell-surface receptors. This review aims to highlight salient features of cell signaling by one class of these receptors, known as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors, in the context of phosphatidylinos...

  19. Adipose-specific disruption of autotaxin enhances nutritional fattening and reduces plasma lysophosphatidic acid

    Dusaulcy, Rodolphe; Rancoule, Chloé; Grès, Sandra; Wanecq, Estelle; Colom, André; Guigné, Charlotte; van Meeteren, Laurens A.; Moolenaar, Wouter H.; Valet, Philippe; Saulnier-Blache, Jean Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted lysophospholipase D that generates the lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). ATX is secreted by adipose tissue and its expression is enhanced in obese/insulin-resistant individuals. Here, we analyzed the specific contribution of adipose-ATX to fat expansion associated with nutritional obesity and its consequences on plasma LPA levels. We established ATXF/F/aP2-Cre (FATX-KO) transgenic mice carrying a null ATX allele specifically in adipose tissue. FATX-KO m...

  20. Lysophosphatidic Acid Stimulates MCP-1 Secretion from C2C12 Myoblast

    Tamotsu Tsukahara; Hisao Haniu

    2012-01-01

    Chemokines are regulatory proteins that play an important role in muscle cell migration and proliferation. In this study, C2C12 cells treated with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) showed an increase in endogenous monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) expression and secretion. LPA is a naturally occurring bioactive lysophospholipid with hormone- and growth-factor-like activities. LPA is produced by activated platelets, cytokine-stimulated leukocytes, and possibly by other cell types. However, the ...

  1. Lysophosphatidic Acid Signaling in Late Cleavage and Blastocyst Stage Bovine Embryos

    Ana Catarina Torres; Dorota Boruszewska; Mariana Batista; Ilona Kowalczyk-Zieba; Patricia Diniz; Emilia Sinderewicz; Jean Sebastian Saulnier-Blache; Izabela Woclawek-Potocka; Luis Lopes-da-Costa

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a known cell signaling lipid mediator in reproductive tissues. In the cow, LPA is involved in luteal and early pregnancy maintenance. Here, we evaluated the presence and role of LPA in bovine early embryonic development. In relevant aspects, bovine embryos reflect more closely the scenario occurring in human embryos than the mouse model. Transcription of mRNA and protein expression of enzymes involved in LPA synthesis (ATX and cPLA2) and of LPA receptors (LPAR1–...

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid regulates adhesion molecules and enhances migration of human oral keratinocytes.

    Thorlakson, Hong H; Schreurs, Olav; Schenck, Karl; Blix, Inger J S

    2016-04-01

    Oral keratinocytes are connected via cell-to-cell adhesions to protect underlying tissues from physical and bacterial damage. Lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs) are a family of phospholipid mediators that have the ability to regulate gene expression, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and cytokine/chemokine secretion, which mediate proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Several forms of LPA are found in saliva and gingival crevicular fluid, but it is unknown how they affect human oral keratinocytes (HOK). The aim of the present study was therefore to examine how different LPA forms affect the expression of adhesion molecules and the migration and proliferation of HOK. Keratinocytes were isolated from gingival biopsies obtained from healthy donors and challenged with different forms of LPA. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry were used to analyze the expression of adhesion molecules. Migration and proliferation assays were performed. Lysophosphatidic acids strongly promoted expression of E-cadherin and occludin mRNAs and translocation of E-cadherin protein from the cytoplasm to the membrane. Occludin and claudin-1 proteins were up-regulated by LPA. Migration of HOK in culture was increased, but proliferation was reduced, by the addition of LPA. This indicates that LPA can have a role in the regulation of the oral epithelial barrier by increasing the expression of adhesion molecules of HOK, by promotion of migration and by inhibition of proliferation. PMID:26913569

  3. Mutations of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene during progression of lung tumors in rats

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. In this study, mutations of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 (LPA1) gene were investigated to clarify the possible molecular mechanisms underlying the development of lung tumors induced by N-nitrosobis(2-hydroxypropyl)amine (BHP) in rats. Male Wistar rats, 6 weeks of age, were given 2000 ppm BHP in their drinking water for 12 weeks and then maintained without further treatment until sacrifice at 25 weeks. Genomic DNAs were extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues and exons 2-4 were examined for mutations, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. No LPA1 mutations were detected in 15 hyperplasias, but 2 out of 12 adenomas (16.7%) and 7 out of 17 adenocarcinomas (41.2%). These results suggest that mutations of LPA1 gene may be involved in the acquisition of growth advantage from adenomas to adenocarcinomas in lung carcinogenesis induced in rats by BHP.

  4. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Is a Functional Marker of Adult Hippocampal Precursor Cells

    Tara L. Walker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Here, we show that the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPA1 is expressed by a defined population of type 1 stem cells and type 2a precursor cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus. LPA1, in contrast to Nestin, also marks the quiescent stem cell population. Combining LPA1-GFP with EGFR and prominin-1 expression, we have enabled the prospective separation of both proliferative and non-proliferative precursor cell populations. Transcriptional profiling of the isolated proliferative precursor cells suggested immune mechanisms and cytokine signaling as molecular regulators of adult hippocampal precursor cell proliferation. In addition to LPA1 being a marker of this important stem cell population, we also show that the corresponding ligand LPA is directly involved in the regulation of adult hippocampal precursor cell proliferation and neurogenesis, an effect that can be attributed to LPA signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways.

  5. Cloning and identification of the human LPAAT-zeta gene, a novel member of the lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase family.

    Li, Dan; Yu, Long; Wu, Hai; Shan, Yuxi; Guo, Jinhu; Dang, Yongjun; Wei, Youheng; Zhao, Shouyuan

    2003-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a naturally occurring component of phospholipid and plays a critical role in the regulation of many physiological and pathophysiological processes including cell growth, survival, and pro-angiogenesis. LPA is converted to phosphatidic acid by the action of lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT). Five members of the LPAAT gene family have been detected in humans to date. Here, we report the identification of a novel LPAAT member, which is designated as LPAAT-zeta. LPAAT-zeta was predicted to encode a protein consisting of 456 amino acid residues with a signal peptide sequence and the acyltransferase domain. Northern blot analysis showed that LPAAT-zeta was ubiquitously expressed in all 16 human tissues examined, with levels in the skeletal muscle, heart, and testis being relatively high and in the lung being relatively low. The human LPAAT-zeta gene consisted of 13 exons and is positioned at chromosome 8p11.21. PMID:12938015

  6. Lysophosphatidic Acid Alters the Expression Profiles of Angiogenic Factors, Cytokines, and Chemokines in Mouse Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells

    Chia-Hung Chou; Shou-Lun Lai; Cheng-Maw Ho; Wen-Hsi Lin; Chiung-Nien Chen; Po-Huang Lee; Fu-Chuo Peng; Sung-Hsin Kuo; Szu-Yuan Wu; Hong-Shiee Lai

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a multi-function glycerophospholipid. LPA affects the proliferation of hepatocytes and stellate cells in vitro, and in a partial hepatectomy induced liver regeneration model, the circulating LPA levels and LPA receptor (LPAR) expression levels in liver tissue are significantly changed. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (Lsecs) play an important role during liver regeneration. However, the effects of LPA on Lsecs are not well known. Thus, we ...

  7. Lysophosphatidic acid stimulates gastric cancer cell proliferation via ERK1-dependent upregulation of sphingosine kinase 1 transcription

    Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Shida, Dai; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Fang, Xianjun; Milstien, Sheldon; Takabe, Kazuaki; Spiegel, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    In MKN1 gastric cancer cells, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) upregulates expression of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) and its downregulation or inhibition suppresses LPA-mediated proliferation. Although LPA activates numerous signaling pathways downstream of its receptors, including ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and Akt, and the transactivation of the EGF receptor, pharmacological and molecular approaches demonstrated that only activation of ERK1, in addition to the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) t...

  8. New metabolically stabilized analogues of lysophosphatidic acid: agonists, antagonists and enzyme inhibitors.

    Prestwich, G D; Xu, Y; Qian, L; Gajewiak, J; Jiang, G

    2005-12-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a metabolically labile natural phospholipid with a bewildering array of physiological effects. We describe herein a variety of long-lived receptor-specific agonists and antagonists for LPA receptors. Several LPA and PA (phosphatidic acid) analogues also inhibit LPP (lipid phosphate phosphatase). The sn-1 or sn-2 hydroxy groups have been replaced by fluorine, difluoromethyl, difluoroethyl, O-methyl or O-hydroxyethoxy groups to give non-migrating LPA analogues that resist acyltransferases. Alkyl ether replacement of acyl esters produced lipase and acyltransferase-resistant analogues. Replacement of the bridging oxygen in the monophosphate by an alpha-monofluoromethylene-, alpha-bromomethylene- or alpha,alpha-difluoromethylenephosphonate gave phosphatase-resistant analogues. Phosphorothioate analogues with O-acyl and O-alkyl chains are potent, long-lived agonists for LPA1 and LPA3 receptors. Most recently, we have (i) prepared stabilized O-alkyl analogues of lysobisphosphatidic acid, (ii) explored the structure-activity relationship of stabilized cyclic LPA analogues and (iii) synthesized neutral head group trifluoromethylsulphonamide analogues of LPA. Through collaborative studies, we have collected data for these stabilized analogues as selective LPA receptor (ant)agonists, LPP inhibitors, TREK (transmembrane calcium channel) K+ channel agonists, activators of the nuclear transcription factor PPAR-gamma (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-gamma), promoters of cell motility and survival, and radioprotectants for human B-cells. PMID:16246118

  9. Toluene diisocyanate: Induction of the autotaxin-lysophosphatidic acid axis and its association with airways symptoms

    Diisocyanates are industrial chemicals which have a wide range of applications in developed and developing countries. They are notorious lung toxicants and respiratory sensitizers. However, the mechanisms behind their adverse effects are not adequately characterized. Autotaxin (ATX) is an enzyme producing lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the ATX-LPA axis has been implicated in lung related inflammatory conditions and diseases, including allergic asthma, but not to toxicity of environmental low-molecular-weight chemicals. We investigated effects of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) on ATX induction in human lung epithelial cell models, and we correlated LPA-levels in plasma to biomarkers of TDI exposure in urine collected from workers exposed to < 5 ppb (parts per billion). Information on workers' symptoms was collected through interviews. One nanomolar TDI robustly induced ATX release within 10 min in vitro. A P2X7- and P2X4-dependent microvesicle formation was implicated in a rapid ATX release and a subsequent protein synthesis. Co-localization between purinergic receptors and ATX was documented by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. The release was modulated by monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and by extracellular ATP. In workers, we found a dose–response relationship between TDI exposure biomarkers in urine and LPA levels in plasma. Among symptomatic workers reporting “sneezing”, the LPA levels were higher than among non-symptomatic workers. This is the first report indicating induction of the ATX-LPA axis by an environmental low-molecular-weight chemical, and our data suggest a role for the ATX-LPA axis in TDI toxicity. - Highlights: • Human epithelial cells release autotaxin in response to 1 nM toluene diisocyanate (TDI). • The release involves P2X4 and P2X7 receptors and is modulated by ATP and MCP-1. • Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was measured in workers exposed to < 5 ppb TDI. • LPA in plasma correlated to TDI exposure

  10. Blockade of lysophosphatidic acid receptors LPAR1/3 ameliorates lung fibrosis induced by irradiation

    Highlights: → Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) levels and its receptors LPAR1/3 transcripts were elevated during the development of radiation-induced lung fibrosis. → Lung fibrosis was obviously alleviated in mice treated with the dual LPAR1/3 antagonist, VPC12249. → VPC12249 administration effectively inhibited radiation-induced fibroblast accumulation in vivo, and suppressed LPA-induced fibroblast proliferation in vitro. → LPA-LPAR1/3 signaling regulated TGFβ1 and CTGF expressions in radiation-challenged lungs, but only influenced CTGF expression in cultured fibroblasts. → LPA-LPAR1/3 signaling induced fibroblast proliferation through a CTGF-dependent pathway, rather than through TGFβ1 activation. -- Abstract: Lung fibrosis is a common and serious complication of radiation therapy for lung cancer, for which there are no efficient treatments. Emerging evidence indicates that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and its receptors (LPARs) are involved in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. Here, we reported that thoracic radiation with 16 Gy in mice induced development of radiation lung fibrosis (RLF) accompanied by obvious increases in LPA release and LPAR1 and LPAR3 (LPAR1/3) transcripts. RLF was significantly alleviated in mice treated with the dual LPAR1/3 antagonist, VPC12249. VPC12249 administration effectively prolonged animal survival, restored lung structure, inhibited fibroblast accumulation and reduced collagen deposition. Moreover, profibrotic cytokines in radiation-challenged lungs obviously decreased following administration of VPC12249, including transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). In vitro, LPA induced both fibroblast proliferation and CTGF expression in a dose-dependent manner, and both were suppressed by blockade of LPAR1/3. The pro-proliferative activity of LPA on fibroblasts was inhibited by siRNA directed against CTGF. Together, our data suggest that the LPA-LPAR1/3 signaling system is involved in the

  11. Blockade of lysophosphatidic acid receptors LPAR1/3 ameliorates lung fibrosis induced by irradiation

    Gan, Lu [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Xue, Jian-Xin [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Li, Xin [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Liu, De-Song [Department of Pediatrics, Sichuan Provincial Hospital of Women and Children, Chengdu (China); Ge, Yan; Ni, Pei-Yan; Deng, Lin [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Lu, You, E-mail: radyoulu@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Department of Thoracic Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Jiang, Wei, E-mail: wcumsjw72@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) levels and its receptors LPAR1/3 transcripts were elevated during the development of radiation-induced lung fibrosis. {yields} Lung fibrosis was obviously alleviated in mice treated with the dual LPAR1/3 antagonist, VPC12249. {yields} VPC12249 administration effectively inhibited radiation-induced fibroblast accumulation in vivo, and suppressed LPA-induced fibroblast proliferation in vitro. {yields} LPA-LPAR1/3 signaling regulated TGF{beta}1 and CTGF expressions in radiation-challenged lungs, but only influenced CTGF expression in cultured fibroblasts. {yields} LPA-LPAR1/3 signaling induced fibroblast proliferation through a CTGF-dependent pathway, rather than through TGF{beta}1 activation. -- Abstract: Lung fibrosis is a common and serious complication of radiation therapy for lung cancer, for which there are no efficient treatments. Emerging evidence indicates that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and its receptors (LPARs) are involved in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. Here, we reported that thoracic radiation with 16 Gy in mice induced development of radiation lung fibrosis (RLF) accompanied by obvious increases in LPA release and LPAR1 and LPAR3 (LPAR1/3) transcripts. RLF was significantly alleviated in mice treated with the dual LPAR1/3 antagonist, VPC12249. VPC12249 administration effectively prolonged animal survival, restored lung structure, inhibited fibroblast accumulation and reduced collagen deposition. Moreover, profibrotic cytokines in radiation-challenged lungs obviously decreased following administration of VPC12249, including transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). In vitro, LPA induced both fibroblast proliferation and CTGF expression in a dose-dependent manner, and both were suppressed by blockade of LPAR1/3. The pro-proliferative activity of LPA on fibroblasts was inhibited by siRNA directed against CTGF. Together, our data suggest that the LPA-LPAR1

  12. Toluene diisocyanate: Induction of the autotaxin-lysophosphatidic acid axis and its association with airways symptoms

    Broström, Julia M. [Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE 221 85 Lund (Sweden); Ye, Zhi-wei [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE 171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Axmon, Anna; Littorin, Margareta; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Lindh, Christian H. [Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE 221 85 Lund (Sweden); Zheng, Huiyuan; Ghalali, Aram; Stenius, Ulla [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE 171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Jönsson, Bo A.G. [Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE 221 85 Lund (Sweden); Högberg, Johan, E-mail: johan.hogberg@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE 171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    Diisocyanates are industrial chemicals which have a wide range of applications in developed and developing countries. They are notorious lung toxicants and respiratory sensitizers. However, the mechanisms behind their adverse effects are not adequately characterized. Autotaxin (ATX) is an enzyme producing lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the ATX-LPA axis has been implicated in lung related inflammatory conditions and diseases, including allergic asthma, but not to toxicity of environmental low-molecular-weight chemicals. We investigated effects of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) on ATX induction in human lung epithelial cell models, and we correlated LPA-levels in plasma to biomarkers of TDI exposure in urine collected from workers exposed to < 5 ppb (parts per billion). Information on workers' symptoms was collected through interviews. One nanomolar TDI robustly induced ATX release within 10 min in vitro. A P2X7- and P2X4-dependent microvesicle formation was implicated in a rapid ATX release and a subsequent protein synthesis. Co-localization between purinergic receptors and ATX was documented by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. The release was modulated by monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and by extracellular ATP. In workers, we found a dose–response relationship between TDI exposure biomarkers in urine and LPA levels in plasma. Among symptomatic workers reporting “sneezing”, the LPA levels were higher than among non-symptomatic workers. This is the first report indicating induction of the ATX-LPA axis by an environmental low-molecular-weight chemical, and our data suggest a role for the ATX-LPA axis in TDI toxicity. - Highlights: • Human epithelial cells release autotaxin in response to 1 nM toluene diisocyanate (TDI). • The release involves P2X4 and P2X7 receptors and is modulated by ATP and MCP-1. • Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was measured in workers exposed to < 5 ppb TDI. • LPA in plasma correlated to TDI exposure

  13. Lysophosphatidic Acid Stimulates MCP-1 Secretion from C2C12 Myoblast.

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Haniu, Hisao

    2012-01-01

    Chemokines are regulatory proteins that play an important role in muscle cell migration and proliferation. In this study, C2C12 cells treated with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) showed an increase in endogenous monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) expression and secretion. LPA is a naturally occurring bioactive lysophospholipid with hormone- and growth-factor-like activities. LPA is produced by activated platelets, cytokine-stimulated leukocytes, and possibly by other cell types. However, the LPA analog cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) had no effect on the expression and secretion of MCP-1. LPA, although similar in structure to cPA, had potent inducing effects on MCP-1 expression in C2C12 cells. In this study, we showed that LPA enhanced MCP-1 mRNA expression and protein secretion in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that LPA enhances MCP-1 secretion in C2C12 cells and thus may play an important role in cell proliferation. PMID:24049655

  14. The autotaxin-lysophosphatidic acid-lysophosphatidic acid receptor cascade: proposal of a novel potential therapeutic target for treating glioblastoma multiforme.

    Tabuchi, Sadaharu

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant tumor of the central nervous system (CNS). Its prognosis is one of the worst among all cancer types, and it is considered a fatal malignancy, incurable with conventional therapeutic strategies. As the bioactive multifunctional lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is well recognized to be involved in the tumorigenesis of cancers by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors, LPA receptor (LPAR) antagonists and LPA synthesis inhibitors have been proposed as promising drugs for cancer treatment. Six LPARs, named LPA1-6, are currently recognized. Among them, LPA1 is the dominant LPAR in the CNS and is highly expressed in GBM in combination with the overexpression of autotaxin (ATX), the enzyme (a phosphodiesterase, which is a potent cell motility-stimulating factor) that produces LPA.Invasion is a defining hallmark of GBM. LPA is significantly related to cell adhesion, cell motility, and invasion through the Rho family GTPases Rho and Rac. LPA1 is responsible for LPA-driven cell motility, which is attenuated by LPA4. GBM is among the most vascular human tumors. Although anti-angiogenic therapy (through the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)) was established, sufficient results have not been obtained because of the increased invasiveness triggered by anti-angiogenesis. As both ATX and LPA play a significant role in angiogenesis, similar to VEGF, inhibition of the ATX/LPA axis may be beneficial as a two-pronged therapy that includes anti-angiogenic and anti-invasion therapy. Conventional approaches to GBM are predominantly directed at cell proliferation. Recurrent tumors regrow from cells that have invaded brain tissues and are less proliferative, and are thus quite resistant to conventional drugs and radiation, which preferentially kill rapidly proliferating cells. A novel approach that targets this invasive subpopulation of GBM cells may improve the prognosis of GBM. Patients with GBM that

  15. A novel highly potent autotaxin/ENPP2 inhibitor produces prolonged decreases in plasma lysophosphatidic acid formation in vivo and regulates urethral tension.

    Hiroshi Saga

    Full Text Available Autotaxin, also known as ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 2 (ENPP2, is a secreted enzyme that has lysophospholipase D activity, which converts lysophosphatidylcholine to bioactive lysophosphatidic acid. Lysophosphatidic acid activates at least six G-protein coupled recpetors, which promote cell proliferation, survival, migration and muscle contraction. These physiological effects become dysfunctional in the pathology of cancer, fibrosis, and pain. To date, several autotaxin/ENPP2 inhibitors have been reported; however, none were able to completely and continuously inhibit autotaxin/ENPP2 in vivo. In this study, we report the discovery of a highly potent autotaxin/ENPP2 inhibitor, ONO-8430506, which decreased plasma lysophosphatidic acid formation. The IC50 values of ONO-8540506 for lysophospholipase D activity were 6.4-19 nM for recombinant autotaxin/ENPP2 proteins and 4.7-11.6 nM for plasma from various animal species. Plasma lysophosphatidic acid formation during 1-h incubation was almost completely inhibited by the addition of >300 nM of the compound to human plasma. In addition, when administered orally to rats at a dose of 30 mg/kg, the compound demonstrated good pharmacokinetics in rats and persistently inhibited plasma lysophosphatidic acid formation even at 24 h after administration. Smooth muscle contraction is a known to be promoted by lysophosphatidic acid. In this study, we showed that dosing rats with ONO-8430506 decreased intraurethral pressure accompanied by urethral relaxation. These findings demonstrate the potential of this autotaxin/ENPP2 inhibitor for the treatment of various diseases caused by lysophosphatidic acid, including urethral obstructive disease such as benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  16. The effects of aspirin on platelet function and lysophosphatidic acids depend on plasma concentrations of EPA and DHA

    Block, Robert C.; Abdolahi, Amir; Tu, Xin; Georas, Steve N.; Brenna, J. Thomas; Phipps, Richard P.; Lawrence, Peter; Mousa, Shaker A.

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin’s prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus is controversial. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and aspirin all affect the cyclooxygenase enzyme. The relationship between plasma EPA and DHA and aspirin’s effects has not been determined. Thirty adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus ingested aspirin (81 mg/day) for 7 days, then EPA+DHA (2.6 g/day) for 28 days, then both for another 7 days. Lysophosphatidic acid...

  17. Lysophosphatidic acid stimulates thrombomodulin lectin-like domain shedding in human endothelial cells

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an anticoagulant glycoprotein highly expressed on endothelial cell surfaces. Increased levels of soluble TM in circulation have been widely accepted as an indicator of endothelial damage or dysfunction. Previous studies indicated that various proinflammatory factors stimulate TM shedding in various cell types such as smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator present in biological fluids during endothelial damage or injury. In the present study, we first observed that LPA triggered TM shedding in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By Cyflow analysis, we showed that the LPA-induced accessibility of antibodies to the endothelial growth factor (EGF)-like domain of TM is independent of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), while LPA-induced TM lectin-like domain shedding is MMP-dependent. Furthermore, a stable cell line expressing TM without its lectin-like domain exhibited a higher cell proliferation rate than a stable cell line expressing full-length TM. These results imply that LPA induces TM lectin-like domain shedding, which might contribute to the exposure of its EGF-like domain for EGF receptor (EGFR) binding, thereby stimulating subsequent cell proliferation. Based on our findings, we propose a novel mechanism for the exposure of TM EGF-like domain, which possibly mediates LPA-induced EGFR transactivation

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid mediates myeloid differentiation within the human bone marrow microenvironment.

    Denis Evseenko

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is a pleiotropic phospholipid present in the blood and certain tissues at high concentrations; its diverse effects are mediated through differential, tissue specific expression of LPA receptors. Our goal was to determine if LPA exerts lineage-specific effects during normal human hematopoiesis. In vitro stimulation of CD34+ human hematopoietic progenitors by LPA induced myeloid differentiation but had no effect on lymphoid differentiation. LPA receptors were expressed at significantly higher levels on Common Myeloid Progenitors (CMP than either multipotent Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells (HSPC or Common Lymphoid Progenitors (CLP suggesting that LPA acts on committed myeloid progenitors. Functional studies demonstrated that LPA enhanced migration, induced cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis of isolated CMP, but had no effect on either HSPC or CLP. Analysis of adult and fetal human bone marrow sections showed that PPAP2A, (the enzyme which degrades LPA was highly expressed in the osteoblastic niche but not in the perivascular regions, whereas Autotaxin (the enzyme that synthesizes LPA was expressed in perivascular regions of the marrow. We propose that a gradient of LPA with the highest levels in peri-sinusoidal regions and lowest near the endosteal zone, regulates the localization, proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors within the bone marrow marrow.

  19. Lysophosphatidic acid-functionalised titanium as a superior surface for supporting human osteoblast (MG63 maturation

    JP Mansell

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Covalent modifications of titanium with small molecules known to promote human osteoblast maturation are especially attractive in developing superior biomaterials. An important step in securing competent bone formation at implant sites is promoting the formation of mature osteoblasts, either from committed pre-osteoblasts or from their mesenchymal progenitors. To this end our research has focussed on identifying molecules that enhance human osteoblast formation and maturation and to develop ways of covalently attaching these molecules to implant surfaces so that they are more likely to withstand the rigors of the implantation process whilst still retaining their bioactivity. Herein we report the novel production of lipid-functionalised titanium using lysophosphatidic acid or a related compound, (3S 1-fluoro-3-hydroxy-4-butyl-1-phosphonate. Both lipids were especially effective at co-operating with calcitriol to promote human osteoblast maturation at these modified Ti surfaces in vitro. The novel findings presented offer enticing new developments towards the fabrication of next-generation implant devices with the potential to significantly enhance the osseointegration process and with it improvements in future prosthesis performance and longevity.

  20. Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) venom phospholipase D (PLD) generates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA).

    Lee, Sangderk; Lynch, Kevin R

    2005-10-15

    Envenomation by the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) may cause local dermonecrosis and, rarely, coagulopathies, kidney failure and death. A venom phospholipase, SMaseD (sphingomyelinase D), is responsible for the pathological manifestations of envenomation. Recently, the recombinant SMaseD from Loxosceles laeta was demonstrated to hydrolyse LPC (lysophosphatidylcholine) to produce LPA (lysophosphatidic acid) and choline. Therefore activation of LPA signalling pathways may be involved in some manifestations of Loxosceles envenomation. To begin investigating this idea, we cloned a full-length cDNA encoding L. reclusa SMaseD. The 305 amino acid sequence of the L. reclusa enzyme is 87, 85 and 60% identical with those of L. arizonica, L. intermedia and L. laeta respectively. The recombinant enzyme expressed in bacteria had broad substrate specificity. The lysophospholipids LPC, LPI (18:1-1-oleyol lysophosphatidylinositol), LPS, LPG (18:1-1-oleoyl-lysophosphatidylglycerol), LBPA (18:1-1-oleoyl-lysobisphosphatidic acid) (all with various acyl chains), lyso-platelet-activating factor (C16:0), cyclic phosphatidic acid and sphingomyelin were hydrolysed, whereas sphingosylphosphorylcholine, PC (phosphatidylcholine; C22:6, C20:4 and C6:0), oxidized PCs and PAF (platelet-activating factor; C16:0) were not hydrolysed. The PAF analogue, edelfosine, inhibited enzyme activity. Recombinant enzyme plus LPC (C18:1) induced the migration of A2058 melanoma cells, and this activity was blocked by the LPA receptor antagonist, VPC32183. The recombinant spider enzyme was haemolytic, but this activity was absent from catalytically inactive H37N (His37-->Asn) and H73N mutants. Our results demonstrate that Loxosceles phospholipase D hydrolyses a wider range of lysophospholipids than previously supposed, and thus the term 'SMaseD' is too limited in describing this enzyme. PMID:15926888

  1. Structurally divergent lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferases with high selectivity for saturated medium chain fatty acids from Cuphea seeds.

    Kim, Hae Jin; Silva, Jillian E; Iskandarov, Umidjon; Andersson, Mariette; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-12-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAT) catalyzes acylation of the sn-2 position on lysophosphatidic acid by an acyl CoA substrate to produce the phosphatidic acid precursor of polar glycerolipids and triacylglycerols (TAGs). In the case of TAGs, this reaction is typically catalyzed by an LPAT2 from microsomal LPAT class A that has high specificity for C18 fatty acids containing Δ9 unsaturation. Because of this specificity, the occurrence of saturated fatty acids in the TAG sn-2 position is infrequent in seed oils. To identify LPATs with variant substrate specificities, deep transcriptomic mining was performed on seeds of two Cuphea species producing TAGs that are highly enriched in saturated C8 and C10 fatty acids. From these analyses, cDNAs for seven previously unreported LPATs were identified, including cDNAs from Cuphea viscosissima (CvLPAT2) and Cuphea avigera var. pulcherrima (CpuLPAT2a) encoding microsomal, seed-specific class A LPAT2s and a cDNA from C. avigera var. pulcherrima (CpuLPATB) encoding a microsomal, seed-specific LPAT from the bacterial-type class B. The activities of these enzymes were characterized in Camelina sativa by seed-specific co-expression with cDNAs for various Cuphea FatB acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (FatB) that produce a variety of saturated medium-chain fatty acids. CvLPAT2 and CpuLPAT2a expression resulted in accumulation of 10:0 fatty acids in the Camelina sativa TAG sn-2 position, indicating a 10:0 CoA specificity that has not been previously described for plant LPATs. CpuLPATB expression generated TAGs with 14:0 at the sn-2 position, but not 10:0. Identification of these LPATs provides tools for understanding the structural basis of LPAT substrate specificity and for generating altered oil functionalities. PMID:26505880

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA 18:1 transcriptional regulation of primary human gingival fibroblasts

    D. Roselyn Cerutis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The pleiotropic, bioactive lipid lysophosphatidic acid [(LPA, 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate] exerts critical regulatory actions in physiology and pathophysiology in many systems. It is present in normal bodily fluids, and is elevated in pathology (1. In vivo, “LPA” exists as distinct molecular species, each having a single fatty acid of varying chain length and degree of unsaturation covalently attached to the glycerol backbone via an acyl, alkyl, or alkenyl link. These species differ in affinities for the individual LPA receptors [(LPARs, LPA1-6] and coupling to G proteins (2. However, LPA 18:1 has been and continues to be the most commonly utilized species in reported studies. The actions of “LPA” remain poorly defined in oral biology and pathophysiology. Our laboratory has addressed this knowledge gap by studying in vitro the actions of the major human salivary LPA species [18:1, 18:0, and 16:0 (3] in human oral cells (4–7. This includes gingival fibroblasts (GF, which our flow cytometry data from multiple donors found that they express LPA1-5 (6. We have also reported that these species are ten-fold elevated to pharmacologic levels in the saliva and gingival crevicular fluid obtained from patients with moderate–severe periodontitis (8. As the potential of LPA to regulate transcriptional activity had not been examined in the oral system, this study used whole human genome microarray analysis to test the hypothesis that LPA 18:1-treated human GF would show significant changes in gene transcripts relevant to their biology, wound-healing, and inflammatory responses. LPA 18:1 was found to significantly regulate a large, complex set of genes critical to GF biology in these categories and to periodontal disease. The raw data has been deposited at NCBI's GEO database as record GSE57496.

  3. Tubular cell phenotype in HIV-associated nephropathy: role of phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid.

    Ayasolla, Kamesh R; Rai, Partab; Rahimipour, Shai; Hussain, Mohammad; Malhotra, Ashwani; Singhal, Pravin C

    2015-08-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy and microcysts are characteristic histological features of HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). We have previously reported the role of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the development of glomerular and tubular cell phenotypes in HIVAN. Since persistent tubular cell activation of NFκB has been reported in HIVAN, we now hypothesize that HIV may be contributing to tubular cell phenotype via lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediated downstream signaling. Interestingly, LPA and its receptors have also been implicated in the tubular interstitial cell fibrosis (TIF) and cyst formation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Primary human proximal tubular cells (HRPTCs) were transduced with either empty vector (EV/HRPTCs), HIV (HIV/HRPTCs) or treated with LPA (LPA/HRPTC). Immunoelectrophoresis of HIV/HRPTCs and LPA/HRPTCs displayed enhanced expression of pro-fibrotic markers: a) fibronectin (2.25 fold), b) connective tissue growth factor (CTGF; 4.8 fold), c) α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA; 12 fold), and d) collagen I (5.7 fold). HIV enhanced tubular cell phosphorylation of ILK-1, FAK, PI3K, Akt, ERKs and P38 MAPK. HIV increased tubular cell transcriptional binding activity of NF-κB; whereas, a LPA biosynthesis inhibitor (AACOCF3), a DAG kinase inhibitor, a LPA receptor blocker (Ki16425), a NF-κB inhibitor (PDTC) and NFκB-siRNA not only displayed downregulation of a NFκB activity but also showed attenuated expression of profibrotic/EMT genes in HIV milieu. These findings suggest that LPA could be contributing to HIV-induced tubular cell phenotype via NFκB activation in HIVAN. PMID:26079546

  4. Mechanisms of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediated stimulation of intestinal apical Cl-/OH- exchange.

    Singla, Amika; Dwivedi, Alka; Saksena, Seema; Gill, Ravinder K; Alrefai, Waddah A; Ramaswamy, Krishnamurthy; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2010-02-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a potent bioactive phospholipid, is a natural component of food products like soy and egg yolk. LPA modulates a number of epithelial functions and has been shown to inhibit cholera toxin-induced diarrhea. Antidiarrheal effects of LPA are known to be mediated by inhibiting chloride secretion. However, the effects of LPA on chloride absorption in the mammalian intestine are not known. The present studies examined the effects of LPA on apical Cl(-)/OH(-) exchangers known to be involved in chloride absorption in intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were treated with LPA, and Cl(-)/OH(-) exchange activity was measured as DIDS-sensitive (36)Cl(-) uptake. Cell surface biotinylation studies were performed to evaluate the effect of LPA on cell surface levels of apical Cl(-)/OH(-) exchangers, downregulated in adenoma (DRA) (SLC26A3), and putative anion transporter-1 (SLC26A6). Treatment of Caco-2 cells with LPA (100 muM) significantly stimulated Cl(-)/OH(-) exchange activity. Specific agonist for LPA2 receptor mimicked the effects of LPA. LPA-mediated stimulation of Cl(-)/OH(-) exchange activity was dependent on activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. Consistent with the functional activity, LPA treatment resulted in increased levels of DRA on the apical membrane. Our results demonstrate that LPA stimulates apical Cl(-)/OH(-) exchange activity and surface levels of DRA in intestinal epithelial cells. This increase in Cl(-)/OH(-) exchange may contribute to the antidiarrheal effects of LPA. PMID:19910524

  5. Ginseng pharmacology: a new paradigm based on gintonin-lysophosphatidic acid receptor interactions

    Seung-Yeol eNah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng, is used as a traditional medicine. Despite the long history of the use of ginseng, there is no specific scientific or clinical rationale for ginseng pharmacology besides its application as a general tonic. The ambiguous description of ginseng pharmacology might be due to the absence of a predominant active ingredient that represents ginseng pharmacology. Recent studies show that ginseng abundantly contains lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs, which are phospholipid-derived growth factor with diverse biological functions including those claimed to be exhibited by ginseng. LPAs in ginseng form a complex with ginseng proteins, which can bind and deliver LPA to its cognate receptors with a high affinity. As a first messenger, gintonin produces second messenger Ca2+ via G protein-coupled LPA receptors. Ca2+ is an intracellular mediator of gintonin and initiates a cascade of amplifications for further intercellular communications by activation of Ca2+-dependent kinases, receptors, gliotransmitter and neurotransmitter release. Ginsenosides, which have been regarded as primary ingredients of ginseng, cannot elicit intracellular [Ca2+]i transients, since they lack specific cell surface receptor. However, ginsenosides exhibit non-specific ion channel and receptor regulations. This is the key characteristic that distinguishes gintonin from ginsenosides. Although the current discourse on ginseng pharmacology is focused on ginsenosides, gintonin can definitely provide a mode of action for ginseng pharmacology that ginsenosides cannot. This review article introduces a novel concept of ginseng ligand-LPA receptor interaction and proposes to establish a paradigm that shifts the focus from ginsenosides to gintonin as a major ingredient representing ginseng pharmacology.

  6. Expression of lysophosphatidic acid and its receptor in human pancreatic cancer and its clinical evaluation of diagnosis and therapy

    WANG Shao-kai; TAO Chen-jie; WANG Wei-dong; L(U)Guang-mei; GONG Yong-ling

    2011-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid(LPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid with diverse effects in various cells, ranging from immediate morphological alteration to long lasting cellular function changes, such as induction of stimulation of cell proliferation, survival, drug resistance and motility. Like many other biomediators, LPA interacts with cells through specific cell surface receptors(G protein-coupled receptors). LPA1/Edg-2,LPA2/Edg-4 and LPA3/Edg-7, named as Edg/LP subfamily, are the three most common lysophosphatidic acid receptors. LPA plays a critical role as a general growth, survival and pro-angiogenic factor in the regulation of pathophysiological processes in vivo and in vitro. Recent literatures suggest that abnormalities in LPA metabolism and function in pancreatic cancer patients may contribute to the initiation and progression of the disease. Thus, LPA might be a potential target for clinical pancreatic cancer diagnosis and therapy. Herein we review the expression of LPA and its receptors in the carcinogenesis of human malignancies, with focus on human pancreatic cancer, and also clinical diagnosis and treatment has been evaluated.

  7. Clinical significance of plasma lysophosphatidic acid levels in the differential diagnosis of ovarian cancer

    Yun-Jie Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the value of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Materials and Methods: We first performed a hospital-based, case-control study involving 123 ovarian cancer patients and 101 benign ovarian tumor patients, and then conducted a meta-analysis with 19 case-control studies to assess the correlation between ovarian cancer and plasma LPA levels. Results: The case-control study results demonstrated that ovarian cancer patients have increased LPA and cancer antigen (CA-125 levels compared to patients with benign ovarian tumor (LPA: Ovarian cancer vs benign ovarian tumor: 5.28 ± 1.52 vs 1.82 ± 0.77 μmol/L; CA-125: Ovarian cancer vs benign ovarian tumor: 87.17 ± 45.81 vs. 14.03 ± 10.14 U/mL, which showed statistically significant differences (both P < 0.05. LPA with advanced sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy rate of diagnosis excelled CA-125 in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer (both P < 0.05. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer (LPA: 0.983; CA-125: 0.910 were statistically significant compared with the reference (both P < 0.001 and the difference of the areas of ROC curve between LPA and CA-125 in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer showed statistically significant difference (P < 0.05. The meta-analysis results suggested that plasma LPA levels were higher in ovarian cancer tissues than in benign tissues (standardized mean difference (SMD =2.36, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.61-3.11, P < 0.001 and normal tissues (SMD = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.77-2.87, P < 0.001. Conclusion: LPA shows greater value in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer compared to CA-125 and may be employed as a biological index to diagnose ovarian cancer.

  8. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    Highlights: • LPA5 inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA5 suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA5 on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA1 in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA5 in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA5 acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA1–LPA6) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA1 inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA5 in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA1 and LPA5 on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA5 may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA1

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  10. Golgi membrane fission requires the CtBP1-S/BARS-induced activation of lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase δ.

    Pagliuso, Alessandro; Valente, Carmen; Giordano, Lucia Laura; Filograna, Angela; Li, Guiling; Circolo, Diego; Turacchio, Gabriele; Marzullo, Vincenzo Manuel; Mandrich, Luigi; Zhukovsky, Mikhail A; Formiggini, Fabio; Polishchuk, Roman S; Corda, Daniela; Luini, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fission is an essential cellular process by which continuous membranes split into separate parts. We have previously identified CtBP1-S/BARS (BARS) as a key component of a protein complex that is required for fission of several endomembranes, including basolateral post-Golgi transport carriers. Assembly of this complex occurs at the Golgi apparatus, where BARS binds to the phosphoinositide kinase PI4KIIIβ through a 14-3-3γ dimer, as well as to ARF and the PKD and PAK kinases. We now report that, when incorporated into this complex, BARS binds to and activates a trans-Golgi lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) acyltransferase type δ (LPAATδ) that converts LPA into phosphatidic acid (PA); and that this reaction is essential for fission of the carriers. LPA and PA have unique biophysical properties, and their interconversion might facilitate the fission process either directly or indirectly (via recruitment of proteins that bind to PA, including BARS itself). PMID:27401954

  11. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of (lyso)phosphatidic acids, (lyso)phosphatidylserines and other lipid classes.

    Cífková, Eva; Hájek, Roman; Lísa, Miroslav; Holčapek, Michal

    2016-03-25

    The goal of this work is a systematic optimization of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) separation of acidic lipid classes (namely phosphatidic acids-PA, lysophosphatidic acids-LPA, phosphatidylserines-PS and lysophosphatidylserines-LPS) and other lipid classes under mass spectrometry (MS) compatible conditions. The main parameters included in this optimization are the type of stationary phases used in HILIC, pH of the mobile phase, the type and concentration of mobile phase additives. Nine HILIC columns with different chemistries (unmodified silica, modified silica using diol, 2-picolylamine, diethylamine and 1-aminoanthracene and hydride silica) are compared with the emphasis on peak shapes of acidic lipid classes. The optimization of pH is correlated with the theoretical calculation of acidobasic equilibria of studied lipid classes. The final method using the hydride column, pH 4 adjusted by formic acid and the gradient of acetonitrile and 40mmol/L of aqueous ammonium formate provides good peak shapes for all analyzed lipid classes including acidic lipids. This method is applied for the identification of lipids in real samples of porcine brain and kidney extracts. PMID:26858118

  12. Regulation of gene expression and subcellular protein distribution in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells by lysophosphatidic acid: Relevance to dendrite outgrowth

    Waters, Katrina M.; Jon M Jacobs; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are highly responsive to the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but the mechanisms by which LPA alters bone cell functions are largely unknown. A major effect of LPA on osteocytic cells is the stimulation of dendrite membrane outgrowth, a process that we predicted to require changes in gene expression and protein distribution. We employed DNA microarrays for global transcriptional profiling of MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells grown for 6 and 24 hours in t...

  13. Lipid transmitter signaling as a new target for treatment of cocaine addiction: new roles for acylethanolamides and lysophosphatidic acid.

    Orio, Laura; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Blanco, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Araos, Pedro; Pedraz, María; Rivera, Patricia; Calado, Montserrat; Suárez, Juan; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    This review analyzes the roles of lipid transmitters, especially those derived from the cleavage of membrane phospholipids, in cocaine-associated behaviors. These lipid signals are important modulators of information processing in the brain, affecting transmitter release, neural plasticity, synaptogenesis, neurogenesis, and cellular energetics. This broad range of actions makes them suitable targets for pharmaceutical development of cocaine addiction therapies because they participate in the main cellular processes underlying the neuroadaptations associated with chronic use of this psychostimulant. The main lipid transmitters reviewed here include a) acylethanolamides and acylglycerols acting on cannabinoid receptors, such as anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol; b) acylethanolamides that do not act on cannabinoid receptors, such as oleoylethanolamide; c) eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid, including prostaglandins; and d) lysophosphatidic acid, focusing on the role of its LPA-1 receptor. Direct experimental evidence for the significance of these lipids in cocaine-related behaviors is presented and discussed. Additionally, the roles for both their biosynthesis and degradation pathways, as well as the participation of their receptors, are examined. Overall, lipid transmitter signaling can offer new targets for the development of therapies for cocaine addiction. PMID:23574441

  14. Lipid phosphate phosphatases regulate lysophosphatidic acid production and signaling in platelets: studies using chemical inhibitors of lipid phosphate phosphatase activity.

    Smyth, Susan S; Sciorra, Vicki A; Sigal, Yury J; Pamuklar, Zehra; Wang, Zuncai; Xu, Yong; Prestwich, Glenn D; Morris, Andrew J

    2003-10-31

    Blood platelets play an essential role in ischemic heart disease and stroke contributing to acute thrombotic events by release of potent inflammatory agents within the vasculature. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator produced by platelets and found in the blood and atherosclerotic plaques. LPA receptors on platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells regulate growth, differentiation, survival, motility, and contractile activity. Definition of the opposing pathways of synthesis and degradation that control extracellular LPA levels is critical to understanding how LPA bioactivity is regulated. We show that intact platelets and platelet membranes actively dephosphorylate LPA and identify the major enzyme responsible as lipid phosphate phosphatase 1 (LPP1). Localization of LPP1 to the platelet surface is increased by exposure to LPA. A novel receptor-inactive sn-3-substituted difluoromethylenephosphonate analog of phosphatidic acid that is a potent competitive inhibitor of LPP1 activity potentiates platelet aggregation and shape change responses to LPA and amplifies LPA production by agonist-stimulated platelets. Our results identify LPP1 as a pivotal regulator of LPA signaling in the cardiovascular system. These findings are consistent with genetic and cell biological evidence implicating LPPs as negative regulators of lysophospholipid signaling and suggest that the mechanisms involve both attenuation of lysophospholipid actions at cell surface receptors and opposition of lysophospholipid production. PMID:12909631

  15. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Ju, Tsai-Kai [Instrumentation Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Technology Commons, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Yuan-Li [Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Ming-Shyue [Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jiun-Hong [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Life Science, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Hsinyu, E-mail: hsinyu@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Zoology, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Life Science, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Center for Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Research Center for Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

  16. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA1 and LPA3. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA1 and LPA3 siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway

  17. Transgenic Expression of Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor LPA2 in Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells Induces Intestinal Dysplasia.

    Michihiro Yoshida

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA acts on LPA2 receptor to mediate multiple pathological effects that are associated with tumorigenesis. The absence of LPA2 attenuates tumor progression in rodent models of colorectal cancer, but whether overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to malignant transformation in the intestinal tract has not been studied. In this study, we expressed human LPA2 in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs under control of the villin promoter. Less than 4% of F1-generation mice had germline transmission of transgenic (TG human LPA2; as such only 3 F1 mice out of 72 genotyped had TG expression. These TG mice appeared anemic with hematochezia and died shortly after birth. TG mice were smaller in size compared with the wild type mouse of the same age and sex. Morphological analysis showed that TG LPA2 colon had hyper-proliferation of IECs resulting in increased colonic crypt depth. Surprisingly, TG small intestine had villus blunting and decreased IEC proliferation and dysplasia. In both intestine and colon, TG expression of LPA2 compromised the terminal epithelial differentiation, consistent with epithelial dysplasia. Furthermore, we showed that epithelial dysplasia was observed in founder mouse intestine, correlating LPA2 overexpression with epithelial dysplasia. The current study demonstrates that overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to intestinal dysplasia.

  18. Involvement of aberrant DNA methylation on reduced expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene in rat tumor cell lines

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, it has been reported that alterations of LPA receptor expression might be important in the malignant transformation of tumor cells. Therefore, to assess an involvement of DNA methylation in reduced expression of the LPA receptor-1 (lpa1) gene, we investigated the expression of the lpa1 gene and its DNA methylation patterns in rat tumor cell lines. Both rat brain-derived neuroblastoma B103 and liver-derived hepatoma RH7777 cells used in this study indicated no expression of lpa1. For the analysis of methylation status, bisulfite sequencing was performed with B103 and RH7777 cells, comparing with other lpa1 expressed cells and normal tissues of brain and liver. The lpa1 expressed cells and tissues were all unmethylated in this region of lpa1. In contrast, both B103 and RH7777 cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expression of the lpa1. Treatment with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine induced expression of lpa1 gene in B103 and RH7777 cells after 24 h. In RH7777 cells treated with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine, stress fiber formation was also observed in response to LPA in RH7777 cells, but not in untreated RH7777 cells. These results suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of the lpa1 gene may be involved in its reduced expression in rat tumor cells

  19. Lysophosphatidic acid induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB in Panc-1 cells by mobilizing cytosolic free calcium

    Yoshiyuki Arita; Tetsuhide Ito; Takamasa Pond; Ken Kawabe; Terumasa Hisano; Ryoichi Takayanagi

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To clarify whether Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) activates the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in pancreatic cancer.METHODS: Panc-1, a human pancreatic cancer cell line, was used throughout the study. The expression of LPA receptors was confirmed by reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cytosolic free calcium was measured by fluorescent calcium indicator fura-2, and the localization of NF-κB was visualized by immunofluorescent method with or without various agents, which effect cell signaling.RESULTS: Panc-1 expressed LPA receptors, LPAA1,LPA2 and LPA3. LPA caused the elevation of cytosolic free calcium dose-dependently. LPA also caused the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Cytosolic free calcium was attenuated by pertussis toxin (PTX) and U73122,an inhibitor of phospholipase C. The translocation of NF-κB was similarly attenuated by PTX and U73122,but phorbol ester, an activator of protein kinase C,alone did not translocate NF-κB. Furthermore, the transtocation of NF-κB was completely blocked by Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. Thapsigargin, an endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPase pump inhibitor, also promoted the translocation of NF-κB. Staurosporine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, attenuated translocation of NF-κB induced by LPA.CONCLUSlON: These findings suggest that protein kinase C is activated endogenously in Panc-1, and protein kinase C is essential for activating NF-κB with cytosolic calcium and that LPA induces the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in Panc-1 by mobilizing cytosolic free calcium.

  20. Progesterone produces antinociceptive and neuroprotective effects in rats with microinjected lysophosphatidic acid in the trigeminal nerve root

    Kim Min

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our present study, we studied the role of demyelination of the trigeminal nerve root in the development of prolonged nociceptive behavior in the trigeminal territory. Results Under anesthesia, the Sprague-Dawley rats were mounted onto a stereotaxic frame and 3 μL of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, 1 nmol was injected into the trigeminal nerve root to produce demyelination. This treatment decreased the air-puff thresholds, persisted until postoperative day 130, and then returned to the preoperative levels 160 days after LPA injection. The LPA-treated rats also showed a significant hyper-responsiveness to pin-prick stimulation. We further investigated the antinociceptive and neuroprotective effects of progesterone in rats undergoing demyelination of the trigeminal nerve root. Progesterone (8, 16 mg/kg/day was administered subcutaneously, beginning on the operative day, for five consecutive days in the LPA-treated rats. Treatment with progesterone produced significant early anti-allodynic effects and delayed prolonged anti-allodynic effects. The expression of protein zero (P0 and peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 were significantly down-regulated in the trigeminal nerve root on postoperative day 5 following LPA injection. This down-regulation of the P0 and PMP22 levels was blocked by progesterone treatment. Conclusions These results suggest that progesterone produces antinociceptive effects through neuroprotective action in animals with LPA-induced trigeminal neuropathic pain. Moreover, progesterone has potential utility as a novel therapy for trigeminal neuropathic pain relief at an appropriate managed dose and is therefore a possible future treatment strategy for improving the recovery from injury.

  1. Derivatives of Dictyostelium differentiation-inducing factors inhibit lysophosphatidic acid-stimulated migration of murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells.

    Kubohara, Yuzuru; Komachi, Mayumi; Homma, Yoshimi; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2015-08-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common metastatic bone cancer that predominantly develops in children and adolescents. Metastatic osteosarcoma remains associated with a poor prognosis; therefore, more effective anti-metastatic drugs are needed. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), -2, and -3 are novel lead anti-tumor agents that were originally isolated from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Here we investigated the effects of a panel of DIF derivatives on lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced migration of mouse osteosarcoma LM8 cells by using a Boyden chamber assay. Some DIF derivatives such as Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 (5-20 μM) dose-dependently suppressed LPA-induced cell migration with associated IC50 values of 5.5, 4.6, and 4.2 μM, respectively. On the other hand, the IC50 values of Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 versus cell proliferation were 18.5, 7.2, and 2.0 μM, respectively, in LM8 cells, and >20, 14.8, and 4.3 μM, respectively, in mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts (non-transformed). Together, our results demonstrate that Br-DIF-1 in particular may be a valuable tool for the analysis of cancer cell migration, and that DIF derivatives such as DIF-3(+2) and Bu-DIF-3 are promising lead anti-tumor agents for the development of therapies that suppress osteosarcoma cell proliferation, migration, and metastasis. PMID:26056940

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 antagonist ki16425 blunts abdominal and systemic inflammation in a mouse model of peritoneal sepsis.

    Zhao, Jing; Wei, Jianxin; Weathington, Nathaniel; Jacko, Anastasia M; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan; Zhao, Yutong

    2015-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator of inflammation via the LPA receptors 1-6. We and others have previously described proinflammatory and profibrotic activities of LPA signaling in bleomycin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary fibrosis or lung injury models. In this study, we investigated if LPA signaling plays a role in the pathogenesis of systemic sepsis from an abdominal source. We report here that antagonism of the LPA receptor LPA1 with the small molecule ki16425 reduces the severity of abdominal inflammation and organ damage in the setting of peritoneal endotoxin exposure. Pretreatment of mice with intraperitoneal ki16425 eliminates LPS-induced peritoneal neutrophil chemokine and cytokine production, liver oxidative stress, liver injury, and cellular apoptosis in visceral organs. Mice pretreated with ki16425 are also protected from LPS-induced mortality. Tissue myeloperoxidase activity is not affected by LPA1 antagonism. We have shown that LPA1 is associated with LPS coreceptor CD14 and the association is suppressed by ki16425. LPS-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) in liver cells and interleukin 6 production in Raw264 cells are likewise blunted by LPA1 antagonism. These studies indicate that the small molecule inhibitor of LPA1, ki16425, suppresses cytokine responses and inflammation in a peritoneal sepsis model by blunting downstream signaling through the LPA1-CD14-toll-like receptor 4 receptor complex. This anti-inflammatory effect may represent a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of systemic inflammatory responses to infection of the abdominal cavity. PMID:25701366

  3. Autotaxin and lysophosphatidic acid1 receptor-mediated demyelination of dorsal root fibers by sciatic nerve injury and intrathecal lysophosphatidylcholine

    Aoki Junken

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although neuropathic pain is frequently observed in demyelinating diseases such as Guillain-Barré syndrome and multiple sclerosis, the molecular basis for the relationship between demyelination and neuropathic pain behaviors is poorly understood. Previously, we found that lysophosphatidic acid receptor (LPA1 signaling initiates sciatic nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and demyelination. Results In the present study, we have demonstrated that sciatic nerve injury induces marked demyelination accompanied by myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG down-regulation and damage of Schwann cell partitioning of C-fiber-containing Remak bundles in the sciatic nerve and dorsal root, but not in the spinal nerve. Demyelination, MAG down-regulation and Remak bundle damage in the dorsal root were abolished in LPA1 receptor-deficient (Lpar1-/- mice, but these alterations were not observed in sciatic nerve. However, LPA-induced demyelination in ex vivo experiments was observed in the sciatic nerve, spinal nerve and dorsal root, all which express LPA1 transcript and protein. Nerve injury-induced dorsal root demyelination was markedly attenuated in mice heterozygous for autotaxin (atx+/-, which converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC to LPA. Although the addition of LPC to ex vivo cultures of dorsal root fibers in the presence of recombinant ATX caused potent demyelination, it had no significant effect in the absence of ATX. On the other hand, intrathecal injection of LPC caused potent dorsal root demyelination, which was markedly attenuated or abolished in atx+/- or Lpar1-/- mice. Conclusions These results suggest that LPA, which is converted from LPC by ATX, activates LPA1 receptors and induces dorsal root demyelination following nerve injury, which causes neuropathic pain.

  4. The mouse lp(A3)/Edg7 lysophosphatidic acid receptor gene: genomic structure, chromosomal localization, and expression pattern.

    Contos, J J; Chun, J

    2001-04-18

    The extracellular signaling molecule, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), mediates proliferative and morphological effects on cells and has been proposed to be involved in several biological processes including neuronal development, wound healing, and cancer progression. Three mammalian G protein-coupled receptors, encoded by genes designated lp (lysophospholipid) receptor or edg (endothelial differentiation gene), mediate the effects of LPA, activating similar (e.g. Ca(2+) release) as well as distinct (neurite retraction) responses. To understand the evolution and function of LPA receptor genes, we characterized lp(A3)/Edg7 in mouse and human and compared the expression pattern with the other two known LPA receptor genes (lp(A1)/Edg2 and lp(A2)/Edg4non-mutant). We found mouse and human lp(A3) to have nearly identical three-exon genomic structures, with introns upstream of the coding region for transmembrane domain (TMD) I and within the coding region for TMD VI. This structure is similar to lp(A1) and lp(A2), indicating a common ancestral gene with two introns. We localized mouse lp(A3) to distal Chromosome 3 near the varitint waddler (Va) gene, in a region syntenic with the human lp(A3) chromosomal location (1p22.3-31.1). We found highest expression levels of each of the three LPA receptor genes in adult mouse testes, relatively high expression levels of lp(A2) and lp(A3) in kidney, and moderate expression of lp(A2) and lp(A3) in lung. All lp(A) transcripts were expressed during brain development, with lp(A1) and lp(A2) transcripts expressed during the embryonic neurogenic period, and lp(A3) transcript during the early postnatal period. Our results indicate both overlapping as well as distinct functions of lp(A1), lp(A2), and lp(A3). PMID:11313151

  5. Heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP3) is a lysophosphatidic acid-binding protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells

    Tsukahara, Ryoko; Haniu, Hisao; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Tsukahara, Tamotsu

    2014-01-01

    Fatty-acid-binding protein 3, muscle and heart (FABP3), also known as heart-type FABP, is a member of the family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins. It is a small cytoplasmic protein with a molecular mass of about 15 kDa. FABPs are known to be carrier proteins for transporting fatty acids and other lipophilic substances from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where these lipids are released to a group of nuclear receptors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). In this study, using lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-coated agarose beads, we have identified FABP3 as an LPA carrier protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). Administration of LPA to HCAECs resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PPARγ activation. Furthermore, the LPA-induced PPARγ activation was abolished when the FABP3 expression was reduced using small interfering RNA (siRNA). We further show that the nuclear fraction of control HCAECs contained a significant amount of exogenously added LPA, whereas FABP3 siRNA-transfected HCAECs had a decreased level of LPA in the nucleus. Taken together, these results suggest that FABP3 governs the transcriptional activities of LPA by targeting them to cognate PPARγ in the nucleus. PMID:25426414

  6. Heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP3 is a lysophosphatidic acid-binding protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells

    Ryoko Tsukahara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty-acid-binding protein 3, muscle and heart (FABP3, also known as heart-type FABP, is a member of the family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins. It is a small cytoplasmic protein with a molecular mass of about 15 kDa. FABPs are known to be carrier proteins for transporting fatty acids and other lipophilic substances from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where these lipids are released to a group of nuclear receptors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs. In this study, using lysophosphatidic acid (LPA-coated agarose beads, we have identified FABP3 as an LPA carrier protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs. Administration of LPA to HCAECs resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PPARγ activation. Furthermore, the LPA-induced PPARγ activation was abolished when the FABP3 expression was reduced using small interfering RNA (siRNA. We further show that the nuclear fraction of control HCAECs contained a significant amount of exogenously added LPA, whereas FABP3 siRNA-transfected HCAECs had a decreased level of LPA in the nucleus. Taken together, these results suggest that FABP3 governs the transcriptional activities of LPA by targeting them to cognate PPARγ in the nucleus.

  7. Cancer cell expression of autotaxin controls bone metastasis formation in mouse through lysophosphatidic acid-dependent activation of osteoclasts.

    Marion David

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone metastases are highly frequent complications of breast cancers. Current bone metastasis treatments using powerful anti-resorptive agents are only palliative indicating that factors independent of bone resorption control bone metastasis progression. Autotaxin (ATX/NPP2 is a secreted protein with both oncogenic and pro-metastatic properties. Through its lysosphospholipase D (lysoPLD activity, ATX controls the level of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA in the blood. Platelet-derived LPA promotes the progression of osteolytic bone metastases of breast cancer cells. We asked whether ATX was involved in the bone metastasis process. We characterized the role of ATX in osteolytic bone metastasis formation by using genetically modified breast cancer cells exploited on different osteolytic bone metastasis mouse models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Intravenous injection of human breast cancer MDA-B02 cells with forced expression of ATX (MDA-B02/ATX to immunodeficiency BALB/C nude mice enhanced osteolytic bone metastasis formation, as judged by increased bone loss, tumor burden, and a higher number of active osteoclasts at the metastatic site. Mouse breast cancer 4T1 cells induced the formation of osteolytic bone metastases after intracardiac injection in immunocompetent BALB/C mice. These cells expressed active ATX and silencing ATX expression inhibited the extent of osteolytic bone lesions and decreased the number of active osteoclasts at the bone metastatic site. In vitro, osteoclast differentiation was enhanced in presence of MDA-B02/ATX cell conditioned media or recombinant autotaxin that was blocked by the autotaxin inhibitor vpc8a202. In vitro, addition of LPA to active charcoal-treated serum restored the capacity of the serum to support RANK-L/MCSF-induced osteoclastogenesis. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Expression of autotaxin by cancer cells controls osteolytic bone metastasis formation. This work demonstrates a new role for LPA as a

  8. Autotaxin, a synthetic enzyme of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, mediates the induction of nerve-injured neuropathic pain

    Chun Jerold

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently, we reported that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA induces long-lasting mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia as well as demyelination and upregulation of pain-related proteins through one of its cognate receptors, LPA1. In addition, mice lacking the LPA1 receptor gene (lpa1-/- mice lost these nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain behaviors and phenomena. However, since lpa1-/- mice did not exhibit any effects on the basal nociceptive threshold, it is possible that nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and its machineries are initiated by LPA via defined biosynthetic pathways that involve multiple enzymes. Here, we attempted to clarify the involvement of a single synthetic enzyme of LPA known as autotaxin (ATX in nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. Wild-type mice with partial sciatic nerve injury showed robust mechanical allodynia starting from day 3 after the nerve injury and persisting for at least 14 days, along with thermal hyperalgesia. On the other hand, heterozygous mutant mice for the autotaxin gene (atx+/-, which have 50% ATX protein and 50% lysophospholipase D activity compared with wild-type mice, showed approximately 50% recovery of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. In addition, hypersensitization of myelinated Aβ˜ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacPC6xNi=xH8viVGI8Gi=hEeeu0xXdbba9frFj0xb9qqpG0dXdb9aspeI8k8fiI+fsY=rqGqVepae9pg0db9vqaiVgFr0xfr=xfr=xc9adbaqaaeGacaGaaiaabeqaaeqabiWaaaGcbaGafqOSdiMbaGaaaaa@2D83@- or Aδ-fiber function following nerve injury was observed in electrical stimuli-induced paw withdrawal tests using a Neurometer®. The hyperalgesia was completely abolished in lpa1-/- mice, and reduced by 50% in atx+/- mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that LPA biosynthesis through ATX is the source of LPA for LPA1 receptor-mediated neuropathic pain. Therefore, targeted inhibition of ATX-mediated LPA biosynthesis as well as

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid alters the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in mouse liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    Chia-Hung Chou

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is a multi-function glycerophospholipid. LPA affects the proliferation of hepatocytes and stellate cells in vitro, and in a partial hepatectomy induced liver regeneration model, the circulating LPA levels and LPA receptor (LPAR expression levels in liver tissue are significantly changed. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (Lsecs play an important role during liver regeneration. However, the effects of LPA on Lsecs are not well known. Thus, we investigated the effects of LPA on the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs.Mouse Lsecs were isolated using CD31-coated magnetic beads. The mRNA expression levels of LPAR's and other target genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The protein levels of angiogenesis factors, cytokines, and chemokines were determined using protein arrays and enzyme immunoassay (EIA. Critical LPAR related signal transduction was verified by using an appropriate chemical inhibitor.LPAR1 and LPAR3 mRNA's were expressed in mouse LPA-treated Lsecs. Treating Lsecs with a physiological level of LPA significantly enhanced the protein levels of angiogenesis related proteins (cyr61 and TIMP-1, cytokines (C5/C5a, M-CSF, and SDF-1, and chemokines (MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16. The LPAR1 and LPAR3 antagonist ki16425 significantly inhibited the LPA-enhanced expression of cyr61, TIMP-1, SDF-1, MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16, but not that of C5/C5a or M-CSF. LPA-induced C5/C5a and M-CSF expression may have been through an indirect regulation mechanism.LPA regulated the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs that was mediated via LPAR1 and LPAR3 signaling. Most of the factors that were enhanced by LPA have been found to play critical roles during liver regeneration. Thus, these results may prove useful for manipulating LPA effects on liver regeneration.

  10. Lysophosphatidic Acid Alters the Expression Profiles of Angiogenic Factors, Cytokines, and Chemokines in Mouse Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells

    Chou, Chia-Hung; Lai, Shou-Lun; Ho, Cheng-Maw; Lin, Wen-Hsi; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lee, Po-Huang; Peng, Fu-Chuo; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Wu, Szu-Yuan; Lai, Hong-Shiee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a multi-function glycerophospholipid. LPA affects the proliferation of hepatocytes and stellate cells in vitro, and in a partial hepatectomy induced liver regeneration model, the circulating LPA levels and LPA receptor (LPAR) expression levels in liver tissue are significantly changed. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (Lsecs) play an important role during liver regeneration. However, the effects of LPA on Lsecs are not well known. Thus, we investigated the effects of LPA on the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs. Methods Mouse Lsecs were isolated using CD31-coated magnetic beads. The mRNA expression levels of LPAR’s and other target genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The protein levels of angiogenesis factors, cytokines, and chemokines were determined using protein arrays and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Critical LPAR related signal transduction was verified by using an appropriate chemical inhibitor. Results LPAR1 and LPAR3 mRNA’s were expressed in mouse LPA-treated Lsecs. Treating Lsecs with a physiological level of LPA significantly enhanced the protein levels of angiogenesis related proteins (cyr61 and TIMP-1), cytokines (C5/C5a, M-CSF, and SDF-1), and chemokines (MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16). The LPAR1 and LPAR3 antagonist ki16425 significantly inhibited the LPA-enhanced expression of cyr61, TIMP-1, SDF-1, MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16, but not that of C5/C5a or M-CSF. LPA-induced C5/C5a and M-CSF expression may have been through an indirect regulation mechanism. Conclusion LPA regulated the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs that was mediated via LPAR1 and LPAR3 signaling. Most of the factors that were enhanced by LPA have been found to play critical roles during liver regeneration. Thus, these results may prove useful for manipulating LPA effects on liver regeneration. PMID:25822713

  11. Identification of Heparin-Binding EGF-Like Growth Factor (HB-EGF) as a Biomarker for Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Type 1 (LPA1) Activation in Human Breast and Prostate Cancers

    David, Marion; Sahay, Debashish; Mege, Florence; Descotes, Françoise; Leblanc, Raphaël; Ribeiro, Johnny; Clézardin, Philippe; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural bioactive lipid with growth factor-like functions due to activation of a series of six G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1–6). LPA receptor type 1 (LPA1) signaling influences the pathophysiology of many diseases including cancer, obesity, rheumatoid arthritis, as well as lung, liver and kidney fibrosis. Therefore, LPA1 is an attractive therapeutic target. However, most mammalian cells co-express multiple LPA receptors whose co-activation impairs the vali...

  12. Quantitative Phosphoproteome Analysis of Lysophosphatidic Acid Induced Chemotaxis applying Dual-step ¹⁸O Labeling Coupled with Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity Chromatography

    Ding, Shi-Jian; Wang, Yingchun; Jacobs, Jon M.; Qian, Weijun; Yang, Feng; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Du, Xiuxia; Wang, Wei; Moore, Ronald J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Waters, Katrina M.; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Camp, David G.; Klemke, Richard L.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central cellular regulatory mechanism in modulating protein activity and propagating signals within cellular pathways and networks. Development of more effective methods for the simultaneous identification of phosphorylation sites and quantification of temporal changes in protein phosphorylation could provide important insights into molecular signaling mechanisms in a variety of different cellular processes. Here we present an integrated quantitative phosphoproteomics approach and its applications for comparative analysis of Cos-7 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradient stimulation. The approach combines trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling plus 16O/18O-methanol esterification labeling for quantitation, a macro- Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity Chromatography trap for phosphopeptide enrichment, and a monolithic capillary column with integrated electrospray emitter. LC separation and MS/MS is followed by neutral loss-dependent MS/MS/MS for phosphopeptide identification using a linear ion trap (LTQ)-FT mass spectrometer and complementary searching algorithms for interpreting MS/MS spectra. Protein phosphorylation involved in various signaling pathways of cell migration were identified and quantified, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase 1, dual-specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2, and dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1b, and a number of Rho GTPase-activating proteins. These results demonstrate the efficiency of this quantitative phosphoproteomics approach and its application for rapid discovery of phosphorylation events associated with gradient sensing and cell chemotaxis.

  13. Mechanism of sphingosine 1-phosphate- and lysophosphatidic Acid-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and eosinophil chemoattractant in nerve cells.

    Costello, Richard W

    2012-02-01

    The lysophospholipids sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) act via G-protein coupled receptors S1P(1-5) and LPA(1-3) respectively, and are implicated in allergy. Eosinophils accumulate at innervating cholinergic nerves in asthma and adhere to nerve cells via intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells were used as an in vitro cholinergic nerve cell model. The G(i) coupled receptors S1P(1), S1P(3), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3) were expressed on IMR-32 cells. Both S1P and LPA induced ERK phosphorylation and ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression, with differing time courses. LPA also induced ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of the eosinophil chemoattractant, CCL-26. The eosinophil granule protein eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) induced ERK-dependent up-regulation of transcription of S1P(1), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3), providing the situation whereby eosinophil granule proteins may enhance S1P- and\\/or LPA- induced eosinophil accumulation at nerve cells in allergic conditions.

  14. Mechanism of sphingosine 1-phosphate- and lysophosphatidic Acid-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and eosinophil chemoattractant in nerve cells.

    Costello, Richard W

    2011-05-01

    The lysophospholipids sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) act via G-protein coupled receptors S1P(1-5) and LPA(1-3) respectively, and are implicated in allergy. Eosinophils accumulate at innervating cholinergic nerves in asthma and adhere to nerve cells via intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells were used as an in vitro cholinergic nerve cell model. The G(i) coupled receptors S1P(1), S1P(3), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3) were expressed on IMR-32 cells. Both S1P and LPA induced ERK phosphorylation and ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression, with differing time courses. LPA also induced ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of the eosinophil chemoattractant, CCL-26. The eosinophil granule protein eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) induced ERK-dependent up-regulation of transcription of S1P(1), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3), providing the situation whereby eosinophil granule proteins may enhance S1P- and\\/or LPA- induced eosinophil accumulation at nerve cells in allergic conditions.

  15. Expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and relation with cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis on preneoplastic changes induced by cadmium chloride in the rat ventral prostate.

    Riánsares Arriazu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is a phospholipid growth factor involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, inflammation, angiogenesis, wound healing, cancer invasion, and survival. This study was directed to evaluate the immunoexpression of LPA-1, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis markers in preneoplastic lesions induced with cadmium chloride in rat prostate. METHODS: The following parameters were calculated in ventral prostate of normal rats and rats that received Cd in drinking water during 24 months: percentages of cells immunoreactive to LPA-1 (LILPA1, PCNA (LIPCNA, MCM7 (LIMCM7, ubiquitin (LIUBI, apoptotic cells (LIAPO, and p53 (LIp53; volume fraction of Bcl-2 (VFBcl-2; and length of microvessels per unit of volume (LVMV/mm3. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test and Pearson correlation test. RESULTS: The LILPA1 in dysplastic lesions and normal epithelium of Cd-treated rats was significantly higher than those in the control group. Markers of proliferation were significantly increased in dysplastic lesions, whereas some apoptotic markers were significantly decreased. No significant differences between groups were found in VFBcl-2. Dysplastic lesions showed a significant increase of LIp53. The length of microvessels per unit of volume was elevated in dysplastic acini. Statistically significant correlations were found only between LILPA1 and LIUBI. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that LPA-1 might be implicated in dysplastic lesions induced by cadmium chloride development. More studies are needed to confirm its potential contribution to the disease.

  16. Aromatic hydrocarbon receptor inhibits lysophosphatidic acid-induced vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression in PC-3 prostate cancer cells

    Wu, Pei-Yi; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Lan, Shun-Yan [Institute of Zoology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yuan-Li [Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsinyu, E-mail: hsinyu@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Zoology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •LPA-induced VEGF-A expression was regulated by HIF-1α and ARNT. •PI3K mediated LPA-induced VEGF-A expression. •AHR signaling inhibited LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid growth factor with multiple biological functions and has been shown to stimulate cancer cell secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and trigger angiogenesis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a heterodimer consisting of HIF-1α and HIF-1β (also known as aromatic hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)) subunits, is an important regulator of angiogenesis in prostate cancer (PC) through the enhancement of VEGF-A expression. In this study, we first confirmed the ability of LPA to induce VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells and then validated that LPA-induced VEGF-A expression was regulated by HIF-1α and ARNT through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation. Aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a receptor for dioxin-like compounds, functions as a transcription factor through dimerization with ARNT and was found to inhibit prostate carcinogenesis and vanadate-induced VEGF-A production. Since ARNT is a common dimerization partner of AHR and HIF-1α, we hypothesized that AHR might suppress LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells by competing with HIF-1α for ARNT. Here we demonstrated that overexpression and ligand activation of AHR inhibited HIF-1-mediated VEGF-A induction by LPA treatment of PC-3 cells. In conclusion, our results suggested that AHR activation may inhibit LPA-induced VEGF-A expression in PC-3 cells by attenuating HIF-1α signaling, and subsequently, suppressing angiogenesis and metastasis of PC. These results suggested that AHR presents a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of PC metastasis.

  17. β-Arrestin2 regulates lysophosphatidic acid-induced human breast tumor cell migration and invasion via Rap1 and IQGAP1.

    Mistre Alemayehu

    Full Text Available β-Arrestins play critical roles in chemotaxis and cytoskeletal reorganization downstream of several receptor types, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, which are targets for greater than 50% of all pharmaceuticals. Among them, receptors for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, namely LPA(1 are overexpressed in breast cancer and promote metastatic spread. We have recently reported that β-arrestin2 regulates LPA(1-mediated breast cancer cell migration and invasion, although the underlying molecular mechanisms are not clearly understood. We show here that LPA induces activity of the small G protein, Rap1 in breast cancer cells in a β-arrestin2-dependent manner, but fails to activate Rap1 in non-malignant mammary epithelial cells. We found that Rap1A mRNA levels are higher in human breast tumors compared to healthy patient samples and Rap1A is robustly expressed in human ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive tumors, in contrast to the normal mammary ducts. Rap1A protein expression is also higher in aggressive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and Hs578t relative to the weakly invasive MCF-7 cells or non-malignant MCF10A mammary cells. Depletion of Rap1A expression significantly impaired LPA-stimulated migration of breast cancer cells and invasiveness in three-dimensional Matrigel cultures. Furthermore, we found that β-arrestin2 associates with the actin binding protein IQGAP1 in breast cancer cells, and is necessary for the recruitment of IQGAP1 to the leading edge of migratory cells. Depletion of IQGAP1 blocked LPA-stimulated breast cancer cell invasion. Finally, we have identified that LPA enhances the binding of endogenous Rap1A to β-arrestin2, and also stimulates Rap1A and IQGAP1 to associate with LPA(1. Thus our data establish novel roles for Rap1A and IQGAP1 as critical regulators of LPA-induced breast cancer cell migration and invasion.

  18. Regulation of gene expression and subcellular protein distribution in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells by lysophosphatidic acid: Relevance to dendrite outgrowth.

    Waters, Katrina M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-02-26

    Osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are highly responsive to the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but the mechanisms by which LPA alters bone cell functions are largely unknown. A major effect of LPA on osteocytic cells is the stimulation of dendrite membrane outgrowth, a process that we predicted to require changes in gene expression and protein distribution. We employed DNA microarrays for global transcriptional profiling of MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells grown for 6 and 24h in the presence or absence of LPA. We identified 932 transcripts that displayed statistically significant changes in abundance of at least 1.25-fold in response to LPA treatment. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the regulated gene products were linked to diverse cellular processes, including DNA repair, response to unfolded protein, ossification, protein-RNA complex assembly, and amine biosynthesis. Gene products associated with the regulation of actin microfilament dynamics displayed the most robust expression changes, and LPA-induced dendritogenesis in vitro was blocked by the stress fiber inhibitor cytochalasin D. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of MLO-Y4 cells revealed significant LPA-induced changes in the abundance of 284 proteins at 6h and 844 proteins at 24h. GO analysis of the proteomic data linked the effects of LPA to cell processes that control of protein distribution and membrane outgrowth, including protein localization, protein complex assembly, Golgi vesicle transport, cytoskeleton-dependent transport, and membrane invagination/endocytosis. Dendrites were isolated from LPA-treated MLO-Y4 cells and subjected to proteomic analysis to quantitatively assess the subcellular distribution of proteins. Sets of 129 and 36 proteins were enriched in the dendrite fraction as compared to whole cells after 6h and 24h of LPA exposure, respectively. Protein markers indicated that membranous organelles were largely excluded from the dendrites. Highly represented among

  19. 偏头痛急性期患者溶血磷脂酸与TCD的变化%Changes of lysophosphatidic acid and TCD in patients with migraine during acute stage

    宋叶华; 牛建平; 汤婷; 叶良灶; 何倪靖

    2013-01-01

    Objective Observation the changesof plasma lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) 、lysophosphatidic acid similar levels of phospholipids(AP) and Transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) in acute migraine patients. Methodes Determination plasma LPA and AP in migraine patients with acute period (migraine without aura and migraine with aura group) ,at the same time,were examined by TCD, compared with normal patients. Results Migraine patients with LPA 、AP increased significantly, especial y for migraine with aura group increased more significantly, suggesting that platelet activation in patients with acute migraine attacks, and blood flow velocity in patients with migraine acute stage significantly increased in patients with migraine.The results support functions - vascular nerve disorder in patients with migraine.%目的观察偏头痛急性发作期患者血浆溶血磷脂酸(LPA)及溶血磷脂酸相似磷脂水平(AP)、经颅多普勒超声(TCD)的变化。方法测定偏头痛急性期患者(无先兆偏头痛组及有先兆偏头痛组)血浆LPA及AP水平,同时对患者行TCD检查,与正常患者进行对照。结果偏头痛组血浆LPA水平高于对照组,尤其是有先兆偏头痛组,且偏头痛急性期TCD以血流速度增快为主,尤其是患侧大脑中动脉血流速度。结论偏头痛发作期患者LPA、AP明显升高,尤其是有先兆偏头痛组升高更明显,提示偏头痛急性发作期患者存在血小板活化过程,同时偏头痛急性期患者血流速度常明显增快,支持偏头痛患者存在神经-血管功能紊乱。

  20. Apicoplast-Localized Lysophosphatidic Acid Precursor Assembly Is Required for Bulk Phospholipid Synthesis in Toxoplasma gondii and Relies on an Algal/Plant-Like Glycerol 3-Phosphate Acyltransferase.

    Amiar, Souad; MacRae, James I; Callahan, Damien L; Dubois, David; van Dooren, Giel G; Shears, Melanie J; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Maréchal, Eric; McConville, Malcolm J; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Yamaryo-Botté, Yoshiki; Botté, Cyrille Y

    2016-08-01

    Most apicomplexan parasites possess a non-photosynthetic plastid (the apicoplast), which harbors enzymes for a number of metabolic pathways, including a prokaryotic type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway. In Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, the FASII pathway is essential for parasite growth and infectivity. However, little is known about the fate of fatty acids synthesized by FASII. In this study, we have investigated the function of a plant-like glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (TgATS1) that localizes to the T. gondii apicoplast. Knock-down of TgATS1 resulted in significantly reduced incorporation of FASII-synthesized fatty acids into phosphatidic acid and downstream phospholipids and a severe defect in intracellular parasite replication and survival. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that lipid precursors are made in, and exported from, the apicoplast for de novo biosynthesis of bulk phospholipids. This study reveals that the apicoplast-located FASII and ATS1, which are primarily used to generate plastid galactolipids in plants and algae, instead generate bulk phospholipids for membrane biogenesis in T. gondii. PMID:27490259

  1. Identification of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF as a biomarker for lysophosphatidic acid receptor type 1 (LPA1 activation in human breast and prostate cancers.

    Marion David

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is a natural bioactive lipid with growth factor-like functions due to activation of a series of six G protein-coupled receptors (LPA₁₋₆. LPA receptor type 1 (LPA₁ signaling influences the pathophysiology of many diseases including cancer, obesity, rheumatoid arthritis, as well as lung, liver and kidney fibrosis. Therefore, LPA₁ is an attractive therapeutic target. However, most mammalian cells co-express multiple LPA receptors whose co-activation impairs the validation of target inhibition in patients because of missing LPA receptor-specific biomarkers. LPA₁ is known to induce IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, as also do LPA₂ and LPA₃. In this work, we first determined the LPA induced early-gene expression profile in three unrelated human cancer cell lines expressing different patterns of LPA receptors (PC3: LPA₁,₂,₆; MDA-MB-231: LPA1,2; MCF-7: LPA₂,₆. Among the set of genes upregulated by LPA only in LPA₁-expressing cells, we validated by QPCR and ELISA that upregulation of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF was inhibited by LPA₁-₃ antagonists (Ki16425, Debio0719. Upregulation and downregulation of HB-EGF mRNA was confirmed in vitro in human MDA-B02 breast cancer cells stably overexpressing LPA₁ (MDA-B02/LPA₁ and downregulated for LPA₁ (MDA-B02/shLPA1, respectively. At a clinical level, we quantified the expression of LPA₁ and HB-EGF by QPCR in primary tumors of a cohort of 234 breast cancer patients and found a significantly higher expression of HB-EGF in breast tumors expressing high levels of LPA₁. We also generated human xenograph prostate tumors in mice injected with PC3 cells and found that a five-day treatment with Ki16425 significantly decreased both HB-EGF mRNA expression at the primary tumor site and circulating human HB-EGF concentrations in serum. All together our results demonstrate that HB-EGF is a new and relevant biomarker with potentially high value in

  2. Dual Action of Lysophosphatidate-Functionalised Titanium: Interactions with Human (MG63) Osteoblasts and Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Skindersø, Mette Elena; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki; Blom, Ashley;

    2015-01-01

    design. One way of realising improvements in implant quality is to coat the Ti surface with small biological agents known to support human osteoblast formation and maturation at Ti surfaces. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and certain LPA analogues offer potential solutions as Ti coatings in reducing aseptic...

  3. Tetracyclines increase lipid phosphate phosphatase expression on plasma membranes and turnover of plasma lysophosphatidate.

    Tang, Xiaoyun; Zhao, Yuan Y; Dewald, Jay; Curtis, Jonathan M; Brindley, David N

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular lysophosphatidate and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) are important bioactive lipids, which signal through G-protein-coupled receptors to stimulate cell growth and survival. The lysophosphatidate and S1P signals are terminated partly by degradation through three broad-specificity lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs) on the cell surface. Significantly, the expression of LPP1 and LPP3 is decreased in many cancers, and this increases the impact of lysophosphatidate and S1P signaling. However, relatively little is known about the physiological or pharmacological regulation of the expression of the different LPPs. We now show that treating several malignant and nonmalignant cell lines with 1 μg/ml tetracycline, doxycycline, or minocycline significantly increased the extracellular degradation of lysophosphatidate. S1P degradation was also increased in cells that expressed high LPP3 activity. These results depended on an increase in the stabilities of the three LPPs and increased expression on the plasma membrane. We tested the physiological significance of these results and showed that treating rats with doxycycline accelerated the clearance of lysophosphatidate, but not S1P, from the circulation. However, administering 100 mg/kg/day doxycycline to mice decreased plasma concentrations of lysophosphatidate and S1P. This study demonstrates a completely new property of tetracyclines in increasing the plasma membrane expression of the LPPs. PMID:26884614

  4. Lysophosphatidate induces chemo-resistance by releasing breast cancer cells from taxol-induced mitotic arrest.

    Nasser Samadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Taxol is a microtubule stabilizing agent that arrests cells in mitosis leading to cell death. Taxol is widely used to treat breast cancer, but resistance occurs in 25-69% of patients and it is vital to understand how Taxol resistance develops to improve chemotherapy. The effects of chemotherapeutic agents are overcome by survival signals that cancer cells receive. We focused our studies on autotaxin, which is a secreted protein that increases tumor growth, aggressiveness, angiogenesis and metastasis. We discovered that autotaxin strongly antagonizes the Taxol-induced killing of breast cancer and melanoma cells by converting the abundant extra-cellular lipid, lysophosphatidylcholine, into lysophosphatidate. This lipid stimulates specific G-protein coupled receptors that activate survival signals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we determined the basis of these antagonistic actions of lysophosphatidate towards Taxol-induced G2/M arrest and cell death using cultured breast cancer cells. Lysophosphatidate does not antagonize Taxol action in MCF-7 cells by increasing Taxol metabolism or its expulsion through multi-drug resistance transporters. Lysophosphatidate does not lower the percentage of cells accumulating in G2/M by decreasing exit from S-phase or selective stimulation of cell death in G2/M. Instead, LPA had an unexpected and remarkable action in enabling MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 cells, which had been arrested in G2/M by Taxol, to normalize spindle structure and divide, thus avoiding cell death. This action involves displacement of Taxol from the tubulin polymer fraction, which based on inhibitor studies, depends on activation of LPA receptors and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work demonstrates a previously unknown consequence of lysophosphatidate action that explains why autotaxin and lysophosphatidate protect against Taxol-induced cell death and promote resistance to the action of this

  5. An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assay for quantifying 3-ketocholanoic acid: Application to the human liver microsomal CYP3A-dependent lithocholic acid 3-oxidation assay.

    Bansal, Sumit; Chai, Swee Fen; Lau, Aik Jiang

    2016-06-15

    Lithocholic acid (LCA), a hepatotoxic and carcinogenic bile acid, is metabolized to 3-ketocholanoic acid (3-KCA) by cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A). In the present study, the objectives were to develop and validate an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (UPLC-MS/MS) method to quantify 3-KCA and apply it to the human liver microsomal CYP3A-dependent LCA 3-oxidation assay. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Waters ACQUITY™ UPLC C18 column (50×2.1mm, 1.7μm) with a gradient system consisting of 0.1% v/v formic acid in water (solvent A) and 0.1% v/v formic acid in acetonitrile (solvent B). The retention time was 3.73min for 3-KCA and 2.73min for cortisol (internal standard). Positive electrospray ionization with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used to quantify 3-KCA (m/z 375.4→135.2) and cortisol (m/z 363.5→121.0). The limit of detection of 3-KCA was 10μM, the lower limit of quantification was 33.3μM, and the calibration curve was linear from 0.05-10μM with r(2)>0.99. Intra-day and inter-day accuracy and precision were LCA 3-oxidation assay was linear with respect to the amount of microsomal protein (up to 40μg) and incubation time (5-30min). Enzyme kinetics experiment indicated that LCA 3-oxidation followed the Michaelis-Menten model with an apparent Km of 26±7μM and Vmax of 303±50pmol/min/mg protein. This novel UPLC-MS/MS method for quantifying 3-KCA offers a specific, sensitive, and fast approach to determine liver microsomal LCA 3-oxidation. PMID:27153105

  6. Tauroursodeoxycholate Protects Rat Hepatocytes from Bile Acid-Induced Apoptosis via β1-Integrin- and Protein Kinase A-Dependent Mechanisms

    Annika Sommerfeld

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Ursodeoxycholic acid, which in vivo is rapidly converted into its taurine conjugate, is frequently used for the treatment of cholestatic liver disease. Apart from its choleretic effects, tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC can protect hepatocytes from bile acid-induced apoptosis, but the mechanisms underlying its anti-apoptotic effects are poorly understood. Methods: These mechanisms were investigated in perfused rat liver and isolated rat hepatocytes. Results: It was found that TUDC inhibited the glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC-induced activation of the CD95 death receptor at the level of association between CD95 and the epidermal growth factor receptor. This was due to a rapid TUDC-induced β1-integrin-dependent cyclic AMP (cAMP signal with induction of the dual specificity mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1, which prevented GCDC-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MKK4 and c-jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK activation. Furthermore, TUDC induced a protein kinase A (PKA-mediated serine/threonine phosphorylation of the CD95, which was recently identified as an internalization signal for CD95. Furthermore, TUDC inhibited GCDC-induced CD95 targeting to the plasma membrane in a β1-integrin-and PKA-dependent manner. In line with this, the β1-integrin siRNA knockdown in sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp-transfected HepG2 cells abolished the protective effect of TUDC against GCDC-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: TUDC exerts its anti-apoptotic effect via a β1-integrin-mediated formation of cAMP, which prevents CD95 activation by hydrophobic bile acids at the levels of JNK activation and CD95 serine/threonine phosphorylation.

  7. Derivatives of Dictyostelium differentiation-inducing factors inhibit lysophosphatidic acid–stimulated migration of murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells

    Kubohara, Yuzuru, E-mail: ykuboha@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation (IMCR), Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Department of Health Science, Juntendo University Graduate School of Health and Sports Science, Inzai 270-1695 (Japan); Komachi, Mayumi [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation (IMCR), Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Homma, Yoshimi [Department of Biomolecular Science, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima 960-1295 (Japan); Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Oshima, Yoshiteru [Laboratory of Natural Product Chemistry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aoba-yama, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Osteosarcoma is a common metastatic bone cancer that predominantly develops in children and adolescents. Metastatic osteosarcoma remains associated with a poor prognosis; therefore, more effective anti-metastatic drugs are needed. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), −2, and −3 are novel lead anti-tumor agents that were originally isolated from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Here we investigated the effects of a panel of DIF derivatives on lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced migration of mouse osteosarcoma LM8 cells by using a Boyden chamber assay. Some DIF derivatives such as Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 (5–20 μM) dose-dependently suppressed LPA-induced cell migration with associated IC{sub 50} values of 5.5, 4.6, and 4.2 μM, respectively. On the other hand, the IC{sub 50} values of Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 versus cell proliferation were 18.5, 7.2, and 2.0 μM, respectively, in LM8 cells, and >20, 14.8, and 4.3 μM, respectively, in mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts (non-transformed). Together, our results demonstrate that Br-DIF-1 in particular may be a valuable tool for the analysis of cancer cell migration, and that DIF derivatives such as DIF-3(+2) and Bu-DIF-3 are promising lead anti-tumor agents for the development of therapies that suppress osteosarcoma cell proliferation, migration, and metastasis. - Highlights: • LPA induces cell migration (invasion) in murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells. • DIFs are novel lead anti-tumor agents found in Dictyostelium discoideum. • We examined the effects of DIF derivatives on LPA-induced LM8 cell migration in vitro. • Some of the DIF derivatives inhibited LPA-induced LM8 cell migration.

  8. Derivatives of Dictyostelium differentiation-inducing factors inhibit lysophosphatidic acid–stimulated migration of murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells

    Osteosarcoma is a common metastatic bone cancer that predominantly develops in children and adolescents. Metastatic osteosarcoma remains associated with a poor prognosis; therefore, more effective anti-metastatic drugs are needed. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), −2, and −3 are novel lead anti-tumor agents that were originally isolated from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Here we investigated the effects of a panel of DIF derivatives on lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced migration of mouse osteosarcoma LM8 cells by using a Boyden chamber assay. Some DIF derivatives such as Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 (5–20 μM) dose-dependently suppressed LPA-induced cell migration with associated IC50 values of 5.5, 4.6, and 4.2 μM, respectively. On the other hand, the IC50 values of Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 versus cell proliferation were 18.5, 7.2, and 2.0 μM, respectively, in LM8 cells, and >20, 14.8, and 4.3 μM, respectively, in mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts (non-transformed). Together, our results demonstrate that Br-DIF-1 in particular may be a valuable tool for the analysis of cancer cell migration, and that DIF derivatives such as DIF-3(+2) and Bu-DIF-3 are promising lead anti-tumor agents for the development of therapies that suppress osteosarcoma cell proliferation, migration, and metastasis. - Highlights: • LPA induces cell migration (invasion) in murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells. • DIFs are novel lead anti-tumor agents found in Dictyostelium discoideum. • We examined the effects of DIF derivatives on LPA-induced LM8 cell migration in vitro. • Some of the DIF derivatives inhibited LPA-induced LM8 cell migration

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling in neuropathic pain development and Schwann cell biology

    Lin, Mu-En

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chonic pain state caused by lesions or diseases in the nervous system. Unlike acute pain, neuropathic pain persists without obvious injury or stimuli and can severely interfere with normal daily life for those who suffer from it. Despite numerous efforts on studying its mechanism and possible treatments, there is no effective treatment currently available to remove or alleviate this symptom. This dissertation aims to provide further understanding into the relationship be...

  10. Cell Shrinkage is Essential in Lysophosphatidic Acid Signaling in Ehrlich Ascites

    Pedersen, Susanne; Hoffmann, Else Kay; Hougaard, Charlotte;

    2000-01-01

    ; (ii) a subsequent cell shrinkage and increased polymerization of F-actin, and (iii) activation of a Na(+)/H(+) exchange, resulting in a concentration-dependent intracellular alkalinization. The EC(50) value for the LPA-induced rate of alkalinization was estimated at 0. 37 nm LPA. When cell shrinkage...

  11. L-histidine inhibits production of lysophosphatidic acid by the tumor-associated cytokine, autotaxin

    Schiffmann Elliott

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autotaxin (ATX, NPP-2, originally purified as a potent tumor cell motility factor, is now known to be the long-sought plasma lysophospholipase D (LPLD. The integrity of the enzymatic active site, including three crucial histidine moieties, is required for motility stimulation, as well as LPLD and 5'nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE activities. Except for relatively non-specific chelation agents, there are no known inhibitors of the ATX LPLD activity. Results We show that millimolar concentrations of L-histidine inhibit ATX-stimulated but not LPA-stimulated motility in two tumor cell lines, as well as inhibiting enzymatic activities. Inhibition is reversed by 20-fold lower concentrations of zinc salt. L-histidine has no significant effect on the Km of LPLD, but reduces the Vmax by greater than 50%, acting as a non-competitive inhibitor. Several histidine analogs also inhibit the LPLD activity of ATX; however, none has greater potency than L-histidine and all decrease cell viability or adhesion. Conclusion L-histidine inhibition of LPLD is not a simple stoichiometric chelation of metal ions but is more likely a complex interaction with a variety of moieties, including the metal cation, at or near the active site. The inhibitory effect of L-histidine requires all three major functional groups of histidine: the alpha amino group, the alpha carboxyl group, and the metal-binding imidazole side chain. Because of LPA's involvement in pathological processes, regulation of its formation by ATX may give insight into possible novel therapeutic approaches.

  12. Spinal cord injury: Role of endothelial differentiation gene family lysophosphatidic acid receptors

    Santos Nogueira, Eva

    2014-01-01

    El daño tisular secundario que se produce tras una lesión de la médula espinal contribuye de manera significativa a las pérdidas funcionales que se observan pacientes que padecen este tipo de afectación. Aunque la regeneración axonal y la sustitución de las neuronas dañadas tras el traumatismo medular son objetivos importantes para reparar estas lesiones, el desarrollo de estrategias experimentales que tengan como meta evitar el daño secundario sobre axones, neuronas, mielina y las células gl...

  13. Expression of Castor LPAT2 Enhances Ricinoleic Acid Content at the sn-2 Position of Triacylglycerols in Lesquerella Seed

    Grace Q. Chen; Harrie van Erp; Jose Martin-Moreno; Kumiko Johnson; Eva Morales; John Browse; Peter J. Eastmond; Jiann-Tsyh Lin

    2016-01-01

    Lesquerella is a potential industrial oilseed crop that makes hydroxy fatty acid (HFA). Unlike castor its seeds are not poisonous but accumulate lesquerolic acid mostly at the sn-1 and sn-3 positions of triacylglycerol (TAG), whereas castor contains ricinoleic acid (18:1OH) at all three positions. To investigate whether lesquerella can be engineered to accumulate HFAs in the sn-2 position, multiple transgenic lines were made that express castor lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase 2 (RcLPAT2...

  14. A dependence of nuclear structure functions

    We show that clustering of nucleons, with confinement-size changes, naturally explains and accurately describes recent data on the A dependence of deep-inelastic nuclear cross sections. Predictions for gluon distributions in nuclei are given

  15. Analysis of the ligand binding properties of recombinant bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein

    Rolf, B; Oudenampsen-Krüger, E; Börchers, T;

    1995-01-01

    The coding part of the cDNA for bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) has been amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and used for the construction of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system. The recombinant protein made up to 25% of the soluble E. coli proteins and could be isolated...... by a simple two step protocol combining ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Dissociation constants for binding of oleic acid, arachidonic acid, oleoyl-CoA, lysophosphatidic acid and the peroxisomal proliferator bezafibrate to L-FABP have been determined by titration calorimetry. All ligands were...... bound in a 2:1 stoichiometry, the dissociation constants for the first ligand bound were all in the micro molar range. Oleic acid was bound with the highest affinity and a Kd of 0.26 microM. Furthermore, binding of cholesterol to L-FABP was investigated with the Lipidex assay, a liposome binding assay...

  16. The Effect of Lysophosphatidic Acid during In Vitro Maturation of Bovine Oocytes: Embryonic Development and mRNA Abundances of Genes Involved in Apoptosis and Oocyte Competence

    Dorota Boruszewska; Ana Catarina Torres; Ilona Kowalczyk-Zieba; Patricia Diniz; Mariana Batista; Luis Lopes-da-Costa; Izabela Woclawek-Potocka

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we examined whether LPA can be synthesized and act during in vitro maturation of bovine cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs). We found transcription of genes coding for enzymes of LPA synthesis pathway (ATX and PLA2) and of LPA receptors (LPAR 1–4) in bovine oocytes and cumulus cells, following in vitro maturation. COCs were matured in vitro in presence or absence of LPA (10−5 M) for 24 h. Supplementation of maturation medium with LPA increased mRNA abundance of FST and GDF9 i...

  17. Gene : CBRC-RMAC-15-0027 [SEVENS

    Full Text Available PREDICTED: similar to endothelial differentiation, lysophosphatidic acid G-protein-coupled receptor, 2 isofo...rm 1 [Macaca mulatta] ref|XP_001106110.1| PREDICTED: similar to endothelial differentiation, lysophosphatidic acid...1| PREDICTED: similar to endothelial differentiation, lysophosphatidic acid G-protein-coupled receptor, 2 is...33369948 PREDICTED: Macaca mulatta similar to endothelial differentiation, lysophosphatidic acid... G-protein-coupled receptor, 2, transcript variant 3 (LOC709208), mRNA /cds=p(427,1521) /gb=X

  18. The effect of charge reversal mutations in the alpha-helical region of liver fatty acid binding protein on the binding of fatty-acyl CoAs, lysophospholipids and bile acids.

    Hagan, Robert M; Davies, Joanna K; Wilton, David C

    2002-10-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) is unique among the various types of FABPs in that it can bind a variety of ligands in addition to fatty acids. LFABP is able to bind long chain fatty acids with a 2:1 stoichiometry and the crystal structure has identified two fatty acid binding sites in the binding cavity. The presumed primary site (site 1) involves the fatty acid binding with the carboxylate group buried in the cavity whereas the fatty acid at site 2 has the carboxylate group solvent-exposed within the ligand portal region and in the vicinity of alpha-helix II. The alpha-helical region contains three cationic residues, K20, K31, K33 and modelling studies suggest that K31 on alpha-helix II could make an electrostatic contribution to anionic ligands binding to site 2. The preparation of three charge reversal mutants of LFABP, K20E, K31E and K33E has allowed an investigation of the role of site 2 in ligand binding, particularly those ligands with a bulky anionic head group. The binding of oleoyl CoA, lysophosphatidic acid, lysophosphatidylcholine, lithocholic acid and taurolithocholate 3-sulphate to LFABP has been studied using the alpha-helical mutants. The results support the concept that such ligands bind at site 2 of LFABP where solvent exposure allows the accommodation of their bulky anionic group. PMID:12479568

  19. Consequencs of a Dependence of GRB Properties on Local Metallicity

    Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Blain, Andrew W.; Lazzati, Davide

    2003-01-01

    We report a correlation between the isotropic equivalent energy of GRBs and their position offset from their host galaxies. This is possibly due to a dependence of the end point of massive stellar evolution on metallicity. If confirmed in further host observations, this correlation will both complicate interpretation of GRBs as tracers of cosmic star formation, and potentially allow a new probe of the astrophysics in high-redshift galaxies.

  20. Expression of Castor LPAT2 Enhances Ricinoleic Acid Content at the sn-2 Position of Triacylglycerols in Lesquerella Seed

    Chen, Grace Q.; van Erp, Harrie; Martin-Moreno, Jose; Johnson, Kumiko; Morales, Eva; Browse, John; Eastmond, Peter J.; Lin, Jiann-Tsyh

    2016-01-01

    Lesquerella is a potential industrial oilseed crop that makes hydroxy fatty acid (HFA). Unlike castor its seeds are not poisonous but accumulate lesquerolic acid mostly at the sn-1 and sn-3 positions of triacylglycerol (TAG), whereas castor contains ricinoleic acid (18:1OH) at all three positions. To investigate whether lesquerella can be engineered to accumulate HFAs in the sn-2 position, multiple transgenic lines were made that express castor lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase 2 (RcLPAT2) in the seed. RcLPAT2 increased 18:1OH at the sn-2 position of TAGs from 2% to 14%–17%, which resulted in an increase of tri-HFA-TAGs from 5% to 13%–14%. Our result is the first example of using a LPAT to increase ricinoleic acid at the sn-2 position of seed TAG. This work provides insights to the mechanism of HFA-containing TAG assembly in lesquerella and directs future research to optimize this plant for HFA production. PMID:27058535

  1. Clinical study on lysophospholipids acid, D_dimers detection in the prediction of progress and application effect of cerebral apoplexy%溶血磷脂酸、D-二聚体检测预测进展性脑卒中的临床应用研究

    胡红晓

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study the lysophospholipids acid , D_dimers detection in the prediction of progress and application effect of cerebral apoplexy .Methods:Our hospital in April 2012 to April 2013 were 35 patients with progressive stroke ( research group ) , physical examination, 35 cases (control group) as the research object, research on two groups of objects of D -dimer, lysophosphatide acid level testing and comparison .Results:The group D -dimer level of patients >75 mu g/L, positive;Control the research object of D -dimer level <75 mu g/L, negative;Group patients were lysophospholipids , D -dimer acid average levels were significantly higher than that of control group, P <0.05).Conclusion:D -dimer, lysophosphatide acid was an important molecular markers of early thrombosis in vivo, by detecting D -dimer, lysophosphatide acid levels , could provide effective basis for clinical prediction progress sex stroke .%目的:探讨溶血磷脂酸、D-二聚体检测在预测进展性脑卒中的应用效果。方法:选取我院在2012年4月~2013年4月收治的进展性脑卒中患者35例(研究组)、健康体检者35例(对照组)作为研究对象,对2组研究对象的D-二聚体、溶血磷脂酸水平进行检测、比较。结果:研究组患者的D-二聚体水平均>75μg/L,呈阳性;对照组研究对象的D-二聚体水平均<75μg/L,呈阴性;研究组患者的溶血磷脂酸、D-二聚体平均水平均显著高于对照组,P<0.05。结论:D-二聚体、溶血磷脂酸是体内早期血栓形成的重要分子标志物,通过检测D-二聚体、溶血磷脂酸水平,可为临床预测进展性脑卒中提供有效依据。

  2. Metabolic engineering of medium-chain fatty acid biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana plant leaf lipids.

    Reynolds, Kyle B; Taylor, Matthew C; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Vanhercke, Thomas; Wood, Craig C; Blanchard, Christopher L; Singh, Surinder P; Petrie, James R

    2015-01-01

    Various research groups are investigating the production of oil in non-seed biomass such as leaves. Recently, high levels of oil accumulation have been achieved in plant biomass using a combination of biotechnological approaches which also resulted in significant changes to the fatty acid composition of the leaf oil. In this study, we were interested to determine whether medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) could be accumulated in leaf oil. MCFA are an ideal feedstock for biodiesel and a range of oleochemical products including lubricants, coatings, and detergents. In this study, we explore the synthesis, accumulation, and glycerolipid head-group distribution of MCFA in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana after transient transgenic expression of C12:0-, C14:0-, and C16:0-ACP thioesterase genes. We demonstrate that the production of these MCFA in leaf is increased by the co-expression of the WRINKLED1 (WRI1) transcription factor, with the lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT) from Cocos nucifera being required for the assembly of tri-MCFA TAG species. We also demonstrate that the newly-produced MCFA are incorporated into the triacylglycerol of leaves in which WRI1 + diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 (DGAT1) genes are co-expressed for increased oil accumulation. PMID:25852716

  3. Age-related changes in retinoic, docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid modulation in nuclear lipid metabolism.

    Gaveglio, Virginia L; Pascual, Ana C; Giusto, Norma M; Pasquaré, Susana J

    2016-08-15

    The aim of this work was to study how age-related changes could modify several enzymatic activities that regulate lipid mediator levels in nuclei from rat cerebellum and how these changes are modulated by all-trans retinoic acid (RA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA). The higher phosphatidate phosphohydrolase activity and lower diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) activity observed in aged animals compared with adults could augment diacylglycerol (DAG) availability in the former. Additionally, monoacylglycerol (MAG) availability could be high due to an increase in lysophosphatidate phosphohydrolase (LPAPase) activity and a decrease in monocylglycerol lipase activity. Interestingly, RA, DHA and AA were observed to modulate these enzymatic activities and this modulation was found to change in aged rats. In adult nuclei, whereas RA led to high DAG and MAG production through inhibition of their hydrolytic enzymes, DHA and AA promoted high MAG production by LPAPase and DAGL stimulation. In contrast, in aged nuclei RA caused high MAG generation whereas DHA and AA diminished it through LPAPase activity modulation. These results demonstrate that aging promotes a different nuclear lipid metabolism as well as a different type of non-genomic regulation by RA, DHA and AA, which could be involved in nuclear signaling events. PMID:27355428

  4. Amino acids

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  5. A Dependent Hidden Markov Model of Credit Quality

    Małgorzata Wiktoria Korolkiewicz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a dependent hidden Markov model of credit quality. We suppose that the "true" credit quality is not observed directly but only through noisy observations given by posted credit ratings. The model is formulated in discrete time with a Markov chain observed in martingale noise, where "noise" terms of the state and observation processes are possibly dependent. The model provides estimates for the state of the Markov chain governing the evolution of the credit rating process and the parameters of the model, where the latter are estimated using the EM algorithm. The dependent dynamics allow for the so-called "rating momentum" discussed in the credit literature and also provide a convenient test of independence between the state and observation dynamics.

  6. Fatty acid composition of muscle fat and enzymes of storage lipid synthesis in whole muscle from beef cattle.

    Kazala, E Chris; Lozeman, Fred J; Mir, Priya S; Aalhus, Jennifer L; Schmutz, Sheila M; Weselake, Randall J

    2006-11-01

    Enhanced intramuscular fat content (i.e., marbling) in beef is a desirable trait, which can result in increased product value. This study was undertaken with the aim of revealing biochemical factors associated with the marbling trait in beef cattle. Samples of longissimus lumborum (LL) and pars costalis diaphragmatis (PCD) were taken from a group of intact crossbred males and females at slaughter, lipids extracted, and the resulting FAME examined for relationships with marbling fat deposition. For LL, significant associations were found between degree of marbling and myristic (14:0, r = 0.55, P muscle were assayed for diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT), and phosphatidic acid phosphatase-1 (PAP-1) activity, and the results examined for relationships with degree of intramuscular fat deposition. None of the enzyme activities from PCD displayed an association with marbling fat content, but DGAT specific activity showed significant positive associations with LPAAT (r = 0.54, P muscle tissues provide insight into possible enzyme action associated with the production of specific FA. The increased proportion of oleic acid associated with enhanced lipid content of whole muscle is noteworthy given the known health benefits of this FA. PMID:17263304

  7. Acid Rain.

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  8. Folic Acid

    ... found naturally in some foods, including leafy vegetables, citrus fruits, beans (legumes), and whole grains. Folic acid ... mcg of folic acid every day for good health. But older adults need to be sure they ...

  9. Ibotenic acid and thioibotenic acid

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Nielsen, Birgitte;

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we have determined and compared the pharmacological profiles of ibotenic acid and its isothiazole analogue thioibotenic acid at native rat ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors and at recombinant rat metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors expressed in mammalian cell lines....... Thioibotenic acid has a distinct pharmacological profile at group III mGlu receptors compared with the closely structurally related ibotenic acid; the former is a potent (low microm) agonist, whereas the latter is inactive. By comparing the conformational energy profiles of ibotenic and thioibotenic acid with...... the conformations preferred by the ligands upon docking to mGlu1 and models of the other mGlu subtypes, we propose that unlike other subtypes, group III mGlu receptor binding sites require a ligand conformation at an energy level which is prohibitively expensive for ibotenic acid, but not for...

  10. [Gastric Acid].

    Ruíz Chávez, R

    1996-01-01

    Gastric acid, a product of parietal cells secretion, full fills multiple biological roles which are absolutely necessary to keep corporal homeostasis. The production of the acid depends upon an effector cellular process represented in the first step by histamine, acetilcholine and gastrin, first messengers of the process. These interact with specific receptors than in sequence activate second messengers -cAMP and the calcium-calmodulin system- which afterwards activate a kinase. An specific protein is then phosphorilated by this enzyme, being the crucial factor that starts the production of acid. Finally, a proton bomb, extrudes the acid towards the gastric lumen. The secretion process mentioned above, is progressive lyactivated in three steps, two of which are stimulators -cephalic and gastric phases- and the other one inhibitor or intestinal phase. These stages are started by mental and neurological phenomena -thought, sight, smell or memory-; by food, drugs or other ingested substances; and by products of digestion. Changes in regulation of acid secretion, in the structure of gastro-duodenal mucosal barrier by a wide spectrum of factors and agents including food, drugs and H. pylori, are the basis of acid-peptic disease, entity in which gastric acid plays a fundamental role. From the therapeutic point of view, so at the theoretical as at the practical levels, t is possible to interfere with the secretion of acid by neutralization of some of the steps of the effector cellular process. An adequate knowledge of the basics related to gastric acid, allows to create strategies for the clinical handling of associated pathology, specifically in relation to peptic acid disease in all of the known clinical forms. PMID:12165790

  11. ACID RAIN

    Acid precipitation has become one of the major environmental problems of this decade. It is a challenge to scientists throughout the world. Researchers from such diverse disciplines as plant pathology, soil science, bacteriology, meteorology and engineering are investigating diff...

  12. Folic Acid

    Full Text Available ... Just a moment, please. You've saved this page It's been added to your dashboard . Folic acid ... Map Premature birth report card Careers Archives Health Topics Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness ...

  13. Folic acid

    ... include leafy vegetables (such as spinach, broccoli, and lettuce), okra, asparagus, fruits (such as bananas, melons, and ... Pyrimethamine (Daraprim)Pyrimethamine (Daraprim) is used to treat parasite infections. Folic acid might decrease the effectiveness of ...

  14. Folic Acid

    Full Text Available ... March of Dimes Premature Birth Report Card Grades Cities, Counties; Focuses on Racial and Ethnic Disparities March ... your baby. Learn how you can get the right amout of folic acid before and during pregnancy ...

  15. Folic Acid

    Full Text Available ... Folic acid Description | Related videos | Most played video E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. Please enter a valid e-mail address. Your information: Your recipient's information: Your ...

  16. Okadaic acid

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H; Severinsen, Mai C K

    2014-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a polyether fatty acid produced by marine dinoflagellates and the causative agent of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning. The effect of OA on apical endocytosis in the small intestine was studied in organ cultured porcine mucosal explants. Within 0.5-1 h of culture, the toxin caused...... endosomes (TWEEs) occurred unimpeded in the presence of OA, FM condensed in larger subapical structures by 1 h, implying a perturbed endosomal trafficking/maturation. The fluorescent lysosomotropic agent Lysotracker revealed induction of large lysosomal structures by OA. Endocytosis from the brush border...

  17. Mefenamic Acid

    Mefenamic acid comes as a capsule to take by mouth. It is usually taken with food every 6 hours as needed for up to 1 week. Follow ... pain vomit that is bloody or looks like coffee grounds black, tarry, or bloody stools slowed breathing ...

  18. Ascorbic Acid

    Cevi-Bid® ... If you become pregnant while taking ascorbic acid, call your doctor. ... In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call ...

  19. Perfluorooctanoic acid

    P. de Voogt

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, 335-67-1) is used in fluoropolymer production and firefighting foams and persists in the environment. Human exposure to PFOA is mostly through the diet. PFOA primarily affects the liver and can cause developmental and reproductive toxic effects in test animals.

  20. Stearic Acid

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) is presented for the chemical, stearic acid. The profile lists the chemical's physical and harmful characteristics, exposure limits, and symptoms of major exposure, for the benefit of teachers and students, who use the chemical in the laboratory.

  1. Metabolism of β-valine via a CoA-dependent ammonia lyase pathway

    Otzen, Marleen; Crismaru, Ciprian G.; Postema, Christiaan P.; Wijma, Hein J.; Heberling, Matthew M.; Szymanski, Wiktor; de Wildeman, Stefaan; Janssen, Dick B.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas species strain SBV1 can rapidly grow on medium containing β-valine as a sole nitrogen source. The tertiary amine feature of β-valine prevents direct deamination reactions catalyzed by aminotransferases, amino acid dehydrogenases, and amino acid oxidases. However, lyase- or aminomutase-me

  2. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  3. Gene : CBRC-CFAM-11-0034 [SEVENS

    Full Text Available DICTED: similar to endothelial differentiation, lysophosphatidic acid G-protein-coupled receptor, 2 isoform 2 [Can...is familiaris] ref|XP_532031.2| PREDICTED: similar to endothelial differentiation, lysophosphatidic acid...#S22754747 PREDICTED: Canis familiaris similar to endothelial differentiation, lysophosphatidic acid G-prote...in-coupled receptor, 2, transcript variant 1 (LOC474800), mRNA /cds=p(92,1132) /gb=XM_532031 /gi=73971553 /u...CBRC-CFAM-11-0034 11 A Lysolipids receptors EDG2_SHEEP 0.0 98% ref|XP_853534.1| PRE

  4. Angiomodulin is a specific marker of vasculature and regulates VEGF-A dependent neo-angiogenesis

    Hooper, Andrea T.; Shmelkov, Sergey V.; Gupta, Sunny; Milde, Till; Bambino, Kathryn; Gillen, Kelly; Goetz, Mollie; Chavala, Sai; Baljevic, Muhamed; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M; Gale, Nicholas W.; Thurston, Gavin; Yancopoulos, George D.; Vahdat, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Blood vessel formation is controlled by the balance between pro- and anti-angiogenic pathways. Although much is known about the factors that drive sprouting of neovessels, the factors that stabilize and pattern neovessels are undefined. The expression of angiomodulin (AGM), a VEGF-A binding protein, was increased in the vasculature of several human tumors as compared to normal tissue, raising the hypothesis that AGM may modulate VEGF-A-dependent vascular patterning. To elucidate the expressio...

  5. Understanding Acid Rain

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  6. Dehydroabietic acid

    Xiao-Ping Rao

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound [systematic name: (1R,4aS,10aR-7-isopropyl-1,4a-dimethyl-1,2,3,4,4a,9,10,10a-octahydrophenanthrene-1-carboxylic acid], C20H28O2, has been isolated from disproportionated rosin which is obtained by isomerizing gum rosin with a Pd-C catalyst.. Two crystallographically independent molecules exist in the asymmetric unit. In each molecule, there are three six-membered rings, which adopt planar, half-chair and chair conformations. The two cyclohexane rings form a trans ring junction with the two methyl groups in axial positions. The crystal structure is stabilized by intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  7. Retarded acid emulsion

    Fast, C.R.; Rixe, F.H.; Duffield, E.L. Jr.

    1972-08-01

    Compositions for use in acidizing hydrocarbon-bearing formations are described. Retarded acid emulsions of prolonged stability make it possible for the acid in this form to be displaced substantial distances out into the formation before becoming spent. The action of acid emulsions for use in acidizing hydrocarbon-bearing formations is prolonged by employing as the principal emulsifying agent an amine salt of dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid. Acid emulsions employing the amine salt of dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid exhibit greater stability than those employing the free acid. (8 claims)

  8. PUMA promotes Bax translocation in FOXO3a-dependent pathway during STS-induced apoptosis

    Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Qun

    2009-08-01

    PUMA (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis, also called Bbc3) was first identified as a BH3-only Bcl-2 family protein that is transcriptionally up-regulated by p53 and activated upon p53-dependent apoptotic stimuli, such as treatment with DNA-damaging drugs or UV irradiation. Recently studies have been shown that Puma is also up-regulated in response to certain p53-independent apoptotic stimuli, such as growth factor deprivation or treatment with glucocorticoids or STS (staurosporine). However, the molecular mechanisms of PUMA up-regulation and how PUMA functions in response to p53-independent apoptotic stimuli remain poorly understood. In this study, based on real-time single cell analysis, flow cytometry and western blotting technique, we investigated the function of PUMA in living human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) after STS treatment. Our results show that FOXO3a was activated by STS stimulation and then translocated from cytosol to nucleus. The expression of PUMA was up-regulated via a FOXO3a-dependent manner after STS treatment, while p53 had little function in this process. Moreover, cell apoptosis and Bax translocation induced by STS were not blocked by Pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor), which suggested that p53 was not involved in this signaling pathway. Taken together, these results indicate that PUMA promoted Bax translocation in a FOXO3a-dependment pathway during STS-induced apoptosis, while p53 was dispensable in this process.

  9. RNA G-quadruplexes cause eIF4A-dependent oncogene translation in cancer

    Wolfe, Andrew L.; Singh, Kamini; Zhong, Yi; Drewe, Philipp; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Sanghvi, Viraj R.; Mavrakis, Konstantinos J.; Jiang, Man; Roderick, Justine E.; van der Meulen, Joni; Schatz, Jonathan H.; Rodrigo, Christina M.; Zhao, Chunying; Rondou, Pieter; de Stanchina, Elisa; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Speleman, Frank; Porco, John A.; Pelletier, Jerry; Rätsch, Gunnar; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2014-09-01

    The translational control of oncoprotein expression is implicated in many cancers. Here we report an eIF4A RNA helicase-dependent mechanism of translational control that contributes to oncogenesis and underlies the anticancer effects of silvestrol and related compounds. For example, eIF4A promotes T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia development in vivo and is required for leukaemia maintenance. Accordingly, inhibition of eIF4A with silvestrol has powerful therapeutic effects against murine and human leukaemic cells in vitro and in vivo. We use transcriptome-scale ribosome footprinting to identify the hallmarks of eIF4A-dependent transcripts. These include 5' untranslated region (UTR) sequences such as the 12-nucleotide guanine quartet (CGG)4 motif that can form RNA G-quadruplex structures. Notably, among the most eIF4A-dependent and silvestrol-sensitive transcripts are a number of oncogenes, superenhancer-associated transcription factors, and epigenetic regulators. Hence, the 5' UTRs of select cancer genes harbour a targetable requirement for the eIF4A RNA helicase.

  10. Acid Lipase Disease

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease, ... Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs when ...

  11. Plasma amino acids

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  12. POLYELEOSTEARIC ACID VESICLES

    LI Zichen; XIE Ximng; FAN Qinghua; FANG Yifei

    1992-01-01

    α-Eleostearic acid and β-eleostearic acid formed vesicles in aqueous medium when an ethanol solutionofeleostearic acid was injected rapidly into a vigorously vortexed aqueous phase. Formation of the vesicles was demonstrated by electron microscopic observation and bromothymol blue encapsulation experiments. Polymerizations of the eleostearic acids in the formed vesicles carried out by UV irradiation produced poly-α-eleostearic acid and poly-β-eleostearic acid vesicles.

  13. Measurement of the $Z/A$ dependence of neutrino charged-current total cross-sections

    Kayis-Topaksu, A; Van Dantzig, R; De Jong, M; Konijn, J; Melzer, O; Oldeman, R G C; Pesen, E; Van der Poel, C A F J; Spada, F R; Visschers, J L; Güler, M; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Kama, S; Sever, R; Tolun, P; Zeyrek, M T; Armenise, N; Catanesi, M G; De Serio, M; Ieva, M; Muciaccia, M T; Radicioni, E; Simone, S; Bülte, A; Winter, Klaus; El-Aidi, R; Van de Vyver, B; Vilian, P; Wilquet, G; Saitta, B; Di Capua, E; Ogawa, S; Shibuya, H; Artamonov, A V; Brunner, J; Chizhov, M; Cussans, D G; Doucet, M; Fabre, Jean-Paul; Hristova, I R; Kawamura, T; Kolev, D; Litmaath, M; Meinhard, H; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Ricciardi, S; Rozanov, A; Saltzberg, D; Tsenov, R V; Uiterwijk, J W E; Zucchelli, P; Goldberg, J; Chikawa, M; Arik, E; Song, J S; Yoon, C S; Kodama, K; Ushida, N; Aoki, S; Hara, T; Delbar, T; Favart, D; Grégoire, G; Kalinin, S; Makhlyoueva, I V; Gorbunov, P; Khovanskii, V D; Shamanov, V V; Tsukerman, I; Bruski, N; Frekers, D; Rondeshagen, D; Wolff, T; Hoshino, K; Kawada, J; Komatsu, M; Miyanishi, M; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Narita, K; Niu, K; Niwa, K; Nonaka, N; Sato, O; Toshito, T; Buontempo, S; Cocco, A G; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; De Rosa, G; Di Capua, F; Ereditato, A; Fiorillo, G; Marotta, A; Messina, M; Migliozzi, P; Pistillo, C; Santorelli, R; Scotto-Lavina, L; Strolin, P; Tioukov, V; Nakamura, K; Okusawa, T; Dore, U; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Maslennikov, A L; Righini, P; Rosa, G; Santacesaria, R; Satta, A; Barbuto, E; Bozza, C; Grella, G; Romano, G; Sirignano, C; Sorrentino, S; Sato, Y; Tezuka, I

    2003-01-01

    A relative measurement of total cross-sections is reported for polyethylene, marble, iron, and lead targets for the inclusive charged-current reaction nu_mu + N -> mu^- + X. The targets, passive blocks of ~100kg each, were exposed simultaneously to the CERN SPS wide-band muon-neutrino beam over a period of 18 weeks. Systematics effects due to differences in the neutrino flux and detector efficiency for the different target locations were minimised by changing the position of the four targets on their support about every two weeks. The relative neutrino fluxes on the targets were monitored within the same experiment using charged-current interactions in the calorimeter positioned directly downstream of the four targets. From a fit to the Z/A dependence of the total cross-sections a value is deduced for the effective neutron-to-proton cross-section ratio.

  14. Measurement of the Z/A dependence of neutrino charged-current total cross-sections

    Kayis-Topasku, A; Dantzig, R V

    2003-01-01

    A relative measurement of total cross-sections is reported for polyethylene, marble, iron, and lead targets for the inclusive charged-current reaction nu submu + N -> mu sup - + X. The targets, passive blocks of propor to 100 kg each, were exposed simultaneously to the CERN SPS wide-band muon-neutrino beam over a period of 18 weeks. Systematic effects due to differences in the neutrino flux and detector efficiency for the different target locations were minimised by changing the position of the four targets on their support about every two weeks. The relative neutrino fluxes on the targets were monitored within the same experiment using charged-current interactions in the calorimeter positioned directly downstream of the four targets. From a fit to the Z/A dependence of the total cross-sections a value is deduced for the effective neutron-to-proton cross-section ratio. (orig.)

  15. $A$-dependence of coherent electroproduction of $\\rho^{0}$ mesons on nuclei in forward direction

    Akopov, N; Aslanyan, G; Grigoryan, L

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the $A$-dependence of the differential cross section for the coherent electroproduction of vector mesons on nuclei in forward direction, at fixed values of longitudinal momentum transfer $q_{L}$. It is shown that such cross section has complicated behavior over the atomic mass number $A$ with local minimums and maximums. It is also shown that a ratio of the real to the imaginary parts of the forward coherent amplitude on nuclei $\\alpha_{A} = \\Re e{f_{A}} / \\Im m{f_{A}}$ has breaking points at some values of $A$. Comparison of the behaviors of the normalized cross section $\\Big(\\frac{d\\sigma}{d\\Omega}\\Big)_{A}\\Big/\\Big(\\frac{d\\sigma}{d\\Omega}\\Big)_{N}$ and $\\alpha_{A}$ over $A$ shows that the location of minimums of the cross section are very close to the breaking points of $\\alpha_{A}$.

  16. A-dependence of the Spectra of the F Isotopes from ab initio Calculations

    Barrett, Bruce R.; Dikmen, Erdal; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.; Shirokov, Andrey M.

    2016-03-01

    Using a succession of Okubo-Lee-Suzuki transformations within the No Core Shell Model (NCSM) formalism, we derive an ab initio, non-perturbative procedure for calculating the input for standard shell-model (SSM) calculations within one major shell. We have used this approach for calculating the spectra of the F isotopes from A=18 to A=25, so as to study the A-dependence of the results. In particular, we are interested in seeing if the theoretical input is weak enough, so that a single set of two-body effective interactions can be used for all of the F isotopes investigated. We will present results from SSM calculations based on input obtained with the JISP16 nucleon-nucleon interaction in an initial 4 ℏΩ NCSM basis space. This work supported in part by TUBITAK-BIDEB, the US DOE, the US NSF, NERSC, and the Russian Ministry of Education and Science.

  17. A-dependence of differential multiplicity at 7 GeV/c

    Particle production in the inelastic proton-nucleus interactions have been investigated at the initial momentum psub(0)=7 GeV/c for Be, Al, C, Cu, Cd and Pb nuclei. A-dependences of both π- and p differential multiplicities are parametrized as approximately Asup(α(sub(i)))i. Similar parametrization seems to be also suitable for the normalized topological cross-section Wsup(n-)(A) of the processes with nsup(-) forward emitted negative pions. The dependence of αsub(i) on the secondary particle type and its kinematic region for (A) and on n- for Wsup(n-)(A) has been obtained. These experimental data indicate to secondary interactions of the produced particles inside nucleus. The total multiplicity distribution is observed to obey KNO scaling

  18. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  19. Nuclear Envelope Protein SUN2 Promotes Cyclophilin-A-Dependent Steps of HIV Replication

    Lahaye, Xavier; Satoh, Takeshi; Gentili, Matteo; Cerboni, Silvia; Silvin, Aymeric; Conrad, Cécile; Ahmed-Belkacem, Abdelhakim; Rodriguez, Elisa C.; Guichou, Jean-François; Bosquet, Nathalie; Piel, Matthieu; Le Grand, Roger; King, Megan C.; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Manel, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Summary During the early phase of replication, HIV reverse transcribes its RNA and crosses the nuclear envelope while escaping host antiviral defenses. The host factor Cyclophilin A (CypA) is essential for these steps and binds the HIV capsid; however, the mechanism underlying this effect remains elusive. Here, we identify related capsid mutants in HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIVmac that are restricted by CypA. This antiviral restriction of mutated viruses is conserved across species and prevents nuclear import of the viral cDNA. Importantly, the inner nuclear envelope protein SUN2 is required for the antiviral activity of CypA. We show that wild-type HIV exploits SUN2 in primary CD4+ T cells as an essential host factor that is required for the positive effects of CypA on reverse transcription and infection. Altogether, these results establish essential CypA-dependent functions of SUN2 in HIV infection at the nuclear envelope. PMID:27149839

  20. Gene : CBRC-CFAM-06-0034 [SEVENS

    Full Text Available gnl|UG|Cfa#S22754747 PREDICTED: Canis familiaris similar to endothelial differentiation, lysophosphatidic acid...ICTED: similar to Lysophosphatidic acid receptor Edg-7 (LPA receptor 3) (LPA-3) [Canis familiaris] 0.0 100% ... G-protein-coupled receptor, 2, transcript variant 1 (LOC474800), mRNA /cds=p(9...CBRC-CFAM-06-0034 6 A Lysolipids receptors EDG7_HUMAN 0.0 93% ref|XP_547308.2| PRED

  1. Gene : CBRC-RMAC-01-0033 [SEVENS

    Full Text Available REDICTED: endothelial differentiation, lysophosphatidic acid G-protein-coupled receptor, 7 [Macaca mulatta] ...0.0 100% gnl|UG|Mmu#S33369948 PREDICTED: Macaca mulatta similar to endothelial differentiation, lysophosphatidic acid... G-protein-coupled receptor, 2, transcript variant 3 (LOC709208), mRNA /cds...CBRC-RMAC-01-0033 1 A Lysolipids receptors EDG7_HUMAN 0.0 96% ref|XP_001107923.1| P

  2. Charge-dependent and A-dependent effects in isotope shifts of Coulomb displacement energies

    Coulomb displacement energies in a series of isotopes generally decrease with A. This decrease can arise from an increase with A of the average distance of interaction between pairs of protons. In the shell model a decrease can also result from charge-independence-breaking effects if the neutron-proton interaction for the valence nucleons is more attractive than the neutron-neutron interaction. Using the model recently proposed by Sherr and Talmi for the 1d/sub 3/2/ shell, existing data for this shell and also the 1d/sub 5/2/ and 1f/sub 7/2/ shells were analyzed allowing all matrix elements to vary as A/sup -lambda/3/. Least squares calculations of the rms deviation sigma were carried out for varying values of lambda from -2 to +2. It was found that although there was a minimum in sigma vs lambda it was too shallow to exclude any lambda for -1 to +1 in the 1d/sub 3/2/ and 1f/sub 7/2/ shells or 0 to +1 in the 1d/sub 5/2/ shell. It is therefore not possible to distinguish between A dependence and charge dependence in this model. The magnitude of the latter as expressed in terms of (np-nn) matrix elements depends strongly on the former. As lambda increases from -1 to +1, these (np-nn) matrix elements decrease roughly linearly in absolute magnitude and eventually change sign. For lambda = 0 they have appreciable and reasonable magnitudes for the 1d/sub 3/2/ and 1f/sub 7/2/ shells but for the 1d/sub 5/2/ shell the values are too small to be considered significant

  3. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  4. Acid Deposition Phenomena

    Acid deposition, commonly known as acid rain, occurs when emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and other industrial processes undergo complex chemical reactions in the atmosphere and fall to the earth as wet deposition (rain, snow, cloud, fog) or dry deposition (dry particles, gas). Rain and snow are already naturally acidic, but are only considered problematic when less than a ph of 5.0 The main chemical precursors leading to acidic conditions are atmospheric concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). When these two compounds react with water, oxygen, and sunlight in the atmosphere, the result is sulfuric (H2SO4) and nitric acids (HNO3), the primary agents of acid deposition which mainly produced from the combustion of fossil fuel and from petroleum refinery. Airborne chemicals can travel long distances from their sources and can therefore affect ecosystems over broad regional scales and in locations far from the sources of emissions. According to the concern of petroleum ministry with the environment and occupational health, in this paper we will discussed the acid deposition phenomena through the following: Types of acidic deposition and its components in the atmosphere Natural and man-made sources of compounds causing the acidic deposition. Chemical reactions causing the acidic deposition phenomenon in the atmosphere. Factors affecting level of acidic deposition in the atmosphere. Impact of acid deposition. Procedures for acidic deposition control in petroleum industry

  5. Catalytic Synthesis Lactobionic Acid

    V.G. Borodina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles are obtained, characterized and deposited on the carrier. Conducted catalytic synthesis of lactobionic acid from lactose. Received lactobionic acid identify on the IR spectrum.

  6. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    ... Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other ... ACIDS are as follows:Improving mental development or growth in infants. Adding arachidonic acid (an omega-6 ...

  7. Plasma amino acids

    Plasma amino acids is a screening test done on infants that looks at the amounts of amino ... Laboratory error High or low amounts of individual plasma amino acids must be considered with other information. ...

  8. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount ... the blood in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications ...

  9. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    ... experience a reaction during the first few days after you receive a dose of zoledronic acid injection. Symptoms ... symptoms may begin during the first 3 days after you receive a dose of zoledronic acid injection and ...

  10. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  11. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  12. Immunoglobulin and fatty acids

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising 0.1-10 w/w % immunoglobulin (Ig), 4-14 w/w % saturated fatty acids, 4-14 w/w % mono-unsaturated fatty acids and 0-5 w/w % poly-unsaturated fatty acids, wherein the weight percentages are based on the content of dry matter in the composition...

  13. Interpretation of the EMC-SLAC effect and its A dependence in self-consistent approach without exotics

    Possibility of interpretation of the self-consistent description of the EMC-SLAC effect A-dependence on the basis of standard representation of nuclear structure is discussed. Different models suggested for description of the EMC effect satisfying the following requirements: conservation of energy-momentum; conservation of baryon charge; self-consistent description of static, spectroscopic an dynamic characteristics of nucleus; account of space-time picture of the process; absence of free parameters in description of EMC effect A-dependence, are discussed. Results of self-consistent calculations of structure functions for d, 12C, 56Fe, 108Ag are presented. The carried out consideration permitted to conclude that EMC effect and its A dependence are not critical to selection of meson or quark phenomenology and the latter is not applied as exotics at the background of usual description

  14. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  15. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Waunakee, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow; Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  16. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James L. (Madison, WI)

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  17. Nucleic acid detection assays

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  18. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  19. Acidizing carbonate reservoirs with chlorocarboxylic acid salt solutions

    Richardson, E.A.; Scheuerman, R.F.; Templeton, C.C.

    1978-10-31

    A carbonate reservoir is acidized slowly by injecting an aqueous solution of a chlorocarboxylic acid salt so that the rate of the acidization is limited to the rate at which an acid is formed by the hydrolyzing of the chlorocarboxylate ions. The rate at which a chlorocarboxylic acid salt hydrolyzes to form an acid provides the desired rate of acid-release. A more complete acid-base reaction by chloroacetic acid, as compared to formic, acetic, and proprionic, is due to its being a much stronger acid. The pKa of chloroacetic acid is 2.86, whereas that of formic acid is 3.75, and that of acetic acid is 4.75. The pKa of a solution of a weak acid is the pH exhibited when the concentration of undissociated acid equals the concentration of the acid anion. 14 claims.

  20. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition. PMID:27175515

  1. Nucleic acid detection kits

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  2. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  3. Bile acid sequestrants

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David P; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized in the liver from cholesterol and have traditionally been recognized for their role in absorption of lipids and in cholesterol homeostasis. In recent years, however, bile acids have emerged as metabolic signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of lipid and...... glucose metabolism, and possibly energy homeostasis, through activation of the bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5. Bile acid sequestrants (BASs) constitute a class of drugs that bind bile acids in the intestine to form a nonabsorbable complex resulting in interruption of the...... enterohepatic circulation. This increases bile acid synthesis and consequently reduces serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Also, BASs improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Despite a growing understanding of the impact of BASs on glucose metabolism, the mechanisms behind their glucose...

  4. Docosahexaenoic Acid Neurolipidomics

    Niemoller, Tiffany D.; Bazan, Nicolas G.

    2009-01-01

    Mediator lipidomics is a field of study concerned with the characterization, structural elucidation and bioactivity of lipid derivatives generated by enzymatic activity. Omega-3 fatty acids have beneficial effects for vision, brain function, cardiovascular function, and immune-inflammatory responses. Docosahexaenoic acid [DHA; 22:6(n-3)], the most abundant essential omega-3 fatty acid in the human body, is selectively enriched and avidly retained in the central nervous system as an acyl chain...

  5. Fatty acids and epigenetics

    Burdge, Graham C; Lillycrop, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to assess the findings of recent studies on the effects of fatty acids on epigenetic process and the role of epigenetics in regulating fatty acid metabolism. Recent findings The DNA methylation status of the Fads2 promoter was increased in the liver of the offspring of mice fed an ?-linolenic acid-enriched diet during pregnancy. In rats, increasing total maternal fat intake during pregnancy and lactation induced persistent hypermethyl...

  6. The acid rain primer

    Acid rain continues to be a major problem in North America, and particularly in eastern Canada. This report introduced the topic of acid rain and discussed its formation, measurement, sources, and geographic distribution. The major sources of sulphur dioxide in Canada are smelting metals, burning coal for electrical power generation, industrial emissions (e.g., pulp and paper, petroleum and aluminum industry), and oil and gas extraction and refining. In Canada, the largest source of nitrogen oxide is the burning of fossil fuels by the transportation sector. Problem areas for acid rain in Canada were identified. The effects of acid rain were examined on lakes and aquatic ecosystems, forests and soils, human-made structures and materials, human health, and on visibility. Acid rain policies and programs were then presented from a historical and current context. Ecosystem recovery from acid rain was discussed with reference to acid rain monitoring, atmospheric response to reductions in acid-causing emissions, and ecosystem recovery of lakes, forests, and aquatic ecosystems. Challenges affecting ecosystem recovery were also presented. These challenges include drought and dry weather, decrease of base cations in precipitation, release of sulphate previously stored in soil, mineralization and immobilization of sulphur/sulphates. Last, the report discussed what still needs to be done to improve the problem of acid rain as well as future concerns. These concerns include loss of base cations from forested watersheds and nitrogen deposition and saturation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 17 figs

  7. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  8. Azetidinic amino acids

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Bunch, Lennart; Chopin, Nathalie;

    2005-01-01

    A set of ten azetidinic amino acids, that can be envisioned as C-4 alkyl substituted analogues of trans-2-carboxyazetidine-3-acetic acid (t-CAA) and/or conformationally constrained analogues of (R)- or (S)-glutamic acid (Glu) have been synthesized in a diastereo- and enantiomerically pure form from...... two diastereoisomers that were easily separated and converted in two steps into azetidinic amino acids. Azetidines 35-44 were characterized in binding studies on native ionotropic Glu receptors and in functional assays at cloned metabotropic receptors mGluR1, 2 and 4, representing group I, II and III...

  9. Halogenated fatty acids

    Mu, Huiling; Wesén, Clas; Sundin, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Chlorinated fatty acids have been found to be major contributors to organohalogen compounds in fish, bivalves, jellyfish, and lobster, and they have been indicated to contribute considerably to organohalogens in marine mammals. Brominated fatty acids have been found in marine sponges. Also....... However, a natural production of halogenated fatty acids is also possible. In this paper we summarize the present knowledge of the occurrence of halogenated fatty acids in lipids and suggested ways of their formation. In Part II (Trends Anal. Chem. 16 (1997) 274) we deal with methods of their...

  10. THIN-LAYER SEPARATION OF CITRIC ACID CYCLE INTERMEDIATES, LACTIC ACID, AND THE AMINO ACID TAURINE

    This paper describes a two-dimensional mixed-layer method for separating citric acid cycle intermediates, lactic acid and the amino acid taurine. The method cleanly separates all citric acid cycle intermediates tested, excepting citric acid and isocitric acid. The solvents are in...

  11. Molecular Interaction of Pinic Acid with Sulfuric Acid

    Elm, Jonas; Kurten, Theo; Bilde, Merete;

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the molecular interactions between the semivolatile α-pinene oxidation product pinic acid and sulfuric acid using computational methods. The stepwise Gibbs free energies of formation have been calculated utilizing the M06-2X functional, and the stability of the clusters is evaluated...... from the corresponding ΔG values. The first two additions of sulfuric acid to pinic acid are found to be favorable with ΔG values of -9.06 and -10.41 kcal/mol. Addition of a third sulfuric acid molecule is less favorable and leads to a structural rearrangement forming a bridged sulfuric acid-pinic acid...... without the further possibility for attachment of either sulfuric acid or pinic acid. This suggests that pinic acid cannot be a key species in the first steps in nucleation, but the favorable interactions between sulfuric acid and pinic acid imply that pinic acid can contribute to the subsequent growth of...

  12. Characterization of acid tars

    Acid tars from the processing of petroleum and petrochemicals using sulfuric acid were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) micro-analysis. Leaching of contaminants from the acid tars in 48 h batch tests with distilled water at a liquid-to-solid ratio 10:1 was also studied. GC/MS results show that the samples contained aliphatic hydrocarbons, cyclic hydrocarbons, up to 12 of the 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and numerous other organic groups, including organic acids (sulfonic acids, carboxylic acids and aromatic acids), phenyl, nitrile, amide, furans, thiophenes, pyrroles, and phthalates, many of which are toxic. Metals analysis shows that Pb was present in significant concentration. DSC results show different transition peaks in the studied samples, demonstrating their complexity and variability. FTIR analysis further confirmed the presence of the organic groups detected by GC/MS. The SEM/EDX micro-analysis results provided insight on the surface characteristics of the samples and show that contaminants distribution was heterogeneous. The results provide useful data on the composition, complexity, and variability of acid tars; information which hitherto have been scarce in public domain.

  13. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  14. Science of acid rain

    In this report, the mechanism of forming acid rain in the atmosphere and the process of its fall to ground, the mechanism of withering forests by acid substances, and the process of acidifying lakes and marshes are explained. Moreover, the monitoring networks for acid rain and the countermeasures are described. Acid rain is the pollution phenomena related to all environment, that is, atmosphere, hydrosphere, soilsphere, biosphere and so on, and it is a local environmental pollution problem, and at the same time, an international, global environmental pollution problem. In Japan, acid rain has fallen, but the acidification of lakes and marshes is not clear, and the damage to forests is on small scale. However in East Asia region, the release of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides is much, and the increase of the effects of acid rain is expected. It is necessary to devise the measures for preventing the damage due to acid rain. The global monitoring networks of World Meteorological Organization and United Nations Environment Program, and those in Europe, USA and Japan are described. The monitoring of acid rain in Japan is behind that in Europe and USA. (K.I.)

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  16. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a...

  17. Locked nucleic acid

    Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Sørensen, Mads D; Wengel, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a class of nucleic acid analogs possessing very high affinity and excellent specificity toward complementary DNA and RNA, and LNA oligonucleotides have been applied as antisense molecules both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we briefly describe the basic...

  18. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  19. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  20. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  1. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis IX

    Carey, E. M.; Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Dils, R.

    1972-01-01

    # 1. I. [I-14C]Acetate was covalently bound to rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase by enzymic transacylation from [I-14C]acetyl-CoA. Per mole of enzyme 2 moles of acetate were bound to thiol groups and up to I mole of acetate was bound to non-thiol groups. # 2. 2. The acetyl-fatty acid...

  2. Halogenated fatty acids

    Mu, Huiling; Wesén, Clas; Sundin, Peter

    1997-01-01

    . However, a natural production of halogenated fatty acids is also possible. In this paper we summarize the present knowledge of the occurrence of halogenated fatty acids in lipids and suggested ways of their formation. In Part II (Trends Anal. Chem. 16 (1997) 274) we deal with methods of their...

  3. Instrumental Role of Helicobacter pylori γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase in VacA-Dependent Vacuolation in Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Ling, Samantha Shi Min; Khoo, Lawrence Han Boon; Hwang, Le-Ann; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Ho, Bow

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes cellular vacuolation in host cells, a cytotoxic event attributed to vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) and the presence of permeant weak bases such as ammonia. We report here the role of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), a constitutively expressed secretory enzyme of H. pylori, in potentiating VacA-dependent vacuolation formation in H. pylori-infected AGS and primary gastric cells. The enhancement is brought about by GGT hydrolysing glutamine present in the extracellular m...

  4. Canadian acid rain policy

    On March 13 of 1991, the Prime Minister of Canada, Brian Mulroney and the President of the United States of America, George Bush, signed an Agreement on Air Quality. This agreement enshrines Principle 21 of the 1972 Stockholm Declaration which states that countries are to ensure that activities within their jurisdiction do not cause damage to the environment of another country. This agreement also includes provisions for controlling acid rain. The Agreement on Air Quality followed years of discussion between the two countries and is a significant milestone in the history of Canadian acid rain policy. This paper begins by describing Canadian acid rain policy and its evolution. The paper also outlines the Canada-United States Air Quality Agreement and the effect of the acid rain provisions on deposition in Canada. Finally, it considers the future work that must be undertaken to further resolve the acid rain problem. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Synthesis of aminoaldonic acids

    Jørgensen, Christel Thea

    With the aim of synthesising aminoaldonic acids, two 2-acetamido-2-deoxyaldonolactones with D-galacto (6) and D-arabino (11) configuration were prepared from acetylated sugar formazans in analogy with a known procedure. Empolying the same procedure to acetylated sugar phenylhydrazones gave mixtures...... of 2,5-anhydrides and not the expected 2-acetamido-2-deoxy aldose phenylhydrazones. The acetylated phenylhydrazones were found to eliminate acetic acid when heated in aqueous ethanol and 1-phenylazoalkenes could be isolated by crystallisation. By this method the 17, 20, 23 and 25 were prepared from...... aziridino amides 43 and 51 were reductively cleaved with hydrazine to give 3-amino-2,3-dideoxyhexonhydrazides 83 and 85, which were easily converted into the corresponding lactone 84 and acid 86. The aziridine ring of 43 and 51 was also opened with acetic acid to give the 3-amino-3-deoxyhexonic acids 79 and...

  6. Fusidic acid in dermatology

    Schöfer, Helmut; Simonsen, Lene

    1995-01-01

    Studies on the clinical efficacy of fusidic acid in skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), notably those due to Staphylococcus aureus, are reviewed. Oral fusidic acid (tablets dosed at 250 mg twice daily, or a suspension for paediatric use at 20 mg/kg/day given as two daily doses) has shown good...... efficacy and tolerability. Similarly, plain fusidic acid cream or ointment used two or three times daily in SSTIs such as impetigo are clinically and bacteriologically effective, with minimal adverse events. Combination formulations of fusidic acid with 1% hydrocortisone or 0.1% betamethasone achieve...... excellent results in infected eczema by addressing both inflammation and infection. A new lipid-rich combination formulation provides an extra moisturizing effect. Development of resistance to fusidic acid has remained generally low or short-lived and can be minimized by restricting therapy to no more than...

  7. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain. This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks. Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  8. Stomach acid test

    Gastric acid secretion test ... The test is done after you have not eaten for a while so fluid is all that remains in ... injected into your body. This is done to test the ability of the cells in the stomach ...

  9. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  10. Folic acid in diet

    ... green leafy vegetables Dried beans and peas (legumes) Citrus fruits and juices Fortified means that vitamins have ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Folic Acid Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  11. Citric acid urine test

    ... usually done while you are on a normal diet. Ask your provider for more information. ... acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. The ... acid levels: A high carbohydrate diet Estrogen therapy Vitamin D

  12. Azelaic Acid Topical

    ... pores and by decreasing production of keratin, a natural substance that can lead to the development of ... acid controls acne and rosacea but does not cure these conditions. It may take 4 weeks or ...

  13. Acid rain: An overview

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of the effects of acid rain and related processes, sources, issues, corrective actions, research, current law, potential solutions, political solutions,...

  14. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in endodontics

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is a chelating agent can bind to metals via four carboxylate and two amine groups. It is a polyamino carboxylic acid and a colorless, water-soluble solid, which is widely used to dissolve lime scale. It is produced as several salts, notably disodium EDTA and calcium disodium EDTA. EDTA reacts with the calcium ions in dentine and forms soluble calcium chelates. A review of the literature and a discussion of the different indications and considerations for...

  15. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination. PMID:26227050

  16. Utilization of acid tars

    Frolov, A.F.; Denisova, T.L.; Aminov, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    Freshly produced acid tar (FPAT), obtained as refinery waste in treating petroleum oils with sulfuric acid and oleum, contains 80% or more sulfuric acid. Of such tars, pond acid tars, which contain up to 80% neutral petroleum products and sulfonated resins, are more stable, and have found applications in the production of binders for paving materials. In this article the authors are presenting results obtained in a study of the composition and reactivity of FPAT and its stability in storage in blends with asphalts obtained in deasphalting operations, and the possibility of using the FPAT in road construction has been examined. In this work, wastes were used which were obtained in treating the oils T-750, KhF-12, I-8A, and MS-14. Data on the change in group chemical composition of FPAT are shown, and the acidity, viscosity, needle penetration, and softening point of acid tars obtained from different grades of oils are plotted as functions of the storage time. It is also shown that the fresh and hardened FPATs differ in their solubilities in various solvents.

  17. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis IX

    Carey, E. M.; Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Dils, R.

    1972-01-01

    # 1. I. [I-14C]Acetate was covalently bound to rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase by enzymic transacylation from [I-14C]acetyl-CoA. Per mole of enzyme 2 moles of acetate were bound to thiol groups and up to I mole of acetate was bound to non-thiol groups. # 2. 2. The acetyl-fatty acid...... synthetase complex was isolated free from acetyl-CoA. It was rapidly hydrolysed at 30°C, but hydrolysis was greatly diminished at o°C and triacetic lactone synthesis occurred. In the presence of malonyl-CoA and NADPH, all the acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase was incorporated into long-chain fatty acids....... Hydrolysis of bound acetate and incorporation of bound acetate into fatty acids were inhibited to the same extent by guanidine hydrochloride. # 3. 3. Acetate was also covalently bound to fatty acid synthetase by chemical acetylation with [I-14C]acetic anhydride in the absence of CoASH. A total of 60 moles of...

  18. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  19. Acidification and Acid Rain

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  20. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  1. Synthesis and anticonvulsant activity of novel bicyclic acidic amino acids

    Conti, Paola; De Amici, Marco; Joppolo Di Ventimiglia, Samuele;

    2003-01-01

    Bicyclic acidic amino acids (+/-)-6 and (+/-)-7, which are conformationally constrained homologues of glutamic acid, were prepared via a strategy based on a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The new amino acids were tested toward ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes; both of them...

  2. Amino acids in the sedimentary humic and fulvic acids

    Sardessai, S.

    Humic and fulvic acids isolated from a few sediment samples from Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal were analysed for total hydrolysable amino acids concentration and their composition. The amono acids content of fulvic acids was higher than in the humic...

  3. EFFECT OF ACIDITY ON ACID-SENSITIVE UV CURING SYSTEM

    Qi-dao Chen; Bing Wu; Xiao-yin Hong

    1999-01-01

    By using diphenyliodonium salts with different counterions as photo acid generators (PAGs), the effect of acidity on ring-opening polymerization of epoxy monomers and polycondensation of polyol with hexamethoxymethyl melamine (HMMM) was studied. The result shows that the rate of ring-opening polymerization is evidently dependent on the acidity of the acid and strong photo-generated acid is required.However, there is a leveling effect in the polycondensation system; if the photo-generated acid is stronger than protonated HMMM, the acidity does not obviously affect the polycondensation rate.

  4. Chemistry and electrochemistry in trifluoroacetic acid. Comparison with acetic acid

    As the trifluoroacetic acid is, with the acetic acid, one of most often used carboxylic acids as solvent, notably in organic chemistry, this research thesis addresses some relatively simple complexing and redox reactions to highlight the peculiar feature of this acid, and to explain its very much different behaviour with respect to acetic acid. The author develops the notion of acidity level in solvents of low dielectric constant. The second part addresses a specific solvent: BF3(CH3COOH)2. The boron trifluoride strengthens the acidity of acetic acid and modifies its chemical and physical-chemical properties. In the third part, the author compares solvent properties of CF3COOH and CH3COOH. Noticed differences explain why the trifluoroacetic acid is a more interesting reaction environment than acetic acid for reactions such as electrophilic substitutions or protein solubilisation

  5. Determination of Sialic Acids by Acidic Ninhydrin Reaction

    Yao,Kenzabroh

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available A new acidic ninhydrin method for determining free sialic acids is described. The method is based on the reaction of sialic acids with Gaitonde's acid ninhydrin reagent 2 which yields a stable color with an absorption maximum at 470 nm. The standard curve is linear in the range of 5 to 500 nmol of N-acetylneuraminic acid per 0.9 ml of reaction mixture. The reaction was specific only for sialic acids among the various sugars and sugar derivatives examined. Some interference of this method by cysteine, cystine and tryptophan was noted, although their absorption maxima differed from that of sialic acids. The interference by these amino acids was eliminated with the use of a small column of cation-exchange resin. The acidic ninhydrin method provides a simple and rapid method for the determination of free sialic acids in biological materials.

  6. Fatty Acid Desaturases, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Regulation, and Biotechnological Advances

    Je Min Lee; Hyungjae Lee; SeokBeom Kang; Woo Jung Park

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are considered to be critical nutrients to regulate human health and development, and numerous fatty acid desaturases play key roles in synthesizing PUFAs. Given the lack of delta-12 and -15 desaturases and the low levels of conversion to PUFAs, humans must consume some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in their diet. Many studies on fatty acid desaturases as well as PUFAs have shown that fatty acid desaturase genes are closely related to different human phys...

  7. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    John S. Ramsdell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  8. Biological properties of lipoic acid

    Anna Bilska; Lidia Włodek

    2002-01-01

    Lipoic acid is a prostetic group of H-protein of the glycine cleavage system and the dihydrolipoamide acyltransferases (E2) of the pyruvate, alpha-ketoglutarate and branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complexes. Lipoic acid and its reduced form, dihydrolipoic acid, reacts with oxygen reactive species. This paper reviews the beneficial effects in oxidative stress models or clinical conditions.

  9. A Demonstration of Acid Rain

    Fong, Man Wai

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain formation is described. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen that result from the burning of fossil fuels are the major pollutants of acid rain. In this demonstration, SO[subscript 2] gas is produced by the burning of matches. An acid-base indicator will show that the dissolved gas turns an aqueous solution acidic.

  10. Amino acid analysis.

    Crabb, J W; West, K A; Dodson, W S; Hulmes, J D

    2001-05-01

    Amino acid analysis (AAA) is one of the best methods to quantify peptides and proteins. Two general approaches to quantitative AAA exist, namely, classical postcolumn derivatization following ion-exchange chromatography and precolumn derivatization followed by reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC). Excellent instrumentation and several specific methodologies are available for both approaches, and both have advantages and disadvantages. This unit focuses on picomole-level AAA of peptides and proteins using the most popular precolumn-derivatization method, namely, phenylthiocarbamyl amino acid analysis (PTC-AAA). It is directed primarily toward those interested in establishing the technology with a modest budget. PTC derivatization and analysis conditions are described, and support and alternate protocols describe additional techniques necessary or useful for most any AAA method--e.g., sample preparation, hydrolysis, instrument calibration, data interpretation, and analysis of difficult or unusual residues such as cysteine, tryptophan, phosphoamino acids, and hydroxyproline. PMID:18429107

  11. Halogenated fatty acids

    Mu, Huiling; Sundin, Peter; Wesén, Clas

    1997-01-01

    Halogenated fatty acids are the major contributors to organohalogen compounds in lipids of marine mammals, fish, and bivalves. For the initial characterization of these recently noticed compounds, a determination of the halogen concentration has usually been combined with some lipid isolation and...... separation method. This review covers separation by solid phase chromatography, gel permeation chromatography, and liquid-liquid extraction, followed by halogen determination. All studies performed according to this outline have indicated that the major organohalogen compounds are chlorinated fatty acids...... bound in different lipids. For the detection and identification of individual, halogenated fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) liberated from the lipids, gas chromatography (GC) has been employed together with detection methods such as electron capture detection, electrolytic conductivity detection (ELCD...

  12. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in endodontics.

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2013-09-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is a chelating agent can bind to metals via four carboxylate and two amine groups. It is a polyamino carboxylic acid and a colorless, water-soluble solid, which is widely used to dissolve lime scale. It is produced as several salts, notably disodium EDTA and calcium disodium EDTA. EDTA reacts with the calcium ions in dentine and forms soluble calcium chelates. A review of the literature and a discussion of the different indications and considerations for its usage are presented. PMID:24966721

  13. [Nicotinic acid and nicotinamide].

    Kobayashi, M; Shimizu, S

    1999-10-01

    Nicotinic acid and nicotinamide are called niacin. They are the antipellagra vitamin essential to many animals for growth and health. In human being, niacin is believed necessary together with other vitamins for the prevention and cure of pellagra. Niacin is widely distributed in nature; appreciable amounts are found in liver, fish, yeast and cereal grains. Nicotinamide is a precursor of the coenzyme NAD and NADP. Some of the most understood metabolic processes that involve niacin are glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and respiration. Niacin is also related to the following diseases: Hartnup disease; blue diaper syndrome; tryptophanuria; hydroxykynureninuria; xanthurenic aciduria; Huntington's disease. PMID:10540864

  14. Whither Acid Rain?

    Peter Brimblecombe

    2000-01-01

    Acid rain, the environmental cause célèbre of the 1980s seems to have vanished from popular conscience. By contrast, scientific research, despite funding difficulties, has continued to produce hundreds of research papers each year. Studies of acid rain taught much about precipitation chemistry, the behaviour of snow packs, long-range transport of pollutants and new issues in the biology of fish and forested ecosystems. There is now evidence of a shift away from research in precipitation and s...

  15. A very acid rocket

    Benoit Browaeys, D.

    1996-04-01

    The french rocket Ariane is the cause of environmental pollution. These effects are discussed in this article. Chloric acid and aluminium are in question: chloric acid is responsible of leaves necrosis and pulmonary diseases among the rats. For the man, the danger would be that drinking water could be contaminated by aluminium, which is neuro toxic with serious chronic effects. It is implicated in Alzheimer disease. But no studies has been made to search aluminium in drinking water of Sinnamary and Kourou. (N.C.). 8 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Whither Acid Rain?

    Peter Brimblecombe

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid rain, the environmental cause célèbre of the 1980s seems to have vanished from popular conscience. By contrast, scientific research, despite funding difficulties, has continued to produce hundreds of research papers each year. Studies of acid rain taught much about precipitation chemistry, the behaviour of snow packs, long-range transport of pollutants and new issues in the biology of fish and forested ecosystems. There is now evidence of a shift away from research in precipitation and sulfur chemistry, but an impressive theoretical base remains as a legacy.

  17. Boric acid concentration monitoring

    Boric acid concentration was measured by thermal neutron absorption in the study of the boric acid sorption and desorption curves on an anion exchange resin. Ra-Be 18.5 GBq and Am-Be 111 GBq sources and water as a moderator were used. The SNM 12 cylindrical corona detector with 10B placed in the middle of the measuring cell was used for neutron flux measurement. The HP 9600 E computer system was used for measured data collection and evaluation. (Ha)

  18. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammation

    Calder Philip C

    2004-01-01

    The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid arachidonic acid gives rise to the eicosanoid family of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandins, leukotrienes and related metabolites) and through these regulates the activities of inflammatory cells, the production of cytokines and the various balances within the immune system. Fish oil and oily fish are good sources of long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Consumption of these fatty acids decreases the amount of arachidonic acid in cell membranes and ...

  19. TRIP6 antagonizes the recruitment of A20 and CYLD to TRAF6 to promote the LPA2 receptor-mediated TRAF6 activation

    Lin, Fang-Tsyr; Lin, Vivian Y; Lin, Victor TG; Lin, Weei-Chin

    2016-01-01

    The elevated lysophosphatidic acid signaling has been causally linked to cancer-associated inflammation and tumorigenesis through upregulation of nuclear factor-κB signaling. However, how this signaling event is regulated has not yet been fully understood. Here we demonstrate that TRIP6, an LPA2 receptor-interacting adaptor protein, functions as a positive regulator of nuclear factor-κB and JNK signaling through direct binding to and activation of the E3 ligase TRAF6. Upon lysophosphatidic acid stimulation, TRIP6 recruits TRAF6 to the LPA2 receptor and promotes lysophosphatidic acid-induced JNK and nuclear factor-κB activation in a TRAF6-dependent manner. TRIP6 antagonizes the recruitment of deubiquitinases A20 and CYLD to TRAF6, thus sustaining the E3 ligase activity of TRAF6 and augmenting lysophosphatidic acid-activated nuclear factor-κB signaling. In contrast, depletion of TRIP6 by TRIP6-specific shRNA or Cas9/sgRNA greatly enhances the association of TRAF6 with A20 and CYLD, and attenuates lysophosphatidic acid-induced muclear factor-κB and JNK/p38 activation in ovarian cancer cells. On the other hand, TRAF6 also regulates TRIP6 by facilitating its binding to nuclear factor-κB p65 and phosphorylation by c-Src. Together, TRIP6 cooperates with TRAF6 to regulate the LPA2 receptor signaling, which may ultimately contribute to chronic inflammation, apoptotic resistance and cell invasion.

  20. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eighteen years (from 1988 till the beginning of 2006 are analyzed in this paper. It is very alarming data that, according to all the recorded accidents, over 1.6 million tons of sulfuric acid were exuded. Although water transport is the safest (only 16.38% of the total amount of accidents in that way 98.88% of the total amount of sulfuric acid was exuded into the environment. Human factor was the common factor in all the accidents, whether there was enough control of the production process, of reservoirs or transportation tanks or the transport was done by inadequate (old tanks, or the accidents arose from human factor (inadequate speed, lock of caution etc. The fact is that huge energy, sacrifice and courage were involved in the recovery from accidents where rescue teams and fire brigades showed great courage to prevent real environmental catastrophes and very often they lost their lives during the events. So, the phrase that sulfuric acid is a real "environmental bomb" has become clearer.

  1. Acid dip for dosemeter

    Background signal in a PTFE based dosemeter caused by impurities in the PTFE and in the active component such as lithium fluoride is substantially reduced by treating the dosemeter with acid. The optimum treatment involves use of hydrofluoric acid at room temperature for approximately one minute, followed by thorough washing with methanol, and finally drying. This treatment is best applied after the original manufacture of the dosemeters. It may also be applied to existing dosemeters after they have been in use for some time. The treatment produces a permanent effect in reducing both the light induced signal and the non-light induced signal. The process may be applied to all types of dosemeter manufactured from PTFE or other plastics or resins which are able to resist brief exposure to acid. The treatment works particularly well with dosemeters based on PTFE and lithium fluoride. It is also applicable to dosemeters based on calcium sulphate, lithium borate and magnesium borate. Acids which may be used include hydrofluoric, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric and sulphuric. (author)

  2. Acid Rain Investigations.

    Hugo, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students investigate the formation of solid ammonium chloride aerosol particles to help students better understand the concept of acid rain. Provides activity objectives, procedures, sample data, clean-up instructions, and questions and answers to help interpret the data. (MDH)

  3. Acid Rain Classroom Projects.

    Demchik, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a curriculum plan in which students learn about acid rain through instructional media, research and class presentations, lab activities, simulations, design, and design implementation. Describes the simulation activity in detail and includes materials, procedures, instructions, examples, results, and discussion sections. (SAH)

  4. The Acid Rain Game.

    Rakow, Steven J.; Glenn, Allen

    1982-01-01

    Provides rationale for and description of an acid rain game (designed for two players), a problem-solving model for elementary students. Although complete instructions are provided, including a copy of the game board, the game is also available for Apple II microcomputers. Information for the computer program is available from the author.…

  5. The Acid Rain Debate.

    Oates-Bockenstedt, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity designed to motivate students by incorporating science-related issues into a classroom debate. Includes "The Acid Rain Bill" and "Position Guides" for student roles as committee members, consumers, governors, industry owners, tourism professionals, senators, and debate directors. (DKM)

  6. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  7. Koetjapic acid chloroform hemisolvate

    Z. D. Nassar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C30H46O4·0.5CHCl3, consists of one koetjapic acid [systematic name: (3R,4aR,4bS,7S,8S,10bS,12aS-7-(2-carboxyethyl-3,4b,7,10b,12a-pentamethyl-8-(prop-1-en-2-yl-1,2,3,4,4a,4b,5,6,7,8,9,10,10b,11,12,12a-hexadecahydrochrysene-3-carboxylic acid] molecule and one half-molecule of chloroform solvent, which is disordered about a twofold rotation axis. The symmetry-independent component is further disordered over two sites, with occupancies of 0.30 and 0.20. The koetjapic acid contains a fused four-ring system, A/B/C/D. The A/B, B/C and C/D junctions adopt E/trans/cis configurations, respectively. The conformation of ring A is intermediate between envelope and half-chair and ring B adopts an envelope conformation whereas rings C and D adopt chair conformations. A weak intramolecular C—H...O hydrogen bond is observed. The koetjapic acid molecules are linked into dimers by two pairs of intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds. The dimers are stacked along the c axis.

  8. Lactic acid and lactates

    Schreurs, V.V.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    This review aims to integrate the present state of knowledge on lactate metabolism in human and mammalian physiology as far as it could be subject to nutritional interventions. An integrated view on the nutritional, metabolic and physiological aspects of lactic acid and lactates might open a perspec

  9. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  10. The biosynthesis of erucic acid in developing embryos of Brassica rapus

    The prevailing hypothesis on the biosynthesis of erucic acid in developing seeds is that oleic acid, produced in the plastid, is activated to oleoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) for malonyl-CoA-dependent elongation to erucic acid in the cytosol. Several in vivo-labeling experiments designed to probe and extend this hypothesis are reported here. To examine whether newly synthesized oleic acid is directly elongated to erucic acid in developing seeds of Brassica rapa L., embryos were labeled with [14C]acetate, and the ratio of radioactivity of carbon atoms C-5 to C-22 (de novo fatty acid synthesis portion) to carbon atoms C-1 to C-4 (elongated portion) of erucic acid was monitored with time. If newly synthesized 18:1 (oleate) immediately becomes a substrate for elongation to erucic acid, this ratio would be expected to remain constant with incubation time. However, if erucic acid is produced from a pool of preexisting oleic acid, the ratio of 14C in the 4 elongation carbons to 14C in the methyl-terminal 18 carbons would be expected to decrease with time. This labeling ratio decreased with time and, therefore, suggests the existence of an intermediate pool of 18:1, which contributes at least part of the oleoyl precursor for the production of erucic acid. The addition of 2-[(3-chloro-5-(trifluromethyl)-2-pyridinyl) oxyphenoxy]propanoic acid, which inhibits the homodimeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase, severely inhibited the synthesis of [14C]erucic acid, indicating that essentially all malonyl-CoA for elongation of 18:1 to erucate was produced by homodimeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Both light and 2-[(3-chloro-5(trifluromethyl)-2-pyridinyl) oxyphenoxy]-propanoic acid increased the accumulation of [14C]18:1 and the parallel accumulation of [14C]phosphatidylcholine. Taken together, these results show an additional level of complexity in the biosynthesis of erucic acid

  11. Photostabilization of ascorbic acid with citric acid, tartaric acid and boric acid in cream formulations.

    Ahmad, I; Ali Sheraz, M; Ahmed, S; Shad, Z; Vaid, F H M

    2012-06-01

    This study involves the evaluation of the effect of certain stabilizers, that is, citric acid (CT), tartaric acid (TA) and boric acid (BA) on the degradation of ascorbic acid (AH(2) ) in oil-in-water cream formulations exposed to the UV light and stored in the dark. The apparent first-order rate constants (0.34-0.95 × 10(-3) min(-1) in light, 0.38-1.24 × 10(-2) day(-1) in dark) for the degradation reactions in the presence of the stabilizers have been determined. These rate constants have been used to derive the second-order rate constants (0.26-1.45 × 10(-2) M(-1) min(-1) in light, 3.75-8.50 × 10(-3) M(-1) day(-1) in dark) for the interaction of AH(2) and the individual stabilizers. These stabilizers are effective in causing the inhibition of the rate of degradation of AH(2) both in the light and in the dark. The inhibitory effect of the stabilizers is in the order of CT > TA > BA. The rate of degradation of AH(2) in the presence of these stabilizers in the light is about 120 times higher than that in the dark. This could be explained on the basis of the deactivation of AH(2) -excited triplet state by CT and TA and by the inhibition of AH(2) degradation through complex formation with BA. AH(2) leads to the formation of dehydroascorbic acid (A) by chemical and photooxidation in cream formulations. PMID:22296174

  12. Origin of fatty acids

    The appearance of fatty acids and membranes is one of the most important events of the prebiotic world because genesis of life required the compartmentalization of molecules. Membranes allowed cells to become enriched with molecules relevant for their evolution and gave rise to gradients convertible into energy. By virtue of their hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface, membranes developed certain enzymatic activities impossible in the aqueous phase. A prebiotic cell is an energy unit but it is also an information unit. It has a past, a present and a future. The biochemistry of fatty acids involves acetylCoA, malonylCoA and an enzyme, acyl synthetase, which joins both molecules. After substitution of the acetyl group in place of the carboxyl group of malonyl derivatives, the chain is reduced and dehydrated to crotonyl derivatives. These molecules can again react with malonylCoA to form unsaturated chain; they can also undergo a new reduction step to form butyryl derivatives which can react with malonylCoA to form a longer aliphatic chain. The formation of malonylCoA consumes ATP. The reduction step needs NADPH and proton. Dehydration requires structural information because the reduction product is chiral (D configuration). It is unlikely that these steps were possible in a prebiotic environment. Thus we have to understand how fatty acids could appear in the prebiotic era. This hypothesis about the origin of fatty acids is based on the chemistry of sulfonium ylides and sulfonium salts. The most well-known among these molecules are S-melthyl-methionine and S-adenosyl methionine. The simplest sulfonium cation is the trimethylsulfonium cation. Chemists have evidence that these products can produce olefin when they are heated or flashed with UV light in some conditions. I suggest that these volatile products can allow the formation of fatty acids chains in atmospheric phase with UV and temperature using methanol as starting material. Different synthetic pathways will be

  13. Arterial Blood Carbonic Acid Inversely Determines Lactic and Organic Acids

    Aiken, Christopher Geoffrey Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish that arterial blood carbonic acid varies inversely with lactic acid in accordance with bicarbonate exchanging for lactate across cell membranes through the anion exchange mechanism to maintain the Gibbs-Donnan equilibrium.

  14. Boswellic acid inhibits expression of acid sphingomyelinase in intestinal cells

    Duan Rui-Dong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Boswellic acid is a type of triterpenoids with antiinflammatory and antiproliferative properties. Sphingomyelin metabolism generates multiple lipid signals affecting cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Upregulation of acid sphingomyelinase (SMase has been found in several inflammation-related diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Methods The present study is to examine the effect of 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acids (AKBA, a potent boswellic acid, on acid SMase activity and expression in intestinal cells. Both transformed Caco-2 cells and non-transformed Int407 cells were incubated with AKBA. After incubation, the change of acid SMase activity was assayed biochemically, the enzyme protein was examined by Western blot, and acid SMase mRNA was quantified by qPCR. Results We found that AKBA decreased acid SMase activity in both intestinal cell lines in dose and time dependent manners without affecting the secretion of the enzyme to the cell culture medium. The effect of AKBA was more effective in the fetal bovine serum-free culture medium. Among different types of boswellic acid, AKBA was the most potent one. The inhibitory effect on acid SMase activity occurred only in the intact cells but not in cell-free extract in the test tubes. At low concentration, AKBA only decreased the acid SMase activity but not the quantity of the enzyme protein. However, at high concentration, AKBA decreased both the mass of acid SMase protein and the mRNA levels of acid SMase in the cells, as demonstrated by Western blot and qPCR, respectively. Under the concentrations decreasing acid SMase activity, AKBA significantly inhibited cell proliferation. Conclusion We identified a novel inhibitory effect of boswellic acids on acid SMase expression, which may have implications in human diseases and health.

  15. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis. PMID:27349116

  16. Augmenting acid with affective details to assess credibility

    Roland Fleck

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a need within the criminal justice systems of many countries to create a valid and applicable system of investigative interviewing and credibility assessment. The present study assesses the general validity one such system, called Assessment Criteria Indicative of Deception (ACID. ACID comprises interviewing strategies that facilitate the detection of deception and content criteria that highlight differences in verbal behavior. Sixty university undergraduates performed a staged theft under time pressure and with incentives designed to increase external validity. The participants were interviewed and assessed using the ACID procedure. Half of them were instructed to answer honestly and the other half to deny his/her participation in the theft. Results showed that honest statements were longer, more vividly detailed, and more spontaneously structured than deceptive statements. Also, the addition of affective details as a dependent measure significantly improved the ACID system. Overall, 48 of 60 statements were accurately classified (26 of 30 honest statements and 22 of 30 deceptive statements. The ACID procedure was effective and benefited from the addition of affective details. The strengths and weaknesses of this study are discussed in light of basic research into deception and potential forensic application.

  17. Jmjd2C increases MyoD transcriptional activity through inhibiting G9a-dependent MyoD degradation.

    Jung, Eun-Shil; Sim, Ye-Ji; Jeong, Hoe-Su; Kim, Su-Jin; Yun, Ye-Jin; Song, Joo-Hoon; Jeon, Su-Hee; Choe, Chungyoul; Park, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Kye-Seong

    2015-08-01

    Skeletal muscle cell differentiation requires a family of proteins called myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) to which MyoD belongs. The activity of MyoD is under epigenetic regulation, however, the molecular mechanism by which histone KMTs and KDMs regulate MyoD transcriptional activity through methylation remains to be determined. Here we provide evidence for a unique regulatory mechanism of MyoD transcriptional activity through demethylation by Jmjd2C demethylase whose level increases during muscle differentiation. G9a decreases MyoD stability via methylation-dependent MyoD ubiquitination. Jmjd2C directly associates with MyoD in vitro and in vivo to demethylate and stabilize MyoD. The hypo-methylated MyoD due to Jmjd2C is significantly more stable than hyper-methylated MyoD by G9a. Cul4/Ddb1/Dcaf1 pathway is essential for the G9a-mediated MyoD degradation in myoblasts. By the stabilization of MyoD, Jmjd2C increases myogenic conversion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and MyoD transcriptional activity with erasing repressive H3K9me3 level at the promoter of MyoD target genes. Collectively, Jmjd2C increases MyoD transcriptional activity to facilitate skeletal muscle differentiation by increasing MyoD stability through inhibiting G9a-dependent MyoD degradation. PMID:26149774

  18. Group boundary permeability moderates the effect of a dependency meta-stereotype on help-seeking behaviour.

    Zhang, Lange; Kou, Yu; Zhao, Yunlong; Fu, Xinyuan

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have found that when low-status group members are aware that their in-group is stereotyped as dependent by a specific out-group (i.e. a dependency meta-stereotype is salient), they are reluctant to seek help from the high-status out-group to avoid confirming the negative meta-stereotype. However, it is unclear whether low-status group members would seek more help in the context of a salient dependency meta-stereotype when there is low (vs. high) group boundary permeability. Therefore, we conducted two experiments to examine the moderating effect of permeability on meta-stereotype confirmation with a real group. In study 1, we manipulated the salience of the dependency meta-stereotype, measured participants' perceived permeability and examined their help-seeking behaviour in a real-world task. Participants who perceived low permeability sought more help when the meta-stereotype was salient (vs. not salient), whereas participants who perceived high permeability sought the same amount of help across conditions. In study 2, we manipulated the permeability levels and measured the dependency meta-stereotype. Participants who endorsed a high-dependency meta-stereotype sought more help than participants who endorsed a low-dependency meta-stereotype; this effect was particularly strong in the low-permeability condition. The implications of these results for social mobility and intergroup helping are discussed. PMID:25885332

  19. Compression regulates gene expression of chondrocytes through HDAC4 nuclear relocation via PP2A-dependent HDAC4 dephosphorylation.

    Chen, Chongwei; Wei, Xiaochun; Wang, Shaowei; Jiao, Qiang; Zhang, Yang; Du, Guoqing; Wang, Xiaohu; Wei, Fangyuan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wei, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Biomechanics plays a critical role in the modulation of chondrocyte function. The mechanisms by which mechanical loading is transduced into intracellular signals that regulate chondrocyte gene expression remain largely unknown. Histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) is specifically expressed in chondrocytes. Mice lacking HDAC4 display chondrocyte hypertrophy, ectopic and premature ossification, and die early during the perinatal period. HDAC4 has a remarkable ability to translocate between the cell's cytoplasm and nucleus. It has been established that subcellular relocation of HDAC4 plays a critical role in chondrocyte differentiation and proliferation. However, it remains unclear whether subcellular relocation of HDAC4 in chondrocytes can be induced by mechanical loading. In this study, we first report that compressive loading induces HDAC4 relocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of chondrocytes via stimulation of Ser/Thr-phosphoprotein phosphatases 2A (PP2A) activity, which results in dephosphorylation of HDAC4. Dephosphorylated HDAC4 relocates to the nucleus to achieve transcriptional repression of Runx2 and regulates chondrocyte gene expression in response to compression. Our results elucidate the mechanism by which mechanical compression regulates chondrocyte gene expression through HDAC4 relocation from the cell's cytoplasm to the nucleus via PP2A-dependent HDAC4 dephosphorylation. PMID:27106144

  20. College Chemistry Students' Mental Models of Acids and Acid Strength

    McClary, LaKeisha; Talanquer, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    The central goal of this study was to characterize the mental models of acids and acid strength expressed by advanced college chemistry students when engaged in prediction, explanation, and justification tasks that asked them to rank chemical compounds based on their relative acid strength. For that purpose we completed a qualitative research…

  1. Acetic acid extraction from aqueous solutions using fatty acids

    IJmker, H.M.; Gramblicka, M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Ham, van der A.G.J.; Schuur, B.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for production of acetic acid via bio-based routes is cost-effective concentration and purification of the acetic acid from the aqueous solutions, for which liquid–liquid extraction is a possible method. A main challenge in extraction of acetic acid from dilute aqueous solutions is

  2. [Progress in glucaric acid].

    Qiu, Yuying; Fang, Fang; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Glucaric acid (GA) is derived from glucose and commonly used in chemical industry. It is also considered as one of the "Top value-added chemicals from biomass" as carbohydrate monomers to produce various synthetic polymers and bioenergy. The demand for GA in food manufacture is increasing. GA has also attracted public attentions due to its therapeutic uses such as regulating hormones, increasing the immune function and reducing the risks of cancers. Currently GA is produced by chemical oxidation. Research on production of GA via microbial synthesis is still at preliminary stage. We reviewed the advances of glucaric acid applications, preparation and quantification methods. The prospects on production of GA by microbial fermentation were also discussed. PMID:26380405

  3. N-(3-Methylphenylsuccinamic acid

    B. Thimme Gowda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound, C11H13NO3, the conformations of the N—H and C=O bonds in the amide segment are anti to each other, and that of the amide H atom is anti to the meta-methyl group in the benzene ring. Furthermore, the conformations of the amide oxygen and the carbonyl O atom of the acid segment are also anti to the adjacent –CH2 groups. The C=O and O—H bonds of the acid group are syn to each other. In the crystal, the molecules are packed into infinite chains through intermolecular N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  4. Studies on terreic acid.

    Yamamoto, H; Moriyama, K; Jinnouchi, H; Yagishita, K

    1980-03-01

    It was found that Aspergillus sp. No. Y-8980 which was isolated from a soil sample collected at Yoron Island in Kagoshima Prefecture belonged to Aspergillus terreus group by morphological observation. The active substance produced by the strain was obtained with a high yield in sucrose-yeast extract medium and extracted by chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol at pH 2.4 approximately 2.6 from the culture broth. The substance was crystallized from chloroform and ethyl acetate after charcoal treatment of the crude crystal. From various physico-chemical properties, it was found that the substance was identical to terreic acid. Terreic acid showed MICs of 25 approximately 100 mcg/ml, 12.5 mcg/ml and 50 mcg/ml against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Xanthomonas oryzae and Xanthomonas citri, respectively, but it did not control Pseudomonas, fungi and yeast. The LD50 was 75 mg/kg i.p. and i.v. in mice. With regards to the anti-tumor effect, the morphological degeneration on HeLa cells (human carcinoma cells) was observed in the concentrations of more than 6.25 mcg/ml of terreic acid. An increase of body weight of mice caused by Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells was not definitely observed by the daily administration of 150 mcg of terreic acid per mouse for 8 consecutive days. Above showed the enough survival effect in dd mice implanted with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells, and the effect also was demonstrated by anatomies of mice. PMID:7190624

  5. Electrochemistry of nucleic acids

    Paleček, Emil; Bartošík, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 6 (2012), s. 3427-3481. ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055; GA MŠk(CZ) ME09038; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : nucleic acids electrochemistry * DNA biosensors * DNA damage Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 41.298, year: 2012

  6. Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5)

    ... niacinamide), vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), and folic acid. However, some products do ... for dandruff, depression, diabetic nerve pain, enhancing immune function, improving athletic performance, tongue infections, gray hair, headache, ...

  7. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  8. ACID ROCK DRAINAGE

    Anca Ionce

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Acid rock drainage (ARD is an particularly important aspect for the evaluation of the decantation ponds’ safety, and which has been only once taken into consideration at the Tarnicioara decantation pond, year 2002, as a consequence of the apparition of a strong seepage on the deposit’s dump, that has chemically de-purified the water from the river Brateasa. We have observed ARD, which implies the release of acid solutions from the mining sterile deposits, from the underground mining works and from the quarries, in the following tailings dams: Tarnicioara, Valea Strajii, Poarta Veche- which served Tarniţa Preparation Enterprise and in the Dealu Negru and Paraul Cailor ponds- which, at their time served Fundu Moldovei Preparation Enterprise, both during the period of their functioning and the period after their closure. For the decantation pond Dumitrelu which served the Calimani preparation enterprise, acid seepages from the deposit were mentioned in a study made by SC ICPM SA Baia Mare in 1993. Subsequently to the closure of the objective such seepage did not take place anymore. Instead, by raining, there is a frequent plant sterile dragging from the contour retaining wall down to the trouble pond, situated upstream.

  9. Study of the A-dependence of the deep inelastic scattering of leptons and its implications for understanding of the EMC effect

    It is suggested to determine A dependence of distortions of the nucleon structure function summing up the distortions found in some interval. All the available data evidence for the saturation of the distortion magnitude with A rising

  10. Biological properties of lipoic acid

    Anna Bilska

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipoic acid is a prostetic group of H-protein of the glycine cleavage system and the dihydrolipoamide acyltransferases (E2 of the pyruvate, alpha-ketoglutarate and branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complexes. Lipoic acid and its reduced form, dihydrolipoic acid, reacts with oxygen reactive species. This paper reviews the beneficial effects in oxidative stress models or clinical conditions.