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Sample records for 9cr-1mo ferritic steel

  1. Modification in the Microstructure of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo Ferritic Martensitic Steel Exposed to Sodium

    Prasanthi, T. N.; Sudha, Cheruvathur; Paul, V. Thomas; Bharasi, N. Sivai; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2014-09-01

    Mod. 9Cr-1Mo is used as the structural material in the steam generator circuit of liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors. Microstructural modifications on the surface of this steel are investigated after exposing to flowing sodium at a temperature of 798 K (525 °C) for 16000 hours. Sodium exposure results in the carburization of the ferritic steel up to a depth of ~218 µm from the surface. Electron microprobe analysis revealed the existence of two separate zones with appreciable difference in microchemistry within the carburized layer. Differences in the type, morphology, volume fraction, and microchemistry of the carbides present in the two zones are investigated using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Formation of separate zones within the carburized layer is understood as a combined effect of leaching, diffusion of the alloying elements, and thermal aging. Chromium concentration on the surface in the α-phase suggested possible degradation in the corrosion resistance of the steel. Further, concentration-dependent diffusivities for carbon are determined in the base material and carburized zones using Hall's and den Broeder's methods, respectively. These are given as inputs for simulating the concentration profiles for carbon using numerical computation technique based on finite difference method. Predicted thickness of the carburized zone agrees reasonably well with that of experiment.

  2. Prediction of high temperature flow stress in 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel during hot compression

    Constitutive analysis was performed on the experimental true stress-true strain data obtained from hot isothermal compression tests on 9Cr-1Mo steel in a wide range of temperatures (1173-1373 K, i.e. 900-1100 oC) and strain rates (0.01-100 s-1). The constitutive equation for hot deformation is represented by a hyperbolic-sine Arrhenius type equation relating flow stress, strain rate and temperature, and could be described by the Zener-Hollomon parameter in an exponential type equation. The influence of strain was incorporated in the constitutive equation by considering the variation of material constants as a function of strain. It is observed that the compensation for strain could not accurately predict the flow stress for the entire strain rate and temperature regime. The constitutive equation was revised incorporating compensation for both strain and strain rate by suitably modifying the Zener-Hollomon parameter and the modified constitutive equation is found to give good prediction of flow stresses for most strain rate and temperature combinations. - Highlights: → Constitutive analysis is performed on hot compression flow data on 9Cr-1Mo steel. → The influence of strain was incorporated in hyperbolic-sine constitutive equation. → The material constants in constitutive equation were found to vary with strain. → Constitutive equation was revised by suitably modifying the Zener-Hollomon parameter. → The modified constitutive equation gave good prediction of the flow stress.

  3. Prediction of high temperature flow stress in 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel during hot compression

    Krishnan, S.A. [Materials Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Dept of Atomic Energy, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Phaniraj, C., E-mail: phani@igcar.gov.in [Materials Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Dept of Atomic Energy, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Ravishankar, C.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Sivaprasad, P.V. [Materials Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Dept of Atomic Energy, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2011-12-15

    Constitutive analysis was performed on the experimental true stress-true strain data obtained from hot isothermal compression tests on 9Cr-1Mo steel in a wide range of temperatures (1173-1373 K, i.e. 900-1100 {sup o}C) and strain rates (0.01-100 s{sup -1}). The constitutive equation for hot deformation is represented by a hyperbolic-sine Arrhenius type equation relating flow stress, strain rate and temperature, and could be described by the Zener-Hollomon parameter in an exponential type equation. The influence of strain was incorporated in the constitutive equation by considering the variation of material constants as a function of strain. It is observed that the compensation for strain could not accurately predict the flow stress for the entire strain rate and temperature regime. The constitutive equation was revised incorporating compensation for both strain and strain rate by suitably modifying the Zener-Hollomon parameter and the modified constitutive equation is found to give good prediction of flow stresses for most strain rate and temperature combinations. - Highlights: > Constitutive analysis is performed on hot compression flow data on 9Cr-1Mo steel. > The influence of strain was incorporated in hyperbolic-sine constitutive equation. > The material constants in constitutive equation were found to vary with strain. > Constitutive equation was revised by suitably modifying the Zener-Hollomon parameter. > The modified constitutive equation gave good prediction of the flow stress.

  4. Nondestructive testing for microstructural characterization in 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel towards assessment of fabrication quality and in-service degradation

    The paper discusses the usefulness of non destructive testing for microstructural characterization in 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements and spectral analysis have been used in a complementary way for characterizing Ac1 and Ac3 temperatures, amount of martensite and ferrite, dissolution of V4C3 and NbC and formation of δ-ferrite. The microstructural degradation occurring due to thermal ageing and creep has also been studied by ultrasonic velocity measurements. Magnetic Barkhausen noise technique has been used for estimating the extent of various regions in heat affected zone (HAZ) of 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel weldment. The same technique has been used for the assessment of low cycle fatigue damage in 9Cr-1Mo steel. The study establishes that non destructive methods can be used for the assessment of fabrication quality and in service degradation of the components. (author)

  5. Microstructure of welded and weld-simulated modified 9Cr-1Mo (P 91) ferritic steel

    Within the last 30 years significant advances in materials development have been made which have enhanced the operation temperature of thermal power plants led to an improvement in efficiency. Currently, a great deal of work relating to the modified 9% Cr-1/5 Mo steel (P 91) is in progress. This type of steel was originally considered to be an appropriate candidate for Fast Breeder Applications, and it was designed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Up to the present, several modifications of 9% chromium steels have been developed in several labs all over the globe containing different portions of tungsten and molybdenum. This report focuses on the microstructural characterization of a heavy section multi pass weld done on a tube composed of P 91 steel. Weld simulations, using the Gleeble 1500 technology, were successfully applied to aid the microstructural study of the heat affected zone (HAZ). As revealed by the investigations, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) results in a softening of the heat affected zone in an area close to the uninfluenced base metal. According to the observed microstructure and Gleeble simulations, the peak temperature of the soft zone during welding falls within a temperature range between AC1 (= 810 C) and slightly above AC3 typically 900--930 C which was discovered for the first time in a previous investigation

  6. Microstructure of welded and weld-simulated modified 9Cr-1Mo (P 91) ferritic steel

    Prader, R.; Cerjak, H. [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Within the last 30 years significant advances in materials development have been made which have enhanced the operation temperature of thermal power plants led to an improvement in efficiency. Currently, a great deal of work relating to the modified 9% Cr-1/5 Mo steel (P 91) is in progress. This type of steel was originally considered to be an appropriate candidate for Fast Breeder Applications, and it was designed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Up to the present, several modifications of 9% chromium steels have been developed in several labs all over the globe containing different portions of tungsten and molybdenum. This report focuses on the microstructural characterization of a heavy section multi pass weld done on a tube composed of P 91 steel. Weld simulations, using the Gleeble 1500 technology, were successfully applied to aid the microstructural study of the heat affected zone (HAZ). As revealed by the investigations, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) results in a softening of the heat affected zone in an area close to the uninfluenced base metal. According to the observed microstructure and Gleeble simulations, the peak temperature of the soft zone during welding falls within a temperature range between A{sub C1} (= 810 C) and slightly above A{sub C3} typically 900--930 C which was discovered for the first time in a previous investigation.

  7. 9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    Jablonski, Paul D; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-11-27

    One or more embodiments relates to a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel has a tempered martensite microstructure and is comprised of both large (0.5-3 .mu.m) primary titanium carbides and small (5-50 nm) secondary titanium carbides in a ratio of. from about 1:1.5 to about 1.5:1. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel may be fabricated using exemplary austenizing, rapid cooling, and tempering steps without subsequent hot working requirements. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined.

  8. Effects of processing and thermal ageing on the low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue interaction behaviour of 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel

    9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is at present under consideration for thick-section tube plates and tubing for steam generators in liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor. The low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour of 300mm thick section forged 9Cr-1Mo steel was studied under total axial strain control in simulated post-weld heat treatment (SPWHT) and isothermally aged (5000h at 793K) conditions at 793K. A symmetrical triangular wave form and a strain rate of 1 x 103s-1 were employed for all the LCF tests performed over strain amplitudes in the range of ±0.25% to ±1.0%. In both the material conditions cyclic softening was seen at all strain amplitudes. Prior ageing improved the fatigue resistance of simulated post weld heat treat (SPWHT). The fatigue life of forged thick section 9Cr-1Mo steel was lower than that of thin section rolled bar material. LCF life of SPWHT material could be predicted successfully using Tomkins crack growth model. A tentative fatigue design curve for 793K has been proposed based on the information generated in the laboratory using the philosophy outlined in the code case N-47. Creep-fatigue interaction tests, conducted by introducing one minute hold periods at maximum strain amplitude (±0.50%) in tension only, compression only and combined tension and compression, showed little effect on the fatigue life. Attempts at fitting the hold time data to the linear interaction damage model yielded a value of unity for the summation of creep and fatigue damages. (author). 26 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of tempered 9%Cr-1% Mo steel

    The influence of the subsurface hydrogen activity on the hydrogen embrittlement (HE) susceptibility of a tempered 9%Cr-1%Mo ferritic-martensitic steel (T91) has been studied by constant extension rate tests (CERT) performed under cathodic charging during straining at 20 degrees C. changes in the hydrogen activity on the surface were obtained by varying the cathodic current density imposed during a tensile test completed to fracture. The broken samples were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show a strong dependence of the extent of the brittle zone with the subsurface hydrogen activity. This effect could be attributed to an enhancement of the apparent diffusion coefficient of hydrogen when increasing H activity. Increasing H activity could enhance both the trapping rate on pre-existing and strain-induced traps and H dragging by moving traps such as dislocations. (authors)

  10. Influence of prior thermal ageing on tensile deformation and fracture behaviour of forged thick section 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel

    Tensile tests were performed on specimens in quenched and tempered (Q + T) and thermally aged (TA) conditions over a wide temperature range (300-873 K) to assess the influence of prior thermal ageing on tensile deformation and fracture behaviour of forged thick section 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel. Prior thermal ageing at 793 and 873 K for durations ranging from 10 to 5000 h did not cause a significant change in room temperature tensile properties. However, a marginal decrease in yield strength and reduction in area were observed for specimens aged for longer durations at 793 and 873 K. Prior thermal ageing at 793 K for 5000 h and at 873 K for 1000 and 5000 h produced significant reduction in strength values at intermediate temperatures (523-723 K) compared to that observed at high temperatures. At intermediate temperatures, the alloy in all heat treatment conditions exhibited serrated flow, a manifestation of dynamic strain ageing (DSA). The significant loss of strength in thermally aged conditions at intermediate temperatures has been attributed to reduced propensity to DSA. The elongation to fracture values at temperatures in the range 300-873 K were affected little by prior thermal ageing, whereas the reduction in area exhibited a decrease in the value with increasing thermal ageing. The fracture mode remained transgranular ductile at all test conditions investigated in the present study. However, specimens aged for longer durations exhibited chisel fracture at room and intermediate temperatures due to split in the martensite lath boundaries. The influence of thermal ageing on room temperature tensile properties of the forging remained similar to that reported for thin section 9Cr-1Mo steel. (orig.)

  11. Influence of prior thermal ageing on creep and low cycle fatigue behaviour of forged thick section 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel at 793 K

    Detailed investigations have been carried out to understand the influence of prior thermal ageing on creep and low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour of thick section 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel forging. Creep tests were conducted in quenched and tempered (Q+T), simulated post weld heat treatment (SPWHT) and thermally aged (TA) conditions at 793 K. Total-axial-strain controlled continuous cycling LCF tests have been performed on SPWHT and TA specimens at 793 K. No significant variation in creep rupture properties was observed in the three material conditions investigated. The failure mode remained transgranular ductile characterized by void coalescence under all test conditions. LCF resistance of thermally aged material was found to be higher compared to SPWHT material. Both SPWHT and TA materials exhibited progressive cyclic softening and similar cyclic stress-strain behaviour obeying power-law relationship. The crack initiation and propagation modes remained transgranular in both material conditions. However, thermally aged material exhibited extensive particle decohesion and higher secondary cracking. The improved LCF resistance of thermally aged material has been ascribed mainly to the reduction in stress intensity at the tip of propagating main crack caused by enhanced particle decohesion and secondary cracks. (author). 37 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  12. Characterization of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel extruded pipe

    The fabrication of hot-extruded pipe of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel at Cameron Iron Works is described. The report also deals with the tempering response; tensile, Charpy impact, and creep properties; and microstructure of the hot-extruded pipe. The tensile properties of the pipe are compared with the average and average -1.65 standard error of estimate curves for various product forms of several commercial heats of this alloy. The creep-rupture properties are compared with the average curve for various product forms of the commercial heats

  13. Stress-controlled inelastic behavior of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel at elevated temperatures

    Interest in the ferritic steels of higher chromium concentration has increased recently because of an economical combination of mechanical and corrosion properties at elevated temperatures. A modified 9 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel, developed in the United States, has been expected as an alternative structural material for fast breeder reactor components, in which Type 304 stainless steel or 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel is currently used. For application of this material to the structural components, a lot of work has been done to develop evaluation methods for the deformation behavior and strength properties. The authors have studied the inelastic behavior and the creep-fatigue properties of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel at elevated temperatures, and proposed a constitutive equation and a creep-fatigue damage equation based on the overstress concept. In this paper, the applicability is discussed of the constitutive equation to stress-controlled inelastic behavior, such as creep strain hardening and stress cycling

  14. Thermal Aging Evaluation of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo Steel using Nonlinear Rayleigh Waves

    Thermal aging can pose a high risk to decreases in the mechanical properties such as strength or creep resistance. This can lead to an unexpected failure during long term operation. Nonlinear NDE techniques are preferred over conventional NDE techniques (linear ultrasonic measurements) because nonlinear ultrasonic techniques have shown their capability to detect a microstructural damage in the structures undergoing fatigue and creep. These nonlinear ultrasonic techniques make use of the fact that the dislocation density increases, which will create a nonlinear distortion of an ultrasonic wave; this damage causes the generation of measurable higher harmonic components in an initially mono-chromatic ultrasonic signal. This study investigates the recently developed non-contact nonlinear ultrasonic technique to detect the microstructural damage of mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel based on nonlinear Rayleigh wave with varying propagation distances. Nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave measurements using a non-contact, air-coupled ultrasonic transducer have been applied for the thermal aging evaluation of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel. Thermal aging for various heat treatment times of mod.. 9Cr-1Mo steel specimens is performed to obtain the nucleation and growth of precipitated particles in specimens. The amplitudes of the first and second harmonics are measured along the propagation distance and the relative nonlinearity parameter is obtained from these amplitudes. The relative nonlinearity parameter shows a similar trend with the Rockwell C hardness

  15. Thermal Aging Evaluation of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo Steel using Nonlinear Rayleigh Waves

    Joo, Young-Sang; Kim, Hoe-Woong; Kim, Jong-Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Marino, Daniel; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, L.J [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta (United States); Ruiz, Alberto [UMSNH, Morelia (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    Thermal aging can pose a high risk to decreases in the mechanical properties such as strength or creep resistance. This can lead to an unexpected failure during long term operation. Nonlinear NDE techniques are preferred over conventional NDE techniques (linear ultrasonic measurements) because nonlinear ultrasonic techniques have shown their capability to detect a microstructural damage in the structures undergoing fatigue and creep. These nonlinear ultrasonic techniques make use of the fact that the dislocation density increases, which will create a nonlinear distortion of an ultrasonic wave; this damage causes the generation of measurable higher harmonic components in an initially mono-chromatic ultrasonic signal. This study investigates the recently developed non-contact nonlinear ultrasonic technique to detect the microstructural damage of mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel based on nonlinear Rayleigh wave with varying propagation distances. Nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave measurements using a non-contact, air-coupled ultrasonic transducer have been applied for the thermal aging evaluation of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel. Thermal aging for various heat treatment times of mod.. 9Cr-1Mo steel specimens is performed to obtain the nucleation and growth of precipitated particles in specimens. The amplitudes of the first and second harmonics are measured along the propagation distance and the relative nonlinearity parameter is obtained from these amplitudes. The relative nonlinearity parameter shows a similar trend with the Rockwell C hardness.

  16. Liquid Metal Embrittlement of a 9Cr-1Mo Ferritic-martensitic Steel in Lead-bismuth Eutectic Environment under Low Cycle Fatigue

    Gong, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic T91 steel is a candidate material for constructing the proton beam window of the MYRRHA nuclear reactor, which is being developed in SCK•CEN, Belgium for transmuting long-lived nuclear waste. As one important part of the MYRRHA material qualification program, liquid metal embrittlement (LME), a phenomenon could cause premature brittle failure of components, is crucial to be checked for T91 steel in contact with lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) which is the coolant and spallati...

  17. Analysis of weldment mechanical properties of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel

    The status of welding and weldability studies on modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel is presented, and microhardness, tensile, creep, and Charpy impact properties of welds made by gas tungsten arc, shielded metal arc, and submerged arc processes are analyzed. Microhardness traverses of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo welds were examined after nominal and extended postweld heat treatments. Microhardness data on modified 9 Cr-1 Mo were also compared with similar results on standard 9 Cr-1 Mo, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, and HT9. Tensile and creep data were primarily on weldment specimens in which the gage length contained the base metal, weld metal, and heat-affected zone. Charpy impact data were primarily on the weld metal, with notch parallel to the welding direction. On the basis of the data presented, it is concluded that standard 9 Cr-1 Mo wire and electrodes can be used to weld modified 9 Cr-1 Mo base metal if welds are given a nominal postweld heat treatment. If welds are to be normalized and tempered, the use of modified wire and electrodes having the base metal composition is recommended

  18. Weld simulated US Mod 9Cr 1 Mo steel: Pt. 1

    A microstructural investigation of simulated welds in US Mod 9Cr1Mo ferritic steel has been undertaken using transmission electron microscopy, with EDX microanalysis and hardness transverse measurements. Samples have also been normalised at 10400C for 0.5h and tempered at 7600C for 1h under conditions which have been reported elsewhere as leading to the best creep properties. Observations include both base metal and heat affected zones in the welded and postwelded heat treated conditions. Particular emphasis was given to the interface of the above regions, where a hardness drop related to a degradation of creep properties had been detected by a number of studies. The results include the identification of precipitates, their chemical composition and a description of the various morphologies observed. The main findings are discussed in terms of the thermal cycle associated with the weld simulation and the presence of strong carbide formers such as vanadium and niobium. (author)

  19. Microstructural evolution of as-rolled modified 9Cr-1Mo steel during friction stir welding

    Lee, Jung-Gu; Lee, Min-Ku; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Nuclear Materials Development Div.; Kim, Ju-Myoung [Nano Technology Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). R and D Center

    2013-09-15

    Friction stir welding was tried on a modified 9Cr-1Mo (wt.%) ferritic steel in an as-rolled condition. The microstructure of the resultant weld was divided into four distinct regions according to each thermo-mechanical history experienced during welding; i.e., stir zone, thermo-mechanically affected zone, inner heat-affected zone, and outer heat-affected zone. The first three zones showed distinct martensite morphologies depending on the different recrystallization phenomena during the heating cycle in the single-phase austenite region. In the outer heat-affected zone, however, only tempering occurred without phase transformation owing to a relatively low heating temperature. Hardness distribution of the weld closely reflected such microstructural differences, indicating that a considerable softening occurred in the thermo-mechanically affected zone and outer heat-affected zone owing to the coarsening and tempering effects, respectively. (orig.)

  20. Ultra-high temperature strength properties on Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel

    A sodium-water reaction drove from the single tube break in steam generator of FBR might overheat labor tubes rapidly under internal pressure loadings. If the temperature of tube wall becomes too high, it has to be evaluated that the stress of tube does not exceed the material strength limit to prevent the propagation of tube rupture. This study clarified the tensile and creep properties of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel at ultra-high temperature which will be used in evaluation of the tube burst by sodium-water reaction. The strain rates for tensile test are from 10%/min to 10%/sec, and creep-rupture time is maximum 277sec. The range of test temperature is 700degC to 1300degC. The main results obtained were as follows; (1) The evaluation data on the relationship between tensile strength and strain rate and creep-rupture strength in shorter time on Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel were acquired. (2) Short-term mechanical properties of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel were evaluated based on the results of tensile and creep-rupture tests up to 1300degC. As a result of the evaluation, recommended equation of creep-rupture strength in the short-term was proposed. (3) Tensile and creep-rupture strength of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel tube showed the value which was higher than the 2·1/4Cr-1Mo steel, and it was proven to have the superior properties. (author)

  1. Development of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel for elevated-temperature service

    The status of development and commercialization of a modified 9 Cr-1 Mo alloy is presented. The alloy is modified by the addition of 0.06 to 0.10% Nb and 0.18 to 0.25% V. The alloy is recommended for use in the normalized and tempered condition (10400C for 1 h, air cooled to room temperature; 7600C for 1 h, air cooled to room temperature). Heat treatment, Charpy impact, tensile, and creep properties of the alloy are described in detail along with a brief description of other properties. The modified alloy has creep strength that exceeds that of standard 9 Cr-1 Mo and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steels for the temperature range from 427 to 7040C. The total-elongation and reduction-of-area values for all test temperatures and rupture times up to 22,500 h exceed 15 and 70%, respectively. The estimated design allowable stresses for this alloy are higher than those for standard 9 Cr-1 Mo and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. At 5500C and above, these values are twice those of the other alloys. Operating experience on this alloy is being obtained by installing tubes in various steam power plants. 13 figures, 5 tables

  2. Creep-fatigue evaluation method for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    As creep-fatigue evaluation methods on normalized and tempered Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for design use, the time fraction rule and the simplified conventional ductility exhaustion rule are investigated for the prediction of tension strain hold creep-fatigue damage of this material. For the above investigation, stress relaxation behaviour during strain hold has to be analyzed using stress-strain-time relation. The initial value of stress relaxation was determined by cyclic stress-strain curves in continuous cycling fatigue tests. Cyclic stress-strain behaviour of Mod.9Cr-1Mo(NT) steel is different from that of austenitic stainless steels, so this effect was considered. Stress relaxation analysis was performed using static creep strain-time relation and conventional hardening rule. The time fraction by using the above stress relaxation analysis results can give good prediction for creep-fatigue life of Mod.9Cr-1Mo(NT) steel. For design use it is practical to be able to estimate creep damages conservatively by both strain behaviour of cyclic plastic (in continuous cycling fatigue tests) and monotonic creep (in standard creep tests). The life reduction by strain hold at the minimum peak of compressive stress in creep-fatigue tests was examined, and this effects can be evaluated by the relationship between the location of oxidation and the effective deformation at crack tip. In an accelerated oxidation environment, for example in high temperature and high pressure steam, a different approach for life reduction should be developed based on the mechanism of growth of oxide and crack growth with oxidation. However, in the creep damage dominant region, its effect is saturated and the effect of cavity growth along grain boundary becomes dominant for long-term strain hold in the high temperature conditions. (author). 6 refs, 6 figs

  3. Effect of alkali and chloride ions on pitting corrosion behaviour of boron added modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is used as a structural material for the steam generator of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) due to its high temperature corrosion and oxidation resistance. Since all the components (tube, tube sheet and shell) of steam generator are made of modified 9Cr-1Mo, it is also required to be resistant against general and localized corrosion. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel with 100 ppm boron addition is being considered as the structural material for the steam generators of future fast reactors, owing to its improved creep properties. In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the pitting corrosion behaviour of this material in alkaline environment containing chloride ions. Alkaline environment was chosen to simulate the caustic condition generated in the steam generator due to the accidental leak of feed water containing chloride ions (as impurity) with hot sodium. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization studies were carried out in deaerated 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5M sodium hydroxide solutions containing 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5M sodium chloride. During the experiments current value was allowed to increase up to 1 mA to ensure that stable pits were developed. Pitting potentials (Epp) were determined from the anodic polarization diagrams. The pitted specimens etched in Villela's reagent were observed under an optical microscope as well as a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Most of the pits observed under optical microscope were found to be hemispherical in nature. The diameters of 30 random pits were measured (two diameters at right angles for each pit) and an average diameter for each pit was calculated

  4. Tensile properties of 9Cr-1Mo martensitic steel irradiated with high energy protons and neutrons

    Tensile specimens of 9Cr-1Mo martensitic steel in three metallurgical conditions (tempered, 20% cold-worked and as-quenched) were irradiated in SINQ target-3 with high energy protons and spallation neutrons at temperatures between about 130 and 310 deg. C to doses between 4 and 12 dpa. Tensile properties were measured mostly at room temperature but a limited number of tests were performed at 250 and 350 deg. C. Scanning electron microscopy observations of fracture surfaces as well as reduction of area measurements were performed in selected cases. Results of preliminary TEM investigations carried out on 3 mm discs irradiated together with the tensile specimens are also presented. Tensile properties are compared with earlier results on martensitic steels irradiated in spallation conditions as well as with tensile data obtained for the same heat of 9Cr-1Mo steel after irradiation with fission neutrons in the OSIRIS reactor. The as-quenched specimens displayed a fully brittle behaviour and SEM observations revealed an intergranular fracture mode. The irradiated cold-worked and annealed specimens showed large increases in strength as well as drastic reductions in uniform elongation up to a dose of about 10 dpa. The fracture surface appearances remained however ductile. The few specimens irradiated to higher doses (up to 12 dpa) recovered significant ductility, which is presently not understood on the basis of the available preliminary microstructural data

  5. Reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments

    The provisions of ASME B ampersand PV Code Case N-47 currently include reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of weldments. To provide experimental confirmation of such factors for modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel, tests of tubular specimens were conducted at 538 degree C (1000 degree F). Three creep-rupture specimens with longitudinal welds were tested in tension; and, of three with circumferential welds, two were tested in tension and one in torsion. In each specimen with a circumferential weld, a nonuniform axial distribution of strain was easily visible. The test results were compared to an existing empirical model of creep-rupture life. For the torsion test, the comparison was based on a definition of equivalent normal stress recently adopted in Code Case N-47. Some 27 fatigue specimens, with longitudinal, circumferential, or no welds, were tested under axial or torsional strain control. In specimens with welds, fatigue cracking initiated at fusion lines. In axial tests cracks grew in the circumferential direction, and in torsional tests cracks grew along fusion lines. The test results were compared to empirical models of fatigue life based on two definition of equivalent normal strain range. The results have provided some needed confirmation of the reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments currently under consideration by ASME Code committees. 8 refs., 5 figs

  6. Basic investigation for life assessment technology of modified 9CR-1Mo steel

    Okamura, Hiroyuki [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Ohtani, Ryuichi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Fujii, Kazuya [Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Kimura, Kazushige; Ishii, Ryuichi; Fujiyama, Kazunari; Hongo, Shigetada; Iseki, Takashi; Uchida, Hiroshi [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    For the basic study of life assessment technologies for aged components made of mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, specimens were artificially deteriorated by aging, creep and fatigue tests at elevated temperatures. And metallurgical and mechanical properties were examined. The change in the precipitates caused the decrease in toughness. The creep damage in base metal corresponded to the decrease in hardness. The fatigue damage in base metal correlated to the maximum length of a crack among micro-cracks initiated during fatigue cycle. In the welded joint, the creep fracture occurred by the formation and growth of voids in the fine grained region of HAZ near base metal. The creep damage was associated with the increase in both number and area fraction of voids. (orig.)

  7. Fatigue crack growth and endurance data on 9% Cr 1% Mo steels for AGR applications

    Experimental investigations have been carried out on 9%Cr 1%Mo steels to examine: (1) The significance of carburisation on the fatigue endurance of plain and welded boiler tubes, and tube spacer strip; (2) the high cycle fatigue endurance of spacer strip and spacer weld metal; (3) fatigue crack growth rates in spacer strip and spacer weld metal. This report summarises the results of these investigations and where necessary compares the data to that in current data sheets. The effects of carburisation are variable depending on the structure and type of carburisation. The fatigue endurance properties of spacer strip and spacer weld metal are also similar and need not be considered separately for assessment or design purposes. Fatigue crack growth rates in spacer strip and space weld metal are similar and are influenced by both stress ratio and temperature. A design curve from a fast reactor data sheet may be used as an upper bound to these fatigue crack growth results. (author)

  8. Creep life assessment of an overheated 9Cr-1Mo steel tube

    Crude oil heater 9Cr-1Mo steel tubes from a refinery plant were studied, after 24 years of service at nominally 650 oC and 27 MPa, to predict their remanent lives. The investigation included dimensional, hardness and tensile measurements in addition to accelerated stress rupture tests between 650 oC and 700 oC and microstructural examination. Tube specimens were taken from two sections, the overheated side and the side which only saw the nominal operating temperature. The method employed involved the prediction of the increase in temperature with increasing sediment deposition during the operating life times using an FEM model. In addition the predicted temperatures are used to derive appropriate creep properties at relevant temperatures in a 3D pipe FEM creep analysis to predict the pipe deformation rate. All compare well with the actual service exposed pipe measurements and layer deposition. The overheated side revealed a small loss of creep strength in a stress rupture test. A layer of sediment (appr. 10 mm thickness) consisting basically of sintered carbon (coke) spread over the inside of the tube was acting as a thermal barrier causing the temperature to rise above 650 oC. Analysis for the overheated side predicted an upper bound temperature of ∼800 oC and a life of about 50 h suggesting that failure by creep rupture could occur rapidly in the sediment region. - Research highlights: →Remanent life of 9Cr-1Mo steel tubes after 24 year of service was predicted. →Accelerated creep testing and metallographic investigation was performed. →prediction of the increase in temperature with increasing sediment deposition was made using FEM. →3D pipe FEM creep analysis was used to predict the pipe bending deformation.

  9. An experimental study of biaxial yield in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at room temperature

    Ellis, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Described are two biaxial experiments which investigated yield, hardening, and flow behavior in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at room temperature. The aim of these experiments was to determine whether the procedures recommended in NE Standard F9-5T for inelastic design analysis are applicable for this material in normalized and tempered condition. The first experiment investigated small offset yield behavior subsequent to radial preloads (sq rt of 3 sub sigma 12 = sub sigma 11) in tension-torsion stress space. The second experiment investigated yield behavior subsequent to nonradial preloads and also the time-dependent flow occurring during 0.5 hour periods at constant stress. The results of these experiments were qualitatively similar to those obtained earlier for types 304 and 316 stainless steel. Specifically, the von Mises yield criterion was found to provide a reasonable approximation of initial yield behavior. Although the subsequent yield surfaces suffered considerable distortion from their near-circular form after both radial and nonradial preloads, the hardening behavior was to the first order kinematic in nature. The strain-time data obtained during the 0.5 hr hold periods showed characteristics typical of creep curves. As in the case of earlier experiments, the high initial flow rates diminished more rapidly than would be estimated from elevated temperature data.

  10. Effect of dynamic plastic deformation on microstructure and annealing behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Mishin, Oleg V.; Tao, N. R.;

    2015-01-01

    The effect of dynamic plastic deformation on the microstructure of a modified 9Cr - 1Mo steel has been investigated in comparison with the effect of quasi- static compression. It is found that the boundary spacing after dynamic plastic deformation is smaller and the hardness is higher than those ...

  11. Creep Behavior, Deformation Mechanisms, and Creep Life of Mod.9Cr-1Mo Steel

    ABE, Fujio

    2015-12-01

    The creep behavior, deformation mechanisms, and the correlation between creep deformation parameters and creep life have been investigated for Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel (Gr.91, 9Cr-1Mo-VNb) by analyzing creep strain data at 723 K to 998 K (450 °C to 725 °C), 40 to 450 MPa, and t r = 11.4 to 68,755 hours in NIMS Creep Data Sheet. The time to rupture t r is reasonably correlated with the minimum creep rate {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } and the acceleration of creep rate by strain in the acceleration region dln {dot{\\varepsilon }} /d ɛ, as t r = 1.5/[ {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } ( dln {dot{\\varepsilon }} /d ɛ)], where {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } and dln {dot{\\varepsilon }} /d ɛ reflect the creep behavior in the transient and acceleration regions, respectively. The {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } is inversely proportional to the time to minimum creep rate t m, while it is proportional to the strain to minimum creep rate ɛ m, as {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } = 0.54 ( ɛ m/ t m). The ɛ m decreases with decreasing stress, suggesting that the creep deformation in the transient region becomes localized in the vicinity of prior austenite grain boundaries with decreasing stress. The duration of acceleration region is proportional to the duration of transient region, while the dln {dot{\\varepsilon }} /d ɛ is inversely proportional to the ɛ m. The t r is also correlated with the t m, as t r = g t m, where g is a constant. The present creep life equations reasonably predict the degradation in creep rupture strength at long times. The downward deviation takes place in the t r vs {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } curves (Monkman-Grant plot). At the same {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } , both the ɛ m and t m change upon the condition of t m ∝ ɛ m. The decrease in ɛ m with decreasing stress, corresponding to decreasing {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } , causes a decrease in t m, indicating the downward deviation of the t r vs {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } curves.

  12. Understanding of microstructures in the heat affected zone of boron-added modified 9Cr-1Mo steel using gleeble simulation

    Beneficial effect of boron on improving the creep properties and resistance to Type IV cracking of the ferritic steels is now well established. It has also been shown that boron significantly influence the ferrite to austenite transformation that takes place in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of a weld joint of ferritic steel and this in turns alters the HAZ microstructure from those observed in the boron free steels and thus improving the resistance to Type IV cracking. In the present study transformation of tempered martensite to austenite for two boron containing 9Cr-1Mo steels when subjected to different weld thermal cycles were examined. Studies using Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) carried out on one of the steels showed that both Ac1 and Ac3 temperatures increased with increase in heating rates. Heating and cooling rates in weld thermal cycles is higher than that could be achieved using a DSC and Gleeble simulation of the weld thermal cycle showed that transformation temperatures obtained were still higher than that obtained using a DSC. Examination of the microstructures in the as-simulated condition and after subjecting to heat treatment of 760 C/3h confirmed there is no grain refinement, normally expected in a conventional boron free 9Cr-1Mo steel. Subsequently, these steels were given isothermal heat treatment in a furnace at temperatures of 875 and 900 C for short durations of 5-60 minutes to allow different extents of transformation of tempered martensite to austenite and their effect on the final microstructures. Stability of microstructure in boron containing two modified 9Cr-1Mo steels was studied using Gleeble thermal simulator by varying peak temperatures from 875 to 1000 C. Results of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel was used for comparison purpose. Ac1 and Ac3 transformation temperatures are found to be similar as estimated from the DSC and Gleeble thermal simulator using C strain technique. Lath martensitic microstructure was observed in both these

  13. Evaluation of creep damage in a welded joint of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    Li, Yongkui; Monma, Yoshio; Hongo, Hiromichi; Tabuchi, Masaaki

    2010-10-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the creep damage of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel under 600 °C operating conditions, using constitutive equations based on the continuum damage mechanics. The accumulation of voids over a long period is believed to contribute to the formation of Type IV cracking, which in turn leads eventually to the failure of weldment under conditions of higher temperatures and lower stresses. Specimens of base metal, a simulated fine-grained heat affected zone, and a thin (thick) welded joint were kept under stress from 80 to 160 MPa at 600 °C. During the creep tests of thick plate welded joint specimens, the application of stress was suspended several times, and the creep damage as indicated by the void distribution was examined quantitatively using a laser microscope. The combined effect of the equivalent creep strain and the stress triaxial factor was considered and introduced into the constitutive equations with the aid of a finite element method. The logarithms of m and 1/λ in the continuum damage mechanics equations were determined to have a linear correlation with the ratio of the applied stress to the yield stress for homogeneous materials. In this way, the damage distribution and evolution in the fine-grained heat affected zone were evaluated successfully.

  14. Transfer of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel technology through cooperative programs (1980-1985)

    The principal objective of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) 9Cr-1Mo steel development program has been to provide the data and analyses required by designers for use of the alloy in advanced liquid metal reactors to reduce technical tasks and plant capital costs. It was recognized early that designers would not consider use of any material for nuclear applications unless there was a considerable body of experience already established. Toward this end, the plan has been to get the alloy accepted in Section I (Power Boilers), Section II (Materials Specifications), Section VIII (Pressure Vessels), and Section III (Nuclear power Plant Components) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code as logical steps in the process. To achieve this objective, extensive interaction with the industrial community was considered mandatory. Accordingly, an intensive effort to achieve technology transfer was initiated, which resulted in the involvement of many organizations. This report is a compilation of 47 status sheets describing 35 participating organizations and funding sources, purpose of the interactions, material and product forms utilized, summary of the work completed, findings, and appropriate references. These interactions contributed significantly toward the fulfillment of the program goals

  15. Evaluation of creep damage in a welded joint of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    This paper aims to evaluate the creep damage of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel under 600 oC operating conditions, using constitutive equations based on the continuum damage mechanics. The accumulation of voids over a long period is believed to contribute to the formation of Type IV cracking, which in turn leads eventually to the failure of weldment under conditions of higher temperatures and lower stresses. Specimens of base metal, a simulated fine-grained heat affected zone, and a thin (thick) welded joint were kept under stress from 80 to 160 MPa at 600 oC. During the creep tests of thick plate welded joint specimens, the application of stress was suspended several times, and the creep damage as indicated by the void distribution was examined quantitatively using a laser microscope. The combined effect of the equivalent creep strain and the stress triaxial factor was considered and introduced into the constitutive equations with the aid of a finite element method. The logarithms of m and 1/λ in the continuum damage mechanics equations were determined to have a linear correlation with the ratio of the applied stress to the yield stress for homogeneous materials. In this way, the damage distribution and evolution in the fine-grained heat affected zone were evaluated successfully.

  16. Fabrication of superhydrophobic 9Cr-1Mo steel to combat corrosion in chloride environment

    Lotus leaves show extreme water repellency with a water contact angle of greater than 150° called Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHP). In recent years researchers show keen interest to develop SHP surfaces due to its practical and real life applications so, in our present studies attempts are made to fabricate SHP surface on 9Cr-1Mo steel which has a wide application in nuclear industry as a structural material for steam generator. Superhydrophobicity is dependent on two important factors. First, when the surface energy is lowered, the hydrophobicity is enhanced. However, even a material with the lowest surface energy gives a water contact angle of around 120° only; therefore a suitable surface roughness along with a low surface energy coating is required. In order to get SHP surfaces, the substrates were mechanically polished and chemically etched to create the required roughness and coated with alkoxy silane which is a low surface energy material. Contact angle meter was used to characterize the SHP surfaces by measuring water contact angle (WCA) values and the surface morphology of the coatings was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The antibacterial activity studies were also carried out for SHP surfaces. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and open circuit potential (OCP) - time values were studied for SHP surfaces at different time intervals in different chloride environments. After electrochemical measurements surface morphology of the exposed samples were also studied. (author)

  17. Thermal histories causing low hardness and the minimum hardness requirement in a modified 9Cr1Mo steel for boiler

    In a Mod.9Cr1Mo steel widely applied to boiler components, low hardness problem related with manufacturing and fabrication processes has become a critical issue recently. In this study, hardness, microstructure, tensile and creep rupture tests have been performed using specimens experienced various thermal cycles to investigate the detailed mechanism causing low hardness values of 150 to 170 Hv and the minimum hardness requirement from a standpoint of tensile and allowable stresses. Low hardness values were mainly attributed to the formation of ferrite structure on cooling after heating at intercritical temperature just above the Ac1, 850 .deg. C. Ferrite transformation on cooling after intercritical heating occurred even at the relatively faster cooling compared to normal heating above the Ac3 since the nose of ferrite transformation in the CCT curve moved to the left due to the very low carbon content in austenite phase formed at intercritical temperature. Low hardness value of 160's Hv occurred occasionally in practical applications was observed at a cooling rate of below 0.167 deg. C/sec(10 .deg. C/min) after intercritical heating. At least 190 Hv of hardness values or more were needed to satisfy tensile properties and maximum allowable stresses specified in ASME B and PV code

  18. Microstructure of 9 Cr-1 MoVNb steel irradiated to 40 dpa at elevated temperatures in HFIR

    As part of an effort by the Office of Fusion Energy to evaluate the irradiation behavior of ferritic steels, a 9 Cr-1 MoVNb alloy was irradiated in HFIR to a dose of approx. 36 dpa at temperatures of 300, 400, 500, and 6000C. In addition to the displacement damage produced during irradiation, a transmutation reaction of nickel during HFIR irradiation resulted in the simultaneous production of approx. 30 at. ppM He. Electron microscopy disks in the normalized and tempered condition were irradiated, and the microstructures were evaluated as a function of irradiation temperature. A few small cavities were observed after irradiation at 300, 500, and 6000C. However, a pronounced cavity microstructure was found after irradiation at 4000C. At this temperature, the cavities had a volume-averaged diameter of 15 nm and a concentration of 1.1 x 1021 m-3, resulting in a void-swelling contribution of 0.19%. The cavities at 4000C were homogeneously distributed throughout the tempered martensite matrix, and showed no preference for lath boundaries or precipitate interfaces. The results are compared to those recently reported on a similarly irradiated 12 Cr-1 MoVW ferritic steel

  19. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  20. The Ductile to Brittle Transition Behavior of the Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel and Its Laser Welds

    H.C.Wu; R.K.Shiue; C.Chen

    2004-01-01

    The ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and its laser welds was studied. The increase in grain size of the weld structure ascended the DBTT of the steel significantly. The transformation of retained austenite at martensite interlath boundaries into untempered and/or twinned martensite could also contribute to increased DBTTs of the steel and its welds tempered at 540℃.

  1. Enhanced localized corrosion resistance of modified 9Cr - 1Mo steel by mesoporous silica based self healing coatings

    Chrome moly steels are extensively used in chemical industries and power plants for various applications due to their excellent mechanical and corrosion properties. However, in aggressive environments these steels are prone to localized corrosion. An attempt was made to improve the localized corrosion resistance of these steels by mesoporous silica based self healing coatings. Mesoporous silica containers were synthesized by sol- hydrothermal method and it was characterized by low angle XRD, High Resolution TEM and Raman spectroscopy. HRTEM observation suggested that the mesoporous silica materials had a uniform well defined hexagonal mesostructure. Low angle XRD studies further confirmed the hexagonal symmetry structure (P6nm) typical of MCM-41 material. All the characteristic peaks of MCM-41 were observed in Raman spectra. The extraordinary large surface area and narrow mesopore channels are both essential for high inhibitor loading and controlled release was revealed from BET analysis. The surface area was 940 m2/g and mean pore width was 2.5 nm. Later this mesoporous silica was used successfully for loading the inhibitor molecule 2-mercaptobenzothiazole. The loading and controlled release of the inhibitor from mesoporous silica was proved by UV-Visible and Raman spectroscopy studies. These inhibitor loaded nanocontainers were incorporated in zirconia/silane hybrid sol and coated on phosphate pretreated Mod. 9Cr-1Mo alloy specimens by dip coating method. These coatings were characterized by using SEM and Raman spectroscopy. Both coated and uncoated Mod.9Cr - 1Mo steel specimens were subjected to electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies in 0.05M NaCI solution. From EIS studies polarization resistance, capacitance and pore resistance of the coatings were determined. The results obtained in these detailed electrochemical and microscopic studies were correlated with the localized corrosion resistance of coated 9Cr-1Mo steel. Active corrosion protection

  2. Thermal transient test and strength evaluation of a thick cylinder model made of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel

    Highlights: ► Cyclic thermal transient test with thick cylinder model made of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel was performed using a sodium loop. ► Microstructure of the fracture surface was observed and analyzed. ► The failure mode was initiation of creep–fatigue crack and its propagation. ► The failure life was evaluated by the several methods using finite element analyses. ► Failure life could be predicted within a factor of 3 using the inelastic finite element analyses. -- Abstract: Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel is a candidate material for the primary and secondary heat transport system components of the Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, there is little evidence to support the structural integrity of components made of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel in a practical environment. To verify the failure mode and assess creep–fatigue damage, a thick cylinder test model made of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel was subjected to 1873 cycles of accelerated thermal transient loading using a large-scale sodium loop through which liquid sodium at 600 °C and 250 °C flowed repeatedly, with the period of each transient being 2 h and 1 h, respectively. After completion of the test, the test model was inspected using liquid penetrant testing. Observations using a scanning electron microscope and hardness testing were then performed to characterize creep–fatigue damage in the structural model subjected to cyclic thermal transient loading in a sodium environment. Heat transfer analysis based on the measured temperature data and elastic and inelastic thermal stress analyses using finite element analysis were performed to evaluate the relationship between creep–fatigue damage and the observed crack conditions. Finally, the characteristics of creep–fatigue damage under cyclic thermal loading in a sodium environment and the evaluation methods were considered

  3. Effect of Alloy 625 Buffer Layer on Hardfacing of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Using Nickel Base Hardfacing Alloy

    Chakraborty, Gopa; Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murugesan, S.; Dasgupta, Arup

    2016-04-01

    Dashpot piston, made up of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, is a part of diverse safety rod used for safe shutdown of a nuclear reactor. This component was hardfaced using nickel base AWS ER NiCr-B alloy and extensive cracking was experienced during direct deposition of this alloy on dashpot piston. Cracking reduced considerably and the component was successfully hardfaced by application of Inconel 625 as buffer layer prior to hardface deposition. Hence, a separate study was undertaken to investigate the role of buffer layer in reducing the cracking and on the microstructure of the hardfaced deposit. Results indicate that in the direct deposition of hardfacing alloy on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, both heat-affected zone (HAZ) formed and the deposit layer are hard making the thickness of the hard layer formed equal to combined thickness of both HAZ and deposit. This hard layer is unable to absorb thermal stresses resulting in the cracking of the deposit. By providing a buffer layer of Alloy 625 followed by a post-weld heat treatment, HAZ formed in the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is effectively tempered, and HAZ formed during the subsequent deposition of the hardfacing alloy over the Alloy 625 buffer layer is almost completely confined to Alloy 625, which does not harden. This reduces the cracking susceptibility of the deposit. Further, unlike in the case of direct deposition on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, dilution of the deposit by Ni-base buffer layer does not alter the hardness of the deposit and desired hardness on the deposit surface could be achieved even with lower thickness of the deposit. This gives an option for reducing the recommended thickness of the deposit, which can also reduce the risk of cracking.

  4. Effect of boron addition on pitting corrosion resistance of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel: Application of electrochemical noise

    Highlights: → Weibull probability plots separate pitting and passive corrosion events. → Gumbel distribution analysis gives maximum metastable pit depths. → Addition of boron results in superior pitting corrosion resistance in 0.1 M NaCl. → Incorporation of B into M23C6 carbides refines them and improves pitting resistance. → Coarse M23C6 carbides and delta-ferrite result in inferior pitting resistance. - Abstract: 9Cr-1Mo steels indigenously melted with the addition of boron (Alloy B) and without it (Alloy D) along with Alloy C (without boron addition with minor changes in the trace element concentrations) were studied for their pitting corrosion resistance in 0.001 M, 0.01 M, 0.05 M and 0.1 M sodium chloride solutions using electrochemical noise (EN) technique. Weibull probability plots were used to determine the pit embryo generation rates. Gumbel extreme value analysis was conducted to determine the maximum metastable as well as stable pit radii. The analysis of the data showed superior pitting corrosion resistance of the Alloy B compared to Alloy C as well as Alloy D.

  5. The impact and hot tensile properties of 9Cr1Mo steel in various heat treatment conditions

    The impact and elevated temperature tensile properties of 9Cr1Mo in several heat treatment conditions have been studied to test the tolerance of the steel to departures from the material specification for AGR or fast reactor applications. The properties were found not to be sensitive to grain size or to the presence of grain boundary delta ferrite (<5%) which can arise in weld heat affected zones. Prior creep resulted in some loss of tensile strength but no loss of ductility was measured even though secondary precipitation had begun to develop under the conditions of the prior creep test. The dominant variable governing both tensile and impact properties was the state of temper and an empirical relationship was found between the tensile properties and hardness: the latter also being predictable by a Holloman-Jaffe form of expression. However, the Charpy impact properties of specimens aged near the service temperature (at 550 deg. C) were severely reduced by a mode of prior austenite grain boundary embrittlement manifested as severe intercrystalline failure. The embrittlement is of a type consistent with decohesion arising simply from equilibrium segregation (ie temper embrittlement). While the latter appears to make a significant contribution, interface decohesion is believed also to depend on concentration changes associated with carbide growth. (author)

  6. Caustic cracking of 9Cr 1Mo steel at 3000C

    The stress corrosion cracking of correctly heat-treated 9Cr-1Mo in caustic solutions at 3000C has been examined using a bursting tube version of the slow strain rate technique. Some susceptibility was detected at all concentrations examined, the more concentrated solutions which favoured less protective oxide formation, producing the more severe cracking. The cracking in these strong solutions proceeded at velocities up to 0.1 mm h-1 and produced wide oxide filled cracks. This cracking is not strongly dependent on potential, although more anodic potentials promote thicker oxide formation while cathodic potentials favour general dissolution. Normalized and tempered, annealed, and a simulated heat-affected zone microstructure were all equally susceptible to cracking. Some constant pressure tests were performed which suggested cracking could occur at stresses below the yield stress. In more dilute solutions susceptibility was much less, and the crack velocity was about 0.01 mm h-1, i.e. ten times slower than in 8 M NaOH. The relationship between slow strain rate tests, conventional tests and practical experience are discussed. The behaviour of 9Cr 1Mo in caustic below 2 1/2 M places it in the low susceptibility category and failures under realistic conditions are unlikely. (author)

  7. Microstructure and annealing behavior of a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel after dynamic plastic deformation to different strains

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Mishin, Oleg; Tao, N.R.;

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure, hardness and tensile properties of a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel processed by dynamic plastic deformation (DPD) to different strains (0.5 and 2.3) have been investigated in the as-deformed and annealed conditions. It is found that significant structural refinement and a high level...... of strength can be achieved by DPD to a strain of 2.3, and that the microstructure at this strain contains a large fraction of high angle boundaries. The ductility of the DPD processed steel is however low. Considerable structural coarsening of the deformed microstructure without pronounced recrystallization...

  8. CARBON DIFFUSION IN CARBON-SUPERSATURATED 9CR-1MO STEEL: ANOMALOUS TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF CARBON DIFFUSIVITY

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír

    Ostrava : Tanger Ltd, 2014. ISBN 978-80-87294-52-9. [Metal 2014. International Conference on Metallurgy and Materials /23./. Brno (CZ), 21.05.2014-23.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0148; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Diffusion * Carbon * phase decomposition * Carbon-supersaturation * Cr-Mo steels Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics http://www.metal2014.com/cz/zobrazit-seznam-prispevku/2498-carbon-diffusion-in-carbon-supersaturated-9cr-1mo-steel-anomalous-temperature-dependence-of-carbon-diffusivity/

  9. Influence of high-temperature exposure on the microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar metal welds between modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and alloy 800

    Sireesha, M.; Albert, Shaju K.; Sundaresan, S.

    2005-06-01

    Transition joints between ferritic steel and austenitic stainless steel are commonly encountered in high-temperature components of power plants. Service failures in these are known to occur as a result, mainly, of thermal stresses due to expansion coefficient differentials. In order to mitigate the problem, a trimetallic configuration involving an intermediate piece of a material such as Alloy 800 between the ferritic and austenitic steels has been suggested. In our work, modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and 316LN stainless steel are used as the ferritic and austenitic components and the thermal behavior of the joints between modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and Alloy 800 is described in this article. The joints, made using the nickel-base filler material INCONEL 82/182 (INCONEL 82 for the root pass by gas-tungsten arc welding and INCONEL 182 for the filler passes by shielded-metal arc welding), were aged at 625 °C for periods up to 5000 hours. The microstructural changes occurring in the weld metal as well as at the interfaces with the two parent materials are characterized in detail. Results of across-the-weld hardness surveys and cross-weld tension tests and weld metal Charpy impact tests are correlated with the structural changes observed. Principally, the results show that (1) the tendency for carbon to diffuse from the ferritic steel into the weld metal is much less pronounced than when 2.25Cr-1Mo steel is used as the ferritic part; and (2) intermetallic precipitation occurs in the weld metal for aging durations longer than 2000 hours, but the weld metal toughness still remains adequate in terms of the relevant specification.

  10. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Reactor Pressure Vessels

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions; Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process; Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens; Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds; Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life; Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates; Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses; Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage; Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength; Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads; and Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  11. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Teactor Pressure Vessels

    Potirniche, Gabriel [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Barlow, Fred D. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Charit, Indrajit [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Rink, Karl [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2013-11-26

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions; Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process; Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens; Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds; Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life; Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates; Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses; Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage; Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength; Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads; and Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  12. Fabrication, evaluation, and inspection of cold-reduced and cold-drawn tubes of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel

    Modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel is being developed and commercialized jointly by ORNL and Combustion Engineering (CE), Chattanooga Tennessee, as an alternate steam generator material for breeder reactors. The alloy has been commercially melted by the argon-oxygen decarburization (AOD) process and refined by electroslag remelting (ESR). It has also been commercially fabricated into plate, bar, tube hollows, and centrifugally cast and cold-pilgered tubes. The purpose of this study was to develop procedures for fabricating tubes of various sizes by cold-reducing and drawing processes. Fabricated tubes were subjected to microstructural analysis, hardness measurements, and ultrasonic inspection

  13. Effect of Application of Short and Long Holds on Fatigue Life of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joint

    Shankar, Vani; Mariappan, K.; Sandhya, R.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.

    2013-11-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is a heat-treatable steel and hence the microstructure is temperature sensitive. During welding, the weld joint (WJ) is exposed to various temperatures resulting in a complex heterogeneous microstructure across the weld joint, such as the weld metal, heat-affected zone (HAZ) (consisting of coarse-grained HAZ, fine-grained HAZ, and intercritical HAZ), and the unaffected base metal of varying mechanical properties. The overall creep-fatigue interaction (CFI) response of the WJ is hence due to a complex interplay between various factors such as surface oxides and stress relaxation (SR) occurring in each microstructural zone. It has been demonstrated that SR occurring during application of hold in a CFI cycle is an important parameter that controls fatigue life. Creep-fatigue damage in a cavitation-resistant material such as modified 9Cr-1Mo steel base metal is accommodated in the form of microstructural degradation. However, due to the complex heterogeneous microstructure across the weld joint, SR will be different in different microstructural zones. Hence, the damage is accommodated in the form of preferential coarsening of the substructure, cavity formation around the coarsened carbides, and new surface formation such as cracks in the soft heat-affected zone.

  14. Recovery and recrystallization in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weldments after post-weld heat treatment

    Gao Qiuzhi; Di Xinjie [School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Jointing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu Yongchang, E-mail: licmtju@163.com [School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Jointing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Yan Zesheng [School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Jointing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2012-05-15

    The Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is indispensable to the as-welded joints in fabricating high-temperature structural components of steam power plants. The microstructural evolution and the relationship between the formed precipitates and the recovery and recrystallization of welded joints after PWHT have been studied in details. It is found that the recovery and recrystallization occurring at above 730 Degree-Sign C/2 h led to fragmentation of martensite laths and thus formation of equiaxed grains. Only M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates were observed in the weldments according to the X-ray diffraction results of slag received by electrolytic corrosion. The variation of the recovery and recrystallization behaviors was largely influenced by the distribution of the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates in the microstructure of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weldments after PWHT. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro-hardness decrease with the increment of PWHT holding temperature and time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth rate of intergranular precipitates decreases with extending of holding time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovery and recrystallization occur during PWHT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location and size of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates affect the nucleation of recrystallization.

  15. Influence of long-term strain hold on creep-fatigue life of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is the principal candidate material of a steam generator in a fast breeder reactor because of its superior high-temperature property. In this study, the influence of long-term strain hold on the failure life of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel was investigated and the applicability of existing creep-fatigue life evaluation methods was discussed based on the experimental results. Creep-fatigue tests with hold time up to 10 hours per cycle at either tension or compression maximum strain were conducted under strain control of 0.5% and 1.0% at 550degC. Although failure life reduction occurred by introducing short hold period in the compression hold tests, the degree of reduction became smaller with increasing hold period. On the other hand, the failure life reduction became larger with increasing hold period in the tension hold tests. It was found that the failure life reduction in the compression hold tests was mainly due to the accumulation of tensile strain at the center of a specimen and that in the tension hold tests it was caused by intergranular damage in terms of creep cavity nucleation and growth from observation of the failure specimens. The time fraction rule adopted in a design code gave longer life compared to the experimental life, especially at low strain level. The failure life was well predicted by the ductility exhaustion method and the nonlinear damage accumulation model. (author)

  16. Tensile behaviour of 9Cr-1Mo tempered martensitic steels irradiated up to 20 dpa in a spallation environment

    Tensile specimens of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) and mod 9Cr-1Mo (T91) martensitic steels in the normalized and tempered metallurgical conditions were irradiated with high energy protons and neutrons up to 20 dpa at average temperatures up to about 360 deg. C. Tensile tests were carried out at room temperature and 250 deg. C and a few samples were tested at 350 deg. C. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). While all irradiated specimens displayed at room temperature considerable hardening and loss of ductility, those irradiated to doses above approximately 16 dpa exhibited a fully brittle behaviour and the SEM observations revealed significant amounts of intergranular fracture. Helium accumulation, up to about 0.18 at.% in the specimens irradiated to 20 dpa, is believed to be one of the main factors which triggered the brittle behaviour and intergranular fracture mode. One EM10 and one T91 specimen irradiated to 20 dpa were annealed at 700 deg. C for 1 h following irradiation and subsequently tensile tested. In both cases, a remarkable recovery of ductility and strain-hardening capacity was observed after annealing, while the strength remained significantly above that of the unirradiated material

  17. The high temperature three point bend testing of proton irradiated 316L stainless steel and Mod 9Cr 1Mo

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Zubelewicz, A.; Romero, T.; James, M. R.; Sommer, W. F.; Dai, Y.

    2005-08-01

    The predicted operating conditions for a lead-bismuth eutectic target to be used in an accelerator driven system for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative span a temperature range of 300-600 °C while being irradiated by a high energy (˜600 MeV) proton beam. Such spallation conditions lead to high displacement rates coupled with high accumulation rates of helium and hydrogen up to 150 appm/dpa. Some candidate materials for these applications include Mod9Cr-1Mo and 316L stainless steel. To investigate the effect of irradiation on these materials, the mechanical properties are being measured through three point bend testing on Mod 9Cr-1Mo and 316L at 25, 250, 350 and 500 °C after irradiation in a high energy proton beam (500-800 MeV) to a dose of 9.8 dpa at temperatures from 200 to 320 °C. By comparing measurements made in bending to tensile measurements measured on identically irradiated materials, a measurement of 0.2% offset yield stress was obtained from 0.05% offset yield stress measured in three point bend testing. Yield stress increased by more than a factor of two after irradiation to 9.8 dpa. Observation of the outer fiber surface of 316L showed very localized deformation when tested after irradiation at 70 °C and deformation on multiple slip systems when tested after irradiation at 250-320 °C.

  18. Effect of a Hot Rolling Process on the Mechanical Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    Ferritic-martensitic steel (F/M steel) has been considered as the one of the main candidate cladding materials in the design of sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) in that it has higher thermal conductivity as well as dimensional stability under irradiation when compared as austenitic stainless steel. Optimization of the alloying element as well as manufacturing process has been carried out for the purpose of enhancing thermal creep property under the operation temperature. Among these, hot working process can be applied in the field of hot extrusion at the manufacture of the actual cladding where the hollow billet was formed into the intermediate product. In terms of these, it has been tried to enhance the high temperature mechanical property of the F/M steel by changing hot working temperature or the degree of the hot working rate to initiate the preferential precipitation of the MX particle at the metal matrix and the some works have been proposed. However, lots of the works regarding the effect of the hot working process on the behavior of the F/M steel have yet to be gathered. The objectives of the study are to analyze the effect of such a hot rolling process on the mechanical property of the F/M steel and to assess the hot rolling parameter in the field of a cladding manufacture

  19. Influence of the initial metallurgical state and the austenizing conditions on the distribution of austenitc grain size of the martensitic-ferritic steel T91(9%Cr-1%Mo-V-Nb)

    It is a known fact that the austenizing conditions (speed of heating to the austenite temperature and austenizing time) as well as the initial metallurgical state of the material strongly influence the distribution of austenitic grain size in steels. This distribution will be one of the parameters that will control the behavior of the material in a later transformation from the austenite -by continuous cooling or in the isothermal case - and this behavior will determine the product's final mechanical properties. Based on the published literature, we have studied the influence of the initial metallurgical state and the speed of heating to austenite on the distribution of austenitic grain size for a certain austenizing temperature and time for a martensitic-iron ASTM A213 grade T91 steel. Two-stage thermal cycles were designed for this, that is, tempering for a variable period of time at the industrial tempering temperature (780oC) followed by the austenizing (1050oC, 30 minutes) 'in situ'. We have analyzed the following as a whole: 1) the role of the stabilizing elements (Nb, V) that eventually control the anchoring of the austenitic grain boundary by carbide or carbonitride precipitation. Therefore, we have tried to vary the fraction of these elements present in solid solution by annealing before austenizing. 2) the role of the speed of heating to austenite. In this case, we have considered two different values (1 and 30oC/s), previously reported as inferior and superior, respectively, to the speed of 'critical' heat needed to produce a distribution of heterogeneous austenitic grain size when the metallurgical state before the austenizing is quenched and tempered. Preliminary results suggest that a annealing stage after tempering in the plant and prior to eventual austenizing significantly reduces the influence of the heating to austenite speed in the development of a heterogeneous structure of austenitic grains (CW)

  20. Oxidation mechanism of a Fe-9Cr-1Mo steel by liquid Pb-Bi eutectic alloy (Part I)

    Martinelli, L. [CEA, DEN, Service de la Corrosion et du Comportement des Materiaux dans leur Environnement, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)], E-mail: laure.martinelli@cea.fr; Balbaud-Celerier, F.; Terlain, A. [CEA, DEN, Service de la Corrosion et du Comportement des Materiaux dans leur Environnement, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Delpech, S. [CNRS, UMR 7575 Ecole Nationale superieure de Chimie de Paris, Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Chimie Analytique, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie 75231 Paris (France); Santarini, G. [CEA, Cabinet du Haut-Commisaire, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Favergeon, J.; Moulin, G. [CNRS, centre de recherche de Royallieu FRE CNRS 2833, Laboratoire Roberval, 20529-60205 Compiegne (France); Tabarant, M. [CEA, DEN, Service de Chimie Physique, F- 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Picard, G. [CNRS, UMR 7575 Ecole Nationale superieure de Chimie de Paris, Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Chimie Analytique, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie 75231 Paris (France)

    2008-09-15

    This paper is the first part of a global study on the oxidation process of a Fe-9Cr-1Mo martensitic steel (T91) in static liquid Pb-Bi. It focuses on the oxygen transport mode across the oxide scale. The oxide layer has a duplex structure composed of an internal Fe-Cr spinel layer and an external magnetite layer. Oxygen 18 tracer experiments are performed: they show that the magnetite layer grows at the Pb-Bi/ oxide interface whereas the Fe-Cr spinel layer grows at the metal/oxide interface. Oxygen seems to diffuse across the oxide scale dissolved inside nanometric lead penetrations called nano-channels. Specific experiments are performed to characterize the nano-channels.

  1. Effect of hot rolling process on the mechanical and microstructural property of the 9Cr-1Mo steel

    Highlights: → We performed hot rolling to see the mechanical and microstructural effect in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. → Specimens were hot rolled either at 1050 deg. C or 950 deg. C upon cooling after normalizing. → Continuous annealing right after the hot rolling at 950 deg. C was also performed. → We found hot rolling leads to the precipitation hardening. → Continuous annealing enhanced the hot rolling effect. - Abstract: The effect of hot rolling on the mechanical and microstructural property has been investigated to simulate the effect of hot extrusion during the manufacturing process of the fuel cladding for sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs). Hot rolling of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel was carried out either at 1050 deg. C or 950 deg. C upon cooling after normalizing. Continuous annealing right after the hot rolling at 950 deg. C for 1 h has been carried out followed by the mechanical testing and microstructural analysis. The results showed that hot rolling without any annealing or tempering treatment leaves residual stress so that it leads to the abrupt increase of material strength that would affect cladding formability. Continuous annealing right after the hot rolling process can alleviate residual stress without decreasing too much of material strength. Hot rolling either at 1050 deg. C or 950 deg. C increases the number density of the remained precipitate which leads to the precipitation hardening. Introduction of continuous annealing results in an increase in the fraction of secondary V-rich MX precipitate that leads to an increase in the stability at high temperature mechanical property.

  2. Study on laser welding of fuel clad tubes and end plugs made of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for metallic fuel of Fast Breeder Reactors

    Harinath, Y. V.; Gopal, K. A.; Murugan, S.; Albert, S. K.

    2013-04-01

    A procedure for Pulsed Laser Beam Welding (PLBW) has been developed for fabrication of fuel pins made of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for metallic fuel proposed to be used in future in India's Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) programme. Initial welding trials of the samples were carried out with different average power using Nd-YAG based PLBW process. After analyzing the welds, average power for the weld was optimized for the required depth of penetration and weld quality. Subsequently, keeping the average power constant, the effect of various other welding parameters like laser peak power, pulse frequency, pulse duration and energy per pulse on weld joint integrity were studied and a procedure that would ensure welds of acceptable quality with required depth of penetration, minimum size of fusion zone and Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) were finalized. This procedure is also found to reduce the volume fraction delta-ferrite in the fusion zone.

  3. Microstructural Analysis of Orientation-Dependent Recovery and Recrystallization in a Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Deformed by Compression at a High Strain Rate

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Zhang, Yubin; Mishin, Oleg V.; Tao, Nairong; Pantleon, Wolfgang; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of the microstructure and texture during annealing of a modified ferritic/martensitic 9Cr-1Mo steel compressed by dynamic plastic deformation (DPD) to a strain of 2.3 has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. It is found that the duplex + fiber texture formed by DPD is transformed during annealing to a dominant fiber texture, and that crystallites of the component have an advantage during both nucleation and growth. Detailed characterization of the microstructural morphology, and estimation of the stored energies in - and -oriented regions in deformed and annealed samples, as well as investigations of the growth of recrystallizing grains, are used to analyze the annealing behavior. It is concluded that recrystallization in the given material occurs by a combination of oriented nucleation and oriented growth.

  4. Microstructural Analysis of Orientation-Dependent Recovery and Recrystallization in a Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Deformed by Compression at a High Strain Rate

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Zhang, Yubin; Mishin, Oleg V.; Tao, Nairong; Pantleon, Wolfgang; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of the microstructure and texture during annealing of a modified ferritic/martensitic 9Cr-1Mo steel compressed by dynamic plastic deformation (DPD) to a strain of 2.3 has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. It is found that the duplex + fiber texture formed by DPD is transformed during annealing to a dominant fiber texture, and that crystallites of the component have an advantage during both nucleation and growth. Detailed characterization of the microstructural morphology, and estimation of the stored energies in - and -oriented regions in deformed and annealed samples, as well as investigations of the growth of recrystallizing grains, are used to analyze the annealing behavior. It is concluded that recrystallization in the given material occurs by a combination of oriented nucleation and oriented growth.

  5. Breakaway oxidation of 9Cr-1Mo steel in pressurized carbon dioxide

    The oxide layers formed on this and other alloy steels at elevated temperatures under a pressure of CO2 show a tendency to break off under certain conditions, particularly in mild steel, when more extensive oxidation occurs in the narrow exposed area. This phenomenon is investigated over a range of compositions, temperatures and pressures and some tentative explanations are advanced. (author)

  6. Effect of nitrogen content on creep rupture strength of 9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb steel

    The effect of nitrogen content on creep rupture strength (CRS) was examined in 9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb steel and the metallurgical reasons have been discussed. Nitrogen content as low as 100 mass ppm causes the dense distribution of finer than 30 nm precipitates in matrix. This increases the CRS in the short rupture time region at 600degC. As the precipitates are evaluated to be (V, Nb)N0.5, these precipitates can be estimated not to be so thermodynamically stable that they coagulates during creep test. For this reasons, the CRS of low nitrogen content steel falls down abruptly at about 8,000 h. Higher nitrogen content than 300 mass ppm changes the fine precipitates to the thermodynamically stable ones that have the approximate composition of (V, Nb)N. As the size of (V, Nb)N is as large as 100 nm, the inter-precipitate distance of the precipitates is longer than that of 100 mass ppm nitrogen steel. These precipitates being not so effective in increasing the CRS in shorter rupture time region, they maintain the effect up to prolonged rupture time. (author)

  7. Recovery and recrystallization in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weldments after post-weld heat treatment

    The Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is indispensable to the as-welded joints in fabricating high-temperature structural components of steam power plants. The microstructural evolution and the relationship between the formed precipitates and the recovery and recrystallization of welded joints after PWHT have been studied in details. It is found that the recovery and recrystallization occurring at above 730 °C/2 h led to fragmentation of martensite laths and thus formation of equiaxed grains. Only M23C6 precipitates were observed in the weldments according to the X-ray diffraction results of slag received by electrolytic corrosion. The variation of the recovery and recrystallization behaviors was largely influenced by the distribution of the M23C6 precipitates in the microstructure of the modified 9Cr–1Mo steel weldments after PWHT. - Highlights: ► Micro-hardness decrease with the increment of PWHT holding temperature and time. ► Growth rate of intergranular precipitates decreases with extending of holding time. ► Recovery and recrystallization occur during PWHT. ► Location and size of M23C6 precipitates affect the nucleation of recrystallization.

  8. Influence of microstructure on the room temperature flow behaviour of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel

    The normalizing heat treatment conditions of T-91 grade steel were altered in order to get different austenite/martensite packet grain sizes. Tempering of the steel was carried out at (1) peak hardening temperature and (2) at temperature closer to commercial treatment. Tempering of these specimens, austenitized at a chosen temperature, at the two tempering temperatures resulted in the modification of the fine scale structure by the formation of different carbide types and their distribution. Tensile testing of these specimens (under all the three conditions) was conducted at ambient temperature in order to study the influence of the microstructures on the deformation behaviour. The flow stress, hardness and room temperature impact toughness showed an inverse relation with the martensite packet/austenite grain size. The deformation behavior of the specimens under the three heat treatment conditions was analyzed according to Ashby's model was made assuming. The slip length, λg, was estimated from the σ-ε1/2 plot and compared with the relevant microstructure parameters. The as-received material was seen to undergo aligatoring damage during cold rolling and a modification in their microstructure could render a defect free product. (author)

  9. Fracture toughness of a modified 9CR-1Mo (P91) steel plate at service temperature

    A modified 9Cr-l Mo steel (P91) has been chosen as the material for the steam generator (SG) of the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) under construction at Kalpakkam. The elastic-plastic fracture properties of this material, especially at high temperature, are necessary for 'leak before break' (LBB) analysis of SG. An investigation has therefore been carried out to evaluate the elastic plastic fracture toughness parameter J for 0.2 mm crack extension, J02 for P91 at room temperature, 653 K and 803 K, in as received (Normalised and Tempered, N and T) condition, and after accelerated thermal ageing (2900 h at 923 K) to simulate service exposure. It is concluded that this ageing does not significantly influence the toughness at 653 K and 803 K. At 803 K, creep effects become so strong that a basic premise for J- controlled crack growth, namely rate independent plasticity, is seriously violated giving rise to anomalously high values of J02. (author)

  10. Interfacial microstructure and strength of diffusion brazed joint between Al2O3–TiC and 9Cr1MoV steel

    Wang Juan; Li Yajiang; S A Gerasimov

    2007-08-01

    Joining of composite, Al2O3–TiC, with heat-resistant 9Cr1MoV steel, was carried out by diffusion brazing technology, using a combination of Ti, Cu and Ti as multi-interlayer. The interfacial strength was measured by shear testing and the result was explained by the fracture morphology. Microstructural characterization of the Al2O3–TiC/9Cr1MoV joint was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy-dispersion spectroscopy (EDS). The results indicate that a Al2O3–TiC/9Cr1MoV joint with a shear strength of 122 MPa can be obtained by controlling heating temperature at 1130°C for 60 min with a pressure of 12 MPa. Multi-interlayer Ti/Cu/Ti was fused fully and diffusion occurred to produce interfacial layer between Al2O3–TiC and 9Cr1MoV steel. The total thickness of the interfacial layer is about 100 m and Ti3AlC2, TiC, Cu and Fe2Ti are found to occur in the interface layer.

  11. Application of the overstress concept to inelastic behavior and evaluation of creep-fatigue damage for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    The study reported in this paper was carried out to develop a method for both simulating the inelastic behavior and predicting the life of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at elevated temperature. A unified constitutive equation and a damage-rate equation, based on the overstress concept, have been proposed. These equations are based on the same internal-state variables, which coincide with back stress and overstress determined experimentally. It is therefore possible, by coupling these equations, to simulate inelastic behavior and damage development simultaneously. This method was applied to the results of creep and creep-fatigue tests on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at 5500C in air. The simulated inelastic behavior and the predicted lives agreed well with the experimental results. (author)

  12. Some elevated temperature tensile and strain-controlled fatigue properties for a 9%Cr1Mo steel heat treated to simulate thick section material

    Current interest has been expressed in the usage of thick section 9%Cr1%Mo steel, particularly for UK Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) steam generator tubeplates. This paper presents the results of some preliminary mechanical property test work on a single cast of the steel, heat treated to simulate heavy ruling sections encompassing thicknesses likely to be met in the CDFR context. The microstructures of the simulated thick section material were found to remain predominantly as tempered martensite even at the slowest transformation cooling rates used (50 deg. C/h). The effect of microstructure is reflected in the elevated temperature proof stress, tensile strength and strain-controlled fatigue endurance which were found to be comparable with the properties established for thin section normalised and tempered 9%Cr1%Mo steel. These results are extremely encouraging and, taken in conjunction with the results from other simulation work on this material, further demonstrate the potential of thick section 9%Cr1%Mo steel. (author)

  13. Material test data of 2.25Cr-1Mo Steel and Mod.9Cr-1Mo Steel (Set of data)

    小高 進; 加藤 章一; 吉田 英一; 川上 朋広; 鈴木 高一; 高森 裕二; 川島 成一

    2003-01-01

    Matenal tests of 2.25Cr-1Mo Steel and Mod. 9Cr-1Mo Steel, which were used for structure material of fast breeder reactor (FBR) have been preformed in New Technology Development Group. In this report, the result of test obtained up to this time was collected. Many valuable data from long time test for more than 100000 hours including sodium environment test data in this report will be used for material examination of FBR in the future. It creates, in order for for ASME Code Committee to re...

  14. Transition of Crack from Type IV to Type II Resulting from Improved Utilization of Boron in the Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weldment

    Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Swaminathan, J.; Raju, S.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murty, B. S.

    2012-10-01

    The roles of boron and heat-treatment temperature in improving the type IV cracking resistance of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weldment were studied. Two different heats of P91 steel, one without boron, designated as P91 and the other with controlled addition of boron with very low nitrogen, designated as P91B, were melted for the current study. The addition of Boron to modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has increased the resistance against softening in fine-grained heat-affected zones (FGHAZ) and intercritical heat-affected zones (ICHAZ) of the weldment. Creep rupture life of boron containing modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weldment, prepared from 1423 K (1150 °C) normalized base metal, was found to be much higher than that prepared from 1323 K (1050 °C) normalized base metal because of the stabilization of lath martensite by fine M23C6 precipitates. This finding is in contrast to the reduction in creep rupture life of P91 weldment prepared from 1423 K (1150 °C) normalized base metal compared with that of the weldment prepared from 1323 K (1050 °C) normalized base metal. The trace of failure path from the weld metal to ICHAZ in P91B weldment was indicative of type II failure in contrast to type IV failure outside the HAZ and base metal junction in P91 weldment, which suggested that boron strengthened the microstructure of the HAZ, whereby the utilization of boron at a higher normalizing temperature seemed to be significantly greater than that at the lower normalizing temperature.

  15. Comparison of the effects of long-term thermal aging and HFIR irradiation on the microstructural evolution of 9Cr-1MoVNb steel

    Both thermal aging at 482--704 degree C for up to 25,000h and HFIR irradiation at 300--600 degree C for up to 39 dpa produce substantial changes in the as-tempered microstructure of 9Cr-1MoVNb martensitic/ferritic steel. However, the changes in the dislocation/subgrain boundary and the precipitate structures caused by thermal aging or neutron irradiation are quite different in nature. During thermal aging, the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary and carbide precipitate structures remain stable below 650 degree C, but coarsen and recover somewhat at 650--704 degree C. The formation of abundant intergranular Laves phase, intra-lath dislocation networks, and fine dispersions of VC needles are thermal aging effects that are superimposed upon the as-tempered microstructure at 482--593 degree C. HFIR irradiation produces dense dispersions of very small ''black'' dislocations loops at 300 degree C and produces helium bubbles and voids at 400 degree C At 300--500 degree C, there is considerable recovery of the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary structure and microstructural/microcompositional instability of the as-tempered carbide precipitates during irradiation. By contrast, the as-tempered microstructure remains essentially unchanged during irradiation at 600 degree C. Comparison of thermally aged with irradiation material suggests that the instabilities of the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary and precipitate structures at lower irradiation temperatures are radiation-induced effects, whereas the absence of both Laves phase and fine VC needles during irradiation is a radiation-retarded thermal effect

  16. Experimental study and modelling of high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel weldments

    Chromium martensitic stainless steels are under development since the 70's with the prospect of using them as structural components in thermal and nuclear power plants. The modified 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel is already used, especially in England and Japan, as a material for structural components in thermal power plants where welding is a commonly used joining technique. New generations of chromium martensitic stainless steels with improved mechanical properties for high pressure and temperature use are currently under development. However, observations of several in-service premature failures of welded components in 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel, outline a strong need for understanding the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments. The present study aimed at experimentally determining and then modelling the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of both 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments (typically in the temperature range from 450 C to 650 C). The base metal was first studied as the reference material. It was especially evidenced that tempered chromium martensitic steels exhibit a change in both creep flow and damage behaviour for long term creep exposure. As a consequence, the classically performed extrapolation of 1,000 hours creep data to 100,000 hours creep lifetime predictions might be very hazardous. Based on experimental observations, a new model, integrating and coupling multiple creep flow and damage mechanisms, was developed in the framework of the mechanics of porous media. It was then successfully used to represent creep flow and damage behaviour of the base metal from high to low stress levels even for complex multiaxial loading conditions. Although the high temperature creep properties of the base metal are quite good, the occurrence of premature failure in weldments in high temperature creep conditions largely focused the attention of the scientific community. The lower creep strength of the weld component was also

  17. Heat treatment effects on impact toughness of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels irradiated to 100 dpa

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Plates of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels were given four different heat treatments: two normalizing treatments were used and for each normalizing treatment two tempers were used. Miniature Charpy specimens from each heat treatment were irradiated to {approx}19.5 dpa at 365{degrees}C and to {approx}100 dpa at 420{degrees}C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). In previous work, the same materials were irradiated to 4-5 dpa at 365{degrees}C and 35-36 dpa at 420{degrees}C in FFTF. The tests indicated that prior austenite grain size, which was varied by the different normalizing treatments, had a significant effect on impact behavior of the 9Cr-1MoVNb but not on the 12Cr-1MoVW. Tempering treatment had relatively little effect on the shift in DBTT for both steels. Conclusions are presented on how heat treatment can be used to optimize impact properties.

  18. Heat treatment effects on impact toughness of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels irradiated to 100 dpa

    Plates of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels were given four different heat treatments: two normalizing treatments were used and for each normalizing treatment two tempers were used. Miniature Charpy specimens from each heat treatment were irradiated to ∼19.5 dpa at 365 degrees C and to ∼100 dpa at 420 degrees C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). In previous work, the same materials were irradiated to 4-5 dpa at 365 degrees C and 35-36 dpa at 420 degrees C in FFTF. The tests indicated that prior austenite grain size, which was varied by the different normalizing treatments, had a significant effect on impact behavior of the 9Cr-1MoVNb but not on the 12Cr-1MoVW. Tempering treatment had relatively little effect on the shift in DBTT for both steels. Conclusions are presented on how heat treatment can be used to optimize impact properties

  19. Microstructural changes due to laser peening in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel subjected to creep damage at 823K and 923K in air

    The present study has investigated microstructural changes due to laser peening in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel subjected to creep. The EBSD or Electron Backscatter Diffraction studies have been made on round-bar type specimens creeping at applied stresses of 230 and 240 MPa at 823 K and 105 MPa at 923K in air. Prior to the creep tests, laser peening was applied to specimens at laser power of 8.4-22GW/cm2 per pulse in water. Microstructural change in each specimen after its creep test was investigated by EBSD/SEM. The EBSD/SEM analyses revealed that the laser peening treatment makes creep rupture time longer and it reveals local misorientation value for rupture. (author)

  20. Thermomechanical Model and Bursting Tests to Evaluate the Risk of Swelling and Bursting of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Steam Generator Tubes during a Sodium-Water Reaction Accident

    C. Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The MECTUB code was developed to evaluate the risk of swelling and bursting of Steam Generator (SG tubes. This code deals with the physic of intermediate steam-water leaks into sodium which induce a Sodium-Water Reaction (SWR. It is based on a one-dimensional calculation to describe the thermomechanical behavior of tubes under a high internal pressure and a fast external overheating. The mechanical model of MECTUB is strongly correlated with the kind of the material of the SG tubes. It has been developed and validated by using experiments performed on the alloy 800. A change to tubes made of Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel requires more knowledge of Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel behavior which influences the bursting time at high temperatures (up to 1200°C. Studies have been initiated to adapt the mechanical model and to qualify it for this material. The first part of this paper focuses on the mechanical law modelling (elasticity, plasticity, and creep for Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and on overheating thermal data. In a second part, the results of bursting tests performed on Modified 9Cr-1Mo tubes in the SQUAT facility of CEA are used to validate the mechanical model of MECTUB for the Modified 9Cr-1Mo material.

  1. The mechanical properties of 316L/304L stainless steels, Alloy 718 and Mod 9Cr-1Mo after irradiation in a spallation environment

    Maloy, S. A.; James, M. R.; Willcutt, G.; Sommer, W. F.; Sokolov, M.; Snead, L. L.; Hamilton, M. L.; Garner, F.

    2001-07-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project proposes to use a 1.0 GeV, 100 mA proton beam to produce neutrons via spallation reactions in a tungsten target. The neutrons are multiplied and moderated in a lead/aluminum/water blanket and then captured in 3He to form tritium. The materials in the target and blanket region are exposed to protons and neutrons with energies into the GeV range. The effect of irradiation on the tensile and fracture toughness properties of candidate APT materials, 316L and 304L stainless steel (annealed), modified (Mod) 9Cr-1Mo steel, and Alloy 718 (precipitation hardened), was measured on tensile and fracture toughness specimens irradiated at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center accelerator, which operates at an energy of 800 MeV and a current of 1 mA. The irradiation temperatures ranged from 50°C to 164°C, prototypic of those expected in the APT target/blanket. The maximum achieved proton fluence was 4.5×10 21 p/ cm2 for the materials in the center of the beam. This maximum exposure translates to a dpa of 12 and the generation of 10 000 appm H and 1000 appm He for the Type 304L stainless steel tensile specimens. Specimens were tested at the irradiation temperature of 50-164°C. Less than 1 dpa of exposure reduced the uniform elongation of the Alloy 718 (precipitation hardened) and Mod 9Cr-1Mo to less than 2%. This same dose reduced the fracture toughness by 50%. Approximately 4 dpa of exposure was required to reduce the uniform elongation of the austenitic stainless steels (304L and 316L) to less than 2%. The yield stress of the austenitic steels increased to more than twice its non-irradiated value after less than 1 dpa. The fracture toughness reduced significantly by 4 dpa to ˜100 MPa m 1/2. These results are discussed and compared with results of similar materials irradiated in fission reactor environments.

  2. FEM analyses of creep in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel considering constraint effects induced by anisotropic microstructures

    Modified 9Cr-Mo steel is a candidate structural steel for demonstration fast breeder reactor (FBR's). Due to low thermal activation, the steel can maintain steady-state deformation during long-term creep. The creep strength of its weldment is lower than that of the base metal. Because of different creep strain rate in the solidified weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ), creep deformation in HAZ can be lowered but maximum principal stress augmented in fine-grained HAZ to cause detrimental Type IV cracks in this zone. In this study, FEM analyses were made on long-term creep of over 60 years in double U groove welded modified 9Cr-Mo steel plates with typical microstructures in the welded region of the steel plates taken into consideration. The typical welded region of the plates consists of solidified weld, coarse grain HAZ, fine grain HAZ, interfacial HAZ and base metal. These microstructures were modeled as polycrystal structures having slip systems approximated by orthotropic deformation properties. The results obtained were compared with existing experimental results and those obtained by the authors and found to agree with the experimental results. The results were also compared with computational results obtained by a model having hexagonal crystal grains having the same size and a model having two isotropic materials. The results revealed that the equisized-grain model gives conservative creep life prediction whereas the isotropic model unconservative predictions. (author)

  3. Long-term creep-fatigue life property of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel for steam generator material in FBR

    Extensive research is being executed to establish creep-fatigue life evaluation methodology for Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel which is the principal candidate material of steam generators in Demonstration Fast Breeder Reactor. Previous studies showed that the features of the creep-fatigue life property of the steel are small life reduction by tensile strain hold and significant reduction in compressive hold tests due to oxidation effect. Most of the experiments, however, were conducted under relatively short-term hold conditions and the failure life properties under long-term hold conditions have not yet been clarified. In order to investigate the oxidation and long-term strain hold effects on the creep-fatigue life property, the crack propagation tests in vacuum and air conditions, and the long-term creep-fatigue tests, up to 10 hours hold time per cycle, were performed. As a result, it was found that the significant life reduction occurred by introducing the tensile strain hold longer than 1 hour because of increase of the grain boundary damage due to cavity nucleation, and that the life reduction in compressive hold was caused by acceleration of the crack propagation rate due to accumulation of the tensile strain in center of the specimen. (author)

  4. Residual stress measurements by neutron diffraction in laser and electron beam welded joints in 9Cr-1Mo(V, Nb) steel plates

    Residual stresses are invariably associated with welded joints and have serious implications for integrity of welded components in service conditions. Laser and electron beam welding produces weld joints with narrow fusion zone and heat affected zone. Therefore, there exists very high spatial gradient of residual stresses across the weld joints; measurement of which is indeed a challenging task. Residual stress measurements in laser and electron beam welded 9Cr-1Mo (V, Nb) steel plates were carried out by neutron diffraction. Measurements for laser welded plates were carried out using monochromatic neutron beam at ILL, France and that for electron beam welded plates were carried out using white neutron beam at ISIS, UK. Measurements were made across the weld joints as well as along the weld centre-line for the three orthogonal components-longitudinal, transverse and normal of the residual stress. The cross-weld residual stress profile showed a low tensile/compressive trough in the fusion zone and a high tensile peak on the either side of the joint in the parent metal just outside of metallurgical HAZ. Besides, longitudinal and normal components of the residual stress are significant while the transverse component is the least significant. Residual stress profiles showed very similar characteristics in the weld joints made by laser and electron beam welding processes. These results are presented in this paper and discussed in the context of the metallurgical attributes of the material

  5. Cooperation on impingement wastage experiment of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel using SWAT-1R sodium-water reaction test facility

    The loss of tightness from a Steam Generator Unit (SGU) tube results in high-pressure steam or water leak into sodium causing a Sodium-Water Reaction (SWR), highly exothermic, with corrosive products leading to a local erosion-corrosion called “wastage” of neighbouring tubes. Under the collaboration between CEA and JAEA, wastage experiments were carried out on Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel (T91) tubes. T91 is one of the material candidates of SGU tubes for future sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). Wastage characterization of T91 is needed to evaluate the consequences for safety and the availability of the SGU. Six T91 target tubes were incorporated in the SWR test facility (SWAT-1R) of JAEA and subjected to reaction jets. All tubes were successfully penetrated by the reaction jets, and the wastage rates were determined. The main results are discussed in this paper. These test results contribute to the improvement of wastage rates prediction and to the safety demonstration of future SFRs. (author)

  6. Experimental study and modelling of high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel weldments; Etude experimentale et modelisation, du comportement, de l'endommagement et de la rupture en fluage a haute temperature de joint soudes en acier 9Cr1Mo-NbV

    Gaffard, V

    2004-12-15

    Chromium martensitic stainless steels are under development since the 70's with the prospect of using them as structural components in thermal and nuclear power plants. The modified 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel is already used, especially in England and Japan, as a material for structural components in thermal power plants where welding is a commonly used joining technique. New generations of chromium martensitic stainless steels with improved mechanical properties for high pressure and temperature use are currently under development. However, observations of several in-service premature failures of welded components in 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel, outline a strong need for understanding the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments. The present study aimed at experimentally determining and then modelling the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of both 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments (typically in the temperature range from 450 C to 650 C). The base metal was first studied as the reference material. It was especially evidenced that tempered chromium martensitic steels exhibit a change in both creep flow and damage behaviour for long term creep exposure. As a consequence, the classically performed extrapolation of 1,000 hours creep data to 100,000 hours creep lifetime predictions might be very hazardous. Based on experimental observations, a new model, integrating and coupling multiple creep flow and damage mechanisms, was developed in the framework of the mechanics of porous media. It was then successfully used to represent creep flow and damage behaviour of the base metal from high to low stress levels even for complex multiaxial loading conditions. Although the high temperature creep properties of the base metal are quite good, the occurrence of premature failure in weldments in high temperature creep conditions largely focused the attention of the scientific community. The lower creep strength of the weld component was also

  7. Evaluation study on welded joints of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel tubes of once-through type sodium heated steam generator

    An R and D program has been started to explore the feasibility of using Mod.9Cr-1Mo tubes in once-through steam generators (SG) for FBR plants. This program is divided into 5000 hr. endurance tests on welded joints undergoing cyclic thermal transients, and Tube/tube support wear tests. For the former tests, the following three SG units have been fabricated and tested; - SG Type A: 0.5 MWt helically coiled Mod.9Cr-1Mo SG. (T. of sodium 5150C) - SG Type B: 0.5 MWt helically coiled 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo SG. (T. of sodium=5150C) - SG Type C: 1 MWt helically coiled Mod.9Cr-1Mo SG. (T. of sodium=5400C) This paper describes the two test programs and interim experimental results

  8. Temperature dependence of liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel under low cycle fatigue in lead-bismuth eutectic at 160-450 °C

    Gong, Xing; Marmy, Pierre; Qin, Ling; Verlinden, Bert; Wevers, Martine; Seefeldt, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue properties of a 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel (T91) have been tested in a low oxygen concentration (LOC) lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) environment and in vacuum at 160-450 °C. The results show a clear fatigue endurance "trough" in LOC LBE, while no such a strong temperature dependence of the fatigue endurance is observed when the steel is tested in vacuum. The fractographic observations by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show that ductile microdimples are prevalent on the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in vacuum, whereas the fracture surfaces produced in LOC LBE at all the temperatures are characterized by quasi-cleavage. Interestingly, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), martensitic laths close to the fatigue crack walls or to the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in vacuum are found to have transformed into very fine equiaxed subgrains. Nevertheless, such microstructural modifications do not happen to the specimens tested in LOC LBE at 160-450 °C. These interesting microstructural distinctions indicate that liquid metal embrittlement (LME) is able to occur throughout the fatigue crack propagation phase in the full range of the temperatures investigated, i.e. LME is not very sensitive to temperature during the fatigue crack propagation.

  9. Creep failure model of a 9Cr1Mo-NvV (P91) steel integrating multiple deformation and damage mechanisms

    Gaffard, Vincent; Besson, Jacques; Gourgues-Lorenzon, Anne-Françoise

    2004-01-01

    P91 tempered martensitic stainless steels have recently been developed for boilers and turbines of supercritical and ultra supercritical power plants. Under creep loading conditions at high temperature, those steels exhibit changes in creep flow and damage mechanisms depending on the stress level. Several creep flow and damage mechanisms may also be simultaneously activated. The aim of this contribution is to present a new model integrating a coupling between constitutive equations and damage...

  10. 9Cr-1Mo martensitic alloys: effects of the nitrogen, niobium and vanadium additions on the microstructure, phase transformations and mechanical properties. Pt. 1 and 2

    9Cr - 1Mo martensitic steels are leading candidate materials for fast reactor sub-assembly wrapper applications. The microstructure, phase transformations and mechanical properties of five 9Cr1Mo alloys containing N, Nb and/or V have been studied by dilatometry, optical and electron transmission microscopy and microanalysis

  11. Study of modified 9Cr-1Mo welds

    Modified. 9Cr-1Mo is the best candidate for higher service temperature. It has attractive properties: high creep strength with good ductility, high resistance to cracking, high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient. This paper reviews the main features concerning modified 9Cr-lMo welding. It is obtained that as far as selecting optimum preheat temperature and suitable PWHT, controlling the chemical composition of weld metal, good material properties of Mod. 9Cr-lMo weldment will be obtained. (authors)

  12. Rapid solidification of candidate ferritic steels

    HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo steels were rapidly solidified by the liquid dynamic compaction process and 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel was prepared by the ultrasonic gas atomization process. The consolidation was performed in the ferritic temperature range in order to minimize segregation. These alloys will be tested at ORNL using 1/3 CVN test specimens and the results will be compared with those for conventially processed alloys

  13. Mechanical properties of a 9Cr-1Mo multi-pass thick section weld

    Cerjak, H.; Prader, R. [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria); Swindeman, R.W.; David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Welding of a thick section pipe is a common practice in the fabrication of components for thermal power systems. A new modified 9%Cr-1Mo martensitic steel has gained popularity within the last couple of years not only in the US and Japan but also in many European countries, especially in the United Kingdom, France and recently in Germany. Several modifications of this type of steel, containing different portions of tungsten and Molybdenum, already have been developed and put into service. Because of its improved creep properties and its lower carbon content which results in a better weldability, this type of steel is in direct competition to the 12%Cr steel X 20 CrMoV 12 1 (DIN 17175). Furthermore, owing to its higher thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion, this martensitic steel offers many advantages over austenitic stainless steels in several applications. A brief study was undertaken on the mechanical properties of a tubular circumferential weldment of mod 9%Cr 1Mo (P 91) steel (specification ASTM A 335). A comprehensive microstructural evaluation of this weld as well as Gleeble simulations have been performed. Therefore, this report focuses specifically on the mechanical properties of this weld. Creep, tensile and fatigue properties of this weld have been examined and the results related to the microstructure of the weldment.

  14. Mechanical properties of a 9Cr-1Mo multi-pass thick section weld

    Welding of a thick section pipe is a common practice in the fabrication of components for thermal power systems. A new modified 9%Cr-1Mo martensitic steel has gained popularity within the last couple of years not only in the US and Japan but also in many European countries, especially in the United Kingdom, France and recently in Germany. Several modifications of this type of steel, containing different portions of tungsten and Molybdenum, already have been developed and put into service. Because of its improved creep properties and its lower carbon content which results in a better weldability, this type of steel is in direct competition to the 12%Cr steel X 20 CrMoV 12 1 (DIN 17175). Furthermore, owing to its higher thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion, this martensitic steel offers many advantages over austenitic stainless steels in several applications. A brief study was undertaken on the mechanical properties of a tubular circumferential weldment of mod 9%Cr 1Mo (P 91) steel (specification ASTM A 335). A comprehensive microstructural evaluation of this weld as well as Gleeble simulations have been performed. Therefore, this report focuses specifically on the mechanical properties of this weld. Creep, tensile and fatigue properties of this weld have been examined and the results related to the microstructure of the weldment

  15. Some aspects of the creep and fracture properties of intercritically annealed 9Cr1Mo

    The region of the 9Cr1Mo heat affected zone where the peak welding temperature is below that for complete α→γ transformation (A3) forms a fine grained (< ASTM 12) ferritic structure, the intercritically annealed zone (ICAZ). Under certain stress and temperature regimes this zone has a lower creep strength than the unaffected parent metal with a fracture mode similar to that in alloys which cavitate during 'superplastic' deformation. Furnace heating was successful in simulating the fine grained microstructure uniformly in testpieces. The simulated microstructure had a stress dependence of 2 for the minimum creep rate which was consistent with a predominantly grain boundary sliding deformation mechanism, and a cavitation failure mode similar to that in weld intercritically annealed heat affected zones. (author)

  16. Assessment of the integrity of ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld joints of different grades of Cr-Mo ferritic steels

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group

    2010-07-01

    Integrity of the 2.25 Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800, 9Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800 and 9Cr-1Mo-VNb / Alloy 800 ferritic-austenitic dissimilar joints, fusion welded employing Inconel 182 electrode, has been assessed under creep conditions at 823 K. The dissimilar weld joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals. The strength reduction was more for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and least for 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. The failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of heat-affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with decrease in stress. At still lower stresses the failure occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface. Localized creep deformation and cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure whereas creep cavitation at the weld interface particles induced ferritic / austenitic interface cracking due to high creep strength mismatch across it. Micromechanisms of type IV failure and interface cracking in the ferritic / austenitic joints and different susceptibility to failure for different grades of ferritic steels are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing and finite element analysis. (Note from indexer: paper contains many typographical errors.)

  17. Toughness and austenite stability of modified 9Cr-1Mo welds after tempering

    The influence of tempering treatments on toughness and austenite stability was conducted on modified 9Cr-1Mo welds. Deteriorated impact toughness was noticed for the welds tempered between 450 and 610 C for 1 h, in which the peak hardness and the lowest impact energy occurred at 540 C. The impact toughness of the welds increased rapidly at tempering temperatures above 680 C, and the associated fracture surface exhibited mainly dimple fractures for 750 C/1 h tempered welds, in contrast to quasi-cleavage for 540 C/1 h welds. Retained austenite at martensite interlath boundaries was found to be mechanically stabilized by transformation stresses in the welds tempered at lower temperatures. It could also be transformed to untempered martensite upon cooling if the stresses were relieved to a certain degree by proper selection of temperature and time combinations in tempering. For welds tempered at higher temperatures, e.g. 750 C, the elimination of transformation stresses and the isothermal transformation of retained austenite to ferrite proceeded simultaneously. As a result, no martensitic transformation upon cooling could be found for such welds. The transformation of austenite to untempered martensite would certainly contribute to the minimum toughness of the weld after being tempered at 540 C/1 h. (orig.)

  18. A Comparison of Creep Rupture Strength of Ferritic/Austenitic Dissimilar Weld Joints of Different Grades of Cr-Mo Ferritic Steels

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Evaluations of creep rupture properties of dissimilar weld joints of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, and 9Cr-1MoVNb steels with Alloy 800 at 823 K were carried out. The joints were fabricated by a fusion welding process employing an INCONEL 182 weld electrode. All the joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals, and the strength reduction was greater in the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and less in the 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. Failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with the decrease in stress. At still lower stresses, the failure in the joints occurred at the ferritic/austenitic weld interface. The stress-life variation of the joints showed two-slope behavior and the slope change coincided with the occurrence of ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Preferential creep cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure, whereas creep cavitation at the interfacial particles induced ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Micromechanisms of the type IV failure and the ferritic/austenitic interface cracking in the dissimilar weld joint of the ferritic steels and relative cracking susceptibility of the joints are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing, and finite element analysis (FEA) of the stress state across the joint.

  19. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  20. Nanostructures in a ferritic and an oxide dispersion strengthened steel induced by dynamic plastic deformation

    Zhang, Zhenbo

    fission and fusion reactors. In this study, two candidate steels for nuclear reactors, namely a ferritic/martensitic steel (modified 9Cr-1Mo steel) and an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel (PM2000), were nanostructured by dynamic plastic deformation (DPD). The resulting microstructure...... processes. Higher strain rates are demonstrated to be able to facilitate the structural refinement; nevertheless, the general annealing behavior resembles that of the material after deformation at low strain rate. In addition to the microstructure of the matrix materials, the oxide nanoparticles in PM2000...

  1. Thermal fatigue crack propagation behaviour of F82H ferritic steel

    Kudo, Yusuke E-mail: kudou@fusion.naka.jaeri.go.jp; Kikuchi, Kouichi; Saito, Masakatsu

    2002-12-01

    This paper presents an issue obtained from thermal fatigue research, which attempts to examine the fusion reactor first wall by fracture mechanics. The research is organised with two different approaches: 1. Studies of the thermal fatigue crack propagation behaviour on notched 5-mm thick plate specimens of ferritic steel F82H (9Cr-1W), compared with 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel and type 316 stainless steel; 2. Numerical simulations of the stress field caused by thermal loads including fracture mechanics. It is concluded that the stress intensity factor {delta}K{sub I} is substantial for crack growth while cyclic thermal loading.

  2. Type IV Cracking Susceptibility in Weld Joints of Different Grades of Cr-Mo Ferritic Steel

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2009-02-01

    Relative type-IV cracking susceptibility in 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, and 9Cr-1MoVNb ferritic steel weld joint has been assessed. The type-IV cracking was manifested as preferential accumulation of creep deformation and cavitation in the relatively soft intercritical region of heat affected zone of the weld joint. The type-IV cracking susceptibility has been defined as the reduction in creep-rupture strength of weld joint compared to its base metal. The 2.25Cr-1Mo steel exhibited more susceptibility to type-IV cracking at relatively lower temperatures; whereas, at higher temperatures, 9Cr-1MoVNb steel was more susceptible. The relative susceptibility to type-IV cracking in the weld joint of the Cr-Mo steels has been rationalized on the basis of creep-strengthening mechanisms operating in the steels and their venerability to change on intercritical heating during weld thermal cycle, subsequent postweld heat treatment, and creep exposure.

  3. Tensile characterization of a GTAW bimetallic weld mod 9Cr-1Mo-316L(N) with a new measurement system for tensile testing

    Mod 9Cr-1Mo steel (T91) is a candidate material for steam generator of SFR (Sodium Fast Reactors). In order to validate this choice, it is necessary, firstly to verify that it is able to withstand the planned environmental and operating conditions, and secondly to check if it is covered by the existing design codes, concerning its procurement, fabrication, welding, examination methods and mechanical design rules. A large R and D program on mod 9Cr-1Mo steel has been undertaken at CEA in order to characterize the behavior of this material and of its welded junctions. In this frame, a new measurement system for tensile testing was developed in the laboratory of structural integrity and standards (LISN) of the CEA (French atomic commission), in order to characterize the local behavior of the material during a whole tensile testing. Indeed, with the conventional measurement system (typically an extensometer), the local behavior of the material can only be determined during the stable step of the testing. So, usually the behavior of the material during the necking step of the step is unknown. This new measurement is based on the use of some laser micrometers which allow measuring the minimum diameter of the specimen and the curvature radius during the necking phase with a great precision. Thanks to the Bridgman formula, we can evaluate the local behavior of the material until the failure of the specimen. This new system was used to characterize the tensile propriety of a bimetallic welded junction of Mod 9Cr-1Mo steel and austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) realized with GTAW process and Inconel filler metal. These works lead to propose a tensile curve for each materials of the welded junction. (authors)

  4. Effects of HFIR irradiation at 550C on the microstructure and toughness of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo

    Results are reported for base metal and weld metal specimens of HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo following irradiation in HFIR at 550C to 5 dpa. The DBTT shifts in irradiated base metal specimens were 300C for HT-9 and 900C for 9Cr-1Mo with further shifts of 200C for weld metal. Concurrently, strength as measured by hardness increased 15 percent for HT-9 and 25 percent for 9Cr-1Mo. The hardness increases can be attributed in part to defect cluster 1.5 to 3.0 nm in diameter at densities approaching 1017 cm-3 and also to lower rates of cavity nucleation ahead of the propagating crack

  5. Effect of austenitizing and tempering conditions on the structure and mechanical properties of the 9Cr-1Mo martensitic alloy

    The structure and mechanical properties of the 9Cr-1Mo martensitic alloy, planned to be used as structural materials of the fuel subassembly for fast breeder reactors, has been investigated. Phase transformation temperatures on heating and the continuous cooling transformation diagram were determined by dilatometric techniques. Results concerning the effect of solution-treatment and tempering conditions on austenitic grain size, hardness, tensile properties, creep strength and toughness impact curves are also given

  6. Irradiation creep and swelling of the fusion heats of HT9 and 9Cr-1Mo to 208 DPA at ∼400 degrees C

    The irradiation creep behavior of the fusion heats of HT9 and 9Cr-1Mo at ∼400 degrees C has been measured to exposures as large as 208 dpa. HT9 is somewhat nonlinear in its response to hoop stress level in the range 0-200 MPa, but 9Cr-1Mo exhibits only slightly greater than linear behavior with stress level. The strain data of both alloys appear to include some contributions from precipitate-related density changes. Swelling may have occurred in 9Cr-1Mo

  7. Cyclic Creep Behavior of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel at 600 .deg. C

    Cyclic deformation behavior is important in practice because high-temperature structural components are exposed under the cyclic conditions of repeated loading. In static creep (SC), the response of the material is simple as a static state of monotonic loading. However, in cyclic creep (CC), it is complex as dynamic loading. Cyclic creep data have been rarely reported until now. In particular, it is not understood well whether cyclic creep will accelerate or retard the creep rate compared with static creep, because it is not only the plastic deformation under cyclic loading is drastically different from monotonic loading, but also the cyclic response is dependent on the cycling frequency, stress range, stress ratio, and hold periods of cycling. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the cyclic creep behavior influencing the creep deformation and fracture process. In this study, a series of cyclic creep tests was carried out using magnitudes of stress range of constant stress ratio (R=0.1) under continuous tension-tension loading cycles at a hold time of 10 minutes. Cyclic curves were monitored and obtained with time variations, and the properties of the cyclic creep tests were compared with those of static creep tests. The fracture microstructures were observed and analyzed

  8. Evaluation of carburization and decarburization behavior of Fe-9Cr-Mo ferritic steels in sodium environment

    Carburization and decarburization behavior in sodium have been examined for Fe-9Cr-Mo ferritic steels exposure to flowing sodium with containing 0.0049, 0.016 and 0.16 wppm carbon at temperature between 723 and 873 K. The Fe-9Cr-Mo ferritic steels were more resistant to carbon transfer than 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel. The carbon transfer and its gradient in Fe-9Cr-Mo ferritic steels was closely related with carbon concentration in sodium, and carburization and decarburization behavior depended on the sodium conditions. In the case of the application of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel to heat transfer tubes of steam generator of LMFBR, carburization behavior was observed on the conditions that sodium inlet temperature was 778K and carbon concentration in sodium was 0.01∼0.10 wppm. The mean carbon contents of heat transfer tubes after the operation of the steam generator for 200,000 h were estimated to be about 0.103∼0.148 wt% comparing with initial carbon contents of 0.10 wt%. Consequently it is expected that high-temperature strength of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel would retain sufficient strength and ductility for such operating conditions. (author)

  9. Experimental and Thermokinetic Simulation Studies on the Formation of Deleterious Zones in Dissimilar Ferritic Steel Weldments

    Anand, R.; Sudha, C.; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2013-05-01

    The methods to predict and prevent the formation of hard and soft zones in dissimilar weldments of 9Cr-1Mo and 2¼Cr-1Mo ferritic steels during high-temperature exposure are examined in this article. The computational studies have been carried out using multicomponent diffusion model incorporated in Dictra and validated by experimental methods using EPMA and TEM. Carbon concentration profiles across the interface of the weld joint between the two ferritic steels were simulated in the temperatures ranging from 823 K to 1023 K (from 550 °C to 750 °C) for various time durations using "diffusion in dispersed phase model" in Dictra. When precipitation and diffusion were incorporated into the calculations simultaneously, the agreement was better between the calculated and the experimentally measured values of carbon concentration profiles, type, and volume fractions of carbides in the hard zone and diffusion zone, width, and the activation energy. Calculation results of thermodynamic potentials of carbon in 2¼Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-1Mo steels suggested that the diffusion is driven by the activity gradient of carbon across the joint. The effectiveness of nickel-based diffusion barrier in suppressing the formation of hard and soft zones is demonstrated using calculations based on the cell model incorporated in Dictra.

  10. Effect of Cr content and tempering temperature on precipitation behavior of Z phase in 9-12%Cr steels

    Sawada, K.; Kushima, H.; Tabuchi, M.; Kimura, K. [National Inst. for Materials Science (Japan); Suzuki, K. [Nikkei Research and Development Center, Nippon Light Metal Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    The effect of Cr content on Z phase formation behavior was investigated in base metal and FGHAZ of welded joints for ASME Gr.91, 92, 122 and 12Cr steel with {delta}-ferrite. The influence of tempering temperature on Z phase formation was also clarified in base metal of 9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb-N steel. (orig.)

  11. Effect of Cr content and tempering temperature on precipitation behavior of Z phase in 9-12%Cr steels

    The effect of Cr content on Z phase formation behavior was investigated in base metal and FGHAZ of welded joints for ASME Gr.91, 92, 122 and 12Cr steel with δ-ferrite. The influence of tempering temperature on Z phase formation was also clarified in base metal of 9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb-N steel. (orig.)

  12. Characterization of Microstructures across the Heat-Affected Zone of the Modified 9Cr-1Mo Weld Joint to Understand Its Role in Promoting Type IV Cracking

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Mannan, S. L.

    2007-01-01

    In the postweld heat-treated (PWHT) fusion welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel joint, a soft zone was identified at the outer edge of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the base metal adjacent to the deposited weld metal. Hardness and tensile tests were performed on the base metal subjected to soaking for 5 minutes at temperatures below Ac1 to above Ac3 and tempering at the PWHT condition. These tests indicated that the soft zone in the weld joint corresponds to the intercritical region of HAZ. Creep tests were conducted on the base metal and cross weld joint. At relatively lower stresses and higher test temperatures, the weld joint possessed lower creep rupture life than the base metal, and the difference in creep rupture life increased with the decrease in stress and increase in temperature. Preferential accumulation of creep deformation coupled with extensive creep cavitation in the intercritical region of HAZ led to the premature failure of the weld joint in the intercritical region of the HAZ, commonly known as type IV cracking. The microstructures across the HAZ of the weld joint have been characterized to understand the role of microstructure in promoting type IV cracking. Strength reduction in the intercritical HAZ of the joint resulted from the combined effects of coarsening of dislocation substructures and precipitates. Constrained deformation of the soft intercritical HAZ sandwich between relatively stronger constitutes of the joint induced creep cavitation in the soft zone resulting in premature failure.

  13. Mechanical and microstructural behavior of a ferritic stainless steel under high temperature cycling

    A ferritic stainless steel, Fe9Cr1Mo containing V and Nb, has been proposed for applications which involve combinations of cyclic and static loads at elevated temperatures. Since the components made from this alloy are to be in service over many years it is essential that the microstructure exhibit a high degree of stability under the design conditions. In the present experiments the fatigue life of the modified Fe9Cr1Mo steel was examined at two test temperatures, 5930 and 7000C, in fully reversed fatigue over a total strain range of 2.1 x 10-2. The cycling was either continuous (ramp wave with a strain rate of 4 x 10-3/s) or included a two minute tension or compression hold imposed at the maximum strain. Tests were carried out in vacuum or in a mixture of 3% hydrogen in argon containing water vapor as in impurity which caused the gas to be oxidizing. The resultant microstructure and damage features were investigated by TEM (shadowed 2 stage replicas), optical microscopy, and HVEM examination of thin foils. Cyclic softening was observed in all tests. The stress undergoes a marked relaxation during the hold period. The peak stress is scarcely affected by the introduction of hold times and no mean stress is observed to develop. The presence of a hold time decreases the cycle life but increases the time to failure

  14. The properties and weldability of low activation ferritic steels

    A series of ferritic steels patterned on the chromium-molybdenum alloys, 2 1/4Cr--1Mo, 9Cr--1MoVNb and 12Cr--1MoVW, were tested for weldability. These steels are being developed as candidates for the first wall and blanket structures of fusion reactors. Use of these materials will minimize the long term radioactive hazards associated with disposal after service. In these low activation alloys, elements which become activated during irradiation with long half lives (Mo and Nb) are replaced. The major changes include the replacement of molybdenum with tungsten, the addition of vanadium in 2 1/4% Cr steels, and the replacement of niobium in the 9% Cr steel with tantalum. These replacement elements radically modify both the mechanical properties and weldability of the alloys. In this study, the effect of the alloy modifications on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the welds are presented. Bainitic steels (2 1/4 Cr%) usually exhibit good weldability, while the martensitic steels (5, 9 and 12 Cr%) are suspectable to embrittlement in the heat affected zone (HAZ). The objective of this study was to characterize the welded microstructure and mechanical properties of these low activation alloys. Autogeneous bead-on-plate welds were produced using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Microstructure, microhardness, weld bend and tensile test results are reported for the base metal, heat affected zone and fusion zone of the weld. 46 refs., 36 figs., 14 tabs

  15. Application of Chaboche viscoplastic theory for predicting the cyclic behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo (T91)

    Modified 9Cr 1Mo (grade 91) is the structural material for the SG of 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. This material is codified in RCC-MR (1993). SG top tubesheet and its connecting shell see the hot sodium temperature of about 800 K. The steam temperature is about 770 K at 17 MPa. It is envisaged that this component can meet the creep fatigue damage rules of RCC-MR with 'elastic route' itself. One of the important material data needed to use the simplified rules given in RCC-MR (1993) is 'symmetrization coefficient' (Ks) which is not yet included in RCC-MR. Ks values are established from numerous stress strain cyclic data generated theoretically by using Chaboche viscoplastic model and recommended for the inclusion in the RCC-MR. The Chaboche model for grade 91 material has 20 material parameters which are identified based on the uniaxial monotonic and cyclic data available in RCC-MR (1993) as well as the published data and many uniaxial monotonic, cyclic, creep data are compared well with the predictions. (author). 4 refs, 21 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Effect of molybdenum content on creep-rupture strength and toughness of 9 % chromium ferritic heat resisting steels containing V and Nb

    The effect of molybdenum content on creep-rupture properties and room-temperature toughness of high chromium ferritic heat resisting steels was investigated. Molybdenum content was varied from 1 to 2 wt%. In order to obtain 9Cr-Mo-V-Nb ferritic steels with both high creep-rupture strength and superior toughness, the amount of delta ferrite was controlled below 25 %, and the optimum tempering condition and mechanical properties after simulated welding have been investigated. The influence of molybdenum content on creep-rupture strength and Charpy absorbed energy was investigated with respect to the ratio of delta ferrite to tempered martensite, the precipitates, and the microstructures. Charpy absorbed energy of the 0.05C-9Cr-1Mo-0.15V-0.05Nb steel tempered at 800deg C and then heated at 600∼650deg C for 104 h was as high as 20∼30 kgf-m. By contrast, Charpy absorbed energy of 0.05C-9Cr-2Mo-0.15V-0.05Nb steel was reduced to about 4kgf-m after heating at 600∼650deg C for 104 h. It is considered that the steel of 1Mo shows superior toughness because of its low carbon content and a single phase of martensite. It was concluded that combination of superior creep-rupture strength and toughness can be obtained by optimum heat treatment for the 9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb steel containing 0.05 wt%C. (author)

  17. The development of a 9 Cr steel with improved strength and toughness

    A development program was initiated to provide an alternate code-approved advanced ferritic alloy for LMFBR use. Approximately 30 laboratory heats were made of the type 9Cr-1Mo-Nb-V-W. In elevated-temperature properties the experimental alloys are superior to code-approved and candidate commercial steels. Improvements realized in weldability, toughness, and elevated-temperature strength and stability are discussed. (author)

  18. A comparison of low-chromium and high-chromium reduced-activation steels for fusion applications

    Ferritic steels have been considered candidate structural materials for first wall and blanket structures for fusion power plants since the late 1970s. The first steels considered in the United States were the conventional Cr-Mo steels Sandvik HT9 (nominally 12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C, here designated l2Cr-1MoVW), modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (9Cr-1Mo-0.2V-0.06Nb-0. IC, designated 9Cr-1MoVNb) and, to a lesser extent, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel (2.25Cr-Mo-0.1C). All compositions are in wt. %. The normalized-and-tempered 9 and 12Cr steels had a tempered martensite microstructure, and the normalized-and-tempered 2 1/4 Cr steel had a tempered bainite microstructure. This report describes chromium steels tested in normalized and tempered conditions. Miniature tensile and Charpy specimens were tested

  19. Effect of Austenization Temperature on the Microstructure and Strength of 9% and 12% Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    Terry C. Totemeier

    2004-10-01

    The effect of reduced-temperature austenization on the microstructure and strength of two ferritic-martensitic steels was studied. Prototypic 9% and 12% Cr steels, grade 91 (9Cr-1MoVNb) and type 422 stainless (12Cr-1MoVW), respectively, were austenized at 925°C and 1050°C and tempered at 760°C. The reduced austenization temperature was intended to simulate potential inadequate austenization during field construction of large structures and also the thermal cycle experienced in the Type IV region of weld heat affected zones (HAZ). The microstructure, tensile behavior, and creep strength were characterized for both steels treated at each condition. The reduced austenization temperature resulted in general coarsening of carbides in both steels and polygonization of the tempered martensite structure in type 422. For this steel, a marked reduction in microhardness was observed, while there was little change in microhardness for grade 91. Slight reductions in tensile strength were observed for both steels at room temperature and elevated temperatures of 450 and 550°C. The strength reduction was greater for type 422 than for grade 91. At 650°C the tensile strength reduction was minimal for both steels. Marked reductions in creep rupture lives were observed for both steels at 650°C; the reductions were less at 600°C and minimal at 550°C. Overall, the higher Cr content steel was observed to be more sensitive to variations in heat treatment conditions.

  20. Characterization of the structural details of residual austenite in the weld metal of a 9Cr1MoNbV welded rotor

    Xia Liu; Hui-jun Ji; Peng Liu; Peng Wang; Feng-gui Lu; Yu-lai Gao

    2014-01-01

    The existence of residual austenite in weld metal plays an important role in determining the properties and dimensional accuracy of welded rotors. An effective corrosive agent and the metallographic etching process were developed to clearly reveal the characteristics of residual austenite in the weld metal of a 9Cr1MoNbV welded rotor. Moreover, the details of the distribution, shape, length, length-to-width ratio, and the content of residual austenite were systematically characterized using the Image-Pro Plus image analysis software. The results revealed that the area fraction of residual austenite was approximately 6.3% in the observed weld seam; the average area, length, and length-to-width ratio of dispersed residual austenite were quantitatively evaluated to be (5.5 ± 0.1)μm2, (5.0 ± 0.1)μm, and (2.2 ± 0.1), re-spectively. The newly developed corrosive agent and etching method offer an appropriate approach to characterize residual austenite in the weld metal of welded rotors in detail.

  1. Impact behavior of 9-Cr and 12-Cr ferritic steels after low-temperature irradiation

    Miniature Charpy impact specimens of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels and these steels with 1 and 2% Ni were irradiated in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at 500C to displacement damage levels of up to 9 dpa. Nickel was added to study the effect of transmutation helium. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The 9Cr-1MoVNb steels, with and without nickel, showed a larger shift than the 12Cr-1MoVW steels, with and without nickel. The results indicated that helium also increased the DBTT. The same steels were previously irradiated at higher temperatures. From the present and past tests, the effect of irradiation temperature on the DBTT behavior can be evaluated. For the 9Cr-1MoVNb steel, there is a continuous decrease in the magnitude of the DBTT increase up to an irradiation temperature of about 4000C, after which the shift drops rapidly to zero at about 4500C. The DBTT of the 12Cr-1MoVW steel shows a maximum increase at an irradiation temperature of about 4000C and less of an increase at either higher or lower irradiation temperatures

  2. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  3. Analyzing the characteristics of the cavity nucleation, growth and coalescence mechanism of 9Cr-1Mo-VNb steel (P91) steel

    An, Lili; Xu, Qiang; Lu, Zhongyu; Xu, Donglai

    2013-01-01

    Creep damage is one of the serious problems for the high temperature industries and computational approach (such as continuum damage mechanics) has been developed and used, complementary to the experimental approach, to assist safe operation. However, there are no ready creep damage constitutive equations to be used for predicting the lifetime for this type of alloy, particularly for low stress. This paper presents an analysis of the cavity nucleation, growth and coalescence mechanism of 9Cr-...

  4. Estimation of microstructures, deformation, and fatigue fracture in different steel grades using magnetic Barkhausen emission technique

    Application of the Barkhausen magnetic effect (BME) for the characteristic of the microstructure, deformation and fatigue fracture is discussed by the example of the carbon, stainless austenite (AISI304) and ferrite (2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo) steels. It is shown, that various stages of the tension deformation, depth of the layer, strengthened through induction quenching, the quantity of the martensite, formed by the cold deformation of the stainless steel with the metastable austenite may be determined by the BME parameters

  5. Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic steels

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of ferritic and duplex stainless steels (SS) has been studied by charging annealed or quenched specimens with hydrogen through cathodic polarization. Cathodic charge has been found to reduce severely the ductility of these materials. Using microscopic observations (TEM and SEM and optical) attempts have been made to clarify the initial stage of microstructural changes which are induced by hydrogen charging in these steels. (author)

  6. Weldability of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel under ultra power density fiber laser welding

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are recognized as the primary candidate structural materials for fusion blanket systems as it has been developed based on massive industrial experience of ferritic/martensitic steel replacing Mo and Nb of high chromium heat resistant martensitic steels (such as modified 9Cr-1Mo) with W and Ta, respectively. As one of RAFMS, F82H, which has been developed and studied in Japan, is designed with emphasis on high temperature property and weldablility, and was provided and evaluated in various countries as a part of the collaboration of IEA fusion materials development. Although F82H is the well perceived RAFM as ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM) structural material, the weldability was proved though TIG, EB and YAG laser weld tests using only 15 and 25 mm thickness plate. In order to reduce the welding distortion, the residual stress and the area of the heat affected zone, it is necessary to decrease the total heat input under the welding. Recently, as a result of R and D efforts about the sources of laser beam, a high-power fiber laser beam has been developed as one of the desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. Since the power density of the fiber laser beam is very large, it is possible to increase the welding speed more than 10 m/min. So, in this study, the weldability of 1.5 mm thickness F82H plate and pipe was examined by using a ultra power density fiber laser, in order to reveal the excellent weldability of F82H. As a basic study of the butt welding between 1.5 mm plate and 1.5 mm thickness pipe with 11 mm outer diameter, the focus position, the beam position and the laser power were varied using 25 mm square plate and 25 mm length pipe. Then, by using the fiber laser with 1.1 MW/mm2 peak power density under the appropriate welding condition obtained from the basic study, a full penetrated weld bead with narrow width was formed in the butt welding

  7. Acoustic emission monitoring of the cracking/spallation in the oxide scales developed over microstructurally different regions of a chrome-moly ferritic steel

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring has been used to confirm the difference in initiation and intensity of the cracking and spallation of the scales over the regions with different microstructures in 9Cr-1Mo steel. As indicated by in-air thermogravimetric (TG) tests at 973K, the oxide scale on 9Cr-1Mo steel with 0.26%Si and fine grain size (90μm) suffered a pronounced weight-loss after about 60min., where as the scale on the coarse grain (360μm) steel suffered weight-loss only after 240min. AE monitoring under identical conditions suggest sudden and pronounced increase in AE activity after the respective durations in the two cases. Hence, the weight losses in both cases have been ascribed to spallation of the oxide scale. As suggested both by TG and AE tests, onset of pronounced scale spallation is considerably delayed in the case of the steel with a higher (0.75%) Si-content. Hence it is concluded that increase in Si-content and grain size of 9Cr-1Mo steel improves spallation resistance at high temperatures. (author)

  8. Ferritic steels for French LMFBR steam generators

    Austenitic stainless steels have been widely used in many components of the French LMFBR. Up to now, ferritic steels have not been considered for these components, mainly due to their relatively low creep properties. Some ferritic steels are usable when the maximum temperatures in service do not exceed about 5300C. It is the case of the steam generators of the Phenix plant, where the exchange tubes of the evaporator are made of 2,25% Cr-1% Mo steel, stabilized or not by addition of niobium. These ferritic alloys have worked successfully since the first steam production in October 1973. For the SuperPhenix power plant, an ''all austenitic stainless alloy'' apparatus has been chosen. However, for the future, ferritic alloys offer potential for use as alternative materials in the evaporators: low alloys steels type 2,25% Cr-1% Mo (exchange tubes, tube-sheets, shells), or at higher chromium content type 9% Cr-2% Mo NbV (exchange tubes) or 12M Cr-1% Mo-V (tube-sheets). Most of these steels have already an industrial background, and are widely used in similar applications. The various potential applications of these steels are reviewed with regards to the French LMFBR steam generators, indicating that some points need an effort of clarification, for instance the properties of the heterogeneous ferritic/austenitic weldments

  9. Irradiation embrittlement of ferritic stainless steels

    The characteristics of the irradiation embrittlement of some ferritic stainless steels were examined by tensile tests. Steels selected in this investigation were classified into three groups: chi phase, precipitation hardened Fe-13Cr steels; tempered martensitic Fe-12Cr steels; and low alloy steels. The latter steels were chosen in order to compare the irradiation embrittlement characteristics with those of stainless steels. The stainless steels were superior to the low alloy steels with regard to the irradiation embrittlement (the changes in both ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and unstable plastic flow transition temperature (UPFTT)), irrespective of whether these stainless steels had chi phase precipitated structures or tempered martensitic structures. The suppression of the DBTT increase owing to irradiation results from low yield stress increase Δσsub(y) and high |[dσsub(y)(u)/dT]|, where u denotes unirradiated, in the stainless steels. The suppression of the UPFTT results from the high work hardening rate or the high work exponent and the low Lueders strain in the stainless steels. These characteristics of irradiation embrittlement in the ferritic stainless steels are thought to be caused by the defect structure, which is modified by Cr atoms. (author)

  10. Development of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for application to high temperature and irradiation environment

    Iron oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are candidate for nuclear fuel cladding. Therefore, it is crucial to control their microstructure in order to optimise their mechanical properties at temperatures up to 700 deg C. The industrial candidates, ODS ferritic alloys, present an anisotropic microstructure which induces a weakening of mechanical properties in transversal direction as well as the precipitation of brittle phases under thermal aging and irradiation. For this purpose, we tried to develop a material with isotropic properties. We studied several 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic alloys, strengthened or not by oxide dispersion. The mechanical alloying was performed by attribution and powders were consolidated by hot extrusion. In this work, different metallurgical characterisation techniques and modelling were used to optimise a new martensitic ODS alloy. Microstructural and chemical characterization of matrix has been done. The effect of austenitizing and isochronal tempering treatments on microstructure and hardness has been studied. Oxide distribution, size and chemical composition have been studied before and after high temperature thermal treatment. The study of phase transformation upon heating has permitted the extrapolation to the equilibrium temperature formation of austenite. Phase transformation diagrams upon cooling have been determined and the transformation kinetics have been linked to austenite grain size by a simple relation. Fine grain size is unfavourable for the targeted application, so a particular thermal treatment inducing a coarser grain structure has been developed. Finally, tensile properties have been determined for the different microstructures. (author)

  11. Modelling fracture in ferritic steel

    Smith, G

    2002-01-01

    Results from mathematical models and computer simulations of fracture in polycrystalline steels are presented for a range of temperatures. The proportions of intergranular and intragranular failure predicted are compared with experimental results for brittle fracture, ductile fracture and in the transition region. Interactive software to create two-dimensional polycrystalline models, which allow a range of physical to be varied independently, is described. The results include those for model materials chosen to match steels used by the power generation industry. The models simulate segregation and cavitation effects in steel and fracture of weldments and their associated heat-affected zones.

  12. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Plasma spot wedding of ferritic stainless steels studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shieldings and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas , i. e. a 98% Ar/2% H2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joint was compared to that of resistance sport welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a large weld sport diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same. (Author) 32 refs

  13. Buckling response of ferritic stainless steel columns at elevated temperatures

    Afshan, S; Gardner, L; Baddoo, NR

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on the buckling behaviour of ferritic stainless steel columns in fire. Finite element models were developed and validated against existing test results to predict the elevated temperature non-linear response of ferritic stainless steel columns. A total of nine austenitic and three ferritic stainless steel column tests were replicated using the finite element analysis package ABAQUS. Parametric studies were performed to investigate the effects of variation...

  14. Material properties of high Cr-Mo steel. 3. Mechanical properties of HCM12A (FBR) after thermal aging

    In the FBR components, cyclic thermal loads are predominant and creep deformation must be taken into account. Therefore, the applicability of high chromium ferritic steel for structural material of the future advanced Fast Breeder Reactor is investigated in the feasibility study on commercialized FBR cycle systems, since both of thermal properties and high temperature strength of the steel are superior to those of conventional austenitic stainless steels. In this study, tensile, hardness, impact and relaxation tests are conducted in order to evaluate the basic mechanical properties of each HCM12A(2001-FBR). The material is aged at 600degC for 3000h and 6000h. The aged materials are also tested as well as the as-received one. As a result, the following conclusions are obtained; (1) Though 0.2% proof stress and ultimate tensile strength of thermal aged specimens are smaller than those of as-received ones, those properties still larger than those of as-received Mod.9Cr-1Mo and HCM12A steels for thermal power generating plants and the values of Sy and Su which were given in a tentative plan of HCM12A material properties guideline. (2) The ductility of the material are degraded by aging. The Fracture elongation and reduction of area of the as-received are inferior to those of Mod.9Cr-1Mo and HCM12A steels. (3) Upper shelf energy (USE) of the materials in Charpy impact test decreases with aging. 600degC-6000h aging process degrades the USE of HCM12A(2001-FBR) from about 110 J/cm2 to 65 J/cm2. The USE of the HCM12A(2001-FBR) steel is less than 1/2 and 2/3 of those of Mod.9Cr-1Mo and HCM12A steels, respectively. (4) Relaxation stress material aged at 600degC for 6000h was smaller than as-received one in both 0.15% and 0.30% strain controlled stress relaxation test. (5) The metallurgical examinations suggest that coarsening of M23C6 and precipitation of Laves phase in prior γ-grain, lath and packet boundaries due to thermal aging result in ductility decrease. (author)

  15. New ferritic steels for advanced steam plants

    Mayer, K.H; Koenig, H. [GEC ALSTHOM Energie GmbH, Nuremberg (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    During the last 15-20 years ferritic-martensitic 9-12 % chromium steels have been developed under international research programmes which permit inlet steam temperatures up to approx. 625 deg C and pressures up to about 300 bars, thus leading to improvements in thermal efficiency of around 8 % and a CO{sub 2} reduction of about 20 % versus conventional steam parameters. These new steels are already being applied in 13 European and 34 Japanese power stations with inlet steam temperature up to 610 deg C. This presentation will give an account of the content, scope and results of the research programmes and of the experience gained during the production of components which have been manufactured from the new steels. (orig.) 13 refs.

  16. Ferrite stability in duplex austenitic stainless steel welds

    The presence of ferrite in austenitic stainless steel welds is known to be beneficial in avoiding hot cracking problems. In particular, the primary delta ferrite mode of solidification is important. For alloy compositions in which primary ferrite forms, it has been shown that up to approximately 40% ferrite may exist in the as-solidified structures. With further cooling, the ferrite becomes unstable, transforming to austenite. However, under typical welding conditions, the cooling rate is sufficiently high to suppress the complete transformation of ferrite and some residual ferrite is retained. For example, for Type 308 austenitic stainless steel filler metal, gas-tungsten arc welds contain 6 to 10% ferrite, although under equilibrium conditions at elevated temperatures, this same alloy can be homogenized into a fully austenitic structure. Thus, it is clear the retained ferrite in such duplex structure welds is unstable and transforms during elevated temperature applications. The stability of ferrite was investigated by measuring its composition after several different thermal treatments. The composition was measured by means of analytical electron microscopy of thinned foils, and only the major constituents, iron, chromium, and nickel, were analyzed. The composition of ferrite was measured as a function of aging time and temperature. It was found that, during aging, the ferrite composition changes and approaches a metastable equilibrium limit before eventually transforming to sigma phase or austenite. This limiting composition was determined as a function of temperature

  17. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel

  18. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Sam, Shiju, E-mail: shiju@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India); Das, C.R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  19. Experiments on cold-formed ferritic stainless steel slender sections

    Bock Montero, Marina; Arrayago Luquin, Itsaso; Real Saladrigas, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The usage of stainless steel in construction has been increasing owing to its corrosion resistance, aesthetic appearance and favourable mechanical properties. The most common stainless steel grades used for structural applications are austenitic steels. The main drawback of these grades relies on their nickel content (around 8–10%), resulting in a relatively high initial material cost. Other stainless steel grades with lower nickel content such as the ferritic steels offer the benefits of ...

  20. The behaviour of ferritic steels under fast neutron irradiation

    Ferritic steels have been irradiated in Rapsodie and Phenix to doses up to 150 dpa F. The swelling and irradiation creep characteristics and the mechanical properties of these materials are reported. (author)

  1. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV

  2. Radiation resistance and thermal creep of ODS ferritic steels

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels containing 0.38-0.39 wt% Y2O3 have been produced by mechanical alloying. After thermo-mechanical treatment, the structure of ODS steels includes polygonized extended grains and a great number (to ∼1016-1017 cm-3) of ultrafine complex yttrium oxides ∼2-3 nm in diameter. Irradiation by fast neutrons to 4.5x1026 n/m2 (340 K) and 1.5x1022 n/m2 (77 K) leads to strengthening and plasticity decreasing in ODS alloys. The advantages of ODS ferritic steels in creep resistance and strength against ferritic-martensitic steel 12Cr-2Mo-Nb-B-V and austenitic steel 16Cr-15Ni-3Mo-Ti-V display obviously when creep rate is approximately 10-2 h-1 and fracture time is longer than 1000 h

  3. Effect of Geobacter sulfurreducens on the microbial corrosion of mild steel, ferritic and austenitic stainless steels

    Mehanna, Maha; Basséguy, Régine; Délia, Marie-Line; Bergel, Alain

    2009-01-01

    The influence of Geobacter sulfurreducens was tested on the anaerobic corrosion of four different steels: mild steel 1145, ferritic steel 403 and austenitic steels 304L and 316L. Within a few hours, the presence of cells induced a free potential (Eoc) ennoblement around +0.3 V on 1145 mild steel, 403 ferritic steel and 304L austenitic steels and slightly less on 316L. The kinetics of Eoc ennoblement depended on the amount of bacteria in the inoculum, but the final potential value depended ess...

  4. Breakdown of protective oxide films on ferritic and austenitic steels

    The kinetics and morphology of scale formation on a 9% Cr ferritic and an 18% Cr austenitic steel in high pressure CO2 are discussed. For the ferritic steel, the normal protective oxidation mode is growth of a duplex scale with an Fe3O4 outer layer and an (Fe, Cr) spinel inner layer. After long times at elevated temperatures, the protective scale may break down. The more rapid attack that follows requires conjoint oxidation and carbon deposition. The austenitic steel is not susceptible to this kind of breakaway attack, but a 'breakaway' transition from M2O3 to duplex spinel growth can be induced by temperature cycling. (author)

  5. Corrosion behavior of steels in liquid lead-bismuth with low oxygen concentrations

    Corrosion tests in pots for various steels were conducted in liquid lead-bismuth with low oxygen concentrations to elucidate corrosion behavior of steels in liquid lead-bismuth that is expected to be used for accelerator driven systems and fast reactors. The corrosion tests were performed for 3000 h under the condition of an oxygen concentration of 5x10-8 wt% at 450degC and an oxygen concentration of 3x10-9 wt% at 550degC, respectively. At 450degC, the corrosion rate of 316SS was 0.23 mm/y while it was below 0.1 mm/y for F82H, Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, JPCA(14Cr-16Ni-2Mo), 410SS, 430SS, 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, pure iron and SX(18Cr-19Ni-5Si). Dissolution of Ni and Cr, and penetration of Pb and Bi occurred in 316SS and JPCA. Dissolution of iron and grain boundary corrosion were observed in pure iron and 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, respectively. At 550degC, the corrosion rate of 316SS reached 1.02mm/y and the corrosion rates of F82H, Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, JPCA, 410SS, 2.25Cr-1Mo steel and pure iron were in the range between 0.1 and 1 mm/y. It was lower than 0.1 mm/y for 430SS and SX. Significant dissolution attach occurs for pure iron. Grain boundary corrosion and detachment of grains were observed in ferritic/martensitic steels. Ferritization and penetration of Pb and Bi occur over a wide range in 316SS and JPCA. It is difficult to prevent the grain boundary corrosion caused by Pb and Bi, and selective dissolution of Ni and Cr by using oxide films such as (Mn, Cr)-O and (Mn, Cr, Fe)-O formed under the condition of the low oxygen concentration at 550degC. (author)

  6. Ferritic/martensitic steels - overview of recent results

    Klueh, R. L.; Gelles, D. S.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Odette, G. R.; van der Schaaf, B.; Victoria, M.

    2002-12-01

    Considerable research work has been conducted on the ferritic/martensitic steels since the last International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials in 1999. Since only a limited amount of that work can be reviewed in this paper, four areas will be emphasized: (1) the international collaboration under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) to address potential problems with ferritic/martensitic steels and to prove their feasibility for fusion, (2) the major uncertainty that remains concerning the effect of transmutation helium on mechanical properties of the steels when irradiated in a fusion neutron environment, (3) development of new reduced-activation steels beyond the F82H and JLF-1 steels studied in the IEA collaboration, and (4) work directed at developing oxide dispersion-strengthened steels for operation above 650 °C.

  7. Sintering and characterization of YAG dispersed ferritic stainless steels

    The present study investigates the effect of yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) addition on the densification, mechanical, tribological and corrosion behaviour of ferritic (434L) stainless steels. The composites were sintered at both solid-state (1200 deg. C) and supersolidus (1400 deg. C) sintering conditions. Supersolidus sintering results in superior densification, hardness and corrosion resistance of both straight 434L stainless steel as well as YAG reinforced 434L stainless steels. The addition of YAG to 434L stainless steels at supersolidus sintered conditions improves the strength and wear resistance of 434L stainless steels without significantly degrading the corrosion performance

  8. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  9. Intragranular ferrite in inoculated low-carbon steels

    Inoculated low-carbon plate steels have been developed which provide improved low temperature toughness compared with conventional HSLA steels, and also exhibit better weldability with high heat input welding processes. These characteristics make inoculated steels suitable for large structures in severe environments. The improved toughness and weldability are attributed to the formation of microstructures containing fine, intragranular ferrite which nucleates on inclusion dispersions, similar to acicular ferrite formation in weld metals. The development of various inoculated steels is described and the role of inclusions in intragranular ferrite formation is reviewed. The primary role of inclusions is to provide heterogeneous nucleation sites, but nucleation appears to be enhanced to a certain extent by a number of other phenomena at the inclusion surface. Various phases have been shown to enhance intragranular ferrite nucleation, and the most effective of these for inoculation of plate steels are phases rich in titanium and oxygen. Inoculated Ti-O steels have found limited commercial acceptance, but further development depends on achievement of reliable steelmaking technology to optimise microstructural control with particles

  10. Development of ferritic steels for reduced activation: the US program

    The Cr-Mo ferritic (martensitic) steels are candidates for the structural components of fusion reactors. Irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment produces long-lived radioactive isotopes, which lead to difficult radioactive waste disposal problems once the structure is removed from service. Such problems could be reduced by using steels that contain only elements that produce radioactive isotopes that decay to low levels in a reasonable time (tens of years instead of hundreds or thousands of years). The US Department of Energy has a program to develop steels to meet the criteria for shallow land burial as opposed to deep geologic storage. A review of the alloy development programs indicates that ferritic steels that meet these criteria can be developed

  11. Deformation twinning and the transition temperature of ferritic steels

    The appearance of deformation twins in the wide temperature region of three structural ferritic steels was analyzed. It was found that the deformation twinning was associated with cleavage fracture. These results were verified in more detail on technically pure bcc Fe. For two grain sizes the tensile tests at two different strain rates and impact tests proved deformation twinning in the transition region of technically pure bcc Fe. In ductile specimens the deformation twinning was not observed. The fractographic analysis of cleaved specimens proved the reinitiation of cleavage on the twin boundary. Based on the experimental results, a linkage between the transition temperature and deformation twinning in ferritic steels can be assumed. (author)

  12. The filler powders laser welding of ODS ferritic steels

    Liang, Shenyong, E-mail: s_y_liang@126.com; Lei, Yucheng; Zhu, Qiang

    2015-01-15

    Laser welding was performed on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with the self-designed filler powders. The filler powders were added to weld metal to produce nano-particles (Y–M–O and TiC), submicron particles (Y–M–O) and dislocation rings. The generated particles were evenly distributed in the weld metal and their forming mechanism and behavior were analyzed. The results of the tests showed that the nano-particles, submicron particles and dislocation rings were able to improve the micro-hardness and tensile strength of welded joint, and the filler powders laser welding was an effective welding method of ODS ferritic steel.

  13. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  14. Mechanical tests on two batches of oxide dispersion strengthened RAFM steel (EUROFER97)

    EUROFER97 is a 9CrWVTa reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel, modelled after the conventional T91 alloy (9Cr-1Mo-0.2V-0.08Nb); some of the elements in T91 that will transmute in a fusion neutron spectrum into high-energy radiation emitters with long-half life have been selectively replaced by other elements (W has replaced Mo and Ta has replaced Nb). Such replacements do not influence the mechanical properties but are beneficial from a reduced-activation point of view. The latest developments in the ferritic/martensitic steels for nuclear applications tend toward a fine microstructure with small prior austenite grains and a low number of inclusions, in order to achieve an optimal combination of toughness, strength and high-temperature properties. On the other hand, higher operating temperatures may translate into a better efficiency of power reactors; oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) offers the potential of increasing the operating temperature of RAFM steels from 550 deg. C to about 625 deg. C, while retaining satisfactory mechanical properties. A mechanical characterisation of two ODS versions of EUROFER97 has been carried out at SCK-CEN by means of tensile and instrumented KLST Charpy tests. The two alloys, which contain different weight percentages of Y2O3 (0.3 and 0.5%), have been characterised in two orientations in the 'as-HIPped' state, that is without any post-HIPping heat treatment

  15. Residual stress studies of austenitic and ferritic steels

    Residual studies have been made on austenitic and ferritic steels of the types used as structural materials. The residual stress results presented here will include residual stress measurements in the heat-affected zone on butt welded Type 304 stainless steel pipes, and the stresses induced in Type 304 austenitic stainless steel and Type A508 ferritic steel by several surface preparations. Such surface preparation procedures as machining and grinding can induce large directionality effects in the residual stresses determined by X-ray techniques and some typical data will be presented. A brief description is given of the mobile X-ray residual stress apparatus used to obtain most of the data in these studies. (author)

  16. Deuterium Retention and Physical Sputtering of Low Activation Ferritic Steel

    T, Hino; K, Yamaguchi; Y, Yamauchi; Y, Hirohata; K, Tsuzuki; Y, Kusama

    2005-04-01

    Low activation materials have to be developed toward fusion demonstration reactors. Ferritic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are candidate materials of the first wall, vacuum vessel and blanket components, respectively. Although changes of mechanical-thermal properties owing to neutron irradiation have been investigated so far, there is little data for the plasma material interactions, such as fuel hydrogen retention and erosion. In the present study, deuterium retention and physical sputtering of low activation ferritic steel, F82H, were investigated by using deuterium ion irradiation apparatus. After a ferritic steel sample was irradiated by 1.7 keV D+ ions, the weight loss was measured to obtain the physical sputtering yield. The sputtering yield was 0.04, comparable to that of stainless steel. In order to obtain the retained amount of deuterium, technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was employed to the irradiated sample. The retained deuterium desorbed at temperature ranging from 450 K to 700 K, in the forms of DHO, D2, D2O and hydrocarbons. Hence, the deuterium retained can be reduced by baking with a relatively low temperature. The fluence dependence of retained amount of deuterium was measured by changing the ion fluence. In the ferritic steel without mechanical polish, the retained amount was large even when the fluence was low. In such a case, a large amount of deuterium was trapped in the surface oxide layer containing O and C. When the fluence was large, the thickness of surface oxide layer was reduced by the ion sputtering, and then the retained amount in the oxide layer decreased. In the case of a high fluence, the retained amount of deuterium became comparable to that of ferritic steel with mechanical polish or SS 316L, and one order of magnitude smaller than that of graphite. When the ferritic steel is used, it is required to remove the surface oxide layer for reduction of fuel hydrogen retention. Ferritic steel sample was

  17. FERRITE STRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF LOW ALLOY DUPLEX STEELS

    Hoel, R.H.; Thomas, G.

    1981-04-01

    The purpose of this communication is threefold. 1) To confirm the presence of and to characterize the precipitates in the ferrite phase of the base + Nb and base + Mo steels, 2) to study any possible variation in precipitate density as the martensitic volume fraction is changed and 3) to determine the level of precipitation strengthening.

  18. Microstructural Features During Strain Induced Ferrite Transformation in 08 and 20Mn Steels

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure evolution during strain induced ferrite transformation was followed in thermal-simulation tests of clean 08 and 20Mn steels. The influences of carbon equivalence and initial austenite grain size on ferrite grain refinement and the volume fraction of ferrite during straining were inspected. The results revealed that the accelerating effect of ferrite transformation by strain was increased as the carbon equivalence decreased. However, finer ferrite grains were obtained at higher carbon content. At strain of ~1.5 ferrite grains less than 3m and 2m can be obtained in 08 and 20Mn steels respectively. Whereas the ferrite grain refinement in 08 steel was due to both effects of strain induced transformation and ferrite dynamic recrystallization, that in 20Mn was mainly due to strain induced transformation. Heavy strain can produce fine ferrite grains in coarse austenite grained 08 steel, but it would lead to band microstructure in coarse austenite grained 20Mn.

  19. Effect of Geobacter sulfurreducens on the microbial corrosion of mild steel, ferritic and austenitic stainless steels

    Mehanna, Maha [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, CNRS - Universite de Toulouse, 5 rue Paulin Talabot, BP1301, 31029 Toulouse (France)], E-mail: mum34@psu.edu; Basseguy, Regine; Delia, Marie-Line; Bergel, Alain [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, CNRS - Universite de Toulouse, 5 rue Paulin Talabot, BP1301, 31029 Toulouse (France)

    2009-11-15

    The influence of Geobacter sulfurreducens was tested on the anaerobic corrosion of four different steels: mild steel 1145, ferritic steel 403 and austenitic steels 304L and 316L. Within a few hours, the presence of cells induced a free potential (E{sub oc}) ennoblement around +0.3 V on 1145 mild steel, 403 ferritic steel and 304L austenitic steels and slightly less on 316L. The kinetics of E{sub oc} ennoblement depended on the amount of bacteria in the inoculum, but the final potential value depended essentially on the nature of the material. This effect was due to the capacity of G. sulfurreducens to create a direct cathodic reaction on steel surfaces, extracting the electrons directly from material. The presence of bacterial cells modified the corrosion features of mild steel and ferritic steel, so that corrosion attacks were gathered in determined zones of the surface. Local corrosion was significantly enhanced on ferritic steel. Potential ennoblement was not sufficient to induce corrosion on austenitic steels. In contrast G. sulfurreducens delayed the occurrence of pitting on 304L steel because of its capability to oxidize acetate at high potential values. The electrochemical behaviour of 304L steel was not affected by the concentration of soluble electron donor (acetate, 1-10 mM) or the amount of planktonic cells; it was directly linked to the biofilm coverage. After polarization pitting curves had been recorded, microscopic observations showed that pits propagated only in the surface zones where cell settlement was the densest. The study evidenced that Geobacter sulfurreducens can control the electrochemical behaviour of steels in complex ways that can lead to severe corrosion. As Geobacteraceae are ubiquitous species in sediments and soils they should now be considered as possible crucial actors in the microbial corrosion of buried equipment.

  20. Effect of Geobacter sulfurreducens on the microbial corrosion of mild steel, ferritic and austenitic stainless steels

    The influence of Geobacter sulfurreducens was tested on the anaerobic corrosion of four different steels: mild steel 1145, ferritic steel 403 and austenitic steels 304L and 316L. Within a few hours, the presence of cells induced a free potential (Eoc) ennoblement around +0.3 V on 1145 mild steel, 403 ferritic steel and 304L austenitic steels and slightly less on 316L. The kinetics of Eoc ennoblement depended on the amount of bacteria in the inoculum, but the final potential value depended essentially on the nature of the material. This effect was due to the capacity of G. sulfurreducens to create a direct cathodic reaction on steel surfaces, extracting the electrons directly from material. The presence of bacterial cells modified the corrosion features of mild steel and ferritic steel, so that corrosion attacks were gathered in determined zones of the surface. Local corrosion was significantly enhanced on ferritic steel. Potential ennoblement was not sufficient to induce corrosion on austenitic steels. In contrast G. sulfurreducens delayed the occurrence of pitting on 304L steel because of its capability to oxidize acetate at high potential values. The electrochemical behaviour of 304L steel was not affected by the concentration of soluble electron donor (acetate, 1-10 mM) or the amount of planktonic cells; it was directly linked to the biofilm coverage. After polarization pitting curves had been recorded, microscopic observations showed that pits propagated only in the surface zones where cell settlement was the densest. The study evidenced that Geobacter sulfurreducens can control the electrochemical behaviour of steels in complex ways that can lead to severe corrosion. As Geobacteraceae are ubiquitous species in sediments and soils they should now be considered as possible crucial actors in the microbial corrosion of buried equipment.

  1. Vanadium effect on ductility of nickelless ferrite stainless steels

    Examined were the structure, properties, and the process characteristics of a new 08Kh18F2T1 nickel-free stainless steel, which differs from 08Kh18T1 steel by the additional alloying with vanadium in an amount of up to 1.5%. It has been established that the elongation of the specimens made of 0Kh18F2T1 steel increases noticeably (on the average of 7%) with a certain increase in its strength, as compared with the elongation of 0.8Kh18T1 steel. By varying the modes of the thermal treatment of cold-rolled sheet, the mechanical strength of 0318F2T1 steel may be increased up to 53 to 55.5 kgf/mm2, while the elongation of the steel is preserved within the range of 39 to 41%. It is shown that the additional alloying with vanadium completely suppresses α reversible γ transformation, and cleans the boundaries of ferrite grain. This is substantiated by the measurement of the microhardness at the grain boundaries. Stabilization of ferrite occurs owing to the binding of carbon into titanium carbides and to the introduction of vanadium into the solid solution, and it considerably reduces the absolute and the relative difference between the central portion and the boundaries of grains

  2. Comparison of the tensile properties of 9-12% Cr. steels. (Pt.1) data files, (Pt.2) final report

    A compilation of tensile properties of 9-12% Cr steels for fast breeders has been executed by CEC-member states. These data files will be analyzed and compared under the work, which is agreed upon as Part II. In the absence of a common data bank the CEC-member states contributed from their experience with 9%Cr 1%Mo steel, 9%Cr 2%Mo steel and 12%Cr steel in order to form a sound data basis. England and Italy compiled the information of 75 melts of 9%Cr 1%Mo steel. Belgium and France reported 45 melts of 9%Cr 2%Mo steel. Interatom and Neratoom contributed with 36 melts of 12%Cr steel. The tensile data are compiled between RT and 6000C in 500C intervals and comprise Rsub(p O,2), Rsub(m), reduction of area and elongation. Chemical analysis and condition (heat treatment) are given. The microstructure is described as far as possible

  3. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steel

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray diffraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Foerster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author)

  4. Complex assessment of fracture properties of cast ferritic steel

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Kozák, Vladislav; Holzmann, Miloslav

    Brno : Ústav fyziky materiálů AV ČR Brno, 2001, s. čl. 3. [Transerability of Fracture Mechanical Characteristics - Final Project Workshop Brno. Brno (CZ), 05.11.2001-06.11.2001] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : fracture toughness * cast ferritic steel * transferability Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  5. Ultra-Pure Ferritic Stainless Steels-Grade, Refining Operation, and Application

    YOU Xiang-mi; JIANG Zhou-hua; LI Hua-bing

    2007-01-01

    The grades of ultra-pure ferritic stainless steels, especially the grades used in automobile exhaust system, were reviewed. The dependence of properties on alloying elements, the refining facilities, and the mechanism of the reactions in steel melts were described in detail. Vacuum, strong stirring, and powder injection proved to be effective technologies in the melting of ultra-pure ferritic stainless steels. The application of the ferritic grades was also briefly introduced.

  6. Ferrite hardening response in a low alloy ferrite–martensite dual phase steel

    Highlights: • The ferrite hardening response varies with ferrite volume fraction. • A considerable variation in hardness was observed within a specific ferrite grain. • Finer ferrite grains were accompanied by more homogenized carbon content. • Coarser ferrite grains depicted a significant gradient of carbon content. • Ferrite hardness increased along the center to the peripheral regions of a grain. -- Abstract: This paper is concerned to investigate in details the variation of ferrite hardening response in conjunction with carbon partitioning developed within ferrite during austenite to ferrite phase transformation in a low alloy ferrite–martensite dual phase (DP) steel. For this purpose, a wide variety of ferrite–martensite DP microstructures consisting different volume fractions of ferrite and martensite have been prepared using step quenching heat treatment processes at isothermal temperature of 600 °C for various holding times. Nanoindentation measurements have been supplemented by energy dispersive X-ray and microprobe wavelength-dispersive spectroscopic analyses to follow the variation of ferrite hardening response and its relation to the carbon concentration of ferrite in the ferrite–martensite DP microstructures. The experimental results showed that the ferrite hardening response is quite variable depending on the progress of ferrite formation in the ferrite–martensite DP microstructures. For a specific ferrite grain in a specific ferrite martensite DP microstructure, the location nearer to the ferrite–martensite interfaces has been accompanied with a significant higher carbon concentration and simultaneously higher ferrite hardening response in comparison to that of central regions of ferrite grains. These results are rationalized with a higher concentration of carbon within ferrite developed as a consequence of higher carbon entrapment within defected ferrite area generated at early stage of austenite to ferrite phase transformation

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF POSTHEAT TREATMENT ON FERRITE REDISTRIBUTION IN DUPLEX STEELS ELECTRON BEAM WELDS

    Zita Iždinská; František Kolenič

    2009-01-01

    The duplex stainless steel is two-phase steel with the structure composed of austenite and ferrite with optimum austenite/ferrite proportion 50%. At present, classical arc processes for welding duplex steels are generally regarded as acceptable. On the other hand electron and laser beam welding is up to now considered less suitable for welding duplex steels. The submitted work presents the results of testing various thermal conditions at welding duplex stainless steel with electron beam. It w...

  8. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media

    Hong Luo; Huaizhi Su; Chaofang Dong; Kui Xiao; Xiaogang Li

    2015-01-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other prop...

  9. Ferritic steel strengthening for nuclear application

    Ferritic alloys were studied in view of their application as canning materials for fast reactor fuel. Their creep strength has to be equal to or better than that of AISI 316 at 700 deg C. A Fe-Cr base alloy with addition of Mo and Ti was chosen. The requested properties have been obtained on hot worked alloys, the structure of which can be described as a bamboo structure. Cold working destroys the structure and the mechanical properties are lost. It is however not the case when the alloy is made by powder metallurgy methods with addition of a ceramic oxide. In this case only, heat treatments can rebuild the bamboo structure and the alloy recovers the good mechanical properties

  10. Ferrite hardening response in a low alloy ferrite–martensite dual phase steel

    Fereiduni, E., E-mail: e.fereiduni@yahoo.com; Ghasemi Banadkouki, S.S.

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • The ferrite hardening response varies with ferrite volume fraction. • A considerable variation in hardness was observed within a specific ferrite grain. • Finer ferrite grains were accompanied by more homogenized carbon content. • Coarser ferrite grains depicted a significant gradient of carbon content. • Ferrite hardness increased along the center to the peripheral regions of a grain. -- Abstract: This paper is concerned to investigate in details the variation of ferrite hardening response in conjunction with carbon partitioning developed within ferrite during austenite to ferrite phase transformation in a low alloy ferrite–martensite dual phase (DP) steel. For this purpose, a wide variety of ferrite–martensite DP microstructures consisting different volume fractions of ferrite and martensite have been prepared using step quenching heat treatment processes at isothermal temperature of 600 °C for various holding times. Nanoindentation measurements have been supplemented by energy dispersive X-ray and microprobe wavelength-dispersive spectroscopic analyses to follow the variation of ferrite hardening response and its relation to the carbon concentration of ferrite in the ferrite–martensite DP microstructures. The experimental results showed that the ferrite hardening response is quite variable depending on the progress of ferrite formation in the ferrite–martensite DP microstructures. For a specific ferrite grain in a specific ferrite–martensite DP microstructure, the location nearer to the ferrite–martensite interfaces has been accompanied with a significant higher carbon concentration and simultaneously higher ferrite hardening response in comparison to that of central regions of ferrite grains. These results are rationalized with a higher concentration of carbon within ferrite developed as a consequence of higher carbon entrapment within defected ferrite area generated at early stage of austenite to ferrite phase

  11. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels

    Steels are being developed for fusion-reactor applications that contain only elements that produce radioactive isotopes that decay to low levels in a reasonable time. These reduced-activation or fast induced-radioactivity decay ferritic steels are being developed to be analogous to the Cr-Mo steels presently in the fusion program, but with molybdenum replaced by tungsten. In this paper, steels with 2-1/4% Cr will be discussed. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium on these steels, heats were produced with 2% W, with 0.25% V, with 1% W and 0.25% V, and with 2% W and 0.25% V. Tempering and microstructural studies were made and tensile and impact tests were conducted. Preliminary results indicate that it should be possible to develop a low-chromium Cr-W steel without molybdenum or niobium. Such steels should have properties as good as or better than the three Cr-Mo steels presently being considered as candidates for fusion-reactor applications. 22 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Microstructures and Type-IV Creep Damage of High Cr Steel Welds

    Hongo, Hiromichi; Tabuchi, Masaaki; Takahashi, Yukio

    Creep strength of welded joints in high Cr steels decreases due to the formation of Type-IV creep damage in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) during long-term use at high temperatures. This paper aims to elucidate the processes and mechanisms of Type-IV failure. Creep tests for the welded joints with different groove configurations of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel were conducted. Distributions of Type-IV creep damages in HAZ of these welds were measured quantitatively, and were compared with FEM computations using damage mechanics analysis. For the welded joints with double U groove, creep voids were observed mostly at 20% below the surface of the plate, and scarcely near surfaces and center of thickness. For the welded joints with single U groove, creep voids were observed inside the plate thickness more than 3mm below the surfaces. From the comparison of experimental damage distributions with FEM analysis, it is considered to be important to take the stress triaxiality into account for the prediction of damage location and fracture life of high Cr ferritic steel welds.

  13. Long term corrosion of Cr-Mo steels in superheated steam at 482 and 538 C

    The corrosion of several Cr-Mo ferritic steels was investigated in superheated steam at an operating power plant. Tests were conducted at 482 and 538 C (900 and 1000 F) in a once-through loop for times up to 28,000 hours (3.2 years). Chromium concentrations ranged from 2.0 to 11.4%, and the effect of surface preparation on corrosion was investigated. Only one of many specimens showed evidence of exfoliation at 482 C, but at 538 C, exfoliation occurred on at least some of the specimens of most materials; the exceptions were the alloy with the highest chromium content (Sandvik HT-9), one heat of 9 Cr-1 Mo steel with the highest silicon content, and Sumitomo 9 Cr-2 Mo steel, which was in test for only 19,000 hours. Parabolic oxidation kinetics adequately described the corrosion process for about the first year, after which corrosion rates were constant, and lower than predicted from extrapolation of the initial part of the penetration versus time curves. With chromium concentrations between 2 and 9%, corrosion behavior was independent of chromium content, and corrosion was slightly less with Sandvik HT-9. Corrosion was nearly independent of surface preparation, but in two cases, the presence of mill scale on the surface prior to steam exposure seemed to retard oxidation in steam

  14. Thin slab processing of acicular ferrite steels with high toughness

    Reip, Carl-Peter; Hennig, Wolfgang; Hagmann, Rolf [SMS Demag Aktiengesellschaft, Duesseldorf (Germany); Sabrudin, Bin Mohamad Suren; Susanta, Ghosh; Weng Lan Lee [Megasteel Sdn Bhd, Banting (Malaysia)

    2005-07-01

    Near-net-shape casting processes today represent an important option in steelmaking. High productivity and low production cost as well as the variety of steel grades that can be produced plus an excellent product quality are key factors for the acceptance of such processes in markets all over the world. Today's research focuses on the production of pipe steel with special requirements in terms of toughness at low temperatures. The subject article describes the production of hot strip made from acicular ferritic / bainitic steel grades using the CSP thin-slab technology. In addition, the resulting strength and toughness levels as a function of the alloying concepts are discussed. Optimal control of the CSP process allows the production of higher-strength hot-rolled steel grades with a fine-grain acicular-ferritic/bainitic microstructure. Hot strip produced in this way is characterized by a high toughness at low temperatures. In a drop weight tear test, transition temperatures of up to -50 deg C can be achieved with a shear-fracture share of 85%. (author)

  15. Hot-rolling of reduced activation 8CrODS ferritic steel

    Highlights: •Hot-rolling can induce a coarser ferrite grain in 8CrODS ferritic steel. •HR specimen consists of martensite, residual ferrite and transformed ferrite. •The coarsening of the transformed ferrite was analyzed by EBSD. •Hot-rolling can improve the strength of 8CrODS ferritic steel at 700 °C. -- Abstract: The 8CrODS ferritic steel is based on J1-lot developed for the advanced fusion blanket material to increase the coolant outlet temperature. A hot-rolling was conducted at the temperature above Ar3 of 716 °C, and its effect on the microstructure and tensile strength in 8CrODS ferritic steel was evaluated, comparing together with normalized and tempered specimen. It was confirmed that hot-rolling leads to slightly increased fraction of the ferrite and highly improved tensile strength. This ferrite was formed by transformation from the hot-rolled austenite during cooling due to fine austenite grains induced by hot-rolling. The coarsening of the transformed ferrite in hot-rolled specimen can be attributed to the crystalline rotation and coalescence of the similar oriented grains. The improved strength of hot-rolled specimen was ascribed to the high dislocation density and replacement of easily deformed martensite with the transformed coarse ferrite

  16. Hot-rolling of reduced activation 8CrODS ferritic steel

    Wu, Xiaochao, E-mail: chaoxiaowu_008@163.com [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ukai, Shigeharu [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Leng, Bin [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Oono, Naoko; Hayashi, Shigenari [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Sakasegawa, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Hot-rolling can induce a coarser ferrite grain in 8CrODS ferritic steel. •HR specimen consists of martensite, residual ferrite and transformed ferrite. •The coarsening of the transformed ferrite was analyzed by EBSD. •Hot-rolling can improve the strength of 8CrODS ferritic steel at 700 °C. -- Abstract: The 8CrODS ferritic steel is based on J1-lot developed for the advanced fusion blanket material to increase the coolant outlet temperature. A hot-rolling was conducted at the temperature above A{sub r3} of 716 °C, and its effect on the microstructure and tensile strength in 8CrODS ferritic steel was evaluated, comparing together with normalized and tempered specimen. It was confirmed that hot-rolling leads to slightly increased fraction of the ferrite and highly improved tensile strength. This ferrite was formed by transformation from the hot-rolled austenite during cooling due to fine austenite grains induced by hot-rolling. The coarsening of the transformed ferrite in hot-rolled specimen can be attributed to the crystalline rotation and coalescence of the similar oriented grains. The improved strength of hot-rolled specimen was ascribed to the high dislocation density and replacement of easily deformed martensite with the transformed coarse ferrite.

  17. Corrosion of an austenite and ferrite stainless steel weld

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal connections are prone to frequent failures. These failures are attributed to the difference in the mechanical properties across the weld, the coefficients of thermal expansion of the two types of steels and the resulting creep at the interface. For the weld analyzed in this research, it was shown that corrosion measurements can be used for a proper evaluation of the quality of weld material and for the prediction of whether or not the material, after the applied welding process, can be in service without failures. It was found that the corrosion of the weld analyzed in this research resulted from the simultaneous activity of different types of corrosion. In this study, electrochemical techniques including polarization and metallographic analysis were used to analyze the corrosion of a weld material of ferrite and austenitic stainless steels. Based on surface, chemical and electrochemical analyses, it was concluded that corrosion occurrence was the result of the simultaneous activity of contact corrosion (ferrite and austenitic material conjuction, stress corrosion (originating from deformed ferrite structure and inter-granular corrosion (due to chromium carbide precipitation. The value of corrosion potential of –0.53 V shows that this weld, after the thermal treatment, is not able to repassivate a protective oxide film.

  18. INTRAGRANULAR FERRITE FORMED IN ASSOCIATION WITH INCLUSIONS IN A VANADIUM MICROALLOYED STEEL

    K.M. Wu; M. Enomoto

    2004-01-01

    Intragranular ferrite was formed at inclusions in a vanadium microalloyed steel with excess amount of sulfur. The chemical composition of inclusions in the steel was analyzed by SEM-EDS. The inclusions were mainly composed of MnS and aluminum oxides. The precipitation of MnS at aluminum oxides might result in Mn depletion, which, in turn, promotes the formation of intragranular ferrite. Optical and SEM observations and threedimensional (3D) reconstruction demonstrated that intragranular ferrite was formed at inclusions. The morphology of intragranular ferrite changed with undercooling. At higher temperatures intragranular ferrite was nearly equiaxed whereas it was plate-like or lath-like at lower temperatures.

  19. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tyburska-Puschel, Beata [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  20. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with high temperature strength has been developed in line with low activation criteria for application in fusion power systems. The composition Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25Y2O3 was chosen to provide a minimum chromium content to insure fully delta-ferrite stability. High temperature strength has been demonstrated by measuring creep response of the ODS alloy in uniaxial tension at 650 and 900 C in an inert atmosphere chamber. Results of tests at 900 C demonstrate that this alloy has creep properties similar to other alloys of similar design and can be considered for use in high temperature fusion power system designs. The alloy selection process, materials production, microstructural evaluation and creep testing are described

  1. Fracture toughness of steels of martensite-ferrite structure

    The effect is studied of ferrite, incorporated in a martensitic structure, upon the resistance to cracking of a low-tempered grade 40Kh steel, said resistance being in evaluated terms of the parameter Ksub(1C) and the kinetics of the fatigue crack. It has been shown that, for low values of the stress intensity factor in the mouth of a crack Δ K, the combined martensitic-ferritic structure possesses a greater resilience than the purely martensitic one. The increase in Δ K to Ksub(1C) lowers the resistance to cracking of the combined structure as compared to the purely martensitic one. Said effects are explained on the basis of electron-diffraction fractographic and microscopic observations of crack development

  2. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K. [Vista Metals, Inc., McKeesport, PA (United States); Froes, F.H. [Univ. of Idaho, ID (United States); Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with high temperature strength has been developed in line with low activation criteria for application in fusion power systems. The composition Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sup 3} was chosen to provide a minimum chromium content to insure fully delta-ferrite stability. High temperature strength has been demonstrated by measuring creep response of the ODS alloy in uniaxial tension at 650 and 900 C in an inert atmosphere chamber. Results of tests at 900 C demonstrate that this alloy has creep properties similar to other alloys of similar design and can be considered for use in high temperature fusion power system designs. The alloy selection process, materials production, microstructural evaluation and creep testing are described.

  3. Nucleation and three-dimensional morphology of intragranular ferrite in a vanadium microalloyed steel

    2005-01-01

    The formation of intragranular ferrite at inclusions was analyzed by SEM-EDX in a vanadium microalloyed steel with an excess amount of sulfur. The precipitation of MnS at aluminum oxides may result in Mn depletion, which, in turn, promotes the formation of intragranular ferrite. The morphology of intragranular ferrite changed with undercooling. At higher temperatures intragranular ferrite is nearly equiaxed whereas it is plate-like at lower temperatures.

  4. Microstructure and Mechanical Propertiesof a Nitride-Strengthened Reduced ActivationFerritic/Martensitic Steel

    Zhou, Qiangguo; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yan, Wei; Wang, Wei; SHA, WEI; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2012-01-01

    Nitride-strengthened reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are developed taking advantage of the high thermal stability of nitrides. In the current study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of a nitride-strengthened RAFM steel with improved composition were investigated. Fully martensitic microstructure with fine nitrides dispersion was achieved in the steel. In all, 1.4 pct Mn is sufficient to suppress delta ferrite and assure the steel of the full martensitic micro...

  5. Nano-indentation hardness evaluation of 9Cr-ODS ferritic steel

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel is the most prospective candidate cladding material for the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and other Generation IV reactors. Their target average burnup is 150 GWd/t and relevant neutron dose is as high as 250 dpa. For SFR fuel elements, Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been extensively developing 9Cr-ODS ferritic steel cladding, which exhibits the distinguished creep rupture strength at 973K. In order to elucidate its strengthening mechanism, hardness measurement using 1 mN load was conducted by means of nano-indentaion technique. The 9Cr-ODS ferritic steel exhibits the unique composite structure consisting of the ferrite grains designated as residual ferrite and surrounding tempered martensite grains. The nano-scopic hardness corresponding to individual grains, i.e. residual ferritic grains and tempered martensite grains, was directly measured at the condition of the normalizing and tempering. The inherent hardness of martensite grains reduces with increasing tempering temperature, whilst residual ferrite grains maintain almost constant hardness. TEM observation of the dispersed oxide particles suggested that a dispersion strengthening is slightly higher in residual ferritic grains, but dominant strengthening mechanism could be owing to extremely high density of dislocations, and their recovery retards in residual ferritic grains. The excellent high-temperature strength of 9Cr-ODS ferritic steel is attributed to optimum balancing between hard residual ferrite and soft tempered martensite grains. (authors)

  6. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    2013-10-24

    ... Information The NRC published DG-1279 in the Federal Register on October 3, 2012 (77 FR 60479), for a 60-day... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.''...

  7. On the swelling resistance of ferritic steel

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to study the microstructural features associated with void swelling resistance in FV448 martensitic stainless steel after fast reactor irradiation to damage levels of 30 dpa at temperatures in the range 380-4600C. A characteristic feature of the microstructures is the presence of domains in which the high pre-irradiation network dislocation density is eliminated, and replaced by a homogeneous population of interstitial dislocation loops with a Burgers vectors. These domains grow but remain interspersed within a martensitic-type matrix that still retains high network dislocation densities. It is suggested that the observed evolution of the damage structure and the associated swelling resistance in such b.c.c. materials is due to the relative rates of nucleation and growth of the two interstitial dislocation loop types, with 1/2a and a Burgers vectors. (author)

  8. Foucault current testing of ferritic steel fuel cans

    The analysis of impedance involved by a Foucault current test of ferritic steel tubes, is quite different from the classical analysis which refers to non-magnetic tubes; more particularly, volume defects are considered as magnetic anomalies. Contrarily to current instructions which recommend to test the product in a satured magnetic state, it is very interesting to work with a continuous energizing field, comparatively low, corresponding to a sequenced magnetization, of which value is obtained according to the magnetic structure of the product. This analysis is useful when testing fast reactor fuel cans

  9. Analysis of ridging in ferritic stainless steel sheet

    Wu, P.D. [Novelis Inc., Novelis Global Technology Centre, 945 Princess Street, Kingston, Ont., K7L 5L9 (Canada)]. E-mail: wupeidong@hotmail.com; Jin, H. [Novelis Inc., Novelis Global Technology Centre, 945 Princess Street, Kingston, Ont., K7L 5L9 (Canada); Shi, Y. [Novelis Inc., Novelis Global Technology Centre, 945 Princess Street, Kingston, Ont., K7L 5L9 (Canada); Lloyd, D.J. [Novelis Inc., Novelis Global Technology Centre, 945 Princess Street, Kingston, Ont., K7L 5L9 (Canada)

    2006-05-15

    The finite element method is used to numerically simulate the development of ridging/roping in ferritic stainless steel sheet under stretching. The measured electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) data (grain orientations and their spatial distributions) are directly incorporated into the finite element model and the constitutive response at an integration point is described by the single crystal plasticity theory. The effects of spatial orientation distribution, imposed deformation path, and inhomogeneous deformation within individual grains on the roping are discussed. It is found that the initial texture and its spatial distribution are the predominant factors for the development of ridging.

  10. Corrosion Performance of Ferritic Steel for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-11-01

    Ferritic stainless steels have been identified as potential candidates for interconnects in planar-type solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) operating below 800ºC. Crofer 22 APU was selected for this study. It was studied under simulated SOFC-interconnect dual environment conditions with humidified air on one side of the sample and humidified hydrogen on the other side at 750ºC. The surfaces of the oxidized samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with microanalytical capabilities. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was also used in this study.

  11. Testing for compatibility of reduced activation ferritic steel with plasma on JFT-2M partial coverage of the vacuum vessel with ferritic steel

    The compatibility of reduced activation ferritic steel (F82H), which is a leading candidate material for the demo reactor (e.g. SSTR), with plasma has been investigated in the JFT-2M tokamak with 3 steps in an AMTEX (Advanced Material Tokamak EXperiment). In the first step, the reduction of fast ion losses was well demonstrated with the ferritic steel outside the vacuum vessel. In the second step, the ferritic steel was installed inside the vacuum vessel in order to perform a preliminary investigation of the effect of the ferromagnetism on plasma stability and control, and impurity release. For this purpose, ferritic steels of 7 mm thickness were installed to form 2 sets of toroidally uniform belts, which cover 20% of the vacuum vessel. No deteriorative effects were observed regarding mode locking, plasma control, and impurity desorption. The initial boron coating was applied in order to modify the surface of the ferritic steel. The impurity is remarkably reduced and high normalized-beta plasma was obtained. Thus encouraging results were obtained for the third step, where whole vacuum vessel wall will be covered with ferritic steel. (author)

  12. Effect of initial microstructures on the properties of Ferrite-Martensite Dual-Phase pipeline steels with Strain-Based design

    Yueyue Hu; Xiurong Zuo; Rutao Li; Zhanzhan Zhang

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of initial microstructures on the properties of ferrite-martensite dual-phase pipeline steels with strain-based design. For this purpose, the as-received acicular ferrite steels were first austenitized at 920 ºC for 15 minutes followed by air cooling and water quenching to produce ferrite-pearlite and ferrite-martensite microstructure, respectively. Subsequently, the steels with ferrite-pearlite, ferrite-martensite and as-received acicular ferrite mic...

  13. Effect of boron on sintering of a ferritic stainless steel

    This work studies the effect of boron on the density of a 409Nb ferritic stainless steel obtained by powder metallurgy during the process of sintering. The purpose of adding boron is to promote the formation of a liquid phase during sintering at temperatures below 120 degree centigrade . The boron contents varied from 0.0 to 1.5%wt. Specimens were compacted at 700MPa, and sintering was made at 1075 and 1150 degree centigrade during 60 minutes under a hydrogen atmosphere, using a heating rate of 20 degree centigrade/min. Density values were determined by the Archimedes method, and the samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. This work shows the dependence of the steel density and morphology of the microstructure as a function of boron content and the temperature of sintering. (Author) 29 refs

  14. Diffusion bonding between ODS ferritic steel and F82H steel for fusion applications

    Diffusion bonding techniques were employed to join high Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel (Fe–15Cr–2W–0.2Ti–0.35Y2O3) and F82H steel under uni-axial hydrostatic pressure using a high vacuum hot press, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were investigated. The dissimilar joints were bonded by solid-state diffusion bonding (SSDB) and liquid phase diffusion bonding (LPDB). After bonding process, heat treatments were conducted to utilize the phase transformation of F82H steel for recovering the martensitic structure. Tensile tests with miniaturized specimens were carried out to investigate and compare the bonding strengths of each joint. Microstructure was observed for the bonding interface, and fracture mode was investigated after the tensile tests. LPDB joint of interfacial F82H steel fully recovered to martensite phase by post-joining heat treatments, while SSDB joint had ferrite phases at the interface even after heat treatment, which is considered to be due to decarburization of F82H steel during the bonding process. Therefore it is considered that the insert material plays a role as diffusion barrier of carbon during LPDB process. Microstructure observations and tensile tests of the joints revealed that the LPDB joints possess suitable tensile properties which are comparable to that of F82H steel. This indicates that LPDB is more promising method to bond ODS-FS and F82H steel than SSDB.

  15. Sticking Phenomenon Occurring during Hot Rolling of Ferritic Stainless Steels

    Sticking phenomenon occurring during hot rolling of two ferritic stainless steels, STS 430J1L and STS 436L, was investigated in this study. A hot rolling simulation test was carried out using a high-temperature wear tester capable of controlling rolling speed, load, and temperature. The simulation test results at 900 .deg. C and 1000 .deg. C revealed that the sticking process proceeded with three stages, i.e., nucleation, growth, and saturation, for the both stainless steels, and that STS 430J1L had a smaller number of sticking nucleation sites than the STS436L because of higher high-temperature hardness, thereby leading to a smaller amount of the sticking. When the test temperature was 1070 .deg. C, the sticking hardly occurred in both stainless steels as Fe-Cr oxide layers were formed on the surface of the rolled materials. These findings suggested that the improvement of high-temperature properties of stainless steels and the appropriate rolling conditions for readily forming oxide layers on the rolled material surface were required in order to prevent or minimize the sticking

  16. Influence of HIP treatment on aluminised ferritic-martensitic steels

    Coatings on low activation steels are required in fusion technology in order to reduce the tritium permeation rate through the steel into the cooling water system by a factor of at least 100. Alumina seems to be a promising coating material. However, an appropriate coating system must also have the potential for self healing since the ceramic alumina scale tends to fail if mechanical stress is applied. Hot-dip aluminising is an applicable technology to coat ferritic-martensitic steels which consists of two main process steps: firstly, hot dip aluminising of the steel (700 C, 30 s) Secondly, transformation of the very hard intermetallic scale Fe2Al5 into FeAl and α-Fe(Al) phase during a subsequent heat treatment (1040 C, 30 min). The pressure chosen for the HIP experiment was 1000, 2000 and 3000 bar. Compared to a heat treatment without superimposed high pressure pores formation due to the Kirkendall effect could be suppressed successfully. The influence of the high pressure on the heat treatment (1040 C, 30 min) will be discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  17. Sticking Phenomenon Occurring during Hot Rolling of Ferritic Stainless Steels

    Son, Chang Young; Kim, Chang Kyu; Ha, Dae Jin; Lee, Sung Hak [Pohang Univ. of Institute of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Seog; Kim, Kwang Tae; Lee, Yong Deuk [POSCO Technical Research Lab., Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Sticking phenomenon occurring during hot rolling of two ferritic stainless steels, STS 430J1L and STS 436L, was investigated in this study. A hot rolling simulation test was carried out using a high-temperature wear tester capable of controlling rolling speed, load, and temperature. The simulation test results at 900 .deg. C and 1000 .deg. C revealed that the sticking process proceeded with three stages, i.e., nucleation, growth, and saturation, for the both stainless steels, and that STS 430J1L had a smaller number of sticking nucleation sites than the STS436L because of higher high-temperature hardness, thereby leading to a smaller amount of the sticking. When the test temperature was 1070 .deg. C, the sticking hardly occurred in both stainless steels as Fe-Cr oxide layers were formed on the surface of the rolled materials. These findings suggested that the improvement of high-temperature properties of stainless steels and the appropriate rolling conditions for readily forming oxide layers on the rolled material surface were required in order to prevent or minimize the sticking.

  18. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    Highlights: • The morphology of the corrosion of steel in cement paste was studied in situ. • During galvanostatic corrosion, carbon steel reinforcement corroded homogeneously. • On ferritic stainless steel, deep corrosion pits formed and caused wider cracks. • The measured rate of steel loss correlated well with Faraday’s law of electrolysis. - Abstract: In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover

  19. Alloys influence in ferritic steels with hydrogen attack

    Materials exposed to a corrosive environment and high temperatures, are associated with a decrease of their mechanical properties and embitterment.At room temperatures atomic hydrogen diffuses easily through metals structure, it accumulates in lattice defects forming molecular hydrogen and generating cracking due to internal stresses.Under high temperatures the phenomenon is more complex.The steels in these conditions present different structures of precipitates, that the change under creep conditions period.In this work it is determined the influence of Cr and V alloys, the changes of ferritic steel resistance in a corrosive environment and high temperatures.1.25 Cr 1 Mo 0.25 V and 2.25Cr 1 Mo under different loads and temperatures previously attacked by hydrogen environment.The hydrogen is induced by the electrolytic technique, optimizing the choice of temperatures, current density, electrolyte, etc. In order to control an adequate cathode charge, a follow up procedure is carried out by electronic barrier microscopy.After the attack, the material is settled at room temperatures for certain period of time, to allow the hydrogen to leave and evaluate the residual damage.Creep by torsion assays, under constant load and temperature is used as an experimental technique.With the outcome data curves are drawn in order to study the secondary creep rate, with the applied load and temperature, determining the value of stress exponent n and the activation energy Q.Comparing to equal assays to the same ferritic steels but non attacked by hydrogen, these values allows the prediction of microstructure changes present during these tests

  20. Ferrite/pearlite microstructural and microchemical banding in hot rolled microalloyed steel

    Ferrite/pearlite banded structure is commonly observed in the hot rolled steels which can be described as a microstructure comprising of alternate layers of pro eutectoid ferrite and perlite in contrast to random distribution of these microstructural constituents. The occurrence of banded ferrite/pearlite structure has been well established in case plan carbon steels to segregation of Mn and consequently carbon during solidification. However this has not yet been reported for microalloyed steels. In this work the influence of microchemical and microstructural banding has been examined in microalloyed steel using optical. SEM and fine-probe EDS microanalysis. The compositional changes occurred in the ferrite/pearlite banded structure are explained by the diffusion of elements in the microalloyed steel. (author)

  1. Mechanical properties of high strength quenched steels with minute amounts of ferrite

    In this paper the effects of minute amounts of ferrite on mechanical properties in high strength quenched steels were studied by the sound emission method. The results show that, with the same macrohardness, a decrease of 75% of the resistance to minute amounts of the plastic deformation is as a result of 2.0% ferrite in steels, moreover, both the resistance to ambient temperature creep and the resistance to low cycle fatigue are reduced when minute amounts of ferrite exists in steels. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. Conversion of MX Nitrides to Modified Z-Phase in 9-12%Cr Ferritic Steels

    Cipolla, Leonardo; Somers, Marcel A. J.; Hald, John

    2010-01-01

    The 9-12%Cr ferritic steels are extensively used in modern steam power plants at service temperature up to 620°C. Currently the best perform ing ferritic creep resistance steel is the ASTM Grade 92, whose high temperature strength has recently been assessed by European Creep Collaborative Committee in 2005 as 600°C/113MPa/10 5h. All previous attempts made in the last twenty years to develop ferritic steels for 650°C applications have failed due to the incapacity to combine the superior oxidat...

  3. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 409 Grade Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Shanmugam, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-10-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel, and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behavior of the gas metal arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single ‘V’ butt welded joints. Center cracked tensile specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behavior. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine with a capacity of 100 kN was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  4. Influence of tempering on mechanical properties of ferritic martensitic steels

    In the mid-1980s research programs for development of low activation materials began. This is based on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Guidelines (10CFR part 61) that were developed to reduce long-lived radioactive isotopes, which allows nuclear reactor waste to be disposed of by shallow land burial when removed from service. Development of low activation materials is also key issue in nuclear fusion systems, as the structural components can became radioactive due to nuclear transmutation caused by exposure to high dose neutron irradiation. Reduced-activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels have been developed in the leading countries in nuclear fusion technology, and are now being considered as primary candidate material for the test blanket module (TBM) in the international thermonuclear experiment reactor (ITER). RAFM steels developed so far (e.g., EUROFER 97 and F82H) meet the requirement for structural application in the ITER. However, if such alloys are used in the DEMO or commercial fusion reactor is still unclear, as the reactors are designed to operate under much severe conditions (i.e., higher outlet coolant temperature and neutron fluences). Such harsh operating conditions lead to development of RAFM steels with better creep and irradiation resistances. Mechanical properties of RAFM steels are strongly affected by microstructural features including the distribution, size and type of precipitates, dislocation density and grain size. For a given composition, such microstructural characteristics are determined mainly by thermo-mechanical process employed to fabricate the final product, and accordingly a final heat treatment, i.e., tempering is the key step to control the microstructure and mechanical properties. In the present work, we investigated mechanical properties of the RAFM steels with a particular attention being paid to effects of tempering on impact and creep properties

  5. Investigations of low-temperature neutron embrittlement of ferritic steels

    Investigations were made into reasons for accelerated embrittlement of surveillance specimens of ferritic steels irradiated at 50C at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel. Major suspects for the precocious embrittlement were a highly thermalized neutron spectrum,a low displacement rate, and the impurities boron and copper. None of these were found guilty. A dosimetry measurement shows that the spectrum at a major surveillance site is not thermalized. A new model of matrix hardening due to point defect clusters indicates little effect of displacement rate at low irradiation temperature. Boron levels are measured at 1 wt ppM or less, inadequate for embrittlement. Copper at 0.3 wt % and nickel at 0.7 wt % are shown to promote radiation strengthening in iron binary alloys irradiated at 50 to 60C, but no dependence on copper and nickel was found in steels with 0.05 to 0.22% Cu and 0.07 to 3.3% Ni. It is argued that copper impurity is not responsible for the accelerated embrittlement of the HFIR surveillance specimens. The dosimetry experiment has revealed the possibility that the fast fluence for the surveillance specimens may be underestimated because the stainless steel monitors in the surveillance packages do not record an unexpected component of neutrons in the spectrum at energies just below their measurement thresholds of 2 to 3 MeV

  6. Study on microstructure and mechanical characteristics of low-carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel joints

    Sarkari Khorrami, Mahmoud; Mostafaei, Mohammad Ali; Pouraliakbar, Hesam, E-mail: hpouraliakbar@alum.sharif.edu; Kokabi, Amir Hossein

    2014-07-01

    In this work, examinations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of plain carbon steel and AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel dissimilar welds are carried out. Welding is conducted in both autogenous and using ER309L austenitic filler rod conditions through gas tungsten arc welding process. The results indicate that fully-ferritic and duplex ferritic–martensitic microstructures are formed for autogenous and filler-added welds, respectively. Carbide precipitation and formation of martensite at ferrite grain boundaries (intergranular martensite) as well as grain growth occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of AISI 430 steel. It is found that weld heat input can strongly affect grain growth phenomenon along with the amount and the composition of carbides and intergranular martensite. Acquired mechanical characteristics of weld in the case of using filler metal are significantly higher than those of autogenous one. Accordingly, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), hardness, and absorbed energy during tensile test of weld metal are increased from 662 MPa to 910 MPa, 140 Hv to 385 Hv, and 53.6 J m{sup −3} to 79 J m{sup −3}, respectively by filler metal addition. From fracture surfaces, predominantly ductile fracture is observed in the specimen welded with filler metal while mainly cleavage fracture occurs in the autogenous weld metal.

  7. Study on microstructure and mechanical characteristics of low-carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel joints

    In this work, examinations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of plain carbon steel and AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel dissimilar welds are carried out. Welding is conducted in both autogenous and using ER309L austenitic filler rod conditions through gas tungsten arc welding process. The results indicate that fully-ferritic and duplex ferritic–martensitic microstructures are formed for autogenous and filler-added welds, respectively. Carbide precipitation and formation of martensite at ferrite grain boundaries (intergranular martensite) as well as grain growth occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of AISI 430 steel. It is found that weld heat input can strongly affect grain growth phenomenon along with the amount and the composition of carbides and intergranular martensite. Acquired mechanical characteristics of weld in the case of using filler metal are significantly higher than those of autogenous one. Accordingly, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), hardness, and absorbed energy during tensile test of weld metal are increased from 662 MPa to 910 MPa, 140 Hv to 385 Hv, and 53.6 J m−3 to 79 J m−3, respectively by filler metal addition. From fracture surfaces, predominantly ductile fracture is observed in the specimen welded with filler metal while mainly cleavage fracture occurs in the autogenous weld metal

  8. Mechanical behaviour of ferritic ODS steels - Temperature dependancy and anisotropy

    Fournier, B.; Steckmeyer, A.; Rouffie, A.-L.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Ratti, M.; Wident, P.; Ziolek, L.; Tournie, I.; Rabeau, V.; Gentzbittel, J. M.; Kruml, T.; Kubena, I.

    2012-11-01

    Ferritic 14%Cr and 18%Cr ODS steels produced at CEA in round bars or plates were tested mechanically. The present paper reports results obtained in tension, impact, fatigue, creep and toughness tests. These tests were carried out at various temperatures and in different directions. These materials show a pronounced anisotropy at all tested temperatures. No matter the loading, the transversal direction is always found to be far less resistant than the longitudinal one. This anisotropy is mainly observed in terms of damage mechanisms, with intergranular fracture preferentially occurring along the extrusion direction. This intergranular fracture mode leads to very low and anisotropic toughness values and to the absence of tertiairy creep stage, pointing out the unstable nature of fracture, even at high temperature. The unrealistically high values of the Norton exponent measured in creep suggests the existence of a threshold stress, which is consistent with the mainly kinematic nature of the stress as revealed by fatigue tests.

  9. Simulation of the kinetics of precipitation reactions in ferritic steels

    Computer simulations of diffusion-controlled phase transformations in model alloys of Fe-Cr-C, Fe-Cr-W-C, Fe-Cr-Si-C, and Fe-Cr-Co-V-C are presented. The compositions considered are typical for ferritic steels. The simulations are performed using the software DICTRA and the thermodynamic calculations of phase equilibria are performed using Thermo-Calc. The thermodynamic driving forces and the kinetics of diffusion-controlled precipitation reactions of M23C6, M7C3, cementite and Laves-phase (Fe, Cr)2W are discussed. The simultaneous growth of stable and metastable phases is treated in a multi-cell approach. The results show remarkable effects on the growth kinetics due to the competition during simultaneous growth

  10. Activating Flux Design for Laser Welding of Ferritic Stainless Steel

    马立; 胡绳荪; 胡宝; 申俊琦; 王勇慧

    2014-01-01

    The behaviors of YAG laser welding process of ferritic stainless steel with activating fluxes were investi-gated in this study. Some conventional oxides, halides and carbonates were applied in laser welding. The results showed that the effect of oxides on the penetration depth was more remarkable. Most activating fluxes improved the penetration more effectively at low power than that at high power. The uniform design was adopted to arrange the formula of multicomponent activating fluxes, showing that the optimal formula can make the penetration depth up to 2.23 times as large as that without flux, including 50%ZrO2, 12.09%CaCO3, 10.43%CaO and 27.48%MgO. Through the high-speed photographs of welding process, CaF2 can minimize the plasma volume but slightly improve the pene-tration capability.

  11. Forming limit and fracture mechanism of ferritic stainless steel sheets

    Research highlights: → Forming limit curves of two ferritic stainless steel sheets were well predicted. → Failure occurs by necking in uniaxial and plane strain tension for both materials. → Failure occurs by shearing in balanced biaxial tension for both materials. → Strain rate sensitivity does not affect the limit strains a lot for both materials. → Strain rate sensitivity likely influences the failure mode for both materials. - Abstract: In this work, the forming limit curves (FLCs) of two ferritic stainless steel sheets, AISI409L and AISI430, were predicted with the Marciniak-Kuczynski (MK) and Bressan-William-Hill (BWH) models, combined with the Yld2000-2d yield function and the Swift hardening law. Uniaxial tension, disk compression and hydraulic bulge tests were performed to determine the yield loci and hardening curves of both materials. Meanwhile, the strain rate sensitivity (SRS) coefficient was measured through uniaxial tension tests carried out at different strain rates. Out-of-plane stretching tests were conducted in sheet specimens to obtain the surface limit strains under different linear strain paths. Micrographs of the specimens fractured in different stress states were obtained by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The overall results show that the BWH model can predict the FLC better than the MK model, and that the SRS does not have much effect on the limit strains for both materials. The predicted FLCs and micrograph analysis both indicate that failure occurs by surface localized necking in uniaxial and plane strain tension states, whereas it occurs by localized shearing in the through thickness direction in balanced biaxial tension state.

  12. The potential for using high chromium ferritic alloys for hydroprocessing reactors

    This paper outlines the development of hydroprocessing reactors and the parallel development of applicable steels for their high temperature and high pressure process environments. Trends in the development of newer processes for severe hydroprocessing applications have been increasing in operating hydrogen partial pressures and operating temperatures that require the development of new alloys to meet these more severe process environments. The paper outlines the properties of conventional hydroprocessing reactor materials and discusses the advantages of the advanced high chromium ferritic steel alloy Grade 91 (9Cr-1Mo-V) for high temperature hydroprocessing applications. Additionally, the alloys permitted for ASME Section I and Section VIII Division I construction, Grade 92 (Code Case 2179), and what will probably be called Grade 122 (Code Case 2180) are briefly introduced as possible future choices for hydroprocessing reactor construction. These three alloys contain 9-12% Cr and have time independent allowable stress values above 566 deg. C. These high, time independent, strength values provide materials that will in some cases permit extending hydroprocessing temperature limits by 112 deg. C. The paper provides room temperature and elevated temperature mechanical and toughness properties for the low chrome and Grade 91 materials and discusses the effects of hydrogen attack, and hydrogen and isothermal embrittlement. Fabrication aspects, including forming and welding are addressed. The paper discusses the environmental resistance of these alloys and investigates the possibility of utilizing excess wall metal thickness in these materials in less severe applications in lieu of the deposition of a higher chromium alloy weld overlay to overcome the corrosive effects of the process environment

  13. Microstructure and toughness of Cr-W and Cr-V ferritic steels

    In order to obtain an optimum alloy composition of reduced-activation Cr-W-V ferritic steels, the microstructural evolution during thermal aging at 823-973 K and its effect on the toughness were investigated for simple Cr-W and Cr-V steels by means of transmission electron microscopy and Charpy impact testing. The microstructural evolution of the Cr-W steels was similar to that of the conventional Cr-Mo steels. Carbides precipitated in the martensite and the intermetallic compound Fe2W precipitated in the δ-ferrite of the Cr-W steels. On the other hand, only carbides precipitated in both the martensite and the δ-ferrite of the Cr-V steels. The effect of Cr, W and V on the thermal embrittlement is discussed by taking account of the precipitation behavior. (orig.)

  14. Low Cost Ferritic Stainless Steel in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells with Cobalt Complex Electrolyte

    Miettunen, Kati; Jouttijärvi, Sami; Jiang, Roger; Saukkonen, Tapio; Romu, Jyrki; Halme, Janne; Lund, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cheap ferritic stainless steel is applied here as the counter electrode substrate in dye sensitized solar cells with cobalt complex electrolyte. A 5.0% efficiency was reached with these type of cells which is more than 2.5 times higher compared to previously reported devices with metal counter electrode and cobalt complex electrolyte. The electrochemical impedance spectra analysis showed that the best cells with the ferritic steel counter electrode had as low charge transfer resistance (3.6 Ω...

  15. The development of advanced creep constitutive equations for high chromium alloy steel (P91) at transition stress range

    An, Lili

    2015-01-01

    Creep damage is a time-dependent deformation in metals under a constant stress at high temperature condition. Since the 1980s, high chromium alloy steel P91 (9%Cr-1%Mo-0.25%V) is highly demanded in high temperature industries (Saha, 2003). Continuum damage mechanism is becoming a generic life assessment tool to predict the lifetime of materials at creep condition. The consitutive equations were proposed to predict the lifetime and creep behaviours of materials. The most widely used constituti...

  16. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations

  17. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations.

  18. The effect of cooling rate and austenite grain size on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in microalloyed steels

    The effect of different austenite grain size and different cooling rates on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in one Nb-microalloyed high strength low alloy steel has been investigated. Three different austenite grain sizes were selected and cooled at two different cooling rates for obtaining austenite to ferrite transformation temperature. Moreover, samples with specific austenite grain size have been quenched, partially, for investigation on the microstructural evolution. In order to assess the influence of austenite grain size on the ferrite transformation temperature, a temperature differences method is established and found to be a good way for detection of austenite to ferrite, pearlite and sometimes other ferrite morphologies transformation temperatures. The results obtained in this way show that increasing of austenite grain size and cooling rate has a significant influence on decreasing of the ferrite transformation temperature. Micrographs of different ferrite morphologies show that at high temperatures, where diffusion rates are higher, grain boundary ferrite nucleates. As the temperature is lowered and the driving force for ferrite formation increases, intragranular sites inside the austenite grains become operative as nucleation sites and suppress the grain boundary ferrite growth. The results indicate that increasing the austenite grain size increases the rate and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite in two different cooling rates. Moreover, by increasing of cooling rate, the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature decreases and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite increases.

  19. Tests on ferritic stainless steel RHS and SHS beam-columns

    Arrayago Luquin, Itsaso; Real Saladrigas, Esther; Mirambell Arrizabalaga, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The desirable features offered by different stainless steel grades have encouraged the use of this material in construction and the lower nickel content of the ferritic grades allows, additionally, controlling and decreasing the initial investment needs. Design expressions codified for carbon steel have been extended to stainless steel elements in EN1993-1-4, regardless their different mechanical behaviours. The study of stainless steel elements subjected to combined axial compression and ben...

  20. Experimental study on ferritic stainless steel RHS and SHS beam-columns

    Arrayago Luquin, Itsaso; Real Saladrigas, Esther; Mirambell Arrizabalaga, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steels, with their lower nickel content, supplement the desirable features offered by different stainless steel grades with a more controlled and lower initial investment requirements, which have encouraged the use of these materials in construction. The nonlinear behaviour of stainless steel grades is not usually considered when extending design expressions codified for carbon steel to these alloyed materials, leading to overconservative design approaches and the applicabi...

  1. Modelling of Nb influence on phase transformation behaviours from austenite to ferrite in low carbon steels

    Wang, L.; Parker, S. V.; Rose, A. J.; West, G. D.; Thomson, R. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a new model has been developed to predict the phase transformation behaviours from austenite to ferrite in Nb-containing low carbon steels. The new model is based on some previous work and incorporates the effects of Nb on phase transformation behaviours, in order to make it applicable for Nb-containing steels. Dissolved Nb atoms segregated at prior austenite grain boundaries increase the critical energy for ferrite nucleation, and thus the ferrite nucleation rate is decreased. Dissolved Nb atoms also apply a solute drag effect to the moving transformation interface, and the ferrite grain growth rate is also decreased. The overall transformation kinetics is then calculated according to the classic Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory. The new model predictions are quite consistent with experimental results for various steels during isothermal transformations or continuous cooling.

  2. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien

    2014-06-01

    In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media.

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-12-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott-Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments. PMID:26501086

  4. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    Dai, Y. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-06-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature ({le}380{degrees}C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300{degrees}C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300{degrees}C to 500{degrees}C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180{degrees}C to 330{degrees}C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited.

  5. Effect of Niobium on Isothermal Transformation of Austenite to Ferrite in HSLA Low-Carbon Steel

    CAO Jian-chun; LIU Qing-you; YONG Qi-long; SUN Xin-jun

    2007-01-01

    Using thermomechanical simulation experiment, the kinetics of the isothermal transformation of austenite to ferrite in two HSLA low-carbon steels containing different amounts of niobium was investigated under the conditions of both deformation and undeformation. The results of optical microstructure observation and quantitative metallography analysis showed that the kinetics of the isothermal transformation of austenite to ferrite in lower niobium steel with and without deformation suggests a stage mechanism, wherein there exists a linear relationship between the logarithms of holding time and ferrite volume fraction according to Avrami equation, whereas the isothermal transformation of austenite to ferrite in high niobium steel proceeds via a two stage mechanism according to micrographs, wherein, the nucleation rate of ferrite in the initial stage of transformation is low, and in the second stage,the rate of transformation is high and the transformation of residual austenite to ferrite is rapidly complete. Using carbon extraction replica TEM, niobium carbide precipitation for different holding time was investigated and the results suggested that NbC precipitation and the presence of solute niobium would influence the transformation of austenite to ferrite. The mechanism of the effect of niobium on the isothermal transformation was discussed.

  6. Diffusion of Nickel into Ferritic Steel Interconnects of Solid Oxide Fuel/Electrolysis Stacks

    Molin, Sebastian; Chen, Ming; Bowen, Jacob R.; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2013-01-01

    limited number of studies have been devoted to the phenomenon. Here, diffusion of Ni into ferritic Crofer 22 APU steel is studied in a wet hydrogen atmosphere after 250 hours of exposure at 800 °C using Ni-plated (~ 10 micron thick coatings) sheet steel samples as a model system. Even after this...

  7. Diffusion of Nickel into Ferritic Steel Interconnects of Solid Oxide Fuel/Electrolysis Stacks

    Molin, Sebastian; Chen, Ming; Bowen, Jacob R.;

    2013-01-01

    a limited number of studies have been devoted to the phenomenon. Here, diffusion of Ni into ferritic Crofer 22 APU steel is studied in a wet hydrogen atmosphere after 250 hours of exposure at 800 °C using Ni-plated (~ 10 micron thick coatings) sheet steel samples as a model system. Even after...

  8. ROLE OF STRUCTURE IS IN THE PROCESS OF FERRITIC-PEARLITIC STEEL EROSION

    O. A. Kuzin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of study of influence of structure on mechanical properties and behavior of ferrite-perlite steels under the action of contact loads are presented. It is shown that the formation of the widmanstatten pattern has a negative impact on the performance of steels under static loads but a positive effect on their durability.

  9. Effect of tin addition on the microstructure and properties of ferritic stainless steel

    Yang Li; Ji-peng Han; Zhou-hua Jiang; Pan He

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the effects of Sn on the inclusions as well as the mechanical properties and hot workability of ferritic stainless steel. Precipitation phases and inclusions in Sn-bearing ferritic stainless steel were observed, and the relationship between the workability and the microstructure of the steel was established. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis of the steel reveals that an almost pure Sn phase forms and MnS–Sn compound inclusions appear in the steel with a higher Sn content. Little Sn segregation was observed in grain boundaries and in the areas around sulfide inclusions;however, the presence of Sn does not adversely affect the workability of the steel con-taining 0.4wt%Sn. When the Sn content is 0.1wt%–0.4wt%, Sn improves the tensile strength and the plastic strain ratio and also improves the plasticity with increasing temperature. A mechanism of improving the workability of ferritic stainless steel induced by Sn addition was discussed:the presence of Sn lowers the defect concentration in the ultra-pure ferritic lattice and the good distribution of tin in the lattice overcomes the problem of hot brittleness that occurs in low-carbon steel as a result of Sn segregation.

  10. CYCLIC RECRYSTALLIZATION OF FERRITE IN HOT-ROLLED LOW-CARBON SHEET STEEL WITH STRUCTURETEXTURAL HETEROGENEITY

    A. M. Nesterenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is determined that in the process of soaking at subcritical temperature 680 °C in hot-rolled rolling of low-carbon steel 08 ps recrystallization is developed with heterogeneous fu ll repeat change of the steel ferrite change by its section.

  11. Boron effects on the ductility of a nano-cluster-strengthened ferritic steel

    Research highlights: → Cu-rich nano-particle precipitation strengthens the ferritic steels. → Boron doping suppresses brittle intergranular fracture. → Moisture-induced environmental embrittlement can be alleviated by surface coating. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of Cu-rich nano-cluster-strengthened ferritic steels with and without boron doping were investigated. Tensile tests at room temperature in air showed that the B-doped ferritic steel has similar yield strength but a larger elongation than that without boron doping after extended aging at 500 deg. C. There are three mechanisms affecting the ductility and fracture of these steels: brittle cleavage fracture, week grain boundaries, and moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement. Our study reveals that boron strengthens the grain boundary and suppresses the intergranular fracture. Furthermore, the moisture-induced embrittlement can be alleviated by surface coating with vacuum oil.

  12. Alloying design of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel for long life FBRs core materials

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferrite steels with excellent swelling resistance and superior high temperature strength are prospective cladding materials for advanced fast breeder reactors. The addition of Ti in 13Cr-3W ODS ferritic steels improved the high temperature strength remarkably by the formation of uniformly distributed ultra-fine oxide particles. ODS ferritic steels have a bamboo-like grain structure and a strong deformation texture. The decrease of creep rupture strength in the bi-axial direction compared to the uni-axial direction is attributed mainly to this unique bamboo grain structure. Nearly equivalent creep rutpure strength for both bi-axial and uni-axial direction was successfully attained by introducing the α to γ transformation in ODS martensitic steel. (orig.)

  13. Rupture character of steels with ferrite-pearlite structure under influence of liquid metallic media

    Influence of liquid metal environment (gallium base alloy with melting point of 5 deg C) on mechanical properties and fracture mode was studied for ferritic-pearlitic steels with 0.03-0.8 % C under static and cyclic loading. Liquid metal medium was found to assist plastic deformation in a surface layer and to change fracture mode. It was revealed that the liquid of metal deteriorated steel properties in case of static loads but this effect weakened when passing from ferrite to pearlite. In ferritic steel under cycling loading the liquid metal affected so that shifted cracking resistance value to the region of lower stress intensity factors and promoted transition from intragranular fracture to intergranular one. Pearlitic steels behaved alike under cyclic loading both in liquid metal and in the air

  14. Deformation response of ferrite and martensite in a dual-phase steel

    Deformation response of ferrite and martensite in a commercially produced dual-phase sheet steel with a nominal composition of 0.15% C–1.45% Mn–0.30% Si (wt.%) was characterized by nanoindentation and uniaxial compression of focused ion beam-milled cylindrical micropillars (1–2 μm diameter). These experiments were conducted on as-received and pre-strained specimens. The average nanoindentation hardness of ferrite was found to increase from ∼2 GPa in the as-received condition to ∼3.5 GPa in the specimen that had been pre-strained to 7% plastic tensile strain. Hardness of ferrite in the as-received condition was inhomogeneous: ferrite adjacent to ferrite/martensite interface was ∼20% harder than that in the interior, a feature also captured by micropillar compression experiments. Hardness variation in ferrite was reversed in samples pre-strained to 7% strain. Martensite in the as-received condition and after 5% pre-strain exhibited large scatter in nanoindentation hardness; however, micropillar compression results on the as-received and previously deformed steel specimens demonstrated that the martensite phase in this steel was amenable to plastic deformation and rapid work hardening in the early stages of deformation. The observed microscopic deformation characteristics of the constituent phases are used to explain the macroscopic tensile deformation response of the dual-phase steel

  15. Phase transformations in ferrite phase of a duplex stainless steel aged at 500 degree C

    Due to their high strength, high corrosion resistance, and good properties of castings, duplex stainless steels are widely used in the recirculation system of nuclear power plants. Although the presence of ferrite phase increases the strength and the resistance to SCC, the ferrite phase also brings about thermal aging embrittlement known as ''475 C embrittlement''. The room temperature impact strength can decrease by 80% after aging for 8 years at a temperature as low as 300 C. Much research has been performed on the low temperature embrittlement of duplex stainless steels. It is generally acknowledged that the spinodal decomposition in ferrite phase and precipitation of some other carbides or nickel silicide are responsible for the degradation in mechanical properties of duplex stainless steels at low temperatures. The extent of the degradation was found to be strongly dependent on the composition in ferrite, which is closely related to the change of microstructure. Thus, the exact evolution of phase transformation in ferrite has also drawn a large audience. In this study, using electron microscopy, the authors investigated the phase evolution of ferrite phase in duplex stainless steel, aged at 500 C. up to 10,000 hours

  16. Development and Application of High-Cr Ferritic Stainless Steels as Building Exterior Materials

    Stainless Steels have been widely used as a building exterior materials in Asian countries for the last decade. It is required for the materials in this field to have an aesthetic appearance,a relatively high strength, and an excellent corrosion resistance. Other metallic materials such as copper, aluminum, and carbon steels have been also used as the exterior materials. Considering the cost of maintenance, stainless steel, having the outstanding corrosion resistance, is replacing other materials in the several parts in the building exteriors. Ferritic stainless steel has been applied as the roofing materials because its thermal expansion is much smaller than that of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, it is suitable for the large-scale construction such as airport terminal, convention center, and football stadium. To improve the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels, the modification of alloy composition has been studied to develop new grade materials and the progress in the surface technology has been introduced. Corrosion properties, of these materials were evaluated in the laboratory and in the field for longer than two years. High-Cr ferritic stainless steel showed excellent corrosion resistance to the atmospheric environments. In the region close to the sea, the corrosion resistance of high-Cr ferritic stainless steel was much superior to that of other materials, which may prove this steel to be the appropriate materials for the construction around seashore. In some of the large constructions around seashore in South Korea, high-Cr ferritic stainless steels have been used as the building exterior materials for six years

  17. Effect of carbon content on the mechanical properties of 10Cr-5W ferritic steels

    The effect of carbon content on the microstructures, the tensile strength, creep strength and fracture toughness of 10Cr-5W ferritic steels containing from 0.02 to 0.13 mass% C is investigated. The low carbon steels possess the higher Ms temperature than the high carbon steels, so that the packet size of the martensite structure is larger in the low carbon steels. Both the FATT (fracture appearance transition temperature) and the USE (upper shelf energy) increase with decreasing carbon content. This means the decrease of toughness and the increase of ductility with decreasing carbon content. Fine precipitates of the Laves phase are observed in the martensite lath in all experimental steels after quality heat treatment. The tensile strength measured at 873 K has a tendency to increase with decreasing C content. But a certain amount of C is needed even in 5 W ferritic steels to keep the longer creep-rupture life under the lower stress level. (orig.)

  18. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Nitride-Strengthened Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    Zhou, Qiangguo; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yan, Wei; Wang, Wei; Sha, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2012-12-01

    Nitride-strengthened reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are developed taking advantage of the high thermal stability of nitrides. In the current study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of a nitride-strengthened RAFM steel with improved composition were investigated. Fully martensitic microstructure with fine nitrides dispersion was achieved in the steel. In all, 1.4 pct Mn is sufficient to suppress delta ferrite and assure the steel of the full martensitic microstructure. Compared to Eurofer97, the steel showed similar strength at room temperature but higher strength at 873 K (600 °C). The steel exhibited very high impact toughness and a low ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of 243 K (-30 °C), which could be further reduced by purification.

  19. Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of eutectoid steel with ultrafine or fine (ferrite+cementite) structure

    Eutectoid steel with the ultrafine or fine-grained ferrite (α)+cementite (θ) particles structure was formed by hot deformation of undercooled austenite at 0.1 s−1 or 5 s−1 at 650 °C using a Gleeble 1500 hot simulator and subsequent annealing. The microstructural evolution of fine (α+θ) structure was investigated by means of a scanning electronic microscope, electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscope, and the mechanical properties of fine (α+θ) steel were analyzed in comparison with that of ultrafine (α+θ) steel. The results show that only dynamic transformation of undercooled austenite into proeutectoid ferrite occurs during hot deformation at 650 °C at 5 s−1. During water quenching, lamellar pearlite with small colony sizes is formed and the average size of pearlite colonies decreases with increasing the strain. By subsequent annealing at 650 °C for 30 min, the spheroidization of lamellar pearlite takes place, resulting in the formation of fine (α+θ) structure consisting of ferrite matrix with the average size of about 4.9 μm and fine cementite particles mainly within ferrite grains. In comparison with ultrafine (α+θ) steel consisting of ferrite matrix with the average size of about 1.8 μm and relatively large cementite particles mostly located at grain boundaries, the yield strength, tensile strength, uniform elongation, total elongation and work-hardening capability of fine (α+θ) steel improve markedly

  20. Toughening mechanisms of a high-strength acicular ferrite steel heavy plate

    Cao, Zhi-Qiang; Bao, Yan-Ping; Xia, Zheng-Hai; Luo, Deng; Guo, Ai-Min; Wu, Kai-Ming

    2010-10-01

    An ultra-low carbon acicular ferrite steel heavy plate was obtained with an advanced thermo-mechanical control process-relaxed precipitation controlled transformation (TMCP-RPC) at Xiangtan Steel, Valin Group. The heavy plate has a tensile strength of approximately 600 MPa with a lower yield ratio. The impact toughness of the heavy plate achieves 280 J at -40°C. The fine-grained mixed microstructures of the heavy plate mainly consist of acicular ferrite, granular bainite, and polygonal ferrite. The high strength and excellent toughness of the heavy plate are attributed to the formation of acicular ferrite microstructure. The prevention of blocks of martensite/retained austenite (M/A) and the higher cleanness are also responsible for the superior toughness.

  1. Lead-bismuth eutectic corrosion behaviors of ferritic/martensitic steels in low oxygen concentration environment

    Liu, Jian; Shi, Quanqiang; Luan, He; Yan, Wei; Sha, Wei; Wang, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the compatibility of candidate structural materials with liquid metals, two kinds of ferritic/martensitic steels were chosen to contact with lead–bismuth eutectic in sealed quartz–glass tubes. The corrosion exposures were for 500 and 3000 h. Results showed that the oxidation layer and carbide dissolution layer on the two steels grew with contact time under oxygen unsaturated condition. Short-term corrosion behavior of a newly developed steel showed better lead–bismuth ...

  2. Ferritic stainless steel composite slabs : Experimental study of longitudinal shear transfer

    Ferrer Ballester, Miquel; Marimón Carvajal, Federico; Arrayago Luquin, Itsaso; Mirambell Arrizabalaga, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to carry out the procedure described in Eurocode 4 to evaluate the longitudinal shear transfer capability of conventional steel sheeting open-rib profile with embossments, usually rolled in conventional galvanized steel, being rolled now in ferritic stainless steel 1.4003 alloy. Finally, the results of both composite floor slabs are compared. Two methodologies have been used to evaluate the longitudinal shear resistance in composite slabs, the m-k method and t...

  3. Microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of laser welded dissimilar joints between ferritic stainless steel and carbon steel

    Highlights: • Laser welding of ferritic stainless steel to carbon steel joints was made. • The microstructure of this dissimilar joint is lath martensite and ferrite. • Decarburized layer and type II grain boundary was observed in joints. • The hardness distribution of two heat input joints across interface were analyzed. • Ecorr of dissimilar joint is between two base metals and joint has greatest icorr. - Abstract: The joint of dissimilar metals between ferritic stainless steel (FSS) and low carbon steel (CS) are welded by laser beam with two different welding speeds: 12 mm/s and 24 mm/s. Microstructure of dissimilar joint were investigated using optical microscope, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The results show that the microstructure of this dissimilar joint is lath martensite and few ferrite, upper bainite and widmanstatten ferrite formed in heat-affected zone (HAZ) of CS. An increase of welding speed leads to narrower HAZ of CS and higher hardness of weld bead close to FSS side. The joints with different welding speed have similar ultimate tensile strength but superior elongation is obtained of high welding speed joint. Electrochemical corrosion test indicates the corrosion potential of dissimilar joint falls in between FSS and CS. And dissimilar joint has greatest corrosion current density which is attributed to the effect of galvanic corrosion

  4. Cathodic cage nitriding of AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel with the addition of CH4

    Rômulo Ribeiro Magalhães de Sousa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel samples were nitrided using the cathodic cage plasma nitriding technique (CCPN, with the addition of methane to reduce chromium precipitation, increase hardness and wear resistance and reduce the presence of nitrides when compared to plasma carbonitriding. Microhardness profiles and X-Ray analysis confirm the formation of a very hard layer containing mainly ε-Fe3N and expanded ferrite phases.

  5. Cathodic cage nitriding of AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel with the addition of CH4

    Rômulo Ribeiro Magalhães de Sousa; Francisco Odolberto de Araújo; José Alzamir Pereira da Costa; Antonio Maia de Oliveira; Mineia Sampaio Melo; Clodomiro Alves Junior

    2012-01-01

    AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel samples were nitrided using the cathodic cage plasma nitriding technique (CCPN), with the addition of methane to reduce chromium precipitation, increase hardness and wear resistance and reduce the presence of nitrides when compared to plasma carbonitriding. Microhardness profiles and X-Ray analysis confirm the formation of a very hard layer containing mainly ε-Fe3N and expanded ferrite phases.

  6. Modeling of Ni Diffusion Induced Austenite Formation in Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnects

    Chen, Ming; Molin, Sebastian; Zhang, L; Ta, Na; Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar; Y. Du

    2015-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steel interconnect plates are widely used in planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) or electrolysis cell (SOEC) stacks. During stack production and operation, nickel from the Ni/YSZ fuel electrode or from the Ni contact component diffuses into the IC plate, causing transformation of the ferritic phase into an austenitic phase in the interface region. This is accompanied with changes in volume and in mechanical and corrosion properties of the IC plates. In this work, kinetic mo...

  7. Ferrite control--Measurement problems and solutions during stainless steel fabrication

    Ferrite is one of the magnetic phases found in many grades of otherwise nonmagnetic austenitic stainless steel weldments. Control of ferrite during the fabrication of cryogenic component parts is necessary to produce a reliable product, free of cracking and microfissuring. This is accomplished by balancing compositions in order to produce a small amount of ferrite which is generally accompanied with reduced toughness. Control of ferrite is essential during the fabrication of component parts. The means to accomplish this will vary with the type of material being welded, thickness, welding process, method of measurement and fabrication procedures. An application used during the fabrication of component parts for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) required specially formulated shielded manual arc welding (SMAW) electrodes and consumable inserts. Control of ferrite measurements and shop welding procedures were essential. The special materials and techniques were used to weld Type 316 stainless steel pipe joints, 28 in. (0.71 m) in diameter. By using three lots of electrodes, each with a different ferrite level, a compatible range of ferrite was achieved throughout the layers of weld metal. By extensive use of the Schaeffler and DeLong modified constitution diagrams for stainless steel weld metal, E-16-8-2 SMAW electrodes were developed with ''0'' ferrite level. The electrodes were used during fabrication of the Liquid Metal Fast Breader Reactor (LMFBR) component parts of Type 316 stainless steel. Metallographic evaluation of laboratory specimens, control of shop welding techniques and individual laboratory training of shop welders combined to produce a quality product

  8. Optimization of Ferrite Number of Solution Annealed Duplex Stainless Steel Cladding Using Integrated Artificial Neural Network: Simulated Annealing

    V. Rathinam; T. Kannan

    2014-01-01

    Cladding is the most economical process used on the surface of low carbon structural steel to improve the corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistant property is based on the amount of ferrite present in the clad layer. Generally, the ferrite content present in the layer is expressed in terms of Ferrite Number (FN). The optimum range of ferrite number provides adequate surface properties like chloride stress corrosion cracking resistance, pitting and crevice corrosion resistance and mechani...

  9. Ferritic steels for the first generation of breeder blankets

    Materials development in nuclear fusion for in-vessel components, i.e. for breeder blankets and divertors, has a history of more than two decades. It is the specific in-service and loading conditions and the consequentially required properties in combination with safety standards and social-economic demands that create a unique set of specifications. Objectives of Fusion for Energy (F4E) include: 1) To provide Europe's contribution to the ITER international fusion energy project; 2) To implement the Broader Approach agreement between Euratom and Japan; 3) To prepare for the construction and demonstration of fusion reactors (DEMO). Consequently, activities in F4E focus on structural materials for the first generations of breeder blankets, i.e. ITER Test Blanket Modules (TBM) and DEMO, whereas a Fusion Materials Topical Group implemented under EFDA coordinates R and D on physically based modelling of irradiation effects and R and D in the longer term (new and /or higher risk materials). The paper focuses on martensitic-ferritic steels and (i) reviews briefly the challenges and the rationales for the decisions taken in the past, (ii) analyses the status of the main activities of development and qualification, (iii) indicates unresolved issues, and (iv) outlines future strategies and needs and their implications. Due to the exposure to intense high energy neutron flux, the main issue for breeder materials is high radiation resistance. The First Wall of a breeder blanket should survive 3-5 full power years or, respectively in terms of irradiation damage, typically 50-70 dpa for DEMO and double figures for a power plant. Even though the objective is to have the materials and key fabrication technologies needed for DEMO fully developed and qualified within the next two decades, a major part of the task has to be completed much earlier. Tritium breeding test blanket modules will be installed in ITER with the objective to test DEMO relevant technologies in fusion

  10. Development of nano-structured duplex and ferritic stainless steels by pulverisette planetary milling followed by pressureless sintering

    Nano-structured duplex and ferritic stainless steel powders are prepared by planetary milling of elemental Fe, Cr and Ni powder for 40 h and then consolidated by conventional pressureless sintering. The progress of milling and the continuous refinement of stainless steel powders have been confirmed by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Activation energy for the formation of duplex and ferritic stainless steels is calculated by Kissinger method using differential scanning calorimetry and is found to be 159.24 and 90.17 KJ/mol respectively. Both duplex and ferritic stainless steel powders are consolidated at 1000, 1200 and 1400 °C in argon atmosphere to study microstructure, density and hardness. Maximum sintered density of 90% and Vickers microhardness of 550 HV are achieved for duplex stainless steel sintered at 1400 °C for 1 h. Similarly, 92% sintered density and 263 HV microhardness are achieved for ferritic stainless steel sintered at 1400 °C. - Highlights: • Synthesized duplex and ferritic stainless steels by pulverisette planetary milling • Calculated activation energy for the formation of duplex and ferritic stainless steels • Studied the effect of sintering temperature on density, hardness and microstructure • Duplex stainless steel exhibits 90% sintered density and microhardness of 550 HV. • Ferritic stainless steel shows 92% sintered density and 263 HV microhardness