WorldWideScience

Sample records for 94-4 interim measures

  1. Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.

    Witt, Jonathan L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-05-01

    This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

  2. 7 CFR 94.4 - Analytical methods.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Analytical methods. 94.4 Section 94.4 Agriculture... POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Mandatory Analyses of Egg Products § 94.4 Analytical methods. The majority of analytical methods used by the USDA laboratories to perform mandatory analyses for egg products are listed...

  3. Radon measurements in schools: an interim report

    The report provides school officials, groups such as Parent-Teacher Associations, and other interested person with interim information on how to measure radon in schools and what to do if elevated levels are found. The first sections of the document contain facts about radon and the health risks associated with radon exposure. The next sections summarize what is known about radon in schools and provide guidance for conducting radon measurements. The last sections describe how to interpret the measurement results and suggest techniques that can be used to reduce radon concentrations if elevated levels are found

  4. Effectiveness Monitoring Report, MWMF Tritium Phytoremediation Interim Measures.

    Hitchcock, Dan; Blake, John, I.

    2003-02-10

    This report describes and presents the results of monitoring activities during irrigation operations for the calendar year 2001 of the MWMF Interim Measures Tritium Phytoremediation Project. The purpose of this effectiveness monitoring report is to provide the information on instrument performance, analysis of CY2001 measurements, and critical relationships needed to manage irrigation operations, estimate efficiency and validate the water and tritium balance model.

  5. 78 FR 290 - National Conference on Weights and Measures 98th Interim Meeting

    2013-01-03

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology National Conference on Weights and Measures 98th Interim Meeting AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The 2013 Interim Meeting of the National Conference on Weights and Measures (NCWM) will be held January...

  6. 76 FR 81477 - National Conference on Weights and Measures 97th Interim Meeting

    2011-12-28

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology National Conference on Weights and Measures 97th Interim Meeting AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Interim Meeting of the 97th National Conference on Weights and Measures (NCWM) will be held January 22...

  7. 76 FR 540 - National Conference on Weights and Measures 2011 Interim Meeting

    2011-01-05

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology National Conference on Weights and Measures 2011 Interim Meeting AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Conference on Weights and Measures (NCWM) 2011 Interim Meeting will be held January 23 to 26,...

  8. SWSA 6 interim corrective measures environmental monitoring: FY 1991 results

    In 1988, interim corrective measures (ICMs) were implemented at Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The SWSA 6 site was regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The ICMs consist of eight large high-density polyethylene sheets placed as temporary caps to cover trenches known to contain RCRA-regulated materials. Environmental monitoring for FY 1991 consisted of collecting water levels at 13 groundwater wells outside the capped areas and 44 wells in or near the capped areas in order to identify any significant loss of hydrologic isolation of the wastes. Past annual reports show that the caps are only partially effective in keeping the waste trenches dry and that many trenches consistently or intermittently contain water

  9. SWSA 6 interim corrective measures environmental monitoring: FY 1991 results

    Clapp, R.B.; Marshall, D.S.

    1992-06-01

    In 1988, interim corrective measures (ICMs) were implemented at Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The SWSA 6 site was regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The ICMs consist of eight large high-density polyethylene sheets placed as temporary caps to cover trenches known to contain RCRA-regulated materials. Environmental monitoring for FY 1991 consisted of collecting water levels at 13 groundwater wells outside the capped areas and 44 wells in or near the capped areas in order to identify any significant loss of hydrologic isolation of the wastes. Past annual reports show that the caps are only partially effective in keeping the waste trenches dry and that many trenches consistently or intermittently contain water.

  10. Subsurface Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action Plan/Environmental Assessment and Decision Document, Operable Unit No. 2

    The subject Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action plan/Environmental Assessment (IM/IRAP/EA) addresses residual free-phase volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination suspected in the subsurface within an area identified as Operable Unit No. 2 (OU2). This IM/IRAP/EA also addresses radionuclide contamination beneath the 903 Pad at OU2. Although subsurface VOC and radionuclide contamination on represent a source of OU2 ground-water contamination, they pose no immediate threat to public health or the environment. This IM/IRAP/EA identifies and evaluates interim remedial actions for removal of residual free-phase VOC contamination from three different subsurface environments at OU2. The term ''residual'' refers to the non-aqueous phase contamination remaining in the soil matrix (by capillary force) subsequent to the passage of non-aqueous or free-phase liquid through the subsurface. In addition to the proposed actions, this IM/IRAP/EA presents an assessment of the No Action Alternative. This document also considers an interim remedial action for the removal of radionuclides from beneath the 903 Pad

  11. Interim measure work plan/design for Agra, Kansas.

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-18

    This Interim Measure Work Plan/Design (IMWP/D) is supplemental to the Argonne document Interim Measure Conceptual Design for Remediation of Source Area Contamination at Agra, Kansas. The IMWP/D includes information required by Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy BER-RS-029, Policy and Scope of Work for Interim Measures. Specific to Policy BER-RS-029 is the requirement for several documents that will ensure that an adequate amount and type of data are collected for implementation of the IMWP/D and that data quality and safe conditions are prevailed. Such information is included in the IMWP/D as follows: Appendix A: Data Acquisition Plan--Design Testing Requirements; Appendix B: Basis of Design; Appendix C: Permits; Appendix D: Quality Assurance Project Plan; Appendix E: Health and Safety Plan; and Appendix F: Operations, Maintenance, and Monitoring Schedule. The proposed remedial technology for this project is the installation of five large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) in a source area that has been identified on the property formerly used for grain storage by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The goal of the LDB technology is the remediation of the source area by removal of mass quantities of contaminated soil from the vadose zone and treatment of any remaining contaminated soils that are adjacent to the source area to achieve a carbon tetrachloride concentration below 200 {micro}g/kg. Secondary to the soil remediation is the remediation of groundwater at and adjacent to the source areas. The LDB technology serves the following purposes: (1) The physical removal of contaminated soil from the identified source area. (2) Replacement of less permeable native materials (silty clay, clayey silt, and silty sand) with more permeable materials to facilitate the capture of volatilized contaminants in the vertical borehole. (3) Removal of contaminants volatilized by air sparging (AS) and extracted from the

  12. SWSA 6 interim corrective measures environmental monitoring: FY 1990 results

    Ashwood, T.L.; Spalding, B.P.

    1991-07-01

    This report presents the results and conclusions from a multifaceted monitoring effort associated with the high-density polyethylene caps installed in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as an interim corrective measure (ICM). The caps were installed between November 1988 and June 1989 to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements for closure of those areas of SWSA 6 that had received RCRA-regulated wastes after November 1980. Three separate activities were undertaken to evaluate the performance of the caps: (1) wells were installed in trenches to be covered by the caps, and water levels in these intratrench wells were monitored periodically; (2) samples were taken of the leachate in the intratrench wells and were analyzed for a broad range of radiological and chemical contaminants; and (3) water levels in wells outside the trenches were monitored periodically. With the exception of the trench leachate sampling, each of these activities spanned the preconstruction, construction, and postconstruction periods. Findings of this study have important implications for the ongoing remedial investigation in SWSA 6 and for the design of other ICMs. 51 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. SWSA 6 interim corrective measures environmental monitoring: FY 1990 results

    This report presents the results and conclusions from a multifaceted monitoring effort associated with the high-density polyethylene caps installed in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as an interim corrective measure (ICM). The caps were installed between November 1988 and June 1989 to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements for closure of those areas of SWSA 6 that had received RCRA-regulated wastes after November 1980. Three separate activities were undertaken to evaluate the performance of the caps: (1) wells were installed in trenches to be covered by the caps, and water levels in these intratrench wells were monitored periodically; (2) samples were taken of the leachate in the intratrench wells and were analyzed for a broad range of radiological and chemical contaminants; and (3) water levels in wells outside the trenches were monitored periodically. With the exception of the trench leachate sampling, each of these activities spanned the preconstruction, construction, and postconstruction periods. Findings of this study have important implications for the ongoing remedial investigation in SWSA 6 and for the design of other ICMs. 51 figs., 2 tabs

  14. E-Area Performance Assessment Interim Measures Assessment FY2005

    Stallings, M

    2006-01-31

    After major changes to the limits for various disposal units of the E-Area Low Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) last year, no major changes have been made during FY2005. A Special Analysis was completed which removes the air pathway {sup 14}C limit from the Intermediate Level Vault (ILV). This analysis will allow the disposal of reactor moderator deionizers which previously had no pathway to disposal. Several studies have also been completed providing groundwater transport input for future special analyses. During the past year, since Slit Trenches No.1 and No.2 were nearing volumetric capacity, they were operationally closed under a preliminary closure analysis. This analysis was performed using as-disposed conditions and data and showed that concrete rubble from the demolition of 232-F was acceptable for disposal in the STs even though the latest special analysis for the STs had reduced the tritium limits so that the inventory in the rubble exceeded limits. A number of special studies are planned during the next years; perhaps the largest of these will be revision of the Performance Assessment (PA) for the ELLWF. The revision will be accomplished by incorporating special analyses performed since the last PA revision as well as revising analyses to include new data. Projected impacts on disposal limits of more recent studies have been estimated. No interim measures will be applied during this year. However, it is being recommended that tritium disposals to the Components-in-Grout (CIG) Trenches be suspended until a limited Special Analysis (SA) currently in progress is completed. This SA will give recommendations for optimum placement of tritiated D-Area tower waste. Further recommendations for tritiated waste placement in the CIG Trenches will be given in the upcoming PA revision.

  15. Engineering report single-shell tank farms interim measures to limit infiltration through the vadose zone

    HAASS, C.C.

    1999-10-14

    Identifies, evaluates and recommends interim measures for reducing or eliminating water sources and preferential pathways within the vadose zone of the single-shell tank farms. Features studied: surface water infiltration and leaking water lines that provide recharge moisture, and wells that could provide pathways for contaminant migration. An extensive data base, maps, recommended mitigations, and rough order of magnitude costs are included.

  16. Engineering report single-shell tank farms interim measures to limit infiltration through the vadose zone

    Identifies, evaluates and recommends interim measures for reducing or eliminating water sources and preferential pathways within the vadose zone of the single-shell tank farms. Features studied: surface water infiltration and leaking water lines that provide recharge moisture, and wells that could provide pathways for contaminant migration. An extensive data base, maps, recommended mitigations, and rough order of magnitude costs are included

  17. Interim remedial measures proposed plan for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Washington

    The purpose of this interim remedial measures (IRM) proposed plan is to present and solicit public comments on the IRM planned for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site in Washington state. The 200-ZP-1 is one of two operable units that envelop the groundwater beneath the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site

  18. Interim indoor radon and radon decay-product measurement protocols

    The report provides EPA's procedures for measuring radon concentrations in houses with continuous radon monitors, charcoal canisters, alpha-track detectors, and grab radon techniques. It also provides procedures for measuring radon decay-product concentrations with a continuous-working-level monitor, a radon-progeny integrating sampling unit (RPISU), and grab radon decay-product methods. Specifications for the location of the measurement, the house conditions during the measurement, and minimum requirements for quality control are included in each procedure

  19. Subsurface Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action Plan and Decision Document for the 903 Pad, Mound, and East Trenches Areas (Operable Unit No. 2)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing an Interim Measure/Interim Remedial Action (IM/IRA) at the 903 Pad, Mound, and East Trenches Areas (Operable Unit No. 2) at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). This MIRA is to be conducted to provide information that will aid in the selection and design of final remedial actions at OU2 that will address removal of suspected free-phase volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination. The Plan involves investigating the removal of residual free-phase VOCs by in situ vacuum-enhanced vapor extraction technology at 3 suspected VOC source areas within OU2. VOC-contaminated vapors extracted from the subsurface would be treated by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and discharged. The Plan also includes water table depression, when applicable at the test sites, to investigate the performance of vapor extraction technology in the saturated zone. The Plan provides for treatment of any contaminated ground water recovered during the IM/IRA at existing RFP treatment facilities. The proposed MVIRA Plan is presented in the document entitled ''Proposed Subsurface Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action Plan/Environmental Assessment and Decision Document, 903 Pad, Mound, and East Trenches Areas, Operable Unit No. 2, '' dated 20 March 1992. Information concerning the proposed Subsurface IM/IRA was presented during a DOE Quarterly Review meeting held on 07 April 1992 and a public meeting held on 07 May 1992, at the Marriott Hotel in Golden, Colorado. The Responsiveness Summary presents DOE's response to all comments received at the public meeting, as well as those mailed to date to DOE during the public comment period

  20. Surface Water Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action Plan/Environmental Assessment and Decision Document for South Walnut Creek Basin (Operable Unit No. 2)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing an Interim Measure/Interim Remedial Action (IM/IRA) at the 903 Pad, Mound, and East Trenches Areas (Operable Unit No. 2) at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). This IM/IRA is to be conducted to minimize the release from these areas of hazardous substances that pose a potential threat to the public health and environment. The Plan involved the collection of contaminated surface water at specific locations, treatment by chemical precipitation, cross-flow membrane filtration and granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption, and surface discharge of treated water. Information for the initial configuration of the Plan is presented in the document entitled ''Proposed Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action Plan and Decision Document, 903 Pad, Mound, and East Trenches Areas, Operable Unit No. 2'' (IM/IRAP) dated 26 September 1990. Information concerning the proposed Surface Water IM/IRA was presented during a public meeting held from 7 to 10 p.m., Tuesday, 23 October 1990, at the Westminster City Park Recreation Center in Westminster, Colorado. This Responsiveness Summary presents DOE's response to all comments received at the public meeting, as well as those mailed to DOE during the public comment period which ended 24 November 1990. There were a number of technical comments on the plan that DOE has addressed herein. It is noted that several major issues were raised by the comments. Regardless of the estimated low risk to the public from construction and water transport activities, the popular sentiment of the public, based on comments received, is strong concern over worker and public health risks from these activities. In the light of public and municipal concerns, DOE proposes to eliminate from this IM/IRA the interbasin transfer of Woman Creek seepage to the South Walnut Creek drainage and to address collection and treatment of contaminated South Walnut Creek and Woman Creek surface water under two separate IM/IRAs

  1. KSC Press Site Transformer Bldg. (K7-1205c) SWMU 074 Interim Measure Work Plan

    Starr, A. Scott; Applegate, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This document presents and discusses the Interim Measure (IM) Work Plan for the Press Site Transformer Building (K7-1205C). The purpose of the proposed IM activities is to remove soil affected with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) greater than the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) residential direct-exposure Soil Cleanup Target Level (R-SCTL) of 0.5 milligrams per kilogram and encapsulate concrete exhibiting PCB concentration greater than the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) threshold of 50 milligrams per kilogram.

  2. Department of Energy Plutonium ES ampersand H Vulnerability Assessment Savannah River Site interim compensatory measures

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has recently completed a self-assessment of potential vulnerabilities associated with plutonium and other transuranic materials stored at the site. An independent Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) appointed by DOE/ES ampersand H also performed an independent assessment, and reviewed and validated the site self-assessment. The purpose of this report is to provide a status of interim compensatory measures at SRS to address hazards in advance of any corrective actions. ES ampersand H has requested this status for all vulnerabilities ranked medium or higher with respect to potential consequences to workers, environment, and the public

  3. SWSA 6 interim corrective measures environmental monitoring: FY 1991 results. Environmental Restoration Program

    Clapp, R.B.; Marshall, D.S.

    1992-06-01

    In 1988, interim corrective measures (ICMs) were implemented at Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The SWSA 6 site was regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The ICMs consist of eight large high-density polyethylene sheets placed as temporary caps to cover trenches known to contain RCRA-regulated materials. Environmental monitoring for FY 1991 consisted of collecting water levels at 13 groundwater wells outside the capped areas and 44 wells in or near the capped areas in order to identify any significant loss of hydrologic isolation of the wastes. Past annual reports show that the caps are only partially effective in keeping the waste trenches dry and that many trenches consistently or intermittently contain water.

  4. Mobile Launch Platform Vehicle Assembly Area (SWMU 056) Biosparge Expansion Interim Measures Work Plan

    Burcham, Michael S.; Daprato, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the design details for an Interim Measure (IM) Work Plan (IMWP) for the Mobile Launch Platform/Vehicle Assembly Building (MLPV) Area, located at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. The MLPV Area has been designated Solid Waste Management Unit Number 056 (SWMU 056) under KSC's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action Program. This report was prepared by Geosyntec Consultants (Geosyntec) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under contract number NNK09CA02B and NNK12CA13B, project control number ENV1642. The Advanced Data Package (ADP) presentation covering the elements of this IMWP report received KSC Remediation Team (KSCRT) approval at the December 2015 Team Meeting; the meeting minutes are included in Appendix A.

  5. Surface Water Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action Plan/ Environmental and Decision Document, South Walnut Creek Basin, Operable Unit No.2

    Water quality investigations have identified the presence of volatile organic compound (VOC) and radionuclide contamination of surface water at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). The subject interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action Plan/Environmental Assessment (IM/IRAP/EA) addresses contaminated surface water in a portion of the South Walnut Creek drainage basin located within an area identified as Operable Unit No. 2 (OU 2). There is no immediate threat to public health and the environment posed by this surface water contamination. The affected surface water is contained within the plant boundary by existing detention ponds, and is treated prior to discharge for removal of volatile contaminants and suspended particulates to which radionuclides, if present, are likely to absorb. However, there is a potential threat and the Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing this Surface Water IM/IRAP at the request of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Colorado Department of Health (CDH). Implementation of the Surface Water IM/IRA will enhance the DOE's efforts towards containing and managing contaminated surface water, and will mitigate downgradient migration of contaminants. Another factor in implementing this IM/IRA is the length of time it will take to complete the investigations and engineering studies necessary to determine the final remedy for OU 2. 44 refs., 23 figs., 14 tabs

  6. SWSA 6 interim corrective measures environmental monitoring: FY 1990 results. Environmental Restoration Program

    Ashwood, T.L.; Spalding, B.P.

    1991-07-01

    This report presents the results and conclusions from a multifaceted monitoring effort associated with the high-density polyethylene caps installed in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as an interim corrective measure (ICM). The caps were installed between November 1988 and June 1989 to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements for closure of those areas of SWSA 6 that had received RCRA-regulated wastes after November 1980. Three separate activities were undertaken to evaluate the performance of the caps: (1) wells were installed in trenches to be covered by the caps, and water levels in these intratrench wells were monitored periodically; (2) samples were taken of the leachate in the intratrench wells and were analyzed for a broad range of radiological and chemical contaminants; and (3) water levels in wells outside the trenches were monitored periodically. With the exception of the trench leachate sampling, each of these activities spanned the preconstruction, construction, and postconstruction periods. Findings of this study have important implications for the ongoing remedial investigation in SWSA 6 and for the design of other ICMs. 51 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Spent Fuel Test - Climax: technical measurements. Interim report, fiscal year 1982

    The Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) is located 420 m below surface in the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site. The test is being conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the technical direction of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized April to May 1980, thus initiating a test with a planned 3- to 5-year fuel storage phase. The SFT-C operational objective of demonstrating the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner has been met. Three exchanges of spent fuel between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility furthered this demonstration. Technical objectives of the test led to development of a technical measurements program, which is the subject of this and two previous interim reports. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data have been recorded on a continuing basis for the first 2-1/2 years of the test on more than 900 channels. Data continue to be acquired from the test. Some data are now available for analysis and are presented here. Highlights of activities this year include analysis of fracture data obtained during site characterization, laboratory studies of radiation effects and drilling damage in Climax granite, improved calculations of near-field heat transfer and thermomechanical response, a ventilation effects study, and further development of the data acquisition and management systems

  8. Spent fuel test - Climax: technical measurements. Interim report, Fiscal Year 1983

    The Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) is located 420 m below surface in the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site. The test is being conducted as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized April-May 1980. The spent-fuel canisters were retrieved and the thermal sources were de-energized in March-April 1983 when test data indicated that test objectives were met during the 3-year storage phase. The SFT-C operational objective of demonstrating the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner has been met. In addition to emplacement and retrieval operations, three exchanges of spent-fuel between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility, conducted during the storage phase, furthered this demonstration. Technical objectives of the test led to development of a technical measurements program, which is the subject of this and three previous interim reports. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data have been recorded on a continuing basis for the 3-1/2 year duration of the test on more than 900 channels. Data acquisition from the test is now limited to instrumentation calibration and evaluation activities. Data now available for analysis are presented here. Highlights of activities this year include a campaign of in situ stress measurements, mineralogical and petrological studies of pretest core samples, microfracture analyses of laboratory irradiated cores, improved calculations of near-field heat transfer and thermomechanical response during the final months of heating as well as during a six-month cool-down period, metallurgical analyses of selected test components, and further development of the data acquisition and data management systems. 27 references, 68 figures, 10 tables

  9. Spent fuel test - Climax: technical measurements. Interim report, Fiscal Year 1983

    Patrick, W.C.; Butkovich, T.R.; Carlson, R.C.; Durham, W.B.; Ganow, H.C.; Hage, G.L.; Majer, E.L.; Montan, D.N.; Nyholm, R.A.; Rector, N.L.

    1984-02-01

    The Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) is located 420 m below surface in the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site. The test is being conducted as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized April-May 1980. The spent-fuel canisters were retrieved and the thermal sources were de-energized in March-April 1983 when test data indicated that test objectives were met during the 3-year storage phase. The SFT-C operational objective of demonstrating the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner has been met. In addition to emplacement and retrieval operations, three exchanges of spent-fuel between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility, conducted during the storage phase, furthered this demonstration. Technical objectives of the test led to development of a technical measurements program, which is the subject of this and three previous interim reports. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data have been recorded on a continuing basis for the 3-1/2 year duration of the test on more than 900 channels. Data acquisition from the test is now limited to instrumentation calibration and evaluation activities. Data now available for analysis are presented here. Highlights of activities this year include a campaign of in situ stress measurements, mineralogical and petrological studies of pretest core samples, microfracture analyses of laboratory irradiated cores, improved calculations of near-field heat transfer and thermomechanical response during the final months of heating as well as during a six-month cool-down period, metallurgical analyses of selected test components, and further development of the data acquisition and data management systems. 27 references, 68 figures, 10 tables.

  10. 9 CFR 94.4 - Cured or cooked meat from regions where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists.

    2010-01-01

    ... regulations in 9 CFR 327.2; must meet all other applicable requirements of the Federal Meat Inspection Act and regulations thereunder (9 CFR Chapter III); and must have been approved by the Administrator in accordance... where rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists. 94.4 Section 94.4 Animals and Animal Products...

  11. Contingency interim measure for the public water supply at Barnes, Kansas.

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-07-09

    This document presents a conceptual design for a contingency interim measure (IM) for treatment of the public water supply system at Barnes, Kansas, should this become necessary. The aquifer that serves the public water supply system at Barnes has been affected by trace to low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride and its degradation product, chloroform. Investigations conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne 2008a) have demonstrated that groundwater at the Barnes site is contaminated with carbon tetrachloride at concentrations exceeding the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) formerly operated a grain storage facility in Barnes, approximately 800 ft east-southeast of the public water supply wells. Carbon tetrachloride was used in the treatment of grain. Another potential source identified in an investigation conducted for the KDHE (PRC 1996) is the site of a former agriculture building owned by the local school district (USD 223). This building is located immediately east of well PWS3. The potential contingency IM options evaluated in this report include the treatment of groundwater at the public water supply wellheads and the provision of an alternate water supply via Washington County Rural Water District No.2 (RWD 2). This document was developed in accordance with KDHE Bureau of Environmental Remediation (BER) Policy No.BER-RS-029 (Revised) (KDHE 2006a), supplemented by guidance from the KDHE project manager. Upon the approval of this contingency IM conceptual design by the KDHE, the CCC/USDA will prepare a treatment system design document that will contain the following elements: (1) Description of the approved contingency IM treatment method; (2) Drawings and/or schematics provided by the contractor and/or manufacturer of the approved technology; (3) A

  12. Measurements of Flammable Gas Generation from Saltstone Containing Actual Tank 48H Waste (Interim Report)

    Cozzi, A. D.; Crowley, D. A.; Duffey, J. M.; Eibling, R. E.; Jones, T. M.; Marinik, A. R.; Marra, J. C.; Zamecnik, J. R

    2005-06-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked with determining the benzene release rates in saltstone prepared with tetraphenylborate (TPB) concentrations ranging from 30 mg/L to 3000 mg/L in the salt fraction and with test temperatures ranging from ambient to 95 C. Defense Waste Processing Facility Engineering (DWPF-E) provided a rate of benzene evolution from saltstone of 2.5 {micro}g/L/h saltstone (0.9 {micro}g/kg saltstone/h [1.5 {micro}g/kg saltstone/h x 60%]) to use as a Target Rate of Concern (TRC). The evolution of benzene, toluene, and xylenes from saltstone containing actual Tank 48H salt solution has been measured as a function of time at several temperatures and concentrations of TPB. The Tank 48H salt solution was aggregated with a DWPF recycle simulant to obtain the desired TPB concentrations in the saltstone slurry. The purpose of this interim report is to provide DWPF-E with an indication of the trends of benzene evolution. The data presented are preliminary; more data are being collected and may alter the preliminary results. A more complete description of the methods and materials will be included in the final report. The benzene evolution rates approximately follow an increasing trend with both increasing temperature and TPB concentration. The benzene release rates from 1000 mg/L TPB at 95 C and 3000 mg/L TPB at 75 C and 95 C exceeded the recovery-adjusted 0.9 mg/kg saltstone/h TRC (2.5 {micro}g/L saltstone/h), while all other conditions resulted in benzene release rates below this TRC. The toluene evolution rates for several samples exceeded the TRC initially, but all dropped below the TRC within 2-5 days. The toluene emissions appear to be mainly dependent on the fly ash and are independent of the TPB level, indicating that toluene is not generated from TPB.

  13. CMM Interim Check (U)

    Montano, Joshua Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-23

    Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM) are widely used in industry, throughout the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to verify part conformance to design definition. Calibration cycles for CMMs at LANL are predominantly one year in length. Unfortunately, several nonconformance reports have been generated to document the discovery of a certified machine found out of tolerance during a calibration closeout. In an effort to reduce risk to product quality two solutions were proposed – shorten the calibration cycle which could be costly, or perform an interim check to monitor the machine’s performance between cycles. The CMM interim check discussed makes use of Renishaw’s Machine Checking Gauge. This off-the-shelf product simulates a large sphere within a CMM’s measurement volume and allows for error estimation. Data was gathered, analyzed, and simulated from seven machines in seventeen different configurations to create statistical process control run charts for on-the-floor monitoring.

  14. Staying the return of aliens from Europe through interim measures: the case-law of the European Commission and the European Court of Human Rights

    Burbano Herrera, Clara; Haeck, Yves

    2011-01-01

    The Strasbourg case-law demonstrates a clear tendency to protect aliens through interim measures in case of imminent deportation. Usually but not uniquely those persons claim(ed) before the supervisory organs to be in a situation of extreme gravity in case of forcible return to their country of origin because they can be subject to the death penalty, life imprisonment, persecution for their political activities, deprived of medicine/adequate medical treatment. This contribution explores which...

  15. Measurement techniques and instruments suitable for life-prediction testing of photovoltaic arrays. Interim report

    Noel, G.T.; Sliemers, F.A.; Deringer, G.C.; Wood, V.E.; Wilkes, K.E.; Gaines, G.B.; Carmichael, D.C.

    1978-01-15

    The validation of a service life of 20 years for low-cost photovoltaic arrays must be accomplished through accelerated life-prediction tests. A methodology for such tests has been developed in a preceding study. The results discussed consist of the initial identification and assessment of all known measurement techniques and instruments that might be used in these life-prediction tests. Array failure modes, relevant materials property changes, and primary degradation mechanisms are discussed as a prerequisite to identifying suitable measurement techniques and instruments. Candidate techniques and instruments are identified on the basis of extensive reviews of published and unpublished information. These methods are organized in six measurement categories--chemical, electrical, optical, thermal, mechanical, and ''other physicals''. Using specified evaluation criteria, the most promising techniques and instruments for use in life-prediction tests of arrays are then selected. These recommended techniques and their characteristics are described. Recommendations are made regarding establishment of the adequacy, particularly with respect to precision, of the more fully developed techniques for this application, and regarding the experimental evaluation of promising developmental techniques. Measurement needs not satisfied by presently available techniques/instruments are also identified.

  16. Iodine partition coefficient measurements at simulated PWR steam generator conditions: Interim data report

    Iodine partition coefficients (defined as the ratio of the concentration of iodine species in the aqueous solution to the iodine concentration in the vapor phase) were measured at simulated PWR steam generator conditions (2850C and 6.9 MPa), using carrier-free radioactive 131I in the form of sodium iodide. The iodine tracer concentration was maintained at ∼6 x 10-11 mol/L; boric acid concentration was varied from 0 to 0.4 mol/L; and the solution pH (measured at 250C) was adjusted from 4 to 9 by the addition of lithium hydroxide. Iodine partition coefficients decrease with increasing boric acid concentration; however, the iodine volatility is essentially independent of the solution pH for a given boric acid concentration. Sparging the solutions with air at room temperature increases the iodine volatility by an order of magnitude, compared to that achieved with argon sparging. Iodine partition coefficient measurements ranged from a low of 200 (in 0.2 M boric acid sparged with air) to 400,000 (in purified water sparged with argon)

  17. Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)

    1993-03-01

    Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

  18. Spent fuel test - Climax: technical measurements. Interim report, fiscal year 1981

    Patrick, W.C.; Ballou, L.B.; Butkovich, T.R.

    1982-04-30

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is located 420 m below surface in the Climax granite stock on the Nevada Test Site. Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized from April to May 1980, initiating the 3- to 5-year-duration test. The SFT-C operational objective of demonstrating the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner has been met. Technical objectives of the test led to development of a technical measurements program, which is the subject of this report. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data have been recorded on a continuing basis for the first 1-1/2 years of the test on more than 900 channels. Much of the acquired data are now available for analysis and are presented here. Highlights of activities this year include completion of site characterization field work, major modifications to the data acquisition and the management systems, and the addition of instrument evaluation as an explicit objective of the test.

  19. Spent fuel test - Climax: technical measurements. Interim report, fiscal year 1981

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is located 420 m below surface in the Climax granite stock on the Nevada Test Site. Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized from April to May 1980, initiating the 3- to 5-year-duration test. The SFT-C operational objective of demonstrating the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner has been met. Technical objectives of the test led to development of a technical measurements program, which is the subject of this report. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data have been recorded on a continuing basis for the first 1-1/2 years of the test on more than 900 channels. Much of the acquired data are now available for analysis and are presented here. Highlights of activities this year include completion of site characterization field work, major modifications to the data acquisition and the management systems, and the addition of instrument evaluation as an explicit objective of the test

  20. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Interim Measures for the Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater at the Burial Ground Complex at the Savannah River Site

    N/A

    1999-12-08

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed interim measures for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MW) groundwater at the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE proposes to install a small metal sheet pile dam to impound water around and over the BGC groundwater seepline. In addition, a drip irrigation system would be installed. Interim measures will also address the reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) from ''hot-spot'' regions associated with the Southwest Plume Area (SWPA). This action is taken as an interim measure for the MWMF in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to reduce the amount of tritium seeping from the BGC southwest groundwater plume. The proposed action of this EA is being planned and would be implemented concurrent with a groundwater corrective action program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). On September 30, 1999, SCDHEC issued a modification to the SRS RCRA Part B permit that adds corrective action requirements for four plumes that are currently emanating from the BGC. One of those plumes is the southwest plume. The RCRA permit requires SRS to submit a corrective action plan (CAP) for the southwest plume by March 2000. The permit requires that the initial phase of the CAP prescribe a remedy that achieves a 70-percent reduction in the annual amount of tritium being released from the southwest plume area to Fourmile Branch, a nearby stream. Approval and actual implementation of the corrective measure in that CAP may take several years. As an interim measure, the actions described in this EA would manage the release of tritium from the southwest plume area until the final actions under the CAP can be implemented. This proposed action is expected to reduce the

  1. Interim report

    NONE

    1985-06-01

    This Interim Report summarizes the research and development activities of the Superconducting Super Collider project carried out from the completion of the Reference Designs Study (May 1984) to June 1985. It was prepared by the SSC Central Design Group in draft form on the occasion of the DOE Annual Review, June 19--21, 1985. Now largely organized by CDG Divisions, the bulk of each chapter documents the progress and accomplishments to date, while the final section(s) describe plans for future work. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides a basic brief description of the SSC, its physics justification, its origins, and the R&D organization set up to carry out the work. Chapter 2 gives a summary of the main results of the R&D program, the tasks assigned to the four magnet R&D centers, and an overview of the future plans. The reader wishing a quick look at the SSC Phase I effort can skim Chapter 1 and read Chapter 2. Subsequent chapters discuss in more detail the activities on accelerator physics, accelerator systems, magnets and cryostats, injector, detector R&D, conventional facilities, and project planning and management. The magnet chapter (5) documents in text and photographs the impressive progress in successful construction of many model magnets, the development of cryostats with low heat leaks, and the improvement in current-carrying capacity of superconducting strand. Chapter 9 contains the budgets and schedules of the COG Divisions, the overall R&D program, including the laboratories, and also preliminary projections for construction. Appendices provide information on the various panels, task forces and workshops held by the CDG in FY 1985, a bibliography of COG and Laboratory reports on SSC and SSC-related work, and on private industrial involvement in the project.

  2. Interim Measures for the Tax Preservation and Enforcement Measures of the Customs of the Peoples Republic of China

    2010-01-01

    @@ Article 1 For the purpose of regulating the Tax Preservation and enforcement measures of the Customs of the People's Republic of China, guaranteeing the state taxation and safeguarding the lawful rights and interests of taxpayers, these Measures are formulated in accordance with the Customs Law of the People's Republic of China and the Regulations of the People's Republic of China on Import and Export Duties.

  3. Interim Measures Report for the Headquarters Building Area Location of Concern (LOC) 2E East SWMU 104 John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Sager, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendment portion of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit issued by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), requires identification and evaluation of all known Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Locations of Concern (LOCs) located on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) property. The KSC Headquarters Building Area (KHQA) has been identified as SWMU 104 under KSC's RCRA Program. This report summarizes the Interim Measure (IM) conducted by Geosyntec Consultants (Geosyntec) for NASA under Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity Contract NNK12CA13B at the KHQA to mitigate potential exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-affected media at the eastern side of LOC 2E. The IM activities were conducted in June and July 2015 to remediate PCBs above the FDEP Residential Direct-Exposure (R-) Soil Cleanup Target Level (SCTL) of 0.5 milligram per kilogram (mg/kg) established by Chapter 62-777, Florida Administrative Code. The IM was performed in accordance with the IM Work Plan (IMWP) approved by the FDEP, dated August 2012. IM activities were conducted in accordance with the KSC Generic PCB Work Plan (NASA 2007).

  4. Mobile Launch Platform Vehicle Assembly Building Area (SWMU 056) Hot Spot 3 Bioremediation Interim Measures Work Plan, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Whitney L. Morrison; Daprato, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    This Interim Measures Work Plan (IMWP) presents an approach and design for the remediation of chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) groundwater impacts using bioremediation (biostimulation and bioaugmentation) in Hot Spot 3, which is defined by the area where CVOC (trichloroethene [TCE], cis-1,2-dichloroethene [cDCE], and vinyl chloride [VC]) concentrations are greater than 10 times their respective Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) Natural Attenuation Default Concentration (NADC) [10xNADC] near the western Mobile Launch Platform (MLP) structure. The IM treatment area is the Hot Spot 3 area, which is approximately 0.07 acres and extends from approximately 6 to 22 and 41 to 55 feet below land surface (ft BLS). Within Hot Spot 3, a source zone (SZ; area with TCE concentrations greater than 1% solubility [11,000 micrograms per liter (micrograms/L)]) was delineated and is approximately 0.02 acres and extends from approximately 6 to 16 and 41 to 50 ft BLS.

  5. Development of an EMF Measurments Database, EMF Rapid Program, Project #5, Interim Report: April 1995-December 1996

    T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1998-03-01

    The EMF Measurements Database project is being implemented by T. Dan Bracken, Inc. as part of the EMF Research and Public Information Dissemination (EMF RAPID) Program. The Database is a collection of data sets that relate to measurement of electric and/or magnetic fields. This report describes activities during the period January 1997 to March 1998. Primary goals for the EMF Measurements Database are to develop a database structure that can accommodate the diversity of EMF data sets, provide guidance for production of future EMF data sets, and serve as an accessible repository of EMF measurement data. Specific objectives of the EMF Measurements Database are: o to presewe study descriptions, results and data; o to provide readily accessible, well-documented data; and - o to facilitate communication among researchers. In addition, the EMF Measurements Database will encourage additional analysis of existing data sets, facilitate analysis of data from multiple projects, support design of new studies, and permit future issues in EMF exposure assessment to be addressed with existing data. Preservation of study descriptions and data is accomplished with a formal, but open, structure. Specifications have been developed for the various elements of the database. Each data set in the database is formally described by a metadata file. The structured metadata file describes the origin, development, logical and physical structure, and distribution mechanism for each data set. The metadata for each data set is generated according to a specification developed for the EMF Measurements Database. The actual measurement data is contained in data products for each data set. The number and type of data product will vary by data set. Most of the data products available from the EMF Measurements Database can be downloaded from an Internet site. For some data sets, the data products will be maintained by other patties who may have their own access procedures.

  6. CMM Interim Check Design of Experiments (U)

    Montano, Joshua Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-29

    Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM) are widely used in industry, throughout the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to verify part conformance to design definition. Calibration cycles for CMMs at LANL are predominantly one year in length and include a weekly interim check to reduce risk. The CMM interim check makes use of Renishaw’s Machine Checking Gauge which is an off-the-shelf product simulates a large sphere within a CMM’s measurement volume and allows for error estimation. As verification on the interim check process a design of experiments investigation was proposed to test a couple of key factors (location and inspector). The results from the two-factor factorial experiment proved that location influenced results more than the inspector or interaction.

  7. Assessment report of research and development on 'the abolition measures of nuclear facilities and associated technology development' and 'radioactive waste treatment and disposal and associated technology development' (Interim report)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) consulted the 'Evaluation Committee for Nuclear Cycle Backend Program Promotion' to perform the interim evaluation of 'the abolition measures of nuclear facilities and associated technology development' project and 'radioactive waste treatment and disposal and associated technology development' project in accordance with the 'Guideline for evaluation of government R and D activities', the 'Guideline for evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)' and the 'Operational rule for evaluation of R and D activities' by JAEA. In response to JAEA's request, the Committee decided the evaluation method and performed the interim evaluation of both projects from the viewpoints of purposes, plans, results and so on. As a result of review, the Committee concluded that both projects were proceeded adequately. (author)

  8. Development of an EMF Measurements Database, EMF Rapid Program, Project #5, Interim Report: April 1995-December 1996

    T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-04-01

    The EMF measurement data sets in existence today were compiled with varying goals and techniques. Consequently, they have different information content as well as varying logical and physical structure. Future studies will continue to pursue varying goals and utilize techniques that cannot be known in advance. Primary goals for the EMF Measurements Database developed under the Department of Energy EMF RAPID Program are to develop a database structure that can accommodate the diversity of EMF data sets, provide guidance for production of future EMF data sets, and serve as an accessible repository of EMF measurement data. Specific objectives of the EMF Measurements Database are: o to preserve study descriptions, results and data; o to provide readily accessible, well-documented data; and o to facilitate communication among researchers. In addition, the EMF Measurements Database will encourage additional analysis of existing data sets, facilitate analysis of data from multiple projects, support design of new studies, and permit future issues in EMF exposure assessment to be addressed with existing data. Preservation of study descriptions and data is accomplished with a formal, but open, structure. Specifications have been developed for the various elements of the database. Each data set in the database is formally described by a metadata file. The structured metadata file describes the origin, development, logical and physical structure and distribution mechanism for each data set. The metadata for each data set is generated according to a specification developed for the EMF Measurements Database. The actual measurement data is contained in data Products for each data set. The number and type of data product will vary by data set. Most of the data products in the possession of the EMF Measurements Database are available for download from an Internet site. For some data sets, the data products will be maintained by other parties who may have their own access procedures

  9. Noble gas isotope measurements for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. IAEA Task 90/0A211 interim report

    The nuclear fission of actinides in reactor fuel produces large quantities of Kr and Xe as fission products. Because of the high levels of fission Kr and Xe, sample collection and analysis of noble gases for spent fuel diagnostic measurements is a simple, straight-forward technique. In modern reprocessing plants with continuous dissolvers, it will not be possible to use traditional methods for isolating input batches of fuel. This study investigates the feasibility of using noble gas isotope abundance measurements (isotope correlation techniques - ICT) to solve safeguards requirements. Noble gas measurements might be able to provide an independent analysis of Pu contained within dissolves fuel, on an individual fuel assembly basis. The isotopic composition of Kr and Xe in spent fuel reflects both the composition (isotope abundance ratios) of the fission products and the effects of neutron capture on those fission products. We have reviewed the available literature for noble gas analyses of spent reactor fuel. While references are made to noble gas isotope correlations over the last 20 years, we have found little if any detailed analysis of large data sets. The literature search did find several useful reports. Of these papers, one is particularly useful for evaluating noble gas isotopic compositions. The ''Benchmark-paper'' (1) contains 54 Kr and 56 Xe isotopic composition analyses for 4 different reactors with a variety of fuel enrichment factors. Burnup ranges from 8000 to 37000 MWd/tU. Besides the noble gas measurements, a variety of other measurements are reported (actinides and fission products)

  10. Methods development for measuring and classifying flammability/combustibility of refrigerants. Interim report, task 2 - test plan

    Heinonen, E.W.; Tapscott, R.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Regulations on alternative refrigerants and concerns for the environment are forcing the refrigeration industry to consider the use of potentially flammable fluids to replace CFC fluids currently in use. The objectives of this program are to establish the conditions under which refrigerants and refrigerant blends exhibit flammability and to develop appropriate methods to measure flammability.

  11. Interim Storage Facility decommissioning. Final report

    Decontamination and decommissioning of the Interim Storage Facility were completed. Activities included performing a detailed radiation survey of the facility, removing surface and imbedded contamination, excavating and removing the fuel storage cells, restoring the site to natural conditions, and shipping waste to Hanford, Washington, for burial. The project was accomplished on schedule and 30% under budget with no measurable exposure to decommissioning personnel

  12. Interim storage study report

    Rawlins, J.K.

    1998-02-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

  13. ETF interim design review

    A three-day ETF Interim Design Review was conducted on July 23-25, 1980, at the Sheraton Potomac Inn in Rockville, Maryland. The intent of the review was to provide a forum for an in-depth assessment and critique of all facets of the ETF design by members of the fusion community. The review began with an opening plenary session at which an overview of the ETF design was presented by D. Steiner, manager of the ETF Design Center, complemented by a physics overview by P.H. Rutherford, chairman of the ETF/INTOR Physics Committee. This was followed by six concurrent review sessions over the next day and a half. The review closed with a plenary session at which the Design Review Board presented its findings. This document consists of the viewgraphs for the opening plenary session and an edited version of the presentations made by Steiner and Rutherford

  14. Quality assurance plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Phase 1 -- Interim corrective measures and Phase 2 -- Purge and trap reactive gases

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) identifies and describes the systems utilized by the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project (MSRERP) personnel to implement the requirements and associated applicable guidance contained in the Quality Program Description Y/QD-15 Rev. 2 (Energy Systems 1995f). This QAP defines the quality assurance (QA) requirements applicable to all activities and operations in and directly pertinent to the MSRERP Phase 1--Interim Corrective Measures and Phase 2--Purge and Trap objectives. This QAP will be reviewed, revised, and approved as necessary for Phase 3 and Phase 4 activities. This QAP identifies and describes the QA activities and procedures implemented by the various Oak Ridge National Laboratory support organizations and personnel to provide confidence that these activities meet the requirements of this project. Specific support organization (Division) quality requirements, including the degree of implementation of each, are contained in the appendixes of this plan

  15. Interim Design Report

    Abrams, R J; Alekou, A; Andreopoulos, C; Ankenbrandt, C M; Antusch, S; Apollonio, M; Aslaninejad, M; Back, J; Ballett, P; Barker, G; Beard, K B; Benedetto, E; Bennett, J R J; Berg, J S; Bhattacharya, S; Blackmore, V; Blennow, M; Blondel, A; Bogacz, A; Bonesini, M; Bontoiu, C; Booth, C; Bromberg, C; Brooks, S; Bross, A; Caretta, O; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Choubey, S; Cline, D; Cobb, J; Coloma, P; Coney, L; Cummings, M A C; Davenne, T; de Gouvea, A; Densham, C; Ding, X; Donini, A; Dornan, P; Dracos, M; Dufour, F; Eccleston, R; Edgecock, R; Efthymiopoulos, I; Ellis, M; Fernandez-Martinez, E; Fernow, R; Flanagan, G; Gallardo, J C; Gandhi, R; Garoby, R; Gavela, B; Geer, S; Gilardoni, S; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Goswami, S; Graves, V B; Gupta, R; Hanson, G; Harrison, P; Hart, T; Hernandez, P; Huber, P; Indumathi, D; Johnson, R P; Johnstone, C; Karadzhov, Y; Kelliher, D; Kirk, H; Kopp, J; Kudenko, Y; Kuno, Y; Kurup, A; Kyberd, P; Laing, A; Li, T; Lindner, M; Long, K; Pavon, J Lopez; Loveridge, P; Machida, S; Majumdar, D; Maltoni, M; Martin-Albo, J; Martini, M; Matev, R; McDonald, K T; McFarland, A; Meloni, D; Mezzetto, M; Migliozzi, P; Mishra, S R; Mokhov, N; Mondal, N; Morfin, J; Mori, Y; Morozov, V; Neuffer, D; Ota, T; Palladino, V; Parke, S; Pascoli, S; Pasternak, J; Peltoniemi, J; Petti, R; Planche, T; Popovic, M; Pozimski, J; Prior, G; Prior, C; Rees, G; Rigolin, S; Roberts, T J; Roblin, Y; Rogers, C; Samulyak, R; Schwetz, T; Simos, N; Sinha, N; Skoro, G; Snopok, P; Soler, F J P; Souchlas, N; Strait, J; Stratakis, D; Striganov, S; Tang, J; Thomason, J W G; Tortora, L; Tsenov, R; Winter, W; Witte, H; Yasuda, O; Yoshikawa, C Y; Zisman, M

    2011-01-01

    The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) was established by the community at the ninth "International Workshop on Neutrino Factories, super-beams, and beta- beams" which was held in Okayama in August 2007. The IDS-NF mandate is to deliver the Reference Design Report (RDR) for the facility on the timescale of 2012/13. In addition, the mandate for the study [3] requires an Interim Design Report to be delivered midway through the project as a step on the way to the RDR. This document, the IDR, has two functions: it marks the point in the IDS-NF at which the emphasis turns to the engineering studies required to deliver the RDR and it documents baseline concepts for the accelerator complex, the neutrino detectors, and the instrumentation systems. The IDS-NF is, in essence, a site-independent study. Example sites, CERN, FNAL, and RAL, have been identified to allow site-specific issues to be addressed in the cost analysis that will be presented in the RDR. The choice of example sites shou...

  16. Effects of Interim Assessments on the Achievement Gap: Evidence from an Experiment

    Konstantopoulos, Spyros; Li, Wei; Miller, Shazia; van der Ploeg, Arie

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the passage of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, all states operate accountability systems that measure and report school and student performance annually. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of interim assessments on the achievement gap. The authors examine the impact of interim assessments throughout the…

  17. Ontario interim market

    Ontario's White Paper outlined the government's plan to restructure the electric power industry to an open market by the year 2000. Bill 35, when passed, will be the legislation required to start the process of electricity restructuring laid out in the White Paper. In the section dealing with the Independent Market Operator, the White Paper states that the Ontario government, as a transitional step to an open market, will introduce an element of competition into the industry by establishing an interim market for replacement power and impose a discipline on Ontario Hydro. Unfortunately, this transitional step did not live up to its billing and has had a minimal impact on both Ontario Hydro and the marketplace. Nevertheless, the experiment has provided a peek into the future of electricity and power pricing in Ontario, by making price information available and posted on the Internet. This paper examines how informative this experience has been and looks at the year just past in perspective. One of the notable developments was that the threat of a power shortage as a result of shutting down seven of Ontario Hydro's nuclear reactors, did not materialize. Ontario Hydro's fossil fuel generation plants were able to step into the breach and generate enough energy to make up for the reduction in nuclear production, and did so within the allowable limit for acid gas emissions. Some interesting developments in pricing electric power exported to the US in the summer of of 1998 are also reviewed for what they can teach us about the value of transparency and full price disclosure. 2 figs

  18. An Interim President Sets the Stage

    Guardo, Carol J.

    2006-01-01

    An interim president often plays a crucial role in leading a college or university. In some instances, the interim can address and resolve troublesome issues and thus clear the way for the new president to generate progress. In others, the interim stays the course so that the institution maintains its momentum and seizes strategic opportunities to…

  19. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    Favalli, A.; Vo, D.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Tobin, S. J.; Trellue, H.; Vaccaro, S.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)-Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI-SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity's behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  20. ITER Conceptual design: Interim report

    This interim report describes the results of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Conceptual Design Activities after the first year of design following the selection of the ITER concept in the autumn of 1988. Using the concept definition as the basis for conceptual design, the Design Phase has been underway since October 1988, and will be completed at the end of 1990, at which time a final report will be issued. This interim report includes an executive summary of ITER activities, a description of the ITER device and facility, an operation and research program summary, and a description of the physics and engineering design bases. Included are preliminary cost estimates and schedule for completion of the project

  1. Spent Fuel Behaviour During Interim Storage

    Objective: Review of spent fuel data relevant for future storage in Spain Perform destructive and non-destructive examinations on irradiated and non-irradiated fuel rods relevant to Spanish spent fuel management. Research approach: Among the programmes initiated in the last years (finished or about to be finished) one may highlight the following ones: • Isotopic measurements on high burnup fuels: up to 75 GW·d·t(U)-1 PWR and 53 GW·d·t(U)-1 BWR peak values; • Mechanical tests on high burnup PWR (ZIRLO) cladding and BWR (Zry-2) cladding samples; • Mechanical tests on unirradiated ZIRLO rods. Influence of hydrides content; • Modelling of mechanical tests with unirradiated claddings; • Interim storage creep modelling; • Burnup measurement equipment; • Fuel database

  2. Interim emergency preparedness and response plans

    One of the key components of Ontario Hydro's Dam Safety Program is the Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans (EPRP). Preparing such a plan is time consuming and costly. This paper presents a simplified approach to prepare preliminary or interim EPRPs. The interim EPRPs consist of only the most critical components namely notification plans, action plans and interim inundation maps. The interim inundation maps are developed using simplified methods, assumptions and techniques. They provide a conservative but realistic estimate of the flooding that could occur as a result of a dam breach. Interim EPRPs can be produced in a fraction of the time of full EPRPs and can therefore be implemented quickly. The process described in this paper represents a major saving in time over the production of full EPRP, yet it results in effective interim plans that can act as final plans for small dam owners who do not have the the resources to prepare a comprehensive plan. 5 refs., 4 figs

  3. SFAT geometry verification measurements at the TVO KPA-STORE. Interim report on Task FIN A563 of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards

    Experiments made for the confirmation of the measurement geometry of the Spent Fuel Attribute Tester (SFAT), performed in December 1992, are reported and analysed. The measurement geometry to be chosen for a commercial prototype can be confirmed to be close enough to the optimum and to give a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio. The problems encountered during the determination of the signal-to-noise ratio of Cs137 peaks rise to recommendation of developing new algorithms for processing NaI(Tl) detector spectra. (orig.) (7 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.)

  4. Assessment of Methane and VOC Emissions on Select Upstream Oil and Gas Production Operations Using Remote Measurements, Interim Report on Recent Survey Studies

    Environmentally responsible development of oil and gas assets in the United States is facilitated by advancement of sector-specific air pollution emission measurement and modeling tools. Emissions from upstream oil and gas production are complex in nature due to the variety of e...

  5. Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge : Interim Plans : 2000

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This interim plan for Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge cover an interim comprehensive conservation plan, a hunting and fishing plan and an interim compatibility...

  6. Resurgence of measles in a country of elimination: interim assessment and current control measures in the Republic of Korea in early 2014

    Tae Un Yang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of 2014, the Republic of Korea has experienced a resurgence of measles cases. Among the 220 cases confirmed as measles during epidemiological weeks 1–20 (December 29, 2013 to May 17, 2014, 10 imported cases were identified. The predominant genotype was B3, which reflects the circulating measles virus in adjacent countries. Even with the verification of measles elimination in March 2014 by the World Health Organization, recent importation has been related to international travel. Targeted control measures have been implemented in addition to proper isolation and patient care. A vigilant surveillance system and high levels of vaccine coverage should be maintained to sustain the measles elimination status.

  7. Urgent recommendation. Interim report

    The Investigation Committee for Critical Accident at Uranium Processing Plant was founded immediately after the accident to investigate the cause of the accident and to establish measures to prevent the similar accident. On September 30, 1999 around 10:35, the Japan's first criticality accident occurred at JCO Co. Ltd. Uranium processing plant (auxiliary conversion plant) located at Tokai-mura Ibaraki-ken. The criticality continued on and off for approximately 20 hours after the first instantaneous criticality. The accident led the recommendation of tentative evacuation and sheltering indoors for residents living in the neighborhood. The serious exposure to neutrons happened to three workers. The dominant effect is dose due to neutrons and gamma rays from the precipitation tank. When the accident took place, three workers dissolved sequentially about 2.4 kg uranium powder with 18.8 % enrichment in the 10-litter bucket with nitric acid. The procedure of homogenization of uranium nitrate was supposed to be controlled using the shape-limited narrow storage column. Actually, however, the thick and large precipitation tank was used. As a result, about 16.6 kg of uranium was fed into the tank, which presumably caused criticality. The first notification by JCO was delayed and the following communication was not smooth. This led to the delay of correct understanding of the situation and made the initial proper response difficult, then followed by insufficient communication between the nation, prefecture, and local authority. Urgent recommendations were made on the following items; (1) Safety measures to be taken at the accident site, (2) health cares for residents and others, (3) Comprehensive safety securing at nuclear operators such as Establishment of the effective audit system, Safety education for employees and Qualification and licensing system, Safety related documents, etc. (4) Reconstruction of the government's safety regulations such as How safety regulation

  8. Urgent recommendation. Interim report

    Nakano, Masayuki [International Affairs and Safeguards Division, Atomic Energy Bureau, Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    The Investigation Committee for Critical Accident at Uranium Processing Plant was founded immediately after the accident to investigate the cause of the accident and to establish measures to prevent the similar accident. On September 30, 1999 around 10:35, the Japan's first criticality accident occurred at JCO Co. Ltd. Uranium processing plant (auxiliary conversion plant) located at Tokai-mura Ibaraki-ken. The criticality continued on and off for approximately 20 hours after the first instantaneous criticality. The accident led the recommendation of tentative evacuation and sheltering indoors for residents living in the neighborhood. The serious exposure to neutrons happened to three workers. The dominant effect is dose due to neutrons and gamma rays from the precipitation tank. When the accident took place, three workers dissolved sequentially about 2.4 kg uranium powder with 18.8 % enrichment in the 10-litter bucket with nitric acid. The procedure of homogenization of uranium nitrate was supposed to be controlled using the shape-limited narrow storage column. Actually, however, the thick and large precipitation tank was used. As a result, about 16.6 kg of uranium was fed into the tank, which presumably caused criticality. The first notification by JCO was delayed and the following communication was not smooth. This led to the delay of correct understanding of the situation and made the initial proper response difficult, then followed by insufficient communication between the nation, prefecture, and local authority. Urgent recommendations were made on the following items; (1) Safety measures to be taken at the accident site, (2) health cares for residents and others, (3) Comprehensive safety securing at nuclear operators such as Establishment of the effective audit system, Safety education for employees and Qualification and licensing system, Safety related documents, etc. (4) Reconstruction of the government's safety regulations such as How safety

  9. Fusion Breeder Program interim report

    Moir, R.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.

    1982-06-11

    This interim report for the FY82 Fusion Breeder Program covers work performed during the scoping phase of the study, December, 1981-February 1982. The goals for the FY82 study are the identification and development of a reference blanket concept using the fission suppression concept and the definition of a development plan to further the fusion breeder application. The context of the study is the tandem mirror reactor, but emphasis is placed upon blanket engineering. A tokamak driver and blanket concept will be selected and studied in more detail during FY83.

  10. Fusion Breeder Program interim report

    This interim report for the FY82 Fusion Breeder Program covers work performed during the scoping phase of the study, December, 1981-February 1982. The goals for the FY82 study are the identification and development of a reference blanket concept using the fission suppression concept and the definition of a development plan to further the fusion breeder application. The context of the study is the tandem mirror reactor, but emphasis is placed upon blanket engineering. A tokamak driver and blanket concept will be selected and studied in more detail during FY83

  11. Addendum to IFMIF-CDA interim report

    During the second IFMIF-CDA Design Integration Workshop, the conceptual design and contents of 'IFMIF-CDA Interim Report' were examined and discussed at both general and group meetings. Based on these discussion, the final IFMIF-CDA Report will be modified from the 'Interim Report'. This report describes the outline of these modification. (author)

  12. 7 CFR 1738.21 - Interim financing.

    2010-01-01

    ... followed: (1) Interim construction shall be conducted in accordance with RUS Bulletin 1738-2 and 7 CFR part... be covered by an Environmental Report prepared in accordance with 7 CFR part 1794 and approved by RUS... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim financing. 1738.21 Section...

  13. 15 CFR 904.322 - Interim action.

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim action. 904.322 Section 904... Sanctions and Denials Permit Sanction for Violations § 904.322 Interim action. (a) To protect marine resources during the pendency of an action under this subpart, in cases of willfulness, or as...

  14. THESAURUS OF ERIC DESCRIPTORS (INTERIM) JANUARY 1967.

    1967

    THE "THESAURUS OF ERIC DESCRIPTORS (INTERIM)" SUPERSEDES, AND REPRESENTS A REFINEMENT OF, THE "THESAURUS OF ERIC DESCRIPTORS." THE INTERIM ISSUE IS A PRELIMINARY ERIC SYSTEM TOOL AND IS NOT TO BE CONSIDERED A COMPLETE REPRESENTATION OF THE FINAL PRODUCT. THIS REFINEMENT IS THE RESULT OF TWO MAJOR PROJECTS--(1) THE INCORPORATION OF SUGGESTIONS…

  15. Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis

    This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment

  16. Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis

    Saito, G.H.

    1994-10-01

    This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

  17. Something not written in Hatamura Investigation Committee interim report

    Hatamura Investigation Committee on the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station issued interim report. This article reviewed section 4-6 of interim report; problems of response to the accident, problems of hazard control measures and inappropriate precautionary measures against tsunami and severe accidents, and referred to something not written in the report; (1) whether core meltdown could be prevented by appropriate response to the accident?, (2) scope of evacuation area at the accident was too much underestimated and almost impossible to establish evacuation system in reality and (3) inappropriate design standard of tsunami. The report implied such conclusions; (1) almost no possibility to prevent core meltdown even without misjudgement after earthquake and tsunami, (2) almost impossible to establish evacuation system prepared for next accident with realistic cost and (3) request to revise design standard of tsunami based on latest knowledge and establish measures required from the standard. Preventive design against human errors was requisite for artificial system and safety engineering should be learned from experiences. Probability of accident occurrence at nuclear power station would be extremely low with safer design but damages suffered from reactor accident were widely different from other accidents and huge enough to be comparable to a large-scale natural disaster. Interim report proposed to prepare for actually possible accidents assuming continuation of reactor operation but most assured measure for next accident not to occur was obliged to stop the reactor operation. (T. Tanaka)

  18. The Limitation of Implementing Interim Measures For Social Assistance and Its Perfection%《社会救助暂行办法》实施的局限性及其完善∗

    谢勇才; 王茂福

    2016-01-01

    The Interim Measures for Social Assistance is the first administrative regulations to co-ordinate and regulate the social as⁃sistance system since the founding of the PRC. Its achievements are mainly reflected in the construction of a complete social assistance system, break the urban and rural segmentation of social assistance system and adhere to the people-oriented idea. And it also has many disadvantages, such as the legislative status is not high, the terms of the license are too many, central and local fiscal responsi⁃bility is not clear, the punishment of illegal efforts is not strong enough and the particularity of the migrant workers is disregarded etc. In order to overcome these difficulties and improve the social relief system, the government should take a series of measures to protect the basic life of poverty groups, improve the legal status, introduce detailed rules for the implementation of regulation, clear central and local financial responsibility, increase the intensity of punishment for illegal and pay attention to the particularity of the migrant work⁃ers, and so on.%《社会救助暂行办法》是新中国成立以来第一部统筹和规范各项社会救助制度的行政法规,其成就主要体现在构建了完整的社会救助体系、破除了社会救助制度的城乡二元分割、恪守了以人为本的立法理念三个方面。但它也存在诸多局限,如立法位阶不高、授权条款偏多、央地财政责任不清晰、对违法的惩罚力度不够以及忽视农民工的特殊性等。政府应采取一系列措施,如提升法律位阶、出台法规实施细则、明晰央地财政责任、加大对违法的惩罚力度以及重视农民工的特殊性等,以完善社会救助制度,进而织牢保障贫困群体基本生活的最后安全网。

  19. Evaluating the agreement between measurements and models of net ecosystem exchange at different times and time scales using wavelet coherence: an example using data from the North American Carbon Program Site-Level Interim Synthesis

    P. C. Stoy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Earth system processes exhibit complex patterns across time, as do the models that seek to replicate these processes. Model output may or may not be significantly related to observations at different times and on different frequencies. Conventional model diagnostics provide an aggregate view of model-data agreement, but usually do not identify the time and frequency patterns of model misfit, leaving unclear the steps required to improve model response to environmental drivers that vary on characteristic frequencies. Wavelet coherence can quantify the times and frequencies at which models and measurements are significantly different. We applied wavelet coherence to interpret the predictions of twenty ecosystem models from the North American Carbon Program (NACP Site-Level Interim Synthesis when confronted with eddy covariance-measured net ecosystem exchange (NEE from ten ecosystems with multiple years of available data. Models were grouped into classes with similar approaches for incorporating phenology, the calculation of NEE, and the inclusion of foliar nitrogen (N. Models with prescribed, rather than prognostic, phenology often fit NEE observations better on annual to interannual time scales in grassland, wetland and agricultural ecosystems. Models that calculate NEE as net primary productivity (NPP minus heterotrophic respiration (HR rather than gross ecosystem productivity (GPP minus ecosystem respiration (ER fit better on annual time scales in grassland and wetland ecosystems, but models that calculate NEE as GPP – ER were superior on monthly to seasonal time scales in two coniferous forests. Models that incorporated foliar nitrogen (N data were successful at capturing NEE variability on interannual (multiple year time scales at Howland Forest, Maine. Combined with previous findings, our results suggest that the mechanisms driving daily and annual NEE variability tend to be correctly simulated, but the magnitude of these fluxes is often

  20. AGR-1 Data Qualification Interim Report

    Machael Abbott

    2009-08-01

    Projects for the very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) program provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR Program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the data streams associated with the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) experiment, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY09 qualification status of the AGR-1 data to date. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category, which is assigned by the data generator, and include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing, to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documentation that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent QA program. The interim qualification status of the following four data streams is reported in this document: (1) fuel fabrication data, (2) fuel irradiation data, (3) fission product monitoring system (FPMS) data, and (4) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) operating conditions data. A final report giving the NDMAS qualification status of all AGR-1 data (including cycle 145A) is planned for February 2010.

  1. Glass packages in interim storage

    This report summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the behavior of type C waste packages consisting of vitrified high-level solutions produced by reprocessing spent fuel. The composition and the physical and chemical properties of the feed solutions are reviewed, and the vitrification process is described. Sodium alumino-borosilicate glass compositions are generally employed - the glass used at la Hague for LWR fuel solutions, for example, contains 45 % SiO2. The major physical, chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of the glass are reviewed. In order to allow their thermal power to diminish, the 3630 glass packages produced (as of January 1993) in the vitrification facilities at Marcoule and La Hague are placed in interim storage for several decades. The actual interim storage period has not been defined, as it is closely related to the concept and organization selected for the final destination of the packages: a geological repository. The glass behavior under irradiation is described. Considerable basic and applied research has been conducted to assess the aqueous leaching behavior of nuclear containment glass. The effects of various repository parameters (temperature, flow rate, nature of the environmental materials) have been investigated. The experimental findings have been used to specify a model describing the kinetics of aqueous corrosion of the glass. More generally all the ''source term'' models developed in France by the CEA or by ANDRA are summarized. (author). 152 refs., 33 figs

  2. Safety concept for interim storage facilities in Fukushima

    The Ministry of the Environment is planning to construct the Interim Storage Facility for soil and waste generated in Fukushima prefecture, due to the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. This paper describes the result of study for the safety concepts. Concrete components are estimation of soil/waste generation, soil characterization, structure and location of facilities, radioactive safety assessment, operational management, approach for transportation concept, basic principle of environmental conservation measures. (author)

  3. Radon Measurements in Schools: An Interim Report.

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation Programs.

    Radon-222 is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally in soil, rocks, underground water, and air. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other scientific organizations have identified an increased risk of lung cancer associated with exposure to elevated levels of radon in homes. Schools in many…

  4. 13 CFR 120.890 - Source of interim financing.

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Source of interim financing. 120... Development Company Loan Program (504) Interim Financing § 120.890 Source of interim financing. A Project may use interim financing for all Project costs except the Borrower's contribution. Any source...

  5. Effect of Interim Annealing on Mechanical Strength of TFA-MOD Derived YBCO Coated Conductors

    Takagi, Y.; Nakaoka, K.; Nakamura, T.; Yoshizumi, M.; Kiss, T.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    TFA-MOD derived YBCO tapes are expected for many applications due to cost-efficiency. In some applications, uniformity and mechanical strength are required for tapes. A 205 m-long YBCO tape was fabricated with high and uniform Ic performance throughout the tape by adopting the interim annealing before the conversion process. The effect of the interim annealing on the crystal growth mechanism of YBCO has been studied focusing on the relationship between the interim annealing conditions and delamination, in this work. Delamination strength was evaluated in the samples prepared with and without interim annealing by the stud pull method. Measurements were carried out on 50 different points for each sample and the results were analyzed statistically. The difference between the two samples was remarkably seen in the delamination strength below 60 MPa. The conventionally annealed sample had more points with low delamination strength below 60 MPa than the interim annealed one. The cross sectional images of both samples observed by SEM showed that there were few pores within the interim annealed superconducting layer, although conventional superconducting layer had many pores. These results suggest that the pores within YBCO layer might be origins to be propagated for delamination at low strength.

  6. Interim and End States, Sellafield, United Kingdom

    The Sellafield PFSP is an uncovered external pond, currently in the pre-decommissioning waste retrieval phase. Further consideration is now being given to the next phases of decommissioning, including defining interim states and the end state for the facility

  7. Russian River Interim Action Management Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An interim action plan is presented to guide the 1979 management of the Kenai National Moose Ranges portion of the lower Russian River and its confluence with the...

  8. Dosimetry at an interim storage for spent nuclear fuel.

    Králík, M; Kulich, V; Studeny, J; Pokorny, P

    2007-01-01

    The Czech nuclear power plant Dukovany started its operation in 1985. All fuel spent from 1985 up to the end of 2005 is stored at a dry interim storage, which was designed for 60 CASTOR-440/84 casks. Each of these casks can accommodate 84 fuel assemblies from VVER 440 reactors. Neutron-photon mixed fields around the casks were characterized in terms of ambient dose equivalent measured by standard area dosemeters. Except this, neutron spectra were measured by means of a Bonner sphere spectrometer, and the measured spectra were used to derive the corresponding ambient dose equivalent due to neutrons. PMID:17526479

  9. Hitrex 1: an interim report on experimental and analytical work on BNL's zero power HTR

    Beynon, A.J.; Kitching, S.J.; Lewis, T.A.; Waterson, R.H.

    1972-06-15

    This report presents interim experimental and theoretical results for the BNL Hitrex reactor. Reactivity effects and thermal and fast reaction rate distributions have been measured. Preliminary analysis has been performed, and some initial comparisons between theory and experiments made. (auth)

  10. CANDU spent fuel dry storage interim technique

    CANDU heavy water reactor is developed by Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) it has 40 years of design life. During operation, the reactor can discharge a lot of spent fuels by using natural uranium. The spent fuel interim storage should be considered because the spent fuel bay storage capacity is limited with 6 years inventory. Spent fuel wet interim storage technique was adopted by AECL before 1970s, but it is diseconomy and produced extra radiation waste. So based on CANDU smaller fuel bundle dimension, lighter weight, lower burn-up and no-critical risk, AECL developed spent fuel dry interim storage technique which was applied in many CANDU reactors. Spent fuel dry interim storage facility should be designed base on critical accident prevention, decay heat removal, radiation protection and fissionable material containment. According to this introduction, analysis spent fuel dry interim storage facility and equipment design feature, it can be concluded that spent fuel dry interim storage could be met with the design requirement. (author)

  11. Methods Data Qualification Interim Report

    R. Sam Alessi; Tami Grimmett; Leng Vang; Dave McGrath

    2010-09-01

    The overall goal of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) is to maintain data provenance for all NGNP data including the Methods component of NGNP data. Multiple means are available to access data stored in NDMAS. A web portal environment allows users to access data, view the results of qualification tests and view graphs and charts of various attributes of the data. NDMAS also has methods for the management of the data output from VHTR simulation models and data generated from experiments designed to verify and validate the simulation codes. These simulation models represent the outcome of mathematical representation of VHTR components and systems. The methods data management approaches described herein will handle data that arise from experiment, simulation, and external sources for the main purpose of facilitating parameter estimation and model verification and validation (V&V). A model integration environment entitled ModelCenter is used to automate the storing of data from simulation model runs to the NDMAS repository. This approach does not adversely change the why computational scientists conduct their work. The method is to be used mainly to store the results of model runs that need to be preserved for auditing purposes or for display to the NDMAS web portal. This interim report demonstrates the currently development of NDMAS for Methods data and discusses data and its qualification that is currently part of NDMAS.

  12. Methods Data Qualification Interim Report

    The overall goal of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) is to maintain data provenance for all NGNP data including the Methods component of NGNP data. Multiple means are available to access data stored in NDMAS. A web portal environment allows users to access data, view the results of qualification tests and view graphs and charts of various attributes of the data. NDMAS also has methods for the management of the data output from VHTR simulation models and data generated from experiments designed to verify and validate the simulation codes. These simulation models represent the outcome of mathematical representation of VHTR components and systems. The methods data management approaches described herein will handle data that arise from experiment, simulation, and external sources for the main purpose of facilitating parameter estimation and model verification and validation (V and V). A model integration environment entitled ModelCenter is used to automate the storing of data from simulation model runs to the NDMAS repository. This approach does not adversely change the why computational scientists conduct their work. The method is to be used mainly to store the results of model runs that need to be preserved for auditing purposes or for display to the NDMAS web portal. This interim report demonstrates the currently development of NDMAS for Methods data and discusses data and its qualification that is currently part of NDMAS.

  13. Interim Hanford Waste Management Plan

    The September 1985 Interim Hanford Waste Management Plan (HWMP) is the third revision of this document. In the future, the HWMP will be updated on an annual basis or as major changes in disposal planning at Hanford Site require. The most significant changes in the program since the last release of this document in December 1984 include: (1) Based on studies done in support of the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (HDW-EIS), the size of the protective barriers covering contaminated soil sites, solid waste burial sites, and single-shell tanks has been increased to provide a barrier that extends 30 m beyond the waste zone. (2) As a result of extensive laboratory development and plant testing, removal of transuranic (TRU) elements from PUREX cladding removal waste (CRW) has been initiated in PUREX. (3) The level of capital support in years beyond those for which specific budget projections have been prepared (i.e., fiscal year 1992 and later) has been increased to maintain Hanford Site capability to support potential future missions, such as the extension of N Reactor/PUREX operations. The costs for disposal of Hanford Site defense wastes are identified in four major areas in the HWMP: waste storage and surveillance, technology development, disposal operations, and capital expenditures

  14. Interim Measures for the Tax Preservation And Enforcement Measures of the Customs of The People's Republic of China%中华人民共和国海关税收保全和强制措施暂行办法

    2010-01-01

    @@ Article 1 For the purpose of regulating the Tax Preservation and enforcement measures of the Customs of the People's Republic of China,guaranteeing the state taxation and safeguarding the lawful rights and interests of taxpayers,these Measures are formulated in accordance with the Customs Law of the People's Republic of China and the Regulations of the People's Republic of China on Import and Export Duties.

  15. Interim Financial Reporting in Function of Proper Decision Makind

    Kacanski, Slobodan; Tomašević, Stevan; Vlaović-Begović, Sanja

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the attributes of interim financial reporting, as well as performs overview and interpretation of International Accounting Standard 34 which deals with this issue. The paper emphasizes risk and effects of interim financial statements implementation in decision making process. Time and cost limitations significantly influence the level of reliability on interim repors since those reports were not audited. This paper analyses the attributes of interim financial reporting,...

  16. Interim-Management: A paradox for leadership research?

    Bruns, Jürgen; Kabst, Rüdiger

    2005-01-01

    The study focuses on Interim-Management as a so far rarely discussed phenomenon of the flexible firm. Contradicting popular leadership perception, the authors argue that Interim-Management does not constitute a leadership paradox but can be explained by established organization theory. In particular, transaction cost economics as well as resource-based view help explain the utilization of Interim-Management. Furthermore, the authors show that Interim-Management constitutes a response to reduc...

  17. Choosing a spent fuel interim storage system

    The Transnucleaire Group has developed different modular solutions to address spent fuel interim storage needs of NPP. These solutions, that are present in Europe, USA and Asia are metal casks (dual purpose or storage only) of the TN 24 family and the NUHOMS canister based system. It is not always simple for an operator to sort out relevant choice criteria. After explaining the basic designs involved on the examples of the TN 120 WWER dual purpose cask and the NUHOMS 56 WWER for WWER 440 spent fuel, we shall discuss the criteria that govern the choice of a given spent fuel interim storage system from the stand point of the operator. In conclusion, choosing and implementing an interim storage system is a complex process, whose implications can be far reaching for the long-term success of a spent fuel management policy. (author)

  18. Design review report FFTF interim storage cask

    Scott, P.L.

    1995-01-03

    Final Design Review Report for the FFTF Interim Storage Cask. The Interim Storage Cask (ISC) will be used for long term above ground dry storage of FFTF irradiated fuel in Core Component Containers (CCC)s. The CCC has been designed and will house assemblies that have been sodium washed in the IEM Cell. The Solid Waste Cask (SWC) will transfer a full CCC from the IEM Cell to the RSB Cask Loading Station where the ISC will be located to receive it. Once the loaded ISC has been sealed at the RSB Cask Loading Station, it will be transferred by facility crane to the DSWC Transporter. After the ISC has been transferred to the Interim Storage Area (ISA), which is yet to be designed, a mobile crane will be used to place the ISC in its final storage location.

  19. Design review report FFTF interim storage cask

    Final Design Review Report for the FFTF Interim Storage Cask. The Interim Storage Cask (ISC) will be used for long term above ground dry storage of FFTF irradiated fuel in Core Component Containers (CCC)s. The CCC has been designed and will house assemblies that have been sodium washed in the IEM Cell. The Solid Waste Cask (SWC) will transfer a full CCC from the IEM Cell to the RSB Cask Loading Station where the ISC will be located to receive it. Once the loaded ISC has been sealed at the RSB Cask Loading Station, it will be transferred by facility crane to the DSWC Transporter. After the ISC has been transferred to the Interim Storage Area (ISA), which is yet to be designed, a mobile crane will be used to place the ISC in its final storage location

  20. Transuranic storage and assay facility interim safety basis

    Porten, D.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-12

    The Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF) Interim Safety Basis document provides the authorization basis for the interim operation and restriction on interim operations for the TRUSAF. The TRUSAF ISB demonstrates that the TRUSAF can be operated safely, protecting the workers, the public, and the environment. The previous safety analysis document TRUSAF Hazards Identification and Evaluation (WHC 1987) is superseded by this document.

  1. 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements define administrative controls and design features required to ensure safe operation during receipt and storage of canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. This document is based on the 200 Area Interim Storage Area, Annex D, Final Safety Analysis Report which contains information specific to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area

  2. The Study on Regulations of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility in Japan

    The expansion of nuclear power generation inevitably result in the increase of spent nuclear fuel generation. Every year ∼700t of spent nuclear fuels are accumulated and total of 10,761t of spent nuclear fuels generated from 20 reactors are stored within the reactor sites by the end of 2009. If this trend is maintained, it is expected that Korea will have ∼30,000t of spent nuclear fuel by 2030. The capacity of pools in reactor sites is expected to be reached from 2016 and Korea need to prepare measures including the introduction of interim storage facility urgently. Considering the domestic situation described so far, it is be very necessary to survey and analyze the regulations of interim storage facilities of advanced countries. This report excerpts and analyzes the report of Japanese Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) on the regulations of interim storage facilities which was issues before the construction of the Mutz Interim Storage Facility. This report will be effectively used for the preparation of interim storage facility of Korea

  3. Loss of interim status (LOIS) under RCRA. RCRA Information Brief

    1992-09-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires owners and operators of facilities that treat store, or disposal of hazardous waste (TSDFs) to obtain an operating permit. Recognizing that it would take EPA many years to issue operating permits to all RCRA facilities, Congress created ``interim status`` under Section 3005(e) of the Act. Interim status allows facilities to operate under Subtitle C of RCRA until their permits are issued or denied. This information brief defines interim status and describes how failure to meet interim status requirements may lead to loss of interim status (LOIS).

  4. The EURATOM interim verification system of Natrium declarations

    Full text: Euratom's inspection scheme at the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant THORP makes use of the Near Real Time Material Accountancy (NRTMA) tool developed by the operator to obtain In-Process Inventory (IPI) information in plutonium containing areas that are not accessible during operation. From a verification point of view, appropriate authentication of the data provided, NRTMA is sufficient to fulfil the timeliness component of the safeguards approach without further need to stop the process and carry out interim inventories, the flow component being covered by routine verification activities on a continuous inspection basis. Since commissioning time, the validation of the NRTMA process models, data collection methods, computational techniques and data transmission protocols has been the subject of extensive analyses and agreement procedures involving several departments of the Euratom Safeguards Office (ESO). The Terms of Reference regarding the use of NRTMA by E.S.O are recorded in the NRTMA Framework Document. In this context, the Data Evaluation Sector of ESO was assigned the task of studying the statistical models and anomaly resolutions tools used by NRTMA. The analysis rested on the description of a condensed operational process model and a related statistical model for the measurement errors and their propagation. It included the definition of particular testing variables suitable for safeguards anomaly detection and sensitivity studies based on Monte Carlo simulations. The conclusion of Euratom's statistical analysis was that, although BNFL's NRTMA data collection system is perfectly adequate for interim inventory data declaration, its anomaly detection margin, which was primarily designed to provide a very conservative process control tool, is too narrow for safeguards purposes. This high sensitivity, which, from the operator's point of view, may a desirable feature for taking early corrective action, would create a resource and efficiency problem

  5. 340 waste handling facility interim safety basis

    This document presents an interim safety basis for the 340 Waste Handling Facility classifying the 340 Facility as a Hazard Category 3 facility. The hazard analysis quantifies the operating safety envelop for this facility and demonstrates that the facility can be operated without a significant threat to onsite or offsite people

  6. ITER interim design report package documents

    This publication contains the Excerpt from the ITER Council (IC-8), the ITER Interim Design Report, Cost Review and Safety Analysis, ITER Site Requirements and ITER Site Design Assumptions and the Excerpt from the ITER Council (IC-9). 8 figs, 2 tabs

  7. 340 waste handling facility interim safety basis

    VAIL, T.S.

    1999-04-01

    This document presents an interim safety basis for the 340 Waste Handling Facility classifying the 340 Facility as a Hazard Category 3 facility. The hazard analysis quantifies the operating safety envelop for this facility and demonstrates that the facility can be operated without a significant threat to onsite or offsite people.

  8. Disposal facility data for the interim performance

    The purpose of this report is to identify and provide information on the waste package and disposal facility concepts to be used for the low-level waste tank interim performance assessment. Current concepts for the low-level waste form, canister, and the disposal facility will be used for the interim performance assessment. The concept for the waste form consists of vitrified glass cullet in a sulfur polymer cement matrix material. The waste form will be contained in a 2 x 2 x 8 meter carbon steel container. Two disposal facility concepts will be used for the interim performance assessment. These facility concepts are based on a preliminary disposal facility concept developed for estimating costs for a disposal options configuration study. These disposal concepts are based on vault type structures. None of the concepts given in this report have been approved by a Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) decision board. These concepts will only be used in th interim performance assessment. Future performance assessments will be based on approved designs

  9. 12 CFR 268.505 - Interim relief.

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim relief. 268.505 Section 268.505 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM RULES..., eligibility for a within-grade increase, or the completion of the service requirement for career tenure,...

  10. 7 CFR 1735.75 - Interim financing.

    2010-01-01

    ... preliminary approval from RUS. See § 1735.90 (g) See 7 CFR part 1737 for regulations on interim financing for... completed RUS Form 490, “Application for Telephone Loan or Loan Guarantee.” See 7 CFR part 1737. (3) The... on any investments in nonrural areas. See 7 CFR 1737. (4) The information required in § 1735.74...

  11. LANDFILL BIOREACTOR PERFORMANCE, SECOND INTERIM REPORT

    A bioreactor landfill is a landfill that is operated in a manner that is expected to increase the rate and extent of waste decomposition, gas generation, and settlement compared to a traditional landfill. This Second Interim Report was prepared to provide an interpretation of fie...

  12. 24 CFR 35.1330 - Interim controls.

    2010-04-01

    ...-lead hazards only if they effectively control access to areas with soil-lead hazards. Examples of land... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interim controls. 35.1330 Section 35.1330 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and...

  13. 78 FR 63276 - Interim Policy, FAA Review of Solar Energy System Projects on Federally Obligated Airports

    2013-10-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Interim Policy, FAA Review of Solar Energy System Projects on Federally... federally obligated airports to construct solar energy systems on airport property. FAA is adopting an... for measuring ocular impact of proposed solar energy systems which are effective upon publication....

  14. Interim storage facility for spent fuel

    The spent fuel generated from the operation of a nuclear power plant is to be treated in the reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Aomori. At present, spent fuel is stored in the nuclear power plant until it is reprocessed. However the amount of spent fuel generated exceeds the capacity of the reprocessing plant. Hence an additional spent fuel storage facility is needed for the nuclear fuel cycle. The spent fuel interim storage facility is the first institution in Japan that stores spent fuel outside of the nuclear power plant site. Our company has received an order for internal equipment for this facility. This paper introduces an overview of the interim storage facility for spent fuel. (author)

  15. Pathways to deep decarbonization - Interim 2014 Report

    The interim 2014 report by the Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project (DDPP), coordinated and published by IDDRI and the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN), presents preliminary findings of the pathways developed by the DDPP Country Research Teams with the objective of achieving emission reductions consistent with limiting global warming to less than 2 deg. C. The DDPP is a knowledge network comprising 15 Country Research Teams and several Partner Organizations who develop and share methods, assumptions, and findings related to deep decarbonization. Each DDPP Country Research Team has developed an illustrative road-map for the transition to a low-carbon economy, with the intent of taking into account national socio-economic conditions, development aspirations, infrastructure stocks, resource endowments, and other relevant factors. The interim 2014 report focuses on technically feasible pathways to deep decarbonization

  16. Gaz de France interim financial report 2007

    This financial report contains the unaudited condensed financial statements of Gaz de France Group for the first half ended June 30, 2007, which were reviewed by the audit committee on August 27, 2007 and by the board of directors at its meeting on August 28, 2007. It includes forward-looking statements concerning the objectives, strategies, financial position, future operating results and the operations of Gaz de France Group. These statements reflect the Group's current perception of its activities and the markets in which it operates, as well as various estimates and assumptions considered to be reasonable. Content: interim management report (highlights of the first half of 2007, revenues and results for the period, financial structure, data on outstanding stock, outlook); interim consolidated financial statements (consolidated statements of income, consolidated balance sheets, consolidated statements of cash flows, recognized income and expenses, statements of changes in shareholders' equity, note to the consolidated financial statements); statement by the person responsible for the interim financial report; statutory auditors' report. (J.S.)

  17. Interim report - geotechnical site assessment methodology. Vol.1

    An interim report summarizing the research conducted on geotechnical site assessment methodology at the Carwynnen test mine in Cornwall. The geological setting of the test site in the Cornubian granite batholith is described. The effect of structure imposed by discontinuities on the engineering behaviour of rock masses is discussed and the scanline survey method of obtaining data on discontinuities in the rock mass is described. The requirement for remote geophysical methods of characterizing the mass is discussed and initial experiments using seismic and ultrasonic velocity measurements are reported. Computer programs to perform statistical analysis of the discontinuity patterns are described. Overcoring and hydraulic fracturing methods of determining the in-situ stress are briefly described and the results of a programme of in-situ stress measurements using the overcoring method are reported. (author)

  18. Compilation of interim technical research memoranda. Volume I

    Four interim technical research memoranda are presented that describe the results of numerical simulations designed to investigate the dynamics of energetic plasma beams propagating across magnetic fields

  19. T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY10 Report

    Zhang, Z. F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Strickland, Christopher E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Field, Jim G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Parker, Danny L. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection has constructed interim surface barriers over a portion of the T and TY tank farms as part of the Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The interim surface barriers (hereafter referred to as the surface barriers or barriers) are designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the soil zones containing radioactive contaminants and minimize the movement of the contaminants. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barriers at reducing soil moisture. Solar-powered systems were installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations in the T (i.e., instrument Nests TA, TB, TC, and TD) and the TY (i.e., instrument Nests TYA and TYB) Farms beneath the barriers and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nests TA and TYA are placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serve as controls, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barriers. Nest TB provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests TC, TD, and TYB are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barriers.

  20. T Tank Farm Interim Cover Test - Design Plan

    Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.

    2006-07-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 underground single-shell tanks that store hazardous radioactive waste. Many of these tanks and their associated infrastructure (e.g., pipelines, diversion boxes) have leaked. Some of the leaked waste has entered the groundwater. The largest known leak occurred from the T-106 Tank in 1973. Many of the contaminants from that leak still reside within the vadose zone beneath the T Tank Farm. CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. seeks to minimize movement of this residual contaminant plume by placing an interim cover on the surface. Such a cover is expected to prevent infiltrating water from reaching the plume and moving it further. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has prepared a design plan to monitor and determine the effectiveness of the interim cover. A three-dimensional numerical simulation of water movement beneath a cover was conducted to guide the design of the plan. Soil water content, water pressure, and temperature will be monitored using off-the-shelf equipment that can be installed by the hydraulic hammer technique. In fiscal year 2006, two instrument nests will be installed, one inside and one outside of the proposed cover. In fiscal year 2007, two additional instrument nests, both inside the proposed cover, will be installed. Each instrument nest contains a neutron access tube and a capacitance probe (to measure water content), and four heat-dissipation units (to measure pressure head and temperature). A datalogger and a meteorological station will be installed outside of the fence. Two drain gauges will be installed in locations inside and outside the cover for the purpose of measuring soil water flux.

  1. The Homestake Interim Laboratory and Homestake DUSEL

    Lesko, Kevin T.

    2011-12-01

    The former Homestake gold mine in Lead South Dakota is proposed for the National Science Foundation's Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). The gold mine provides expedient access to depths in excess of 8000 feet below the surface (>7000 mwe). Homestake's long history of promoting scientific endeavours includes the Davis Solar Neutrino Experiment, a chlorine-based experiment that was hosted at the 4850 Level for more than 30 years. As DUSEL, Homestake would be uncompromised by competition with mining interests or other shared uses. The facility's 600-km of drifts would be available for conversion for scientific and educational uses. The State of South Dakota, under Governor Rounds' leadership, has demonstrated exceptionally strong support for Homestake and the creation of DUSEL. The State has provided funding totalling $46M for the preservation of the site for DUSEL and for the conversion and operation of the Homestake Interim Laboratory. Motivated by the strong educational and outreach potential of Homestake, the State contracted a Conversion Plan by world-recognized mine-engineering contractor to define the process of rehabilitating the facility, establishing the appropriate safety program, and regaining access to the facility. The State of South Dakota has established the South Dakota Science and Technology Authority to oversee the transfer of the Homestake property to the State and the rehabilitation and preservation of the facility. The Homestake Scientific Collaboration and the State of South Dakota's Science and Technology Authority has called for Letters of Interest from scientific, educational and engineering collaborations and institutions that are interested in hosting experiments and uses in the Homestake Interim Facility in advance of the NSF's DUSEL, to define experiments starting as early as 2007. The Homestake Program Advisory Committee has reviewed these Letters and their initial report has been released. Options for

  2. National NIF Diagnostic Program Interim Management Plan

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has the mission of supporting Stockpile Stewardship and Basic Science research in high-energy-density plasmas. To execute those missions, the facility must provide diagnostic instrumentation capable of observing and resolving in time events and radiation emissions characteristic of the plasmas of interest. The diagnostic instrumentation must conform to high standards of operability and reliability within the NIF environment. These exacting standards, together with the facility mission of supporting a diverse user base, has led to the need for a central organization charged with delivering diagnostic capability to the NIF. The National NIF Diagnostics Program (NNDP) has been set up under the aegis of the NIF Director to provide that organization authority and accountability to the wide user community for NIF. The funds necessary to perform the work of developing diagnostics for NIF will be allocated from the National NIF Diagnostics Program to the participating laboratories and organizations. The participating laboratories and organizations will design, build, and commission the diagnostics for NIF. Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize NIF Core Diagnostics Systems and Cryogenic Target Handing Systems, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NIF Core Diagnostics Systems. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan for NIF Core Diagnostics Systems has been initiated and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National NIF Diagnostics Program Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope

  3. Site development interim removable dental prosthesis.

    Pasquinelli, Kirk L; Sze, Alexander J; Matosian, Alex J

    2016-07-01

    Transitioning a patient with partial edentulism through hard and soft tissue grafting to an implant restoration with an interim removable dental prosthesis (IRDP) presents a challenge to the restorative dentist. The management of grafted sites requires care, and without the appropriate design, an IRDP may impede surgical outcomes and place the graft at risk for displacement or necrosis. A site development IRDP (SDIRDP) for a grafted site must fulfill restorative goals and promote the surgical objectives for site development. A technique is described for fabricating an SDIRDP that facilitates surgical procedures and maintains prosthetic goals. PMID:26831920

  4. National NIF Diagnostic Program Interim Management Plan

    Warner, B

    2002-04-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has the mission of supporting Stockpile Stewardship and Basic Science research in high-energy-density plasmas. To execute those missions, the facility must provide diagnostic instrumentation capable of observing and resolving in time events and radiation emissions characteristic of the plasmas of interest. The diagnostic instrumentation must conform to high standards of operability and reliability within the NIF environment. These exacting standards, together with the facility mission of supporting a diverse user base, has led to the need for a central organization charged with delivering diagnostic capability to the NIF. The National NIF Diagnostics Program (NNDP) has been set up under the aegis of the NIF Director to provide that organization authority and accountability to the wide user community for NIF. The funds necessary to perform the work of developing diagnostics for NIF will be allocated from the National NIF Diagnostics Program to the participating laboratories and organizations. The participating laboratories and organizations will design, build, and commission the diagnostics for NIF. Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize NIF Core Diagnostics Systems and Cryogenic Target Handing Systems, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NIF Core Diagnostics Systems. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan for NIF Core Diagnostics Systems has been initiated and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National NIF Diagnostics Program Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope

  5. Central waste complex interim safety basis

    This interim safety basis provides the necessary information to conclude that hazards at the Central Waste Complex are controlled and that current and planned activities at the CWC can be conducted safely. CWC is a multi-facility complex within the Solid Waste Management Complex that receives and stores most of the solid wastes generated and received at the Hanford Site. The solid wastes that will be handled at CWC include both currently stored and newly generated low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, contact-handled transuranic, and contact-handled TRU mixed waste

  6. Central waste complex interim safety basis

    Cain, F.G.

    1995-05-15

    This interim safety basis provides the necessary information to conclude that hazards at the Central Waste Complex are controlled and that current and planned activities at the CWC can be conducted safely. CWC is a multi-facility complex within the Solid Waste Management Complex that receives and stores most of the solid wastes generated and received at the Hanford Site. The solid wastes that will be handled at CWC include both currently stored and newly generated low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, contact-handled transuranic, and contact-handled TRU mixed waste.

  7. Interim Reliability Evaluation Program procedures guide

    This document presents procedures for conducting analyses of a scope similar to those performed in Phase II of the Interim Reliability Evaluation Program (IREP). It documents the current state of the art in performing the plant systems analysis portion of a probabilistic risk assessment. Insights gained into managing such an analysis are discussed. Step-by-step procedures and methodological guidance constitute the major portion of the document. While not to be viewed as a cookbook, the procedures set forth the principal steps in performing an IREP analysis. Guidance for resolving the problems encountered in previous analyses is offered. Numerous examples and representative products from previous analyses clarify the discussion

  8. 47 CFR 51.715 - Interim transport and termination pricing.

    2010-10-01

    ... has neither established transport and termination rates based on forward-looking economic cost studies... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interim transport and termination pricing. 51... Telecommunications Traffic § 51.715 Interim transport and termination pricing. (a) Upon request from...

  9. Transuranic waste storage and assay facility (TRUSAF) interim safety basis

    The TRUSAF ISB is based upon current facility configuration and procedures. The purpose of the document is to provide the basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and the authorization basis for the TRUSAF at the Hanford Site. The previous safety analysis document TRUSAF hazards Identification and Evaluation (WHC 1977) is superseded by this document

  10. The Federal interim storage facility for radioactive waste under construction

    A short description of the design of the Federal interim storage facility for radioactive waste, the security aspects and the storage material is given. The interim storage facility is currently under construction in Wuerenlingen at the Paul Scherrer Institute. figs., tabs., 27 refs

  11. Staff Reactions to Interim Leadership in a Student Affairs Organization

    Jones, Robin D.

    2011-01-01

    Interim leadership appointments in higher education are a common strategy used to fill leadership gaps in executive positions. Because student affairs executives are particularly vulnerable to high turnover rates, interim appointments are becoming more widespread. Even with the prevalence of this trend, little attention has been given to the…

  12. Retention of long-term interim restorations with sodium fluoride enriched interim cement

    Strash, Carolyn

    Purpose: Interim fixed dental prostheses, or "provisional restorations", are fabricated to restore teeth when definitive prostheses are made indirectly. Patients undergoing extensive prosthodontic treatment frequently require provisionalization for several months or years. The ideal interim cement would retain the restoration for as long as needed and still allow for ease of removal. It would also avoid recurrent caries by preventing demineralization of tooth structure. This study aims to determine if adding sodium fluoride varnish to interim cement may assist in the retention of interim restorations. Materials and methods: stainless steel dies representing a crown preparation were fabricated. Provisional crowns were milled for the dies using CAD/CAM technology. Crowns were provisionally cemented onto the dies using TempBond NE and NexTemp provisional cements as well as a mixture of TempBond NE and Duraphat fluoride varnish. Samples were stored for 24h then tested or thermocycled for 2500 or 5000 cycles before being tested. Retentive strength of each cement was recorded using a universal testing machine. Results: TempBond NE and NexTemp cements performed similarly when tested after 24h. The addition of Duraphat significantly decreased the retention when added to TempBond NE. NexTemp cement had high variability in retention over all tested time periods. Thermocycling for 2500 and 5000 cycles significantly decreased the retention of all cements. Conclusions: The addition of Duraphat fluoride varnish significantly decreased the retention of TempBond NE and is therefore not recommended for clinical use. Thermocycling significantly reduced the retention of TempBond NE and NexTemp. This may suggest that use of these cements for three months, as simulated in this study, is not recommended.

  13. PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PRECONCEPTUAL CANDIDATE TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTIONS

    MAY TH

    2008-08-12

    The Office of River Protection (ORP) has authorized a study to recommend and select options for interim pretreatment of tank waste and support Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) low activity waste (LAW) operations prior to startup of all the WTP facilities. The Interim Pretreatment System (IPS) is to be a moderately sized system which separates entrained solids and 137Cs from tank waste for an interim time period while WTP high level waste vitrification and pretreatment facilities are completed. This study's objective is to prepare pre-conceptual technology descriptions that expand the technical detail for selected solid and cesium separation technologies. This revision includes information on additional feed tanks.

  14. Interim report and accounts 1993/94

    An interim set of accounts and reports is presented here for 1993/1994 for the health science company Amersham International. The company's research programs focus on developments in life science research, nuclear medicine and industrial quality and safety assurance, with particular expertise in the application of radioactivity to labelling and detection at the molecular level. This report which covers the half-year to 30 September 1993 shows promising financial results, with turnover, operating profits and earnings per share all having risen. All life science markets report growth although difficult trading conditions are being reported in Europe. Two products in the Healthcare business have achieved progress, a pain palliation agent for bone metastases has been launched in the United States, and European approval has been gained for a new technetium based heart imaging agent. Further growth is expected for the company. (UK)

  15. Transport and interim storage casks in Switzerland

    Full text: The Swiss utilities have chosen two different ways for the management of their spent fuel after initial on-site cooling: either reprocessing at La Hague plant (COGEMA) and Sellafield plant (COGEMA); or interim storage at the Central Interim Storage Facility called 'Zwischenlager Wuerenlingen AG' ( ZWILAG). Following international call for tenders, COGEMA LOGISTICS were awarded contracts for the supply of dual-purpose transport and storage casks for the interim storage of various spent fuel assemblies. All these casks belong to the family of the TN 24 dual purpose spent fuel storage casks in operation in the USA and in Belgium as well. They offer utilities a modular solution for the interim storage of spent fuel in robust metal casks which are fully suitable for off site transports. This flexible product can be readily adapted to suit individual user needs. The Leibstadt Nuclear Power Plant (KKL) has purchased six licensed dual-purpose TN97L spent fuel casks (97 BWR type fuel assemblies capacity). Three of them are already in operation at ZWILAG. COGEMA LOGISTICS has also delivered a dual-purpose TN52L spent fuel casks (52 BWR type fuel assemblies capacity) presently used for transport of spent fuel for reprocessing. The Goesgen Nuclear Power Plant (KKG) has purchased four licensed dual-purpose TN24G spent fuel casks (37 PWR type fuel assemblies capacity). They are all in operation at ZWILAG. The Muehleberg Nuclear Power Plant (BKW/KKM) has purchased 2 TN24BH spent fuel casks (69 BWR type fuel assemblies capacity). At the time of this abstract, cold trials are carried out involving the shuttle transport cask TN9/4 procured by COGEMA LOGISTICS as well. This paper will present the main features of these casks and the main steps of their development and implementation: 1) Main features of the casks: - The basic structure is a thick steel cylindrical forging with a welded on forged bottom and two forged steel lids. Containment and gamma shielding features of

  16. Hierarchies of belief and interim rationalizability

    Jeffrey C. Ely

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In games with incomplete information, conventional hierarchies of belief are incomplete as descriptions of the players' information for the purposes of determining a player's behavior. We show by example that this is true for a variety of solution concepts. We then investigate what is essential about a player's information to identify behavior. We specialize to two player games and the solution concept of interim rationalizability. We construct the universal type space for rationalizability and characterize the types in terms of their beliefs. Infinite hierarchies of beliefs over conditional beliefs, which we call Delta-hierarchies, are what turn out to matter. We show that any two types in any two type spaces have the same rationalizable sets in all games if and only if they have the same Delta-hierarchies.

  17. Licensing procedure for interim stores in Germany

    The coalition agreement of October 1998 signed by the parties in government contains a provision about the treatment of spent fuel elements from nuclear power plants which, in principle, seeks to avoid transports and terminate, which would also end transports to France and the UK, by July 1, 2005. After that date, all fuel elements arising are to be managed by direct disposal. Pending the start of operation of a suitable repository, this concept requires safekeeping of spent fuel elements in appropriate storage facilities. The consensus agreement between the federal government and the power utilities contains this approach with the goal of building on-site storage facilities. The Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS), as the competent supervisory authority under Sec. 6 of the Atomic Energy Act, has received licensing applications for temporary and on-site stores, respectively, as decentralized interim stores for all nuclear power plant sites in Germany (with the exception of Muelheim-Kaerlich, for which special regulations exist). Three technical concepts, namely two variants of a hall structure, a tunnel concept for Neckarwestheim, and a temporary store, must be examined by BfS in a licensing procedure including as its main steps public participation, examination of the preconditions for a permit, and drafting of the licensing decision. In addition, on-site stores require that an environmental impact assessment be carried out. Proceedings are conducted at BfS largely in parallel and speedily by a project group set up. BfS intends to finish all steps involving public participation still this year. When all preconditions have been met for licensing decisions to be granted, and with an assumed construction period of two years, on-site interim stores ought to be available from 2005 on. (orig.)

  18. Interim Hanford Waste Management Technology Plan

    The Interim Hanford Waste Management Technology Plan (HWMTP) is a companion document to the Interim Hanford Waste Management Plan (HWMP). A reference plan for management and disposal of all existing and certain projected future radioactive Hanford Site Defense Wastes (HSDW) is described and discussed in the HWMP. Implementation of the reference plan requires that various open technical issues be satisfactorily resolved. The principal purpose of the HWMTP is to present detailed descriptions of the technology which must be developed to close each of the technical issues associated with the reference plan identified in the HWMP. If alternative plans are followed, however, technology development efforts including costs and schedules must be changed accordingly. Technical issues addressed in the HWMTP and HWMP are those which relate to disposal of single-shell tank wastes, contaminated soil sites, solid waste burial sites, double-shell tank wastes, encapsulated 137CsCl and 90SrF2, stored and new solid transuranic (TRU) wastes, and miscellaneous wastes such as contaminated sodium metal. Among the high priority issues to be resolved are characterization of various wastes including early determination of the TRU content of future cladding removal wastes; completion of development of vitrification (Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant) and grout technology; control of subsidence in buried waste sites; and development of criteria and standards including performance assessments of systems proposed for disposal of HSDW. Estimates of the technology costs shown in this report are made on the basis that all identified tasks for all issues associated with the reference disposal plan must be performed. Elimination of, consolidation of, or reduction in the scope of individual tasks will, of course, be reflected in corresponding reduction of overall technology costs

  19. Interim Land Use Plan : Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Interim Land Use Plan for Muscatatuck NWR provides a brief history of the Refuge; summarizes present land conditions, needs, and habitat types; and provides an...

  20. Strategic Review of Medical Training and Career Structure Interim Report

    Department of Health

    2013-01-01

    Click here to download Strategic Review of Medical Training and Career Structure Interim Report PDF 44kb Click here to download Strategic Review of Medical Training and Career Structure Terms of Reference PDF 59KB

  1. Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Materials And Runoff Alternatives Study

    This report identifies candidate materials and concepts for interim surface barriers in the single-shell tank farms. An analysis of these materials for application to the TY tank farm is also provided.

  2. Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge : Interim hunting plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This interim hunting plan for Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge) outlines hunting guidelines for the Refuge....

  3. Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area

    This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards

  4. Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge : Interim Public Access Plan : 2000

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This interim plan covers public access for Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge. Sections include introduction, safety briefing protocols, entry procedure, types of...

  5. Interim research assessment 2003-2005 - Computer Science

    Mouthaan, A.J.; Hartel, P.H.

    2007-01-01

    This report primarily serves as a source of information for the 2007 Interim Research Assessment Committee for Computer Science at the three technical universities in the Netherlands. The report also provides information for others interested in our research activities.

  6. Security of radioactive sources: Interim guidance for comment

    The paper is a brief summary of the material contained in IAEA-TECDOC-1355, Security of Radioactive Sources: Interim Guidance for Comment, covering the topics of threat assessment, Security Groups and performance objectives, and security based categorization. (author)

  7. TANK FARM INTERIM SURFACE BARRIER MATERIALS AND RUNOFF ALTERNATIVES STUDY

    HOLM MJ

    2009-06-25

    This report identifies candidate materials and concepts for interim surface barriers in the single-shell tank farms. An analysis of these materials for application to the TY tank farm is also provided.

  8. Technical bases for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel

    The experience base for water storage of spent nuclear fuel has evolved since 1943. The technology base includes licensing documentation, standards, technology studies, pool operator experience, and documentation from public hearings. That base reflects a technology which is largely successful and mundane. It projects probable satisfactory water storage of spent water reactor fuel for several decades. Interim dry storage of spent water reactor fuel is not yet licensed in the US, but a data base and documentation have developed. There do not appear to be technological barriers to interim dry storage, based on demonstrations with irradiated fuel. Water storage will continue to be a part of spent fuel management at reactors. Whether dry storage becomes a prominent interim fuel management option depends on licensing and economic considerations. National policies will strongly influence how long the spent fuel remains in interim storage and what its final disposition will be

  9. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  10. DOE Hanford Site tank farm interim stabilization during 1990

    Three single-shell nuclear waste storage tanks at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site were interim stabilized during 1990 using a jet pump system. This paper discusses the pumping system, processes, stabilization criteria, and problems encountered during interim stabilization of these tanks. An upgraded pumping system was used that was developed from a previous jet pumping campaign completed in 1985. 6 figs

  11. ITER interim design report package and relevant documents

    This publication documents the technical basis which underlay the Interim Design Report, Cost Review and Safety Analysis submitted to the ITER Councils (IC-8 and IC-9) Records of decisions and the ''ITER Interim Design Report Package''. This publication contains ITER Site Requirements and ITER Site Design Assumptions, TAC-8 Report, SRG Report, CP's Report on Tentative Sequence of Events and Parties' Views on the IDR Package and Parties' Technical Comments on the IDR Package. Figs, tabs

  12. Interim Safety Basis for Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2000-09-07

    This ISB, in conjunction with the IOSR, provides the required basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and administrative controls for the facility until a SAR is prepared in accordance with the new requirements or the facility is shut down. It is concluded that the risks associated with tha current and anticipated mode of the facility, uranium disposition, clean up, and transition activities required for permanent closure, are within risk guidelines.

  13. Packaging, transportation and interim storage of unconditioned and conditioned wastes

    The methods and experiences for packaging, transport and possibilities for interim storage of unconditioned wastes are described. After the waste treatment and immobilization, it is packaged for transport and final disposal following the requirements of the IAEA transport regulations and national regulations. The characteristics of some common types of containe and shielding systems, and some techniques for interim storage of conditioned wastes, are presented. (Author)

  14. RATIO BETWEEN ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES AND INTERIM FINANCIAL REPORTING

    Claudia-Elena GRIGORAS-ICHIM

    2010-01-01

    In economic and financial communication, the common language is represented by accounting rules which consent the process of converting the operations afferent to economic development in figures (the situation of the one which prepares the interim financial reports) and a process to convert figures in economic transactions (the situation of the one using the interim financial reports). Therefore arises necessarily the “accounting standardization process” involving a complex of rules capable t...

  15. Interim Safety Basis for Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility

    This ISB, in conjunction with the IOSR, provides the required basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and administrative controls for the facility until a SAR is prepared in accordance with the new requirements or the facility is shut down. It is concluded that the risks associated with tha current and anticipated mode of the facility, uranium disposition, clean up, and transition activities required for permanent closure, are within risk guidelines

  16. Dry interim spent fuel storage casks. Licensing, evaluation and operational experience

    The German concept for the external dry interim storage of spent fuel and high level wastes is based on the used of monolithic ductile iron casks which are licensed according to the transport regulations and the national Atomic Energy Act. The casks ensure the safe confinement of the radioactive inventory over long term storage periods of up to 40 years. Essential for that purpose is the double barrier containment system, consisting of two independent lids sealed with long term resistant metallic gaskets and equipped with an interspace pressure monitoring device. Since the establishment of this dry interim storage concept in Germany in the early 1980s, a great deal of experience has been accumulated and now spent fuel elements from the THTR reactor at Hamm-Uentrop and from the AVR research reactor at Juelich are loaded into CASTOR-THTR/AVR casks under dry conditions and stored in the licensed external dry interim storage facilities in Ahaus and Juelich. These are now routine procedures that started in 1992 and has so far comprise more than 200 casks. A great deal of operational experience exists and has also been gained in process optimization without any serious problems. Much more difficult are the drying and evacuation procedures for casks loaded under wet conditions in the spent fuel storage pond of a nuclear power plant. In this case, special operational procedures involving humidity measurements are applied. Different loading operations in several German power plants have been carried out since 1982 and the first wet loaded cask proposed for storage in the licensed external dry interim storage facility at Gorleben came into operation in July 1994. (author). 4 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  17. 2. interim report on radiation situation in Finland from 5 to 16 May 1986

    This second interim report is a continuation of the first 'Fallout situation in Finland from April 26 to May 4' STUK-B-VALO-44. It deals with the results from external radiation measurements and analysis of environmental and foodstuff samples between 5 and 16 May, i.e. the development of the situation after the fallout peak. The whole-body counter measurements of tourists returning from the Soviet Union and from other countries in Eastern Europe after the accident are also reported

  18. 340 Waste Handling Facility interim safety basis

    This document establishes the interim safety basis (ISB) for the 340 Waste Handling Facility (340 Facility). An ISB is a documented safety basis that provides a justification for the continued operation of the facility until an upgraded final safety analysis report is prepared that complies with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The ISB for the 340 Facility documents the current design and operation of the facility. The 340 Facility ISB (ISB-003) is based on a facility walkdown and review of the design and operation of the facility, as described in the existing safety documentation. The safety documents reviewed, to develop ISB-003, include the following: OSD-SW-153-0001, Operating Specification Document for the 340 Waste Handling Facility (WHC 1990); OSR-SW-152-00003, Operating Limits for the 340 Waste Handling Facility (WHC 1989); SD-RE-SAP-013, Safety Analysis Report for Packaging, Railroad Liquid Waste Tank Cars (Mercado 1993); SD-WM-TM-001, Safety Assessment Document for the 340 Waste Handling Facility (Berneski 1994a); SD-WM-SEL-016, 340 Facility Safety Equipment List (Berneski 1992); and 340 Complex Fire Hazard Analysis, Draft (Hughes Assoc. Inc. 1994)

  19. Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included

    DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

    1980-12-01

    This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

  20. The UN Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK

    Alfonso J. Iglesias Velasco

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The current situation in the Province of Kosovo in the Republic of Serbia within the Yugoslav State became unsustainable in the late 1990´s as a result of the repressive policies of the Serbian authorities toward the Kosovar Albanians. International efforts tofind a peaceful solution to the conflict were unsuccessful, in large measure on account of Serbian intransigence, and the intensification of the conflict with tragic consequences for the Kosovar civilian population led the Atlantic Alliance in the spring of 1999 to a carryout a military intervention of, to say the least, dubious legality under international law, which in turn forced Serbian leaders to bow to the application of the solution worked out by the international community in the Rambouillet Accords and set down in UN Security Council Resolution 1244 (1999 of June 10, 1999. This resolution provided for two international entities in the province, one a security force (KFOR and the other civilian, the UN Interim Administration Mission (UNMIK. This paper analyzes the mission’s mandate and structure as well as the evolution of the peace process.

  1. SHORT COMMUNICATION: The kilogram redefinition—an interim solution

    Flowers, J. L.; Petley, B. W.

    2005-10-01

    The role of measurements of the fundamental constants continues to be extremely valuable in underpinning the basic units of metrology. It is concluded that it might be preferable to sustain the present definition of the kilogram for an interim period by having a mise en pratique accompanying the definition, much as is currently done with the specified methods of realizing the metre. Central to this proposal is our view that there is considerable latitude in the interpretation of the present definition of the kilogram and that this can be exploited while always disseminating a consistent mass unit. This would also permit the present methods of maintaining and disseminating the kilogram to continue to be employed throughout the world where necessary at the present accuracy until the new technology could be phased in. An alternative definition of the kilogram, formulated in terms of frequency, is also introduced. This would give an ampere that fundamentally depends on the elementary charge, e, without the need to change the present definitions of the ampere and ohm.

  2. Data Analysis of GPM Constellation Satellites-IMERG and ERA-Interim precipitation products over West of Iran

    Sharifi, Ehsan; Steinacker, Reinhold; Saghafian, Bahram

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation is a critical component of the Earth's hydrological cycle. The primary requirement in precipitation measurement is to know where and how much precipitation is falling at any given time. Especially in data sparse regions with insufficient radar coverage, satellite information can provide a spatial and temporal context. Nonetheless, evaluation of satellite precipitation is essential prior to operational use. This is why many previous studies are devoted to the validation of satellite estimation. Accurate quantitative precipitation estimation over mountainous basins is of great importance because of their susceptibility to hazards. In situ observations over mountainous areas are mostly limited, but currently available satellite precipitation products can potentially provide the precipitation estimation needed for meteorological and hydrological applications. One of the newest and blended methods that use multi-satellites and multi-sensors has been developed for estimating global precipitation. The considered data set known as Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals (IMERG) for GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement) is routinely produced by the GPM constellation satellites. Moreover, recent efforts have been put into the improvement of the precipitation products derived from reanalysis systems, which has led to significant progress. One of the best and a worldwide used model is developed by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). They have produced global reanalysis daily precipitation, known as ERA-Interim. This study has evaluated one year of precipitation data from the GPM-IMERG and ERA-Interim reanalysis daily time series over West of Iran. IMERG and ERA-Interim yield underestimate the observed values while IMERG underestimated slightly and performed better when precipitation is greater than 10mm. Furthermore, with respect to evaluation of probability of detection (POD), threat score (TS), false alarm ratio (FAR) and probability

  3. Radiological characterisation of waste in interim storage building of COVRA

    At COVRA spatial dose rate distribution measurements were performed in December 2004 and December 2006 in the interim L/ILW storage building (LOG). This storage facility consists out of four large storage halls (height x width x depth 7 m x 40 m x 70 m) each with a volume of about 20000 m3. The scope of this study is to investigate the benefits of the waste storage strategy and procedures for minimization of the dose to the workers and the public. The main aim of the measurements in 2004 was: to validate the applied L/ILW storage strategy - to examine, if spatial collected data can be used to detect unforeseen differences in radiation level. The results of these measurements of spatial dose showed a number of unforeseen hotspots at different locations, so that it could be concluded that the applied storage strategy and procedures has to be improved. Further the dose rate at the height of 6 m, mainly responsible for the sky-shine dose rate, being an important part of the dose rate to the public at the site boundary, has to be reduced by more shielding. In December 2006 a second serial of spatial radiological and non-radiological data have been collected. The applied nondestructive INDSS-R (Indoor Survey System-Radiation ) method has been improved, so that the following 3-dimensional data could be collected between 0.5 m and 5.5 m: - dose rate (by pressurized ionisation chamber). nuclide depended gamma photon flux (3 x 3 NaI). - temperature and relative humidity. These last two non-radiological parameters were measured to verify the storage conditions of the waste. The main aim of these 3 dimensional collection was to verify the second stated aim of 2004. (authors)

  4. Permitting plan for the high-level waste interim storage

    This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of solidified high-level waste (HLW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Solidified HLW consists of canisters containing vitrified HLW (glass) and containers that hold cesium separated during low-level waste pretreatment. The glass canisters and cesium containers will be transported to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-provided transportation cask via diesel-powered tractor trailer. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms; and (2) interim storage and disposal of TWRS immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW). An environmental requirements checklist and narrative was developed to identify the permitting path forward for the HLW interim storage (HLWIS) project (See Appendix B). This permitting plan will follow the permitting logic developed in that checklist

  5. Next Generation Melter Optioneering Study - Interim Report

    The next generation melter (NOM) development program includes a down selection process to aid in determining the recommended vitrification technology to implement into the WTP at the first melter change-out which is scheduled for 2025. This optioneering study presents a structured value engineering process to establish and assess evaluation criteria that will be incorporated into the down selection process. This process establishes an evaluation framework that will be used progressively throughout the NGM program, and as such this interim report will be updated on a regular basis. The workshop objectives were achieved. In particular: (1) Consensus was reached with stakeholders and technology providers represented at the workshop regarding the need for a decision making process and the application of the D20 process to NGM option evaluation. (2) A framework was established for applying the decision making process to technology development and evaluation between 2010 and 2013. (3) The criteria for the initial evaluation in 2011 were refined and agreed with stakeholders and technology providers. (4) The technology providers have the guidance required to produce data/information to support the next phase of the evaluation process. In some cases it may be necessary to reflect the data/information requirements and overall approach to the evaluation of technology options against specific criteria within updated Statements of Work for 2010-2011. Access to the WTP engineering data has been identified as being very important for option development and evaluation due to the interface issues for the NGM and surrounding plant. WRPS efforts are ongoing to establish precisely data that is required and how to resolve this Issue. It is intended to apply a similarly structured decision making process to the development and evaluation of LAW NGM options.

  6. Safety report for Central Interim Storage facility for radioactive waste from small producers

    protection and remediation of minor defects in the facility. The safety report also incorporates the implementation projects for the inventory rearrangement and the projected waste quantities up to 2013, when the LILW repository should be available. The most important part of the safety report deals with safety analyses of all relevant operational conditions which could influence safety of the storage and its inventory, taking into account also the phase of reconstruction works. The Safety Report is prepared in accordance with the requirements of Regulation E2 (Pravilnik E2) and The Act on Ionising Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety from 2002. After defining the objective of the safety report, the chapters deal with the following topics: The safety approach to the LILW storage, Description and location analysis of the Central interim storage, Technical characteristic of the Central interim storage, Safety analysis of the Central interim storage, Organizational measures for construction and pre-operational testing, Organizational measures for commissioning and normal operation of the Central interim storage, Operational conditions and limitations, Ionizing radiation protection service, its methods and equipment, Radioactive waste management and disposal, Review of the plans, measures and procedures to prevent radiological accidents, Quality assurance programme, Review of the measures for physical protection of the LILW storage and stored radioactive waste, Planned measures and necessary equipment for closure of the Central interim storage. The details on preparation of the Safety report, including the dilemmas and comments on different chapters, are presented in this paper. The most important findings of the safety analysis are also given.(author)

  7. The Proposal to Create the Czech Accounting Standards – Interim Financial Reporting

    Jana Gláserová

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the importance of the position and role of interim financial statements in the Czech financial reporting.The paper created a proposal for the creation of a new Czech Accounting Standard – “Interim Financial Statements”. Its purpose is both to unify the existing fragmented legislation issues examined under the Czech law and also to define the essential terms of the lack of interim financial statements. This is the definition of the interim reporting period, the obligation o...

  8. Radioactive waste interim storage in Germany; Zwischenlagerung von radioaktiven Abfaellen in Deutschland

    NONE

    2015-12-15

    The short summary on the radioactive waste interim storage in Germany covers the following issues: importance of interim storage in the frame of radioactive waste management, responsibilities and regulations, waste forms, storage containers, transport of vitrified high-level radioactive wastes from the reprocessing plants, central interim storage facilities (Gorleben, Ahaus, Nord/Lubmin), local interim storage facilities at nuclear power plant sites, federal state collecting facilities, safety, radiation exposure in Germany.

  9. Interim results from the characterization testing of the Engineering Development (EDM) rubidium clocks for satellite applications

    Powers, Edward D., Jr.; Danzy, Fredrick

    1990-01-01

    Some interim results from the environmental testing program to evaluate the Engineering Design Model (EDM) of the EG and G Spaceborne Rubidium Clock are presented. This effort is in support of the Global Positioning System (GPS) BLOCK IIR program and is intended to characterize the performance of EG and G design for BLOCK IIR satellite applications. Two EG and G EDM units are currently under test at NRL's Clock Test Facility to measure the long-term frequency stability, drift, and frequency versus temperature characteristics.

  10. Fear of permanence: The challenge of siting interim facilities

    This paper examines an increasingly urgent and surprisingly difficult task: siting potentially hazardous facilities that are intended to operate for a limited period, such as a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility (MRS) for radioactive waste. Other examples are at-reactor radioactive waste storage facilities (e.g., dry cask storage) an interim storage facilities for plutonium recovered from retired nuclear weapons. Conventional wisdom holds that such facilities will be easier to site than facilities that are intended to be permanent, such as a radioactive waste repository. Yet the record to date has not provided much support for this expectation. Efforts to site an MRS are approaching the decade mark, despite several acts of Congress and the implementation of a variety of innovative institutional mechanisms designed to facilitate the siting process. And there is no end in sight exclamation point As the title of this paper suggests, we argue that a distinctive challenge to siting interim facilities is meeting the concern of interested publics that the facility may turn out not to be interim and instead achieve de facto permanence. Unless this concern is successfully addressed, siting an interim facility becomes just as difficult as siting as permanent facility because the concerned publics have to assume the worst (that the interim facility will be permanent) and act accordingly. Our analysis of this challenge is in four parts. First, we describe a generalized scenario that captures the logic of the dilemma. Second, we briefly recount four cases where the scenario is being played out (or has the potential to do so). Third, we explore several more specific siting issues through the lens of the interim facilities dilemma. Fourth, we draw conclusions and policy implications

  11. Interim process report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    This report is a documentation of buffer processes identified as relevant to the long-term safety of a KBS-3 repository. The report is part of the interim reporting of the safety assessment SR-Can, see further the Interim main report. The final SR-Can reporting will support SKB's application to build an Encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel and is to be produced in 2006. The purpose of this report is to document the scientific knowledge of the processes to a level required for an adequate treatment in the safety assessment. The documentation is thus from a scientific point of not exhaustive since such a treatment is neither necessary for the purposes of the safety assessment nor possible within the scope of an assessment. The purpose is further to determine the handling of each process in the safety assessment and to demonstrate how uncertainties are taken care of, given the suggested handling. The process documentation in the SR 97 version of the Process report is a starting point for this SR-Can interim version. As further described in the Interim main report, the list of relevant processes has been reviewed and slightly extended by comparison to other databases. Furthermore, the backfill has been included as a system part of its own, rather than being described together with the buffer as in SR 97. Apart from giving an interim account of the documentation and handling of buffer processes in SR-Can, this report is meant to serve as a template for the forthcoming documentation of processes occurring in other parts of the repository system. A complete list of processes can be found in the Interim FEP report for the safety assessment SR-Can. All material presented in this document is preliminary in nature and will possibly be updated as the SR-Can project progresses

  12. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    Solid and liquid radioactive waste continues to be stored in 149 single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. To date, 119 tanks have had most of the pumpable liquid removed by interim stabilization. Thirty tanks remain to be stabilized. One of these tanks (C-106) will be stabilized by retrieval of the tank contents. The remaining 29 tanks will be interim stabilized by saltwell pumping. In the summer of 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) placed a moratorium on the startup of additional saltwell pumping systems because of funding constraints and proposed modifications to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestones to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). In a letter dated February 10, 1998, Final Determination Pursuant to Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) in the Matter of the Disapproval of the DOE's Change Control Form M-41-97-01 (Fitzsimmons 1998), Ecology disapproved the DOE Change Control Form M-41-97-01. In response, Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) directed Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LNMC) to initiate development of a project plan in a letter dated February 25, 1998, Direction for Development of an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan in Support of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In a letter dated March 2, 1998, Request for an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan, the DOE reaffirmed the need for an aggressive SST interim stabilization completion project plan to support a finalized Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-41 recovery plan. This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities

  13. Interim process report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    Sellin, Patrick (ed.)

    2004-08-01

    This report is a documentation of buffer processes identified as relevant to the long-term safety of a KBS-3 repository. The report is part of the interim reporting of the safety assessment SR-Can, see further the Interim main report. The final SR-Can reporting will support SKB's application to build an Encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel and is to be produced in 2006. The purpose of this report is to document the scientific knowledge of the processes to a level required for an adequate treatment in the safety assessment. The documentation is thus from a scientific point of not exhaustive since such a treatment is neither necessary for the purposes of the safety assessment nor possible within the scope of an assessment. The purpose is further to determine the handling of each process in the safety assessment and to demonstrate how uncertainties are taken care of, given the suggested handling. The process documentation in the SR 97 version of the Process report is a starting point for this SR-Can interim version. As further described in the Interim main report, the list of relevant processes has been reviewed and slightly extended by comparison to other databases. Furthermore, the backfill has been included as a system part of its own, rather than being described together with the buffer as in SR 97. Apart from giving an interim account of the documentation and handling of buffer processes in SR-Can, this report is meant to serve as a template for the forthcoming documentation of processes occurring in other parts of the repository system. A complete list of processes can be found in the Interim FEP report for the safety assessment SR-Can. All material presented in this document is preliminary in nature and will possibly be updated as the SR-Can project progresses.

  14. A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria

    LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

    1992-04-01

    Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

  15. 24 CFR 960.257 - Family income and composition: Regular and interim reexaminations.

    2010-04-01

    ... move to an appropriate size unit. (b) Interim reexaminations. A family may request an interim... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family income and composition... and Reexamination § 960.257 Family income and composition: Regular and interim reexaminations....

  16. 40 CFR 57.302 - Performance level of interim constant controls.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance level of interim constant... Performance level of interim constant controls. (a) Maximum feasible efficiency. Each NSO shall require: that the smelter operate its interim constant control systems at their maximum feasible...

  17. Single-shell tank interim stabilization risk analysis

    The purpose of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Risk Analysis is to provide a cost and schedule risk analysis of HNF-2358, Rev. 1, Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization Project Plan (Project Plan) (Ross et al. 1998). The analysis compares the required cost profile by fiscal year (Section 4.2) and revised schedule completion date (Section 4.5) to the Project Plan. The analysis also evaluates the executability of the Project Plan and recommends a path forward for risk mitigation

  18. Corporate Risk Disclosure: A Content Analysis of Swedish Interim Reports

    Khaledi, Soheila

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine the determinants of the level of corporate risk disclosure (CRD) in the interim reports of Swedish non-financial companies. A quantitative research approach is used, the sample data of which consist of 166 firms with 4,849 interim reports over a 10-year period. By utilizing the notion of risk and its definition, I have distinguished three categories of risk, namely risk as uncertainty, risk as threat and risk as opportunity. A systematic content analysis...

  19. Interim safety basis for fuel supply shutdown facility

    This ISB in conjunction with the new TSRs, will provide the required basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and administrative controls for the Facility until a SAR is prepared in accordance with the new requirements. It is concluded that the risk associated with the current operational mode of the Facility, uranium closure, clean up, and transition activities required for permanent closure, are within Risk Acceptance Guidelines. The Facility is classified as a Moderate Hazard Facility because of the potential for an unmitigated fire associated with the uranium storage buildings

  20. Single-shell tank interim stabilization risk analysis

    Basche, A.D.

    1998-07-31

    The purpose of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Risk Analysis is to provide a cost and schedule risk analysis of HNF-2358, Rev. 1, Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization Project Plan (Project Plan) (Ross et al. 1998). The analysis compares the required cost profile by fiscal year (Section 4.2) and revised schedule completion date (Section 4.5) to the Project Plan. The analysis also evaluates the executability of the Project Plan and recommends a path forward for risk mitigation.

  1. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Interim Report

    Green, J.; Schechter, P.; Baltay, C.; Bean, R.; Bennett, D.; Brown, R.; Conselice, C.; Donahue, M.; Gaudi, S.; Lauer, T.; Perlmutter, S.; Rauscher, B.; Rhodes, J.; Roellig, T.; Stern, D.; Sumi, T.; Gerhels, N.; Sambruna, R.; Barry, R. K.; Content, D.; Grady, K; Jackson, C.; Kruk, J.; Melton, M.; Rioux, N.

    2011-01-01

    The New Worlds, New Horizons (NWNH) in Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010 Decadal Survey prioritized the community consensus for ground-based and space-based observatories. Recognizing that many of the community s key questions could be answered with a wide-field infrared survey telescope in space, and that the decade would be one of budget austerity, WFIRST was top ranked in the large space mission category. In addition to the powerful new science that could be accomplished with a wide-field infrared telescope, the WFIRST mission was determined to be both technologically ready and only a small fraction of the cost of previous flagship missions, such as HST or JWST. In response to the top ranking by the community, NASA formed the WFIRST Science Definition Team (SDT) and Project Office. The SDT was charged with fleshing out the NWNH scientific requirements to a greater level of detail. NWNH evaluated the risk and cost of the JDEM-Omega mission design, as submitted by NASA, and stated that it should serve as the basis for the WFIRST mission. The SDT and Project Office were charged with developing a mission optimized for achieving the science goals laid out by the NWNH re-port. The SDT and Project Office opted to use the JDEM-Omega hardware configuration as an initial start-ing point for the hardware implementation. JDEM-Omega and WFIRST both have an infrared imager with a filter wheel, as well as counter-dispersed moderate resolution spectrometers. The primary advantage of space observations is being above the Earth's atmosphere, which absorbs, scatters, warps and emits light. Observing from above the atmosphere enables WFIRST to obtain precision infrared measurements of the shapes of galaxies for weak lensing, infrared light-curves of supernovae and exoplanet microlensing events with low systematic errors, and infrared measurements of the H hydrogen line to be cleanly detected in the 1baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) dark energy measurements. The Infrared Astronomical

  2. 32 CFR 94.4 - Policy and procedures.

    2010-07-01

    ... Forces of the United States may result in the loss of their native country citizenship but this same service may make them eligible for U.S. citizenship. (b) Their eligibility for naturalization, based upon... Islands, they should apply for citizenship only if they expect to be stationed at the base for at least...

  3. Continuation of the summarizing interim report on previous results of the Gorleben site survey as of May 1983

    In addition to results from the 1983 interim report, this report contains, in order to supplement the surface explorations, seismic reflection measurements, hydrogeologic and seismologic investigations, sorption experiments, and studies of glacial development in the site region and of long-term safety of final waste repositories in salt domes. The site's high grade of suitability for becoming a final radioactive waste repository, the legal basis as well as quality assurance are evaluated. (orig.)

  4. LDEF materials: An overview of the interim findings

    The flight and retrieval of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) provided an opportunity for the study of the low-Earth orbit (LEO) environment and long-duration space environmental effect (SEE) on materials that are unparalleled in the history of the U.S. space program. The 5.8-year flight of LDEF greatly enhanced the potential value of materials data from LDEF to the international SEE community, compared to that of the original 1-year flight plan. The remarkable flight attitude stability of LDEF enables specific analyses of various individual and combined effects of LEO environmental parameters on identical materials of the same space vehicle. NASA recognized the potential by forming the LDEF Space Environmental Effects on Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) to address the greatly expanded materials and LEO space environment parameter analysis opportunities available in the LDEF structure, experiment trays, and corollary measurements, so that the combined value of all LDEF materials data to current and future space missions will be assessed and documented. This paper provides an overview of the interim LDEF materials findings of the Principal Investigators and the Materials Special Investigation Group. These revelations are based on observations of LEO environmental effects on materials made in-space during LDEF retrieval and during LDEF tray deintegration at the Kennedy Space Center, and on findings of approximately 1.5 years of laboratory analyses of LDEF materials by the LDEF materials scientists. These findings were extensively reviewed and discussed at the MSIG-sponsored LDEF Materials Workshop '91. The results are presented in a format which categorizes the revelations as clear findings or confusing/unexplained findings and resultant needs for new space materials developments and ground simulation testing/analytical modeling

  5. ASPECTS CONCERNING INTERIM FINANCIAL REPORTING IN ROMANIA: STANDARDS AND REGULATIONS

    Aristita Rotila

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms employed for the communication of accounting information that is necessary for users in their economic decision-making process consist of the financial statements of an entity. All legal entities, no matter the domain of their activity, have the obligation to draw up annual financial statements for every completed financial year. For certain categories of entities, reporting obligations are also required for periods other than the annual reporting, throughout the financial year. It is the case of interim financial reporting. At the level of the international accounting framework, the aspects related to interim financial reporting are the subject of a separate standard, namely, IAS 34 Interim Financial Reporting. In Romania, the current system of accounting regulations concerning the annual financial statements comprises accounting regulations that comply with the European directives and which apply to the various categories of entities, on the one hand and, on the other, accounting regulations in line with the IFRS, which are applicable to other classes of entities from certain activity sectors. The accounting regulations that apply to each category refer to, among other things, the contents and the format of financial statements that have to be presented. Analysing the system of norms and regulations, this article identifies the requirements concerning interim financial reporting in Romania, with reference to the different types of entities.

  6. Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Project Plan

    This project plan establishes the management framework for the conduct of the CHG Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organization structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. This plan serves as the project executional baseline

  7. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. This plan serves as the project executional baseline

  8. Single Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Project Plan

    VLADIMIROFF, D.T.; BOYLES, V.C.

    2000-05-22

    This project plan establishes the management framework for the conduct of the CHG Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organization structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. This plan serves as the project executional baseline.

  9. The Children's Behavioral Classification Project: An Interim Report

    Dreger, Ralph Mason

    1977-01-01

    Described in the interim report of the Children's Behavioral Classification Project (CBCP) is the CBCP instrument, a duplicated list of 274 behavioral items and three demographic items which provides a profile of the emotionally disordered child based on observations by the parent or parent-surrogate. (SBH)

  10. System Specification for Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-12-27

    This specification establishes the system-level functional, performance, design, interface, and test requirements for Phase 1 of the IHLW Interim Storage System, located at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The IHLW canisters will be produced at the Hanford Site by a Selected DOE contractor. Subsequent to storage the canisters will be shipped to a federal geologic repository.

  11. 40 CFR 80.141 - Interim detergent gasoline program.

    2010-07-01

    ... registered by its manufacturer under 40 CFR part 79 according to the specifications in paragraphs (c) (1... hearing procedures shall be informal, and the hearing shall not be subject to or governed by 40 CFR part... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interim detergent gasoline program....

  12. Interim analysis in long-term clinical trials

    G.A. van Es (Gerrit Anne)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this dissertation is to evaluate the usefulness of both stopping rules and estimation methods in long-term clinical trials with interim analyses. The ASPECT trial, a long-term clinical trial to assess the effect of anticoagulant therapy on mortality in patients after myoca

  13. Minish Named Interim Head of Admissions at Virginia Tech

    Virginia Tech News

    2004-01-01

    Roberta M.Minish, of Blacksburg, Va., associate dean emeritus of Virginia Tech's former College of Human Sciences and Education, has been named interim director of undergraduate admissions at the university, effective Jan. 19. She fills the position left vacant in December with the resignation of Karen Torgersen.

  14. System Specification for Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage

    This specification establishes the system-level functional, performance, design, interface, and test requirements for Phase 1 of the IHLW Interim Storage System, located at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The IHLW canisters will be produced at the Hanford Site by a Selected DOE contractor. Subsequent to storage the canisters will be shipped to a federal geologic repository

  15. On-site interim stores for spent fuel elements

    Since June 14 this year, the subject of a nuclear power consensus has been mentioned in the headlines less frequently than in past years. On that day, the government and operators of power plants agreed in Berlin on residual amounts of electricity to be produced and on management of the spent fuel elements of the nineteen German nuclear power plants. One sub-item under the heading of waste management, which continues to arouse debates not only at nuclear power plant sites despite the consensus reached, and which may become vitally important to the operation of plants, will be covered in more detail below: the construction of so-called decentralized interim stores. When present contracts with French and British firms on nuclear fuel reprocessing have been fulfilled and reprocessing has been phased out, these interim stores are to minimize the number of transports within Germany, a notorious source of general unrest, and are supposed to accommodate the spent fuel elements until a suitable repository will have been built where they can then be stored permanently. The whole development of a management concept for spent nuclear fuel in the Federal Republic of Germany, and the requirements to be met by decentralized interim stores, are explained in the article. The resultant standardized concept of dry interim cask storage is outlined in the light of its legal and technical criteria. Finally, the site-dependent variants of this concept are presented, and the status and the special features of the ongoing licensing procedures are explained. (orig.)

  16. 46 CFR 308.103 - Insured amounts under interim binder.

    2010-10-01

    ... INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.103 Insured amounts under interim binder. (a... vessel had been requisitioned for title under section 902(a) of the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended (46 App. U.S.C. 1242(a)) at the time of the attachment of the insurance under said policy:...

  17. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    Ross, W.E.

    1998-05-11

    This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. This plan serves as the project executional baseline.

  18. St. Francis Rain Garden Water Quality Sampling Interim Data Report; Total Nitrogen, Total Phosphorus, Sediments or Solids, and E. Coli for the period April to June, 2014

    This interim data reported is being provided per request to the Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD) to provide summary statistics on a limited set of water quality parameters as measured at the St. Francis Rain Garden site in the Lick Run Valley as it pertains to MSD's Project Grou...

  19. SLIGHTLY IRRADIATED FUEL (SIF) INTERIM DISPOSITION PROJECT

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL PRC) is proud to submit the Slightly Irradiated Fuel (SIF) Interim Disposition Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2010. The SIF Project was a set of six interrelated sub-projects that delivered unique stand-alone outcomes, which, when integrated, provided a comprehensive and compliant system for storing high risk special nuclear materials. The scope of the six sub-projects included the design, construction, testing, and turnover of the facilities and equipment, which would provide safe, secure, and compliant Special Nuclear Material (SNM) storage capabilities for the SIF material. The project encompassed a broad range of activities, including the following: Five buildings/structures removed, relocated, or built; Two buildings renovated; Structural barriers, fencing, and heavy gates installed; New roadways and parking lots built; Multiple detection and assessment systems installed; New and expanded communication systems developed; Multimedia recording devices added; and A new control room to monitor all materials and systems built. Project challenges were numerous and included the following: An aggressive 17-month schedule to support the high-profile Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) decommissioning; Company/contractor changeovers that affected each and every project team member; Project requirements that continually evolved during design and construction due to the performance- and outcome-based nature ofthe security objectives; and Restrictions imposed on all communications due to the sensitive nature of the projects In spite of the significant challenges, the project was delivered on schedule and $2 million under budget, which became a special source of pride that bonded the team. For years, the SIF had been stored at the central Hanford PFP. Because of the weapons-grade piutonium produced and stored there, the PFP had some of the tightest security on the Hanford

  20. SLIGHTLY IRRADIATED FUEL (SIF) INTERIM DISPOSITION PROJECT

    NORTON SH

    2010-02-23

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL PRC) is proud to submit the Slightly Irradiated Fuel (SIF) Interim Disposition Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2010. The SIF Project was a set of six interrelated sub-projects that delivered unique stand-alone outcomes, which, when integrated, provided a comprehensive and compliant system for storing high risk special nuclear materials. The scope of the six sub-projects included the design, construction, testing, and turnover of the facilities and equipment, which would provide safe, secure, and compliant Special Nuclear Material (SNM) storage capabilities for the SIF material. The project encompassed a broad range of activities, including the following: Five buildings/structures removed, relocated, or built; Two buildings renovated; Structural barriers, fencing, and heavy gates installed; New roadways and parking lots built; Multiple detection and assessment systems installed; New and expanded communication systems developed; Multimedia recording devices added; and A new control room to monitor all materials and systems built. Project challenges were numerous and included the following: An aggressive 17-month schedule to support the high-profile Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) decommissioning; Company/contractor changeovers that affected each and every project team member; Project requirements that continually evolved during design and construction due to the performance- and outcome-based nature ofthe security objectives; and Restrictions imposed on all communications due to the sensitive nature of the projects In spite of the significant challenges, the project was delivered on schedule and $2 million under budget, which became a special source of pride that bonded the team. For years, the SIF had been stored at the central Hanford PFP. Because of the weapons-grade piutonium produced and stored there, the PFP had some of the tightest security on the Hanford

  1. Wayne Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Wayne, New Jersey

    The environmental monitoring program, begun in 1984, was continued in 1989 at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in Wayne Township, New Jersey. The WISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive material remains from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The monitoring program at WISS measures radon and thoron concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium, radium, and thorium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. The radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual to verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and to assess its potential effects on public health. This report presents the findings of the environmental monitoring program conducted at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) during calendar year 1989. 26 refs., 12 figs., 16 tabs

  2. Maywood Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Maywood, New Jersey

    1990-05-01

    The environmental monitoring program, which began in 1984, was continued in 1989 at the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in the Borough of Maywood and the Township of Rochelle Park, New Jersey. MISS is currently used for storage of soils contaminated with low-level radioactivity. MISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials are present. The monitoring program at MISS measures thoron and radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and thorium, uranium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. The radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual to verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and to assess its potential effects on public health. This report presents the results of the environmental monitoring program conducted at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) during calendar year 1989. Environmental monitoring began at MISS in 1984. 19 refs., 23 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. Maywood Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Maywood, New Jersey

    The environmental monitoring program, which began in 1984, was continued in 1989 at the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in the Borough of Maywood and the Township of Rochelle Park, New Jersey. MISS is currently used for storage of soils contaminated with low-level radioactivity. MISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials are present. The monitoring program at MISS measures thoron and radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and thorium, uranium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. The radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual to verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and to assess its potential effects on public health. This report presents the results of the environmental monitoring program conducted at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) during calendar year 1989. Environmental monitoring began at MISS in 1984. 19 refs., 23 figs., 14 tabs

  4. Does the radiation from the interim storage in Gorleben affect the sex ratio of newborn children?

    In the professional world but especially in public, the question is discussed whether ionizing radiation from nuclear facilities has a significant impact on the secondary sex ratio of newborn children in the vicinity of the plants. This issue is of exceptional importance in the region around Gorleben, where the opposition to nuclear facilities and activities for decades is particularly strong. At the site borders of the interim storage facility (TBL-G) of GNS the effective individual dose is about 0.2 mSv per year, mainly caused by neutron irradiation from 108 casks with high-level radioactive waste from reprocessing. In the surrounding villages there is no radiation measurable. Statistical studies allegedly have shown evidence that in some villages in the area and during certain periods, proportionately fewer girls were born in comparison to the average for the Federal Republic of Germany. Based on these purely statistical results henceforward was also alleged that neutron-induced secondary effects such as activation or secondary gamma radiation would be responsible for it. Monte Carlo calculations and special measurements yielded values of the dose at the plant border for activation products less than E-04 mSv/a and for secondary gamma radiation of about E-03 mSv/a. These results indicate that the ionizing radiation from the Gorleben interim storage facility cannot be held accountable for shifts of the secondary sex ratio.

  5. Final Safety Report for Central Interim Storage Facility for Radioactive Waste from Small Producers in Brinje near Ljubljana

    In 1999 the Agency for Radwaste Management took over the management of the Central Interim Storage for radioactive waste from small producers in Brinje. At the same time in accordance with a Decree on the Mode, Subject and Terms of Performing the Public Service of Radioactive Waste Management (Official Gazette of RS, 32/99) the ARAO agency was appointed to perform the public service of radioactive waste management for waste produced in Slovenia in industry, medicine and research. After taking over responsibility for the storage the ARAO thoroughly reviewed the facility and the stored inventory. Based on the findings of this review the ARAO agency prepared a basic document for the facility i.e. Final Safety Report for the Central Interim Storage for radioactive waste from small producers in Brinje. The safety report is based on the present state of the facility, its location, stored inventory and present operation. The latter is limited to storing of already stored waste, acceptance of new waste only in emergency cases, and internal transport of the accepted waste with a forklift or manually. The Final Safety Report is prepared in accordance with the requirements of Regulation E2 and deals with the following areas: The safety approach to LILW storage, Description and location analysis of the Central interim storage, Technical features of the Central interim storage, Safety analysis of the Central interim storage, Organisational measures for normal operation of the Central interim storage, Operational conditions and limitations, Ionising radiation protection service, its methods and equipment, Radioactive waste management and disposal, Review of the plans, measures and procedures to prevent radiological accidents, Quality assurance programme, Review of the measures for physical protection of the LILW storage and stored radioactive waste, Planned measures and necessary equipment for the closure of the Central interim storage. Safety analysis proves that the facility

  6. International Peer Review of Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company's SR-Can interim report

    demonstration (e.g. allocation of safety to different barrier functions and the role of dilution); Basis and methods for scenario selection and evaluation; Assessment of model framework for consequence analysis and compliance evaluation (e.g. justification of models, and parameters); Methods for biosphere modelling including the transition zone from basement rock to quaternary deposits and ecosystems; Methods for risk analysis, including the use of probabilistic methods, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, estimation of probabilities, averaging of risk; and Quality assurance measures including handling of expert judgments. Among its conclusions, the IRT considers that the SR-Can Interim Report describes a logical methodology for undertaking a safety assessment that could be used as a component of a safety case to support a licence application. SKB's assessment methodology also includes some innovative and positive components, such as the use of safety function indicators and analytical models. From the IRT's perspective, the main deficiencies in SKB's programme and approach relate less to the methodology and more to the rigour with which safety assessment needs to be conducted to support a formal licence application. There are a number of areas, for example in the development of scenarios and in the management and treatment of uncertainty, where current evidence suggests a need for greater clarity and traceability. More generally, it is recommended that SKB should ensure that all aspects of the safety assessment are conducted in accordance with auditable project-specific guidance and QA procedures. In view of the above, and the fact that SKB has acknowledged that some further development work remains to be done, the IRT believes that it could be a challenge for SKB to conduct and present a safety assessment of suitable quality within the currently proposed timescale for delivery of the SR-Can assessment and the 2006 licence application

  7. Interim assessment of the VAL automated guideway transit system. Interim report

    Anagnostopoulos, G.

    1981-11-01

    This report describes an interim assessment of the VAL (Vehicules Automatiques Legers or Light Automated Vehicle) AGT system which is currently under construction in Lille, France, and which is to become fully operational in December 1983. This report contains a technical description and performance data resulting from a demonstration test program performed concurrently in August 1980. VAL is the first driverless AGT urban system application in France. The system operates at grade, elevated, and in tunnels on an exclusive concrete dual-lane guideway that is 12.7 kilometers long. The configuration of the system is a push-pull loop operating between 17 on-line stations. The system is designed to provide scheduled operation at 60-second headways and a normal one-way capacity of 7440 passengers per hour per direction with 55 percent of the passengers seated. Two pneumatic-tired vehicles are coupled into a single vehicle capable of carrying 124 passengers at line speeds of 60 km/hr. During the course of the demonstration test program, VAL demonstrated that it could achieve high levels of dependability and availability and could perform safely under all perceivable conditions.

  8. Verification of the new ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis over France

    Szczypta, C.; Calvet, J.-C.; Albergel, C.; Balsamo, G.; Boussetta, S.; Carrer, D.; Lafont, S.; Meurey, C.

    2011-02-01

    An evaluation of the global ECMWF atmospheric reanalysis ERA-Interim (with a 0.5° grid) is performed over France, based on the high resolution (8 km) SAFRAN atmospheric reanalysis. The ERA-Interim precipitation, Incoming Solar Radiation (ISR), air temperature, air humidity, and wind speed, are compared with their SAFRAN counterparts. Also, interpolated in situ ISR observations are used in order to consolidate the evaluation of this variable. The daily precipitation estimates produced by ERA-Interim over France correlate very well with SAFRAN. However, the values are underestimated by 27%. A GPCP-corrected version of ERA-Interim is less biased (13%). The ERA-Interim estimates of ISR correlate very well with SAFRAN and with in situ observations on a daily basis. Whereas SAFRAN underestimates the ISR by 6 Wm-2, ERA-Interim overestimates the ISR by 10 Wm-2. In order to assess the impact of the ERA-Interim errors, simulations of the ISBA-A-gs land surface model are performed over the SMOSREX grassland site in southwestern France using ERA-Interim (with and without GPCP rescaling) and SAFRAN. Latent and sensible heat fluxes are simulated, together with carbon dioxide fluxes. The rescaled ERA-Interim performs better than the original ERA-Interim and permits to achieve flux scores similar to those obtained with SAFRAN.

  9. Verification of the new ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis over France

    C. Szczypta

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of the global ECMWF atmospheric reanalysis ERA-Interim (with a 0.5° grid is performed over France, based on the high resolution (8 km SAFRAN atmospheric reanalysis. The ERA-Interim precipitation, Incoming Solar Radiation (ISR, air temperature, air humidity, and wind speed, are compared with their SAFRAN counterparts. Also, interpolated in situ ISR observations are used in order to consolidate the evaluation of this variable. The daily precipitation estimates produced by ERA-Interim over France correlate very well with SAFRAN. However, the values are underestimated by 27%. A GPCP-corrected version of ERA-Interim is less biased (13%. The ERA-Interim estimates of ISR correlate very well with SAFRAN and with in situ observations on a daily basis. Whereas SAFRAN underestimates the ISR by 6 Wm−2, ERA-Interim overestimates the ISR by 10 Wm−2. In order to assess the impact of the ERA-Interim errors, simulations of the ISBA-A-gs land surface model are performed over the SMOSREX grassland site in southwestern France using ERA-Interim (with and without GPCP rescaling and SAFRAN. Latent and sensible heat fluxes are simulated, together with carbon dioxide fluxes. The rescaled ERA-Interim performs better than the original ERA-Interim and permits to achieve flux scores similar to those obtained with SAFRAN.

  10. Verification of the new ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis over France

    C. Szczypta

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of the global ECMWF atmospheric reanalysis ERA-Interim (with a 0.5° grid is performed over France, based on the high resolution (8 km SAFRAN atmospheric reanalysis. The ERA-Interim precipitation, Incoming Solar Radiation (ISR, air temperature, air humidity, and wind speed, are compared with their SAFRAN counterparts. Also, interpolated in situ ISR observations are used in order to consolidate the evaluation of this variable. The daily precipitation estimates produced by ERA-Interim over France correlate very well with SAFRAN. However, the values are underestimated by 26%. A GPCP-corrected version of ERA-Interim is less biased (10–15%. The ERA-Interim estimates of ISR correlate very well with SAFRAN and with in situ observations on a daily basis. Whereas SAFRAN underestimates the ISR by 6–8 W m−2, ERA-Interim overestimates the ISR by 9–10 W m−2. In order to assess the impact of the ERA-Interim errors, simulations of the ISBA-A-gs land surface model are performed over the SMOSREX grassland site in southwestern France using ERA-Interim (with and without GPCP rescaling and SAFRAN. Latent and sensible heat fluxes are simulated, together with carbon dioxide fluxes. The rescaled ERA-Interim performs better than the original ERA-Interim and permits to achieve flux scores similar to those obtained with SAFRAN.

  11. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration--Vadose Zone Monitoring Plan

    Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.; Strickland, Christopher E.

    2007-04-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 underground single-shell tanks that store hazardous radioactive waste. Many of these tanks and their associated infrastructure (e.g., pipelines, diversion boxes) have leaked. Some of the leaked waste has entered the groundwater. The largest known leak occurred from the T-106 Tank in 1973. Many of the contaminants from that leak still reside within the vadose zone beneath the T Tank Farm. CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. seeks to minimize movement of this residual contaminant plume by placing an interim barrier on the surface. Such a barrier is expected to prevent infiltrating water from reaching the plume and moving it further. A plan has been prepared to monitor and determine the effectiveness of the interim surface barrier. Soil water content and water pressure will be monitored using off-the-shelf equipment that can be installed by the hydraulic hammer technique. In fiscal year 2006, two instrument nests were installed. Each instrument nest contains a neutron probe access tube, a capacitance probe, four heat-dissipation units, and a drain gauge to measure soil water flux. A meteorological station has been installed outside of the fence. In fiscal year 2007, two additional instrument nests are planned to be installed beneath the proposed barrier.

  12. Maywood Interim Storage Site: Annual environmental report for calendar year 1990, Maywood, New Jersey

    Environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) and surrounding area began in 1984. MISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The MISS Environmental monitoring programs was established to accommodate facility characteristics, applicable regulations, hazard potential, quantities and concentrations of materials released, extent and use of affected land and water, and local public interest or concern. The environmental monitoring program at MISS includes sampling networks for radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and total uranium, radium-226, and thorium-232 concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards; federal, state, and local applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs); and/or DOE derived concentration guidelines (DCGs). Environmental standards, ARARs, and DCGs are established to protect public health and the environment. Results from the 1990 environmental monitoring program show that concentrations of the contaminants of concern were all below applicable standards. Because the site is used only for interim storage and produces no processing effluents, all monitoring, except for radon and direct gamma radiation, was done on a quarterly basis. 18 refs., 17 figs., 28 tabs

  13. Methods for assessing environmental impacts of a FUSRAP property-cleanup/interim-storage remedial action

    This document provides a description of a property-cleanup/interim-storage action, explanation of how environmental impacts might occur, comprehensive treatment of most potential impacts that might occur as a result of this type of action, discussion of existing methodologies for estimating and assessing impacts, justification of the choice of specific methodologies for use in FUSRAP environmental reviews, assessments of representative impacts (or expected ranges of impacts where possible), suggested mitigation measures, and some key sources of information. The major topical areas covered are physical and biological impacts, radiological impacts, and socioeconomic impacts. Some project-related issues were beyond the scope of this document, including dollar costs, specific accident scenarios, project funding and changes in Congressional mandates, and project management (contracts, labor relations, quality assurance, liability, emergency preparedness, etc.). These issues will be covered in other documents supporting the decision-making process. Although the scope of this document covers property-cleanup and interim-storage actions, it is applicable to other similar remedial actions. For example, the analyses discussed herein for cleanup activities are applicable to any FUSRAP action that includes site cleanup

  14. EMDEX Project Residential Study: Interim report

    Bracken, T.D.; Rankin, R.F.; Alldredge, J.R.; Senior, R.S. (Bracken (T. Dan), Inc., Portland, OR (United States))

    1993-02-01

    The Electric and Magnetic Field Project for Utilities - The EMDEX Project Residential Study described in this report was designed to examine residential magnetic field measurements by collecting magnetic field measurements and other data at utility employee residences over a 25 month period. The specific objectives of this study were: to investigate relationships between residential wire code category and magnetic field measurements; to investigate relationships between various types of magnetic field measurements; and to study residential magnetic field measurements over time. This report presents the results of the first 17 months of data collection. The residences of up to 12 employees were selected at each of 39 EPRI member utilities. Information about the house and nearby electric power system were collected along with a variety of magnetic field measurement data. A universal wire code scheme for electric power system wiring was used to classify houses in five wire code categories: very high current configuration (VHCC); ordinary high current configuration (OHCC); ordinary low current configuration (OLCC); very low current configuration (VLCC), and underground (UG). Measurements were made up to 5 times at each of 380 houses. For each measurement period the site coordinator used an EMDEX magnetic field meter to obtain measurements at specific locations in and around the house. This was followed by three days of measurements during which both long-term data at a fixed location and personal exposure data were collected. Analysis indicated that: VHCC category houses generally had higher magnetic field levels than the other categories; the overlap in distributions of summary measures was considerable for all wire code categories; this overlap made wire code category a poor predictor of residential magnetic field levels at residences as vice versa.

  15. Ad interim legal remedy in case of large projects

    Action for ad interim judicial relief in response to large projects approved of by the authorities very frequently take several years until a decision is taken by the court. Experience has shown that this applies in particular to large projects such as the construction of nuclear power plants, large-size industrial plants, or airports. It has become regular practice by the authorities concerned to issue an order for immediate execution upon the plan approving decision and granting of licence for said projects, in accordance with section 80, sub-section (2), no.4 of the VwGO. The problems thus created with regard to interim legal remedy sought by the parties concerned are of great significance. The book in hand discusses the question as to whether the practice of the administrative authorities and the courts satisfies the requirements embodied in the law, to provide for efficient legal protection. (orig./HSCH)

  16. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage

  17. 105-C Reactor interim safe storage project technology integration plan

    The 105-C Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project Technology Integration Plan involves the decontamination, dismantlement, and interim safe storage of a surplus production reactor. A major goal is to identify and demonstrate new and innovative D and D technologies that will reduce costs, shorten schedules, enhance safety, and have the potential for general use across the RL complex. Innovative technologies are to be demonstrated in the following areas: Characterization; Decontamination; Waste Disposition; Dismantlement, Segmentation, and Demolition; Facility Stabilization; and Health and Safety. The evaluation and ranking of innovative technologies has been completed. Demonstrations will be selected from the ranked technologies according to priority. The contractor team members will review and evaluate the demonstration performances and make final recommendations to DOE

  18. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nass, R. [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

  19. Penalty Inflation Adjustments for Civil Money Penalties. Interim Final Rule.

    2016-06-27

    In accordance with the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended by the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996, and further amended by the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015, section 701: Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015, this interim final rule incorporates the penalty inflation adjustments for the civil money penalties contained in the Social Security Act PMID:27373014

  20. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility interim operational safety requirements

    Covey, L I

    2000-01-01

    The Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSRs) for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls required to ensure safe operation during receipt and inspection of cesium and strontium capsules from private irradiators; decontamination of the capsules and equipment; surveillance of the stored capsules; and maintenance activities. Controls required for public safety, significant defense-in-depth, significant worker safety, and for maintaining radiological consequences below risk evaluation guidelines (EGs) are included.

  1. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION TESTING WITH INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM FEEDS

    The fractional crystallization process was developed as a pretreatment method for saltcake waste retrieved from Hanford single-shell tanks (SST). The process separates the retrieved SST waste into a high-level waste stream containing the bulk of the radionuclides and a low-activity waste stream containing the bulk of the nonradioactive sodium salts. The Interim Pretreatment System project shifted the focus on pretreatment planning from SST waste to double-shell tank waste

  2. 105-H Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project Final Report

    The following information documents the decontamination and decommissioning of the 105-H Reactor facility, and placement of the reactor core into interim safe storage. The D and D of the facility included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and restoration of the site. The ISS work also included construction of the safe storage enclosure, which required the installation of a new roofing system, power and lighting, a remote monitoring system, and ventilation components.

  3. Dry storage of spent fuel elements: interim facility

    Apart from the existing facilities to storage nuclear fuel elements at Argentina's nuclear power stations, a new interim storage facility has been planned and projected by the Argentinean Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) that will be constructed by private group. This article presents the developments and describes the activities undertaken until the national policy approach to the final decision for the most suitable alternative to be adopted. (B.C.A.). 09 refs, 01 fig, 09 tabs

  4. Conditioning of radioactive waste for long - term interim storage

    There are currently 4800 drums of treated radioactive waste originating from the operation and subsequent decommissioning of Siemens' former nuclear fuel fabrication plant in Hanau (Siemens RB) that are in interim storage at two sites in Germany. Some of this waste is in an interim store at the Karlsruhe Research Center operated by its Decontamination Division (HDB). The store also contains around 30,000 drums of radwaste from the research center itself as well as local institutions. Germany's Federal Government anticipates that interim storage will be necessary for a further 30 years until a suitable final repository goes into operation. However, since the waste drums were not designed for such a long period of storage, other steps must now be taken to ensure safe interim storage in the long term. The objective is to condition the existing waste drums as well as future waste arisings in accordance with the 1989 regulatory guideline on non-heat-generating radioactive waste such that they satisfy the acceptance criteria applicable since 1995 for final disposal at the Konrad repository. The drums are to be immobilized in concrete inside Konrad containers designed for long-term corrosion resistance in order to obtain waste packages that can be safely stored for a prolonged period without maintenance. If the activity limit for the container is not reached, low-level waste can be added as an aggregate to the concrete, which occupies around half the volume of each container, in order to save storage capacity at the repository. This waste conditioning, to be performed at HDB and Siemens RB, will convert around 65% of all non-heat-generating waste in Germany to a form that is suitable for final storage and is maintenance-free. (orig.)

  5. Interim dry storage system technologies and innovations VARNA 2002

    The main concepts of the TN24 Family and NUHOMS System are explained in the paper. It is discussed how the NPPs specific requirements and economics trends contributes to the growing families of interim dry storage systems delivered under COGEMA LOGICTICS license. It is concluded that modular solutions are currently dominating because they are derived from main concepts evolved over time, benefited from both the transport aspects with internationally recognised stringent regulations, and various specific ISFSI requirements and economic trends

  6. Bucy named interim assistant vice president, head of sponsored programs

    Trulove, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Linda Bucy of Christiansburg, Va., director of post award administration in the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP), has been appointed interim assistant vice president and director of the Office of Sponsored Programs. She replaces David Richardson, assistant vice president for sponsored program administration in the Office of the Vice President for Research, who has accepted a position at Penn State University as assistant vice president for research and director of the Office of Sponsored Pr...

  7. AN INTERIM THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTY FORMULATION FOR SUPERCRITICAL n-HEXANE

    Azzedine Abbaci; Anissa Acidi; Aicha Rizi; Salaheddine Azzouz

    2010-01-01

    Accurate information on the thermodynamic properties of supercritical fluids is highly sought for the chemical technology, especially, supercritical extraction technology. The thermodynamic properties of fluids near the critical region are strongly affected by the presence of fluctuations and therefore, can not be described by conventional equation. We have investigated an interim formulation for the behavior of the thermodynamic properties of n-hexane in the vicinity of the critical region. ...

  8. Interim prediction method for low frequency core engine noise

    Huff, R. G.; Clark, B. J.; Dorsch, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    A literature survey on low-frequency core engine noise is presented. Possible sources of low frequency internally generated noise in core engines are discussed with emphasis on combustion and component scrubbing noise. An interim method is recommended for predicting low frequency core engine noise that is dominant when jet velocities are low. Suggestions are made for future research on low frequency core engine noise that will aid in improving the prediction method and help define possible additional internal noise sources.

  9. Transformationale Führung als Erfolgsfaktor des Interim Management

    Bollinger, Jan Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde untersucht, wie Führung zur Bewältigung von Unternehmenskrisen und Umsetzung von Veränderungen im Kontext des Interim Management beitragen kann. Dazu wurde die Theorie transformationaler Führung um aufgabenbezogene und indirekte Führung und den Einsatz von Positionsmacht ergänzt. Damit wurden diese erfolgskritischen Führungsdimensionen erstmals in einem gemeinsamen theoretischen Rahmen verbunden und die Auswirkungen einer kombinierten Anwendung untersucht. Die...

  10. Loss of approval for interim storage by time schedule

    The Act ''Gesetz zur Suche und Auswahl eines Standortes fuer ein Endlager fuer Waerme entwickelnde radioaktive Abfaelle'' on the search and selection of a site for a repository for heat-generating radioactive waste as also other acts insert a new topic for interim site storage. The operation should be restricted for 40 years. This part of the act is analysed with respect to future requirements for the storage of waste.

  11. Species management in aquatic habitats WRc RD Interim 1997

    1997-01-01

    This is the Species management in aquatic Habitats WRc Interim 1997 document produced by the Environment Agency in 1997. This document reports progress on R&D Project 640, which aims to provide information on species of conservation value of particular relevance to the Environment Agency, in relation to its activities affecting aquatic environments. A range of stand-alone outputs is being produced, comprising Species Action Plans, practical management guidelines for Agency staff and third par...

  12. Interim Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report. 1997 Annual Report

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    Eight wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Interim Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled semiannually to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Modified Municipal Solid Waste Permit 025500-1120 (formerly dWP-087A) and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program.

  13. Interim storage and transport casks in Switzerland. COGEMA logistics experience

    The Swiss utilities have chosen two different ways for the management of their spent fuel after initial on-site cooling: (1) reprocessing at La Hague plant (COGEMA) and Sellafield plant (BNFL); (2) interim storage at the Central Interim Storage Facility called 'Zwischenlager Wuerenlingen AG' ( ZWILAG). Following international call for tenders by Swiss utilities, COGEMA LOGISTICS has been awarded several contracts for the supply of dual-purpose transport and storage casks for the interim storage of various spent fuel assemblies. All these casks belong to the family of the TN 24 dual purpose spent fuel storage casks in operation in the USA and in Belgium as well. They offer utilities a modular solution for the interim storage of spent fuel in robust metal casks which are fully suitable for off site transports. This flexible product can be readily adapted to suit individual user needs. The Leibstadt Nuclear Power Plant (KKL) has purchased nine licensed dual-purpose TN 97L spent fuel casks (97 BWR type fuel assemblies capacity). Three of them are already in operation at ZWILAG. COGEMA LOGISTICS has also delivered a dual-purpose TN 52L spent fuel casks (52 BWR type fuel assemblies capacity) presently used for transport of spent fuel for reprocessing. The Goesgen Nuclear Power Plant (KKG) has purchased four licensed dual-purpose TN 24G spent fuel casks (37 PWR type fuel assemblies capacity). They are all in operation at ZWILAG. The Muehleberg Nuclear Power Plant (BKW/KKM) has purchased two TN 24BH spent fuel casks (69 BWR type fuel assemblies capacity). At the time of this abstract, cold trials are carried out involving the shuttle transport cask TN 9/4 procured by COGEMA LOGISTICS as well. (author)

  14. Interim Dry Storage of Spent Fuel in Casks

    French option for the back end of the fuel cycle is reprocessing of used fuel and recycling the fissile material, except some very specific fuel stored in vaults (dry conditions). Used fuel management solutions studied by AREVA for various countries allow for either direct transport to the reprocessing plant, or interim storage and transport after storage of used fuel. Interim storage solutions are wet storage or dry storage (DSC, metal casks or vault systems). When the decision on used fuel management has been postponed, some extension of interim storage duration is considered, therefore it becomes necessary to study used fuel and cask material behaviour and deterioration mechanisms. One objective of this R&D was to review research efforts on spent fuel behaviour and Dry storage experience in casks. Particularly we were interested in the assessment of retrievability of fuel after storage for further use. A review therefore, was made of the effect of storage time/ temperatures and of loading/ drying operation on used fuel integrity. R&D programmes were also carried out on the evaluation of cask materials in long term, especially materials susceptible to degradation

  15. Interim data report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    Vahlund, Fredrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden)

    2004-08-01

    This document is the interim data report in the project SR-Can. The purpose of the data report is to present input data, with uncertainty estimates, for the SR-Can assessment calculations. Besides input data, the report also describes the standardised procedures used when deriving the input data and the corresponding uncertainty estimates. However, in the present interim version of the report (written in the initial stage of the project when site characterisation has yet not been completed) the standardised procedures have not been possible to apply for most of the data and, in order to present a compilation of the data used in the assessment, much of the input data is presented without following the standardised procedures. This will however be changed for the final version of the SR-Can data report, in order to show the methodology that will be used in the final version one example of how input data will be presented is included (migration data for buffer) . The recommended input data for the assessment calculations are, for the interim version, mainly based on SR 97 Beberg data, these are merely presented without any background or uncertainty discussion (this is presented in the SR 97 data report)

  16. INTERIM ANALYSIS OF THE CONTRIBUTION OF HIGH-LEVEL EVIDENCE FOR DENGUE VECTOR CONTROL.

    Horstick, Olaf; Ranzinger, Silvia Runge

    2015-01-01

    This interim analysis reviews the available systematic literature for dengue vector control on three levels: 1) single and combined vector control methods, with existing work on peridomestic space spraying and on Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis; further work is available soon on the use of Temephos, Copepods and larvivorous fish; 2) or for a specific purpose, like outbreak control, and 3) on a strategic level, as for example decentralization vs centralization, with a systematic review on vector control organization. Clear best practice guidelines for methodology of entomological studies are needed. There is a need to include measuring dengue transmission data. The following recommendations emerge: Although vector control can be effective, implementation remains an issue; Single interventions are probably not useful; Combinations of interventions have mixed results; Careful implementation of vector control measures may be most important; Outbreak interventions are often applied with questionable effectiveness. PMID:26506739

  17. Effect of polyester fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties of interim fixed partial dentures

    N. Gopichander; K.V. Halini Kumarai; Vasanthakumar, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different reinforcements currently available for interim fixed partial denture (FPD) materials do not provide the ideal strength for long-term use. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to develop a more ideal provisional material for long-term use with better mechanical properties. This study evaluated the effectiveness of polyester fiber reinforcement on different interim FPD materials. Methods: Thirty resin-bonded FPDs were constructed from three provisional interim F...

  18. Immobilized high-level waste interim storage alternatives generation and analysis and decision report

    This report presents a study of alternative system architectures to provide onsite interim storage for the immobilized high-level waste produced by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) privatization vendor. It examines the contract and program changes that have occurred and evaluates their impacts on the baseline immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) interim storage strategy. In addition, this report documents the recommended initial interim storage architecture and implementation path forward

  19. Interim guidelines for protecting fire-fighting personnel from multiple hazards at nuclear plant sites

    This report provides interim guidelines for reducing the impact to fire fighting and other supporting emergency response personnel from the multiple hazards of radiation, heat stress, and trauma when fighting a fire in a United States commercial nuclear power plant. Interim guidelines are provided for fire brigade composition, training, equipment, procedures, strategies, heat stress and trauma. In addition, task definitions are provided to evaluate and further enhance the interim guidelines over the long term. 19 refs

  20. DATA MINING METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING THE OPTIMAL MODEL OF COST PREDICTION IN SHIP INTERIM PRODUCT ASSEMBLY

    Damir Kolich; Nikša Fafandjel; Y. Lawrence Yao

    2016-01-01

    In order to accurately predict costs of the thousands of interim products that are assembled in shipyards, it is necessary to use skilled engineers to develop detailed Gantt charts for each interim product separately which takes many hours. It is helpful to develop a prediction tool to estimate the cost of interim products accurately and quickly without the need for skilled engineers. This will drive down shipyard costs and improve competitiveness. Data mining is used extensively for developi...

  1. Immobilized high-level waste interim storage alternatives generation and analysis and decision report

    CALMUS, R.B.

    1999-05-18

    This report presents a study of alternative system architectures to provide onsite interim storage for the immobilized high-level waste produced by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) privatization vendor. It examines the contract and program changes that have occurred and evaluates their impacts on the baseline immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) interim storage strategy. In addition, this report documents the recommended initial interim storage architecture and implementation path forward.

  2. The Interim Financial Reporting in the Spirit of the IAS 34 Norm

    2008-01-01

    The role of an interim financial reporting is to allow the information users to acknowledge the activity of an entity on period shorter than financial exercise from the perspective of the available profits and cash flows generated as well as from the point of view of its financial position and liquidity. The interim financial reporting includes a complete or condensed set of financial statements which target to update the last financial reporting, usually the annual report. The interim financ...

  3. Interim rules amending ERISA disclosure requirements for group health plans--DoL. Interim rules with request for comments.

    1997-04-01

    This document contains interim rules governing the content of the summary plan description (SPD) for group health plans, the furnishing of summaries of material reductions in covered services or benefits by group health plans, and the disclosure of SPD and related information through electronic media. The rules contained in this document implement amendments to the disclosure provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) enacted as part of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) and the Newborns' and Mothers' Health Protection Act of 1996 (NMHPA). Interested persons are invited to submit comments on the interim rules for consideration by the Department in developing final rules. The rules contained in this document are being adopted on an interim basis to accommodate statutorily established time frames intended to ensure that sponsors and administrators of group health plans, as well as participants and beneficiaries covered by such plans, have timely guidance concerning compliance with the recently enacted amendments to ERISA. PMID:10166825

  4. Labour Force Survey: interim reweighting 2007

    Nicholas Palmer; Matthew Hughes

    2008-01-01

    Outlines the reasons for making revisions and the impact of new population figures on headline labour market indicatorsOn 14 November 2007, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) published revised Labour Force Survey aggregate measures in the Labour Market Statistics First Release to take account of the latest available population estimates. This article firstly describes the various new and revised population estimates and the time periods affected. This is supported by tables and charts i...

  5. Magnetosphere imager science definition team interim report

    Armstrong, T. P.; Johnson, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    For three decades, magnetospheric field and plasma measurements have been made by diverse instruments flown on spacecraft in may different orbits, widely separated in space and time, and under various solar and magnetospheric conditions. Scientists have used this information to piece together an intricate, yet incomplete view of the magnetosphere. A simultaneous global view, using various light wavelengths and energetic neutral atoms, could reveal exciting new data nd help explain complex magnetospheric processes, thus providing a clear picture of this region of space. This report documents the scientific rational for such a magnetospheric imaging mission and provides a mission concept for its implementation.

  6. Interim report on hydrogen storage system

    Hydrogen can be stored in the form of a metal hydride. The formation of the hydride is highly exothermic. Hence the rate at which hydrogen can be added to or removed from the storage system is limited by the rate of heat transfer. Heat transfer is facilitated by displaying the hydride on a metal support that conducts heat. The task was to find a binder to make hydride stay put on a metal support through at least 2500 cycles of hydriding-dehydriding and to measure the rate of hydrogen uptake. 1 tab

  7. Colonie Interim Storage Site: Annual environmental report for calendar year 1990, Colonie, New York

    Environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) and surrounding area began in 1984. CISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sties where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The routine environmental monitoring program at CISS includes sampling networks for external gamma radiation exposures and for radium-226, throium-232, an total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, the nonradiological parameters volatile and semivolatile organics, pesticides/polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), metals, total organic carbon (TOC), total organic halides (TOX), specific conductivity, and pH are measured in groundwater. 14 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs

  8. Characterization of void volume VOC concentration in vented TRU waste drums - an interim report

    A test program is underway at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to determine if the concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the drum headspace is representative of the VOC concentration in the entire drum void space and to demonstrate that the VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement can be estimated using a model incorporating diffusion and permeation transport principles and limited waste drum sampling data. An experimental test plan was developed requiring gas sampling of 66 transuranic (TRU) waste drums. This interim report summarizes the experimental measurements and model predictions of VOC concentration in the innermost layer of confinement from waste drums sampled and analyzed in FY 1994

  9. Wayne Interim Storage Site: Annual environmental report for calendar year 1990, Wayne, New Jersey

    Environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) (a National Priorities List site) and surrounding area began in 1984. WISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at WISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, thorium-232, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Sediment samples were also analyzed for thorium-230, and several nonradiological parameters were measured in groundwater. 16 refs., 12 figs., 23 tabs

  10. Environmental survey of two interim dumpsites, Middle Atlantic Bight from 05 November 1973 to 10 November 1973 (NODC Accession 7501280)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A second oceanographic survey cruise was made to an interim municipal sludge dumpsite and initially to an interim dumpsite for the disposal of industrial acid waste...

  11. A links manipulator simulation program interim report

    A computer program to simulate the performance of the Heysham II rail-following manipulator has been developed. The program is being used to develop and test the rail-following control algorithms which will be used to control movements of the manipulator when it is operating below the gas baffle dome. The simulation includes the dynamic responses of the manipulator joint drives, excluding friction, backlash and compliance. It also includes full details of the manipulator's geometry. A method is given whereby the actual manipulator dynamics can be written into the program once these have been established by measurement. The program is written in FORTRAN and runs on a Perkin-Elmer 3220 mini-computer. The simulation program responds to velocity demands on the individual joints. These will normally come from the control program, in which they will be manually controlled by a joystick. A sigma 5664 colour graphics generator is programmed to display the current position of the manipulator. (UK)

  12. Interim summary report of the safety case 2009

    Following the guidelines set forth by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (now Ministry of Employment and Economy), Posiva is preparing to submit a construction license application for the final disposal spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site, Finland, by the end of the year 2012. Disposal will take place in a geological repository implemented according to the KBS-3 method. The long-term safety section supporting the license application will be based on a safety case that, according to the internationally adopted definition, will be a compilation of the evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety and the level of expert confidence in the safety of the planned repository. The present Interim Summary Report represents a major contribution to the development of this safety case. The report has been compiled in accordance with Posiva's current plan for preparing this safety case. A full safety case for the KBS-3V variant will be developed to support the Preliminary Safety Assessment Report (PSAR) in 2012. The report outlines the current design and safety concept for the planned repository. It summarises the approach used to formulate scenarios for the evolution of the disposal system over time, describes these scenarios and presents the main models and computer codes used to analyse them. It also discusses compliance with Finnish regulatory requirements for long-term safety of a geological repository and gives the main evidence, arguments and analyses that lead to confidence, on the part of Posiva, in the long-term safety of the planned repository. Current understanding of the evolution of the disposal system indicates that, except a few unlikely circumstances affecting a small number of canisters, spent fuel will remain isolated, and the radionuclides contained within the canisters, for hundreds of thousands of years or more, in accordance with the base scenario. Confidence in this base scenario derives, in the first place, from the

  13. An Interim Report on NASA's Draft Space Technology Roadmaps

    2011-01-01

    NASA has developed a set of 14 draft roadmaps to guide the development of space technologies under the leadership of the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT). Each of these roadmaps focuses on a particular technology area (TA). The roadmaps are intended to foster the development of advanced technologies and concepts that address NASA's needs and contribute to other aerospace and national needs. OCT requested that the National Research Council conduct a study to review the draft roadmaps, gather and assess relevant community input, and make recommendations and suggest priorities to inform NASA's decisions as it finalizes its roadmaps. The statement of task states that "based on the results of the community input and its own deliberations, the steering committee will prepare a brief interim report that addresses high-level issues associated with the roadmaps, such as the advisability of modifying the number or technical focus of the draft NASA roadmaps." This interim report, which does not include formal recommendations, addresses that one element of the study charge. NASA requested this interim report so that it would have the opportunity to make an early start in modifying the draft roadmaps based on feedback from the panels and steering committee. The final report will address all other tasks in the statement of task. In particular, the final report will include a prioritization of technologies, will describe in detail the prioritization process and criteria, and will include specific recommendations on a variety of topics, including many of the topics mentioned in this interim report. In developing both this interim report and the final report to come, the steering committee draws on the work of six study panels organized by technical area, loosely following the organization of the 14 roadmaps, as follows: A Panel 1: Propulsion and Power TA01 Launch Propulsion Systems TA02 In-Space Propulsion Technologies TA03 Space Power and Energy Storage Systems TA13

  14. Summary Interim Report on Findings and Interim Themes from Phase 1 of the review of Allied Health Professions (AHP) support for children/young people with a statement of special educational needs (SEN)

    Public Health Agency

    2015-01-01

    Summary Interim Report on Findings and Interim Themes from Phase 1 of the review of Allied Health Professions (AHP) support for children/young people with a statement of special educational needs (SEN)This interim report is outlining the service principles agreed by the Project Board and the themes identified throughout engagement and information gathering.

  15. The Effect of Incorporation, Orientation and Silane Treatment of Glass Fibers on the Fracture Resistance of Interim Fixed Partial Dentures

    Basant, Gupta; Reddy, Y G

    2011-01-01

    Fracture of interim fixed partial dentures (FPD) is of important concern to the dental surgeon, especially with long-span fixed partial dentures or areas of heavy occlusal stress. Polymers used in interim FPDs, reinforced with glass fibers have shown to have a positive effect on the fracture resistance of interim FPDs. Since little research has been done on the influence of silane treated glass fibers on the fracture resistance of interim FPDs, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect ...

  16. Interim Financial Reporting in the Perspective of harmonization of the Romanian Accountancy with the International Financial Reporting Standards

    Bunea-Bontas, Cristina Aurora

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of the interim financial reporting is to present, timely and regularly, information concerning the enterprise’s capacity to generate earnings and cash flows and its financial position and liquidity. International Accounting Standard 34 “Interim Financial Reporting” concerns the financial statements for an interim period. According to IAS 34, the interim financial report includes a complete or condensed set of financial statements, elaborated for a shorter period than a full...

  17. Republic of Congo; Interim Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper Progress Report

    International Monetary Fund

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines Congo’s Interim Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (I-PRSP). Congo’s I-PRSP explains the features and causes of poverty in Congo. It provides a short- and medium-term vision of development as well as a strategic orientation for a return to sustainable and equitable growth. The main objective is steady poverty reduction. The choice and implementation of strategic orientations and priority actions in the I-PRSP are consistent with the government’s commitment to rebuilding the ...

  18. US PRACTICE FOR INTERIM WET STORAGE OF RRSNF

    Vinson, D.

    2010-08-05

    Aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the United States and stored at Department of Energy storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper summarizes the current practices to provide for continued safe interim wet storage in the U.S. Aluminum fuel stored in poor quality water is subject to aggressive corrosion attack and therefore water chemistry control systems are essential to maintain water quality. Fuel with minor breaches are safely stored directly in the basin. Fuel pieces and heavily damaged fuel is safely stored in isolation canisters.

  19. AN INTERIM THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTY FORMULATION FOR SUPERCRITICAL n-HEXANE

    Azzedine Abbaci

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate information on the thermodynamic properties of supercritical fluids is highly sought for the chemical technology, especially, supercritical extraction technology. The thermodynamic properties of fluids near the critical region are strongly affected by the presence of fluctuations and therefore, can not be described by conventional equation. We have investigated an interim formulation for the behavior of the thermodynamic properties of n-hexane in the vicinity of the critical region. For this reason we have used the so-called “crossover model” to describe the thermodynamic properties of n-hexane in a wide range of temperatures and densities around the critical point.

  20. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and performance early in the disposal system project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives

  1. Cost estimation of interim dry storage for Atucha I NPP

    A joint effort between NASA and CNEA has been performed in order to evaluate and fix the strategy of interim spent fuel storage for Atucha I nuclear power plant. In this work the cost estimation on the proposed system was performed in order to fix the parameter and design criteria for the next engineering step. The main results achieved show that both alternatives are all in the same range of costs per unit of mass to be stored, the impact on electricity cost is less than 1 US mills/KWh and the scaling factor achieved is 0.85. (author)

  2. Performance evaluation of the JPL interim digital SAR processor

    Wu, C.; Barkan, B.; Curlander, J.; Jin, M.; Pang, S.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of the Interim Digital SAR Processor (IDP) was evaluated. The IDP processor was originally developed for experimental processing of digital SEASAT SAR data. One phase of the system upgrade which features parallel processing in three peripheral array processors, automated estimation for Doppler parameters, and unsupervised image pixel location determination and registration was executed. The method to compensate for the target range curvature effect was improved. A four point interpolation scheme is implemented to replace the nearest neighbor scheme used in the original IDP. The processor still maintains its fast throughput speed. The current performance and capability of the processing modes now available on the IDP system are updated.

  3. Interim report on cold trap alternatives, sodium technology

    This is an interim report on the modifications which are being made to an existing sodium loop so that a new method of removing hydrogen from sodium can be evaluated in a flowing sodium system. Some preliminary results on the performance of this type of cold trap alternative in a static sodium system are reported. Some tentative reactor design parameters for this type of getter device are presented based on the static test results. The life of such a unit is calculated to be substantially greater than that of a cold trap of equal volume

  4. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    Mann, F.M.

    1997-09-12

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and performance early in the disposal system project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

  5. 42 CFR 417.572 - Budget and enrollment forecast and interim reports.

    2010-10-01

    ... of each contract period. The forecast must be based on financial and statistical data and records... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Budget and enrollment forecast and interim reports... forecast and interim reports. (a) Annual submittal. The HMO or CMP must submit an annual operating...

  6. 32 CFR 643.36 - Policy-Interim leasing of excess properties to facilitate economic readjustment.

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Policy-Interim leasing of excess properties to facilitate economic readjustment. 643.36 Section 643.36 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Policy § 643.36 Policy—Interim leasing of...

  7. 78 FR 40199 - Draft Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation Interim Staff Guidance

    2013-07-03

    ... COMMISSION Draft Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation Interim Staff Guidance AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Regulatory Commission (NRC) requests public comment on Draft Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation Interim... given in NUREG-1927 ``Standard Review Plan for Renewal of Spent Fuel Dry Cask Storage System...

  8. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis

  9. 76 FR 59394 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Publication of the Extension of Interim Waiver...

    2011-09-26

    ... multiple defrost cycles, and requested comments on Samsung's petition. 76 FR 16760 (March 25, 2011... comment period on its interim final rule for the refrigerator test procedure. 76 FR 57612 (Sept. 15, 2011...: Publication of the Extension of Interim Waiver Granted to Samsung Electronics America, Inc. From...

  10. Worldwide survey of dry interim storage of fuel elements from power reactors

    Spent fuel elements with approx. 10,500 t of heavy metal are discharged annually from power reactors worldwide. The total amount existing is approximately 220,000 t. The capacity increase of decay storage pools by compact storage is about to meet limits in technical terms and with respect to licensing. External interim storage of spent fuel elements is becoming more and more important. There is a certain tendency worldwide to use interim stores on the sites of nuclear power plants in order to overcome the need for transports on public traffic routes. In Germany, this trend is enforced by the lack of central stores accessible where and when the need arises. Most interim stores use dry interim storage. In Central and Western Europe, casks are employed almost exclusively; in the United States, more canisters than casks are used. More and more systems are employed which allow both storage and transports (dual purpose systems). In the future, multipurpose systems could well become the systems of choice which, in addition, allow direct disposal of the inventory in the packages used for transport and interim storage. In Germany, important preconditions have been created in the development of the POLLUX trademark cask. No safety-related problems are expected to arise for either wet or dry interim storage. As a consequence, interim storage periods of up to 100 years seem to be possible without any technical problems especially for dry interim storage. Tentative plans along these lines are being developed in France and in the United States. (orig.)

  11. PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY SELECTION SUMMARY DECISION REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION

    This report provides the conclusions of the tank farm interim pretreatment technology decision process. It documents the methodology, data, and results of the selection of cross-flow filtration and ion exchange technologies for implementation in project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This selection resulted from the evaluation of specific scope criteria using quantitative and qualitative analyses, group workshops, and technical expert personnel

  12. Interim Action Proposed Plan for the Chemicals, Metals, and Pesticides (CMP) Pits Operable Unit; FINAL

    The purpose of this Interim Action Proposed Plan (IAPP) is to describe the preferred interim remedial action for addressing the Chemicals, Metals, and Pesticides (CMP) Pits Operable Unit and to provide an opportunity for public input into the remedial action selection process

  13. PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY SELECTION SUMMARY DECISION REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION

    CONRAD EA

    2008-08-12

    This report provides the conclusions of the tank farm interim pretreatment technology decision process. It documents the methodology, data, and results of the selection of cross-flow filtration and ion exchange technologies for implementation in project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This selection resulted from the evaluation of specific scope criteria using quantitative and qualitative analyses, group workshops, and technical expert personnel.

  14. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-06-02

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  15. Interim format and content for a physical security plan for nuclear power plants

    The document serves as interim guidance to assist the licensee or applicant in the preparation of a physical security plan. It is to be used in conjunction with interim acceptance criteria for physical security programs, which will be distributed at a later date

  16. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-04-09

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  17. Interim report on the post irradiation examination of capsules 2 and 3 of the HFR-B1 experiment

    This is an interim report on the post irradiation examination (PIE) of capsules 2 and 3 of the HFR-B1 experiment The PIE has been conducted by the Forschungszentrum Juelich and is nearing completion. After disassembly of the capsules, the examination focused on capsule components including fuel compacts, inert compacts fired in different media, graphite cylinders of different grades, unbonded coated fuel particles and unfueled graphite; in addition, heating experiments with intermittent injections of water vapor were conducted using fuel compacts and the kernels of uranium oxycarbide. Measurement involved gamma scanning and counting, photography, metallography, dimensional and weight changes, burnup determination and fission product release

  18. ANALYSIS OF DOSE RATES DURING REPLACEMENT OF MANIPULATORS IN THE FFTF INTERIM EXAMINATION and MAINTENANCE (IEM) CELL

    Replacement of a master-slave manipulator in the Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell at the Fast Flux Test Facility was carried out in August 2001. This operation created a 178-mm opening in the thick concrete wall of the hot cell. To aid in radiological work planning, dose rates outside the penetration in the wall were predicted using MCNP(trademark) photon transport calculations. The predicted dose rate was 7.7 mrem/h, which was reasonably close to the value of 10.4 mrem/h inferred from measurements

  19. Fast Flux Test Facility interim examination and maintenance cell: Past, present, and future

    The Fast Flux Test Facility Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell was designed to perform interim examination and/or disassembly of experimental core components for final analysis elsewhere, as well as maintenance of sodium-wetted or neutron-activated internal reactor parts and plant support hardware. The Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell equipment developed and used for the first ten years of operation has been primarily devoted to the disassembly and examination of core component test assemblies. While no major reactor equipment has required remote repair or maintenance, the Interim Examina Examination and Maintenance Cell has served as the remote repair facility for its own in-cell equipment, and several innovative remote repairs have been accomplished. The Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell's demonstrated versatility has shown its capability to support a challenging future. 12 refs., 9 figs

  20. Advantages on dry interim storage for spent nuclear fuel

    Romanato, L.S. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo, Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2468, 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rzyski, B.M. [IPEN/ CNEN-SP, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. e-mail: romanato@ctmsp.mar.mil.br

    2006-07-01

    When the nuclear fuel lose its ability to efficiently create energy it is removed from the core reactor and moved to a storage unit waiting for a final destination. Generally, the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) remains inside concrete basins with water within the reactors facility for the radioactive activity decay. Water cools the generated heat and shields radioactivity emissions. After some period of time in water basins the SNF can be sent to a definitive deposition in a geological repository and handled as radioactive waste or to reprocessing installations, or still wait for a future solution. Meanwhile, SNF remains stored for a period of time in dry or wet installations, depending on the method adopted by the nuclear power plant or other plans of the country. In many SNF wet storage sites the capacity can be fulfilled very quickly. If so, additional area or other alternative storage system should be given. There are many options to provide capacity increase in the wet storage area, but dry storages are worldwide preferred since it reduces corrosion concerns. In the wet storage the temperature and water purity should be constantly controlled whereas in the dry storage the SNF stands protected in specially designed canisters. Dry interim storages are practical and approved in many countries especially that have the 'wait and see' philosophy (wait to see new technologies development). This paper shows the advantages of dry interim storages sites in comparison with the wet ones and the nowadays problems as terrorism. (Author)

  1. Interim sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. 1996 Annual report

    Eight wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Interim Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site. These wells are sampled semiannually to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Modified Municipal Solid Waste Permit 025500-1120 and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Trichlorofluoromethane and 1,1,1-trichloroethane were elevated in one sidegradient well and one downgradient well during 1996. Zinc was elevated in three downgradient wells and also was detected in the associated laboratory blanks for two of those wells. Specific conductance was elevated in one background well and one sidegradient well. Barium and copper exceeded standards in one sidegradient well, and dichloromethane (a common laboratory contaminant) was elevated in another sidegradient well. Barium, copper, and dichloromethane were detected in the associated blanks for these wells, also. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Acquifer (Water Table) beneath the Interim Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 210 ft/year during first quarter 1996 and 180 ft/yr during third quarter 1996

  2. Climate change : we are at risk : interim report

    Between November 2002 and May 2003 the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry travelled across Canada to hear the views of farmer organizations, rural associations, ecotourism groups and environmental organizations regarding concerns about climate change and the impact it may have on the agriculture and forestry sectors and rural communities. The Committee also examined potential adaptation strategies focusing on primary production, practices, technologies, ecosystems and other related areas. Farmers and forest operators are already facing changes in market conditions, domestic regulations, trade policies and technology. This interim report expressed the concerns of farmers and forest operators. It includes a review of the Saguenay flood of 1996, the Red River flood of 1997, the ice storm of 1998, and droughts since 1999. It also includes a discussion on climate change and its biophysical and economic effects on agriculture, forestry, water resources, rural communities, and Aboriginal communities. This interim report also briefly outlines the Kyoto Protocol, the emissions trading system, and the decarbonization of global energy systems. It emphasized the need for integrated research and government policies and programs that encourage adaptation to climate change. The final report will be released in October 2003 and will provide specific recommendations to ensure that Canada responds to the concerns of farmers and forest operators and to ensure continued prosperity in these sectors. refs., figs

  3. Criteria for evaluation of interim radwaste solidification systems

    The selection of a permanent volume reduction and/or solidification system has become increasingly complex and difficult for utilities over the years. Factors affecting the selection include the system capital cost, projected transportation costs, projected burial costs and on-site storage options. Complicating the evaluation are the increase in emerging radwaste technologies, uncertainties in future regulations and uncertainties associated with the establishment of regional compacts, such as burial site location, cost of burial and volume allotments. The complexity of this evaluation has led some utilities to delay the selection of a permanent system and to seek other less expensive short-term solutions. Other utilities have made the difficult decision to purchase a permanent system, but find themselves in need of temporary waste processing capability until their permanent system becomes operational, which can take as long as five years. This paper outlines the criteria for evaluating interim radwaste options versus permanent facilities and explains why Duke Power Company has elected to utilize an interim portable volume reduction (VR) service at Duke's Oconee Nuclear Station in South Carolina

  4. The interim fuel storage facility of the PBMR

    The PBMR's spent fuel and partially burnt fuel are stored in the sphere storage system (SSS), which acts as the interim fuel storage facility of the plant. It is unique in the world since the fuel is stored in bulk containers (called storage tanks), each capable of holding more than 500,000 spheres for a period of about 80 years. The SSS has the ability to transfer the contents of one tank to another tank, and to return partially burnt fuel back to the reactor core for re-fuelling. The storage tanks are individually sealed carbon steel pressure vessels. They form the final barrier of any fission products that have diffused from the fuel spheres. Sub-criticality is achieved through the geometric cross-section of the tank, and by taking credit for fuel burn-up. Protection from the corrosive environment where the PBMR Demonstration plant will be built is achieved by actively cooling the tank with clean dry air. In the event of an active cooling failure, louvres open automatically and cooling is done passively via natural convection making use of the chimney-effect. Sufficient radiation protection is provided around each tank to facilitate maintenance and inspection operations where needed. The design of the SSS is nearing the end of its basic design phase, and for some components, detail design work has already commenced. The design complies with all spent fuel storage requirements and is seen as a cost-effective solution for the interim storage of PBMR spent fuel

  5. Glass packages in interim storage; Les verres dans les stockages

    Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the behavior of type C waste packages consisting of vitrified high-level solutions produced by reprocessing spent fuel. The composition and the physical and chemical properties of the feed solutions are reviewed, and the vitrification process is described. Sodium alumino-borosilicate glass compositions are generally employed - the glass used at la Hague for LWR fuel solutions, for example, contains 45 % SiO{sub 2}. The major physical, chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of the glass are reviewed. In order to allow their thermal power to diminish, the 3630 glass packages produced (as of January 1993) in the vitrification facilities at Marcoule and La Hague are placed in interim storage for several decades. The actual interim storage period has not been defined, as it is closely related to the concept and organization selected for the final destination of the packages: a geological repository. The glass behavior under irradiation is described. Considerable basic and applied research has been conducted to assess the aqueous leaching behavior of nuclear containment glass. The effects of various repository parameters (temperature, flow rate, nature of the environmental materials) have been investigated. The experimental findings have been used to specify a model describing the kinetics of aqueous corrosion of the glass. More generally all the ``source term`` models developed in France by the CEA or by ANDRA are summarized. (author). 152 refs., 33 figs.

  6. Interim sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. 1996 Annual report

    Bagwell, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    Eight wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Interim Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site. These wells are sampled semiannually to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Modified Municipal Solid Waste Permit 025500-1120 and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Trichlorofluoromethane and 1,1,1-trichloroethane were elevated in one sidegradient well and one downgradient well during 1996. Zinc was elevated in three downgradient wells and also was detected in the associated laboratory blanks for two of those wells. Specific conductance was elevated in one background well and one sidegradient well. Barium and copper exceeded standards in one sidegradient well, and dichloromethane (a common laboratory contaminant) was elevated in another sidegradient well. Barium, copper, and dichloromethane were detected in the associated blanks for these wells, also. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Acquifer (Water Table) beneath the Interim Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 210 ft/year during first quarter 1996 and 180 ft/yr during third quarter 1996.

  7. Climate change : we are at risk : interim report

    Oliver, D.; Wiebe, J.

    2003-06-01

    Between November 2002 and May 2003 the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry travelled across Canada to hear the views of farmer organizations, rural associations, ecotourism groups and environmental organizations regarding concerns about climate change and the impact it may have on the agriculture and forestry sectors and rural communities. The Committee also examined potential adaptation strategies focusing on primary production, practices, technologies, ecosystems and other related areas. Farmers and forest operators are already facing changes in market conditions, domestic regulations, trade policies and technology. This interim report expressed the concerns of farmers and forest operators. It includes a review of the Saguenay flood of 1996, the Red River flood of 1997, the ice storm of 1998, and droughts since 1999. It also includes a discussion on climate change and its biophysical and economic effects on agriculture, forestry, water resources, rural communities, and Aboriginal communities. This interim report also briefly outlines the Kyoto Protocol, the emissions trading system, and the decarbonization of global energy systems. It emphasized the need for integrated research and government policies and programs that encourage adaptation to climate change. The final report will be released in October 2003 and will provide specific recommendations to ensure that Canada responds to the concerns of farmers and forest operators and to ensure continued prosperity in these sectors. refs., figs.

  8. Nuclear waste: Is there a need for federal interim storage

    The Congress created the Monitored Retrievable Storage Review Commission to provide a report on the need for a Federal monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS) as part of the Nation's nuclear waste management system. The Commission concludes that the MRS as presently described in the law, which links the capacity and schedule of operation of the MRS to a permanent geologic repository, cannot be justified. The Commission finds, however, that while no single factor would favor an MRS over the No-MRS option, cumulatively the advantages of an MRS would justify the building of an MRS if: there were no linkages between the MRS and the repository; the MRS could be constructed at an early date; and the opening of the repository were delayed considerably beyond its presently scheduled date of operation. The Commission therefore recommends that the Congress take the following actions: Authorize construction of a Federal Emergency Storage facility with a capacity limit of 2,000 metric tons of uranium; Authorize construction of a User-Funded Interim Storage facility with a capacity limit of 5,000 metric tons of uranium; Reconsider the subject of interim storage by the year 2000

  9. Interim FEP report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    This report describes the work with identification and structuring of features, events and processes (FEPs) that has been carried out within the scope of the SR-Can safety assessment up to the time of the interim reporting of the project. The overall objective of the work is to develop a database of features, events and processes in a format that would facilitate both a systematic analysis of FEPs and documentation of the FEP analysis as well as facilitate revisions and updates to be made in connection with new safety assessments. This overall objective also includes the development of procedures for a systematic FEP analysis as well as to apply these procedures in order to arrive at an SR-Can version of the FEP database. The work started by implementing the content of the SR 97 Process report into a database format suitable for import and processing of FEP information from other sources. The SR 97 version of the database was systematically audited against the NEA database with Project FEPs, version 1.2. In addition, an earlier audit of the SR 97 process report against the interaction matrices developed for a deep repository of the KBS-3 type was revisited and updated. Relevant FEPs from the audit were sorted into three main categories in the SR-Can database i) FEPs related to the initial states of the repository system, ii) FEPs related to internal processes of the repository system, and iii) FEPs related to external impacts on the repository system. These groups of FEPs were further processed for making decisions on how to handle these FEPs in the assessment. Biosphere processes were not included in the SR 97 Process report and there is thus not the same basis for updating these descriptions as for the engineered barriers and the geosphere. All biosphere FEPs from the audit have therefore been compiled in a single category in the database, but remain to be further handled. FEPs were also categorised as irrelevant or as being related to methodology on a general

  10. Interim FEP report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    Skagius, Kristina (ed.) [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-08-01

    This report describes the work with identification and structuring of features, events and processes (FEPs) that has been carried out within the scope of the SR-Can safety assessment up to the time of the interim reporting of the project. The overall objective of the work is to develop a database of features, events and processes in a format that would facilitate both a systematic analysis of FEPs and documentation of the FEP analysis as well as facilitate revisions and updates to be made in connection with new safety assessments. This overall objective also includes the development of procedures for a systematic FEP analysis as well as to apply these procedures in order to arrive at an SR-Can version of the FEP database. The work started by implementing the content of the SR 97 Process report into a database format suitable for import and processing of FEP information from other sources. The SR 97 version of the database was systematically audited against the NEA database with Project FEPs, version 1.2. In addition, an earlier audit of the SR 97 process report against the interaction matrices developed for a deep repository of the KBS-3 type was revisited and updated. Relevant FEPs from the audit were sorted into three main categories in the SR-Can database i) FEPs related to the initial states of the repository system, ii) FEPs related to internal processes of the repository system, and iii) FEPs related to external impacts on the repository system. These groups of FEPs were further processed for making decisions on how to handle these FEPs in the assessment. Biosphere processes were not included in the SR 97 Process report and there is thus not the same basis for updating these descriptions as for the engineered barriers and the geosphere. All biosphere FEPs from the audit have therefore been compiled in a single category in the database, but remain to be further handled. FEPs were also categorised as irrelevant or as being related to methodology on a general

  11. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DOE INTERIM ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR NEW FEDERAL RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    Lee, A. D.; Baechler, H. C.; Di Massa, F. V.; Lucas, R. G.; Shankle, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    In accordance with federal legislation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a study to demonstrate use of its Interim Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings. The demonstration study was conducted by DOE and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The demonstration is the second step in a three-step process: I) development of interim standards, 2) demonstration of the interim standards, and 3) development of final standards. The standards are mandatory for federal agency housing procurements. Nevertheless, PNL found at the start of the demonstration that agency use of the interim standards had been minimal. The purpose of the standards is to improve the energy efficiency of federal housing and increase the use of nondepletable energy sources. In accordance with the legislation, the standards were to be performance-based rather than prescribing specific energy conservation measures. To fulfill this aspect of the legislation, the standards use a computer software program called COSTSAFR which generates a point system that individualizes the standards to specific projects based on climate, housing type, and fuel costs. The standards generate minimum energy-efficiency requirements by applying the life-cycle cost methodology developed for federal projects. For the demonstration, PNL and DOE chose five federal agency housing projects which had been built in diverse geographic and climate regions. Participating agencies were the Air Force, the Army (which provided two case studies), the Navy, and the Department of Health and Human Services. PNL worked with agency housing procurement officials and designers/architects to hypothetically apply the interim standards to the procurement and design of each housing project. The demonstration started at the point in the project where agencies would establish their energyefficiency requirements for the project and followed the procurement process through the designers' use of the point

  12. Evaluation and Analysis of SEASAT-A Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SSMR) Antenna Pattern Correction (APC) Algorithm. Sub-task 4: Interim Mode T Sub B Versus Cross and Nominal Mode T Sub B

    Kitzis, J. L.; Kitzis, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    The brightness temperature data produced by the SMMR Antenna Pattern Correction algorithm are evaluated. The evaluation consists of: (1) a direct comparison of the outputs of the interim, cross, and nominal APC modes; (2) a refinement of the previously determined cos beta estimates; and (3) a comparison of the world brightness temperature (T sub B) map with actual SMMR measurements.

  13. Realization of the German Concept for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel - Current Situation and Prospects

    The German government has determined a phase out of nuclear power. With respect to the management of spent fuel it was decided to terminate transports to reprocessing plants by 2005 and to set up interim storage facilities on power plant sites. This paper gives an overview of the German concept for spent fuel management focused on the new on-site interim storage concept and the applied interim storage facilities. Since the end of the year 1998, the utilities have applied for permission of on-site interim storage in 13 storage facilities and 5 storage areas; one application for the interim storage facility Stade was withdrawn due to the planned final shut down of Stade nuclear power plant in autumn 2003. In 2001 and 2002, 3 on-site storage areas and 2 on-site storage facilities for spent fuel were licensed by the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). A main task in 2002 and 2003 has been the examination of the safety and security of the planned interim storage facilities and the verification of the licensing prerequisites. In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, BfS has also examined the attack with a big passenger airplane. Up to now, these aircraft crash analyses have been performed for three on-site interim storage facilities; the fundamental results will be presented. It is the objective of BfS to conclude the licensing procedures for the applied on-site interim storage facilities in 2003. With an assumed construction period for the storage buildings of about two years, the on-site interim storage facilities could then be available in the year 2005

  14. Project management plan for Reactor 105-C Interim Safe Storage project

    Reactor 105-C (located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington) will be placed into an interim safe storage condition such that (1) interim inspection can be limited to a 5-year frequency; (2) containment ensures that releases to the environmental are not credible under design basis conditions; and (3) final safe storage configuration shall not preclude or significantly increase the cost for any decommissioning alternatives for the reactor assembly.This project management plan establishes plans, organizational responsibilities, control systems, and procedures for managing the execution of Reactor 105-C interim safe storage activities to meet programmatic requirements within authorized funding and approved schedules

  15. Interim storage is not long-term disposal

    Starting in June 30, 1994 South Carolina enforced an embargo on regular shipments of low-level radioactive waste to the Barnwell repository. The failure of 31 states and their respective compacts to provide access to a long-term disposal facility as stipulated by the low-level radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 promotes waste disposal gridlock and anticipates another waste disposal crisis. This article discusses the problem using the following topics: Appalachian Compact Users of Radioactive Isotopes (ACURI) Association's interest; the problem of denial of access to Barnwell; pro and contra interim storage; vital services and benefits at risk; issues at the ACURI meeting; nobel Prize winners use radioactive materials; if perception is reality, politics is prevalent

  16. Interim report on food irradiation research and development

    The research and development of food irradiation in Japan have been carried out systematically and overall since September, 1967, when the subject was designated as a special atomic energy research by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan. For (Irish) potatoes in particular, the purpose was attained, and the first ''irradiated food'' was put in 1973 on the market. Its significance is the stabilization of price in the off-season. In addition, six other items are being strenuously studied: onion, rice, wheat, Vienna sausage, fish-paste product, and tangerine. While the results so far are satisfactory, further studies are necessary on the soundness of irradiated foods in view of the current status of research and development. The interim report covers the results up to the end of fiscal 1977 from the initial fiscal year 1967. (Mori, K

  17. The interim storage facility at the Beznau nuclear power plant

    In Switzerland, the nuclear power plants (NPPs) are responsible for storage of their own wastes. In addition to the centralised ZWILAG facility at Wuerenlingen, which is planned jointly by the five operating plants, each NPP has its own on-site storage capacity. The example considered in this article is the interim storage facility at the Beznau power plant. At Beznau, the first stage of the ZWIBEZ project involved the opening of a store for low-level waste in March 1993. Future stages will provide additional capacity for intermediate-level and high-level wastes (and spent fuel elements). The store for intermediate-level waste will not be constructed, provided there is no further delay in the realisation of the ZWILAG facility. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab

  18. Licensing Procedures for Interim Storage of Spent Fuel in Germany

    In accordance with the waste management concept in Germany spent fuel is stored in interim storage facilities for 40 years until disposal in a geological repository. The storage concept bases on dry storage of the spent fuel in metallic transport and storage casks, standing upright in halls of reinforced concrete. Storage of spent fuel as well as significant modifications of the storage require a license according to art. 6 of the Atomic Energy Act. The Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt für Strahlenschutz - BfS) is the competent licensing authority. The mode of the licensing procedure — whether formalized or non-formalized — depends on the necessity to carry out an environmental impact assessment. Formalized licensing procedures include a public participation procedure. In the following, the licensing prodecures are illustrated and a short overview over the current licensing procedures conducted by BfS is given. (author)

  19. Radiation analysis for a generic centralized interim storage facility

    This paper documents the radiation analysis performed for the storage area of a generic Centralized Interim Storage Facility (CISF) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The purpose of the analysis is to establish the CISF Protected Area and Restricted Area boundaries by modeling a representative SNF storage array, calculating the radiation dose at selected locations outside the storage area, and comparing the results with regulatory radiation dose limits. The particular challenge for this analysis is to adequately model a large (6000 cask) storage array with a reasonable amount of analysis time and effort. Previous analyses of SNF storage systems for Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations at nuclear plant sites (for example in References 5.1 and 5.2) had only considered small arrays of storage casks. For such analyses, the dose contribution from each storage cask can be modeled individually. Since the large number of casks in the CISF storage array make such an approach unrealistic, a simplified model is required

  20. Corrosion behaviour of metallic containers during long term interim storages

    Two main corrosion phenomena are encountered in long term interim storage conditions: dry oxidation by the air when the temperature of high level nuclear wastes containers is high enough (roughly higher than 100 C) and corrosion phenomena as those encountered in outdoor atmospheric corrosion when the temperature of the container wall is low enough and so condensation is possible on the container walls. Results obtained with dry oxidation in air lead to predict small damages (less than 1μm on steels over 100 years at 100 C) and no drastic changes with pollutants. For atmospheric corrosion, first developments deal with a pragmatic method that gives assessments of the indoor atmospheric corrosivities. (author)

  1. SNF Interim Storage Canister Corrosion and Surface Environment Investigations

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Enos, David G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Of particular concern is stress corrosion cracking (SCC), by which a through-wall crack could potentially form in a canister outer wall over time intervals that are shorter than possible dry storage times. In order for SCC to occur, three criteria must be met. A corrosive environment must be present on the canister surface, the metal must susceptible to SCC, and sufficient tensile stress to support SCC must be present through the entire thickness of the canister wall. SNL is currently evaluating the potential for each of these criteria to be met.

  2. Integrated system of safety features for spent fuel interim storage

    The design of the spent fuel interim storage facility (SFISF) must meet the applicable safety requirements in order to ensure radiological protection of the personnel, public and environment during all phases of the facility. To elaborate the safety documentation necessary for licensing, we were trying to chose the most appropriate approach related to safety features for SFISF, based on national and international regulations, standards and recommendations, as well as on the experience of other countries with similar facilities and finally, on our own experience in designing other nuclear objectives in Romania. The paper presents the issues that we consider important for the safety evaluation and are developed as a detailed diagram. The diagram contains in a logical succession the following issues: - fundamental principles of radioprotection; - fundamental safety principles of radioactive waste management; - safety objectives of SFISF; - safety criteria for SFISF; - safety requirements for SFISF; - siting criteria for SFISF; - siting requirements for SFISF. (authors)

  3. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project. Interim report

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  4. Interim storage of CANDU spent fuel and safety performance

    'Full text:' Pickering Waste Management Facility (PWMF) is operational since November 1995 and safely storing spent fuel from Pickering 8 CANDU reactors. To date, equivalent to 22 reactor-years worth of spent fuel have been loaded, processed and stored in Dry Storage Containers (DSC). One DSC contains spent fuel from approximately one reactor-month of full power operation. The design life for the storage containers is 50 years. A Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) has been formed to advise on the long-term Canadian strategy for management of spent fuel. This paper will present the DSC processing steps, radiological hazard magnitude experienced during the DSC loading and processing for interim storage. A brief description of environmental and occupational safety performance will be presented. (author)

  5. Operator licensing examination standards for power reactors. Interim revision 8

    These examination standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the processes associated with initial and requalification examinations. The standards also ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations for all applicants. These standards are for guidance purposes and are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations (i.e., 10 CFR Part 55), and they are subject to revision or other changes in internal operator licensing policy. This interim revision permits facility licensees to prepare their initial operator licensing examinations on a voluntary basis pending an amendment to 10 CFR Part 55 that will require facility participation. The NRC intends to solicit comments on this revision during the rulemaking process and to issue a final Revision 8 in conjunction with the final rule

  6. Model for low temperature oxidation during long term interim storage

    Low-alloyed steels or carbon steels are considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of some nuclear waste package containers for long term interim storage. The containers are required to remain retrievable for centuries. One factor limiting their performance on this time scale is corrosion. The estimation of the metal thickness lost by dry oxidation over such long periods requires the construction of reliable models from short-time experimental data. In a first step, models based on simplified oxidation theories have been derived from experimental data on iron and a low-alloy steel oxidation. Their extrapolation to long oxidation periods confirms that the expected damage due to dry oxidation could be small. In order to improve the reliability of these predictions advanced models taking into account the elementary processes involved in the whole oxidation mechanism, are under development. (authors)

  7. Provisional materials: key components of interim fixed restorations.

    Perry, Ronald D; Magnuson, Britta

    2012-01-01

    Clinicians have many choices of provisional materials from which to choose when fabricating interim fixed restorations. While traditional materials are still in use today, temporary materials are continuously being updated and improved upon. In addition to the functional necessities required of the provisional material, it must also provide esthetic value for the patient. This article provides an overview of provisional materials, including newer bis-acryls that have helped eliminate some of the challenges associated with traditional acrylic materials. Composite resin preformed crowns for single-unit provisional applications are also discussed, along with CAD/CAM-fabricated materials. Regardless of the material selected, a provisional restoration must maintain and protect the underlying tooth structure from ill effects. PMID:22432178

  8. Interim Site Assessment and Clean-up Guidebook

    In April 1995 an Interim Site Investigation and Clean-up Guidebook (for petroleum hydrocarbon and volatile organic compound impacted sites) was developed for public use. The purpose of the Guidebook was to offer a new approach to the site cleanup process: one that reduces time, cuts costs, and establishes a defined endpoint for investigations and cleanup actions. The Guidebook provided a matrix to screen for low-risk contaminated sites. After a year of use, the Guidebook was revised in May 1996. The most notable change was in the Petroleum Hydrocarbon Section and the modification of the screening table for petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The changes considered the strong influence of lithology on contaminant transport and recognized the large attenuation of the long chain, heavy oil and tar, hydrocarbons in soils

  9. Interim sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. 1995 annual report

    Bagwell, L.

    1996-04-24

    Eight wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Interim Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled biannually to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Modified Municipal Solid Waste Permit 025500- 1120 (formerly DWP-087A) and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Trichlorofluoromethane was elevated in one downgradient and one sidegradient well during 1995. Barium, 1, 1- dichloroethylene, specific conductance, and zinc exceeded standards in one well each. The elevated level of 1, 1-dichloroethylene occurred in a downgradient well. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 190 ft/year during first quarter 1995 and 150 ft/yr during third quarter 1995.

  10. 1998 interim 242-A Evaporator tank system integrity assessment report

    This Integrity Assessment Report (IAR) is prepared by Fluor Daniel Northwest (FDNW) under contract to Lockheed-Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) for Waste Management Hanford (WMH), the 242-A Evaporator (facility) operations contractor for Fluor Daniel Hanford, and the US Department of Energy, the system owner. The contract specifies that FDNW perform an interim (5 year) integrity assessment of the facility and prepare a written IAR in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640. The WAC 173-303 defines a treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facility tank system as the ''dangerous waste storage or treatment tank and its ancillary equipment and containment.'' This integrity assessment evaluates the two tank systems at the facility: the evaporator vessel, C-A-1 (also called the vapor-liquid separator), and the condensate collection tank, TK-C-100. This IAR evaluates the 242-A facility tank systems up to, but not including, the last valve or flanged connection inside the facility perimeter. The initial integrity assessment performed on the facility evaluated certain subsystems not directly in contact with dangerous waste, such as the steam condensate and used raw water subsystems, to provide technical information. These subsystems were not evaluated in this IAR. The last major upgrade to the facility was project B-534. The facility modifications, as a result of project B-534, were evaluated in the 1993 facility interim integrity assessment. Since that time, the following upgrades have occurred in the facility: installation of a process condensate recycle system, and installation of a package steam boiler to provide steam for the facility. The package boiler is not within the scope of the facility TSD

  11. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Interim Status Closure Plan

    This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). WESF is located within the 225B Facility in the 200 East Area on the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based on Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the storage unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the intention is to clean close WESF, postclosure activities are not applicable to this interim status closure plan. To clean close the storage unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or environmentally is impracticable, the interim status closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. WESF stores cesium and strontium encapsulated salts. The encapsulated salts are stored in the pool cells or process cells located within 225B Facility. The dangerous waste is contained within a double containment system to preclude spills to the environment. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the capsules, operating methods and administrative controls require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge

  12. The challenges facing the long term interim storage

    In France electricity generation by means of commercial nuclear power plants has come to a point where it contributes to the national demand at a level of 80%. The safety performance of the production system has also reached a high level of both maturity and reliability taking advantage of the cumulative effect of a 30 years long learning experience and ever more stringent safety requirements. The policy to reprocess spent fuel has been overriding but no final decision has yet been made regarding the ultimate disposition of the waste streams. Although studies on deep geological disposal are ongoing, France is also looking at whether and under which conditions a long-term interim storage may provide an effective flexibility to the fuel cycle back-end. We discuss thereafter the needs and the paramount objectives of this latter R and D program. Results are being framed as potential guiding criteria for decision makers and various stakeholders. In first part, we propose a general analysis which emphasises that a long term interim storage is more than a classical nuclear facility because it explicitly requires long-lasting control and creates a burden for Society during many generations. Then, in second part, we offer an overview of the technical results from the R and D program as they stand at the time of writing. As an answer to the Government request, a strong emphasis has been put on this research for three years. Conclusion is an attempt to outline the societal context in which future decisions will have to be made. (author)

  13. Interim report for defining brine and oil threats in the Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge [2001

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following interim report is a list of activities being performed in conjunction with the study of oil brine effects on crayfish in the Patoka River National...

  14. Intra-Service Section 7 Evaluation Consultation/Conference/Concurrence : Walnut Creek NWR Interim Hunting Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Section 7 Evaluation for the Neal Smith NWR Interim Hunting Plan states that the hunting program is not likely to adversely affect listed species on the...

  15. Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge : Environmental Action Statement, Environmental Assessment, Interim Hunting and Fishing Plan : 2004

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains the Environmental Action Statement, Environmental Assessment, and Interim Hunting and Fishing Plan for Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge from...

  16. Long-term interim storage of low and medium level radioactive waste causes additional radiation exposure

    In contrast to immediate final disposal prolongued interim storage of low and intermediate level radioactive waste which is currently envisaged in Germany causes additional radiation exposure for the waste handling workers. Additional exposure from short time intermediate storage is inevitable because presently there is no operating final repository in Germany. Significant radiation exposure contributions resulting from long term interim storage are encountered by the operating personal waste conditioning and the interim storage facility. They result from additional procedures to enhance the resistance of waste containers against degradation and the surveillance procedures during storage phase. Examples for such additional exposure are shown from different German waste disposal plants. For technical reasons the final repository for negligible heat generating waste KONRAD could start up its operation at least 2010 after finishing the licensing procedure. Thus the necessity for long term interim storage and the resulting additional radiation exposure can be avoided. (orig.)

  17. Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear reactors and nuclear spent fuel interim storage in Germany

    The authors visited Germany in April 2013 to investigate state of reactor decommissioning and dismantling and interim storage of spent fuels reflecting nuclear power phaseout policy after the Fukushima accident. They visited interim storage facilities of radioactive wastes (ZLN, Zwischenlanger Nord) and central active workshop (ZAW, Zentrale Aktive Werkstatt) at Greifswald, and interim storage facilities of spent fuels at Philippsburg. CASTOR (Cask for Storage and Transport of Radioactive Material) was used for interim storage of spent fuels and high-level wastes for 40 years. Amount of wastes produced by decommissioning and dismantling was estimated 1800 ktons consisting of 1200 ktons non-radioactive and 600 ktons radioactive wastes, 500 ktons of which could be decontaminated less than clearance level and 100 ktons of which were obliged to be stored as radioactive wastes. New geological repository site for high level radioactive wastes should be found and developed. (T. Tanaka)

  18. DQO Summary Report for 105-N/109-N Interim Safe Storage Project Waste Characterization

    The DQO summary report provides the results of the DQO process completed for waste characterization activities for the 105-N/109-N Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project including decommission, deactivate, decontaminate, and demolish activities for six associated buildings.

  19. Basis for Interim Operation for the K-Reactor in Cold Standby

    Shedrow, B.

    1998-10-19

    The Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) document for K Reactor in Cold Standby and the L- and P-Reactor Disassembly Basins was prepared in accordance with the draft DOE standard for BIO preparation (dated October 26, 1993).

  20. Interim report for defining brine and oil threats in the Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge [2002

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following interim report is a list of activities being performed in conjunction with the study of oil brine effects on crayfish in the Patoka River National...

  1. Safety evaluation of interim stabilization of non-stabilized single-shell watch list tanks

    The report provides a summation of the status of safety issues associated with interim stabilization of Watch List SSTs (organic, ferrocyanide, and flammable gas), as extracted from recent safety analyses, including the Tank Farms Accelerated Safety Analysis efforts

  2. Basis for Interim Operation for the K-Reactor in Cold Standby

    The Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) document for K Reactor in Cold Standby and the L- and P-Reactor Disassembly Basins was prepared in accordance with the draft DOE standard for BIO preparation (dated October 26, 1993)

  3. Sample results from the interim salt disposition program macrobatch 9 tank 21H qualification samples

    Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-11-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 9 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H.

  4. Loke T. Kok named interim dean of College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

    Owczarski, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Loke T. Kok of Blacksburg, professor and head of the Department of Entomology in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech, has been named the college's interim dean effective March 1.

  5. Interim Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient Following Partial Rhinectomy: A Clinical Report

    Guttal, Satyabodh S.; Vohra, Paras; Pillai, Lekha K.; K.Nadiger, Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Surgical defects often have adverse effects on patient perception of esthetics and self-esteem. Rehabilitation of such surgical defects poses a challenge to the clinician. Presented here is a clinical report of an interim prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient who underwent partial rhinectomy for basal cell carcinoma. Nasal resection included part of the nasal septum, the entire cartilage, and the ala. An interim nasal prosthesis was fabricated for this patient 3 weeks after surgery, to provi...

  6. Interim FDG-PET Scan in Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Hopes and Caveats

    Vander Borght, T.; M. André; Bosly, A.

    2011-01-01

    FDG-PET has recently emerged as an important tool for the management of Hodgkins lymphoma. Although its use for initial staging and response evaluation at the end of treatment is well established, the place of interim PET for response assessment and subsequent treatment tailoring is still quite controversial. The use of interim PET after a few cycles of chemotherapy may allow treatment reduction for good responders, leading to lesser treatment toxicities as well as early treatment adaptation ...

  7. Comparisons of polar processing diagnostics from 34 years of the ERA-Interim and MERRA reanalyses

    Lawrence, Z. D.; Manney, G. L.; Minschwaner, K.; M. L. Santee; Lambert, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive comparison of polar processing diagnostics derived from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim). We use diagnostics that focus on meteorological conditions related to stratospheric chemical ozone loss based on temperatures, polar vortex dynamics, and air parcel t...

  8. Comparisons of polar processing diagnostics from 34 years of the ERA-Interim and MERRA reanalyses

    Lawrence, Z. D.; Manney, G. L.; Minschwaner, K.; M. L. Santee; Lambert, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive comparison of polar processing diagnostics derived from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim). We use diagnostics that focus on meteorological conditions related to stratospheric chemical ozone loss based on temperatures, polar vortex dynamics, and air parcel traj...

  9. Verification of the new ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis over France

    Szczypta, C; J.-C. Calvet; Albergel, C.; Balsamo, G.; S. Boussetta; D. Carrer; S. Lafont; Meurey, C.

    2010-01-01

    An evaluation of the global ECMWF atmospheric reanalysis ERA-Interim (with a 0.5° grid) is performed over France, based on the high resolution (8 km) SAFRAN atmospheric reanalysis. The ERA-Interim precipitation, Incoming Solar Radiation (ISR), air temperature, air humidity, and wind speed, are compared with their SAFRAN counterparts. Also, interpolated in situ ISR observations are used in order to consolidate the evaluation of this variable. The daily precipitation estimates produced by ERA-I...

  10. Verification of the new ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis over France

    Szczypta, C; Calvet, J.-C.; Albergel, C.; Balsamo, G.; S. Boussetta; D. Carrer; S. Lafont; Meurey, C.

    2011-01-01

    An evaluation of the global ECMWF atmospheric reanalysis ERA-Interim (with a 0.5° grid) is performed over France, based on the high resolution (8 km) SAFRAN atmospheric reanalysis. The ERA-Interim precipitation, Incoming Solar Radiation (ISR), air temperature, air humidity, and wind speed, are compared with their SAFRAN counterparts. Also, interpolated in situ ISR observations are used in order to consolidate the evaluation of this variable. The daily precipitation estimates produced by ERA-I...

  11. On-site interim storage of spent nuclear fuel: Emerging public issues

    Failure to consummate plans for a permanent repository or above- ground interim Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility for spent nuclear fuel has spurred innovative efforts to ensure at-reactor storage in an environmentally safe and secure manner. This article examines the institutional and socioeconomic impacts of Dry Cask Storage Technology (DCST)-an approach to spent fuel management that is emerging as the preferred method of on-site interim spent fuel storage by utilities that exhaust existing storage capacity

  12. Final hazard classification and auditable safety analysis for the 105-C Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project

    This document summarizes the inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials present in the 105-C Reactor Facility and the operations associated with the Interim Safe Storage Project which includes decontamination and demolition and interim safe storage of the remaining facility. This document also establishes a final hazard classification and verifies that appropriate and adequate safety functions and controls are in place to reduce or mitigate the risk associated with those operations

  13. Well summary report: 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 interim remedial action wells

    The 23 wells described in this summary report were drilled to support interim actions associated with the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 Operable Units. This document provides a summary of data obtained from the wells drilled to support the interim actions. An additional well was added to the scope of the work; that well addresses the recently discovered chromium 'hot spot' in the 100-D Area. Also included are geologic cross-sections ad detailed test data and field logs

  14. A note on budget balance under interim participation constraints: the case of independent types

    Börgers, Tilman; Norman, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We provide a simple proof of the equivalence between ex ante and ex post budget balanceconstraints in Bayesian mechanism design with independent types when participation decisionsare made at the interim stage. The result is given an interpretation in terms of efficient allocationof risk. We provide a simple proof of the equivalence between ex ante and ex post budget balanceconstraints in Bayesian mechanism design with independent types when participation decisionsare made at the interim stage...

  15. Further evaluation of the proposed interim consolidation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    The Chairman and the Ranking Minority Member, House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, asked GAO to answer nine questions on the proposed interim consolidation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These questions sought additional information and explanation of matters discussed in GAO's September 11, 1980 report on the subject. GAO still believes both the proposed and an alternative NRC interim consolidation option could help strengthen NRC, but points out several unresolved issues

  16. National climate change action plans: Interim report for developing and transition countries

    Benioff, R.; Ness, E.; Hirst, J. [eds.

    1997-10-01

    Under its Support for National Action Plans (SNAP) initiative, the U.S. Country Studies Program is providing financial and technical assistance to 18 countries for the development of climate change action plans. Although most of the countries have not yet completed their plans, the important lessons learned thus far are valuable and should be shared with other countries and international institutions that have an interest in the process of action plan development. This interim report describes the experience of 11 countries that are the furthest along in their planning activity and who have offered to share their results to date with the larger community of interested nations. These action plans delineate specific mitigation and adaptation measures that the countries will implement and integrate into their ongoing development programs. This report focuses on the measures the countries have selected and the methods they used to prepare their action plans. This executive summary presents key lessons and common themes using a structure similar to that used in the individual country chapters.

  17. Sampling and analysis plan for Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), Wayne, New Jersey

    This field sampling plan describes the methodology to perform an independent radiological verification survey and chemical characterization of a remediated area of the subpile at the Wayne Interim Storage Site, Wayne, New Jersey.Data obtained from collection and analysis of systematic and biased soil samples will be used to assess the status of remediation at the site and verify the final radiological status. The objective of this plan is to describe the methods for obtaining sufficient and valid measurements and analytical data to supplement and verify a radiological profile already established by the Project Remediation Management Contractor (PMC). The plan describes the procedure for obtaining sufficient and valid analytical data on soil samples following remediation of the first layer of the subpile. Samples will be taken from an area of the subpile measuring approximately 30 m by 80 m from which soil has been excavated to a depth of approximately 20 feet to confirm that the soil beneath the excavated area does not exceed radiological guidelines established for the site or chemical regulatory limits for inorganic metals. After the WISS has been fully remediated, the Department of Energy will release it for industrial/commercial land use in accordance with the Record of Decision. This plan provides supplemental instructions to guidelines and procedures established for sampling and analysis activities. Procedures will be referenced throughout this plan as applicable, and are available for review if necessary

  18. Environmental surveillance results for 1995 for the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site

    This memorandum presents and interprets analytical results and measurements obtained as part of the 1995 environmental surveillance program for the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The discussion provides a comparative analysis of average historical background conditions and applicable regulatory criteria to the 1995 results reported for external gamma radiation and for samples from the media investigated (air, surface water, sediment, groundwater, and stormwater). Results from the 1995 environmental surveillance program at HISS indicate that, with the exception of thorium-230 in streambed sediment, applicable US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines were not exceeded for any measured parameter or for any dose calculated for potentially exposed members of the general public. In the absence of sediment guidelines, DOE soil guidelines serve as a standard of comparison for data obtained from stream bed sediment; two samples from downstream locations contained concentrations of thorium-230 that exceeded DOE soil guidelines. All stormwater sample results were in compliance with permit-specified limits. Other radioactive materials include radium 226 and natural uranium

  19. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Hazelwood, Missouri

    The environmental monitoring program, begun in 1984, was continued during 1989 at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in the City of Hazelwood, Missouri. HISS is currently used for storage of soils contaminated with residual radioactive material. HISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive material remains from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The monitoring program at HISS measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium, radium, and thorium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. This report presents the findings of the environmental monitoring conducted at HISS during calendar year 1989. 19 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  20. Environmental surveillance results for 1995 for the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site

    McCague, J.C.

    1996-06-01

    This memorandum presents and interprets analytical results and measurements obtained as part of the 1995 environmental surveillance program for the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The discussion provides a comparative analysis of average historical background conditions and applicable regulatory criteria to the 1995 results reported for external gamma radiation and for samples from the media investigated (air, surface water, sediment, groundwater, and stormwater). Results from the 1995 environmental surveillance program at HISS indicate that, with the exception of thorium-230 in streambed sediment, applicable US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines were not exceeded for any measured parameter or for any dose calculated for potentially exposed members of the general public. In the absence of sediment guidelines, DOE soil guidelines serve as a standard of comparison for data obtained from stream bed sediment; two samples from downstream locations contained concentrations of thorium-230 that exceeded DOE soil guidelines. All stormwater sample results were in compliance with permit-specified limits. Other radioactive materials include radium 226 and natural uranium.

  1. Physical protection of shipments of irradiated reactor fuel; Interim guidance. Regulatory report

    During May, 1979, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved for issuance in effective form new interim regulations for strengthening the protection of spent fuel shipments against sabotage and diversion. The new regulations were issued without benefit of public comment, but comments from the public were solicited after the effective date. Based upon the public comments received, the interim regulations were amended and reissued in effective form as a final interim rule in May, 1980. The present document supersedes a previously issued interim guidance document, NUREG-0561 (June, 1979) which accompanied the original rule. This report has been revised to conform to the new interim regulations on the physical protection of shipments of irradiated reactor fuel which are likely to remain in effect until the completion of an ongoing research program concerning the response of spent fuel to certain forms of sabotage, at which time the regulations may be rescinded, modified or made permanent, as appropriate. This report discusses the amended regulations and provides a basis on which licensees can develop an acceptable interim program for the protection of spent fuel shipments

  2. DATA MINING METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING THE OPTIMAL MODEL OF COST PREDICTION IN SHIP INTERIM PRODUCT ASSEMBLY

    Damir Kolich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to accurately predict costs of the thousands of interim products that are assembled in shipyards, it is necessary to use skilled engineers to develop detailed Gantt charts for each interim product separately which takes many hours. It is helpful to develop a prediction tool to estimate the cost of interim products accurately and quickly without the need for skilled engineers. This will drive down shipyard costs and improve competitiveness. Data mining is used extensively for developing prediction models in other industries. Since ships consist of thousands of interim products, it is logical to develop a data mining methodology for a shipyard or any other manufacturing industry where interim products are produced. The methodology involves analysis of existing interim products and data collection. Pre-processing and principal component analysis is done to make the data “user-friendly” for later prediction processing and the development of both accurate and robust models. The support vector machine is demonstrated as the better model when there are a lower number of tuples. However as the number of tuples is increased to over 10000, then the artificial neural network model is recommended.

  3. National Ignition Facility Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan

    Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Cryogenic Target Handling Systems (NCTS) Program, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NCTS. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan (PEP) for NCTS has been initiated, and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National Ignition Facility is a multi-megajoule laser facility being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the Department of Energy (DOE). Its primary mission is to support the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) by performing experiments studying weapons physics, including fusion ignition. NIF also supports the missions of weapons effects, inertial fusion energy, and basic science in high-energy-density physics. NIF will be operated by LLNL under contract to the University of California (UC) as a national user facility. NIF is a low-hazard, radiological facility, and its operation will meet all applicable federal, state, and local Environmental Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements. The NCTS Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope, cost, and schedule. The NIF Director controls the NIF Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan. Overall scope content and execution schedules for the High Energy Density Physics Campaign (SSP Campaign 10) are currently undergoing rebaselining and will be brought into alignment with resources expected to be available throughout the NNSA Future Years National Security Plan (FYNSP). The revised schedule for

  4. Interim main report of the safety assessment SR-Can

    Hedin, Allan (ed.) [and others

    2004-08-01

    This document is an interim report on the safety assessment SR-Can (SR in the acronym stands for Safety Report and Can is short for canister). The final SR-Can report will support SKB's application to build an Encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel and is to be produced in 2006. The purpose of the present interim report is to demonstrate the methodology for safety assessment so that it can be reviewed before it is used in a license application. The assessment relates to the KBS-3 disposal concept in which copper canisters with a cast iron insert containing spent nuclear fuel are surrounded by bentonite clay and deposited at approximately 500 m depth in saturated, granitic rock. Preliminary data from the Forsmark site, presently being investigated by SKB as one of the candidate for a KBS-3 repository are used to some extent as examples. However, the collected data are yet too sparse to allow an evaluation of safety for this site. An important aim of this report is to demonstrate the proper handling of requirements on the safety assessment in applicable regulations. Therefore, regulations issued by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority are duplicated in an Appendix. The principal acceptance criterion requires that 'the annual risk of harmful effects after closure does not exceed 10{sup -6} for a representative individual in the group exposed to the greatest risk'. 'Harmful effects' refer to cancer and hereditary effects. Following the introductory chapter 1, this report outlines the methodology for the SR-Can assessment in chapter 2, and presents in chapters 3, 4 and 5 the initial state of the system and the plans and methods for handling external influences and internal processes, respectively. Function indicators are introduced in chapter 6 and a preliminary evaluation of these is given in chapter 7. The material presented in the first seven chapters is utilised in the scenario selection

  5. Interim main report of the safety assessment SR-Can

    This document is an interim report on the safety assessment SR-Can (SR in the acronym stands for Safety Report and Can is short for canister). The final SR-Can report will support SKB's application to build an Encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel and is to be produced in 2006. The purpose of the present interim report is to demonstrate the methodology for safety assessment so that it can be reviewed before it is used in a license application. The assessment relates to the KBS-3 disposal concept in which copper canisters with a cast iron insert containing spent nuclear fuel are surrounded by bentonite clay and deposited at approximately 500 m depth in saturated, granitic rock. Preliminary data from the Forsmark site, presently being investigated by SKB as one of the candidate for a KBS-3 repository are used to some extent as examples. However, the collected data are yet too sparse to allow an evaluation of safety for this site. An important aim of this report is to demonstrate the proper handling of requirements on the safety assessment in applicable regulations. Therefore, regulations issued by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority are duplicated in an Appendix. The principal acceptance criterion requires that 'the annual risk of harmful effects after closure does not exceed 10-6 for a representative individual in the group exposed to the greatest risk'. 'Harmful effects' refer to cancer and hereditary effects. Following the introductory chapter 1, this report outlines the methodology for the SR-Can assessment in chapter 2, and presents in chapters 3, 4 and 5 the initial state of the system and the plans and methods for handling external influences and internal processes, respectively. Function indicators are introduced in chapter 6 and a preliminary evaluation of these is given in chapter 7. The material presented in the first seven chapters is utilised in the scenario selection in chapter 8. Hydrogeological

  6. Dedicated-site, interim storage of high-level nuclear waste as part of the management system

    Zen, E-an

    1980-01-01

    Dedicated-site interim storage of high-level reprocessed nuclear waste and of spent fuel rods is proposed as a long-term integral part of the systems approach of the national nuclear waste isolation program. Separation of interim sites for retrievable storage from permanent-disposal repositories should enhance ensurance of the performance of the latter; maintenance of retrievability at separate sites also has many advantages in both safety and possible use of waste as resources. Interim stora...

  7. Finding of no significant impact. Consolidation and interim storage of special nuclear material at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA -- 1060, for the consolidation, processing, and interim storage of Category I and II special nuclear material (SNM) in Building 371 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (hereinafter referred to as Rocky Flats or Site), Golden, Colorado. The scope of the EA included alternatives for interim storage including the no action alternative, the construction of a new facility for interim storage at Rocky Flats, and shipment to other DOE facilities for interim storage

  8. International Programs and Agreements in Geothermal Energy. An Interim report

    Oppenheimer, M.; Fein, E.; Bye, J.

    1978-06-01

    This report contains the interim results of a study for the Division of Geothermal Energy on the Division's international programs and activities. The complete research program, which is scheduled to be finished i November 1978, will have the following elements: (1) an assessment of objectives that have motivated the formulation of international programs and an explanation of any changes in the evolution of those programs. These objectives will be assessed for their internal consistency, degree of governmental consensus, their practicality, the current status of their accomplishments, and the implications of their accomplishments for the role of DGE. (2) An assessment of organizational structures and teams, including the identity of key decisionmakers, the nature of the interagency process, procedures for generating nongovernmental support for international programs and the success of these procedures, and the effectiveness of the interface with foreign partners. (3) Assessment of results of international cooperative programs, which involve the development of an overall balance sheet of benefits and disbenefits attributed to each international program. (4) The formulation of future international cooperative programs based on the assessments described. These programs may involve the development of new exchanges, alteration or elimination of existing exchanges, and revisions in the management of exchanges by US government agencies.

  9. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region

  10. DOUBLE TRACKS Test Site interim corrective action plan

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The DOUBLE TRACKS site is located on Range 71 north of the Nellis Air Force Range, northwest of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). DOUBLE TRACKS was the first of four experiments that constituted Operation ROLLER COASTER. On May 15, 1963, weapons-grade plutonium and depleted uranium were dispersed using 54 kilograms of trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosive. The explosion occurred in the open, 0.3 m above the steel plate. No fission yield was detected from the test, and the total amount of plutonium deposited on the ground surface was estimated to be between 980 and 1,600 grams. The test device was composed primarily of uranium-238 and plutonium-239. The mass ratio of uranium to plutonium was 4.35. The objective of the corrective action is to reduce the potential risk to human health and the environment and to demonstrate technically viable and cost-effective excavation, transportation, and disposal. To achieve these objectives, Bechtel Nevada (BN) will remove soil with a total transuranic activity greater then 200 pCI/g, containerize the soil in ``supersacks,`` transport the filled ``supersacks`` to the NTS, and dispose of them in the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site. During this interim corrective action, BN will also conduct a limited demonstration of an alternative method for excavation of radioactive near-surface soil contamination.

  11. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

    2001-07-24

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

  12. Safety aspects of spent nuclear fuel interim storage installations

    Nowadays safety and security of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) interim storage installations are very important, due to a great concentration of fission products, actinides and activation products. In this kind of storage it is necessary to consider the physical security. Nuclear installations have become more vulnerable. New types of accidents must be considered in the design of these installations, which in the early days were not considered like: fissile material stolen, terrorists' acts and war conflicts, and traditional accidents concerning the transport of the spent fuel from the reactor to the storage location, earthquakes occurrence, airplanes crash, etc. Studies related to airplane falling had showed that a collision of big commercials airplanes at velocity of 800 km/h against SNF storage and specially designed concrete casks, do not result in serious structural injury to the casks, and not even radionuclides liberation to the environment. However, it was demonstrated that attacks with modern military ammunitions, against metallic casks, are calamitous. The casks could not support a direct impact of this ammo and the released radioactive materials can expose the workers and public as well the local environment to harmful radiation. This paper deals about the main basic aspects of a dry SNF storage installation, that must be physically well protected, getting barriers that difficult the access of unauthorized persons or vehicles, as well as, must structurally resist to incidents or accidents caused by unauthorized intrusion. (author)

  13. Model for low temperature oxidation during long term interim storage

    For high-level nuclear waste containers in long-term interim storage, dry oxidation will be the first and the main degradation mode during about one century. The metal lost by dry oxidation over such a long period must be evaluated with a good reliability. To achieve this goal, modelling of the oxide scale growth is necessary and this is the aim of the dry oxidation studies performed in the frame of the COCON program. An advanced model based on the description of elementary mechanisms involved in scale growth at low temperatures, like partial interfacial control of the oxidation kinetics and/or grain boundary diffusion, is developed in order to increase the reliability of the long term extrapolations deduced from basic models developed from short time experiments. Since only few experimental data on dry oxidation are available in the temperature range of interest, experiments have also been performed to evaluate the relevant input parameters for models like grain size of oxide scale, considering iron as simplified material. (authors)

  14. Conceptual design of interim storage facility for CNAI

    The reduced storage capacity available in the two spent fuel pools of argentine PHWR Atucha-1 power plant, the current plans for extending the reactor operation beyond its design lifetime, and the government decision on Atucha-2 NPP construction ending, have motivated the evaluation of a dry storage option for the interim management of spent fuel assemblies. Two different designs are presently being analyzed by an expert working group, from both technical and economical points of views. Authors are proposing a modular system consisting of an arrangement of reinforced concrete structures into which welded metallic canisters loaded with 37 spent fuel assemblies each stored in horizontal position. The reinforced concrete module is designed to provide the necessary physical protection and biological shielding to the loaded canisters during long-term storage, as well as passive means to remove the spent fuel decay heat by a combination of radiation, conduction and natural air convection. In this works are presented advances in the conceptual designs for a spent nuclear fuel system to Atucha I nuclear power plant. (author)

  15. Maywood Interim Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Maywood, New Jersey

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring of MISS began in 1984 when congress added the site to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a DOE program to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at MISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron concentrations in air; external gamma radiation-exposure; and total uranium, radium-226, radium-228, thorium-232, and thorium-230 concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment

  16. Biodiversity offsets: a cost-effective interim solution to seabird bycatch in fisheries?

    Sean Pascoe

    Full Text Available The concept of biodiversity offsets is well established as an approach to environmental management. The concept has been suggested for environmental management in fisheries, particularly in relation to the substantial numbers of non-target species--seabirds in particular--caught and killed as incidental bycatch during fishing activities. Substantial areas of fisheries are being closed to protect these species at great cost to the fishing industry. However, other actions may be taken to offset the impact of fishing on these populations at lower cost to the fishing industry. This idea, however, has attracted severe criticism largely as it does not address the underlying externality problems created by the fishing sector, namely seabird fishing mortality. In this paper, we re-examine the potential role of compensatory mitigation as a fisheries management tool, although from the perspective of being an interim management measure while more long-lasting solutions to the problem are found. We re-model an example previously examined by both proponents and opponents of the approach, namely the cost effectiveness of rodent control relative to fishery area closures for the conservation of a seabird population adversely affected by an Australian tuna fishery. We find that, in the example being examined, invasive rodent eradication is at least 10 times more cost effective than area closures. We conclude that, while this does not solve the actual bycatch problem, it may provide breathing space for both the seabird species and the industry to find longer term means of reducing bycatch.

  17. Colonie interim storage site: Annual site environmental report: Calendar year 1988

    The monitoring program at the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) measures external gamma radiation levels and uranium and radium-226 concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and to assess the potential effect of the site on public health, the potential radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, this hypothetical individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 3 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard. This is also approximately equivalent to the exposure a person would receive during a round-trip flight from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation present at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of CISS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is distinguishable from the dose the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of 1988 monitoring show that the CISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 18 refs., 15 figs., 11 tabs

  18. Colonie Interim Storage Site environmental surveillance report for calendar year 1993

    This report summarizes the results of environmental surveillance activities conducted at the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) during calendar year 1993. It includes an overview of site operations, the basis for radiological and nonradiological monitoring, dose to the offsite population, and summaries of environmental programs at CISS. Environmental surveillance activities were conducted in accordance with the site environmental monitoring plan, which describes the rationale and design criteria for the surveillance program, the frequency of sampling and analysis, specific sampling and analysis procedures, and quality assurance requirements. Appendix A contains a discussion of the nature of radiation, the way it is measured, and common sources of it. The primary environmental guidelines and limits applicable to CISS are given in US Department of Energy (DOE) orders and mandated by six federal acts: the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water Act; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); the Toxic Substances Control Act; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). DOE began environmental monitoring of CISS in 1984 when DOE was authorized by Congress through the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act to conduct a decontamination research and development program at the site. The site was subsequently assigned to DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

  19. Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    1994-07-01

    This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,`` of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues.

  20. Performance testing of aged hydrogen getters against criteria for interim safe storage of plutonium bearing materials.

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Nissen, April; Buffleben, George M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen getters were tested for use in storage of plutonium-bearing materials in accordance with DOE's Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials. The hydrogen getter HITOP was aged for 3 months at 70 C and tested under both recombination and hydrogenation conditions at 20 and 70 C; partially saturated and irradiated aged getter samples were also tested. The recombination reaction was found to be very fast and well above the required rate of 45 std. cc H2h. The gettering reaction, which is planned as the backup reaction in this deployment, is slower and may not meet the requirements alone. Pressure drop measurements and {sup 1}H NMR analyses support these conclusions. Although the experimental conditions do not exactly replicate the deployment conditions, the results of our conservative experiments are clear: the aged getter shows sufficient reactivity to maintain hydrogen concentrations below the flammability limit, between the minimum and maximum deployment temperatures, for three months. The flammability risk is further reduced by the removal of oxygen through the recombination reaction. Neither radiation exposure nor thermal aging sufficiently degrades the getter to be a concern. Future testing to evaluate performance for longer aging periods is in progress.

  1. Wayne Interim Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Wayne, New Jersey

    This document describes the envirormental monitoring program at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring of WISS and surrounding area began in 1984 when Congress added the site to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. WISS is a National Priorities List site. The environmental monitoring program at WISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-232, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Several nonradiological parameters are also measured in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency standards, DOE derived concentration guides, dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment

  2. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Hazelwood, Missouri

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring of HISS began in 1984 when the site was assigned to the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. DOE placed responsibility for HISS under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at HISS includes sampling networks for radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, thorium-230, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards and DCGs are established to protect public health and the environment

  3. Index of hazard for radioactive waste (revised). Interim technical report PR 78-10-80R

    This is an interim report of a study to establish a risk measure for radioactive waste repositories and to generate radiological performance objectives. The problem of regulating radioactive waste repositories is reviewed, and the difficulties associated with this activity are discussed. Risk-benefit analysis as a tool for regulation has been suggested, and its contribution is assessed. Decision analysis as a development of risk-benefit analysis is suggested as an alternative approach, in particular, employing the concept of expected utility. A utility function which describes the possible consequences of a radioactive waste repository is discussed in some detail, paying particular attention to the public concerns which must be addressable through such a function and how it is recommended to capture them. A specific utility function is developed, and its elicitation from a particular subject is described. The representation of public values in a decision-analytic approach presents some problems and these are fully discussed; recommendations are made as to appropriate methods to carry this out. The vexed question of determining an acceptable safety limit is studied and recommendations are made concerning the most suitable way to determine ''how safe is safe enough.'' Finally a brief discussion is given of how these concepts may be employed to generate radiological performance objectives

  4. Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ''Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,'' of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues

  5. Interim Report on the Power Law Index of Interplanetary Suprathermal Ion Spectra

    There is a continuing debate about the applicability of the theory presented by Fisk and Gloeckler (FG) regarding the formation of suprathermal ion tails in phase space density vs. velocity spectra; in the solar wind frame the FG theory predicts a power law index of-5 (which is equivalent to a differential intensity vs. energy index of-1.5). There has also been uncertainty and perhaps misunderstanding regarding the extent to which such spectra are actually observed; i.e., is there really a significant preference for the -5 index? Here we report the results of an interim technique we use to analyze ∼1-100 keV/nucleon interplanetary suprathermal H+, He+, and He++, spectra measured at the Cassini spacecraft by the Charge Energy Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS) instrument of the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) suite during the cruise to Saturn. We analyzed 18 active periods and report a mean index in the solar wind frame of 4.9±0.4 for protons, 5.2±0.5 for He+, and 4.7±0.2 for alpha particles. MIMI/CHEMS offers much needed independent observations of heliospheric ions in the suprathermal energy range.

  6. Interim Report on the Power Law Index of Interplanetary Suprathermal Ion Spectra

    Hill, M. E.; Hamilton, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    There is a continuing debate about the applicability of the theory presented by Fisk and Gloeckler (FG) regarding the formation of suprathermal ion tails in phase space density vs. velocity spectra; in the solar wind frame the FG theory predicts a power law index of-5 (which is equivalent to a differential intensity vs. energy index of-1.5). There has also been uncertainty and perhaps misunderstanding regarding the extent to which such spectra are actually observed; i.e., is there really a significant preference for the -5 index? Here we report the results of an interim technique we use to analyze ~1-100 keV/nucleon interplanetary suprathermal H+, He+, and He++, spectra measured at the Cassini spacecraft by the Charge Energy Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS) instrument of the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) suite during the cruise to Saturn. We analyzed 18 active periods and report a mean index in the solar wind frame of 4.9+/-0.4 for protons, 5.2+/-0.5 for He+, and 4.7+/-0.2 for alpha particles. MIMI/CHEMS offers much needed independent observations of heliospheric ions in the suprathermal energy range.

  7. Hazelwood interim storage site: Annual site environmental report, Hazelwood, Missouri, Calendar Year 1988

    The monitoring program at Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium, radium, and thorium, concentrations in surface water, groundwater and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and assess its potential effect or public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual at HISS would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 1 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard. This exposure is less than the exposure a person receives during a flight from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of HISS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose that the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. The results of 1988 monitoring show that HISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 15 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs

  8. Early interim 18F-FDG PET in Hodgkin's lymphoma: evaluation on 304 patients

    The use of early (interim) PET restaging during first-line therapy of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in clinical practice has considerably increased because of its ability to provide early recognition of treatment failure allowing patients to be transferred to more intensive treatment regimens. Between June 1997 and June 2009, 304 patients with newly diagnosed HL (147 early stage and 157 advanced stage) were treated with the ABVD regimen at two Italian institutions. Patients underwent PET staging and restaging at baseline, after two cycles of therapy and at the end of the treatment. Of the 304 patients, 53 showed a positive interim PET scan and of these only 13 (24.5%) achieved continuous complete remission (CCR), whereas 251 patients showed a negative PET scan and of these 231 (92%) achieved CCR. Comparison between interim PET-positive and interim PET-negative patients indicated a significant association between PET findings and 9-year progression-free survival and 9-year overall survival, with a median follow-up of 31 months. Among the early-stage patients, 19 had a positive interim PET scan and only 4 (21%) achieved CCR; among the 128 patients with a negative interim PET scan, 122 (97.6%) achieved CCR. Among the advanced-stage patients, 34 showed a persistently positive PET scan with only 9 (26.4%) achieving CCR, whereas 123 showed a negative interim PET scan with 109 (88.6%) achieving CCR. Our results demonstrate the role of an early PET scan as a significant step forward in the management of patients with early-stage or advanced-stage HL. (orig.)

  9. Long-term interim storage concepts with conditioning strategies ensuring compatibility with subsequent disposal or reprocessing

    The objective of the CEA studies carried out under research topic 3 (long-term interim storage) of the 1991 French radioactive waste management law is to demonstrate the industrial feasibility of a comprehensive, flexible interim storage facility by thoroughly evaluating and comparing all the basic components of various interim storage concepts. In this context, the CEA is considering reference solutions or concepts based on three primary components (the package, the interim storage facility and the site) suitable for determining the specifications of a very long-term solution. Some aspects are examined in greater detail, such as the implementation of long-term technologies, conditioning processes ensuring the absence of water and contamination in the facility, or allowance for radioactive decay of the packages. The results obtained are continually compiled in reports substantiating the design options. These studies should also lead to an overall economic assessment in terms of the capital and operating cost requirements, thereby providing an additional basis for selecting the design options. The comparison with existing industrial facilities highlights the technical and economic progress represented by the new generation of interim storage units. (authors)

  10. Commentary: Interim leadership of academic departments at U.S. medical schools.

    Grigsby, R Kevin; Aber, Robert C; Quillen, David A

    2009-10-01

    Medical schools and teaching hospitals are experiencing more frequent turnover of department chairs. Loss of a department chair creates instability in the department and may have a negative effect on the organization at large. Interim leadership of academic departments is common, and interim chairs are expected to immediately demonstrate skills and leadership abilities. However, little is known about how persons are prepared to assume the interim chair role. Newer competencies for effective leadership include an understanding of the business of medicine, interpersonal and communication skills, the ability to deal with conflict and solve adaptive challenges, and the ability to build and work on teams. Medical schools and teaching hospitals need assistance to meet the unique training and support needs of persons serving as interim leaders. For example, the Association of American Medical Colleges and individual chair societies can develop programs to allow current chairs to reflect on their present positions and plan for the future. Formal leadership training, mentorship opportunities, and conscientious succession planning are good first steps in preparing to meet the needs of academic departments during transitions in leadership. Also, interim leadership experience may be useful as a means for "opening the door" to underrepresented persons, including women, and increasing the diversity of the leadership team. PMID:19881413

  11. Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill

    Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs

  12. Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill

    Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

    1989-07-01

    Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. 4D Dynamic RNP Annual Interim Report-Year 1

    Finkelsztein, Daniel M.; Sturdy, James L.; Alaverdi, Omeed; Chung, William W.; Salvano, Daniel; Klooster, Joel; Hochwarth, Joachim K.

    2010-01-01

    This Annual Interim Report summarizes the activities led by Raytheon, in collaboration with GE Aviation and SAIC, and presents the results obtained during the first year of this research effort to expand the RNP concept to 4 dimensions relative to a dynamic frame of reference. Joint Program Development Office (JPDO)Concepts of Operations for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) considers 4 Dimension Trajectory (4DT) procedures a key enabler to Trajectory Based Operations (TBO). The JPDO defines 4DT as a precise description of an aircraft path in space and time . While NextGen assumes that this path is defined within an Earth-reference frame, many 4DT procedure implementations will require an aircraft to precisely navigate relative to a moving reference such as another aircraft to form aggregate flows or a weather cell to allow for flows to shift. Current methods of implementing routes and flight paths rely on aircraft meeting a Required Navigation Performance (RNP) specification and being equipped with a monitoring and alerting capability to annunciate when the aircraft system is unable to meet the performance specification required for the operation. Since all aircraft today operate within the NAS relative to fixed reference points, the current RNP definition is deemed satisfactory. However, it is not well understood how the current RNP construct will support NextGen 4DT procedures where aircraft operate relative to each other or to other dynamic frames of reference. The objective of this research effort is to analyze candidate 4DT procedures from both an Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP) and aircraft perspective, to identify their specific navigational requirements, assess the shortcomings of the current RNP construct to meet these requirements, to propose an extended 4 Dimensional Dynamic RNP (4D Dynamic RNP) construct that accounts for the dynamic spatial and temporal nature of the selected 4DT procedures, and finally, to design an

  14. Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility

    Bonnema, Bruce Edward

    2001-09-01

    This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

  15. Interim results from UO2 fuel oxidation tests in air

    An experimental program is being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to extend the characterization of spent fuel oxidation in air. To characterize oxidation behavior of irradiated UO2, fuel oxidation tests were performed on declad light-water reactor spent fuel and nonirradited UO2 pellets in the temperature range of 135 to 2500C. These tests were designed to determine the important independent variables that might affect spent fuel oxidation behavior. The data from this program, when combined with the test results from other programs, will be used to develop recommended spent fuel dry-storage temperature limits in air. This report describes interim test results. The initial PNL investigations of nonirradiated and spent fuels identified the important testing variables as temperature, fuel burnup, radiolysis of the air, fuel microstructure, and moisture in the air. Based on these initial results, a more extensive statistically designed test matrix was developed to study the effects of temperature, burnup, and moisture on the oxidation behavior of spent fuel. Oxidation tests were initiated using both boiling-water reactor and pressurized-water reactor fuels from several different reactors with burnups from 8 to 34 GWd/MTU. A 105 R/h gamma field was applied to the test ovens to simulate dry storage cask conditions. Nonirradiated fuel was included as a control. This report describes experimental results from the initial tests on both the spent and nonirradiated fuels and results to date on the tests in a 105 R/h gamma field. 33 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs

  16. Basis for Interim Operation for Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility

    This document establishes the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) for the Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility (FSS) as managed by the 300 Area Deactivation Project (300 ADP) organization in accordance with the requirements of the Project Hanford Management Contract procedure (PHMC) HNF-PRO-700, ''Safety Analysis and Technical Safety Requirements''. A hazard classification (Benecke 2003a) has been prepared for the facility in accordance with DOE-STD-1027-92 resulting in the assignment of Hazard Category 3 for FSS Facility buildings that store N Reactor fuel materials (303-B, 3712, and 3716). All others are designated Industrial buildings. It is concluded that the risks associated with the current and planned operational mode of the FSS Facility (uranium storage, uranium repackaging and shipment, cleanup, and transition activities, etc.) are acceptable. The potential radiological dose and toxicological consequences for a range of credible uranium storage building have been analyzed using Hanford accepted methods. Risk Class designations are summarized for representative events in Table 1.6-1. Mitigation was not considered for any event except the random fire event that exceeds predicted consequences based on existing source and combustible loading because of an inadvertent increase in combustible loading. For that event, a housekeeping program to manage transient combustibles is credited to reduce the probability. An additional administrative control is established to protect assumptions regarding source term by limiting inventories of fuel and combustible materials. Another is established to maintain the criticality safety program. Additional defense-in-depth controls are established to perform fire protection system testing, inspection, and maintenance to ensure predicted availability of those systems, and to maintain the radiological control program. It is also concluded that because an accidental nuclear criticality is not credible based on the low uranium enrichment

  17. Interim report of the task force on energy policy

    A Task Force was established by the Premier of British Columbia in August 2001 to draft an energy policy framework for the province. Based on best practices worldwide, and keeping in mind the specific energy needs of British Columbia, this framework aims at fostering energy development in British Columbia, in accordance with exemplary environmental practices. This interim report comprises the preliminary findings of the Task Force, and public input is sought before the final report is finalized and presented to government. The energy sector of British Columbia comprises hydroelectric power, oil, gas and coal resources. In addition, green energy and alternative energy technologies are being developed, such as wind, solar, and wave power, and hydrogen fuel cells. Industry and individual consumers are well served by the highly developed transmission and distribution systems for energy. Several strategic directions were identified by the Task Force for inclusion in the energy policy of British Columbia, to meet its full potential. They are: growth to ensure safe, reliable energy and take advantage of economic opportunities; diversification; competitiveness; industry restructuring and expansion; environmental imperative; government leadership; and community and First Nations' involvement. Some changes are also required for the continuing success of the energy sector in British Columbia: a move to fully competitive markets in the electricity system, the development of natural gas storage capacity in the Lower Mainland, additional considerations for coal use, and the development of alternative energy sources. It is expected that private capital and more energy supply will result from a fully competitive energy market, which in turn would lower energy costs. Jobs and income would increase as a result of the growth in the sector. Diversification makes good economic and environmental sense. tabs., figs

  18. Report of the Fourth interim meeting of the Seabed Working Group Engineering Studies Task Group, 3-6 October 1983, at Rijks Geologische Dienst, Haarlem, The Netherlands

    This report presents the results of the fourth interim meeting of the Seabed Working Group's (SWG) Engineering Studies Task Group (ESTG). This task group is charged with determining whether the engineering technology exists to emplace waste canisters in deep ocean sediments. The fourth interim meeting, held at Rijks Geologische Dienst, Haarlem, The Netherlands, 3-6 October 1983, reviewed progress made by the various national programs since the ESTG third interim meeting (July 1982) and developed a table of requirements for processing samples for a geotechnical properties data base. Other items addressed were (1) potential methods of instrumenting penetrators to obtain in situ measurements, (2) procedures for evaluating and quantifying the disturbed zone created by an emplaced penetrator, (3) review and modification of the current draft version of the SWG Five-Year Plan, (4) review and extension of the ESTG detailed plan for penetrator tests, and (5) details of the penetrator tests scheduled for March 1984 in the Nares Abyssal Plain using the research vessel M/V TYRO. The review of the national programs indicated significant progress when measured against the integrated ESTG five-year plan which results in a joint evaluation of engineering feasibility of subseabed disposal based upon (1) a demonstration of an emplacement capability, (2) an evaluation of the zone of sediment disturbance created during emplacement, (3) the existence of acceptable emplacement models, and (4) an acceptable engineering data base. A table of geotechnical sample-processing requirements is being developed to provide guidance for the other task groups that may have the opportunity to furnish suitable geotechnical samples to the ESTG as well as to provide some measure of consistency within the ESTG for the development of the engineering data base for the SWG study areas

  19. Environmental assessment for 881 Hillside (High Priority Sites) interim remedial action

    This Environmental Assessment evaluates the impact of an interim remedial action proposed for the High Priority Sites (881 Hillside Area) at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). This interim action is to be conducted to minimize the release of hazardous substances from the 881 Hillside Area that pose a potential long-term threat to public health and the environment. This document integrates current site characterization data and environmental analyses required by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) or ''Superfund'' process, into an environmental assessment pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Characterization of the 881 Hillside Area is continuing. Consequently, a final remedial action has not yet been proposed. Environmental impacts associated with the proposed interim remedial action and reasonable alternatives designed to remove organic and inorganic contaminants, including radionuclides, from alluvial groundwater in the 881 Hillside Area are addressed. 24 refs., 5 figs., 23 tabs

  20. Development of Accident Scenario for Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility Based on Fukushima Accident

    700 MTU of spent nuclear fuel is discharged from nuclear fleet every year and spent fuel storage is currently 70.9% full. The on-site wet type spent fuel storage pool of each NPP(nuclear power plants) in Korea will shortly exceed its storage limit. Backdrop, the Korean government has rolled out a plan to construct an interim spent fuel storage facility by 2024. However, the type of interim spent fuel storage facility has not been decided yet in detail. The Fukushima accident has resulted in more stringent requirements for nuclear facilities in case of beyond design basis accidents. Therefore, there has been growing demand for developing scenario on interim storage facility to prepare for beyond design basis accidents and conducting dose assessment based on the scenario to verify the safety of each type of storage

  1. Process evaluation of the Bonneville Power Administration Interim Residential Weatherization Program

    Lerman, D.I.; Bronfman, B.H.

    1984-08-01

    A process evaluation of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Interim Residential Weatherization Program was conducted between December of 1983 and March of 1984. For this evaluation seven of the utility participants were visited, as were the four BPA area offices serving those utilities. Interviews were also conducted with key staff members at BPA headquarters in Portland. This report describes the Interim Program and the elements of the BPA organizational structure involved in management of the program. It deals also with the implementation process at the seven utilities involved in the evaluation; perceptions of the key actors as to the strengths and weaknesses of the program; the adequacy of the BPA reimbursement for utility administrative expenses; and finally lessons for the Long-Term Program, the BPA residential program which followed the Interim Program in October 1983.

  2. The WFIRST Interim Design Reference Mission: Capabilities, Constraints, and Open Questions

    Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    The Project Office and Science Definition Team for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) are in the midst of a pre-Phase A study to establish a Design Reference Mission (DRM). An Interim report was released in June 2011, with a final report due later in 2012. The predicted performance of the Interim DRM Observatory will be described, including optical quality, observing efficiency, and sensitivity for representative observing scenarios. Observing constraints and other limitations on performance will also be presented, with an emphasis on potential Guest Observer programs. Finally, a brief status update will be provided on open trade studies of interest to the scientific community. The final DRM may differ from the Interim DRM presented here. However, the underlying requirements of the scientific programs are not expected to change, hence the capabilities of the IDRM are likely to be maintained even if the implementation changes in significant ways.

  3. THE IMPORTANCE OF FINANCIAL INTERIM REPORTING FOR THE POSITION OF COMPANIES

    Claudia‐Elena\tGRIGORAȘ‐ICHIM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance that each company must grant to the strategic sources of information generates our concern for analysis of the interim financial reporting. In every enterprise, there are doubts on the usefulness of interim financial reports, given the following elements: the necessary time for their preparation (relatively long, their restricted character and the resources necessary to establish them. Finding a common solution to these problems and, implicitly, increasing the interest for interim financial reporting, can help to increase the economic performance of the company, either by reducing the unnecessary costs related to time, or by increasing communication and transparency with third parties. An appropriate management can act early in the direction of counteracting the negative effects in their company or prevention of any commercial or production failures, the overall economic trends in that field and increasing productivity. Starting from these premises, we propose a research in order to capture the main aspects related to the mentioned issues.

  4. The role of PET for interim response assessment in patients with Hodgkins lymphoma

    18F 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) assessment after completion of therapy for lymphomas has been recently incorporated into the clinical guidelines and is also advocated in Poland by the National Health Fund. There is emerging evidence that in patients with Hodgkins lymphoma (HL) PET performed early during chemotherapy predicts the therapy response better than post-therapy PET. However, it is not clear which criteria should be adopted for an interim PET assessment because of minimal residual uptake (MRU), which hampers interpretation of PET scans as positive or negative. This brief review summarizes the evidence to date for the use of interim PET assessment in patients with advanced HL both using ABVD and BEACOPPesc chemotherapy. The rationale for performing an observational study in Poland aiming at defining criteria used for interim PET assessment which could be utilized in the future as a basis for early therapeutic modification in routine clinical practice is also discussed. (authors)

  5. 78 FR 53183 - Request for Public Comments Regarding the Interim Environmental Review of the Trans-Pacific...

    2013-08-28

    ... interim environmental review of the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP). The interim... with Executive Order 13141-Environmental Review of Trade Agreements (64 FR 63,169, Nov. 18, 1999) and its implementing guidelines (65 FR 79,442, Dec. 19, 2000) and report on such reviews to the...

  6. Immobilized High Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Alternative Generation and analysis and Decision Report 2nd Generation Implementing Architecture

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-09-14

    Two alternative approaches were previously identified to provide second-generation interim storage of Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). One approach was retrofit modification of the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) to accommodate IHLW. The results of the evaluation of the FMEF as the second-generation IHLW interim storage facility and subsequent decision process are provided in this document.

  7. 76 FR 17160 - Office of New Reactors; Final Interim Staff Guidance on the Review of Nuclear Power Plant Designs...

    2011-03-28

    ... COMMISSION Office of New Reactors; Final Interim Staff Guidance on the Review of Nuclear Power Plant Designs... Guidance (ISG) DC/COL-ISG-021 titled ``Interim Staff Guidance on the Review of Nuclear Power Plant Designs... Nuclear Power Plants,'' March 2007, Standard Review Plan (SRP), Section 8.3.1 and Sections 9.5.4 through...

  8. 76 FR 9743 - Foreign-Trade Zone Subzone 22- Chicago, IL, Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority, Baxter...

    2011-02-22

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone Subzone 22-- Chicago, IL, Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority, Baxter Healthcare Corporation (Pharmaceutical and Biological Product Manufacturing), Notice of.../ interim manufacturing (T/IM) authority, on behalf of Baxter Healthcare Corporation (Baxter) to...

  9. 76 FR 50172 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26, Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority, Makita Corporation of America...

    2011-08-12

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26, Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority, Makita Corporation of America, Hand-Held Power Tool and Gasoline/ Electric-Powered Garden Product Manufacturing... temporary/interim manufacturing (T/IM) authority, on behalf of Makita Corporation of America, to...

  10. 77 FR 23222 - Foreign-Trade Zone 59, Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority, Novartis Consumer Health, Inc...

    2012-04-18

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 59, Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority, Novartis Consumer Health, Inc., (Pharmaceutical Product Manufacturing); Notice of Approval On January 12, 2012, the... Foreign Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 59, requesting temporary/interim manufacturing (T/IM)...

  11. 75 FR 41726 - Interim Final Rules for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Relating to Coverage of...

    2010-07-19

    ... this effect on utilization depends on the price elasticity of demand and the percentage change in... April 14, 2010 (75 FR 19297). The second phase was interim final regulations implementing PHS Act... May 13, 2010 (75 FR 27122). The third phase was interim final regulations implementing section 1251...

  12. 40 CFR 262.212 - Making the hazardous waste determination at an on-site interim status or permitted treatment...

    2010-07-01

    ....212 Making the hazardous waste determination at an on-site interim status or permitted treatment... hazardous waste permit or interim status as soon as it arrives in the on-site treatment, storage or disposal... permitted treatment, storage or disposal facility. (e) If the unwanted material is a hazardous waste,...

  13. 33 CFR 96.350 - Interim Document of Compliance certificate: what is it and when can it be used?

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interim Document of Compliance certificate: what is it and when can it be used? 96.350 Section 96.350 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...? § 96.350 Interim Document of Compliance certificate: what is it and when can it be used? (a) An...

  14. 75 FR 984 - Draft Recommended Interim Preliminary Remediation Goals for Dioxin in Soil at CERCLA and RCRA Sites

    2010-01-07

    ... the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (40 CFR 300.430(e)(2)(i... AGENCY RIN 2050-ZA05 Draft Recommended Interim Preliminary Remediation Goals for Dioxin in Soil at CERCLA...) developed in the Draft Recommended Interim Preliminary Remediation Goals for Dioxin in Soil at...

  15. Measuring $\

    Mitchell, Jessica Sarah [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-01

    The MINOS Experiment consists of two steel-scintillator calorimeters, sampling the long baseline NuMI muon neutrino beam. It was designed to make a precise measurement of the ‘atmospheric’ neutrino mixing parameters, Δm2 atm. and sin2 (2 atm.). The Near Detector measures the initial spectrum of the neutrino beam 1km from the production target, and the Far Detector, at a distance of 735 km, measures the impact of oscillations in the neutrino energy spectrum. Work performed to validate the quality of the data collected by the Near Detector is presented as part of this thesis. This thesis primarily details the results of a vμ disappearance analysis, and presents a new sophisticated fitting software framework, which employs a maximum likelihood method to extract the best fit oscillation parameters. The software is entirely decoupled from the extrapolation procedure between the detectors, and is capable of fitting multiple event samples (defined by the selections applied) in parallel, and any combination of energy dependent and independent sources of systematic error. Two techniques to improve the sensitivity of the oscillation measurement were also developed. The inclusion of information on the energy resolution of the neutrino events results in a significant improvement in the allowed region for the oscillation parameters. The degree to which sin2 (2θ )= 1.0 could be disfavoured with the exposure of the current dataset if the true mixing angle was non-maximal, was also investigated, with an improved neutrino energy reconstruction for very low energy events. The best fit oscillation parameters, obtained by the fitting software and incorporating resolution information were: | Δm2| = 2.32+0.12 -0.08×10-3 eV2 and sin2 (2θ ) > 0.90(90% C.L.). The analysis provides the current world best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass

  16. 1987 Federal interim storage fee study: A technical and economic analysis

    This document is the latest in a series of reports that are published annually by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This information in the report, which was prepared by E.R. Johnson Associates under subcontract to PNL, will be used by the DOE to establish a payment schedule for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel under the Federal Interim Storage (FIS) Program, which was mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The information in this report will be used to establish the schedule of charges for FIS services for the year commencing January 1, 1988. 13 tabs

  17. Dynamics of Flexible Rotor Systems with an Interim Mass Unbalanced Disk Using a Spectral Element Model

    Sangkyu Choi; Usik Lee

    2014-01-01

    A frequency domain spectral element model is developed for a rotor system that consists of two spinning shafts and an interim disk or blade system. In this study, the shafts are represented by spinning Timoshenko beam models, and the interim disk system is represented by a uniform thick rigid disk with an unbalanced mass. In our derivation of the governing equations of motion of the disk system, the disk is considered to be wobbling about the geometric center of the disk at which the spinning...

  18. Retrieval of plutonium-contaminated waste materials from interim storage

    Plutonium-contaminated solid waste materials (PCM) (contact-handled transuranic waste) originating from the early UK defence program were placed for interim storage in existing structures at Drigg, a site some 6km (4 miles) from Sellafield (formerly known as Windscale), the UK reprocessing and plutonium production site. The waste was contained within steel drums of up to 205 liters (55 US gallons) capacity or was contained in larger timber and plastic cuboid containment, known as 'crates'. The paper will describe the typical constituents of the drummed waste and of the crated waste, a proportion of which consists of redundant glove box facilities from the early production lines themselves. British Nuclear Fuels pie (BNFL) became responsible for the Drigg site and waste stored on it at Company formation in 1971. In the mid-1970s, a commitment was given that PCM would be removed from the Drigg site leaving it to fulfil its role as the principal site in the UK for the disposal of solid low level radioactive waste from Sellafield and from elsewhere. Following a program of design and procurement of necessary facilities, retrieval of drummed PCM began in 1976. A team of operators, not full-time on this task, removed all drummed PCM from the existing storage structures, known as magazines, by 1986. This work is briefly reviewed in the paper. Five of the magazines contain about 200 non-drummed packages which remain to be removed. Facilities to permit the retrieval of that waste have been designed and are now being procured and installed so that first retrieval can begin during this year. The project team has addressed all aspects of safety and has needed to obtain necessary consents and authorizations from Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution, so far as the safety of the environment and of members of the public is concerned, from Her Majesty's Nuclear Installations Inspectorate, so far as the safety of the workforce is concerned, and from the Department of Transport, so

  19. Introducing Systematic Aging Management for Interim Storage Facilities in Germany

    In Germany twelve at-reactor and three central (away from reactor) dry storage facilities are in operation, where the fuel is stored in combined transport-and-storage casks. The safety of the storage casks and facilities has been approved and is licensed for up to 40 years operating time. If the availability of a final disposal facility for the stored wastes (spent fuel and high-level wastes from reprocessing) will be further delayed the renewal of the licenses can become necessary in future. Since 2001 Germany had a regulatory guideline for at-reactor dry interim storage of spent fuel. In this guideline some elements of ageing were implemented, but no systematic approach was made for a state-of-the-art ageing management. Currently the guideline is updated to include all kind of storage facilities (central storages as well) and all kinds of high level waste (also waste from reprocessing). Draft versions of the update are under discussion. In these drafts a systematic ageing management is seen as an instrument to upgrade the available technical knowledge base for possible later regulatory decisions, should it be necessary to prolong storage periods to beyond the currently approved limits. It is further recognized as an instrument to prevent from possible and currently unrecognized ageing mechanisms. The generation of information on ageing can be an important basis for the necessary safety-relevant verifications for long term storage. For the first time, the demands for a systematic monitoring of ageing processes for all safety-related components of the storage system are described. In addition, for inaccessible container components such as the seal system, the neutron shielding, the baskets and the waste inventory, the development of a monitoring program is recommended. The working draft to the revised guideline also contains recommendations on non-technical ageing issues such as the long-term preservation of knowledge, long term personnel planning and long term

  20. Plutonium Immobilization Form Development Interim and Final Data Report Summaries

    VanKonynenburg, R.; Ebbinghaus, B.

    2000-06-01

    Contained within this report are summaries of the available interim and final data summary reports provided by ANSTO, ANL, LLNL, and WSRC in support of work in the Form Development activity in the Plutonium Immobilization Development and Testing Program. Milestone reports and technical papers prepared for journals or conference proceedings are not included in this list. This document covers work from about 1997 to the present. All of the following reports are available from the Plutonium Immobilization Program Document Control Center (DCC) at LLNL. In most cases, the documents can also be obtained from the libraries the originating site or from the document's authors. All samples of the various formulations discussed in the following summaries were prepared by one of four processes: Wet-milling, dry-milling, an alkoxide-nitrate process, or attritor milling. The fabrication processes differ primarily in the mixing steps. The wet milling process is the one most commonly used. It is a simple ball milling process where water is added that provides intimate mixing of the materials. The dry milling process is a worst case dry mixing process. The alkoxide-nitrate process provides for very intimate mixing and is used when equilibrium samples are desired. The attritor milling process simulates the process being developed for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant. After mixing, the subsequent calcination and consolidation steps are generally the same. Most samples were consolidated by cold pressing and sintering although some of the earlier samples or Some of the single-phase samples were prepared by hot pressing. The sample identification numbers (ID's) that are referenced in the summaries (e.g. A-0, B3-13, etc.) are described in the Sample Test Matrix (PIP-99-012 and PIP-00-016). Samples which contain both plutonium and uranium are given the designation Hf-Pu-U samples. When Ce was used as a surrogate for Pu, the designation is Hf-Ce-U. When Th was used as a

  1. Colonie Interim Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Colonie, New York

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring at CISS began in 1984 when Congress added the site to the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. CISS property and surrounding areas were radioactively contaminated by operations conducted by National Lead Industries, which manufactured various components from uranium and thorium from 1958 to 1984. The environmental monitoring program at CISS includes sampling networks for external gamma radiation exposure and for radium-226, thorium-232, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. In 1992 the program will also include sampling networks for radioactive and chemical contaminants in stormwater to meet permit application requirements under the Clean Water Act. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other requirements in DOE.orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment. Results of environmental monitoring during 1991 indicate that average concentrations of radioactive contaminants of concern were well below applicable standards and DCGS. Concentrations of some chemical contaminants in groundwater were above-the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (Class GA) and EPA guidelines for drinking water. The potential annual radiation exposure (excluding background) calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual is 0.23 mrem (milliroentgen equivalent man), which is less than an individual would receive while traveling in an airplane at 12,000 meters (39,000 feet) for one hour

  2. Development of Thermal Analysis Capability of Dry Storage Cask for Spend Fuel Interim Storage

    As most of the nuclear power plants, on-site spent fuel pools (SFP) of Taiwan's plants were not originally designed with a storage capacity for all the spent fuel generated over the operating life by their reactors. For interim spent fuel storage, dry casks are one of the most reliable measures to on-site store over-filled assemblies from SFPs. The NUHOMSR-52B System consisting of a canister stored horizontally in a concrete module is selected for thermal evaluation in this paper. The performance of each cask in criticality, radioactive, material and thermal needs to be carefully addressed to ensure its enduring safety. Regarding the thermal features of dry storage casks, three different kinds of heat transfer mechanisms are involved, which include natural convection heat transfer outside and/or inside the canister, radiation heat transfer inside and outside the canister, and conduction heat transfer inside the canister. To analyze the thermal performance of dry storage casks, RELAP5-3D is adopted to calculate the natural air convection and radiation heat transfer outside the canister to the ambient environment, and ANSYS is applied to calculate the internal conduction and radiation heat transfer. During coupling iteration between codes, the heat energy across the canister wall needs to be conserved, and the inner wall temperature of the canister needs to be converged. By the coupling of RELAP5-3D and ANSYS, the temperature distribution within each fuel assembly inside canisters can be calculated and the peaking cladding temperature can be identified. (authors)

  3. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site annual site environmental report: Calendar year 1986

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in the City of Hazelwood, Missouri. Originally known as the Cotter Corporation site on Latty Avenue in Hazelwood, the HISS is presently used for the storage of soils contaminated with residual radioactive material. As part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Appropriations Act, remedial action and environmental monitoring program are being conducted at the site and at vicinity properties by Bechtel National, Inc., Project Management Contractor for FUSRAP. The monitoring program at the HISS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium, radium, and thorium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the scenario described in this report, the maximally exposed individual at the HISS would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 2% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than the exposure a person would receive during a round-trip flight from New York to Los Angeles. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the HISS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the HISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 11 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs

  4. 76 FR 57657 - Tetrachlorvinphos; Extension of Time-Limited Interim Pesticide Tolerances

    2011-09-16

    ... residues in whole milk and of which no more than 0.05 ppm is tetrachlorvinphos per se) at 0.05 ppm; poultry..., except kidney and liver.. 1.0 March 18, 2013. Milk, fat (reflecting negligible residues in 0.05 March 18... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Tetrachlorvinphos; Extension of Time-Limited Interim Pesticide Tolerances...

  5. Policy Effectiveness of Interim Assessments in Providence Public Schools. WCER Working Paper No. 2008-10

    Clune, William H.; White, Paula A.

    2008-01-01

    Many urban districts have adopted interim assessments in recent years as a supplement to annual testing. Possible purposes for such tests include monitoring and assisting student progress, aligning the curriculum, and practicing for state exams, but little is known about how effectively real systems advance these purposes. The Providence Public…

  6. 78 FR 76160 - Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS) Capital Fund Interim Scoring Notice: Reinstitution of...

    2013-12-16

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Claudia J. Yarus, Real Estate Assessment Center (REAC), Office of Public and Indian... by an interim rule published on February 23, 2011, at 76 FR 10136. The Capital Fund Program Indicator... Scoring Notice, also published on February 23, 2011, at 76 FR 10053. Under this indicator, PHAs...

  7. Evaluation of Hose in Hose Transfer Line Service Life for Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program

    RPP-6153, Engineering Task Plan for Hose-in-Hose Transfer System for the Interim Stabilization Program, defines the programmatic goals, functional requirements, and technical criteria for the development and subsequent installation of transfer line equipment to support Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program. RPP-6028, Specification for Hose in Hose Transfer Lines for Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program, has been issued to define the specific requirements for the design, manufacture, and verification of transfer line assemblies for specific waste transfer applications. Included in RPP-6028 are tables defining the chemical constituents of concern to which transfer lines will be exposed. Current Interim Stabilization Program planning forecasts that the at-grade transfer lines will be required to convey pumpable waste for as much as three years after commissioning. Prudent engineering dictates that the equipment placed in service have a working life in excess of this forecasted time period, with some margin to allow for future adjustments to the planned schedule. This document evaluates the effective service life of the Hose-in-Hose Transfer Lines, based on information submitted by the manufacturer and published literature. The effective service life of transfer line assemblies is a function of several factors. Foremost among these are process fluid characteristics, ambient environmental conditions, and the manufacturer's stated shelf life. This evaluation examines the manufacturer's certification of shelf life, the manufacturer's certifications of chemical compatibility with waste, and published literature on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on the mechanical properties of elastomeric materials to evaluate transfer line service life

  8. Safety evaluation for the interim stabilization of Tank 241-C-103

    This document provides the basis for interim stabilization of tank 241-C-103. The document covers the removal of the organic liquid layer and the aqueous supernatant from tank 241-C-103. Hazards are identified, consequences are calculated and controls to mitigate or prevent potential accidents are developed

  9. 77 FR 74512 - Interim Policy Leasing for Renewable Energy Data Collection Facility on the Outer Continental...

    2012-12-14

    ... testing facilities on the OCS (72 FR 62673). An applicant has submitted a lease proposal to BOEM pursuant... the Federal Register (72 FR 62673), BOEM announced that it had established an interim policy under... renewable energy activities and initiatives (73 FR 21152). BOEM also took into consideration the...

  10. Global Spent Fuel Logistics Systems Study (GSFLS). Volume 2A. GSFLS visit findings (appendix). Interim report

    This appendix is a part of the interim report documentation for the Global Spent Fuel Logistics System (GSFLS) study. This appendix provides the legal/regulatory reference material, supportive of Volume 2 - GSFLS Visit Finding and Evaluations; and certain background material on British Nuclear Fuel Limited

  11. 77 FR 65366 - Interim Procedures for Considering Requests From the Public for Textile and Apparel Safeguard...

    2012-10-26

    .... 8818, 77 FR 29519 (May 18, 2012). Background Title III, Subtitle B, Section 321 through Section 328 of... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS [Docket :121018560-2560-01; OMB Control :0625-0271 (Expiration: 10/31/2015)] RIN 0625-XC003 Interim Procedures for Considering Requests From the Public for Textile and...

  12. 78 FR 31886 - Interim Procedures for Considering Requests From the Public for Textile and Apparel Safeguard...

    2013-05-28

    ... 321 through Section 328 of the Implementation Act and Proclamation No. 8894, 77 FR 66507 (November 5... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS [Docket : 130430427-3427-01; OMB Control : 0625-0274 (Expiration: 04/30/2016)] RIN 0625-XC006 Interim Procedures for Considering Requests From the Public for Textile and...

  13. 77 FR 15997 - Interim Procedures for Considering Requests From the Public for Textile and Apparel Safeguard...

    2012-03-19

    ... force. In Presidential Proclamation 8783 (77 FR 14265, March 9, 2012), the President delegated to the... Apparel Safeguard Actions on Imports from Peru'', 76 FR 9556 (February 18, 2011). A request will only be... IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Interim Procedures for Considering Requests From the Public for Textile...

  14. 76 FR 9381 - Notice of Availability of Interim Staff Guidance Documents for Spent Fuel Storage Casks

    2011-02-17

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Availability of Interim Staff Guidance Documents for Spent Fuel Storage Casks AGENCY... Gordon, Structural Mechanics and Materials Branch, Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation... performing technical reviews of spent fuel storage and transportation packaging licensing actions.'' This...

  15. Neutron spectrometry at the interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel

    Králik, M; Studeny, J

    2002-01-01

    Dosimetric characteristics of neutron and photon components of mixed fields around casks for spent nuclear fuel have been determined at various places at the dry interim storage facility. The results obtained with metrological grade instruments were compared with data provided by usual survey meters for both neutrons and photons.

  16. Educative Accountability Policies for Tasmania's Locally Managed Schools: Interim Policy Research Findings.

    Macpherson, R. J. S.

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes interim findings of a policy research project in Tasmania, Australia, aimed at producing educative accountability options for identifying processes and criteria to improve learning, teaching, and leadership. Identifies preferred accountability criteria and processes in Tasmania's locally managed school district, maps patterns of…

  17. Geotechnical and environmental aspects of underground interim storage of spent nuclear fuel

    Šňupárek, Richard

    New Delhi : Central Board of Irrigation and Power, 2002 - (Ramamurthy, T.; Narasimhan, S.), s. 44-51 [Advancing Rock Mechanics Frontiers to meet the Challenges of 21st Century. New Delhi (IN), 24.09.2002-27.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK3012103 Keywords : underground interim storage Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  18. THE INTERIM EXPERTS’ COUNCIL RESOLUTION ON THE EMPA-REG OUTCOME TRIAL ISSUES

    M. V. Shestakova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The interdisciplinary interim experts’ council on March 3, 2016 in Moscow have considered the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial results and suggested a number of propositions and recommendations on further empagliflozin’s cardiovascular effects investigation and its clinical application in patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk.

  19. THE INTERIM EXPERTS’ COUNCIL RESOLUTION ON THE EMPA-REG OUTCOME TRIAL ISSUES

    M V Shestakova; S. A. Boytsov; O. M. Drapkina; T Yu Demidova; Drexel, H.; M B Antsiferov; N A Petunina; I. A. Chernikova; V. Yu. Kalashnikov; T P Bardymova; V. K. Protasov; A. Yu. Babenko; L. A. Ruyatkina; V V Klimontov; V. V. Salukhov

    2016-01-01

    The interdisciplinary interim experts’ council on March 3, 2016 in Moscow have considered the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial results and suggested a number of propositions and recommendations on further empagliflozin’s cardiovascular effects investigation and its clinical application in patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk.

  20. Interim-status groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-B-63 trench

    Sweeney, M.D.

    1995-02-09

    This document outlines the groundwater monitoring plan, under RCRA regulations in 40 CFR 265 Subpart F and WAC173-300-400, for the 216-B-63 Trench. This interim status facility is being sampled under detection monitoring criteria and this plan provides current program conditions and requirements.

  1. 14 CFR 60.21 - Interim qualification of FSTDs for new aircraft types or models.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim qualification of FSTDs for new aircraft types or models. 60.21 Section 60.21 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... aircraft, even though the aircraft manufacturer's aircraft data package is preliminary, if the...

  2. 46 CFR 8.570 - Interim approval of prototype SIP company or vessel plans.

    2010-10-01

    ... of 46 CFR part 2, subpart 2.01 of this chapter. ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interim approval of prototype SIP company or vessel... of prototype SIP company or vessel plans. (a) A company operating under an approved prototype...

  3. 76 FR 38719 - Interim Notice of Funding Availability for the Department of Transportation's National...

    2011-07-01

    ... 11, 2000, (65 FR 19477), or you may visit http://www.regulations.gov . For Pre-Applications and... application. The FY 2011 Continuing Appropriations Act requires a new solicitation of applications and... Discretionary Grants.'' In addition, this interim notice announces selection criteria and pre- application...

  4. AN EVALUATION OF THE HUMAN CARCINOGENIC POTENTIAL OF ETHYLENE GLYCOL BUTYL ETHER: INTERIM FINAL POSITION PAPER

    In order to determine the merit of a petition to remove ethylene glycol ether (EGBE) from the Agency's Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) list, EPA has developed an interim final position paper, An Evaluation of the Human Carcinogenic Potential of Ethylene Glycol Butyl Ether, t...

  5. 77 FR 4758 - Foreign-Trade Zone 59-Lincoln, Nebraska, Application for Temporary/Interim Manufacturing...

    2012-01-31

    ... Manufacturing Authority, Novartis Consumer Health, Inc. (Pharmaceutical Product Manufacturing), Lincoln, NE An... Lincoln Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 59, requesting temporary/interim manufacturing (T/ IM... request to the FTZ Board for FTZ manufacturing authority beyond a two-year period, which may...

  6. Experience collecting interim data on mortality: an example from the RALES study

    Kulbertus Henri

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The Randomized Aldactone Evaluation Study (RALES randomized 822 patients to receive 25 mg spironolactone daily and 841 to receive placebo. The primary endpoint was death from all causes. Randomization began on March 24, 1995; recruitment was completed on December 31, 1996; follow-up was scheduled to continue through December 31, 1999. Evidence of a sizeable benefit on mortality emerged early in the RALES. The RALES data safety monitoring board (DSMB, which met semiannually throughout the trial, used a prespecified statistical guideline to recommend stopping for efficacy. At the DSMB's request, its meetings were preceded by an 'endpoint sweep', that is, a census of all participants to confirm their vital status. Methods We used computer simulation to evaluate the effect of the sweeps. Results The sweeps led to an estimated 5 to 8% increase in the number of reported deaths at the fourth and fifth interim analyses. The data crossed the statistical boundary at the fifth interim analysis. If investigators had reported all deaths within the protocol-required 24-h window, the DSMB might have recommended stopping after the fourth interim analysis. Discussion Although endpoint sweeps can cause practical problems at the clinical centers, sweeps are very useful if the intervals between patient visits or contact are long or if endpoints require adjudication by committee, reading center, or central laboratory. Conclusion We recommend that trials with interim analyses institute active reporting of the primary endpoints and endpoint sweeps.

  7. 40 CFR 265.352 - Interim status incinerators burning particular hazardous wastes.

    2010-07-01

    ... HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Incinerators § 265.352 Interim status incinerators burning particular hazardous wastes. (a) Owners or operators of incinerators subject to this... particular hazardous wastes. 265.352 Section 265.352 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  8. 40 CFR 265.383 - Interim status thermal treatment devices burning particular hazardous waste.

    2010-07-01

    ... OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Thermal Treatment § 265.383 Interim status thermal treatment devices burning particular hazardous waste. (a) Owners or operators of thermal treatment devices subject to this subpart may burn EPA Hazardous Wastes FO20, FO21, FO22, FO23, FO26,...

  9. Wendell Flinchum to serve as interim chief of Virginia Tech Police

    Owczarski, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Lt. Wendell Flinchum, a 21-year veteran of the Virginia Tech Police Department, has been named the department's interim chief of police effective July 1. Flinchum's appointment follows the resignation of Chief Debra Duncan, who will leave the university to become police chief for the City of Monroe, N.C.

  10. A Note on Budget Balance under Interim Participation Constraints: The Case of Independet Types

    Tilman Börgers; Peter Norman

    2005-01-01

    We provide a simple proof of the equivalence between ex ante and ex post budget balance constraints in Bayesian mechanism design with independent types when participation decisions are made at the interim stage. The result is given an interpretation in terms of efficient allocation of risk.

  11. Interim Policy Options for Commercialization of Solar Heating and Cooling Systems.

    Bezdek, Roger

    This interim report reviews the major incentive policy options available to accelerate market penetration of solar heating and cooling (SHAC) systems. Feasible policy options designed to overcome existing barriers to commercial acceptance and market penetration are identified and evaluated. The report is divided into seven sections, each dealing…

  12. 26 CFR 1.848-3 - Interim rules for certain reinsurance agreements.

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Other Insurance Companies § 1.848-3 Interim rules for certain... illustrated by the following examples. Example 1. On July 1, 1991, an insurance company (L1) transfers a block of individual life insurance contracts to an unrelated insurance company (L2) under an...

  13. Barrier Free Access to the Man-Made Environment - A Review of Current Literature. Interim Report.

    Steinfeld, Edward

    Reviewed in the interim report on revision of the existing American National Standards Institute provision is current literature on barrier free design for disabled individuals. The report addresses the following topics: the history of access as a civil right; demographic aspects (including information on task dysfunctions of disabled persons…

  14. Global Spent Fuel Logistics Systems Study (GSFLS). Volume 2A. GSFLS visit findings (appendix). Interim report

    None

    1978-01-31

    This appendix is a part of the interim report documentation for the Global Spent Fuel Logistics System (GSFLS) study. This appendix provides the legal/regulatory reference material, supportive of Volume 2 - GSFLS Visit Finding and Evaluations; and certain background material on British Nuclear Fuel Limited (BNFL).

  15. The CARISMA project for measurement of fracture-mechanical characteristics on pre-exposed samples for the German PWR reactor lines. Status and interim report; Das Projekt CARISMA zur Ermittlung von Bruchmechanikkennwerten an vorbestrahlten Proben fuer die deutsche DWR-Baulinien. Status und Zwischenbericht

    Hein, H.; Keim, E.; Schnabel, H. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    In 1983 and 1985, samples of original pressure vessel material of German PWR reactors were exposed to radiation in the VAK reactor in order to ensure pressure vessel integrity in the context of future design changes and possible life-prolonging measures. In the CARISMA project (Crack initiation and ARrest of Irradiated Steel Materials), some of the test pieces were analyzed by mechanical-technological materials tests and the data were used for the further development of new safety concepts. One major goal of the project, which will run until 2007, is the provision of an extensive experimental data base for irradiated and non-irradiated materials from all four types of PWR reactors in operation in Germany. Irradiations were carried out in the VAK reactor in a fluency range of 6.10{sup 18} ro 4.10{sup 19}. The data base is applied to the two concepts of RT{sub NDT} and Master Curve, and fracture toughness characteristics are determinted both for crack initiation and crack arrest. (orig.)

  16. Age of stratospheric air in the ERA-Interim

    Diallo, M.; Legras, B.; Chedin, A.

    2012-07-01

    The age of stratospheric air is calculated over 22 yr of the ERA-Interim reanalysis using an off-line Lagrangian transport model and heating rates. At low and mid-latitudes, the mean age of air is in good agreement with observed ages from aircraft flights, high altitude balloons and satellite observations of CO2 and SF6. The mid-latitude age spectrum in the lower stratosphere exhibits a long tail with a peak at 0.5 yr, which is maximum at the end of the winter, and a secondary flat maximum between 4 and 5 yr due to the combination of fast and slow branches of the Brewer-Dobson circulation and the reinforced barrier effect of the jet. At higher altitudes, the age spectrum exhibits the footprint of the annual modulation of the deep Brewer-Dobson circulation. The variability of the mean age is analysed through a decomposition in terms of annual cycle, QBO, ENSO and trend. The annual modulation is the dominating signal in the lower stratosphere and in the tropical pipe with amplitude up to one year. The phase of the oscillation is opposite in both hemisphere beyond 20° and is also reversed below and above 25 km with maximun arising in mid-March in the Northern Hemisphere and in mid-September in the Southern Hemisphere. The tropical pipe signal is in phase with the lower southern stratosphere and the mid northern stratosphere. The maximum amplitude of the QBO modulation is of about 0.5 yr and is mostly concentrated within the tropics between 25 and 35 km. It lags the QBO wind at 30 hPa by about 8 months. The ENSO signal is small and limited to the lower northen stratosphere. The trend is significant and negative, of the order of -0.3 to -0.5 yr dec-1, within the lower stratosphere in the Southern Hemisphere and under 40° N in the Northern Hemisphere below 25 km. It is positive (of the order of 0.3 yr dec-1) in the mid stratosphere but there is no region of consistent significance. This suggests that the shallow and deep Brewer-Dobson circulations may evolve in

  17. Thermal-hydraulic experiment and analysis for interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel

    The experimental and numerical studies of interim storages for nuclear spent fuels have been performed to investigate thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the dry storage systems and to propose new methodologies for the analysis and the design. Three separate researches have been performed in the present study: (a) Development of a scaling methodology and thermal-hydraulic experiment of a single spent fuel assembly simulating a dry storage cask: (b) Full-scope simulation of a dry storage cask by the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code: (c) Thermal-hydraulic design of a tunnel-type interim storage facility. In the first study, a scaling methodology has been developed to design a scaled-down canister. The scaling was performed in two steps. For the first step, the height of a spent fuel assembly was reduced from full height to half height. In order to consider the effect of height reduction on the natural convection, the scaling law of Ishii and Kataoka (1984) was employed. For the second step, the quantity of spent fuel assemblies was reduced from multiple assemblies to a single assembly. The scaling methodology was validated through the comparison with the experiment of the TN24P cask. The Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT), temperature gradients, and the axial and radial temperature distribution in the nondimensional forms were in good agreement with the experimental data. Based on the developed methodology, we have performed a single assembly experiment which was designed to simulate the full scale of the TN24P cask. The experimental data was compared with the CFD calculations. It turns out that their PCTs were less than the maximum allowable temperature for the fuel cladding and that the differences of their PCTs were agreed within 3 .deg. C, which was less than measurement uncertainty. In the second study, the full-scope simulations of the TN24P cask were performed by FLUENT. In order to investigate the sensitivity of the numerical and physical

  18. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2

    CARRELL, R D

    2002-07-16

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

  19. Does the radiation from the interim storage in Gorleben affect the sex ratio of newborn children?; Beeinflusst die Strahlung aus dem Zwischenlager in Gorleben das Geschlechterverhaeltnis von Neugeborenen?

    Engelmann, H.W.; Schulze, H.; Wede, S. [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Gorleben (Germany); Mueller, S. [Studsvik GmbH, Pforzheim (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In the professional world but especially in public, the question is discussed whether ionizing radiation from nuclear facilities has a significant impact on the secondary sex ratio of newborn children in the vicinity of the plants. This issue is of exceptional importance in the region around Gorleben, where the opposition to nuclear facilities and activities for decades is particularly strong. At the site borders of the interim storage facility (TBL-G) of GNS the effective individual dose is about 0.2 mSv per year, mainly caused by neutron irradiation from 108 casks with high-level radioactive waste from reprocessing. In the surrounding villages there is no radiation measurable. Statistical studies allegedly have shown evidence that in some villages in the area and during certain periods, proportionately fewer girls were born in comparison to the average for the Federal Republic of Germany. Based on these purely statistical results henceforward was also alleged that neutron-induced secondary effects such as activation or secondary gamma radiation would be responsible for it. Monte Carlo calculations and special measurements yielded values of the dose at the plant border for activation products less than E-04 mSv/a and for secondary gamma radiation of about E-03 mSv/a. These results indicate that the ionizing radiation from the Gorleben interim storage facility cannot be held accountable for shifts of the secondary sex ratio.

  20. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY09 Report

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2010-01-01

    DOE’s Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier. Each instrument nest is composed of a capacitance probe (CP) with multiple sensors, multiple heat-dissipation units (HDUs), and a neutron probe (NP) access tube. The monitoring results in FY09 are summarized below. The solar panels functioned normally and could provide sufficient power to the instruments. The CP in Nest C after September 20, 2009, was not functional. The CP sensors in Nest B after July 13 and the 0.9-m CP sensor in Nest D before June 10 gave noisy data. Other CPs were functional normally. All the HDUs were functional normally but some pressure-head values measured by HDUs were greater than the upper measurement-limit. The higher-than-upper-limit values might be due to the very wet soil condition and/or measurement error but do not imply the malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 and FY08, in FY09, the soil under natural conditions (Nest A) was generally recharged during the winter period (October-March) and discharged during the summer period (April-September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements

  1. Observations of precipitable water vapour over complex topography of Ethiopia from ground-based GPS, FTIR, radiosonde and ERA-Interim reanalysis

    Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.

    2015-08-01

    Water vapour is one of the most important greenhouse gases. Long-term changes in the amount of water vapour in the atmosphere need to be monitored not only for its direct role as a greenhouse gas but also because of its role in amplifying other feedbacks such as clouds and albedo. In recent decades, monitoring of water vapour on a regular and continuous basis has become possible as a result of the steady increase in the number of deployed global positioning satellite (GPS) ground-based receivers. However, the Horn of Africa remained a data-void region in this regard until recently, when some GPS ground-receiver stations were deployed to monitor tectonic movements in the Great Rift Valley. This study seizes this opportunity and the installation of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) at Addis Ababa to assess the quality and comparability of precipitable water vapour (PWV) from GPS, FTIR, radiosonde and interim ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim) over Ethiopia. The PWV from the three instruments and the reanalysis show good correlation, with correlation coefficients in the range from 0.83 to 0.92. On average, GPS shows the highest PWV followed by FTIR and radiosonde observations. ERA-Interim is higher than all measurements with a bias of 4.6 mm compared to GPS. The intercomparison between GPS and ERA-Interim was extended to seven other GPS stations in the country. Only four out of eight GPS stations included simultaneous surface pressure observations. Uncertainty in the model surface pressure of 1 hPa can cause up to 0.35 mm error in GPS PWV. The gain obtained from using observed surface pressure in terms of reducing bias and strengthening correlation is significant but shows some variations among the GPS sites. The comparison between GPS and ERA-Interim PWV over the seven other GPS stations shows differences in the magnitude and sign of bias of ERA-Interim with respect to GPS PWV from station to station. This feature is also prevalent in diurnal and seasonal

  2. Security in the transport of radioactive material - interim guidance for comment

    While the IAEA has provided specific guidance for physical protection in the transport of nuclear material, its previous publications have only provided some general guidelines for security of non-nuclear radioactive material in transport. Some basic practical advice has been provided in the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionising Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) [1]. These guidelines were primarily directed toward such issues as unintentional exposure to radiation, negligence and inadvertent loss. Recently, the IAEA published a document on the security of sources, which included some general guidance on providing security during transport of the sources. However, it is clear that more guidance is needed for security during the transport of radioactive material in addition to those already existing for nuclear material. Member States have requested guidance on the type and nature of security measures that might be put in place for radioactive material in general during its transport and on the methodology to be used in choosing and implementing such measures. The purpose of the TECDOC on Security in the Transport of Radioactive Material being developed by the IAEA is to provide an initial response to that request. This interim guidance is being developed with a view to harmonizing the security guidance - as much as possible - with existing guidance from the IAEA for the transport of radioactive sources and nuclear material. It is also intended to harmonize with model requirements developed in 2002-2003 by the United Nations Economic and Social Council's Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods and on the Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals which was issued as general security guidelines for all dangerous goods, including radioactive material, and that will shortly be implemented as binding regulations by the international modal authorities

  3. Unpublished Interim Digital Geologic Map of Hot Springs National Park and Vicinity, Arkansas (NPS, GRD, GRI, HOSP, HOSP digital map) adapted from the interim Arkansas Geological Survey DGM-HSR-003 by Johnson and Hanson (2011)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Unpublished Interim Digital Geologic Map of Hot Springs National Park and Vicinity, Arkansas is composed of GIS data layers complete with ArcMap 9.3 layer...

  4. Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System

    Moyer, B.A.; Birdwell, J.F.; Delmau, L. H.; McFarlane, J.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of ±11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater

  5. Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System

    The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of ±11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater

  6. The experiences from interim spent fuel storage operation with CASTOR 440/84 CASKS in NPP Dukovany

    In this lecture are presented: principles of the CASTOR 440/84 design; design development works; commissioning of interim spent fuel storage facility; international transports of spent fuel utilising CASTOR 440/84 casks

  7. Dedicated-site, interim storage of high-level nuclear waste as part of the management system.

    Zen, E A

    1980-11-01

    Dedicated-site interim storage of high-level reprocessed nuclear waste and of spent fuel rods is proposed as a long-term integral part of the systems approach of the national nuclear waste isolation program. Separation of interim sites for retrievable storage from permanent-disposal repositories should enhance ensurance of the performance of the latter; maintenance of retrievability at separate sites also has many advantages in both safety and possible use of waste as resources. Interim storage sites probably will not be needed beyond about 100 years from now, so the institutional and technical considerations involved in their choice should be much less stringent than those for the selection of permanent sites. Development of interim sites must be concurrent with unabated effort to identify and to develop permanent repositories. PMID:16592904

  8. John Burton named interim director for distance learning and summer sessions; Learning Technologies formally partners with undergraduate education

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    John K. Burton, professor of learning sciences and technology in the School of Education in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences at Virginia Tech, has been named the university's interim director for distance learning and summer sessions.

  9. Detailed Rules for the Implementing the Interim Regulations of the People's Republic of China on Value-added Tax

    2009-01-01

    @@ Article 1 The Detailed Rules are formulated according to the provisions of the Interim Regulations of the People's Republic of Chi-na on Value-added Tax (hereinafter referred to as the Regulations).

  10. Assessment Of Radiation And Criticality Safety For Keeping 106 Spent HEU Fuel Assemblies At Interim Storage Support To Full Core Conversion Of The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    The paper presents calculation results of gamma dose rate and other parameters of Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) to evaluate radiation and criticality safety with the changing of water level in reactor tank and cooling time of burnt High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel assemblies (FAs) when keeping in interim storages. Before using ORIGEN code to calculate spent fuel photon source and decay heat, the library was modified with WWR-M2 burn-up dependent cross-sections of actinides generated by WIMS-ANL. The MCNP was used to estimate gamma dose rate and multiplication coefficient of spent fuel storages. The calculation was also benchmarked to measured gamma dose rate of a HEU burnt FA to affirm the calculation method. To obtain the conservative results of criticality safety, the all burnt FAs were assumed to be fresh ones. The calculation results show that retention 106 burnt HEU FAs at interim storage along with new LEU core 92 LEU FAs is met all requirements about radiation and criticality safety. (author)

  11. Spent fuel test-climax: technical measurements interim report, FY 1980

    The Spent Fuel Test--Climax (SFT-C), a test of the retrievable geologic storage of spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial power reactor, is under way at the Nevada Test Site of the US Department of Energy. Although the main thrust of the project is a demonstration of the feasibility of packaging, handling, storing, and retrieving the highly radioactive fuel assemblies, over 800 data channels have been installed to monitor the response of the rock to the heat and radiation produced by the fuel assemblies and to distinguish in that response the effect due to heat alone. Temperatures in the test array are tracking well with thermal modeling calculations performed before the test was started. The fuel assemblies have been in place since May 1980. The canisters have passed through skin temperature maxima of about 1450C and are currently declining in temperature. Evidence is emerging that the thermomechanical response of the rock surrounding the SFT-C is strongly affected by fractures and other discontinuities inthe rock. Most of the effort to date has been in project construction, design, and installation of the instrumentation. Although the data are available in raw form for verification purposes, the data are not as yet in a suitable form for detailed analyses. Work continues on the data management aspects of the project and in continued monitoring of the test

  12. Mass-spectrometric measurements of enhanced methanation activity over cobalt and nickel foils. Interim report

    Palmer, R.L.; Vroom, D.A.

    1976-12-20

    The kinetics of methane synthesis from H/sub 2//CO mixtures has been studied over Ni, Co, and Fe foils. The gas composition of a flowing reaction cell was analyzed using a differentially pumped, modulated mass-spectrometer. Ni and Co foils that have been previously oxidized, and then reduced in H/sub 2/ at 525-600/sup 0/K show a surprisingly high and specific catalytic activity for methane formation. No unusual activity was observed over iron for any of the surface treatments tried here. Evidence is also presented to support a mechanism for this highly specific reaction involving a labile surface carbon atom intermediate.

  13. 78 FR 78819 - National Conference on Weights and Measures 99th Interim Meeting

    2013-12-27

    ... with billing invoices or credit card bills in the future. Detailed receipts are especially important in... facilitate fuel economy comparisons. In a number of instances since the adoption of these ``equivalents..., devices that are used to buy from or sell to the public or used for determining the quantity of...

  14. Interim report: biogeochemical studies at the Geysers Geothermal Area

    Koranda, J.J.

    1979-10-12

    Field research at the Geysers Geothermal Area directed toward quantifying the deposition of trace elements known to be contained in the cooling tower drift is described briefly. Results from meteorological measurements, particle filtration, gas analysis of air, and a program of coordinated ecological measurements made at Unit 12 are listed. (MHR)

  15. South Philadelphia Passive Sampler and Sensor Study: Interim Report

    Starting in June 2013, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and the City of Philadelphia Air Measurements Services began collaborative research on the use of passive samplers (PSs) and stand-alone air measurement (SAM) systems to improve information on the...

  16. South Philadelphia Passive Sampler and Sensor Study - Interim Report

    Starting in the June 2013, the U.S. EPA and the City of Philadelphia Air Measurements Services (AMS) began a collaborative research project to investigate how sensor-based, stand-alone air measurements (SAMs) and passive samplers (PSs) can help improve information on air pollutan...

  17. A Comparative Study of ERA-40 and ERA-Interim Reanalyses: Uncertainties in Estimating Wave Forcing in Northern Winter

    Lu, Hua; Bracegirdle, Thomas; Phillips, Tony Tony; Turner, John

    2014-05-01

    The eddy heat flux is a fundamental quantity for understanding stratospheric variability. At 100 hPa it is a direct measure of the wave activity that propagates from the troposphere into the stratosphere. In the Northern winter it is dominated by the contribution from stationary waves and forms a significant component of the vertical Eliassen-Palm (E-P) flux. Based on the transformed Eulerian mean (TEM) equation, the divergence of the E-P flux acts as a body force on the mean flow and causes temperature variations in the stratosphere. Thus the accuracy and homogeneity of the heat flux and the associated E-P flux divergence are vital for studying stratospheric dynamics. The objective of this study is to detect possible errors in these wave forcing parameters estimated from the widely used ERA-40 and ERA-Interim reanalysis data sets produced by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). We focus on the December to February mean, during which the magnitude and variation of the wave forcing are largest. We examine two types of discrepancies. The first is based on the simple composite difference between the two data sets across their common period of the 1979/1980-2001/2002 winters. The second is to detect a discontinuity, or a sudden change of mean in each data set. We find four regions where significant discrepancies of zonal mean E-P flux divergence exist. They are: 1) polarward of 20° N in the upper stratosphere where the discrepancies are found to be associated with both the eddy heat flux v'T'and the eddy momentum flux u'v'; 2) poleward of 45° N in the middle to lower stratosphere where the discrepancies are primarily associated with the eddy heat flux v'T'; 3) the tropical to subtropical upper troposphere where the discrepancies are mainly caused by the difference in vertical eddy flux w'u'; and 4) the middle latitude upper troposphere where a large cancellation of error is detected between the vertical eddy flux w'u' and eddy heat flux v

  18. Safety features of proposed concepts for spent fuel dry interim storage

    Whichever solution is selected for the back-end of the fuel cycle, increasing quantities of spent fuel have often to be stored interim for rather long periods of time. Public acceptance of the corresponding storage facilities becomes more and more an important concern for all involved utilities in various countries. The fact that several governments have already issued sets of storage criteria which show significant differences with each other constitutes a weakness for all of them in front of their own population which no longer knows whom to believe. Therefore the need of an international consensus on basic rules and criteria for the safe interim storage of spent fuel has now become really urgent. The paper gives a brief view on this problem. (author)

  19. Early interim PET scan in Hodgkin lymphoma: where do we stand?

    Gallamini, A.; Hutchings, M.; Avigdor, A.; Polliack, A.

    2008-01-01

    chemotherapy. However, it is unclear whether FDG-PET retains this role if therapy is changed as a consequence of the scan, or if performed during a more intensive chemotherapy regimen such as BEACOPPesc, which is used for HL. This brief review presents the up-to-date evidence for the use and interpretation of......Positron emission tomography using [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG-PET) is an important tool for staging and treatment response assessment in malignant lymphomas. In Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), FDG-PET precisely predicts the therapy response when performed very early during standard ABVD...... early interim FDG-PET in HL, including recent preliminary results on early interim FDG-PET during BEACOPPesc therapy Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  20. Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report

    Pickett, W.W.

    1997-12-30

    This report outlines the design and Total Estimated Cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The grout vault facilities in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site were constructed in the 1980s to support Tank Waste disposal activities. The facilities were to serve project B-714 which was intended to store grouted low-activity waste. The existing 4 unused grout vaults, with modifications for remote handling capability, will provide sufficient capacity for approximately three years of immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) production from the Tank Waste Remediation System-Privatization Vendors (TWRS-PV). These retrofit modifications to the grout vaults will result in an ILAW interim storage facility (Project W465) that will comply with applicable DOE directives, and state and federal regulations.

  1. Dynamics of Flexible Rotor Systems with an Interim Mass Unbalanced Disk Using a Spectral Element Model

    Sangkyu Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A frequency domain spectral element model is developed for a rotor system that consists of two spinning shafts and an interim disk or blade system. In this study, the shafts are represented by spinning Timoshenko beam models, and the interim disk system is represented by a uniform thick rigid disk with an unbalanced mass. In our derivation of the governing equations of motion of the disk system, the disk is considered to be wobbling about the geometric center of the disk at which the spinning shafts are attached. The high accuracy of the proposed spectral element model is evaluated by comparison with the natural frequencies obtained using the conventional finite element method (FEM. The spectral element model is then used to investigate the effects of the unbalanced mass on the natural frequencies and dynamic responses of an example rotor system.

  2. The Time Needed to Implement the Blue Ribbon Commission Recommendation on Interim Storage - 13124

    The report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future [1] makes a number of important recommendations to be considered if Congress elects to redirect U.S. high-level radioactive waste disposal policy. Setting aside for the purposes of this discussion any issues related to political forces leading to stopping progress on the Yucca Mountain project and driving the creation of the Commission, an important recommendation of the Commission was to institute prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities. The Blue Ribbon Commission noted that this recommended strategy for future storage and disposal facilities and operations should be implemented regardless of what happens with Yucca Mountain. It is too easy, however, to focus on interim storage as an alternative to geologic disposal. The Blue Ribbon Commission report does not go far enough in addressing the magnitude of the contentious problems associated with reopening the issues of relative authorities of the states and federal government with which Congress wrestled in crafting the Nuclear Waste Policy Act [2]. The Blue Ribbon Commission recommendation for prompt adoption of an interim storage program does not appear to be fully informed about the actions that must be taken, the relative cost of the effort, or the realistic time line that would be involved. In essence, the recommendation leaves to others the details of the systems engineering analyses needed to understand the nature and details of all the operations required to reach an operational interim storage facility without derailing forever the true end goal of geologic disposal. The material presented identifies a number of impediments that must be overcome before the country could develop a centralized federal interim storage facility. In summary, and in the order presented, they are: 1. Change the law, HJR 87, PL 107-200, designating Yucca Mountain for the development of a repository. 2. Bring new nuclear waste

  3. ISOE EG-SAM interim report - Report on behalf of the Sub expert Group

    During its November 2012 meeting, the expert group decided to develop an interim (preliminary) report before the end of 2013 (with a general perspective and discussion of specific severe accident management worker dose issues), and to finalize the report by organizing the international workshop of 2014 to address national experiences, which will be incorporated to the report. The work of the EG-SAM focuses on radiation protection management and organization, radiation protection training and exercises related to severe accident management, facility configuration and readiness, worker protection, radioactive materials, contamination controls and logistics and key lessons learned especially from the TMI, Chernobyl and Fukushima Dai-ichi accidents. This interim report was completed through intensive work of all Group members nominated by the ISOE, and was accomplished during EG-SAM meetings through 2012-2013. This document gathers the different presentations given by the sub expert groups in charge of each chapter of the report

  4. Federal interim storage fee study for civilian spent nuclear fuel: a technical and economical analysis

    This report describes the study conducted by the Department of Energy (the Department) regarding payment charges for the federal interim storage (FIS) of spent fuel and presents the details of the study results. It describes the selection of a methodology for calculating a FIS fee schedule, sets forth the estimates of cost for construction and operation of FIS facilities, provides a range of estimates for the fee for FIS services, and identifies special contractual considerations associated with providing FIS services to authorized users. The fee is structured for a range of spent fuel capacities because of uncertainties regarding the schedule of availability and amount of spent fuel that may require and qualify for FIS. The results set forth in the report were used as a basis for development of the report entitled Payment Charges for Federal Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Civilian Nuclear Power Plants in the United States, dated July 1983

  5. Second interim assessment of the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal. Volume 1

    The nuclear fuel waste disposal concept chosen for development and assessment in Canada involves the isolation of corrosion-resistant containers of waste in a vault located deep in plutonic rock. As the concept and the assessment tools are developed, periodic assessments are performed to permit evaluation of the methodology and provide feedback to those developing the concept. The ultimate goal of these assessments is to predict what impact the disposal system would have on man and the environment if the concept were implemented. The second assessment was performed in 1984 and is documented in the Second Interim assessment of the Canadian Concept for Nuclear Fuel Waste Disposal Volumes 1 to 4. This volume, entitled Summary, is a condensation of Volumes 2, 3 and 4. It briefly describes the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal concept, and the methods and results of the second interim pre-closure and post-closure assessments of that concept. 46 refs

  6. FedEx Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 6-Month Interim Report

    Barnitt, R.

    2010-05-01

    This interim report presents partial (six months) results for a technology evaluation of gasoline hybrid electric parcel delivery trucks operated by FedEx in and around Los Angeles, CA. A 12 month in-use technology evaluation comparing in-use fuel economy and maintenance costs of GHEVs and comparative diesel parcel delivery trucks was started in April 2009. Comparison data was collected and analyzed for in-use fuel economy and fuel costs, maintenance costs, total operating costs, and vehicle uptime. In addition, this interim report presents results of parcel delivery drive cycle collection and analysis activities as well as emissions and fuel economy results of chassis dynamometer testing of a gHEV and a comparative diesel truck at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) ReFUEL laboratory. A final report will be issued when 12 months of in-use data have been collected and analyzed.

  7. Criticality safety evaluation for long term storage of FFTF fuel in interim storage casks

    It has been postulated that a degradation phenomenon, referred to as ''hot cell rot'', may affect irradiated FFTF mixed plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel during dry interim storage. ''Hot cell rot'' refers to a variety of phenomena that degrade fuel pin cladding during exposure to air and inert gas environments. It is thought to be a form of caustic stress corrosion cracking or environmentally assisted cracking. Here, a criticality safety analysis was performed to address the effect of the ''hot cell rot'' phenomenon on the long term storage of irradiated FFTF fuel in core component containers. The results show that seven FFTF fuel assemblies or six Ident-69 pin containers stored in core component containers within interim storage casks will remain safely subcritical

  8. Radiological aspects and behaviour of spent fuel considering long-term interim storage

    For spent nuclear fuel management in Germany, the concept of dry interim storage in dual purpose casks before direct disposal is applied. Currently operation licenses for storage facilities have been granted for a storage time of 40 years associated with the first emplacement of a cask. Operation licenses are based on safety demonstrations for all relevant safety issues as safe enclosure, shielding, sub-criticality and decay heat removal under consideration of operation conditions. In addition, transportability of the casks for the whole storage period has to be provided. Due to current delay in site selection and exploration of a disposal site, an extension of the storage time beyond 40 years seems inevitable. Relevant aspects for licensing of extended storage time will be discussed. Furthermore, an overview about current national and international activities on the safety of long-term interim storage will be given. (orig.)

  9. Interim storage for spent fuel elements. Bavarian Higher Administrative Court, judgement of February 7, 1985

    Spent fuel, which can be reprocessed under the conditions of sec. 9 a (1) Atomic Energy Act, is not classified as radioactive waste but as radioactive residues. Their interim storage is not subject to the provisions for waste disposal of sec. 9 a et seq. Atomic Energy Act, but to those of sec. 5 et seq. Atomic Energy Act. The construction and operation of a compact fuel storage in a cooling pond for the purpose of interim storage of irradiated fuel is subject to a licence pursuant to sec. 7 (1) Atomic Energy Act. External effects on a compact storage due to an incident 'plane crash' are to be attributed to the scope of residual risk because of the special precautions already considered within the design criteria and because of the comparatively favourable site of the plant Isar 1 at Ohu. (orig./HSCH)

  10. Financial compensation for municipalities hosting interim or final disposal facilities for radioactive waste

    Brazilian Law No. 10308 issued November 20, 2001, establishes in its 34th article that 'those municipalities hosting interim or final disposal facilities for radioactive waste are eligible to receive a monthly payment as compensation'. The values of due payments depend on parameters such as volume of wastes and activity and half-lives of the radionuclides. The method to calculating those values was established by the National Commission on Nuclear Energy, the Brazilian regulatory authority, by Resolution No. 10, issued in the August 18, 2003. In this paper we report the application of that method to a low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste interim storage facility at the Nuclear Energy Research Institute. (author)

  11. Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report

    This report outlines the design and Total Estimated Cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The grout vault facilities in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site were constructed in the 1980s to support Tank Waste disposal activities. The facilities were to serve project B-714 which was intended to store grouted low-activity waste. The existing 4 unused grout vaults, with modifications for remote handling capability, will provide sufficient capacity for approximately three years of immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) production from the Tank Waste Remediation System-Privatization Vendors (TWRS-PV). These retrofit modifications to the grout vaults will result in an ILAW interim storage facility (Project W465) that will comply with applicable DOE directives, and state and federal regulations

  12. Functions and requirements document for interim store solidified high-level and transuranic waste

    Smith-Fewell, M.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-17

    The functions, requirements, interfaces, and architectures contained within the Functions and Requirements (F{ampersand}R) Document are based on the information currently contained within the TWRS Functions and Requirements database. The database also documents the set of technically defensible functions and requirements associated with the solidified waste interim storage mission.The F{ampersand}R Document provides a snapshot in time of the technical baseline for the project. The F{ampersand}R document is the product of functional analysis, requirements allocation and architectural structure definition. The technical baseline described in this document is traceable to the TWRS function 4.2.4.1, Interim Store Solidified Waste, and its related requirements, architecture, and interfaces.

  13. Safety evaluation of interim stabilization of non-stabilized single-shell watch list tanks

    This report provides results of a review of recently completed safety analyses related to hazards associated with Interim Stabilization of Single analyses related to hazards included oh the Hanford Site Waste Tank-Watch Shell Tanks (SSTs) that are included on the Hanford List. The purpose of the review was to identify and summarize conclusions regarding the safety of interim stabilization of Watch List SSTs, and to highlight applicable limitations, restrictions, and controls. The scope of this review was restricted to SSTs identified List in the categories of flammable gas ferrocyanide, and organic salts. High heat tanks were not included in the scope. A Watch List tank is defined as an underground storage tank containing waste that requires special safety precautions because it may have a serious potential for release of high level radioactive waste because of uncontrolled increases in temperature or pressure. Special restrictions have been placed on these tanks

  14. Repacking of Cobalt 60 spent sources in the central interim storage

    After the transfer of the responsibility for the management of the Central interim storage for waste from small producers, located at the reactor centre in Brinje near Ljubljana, Slovenia, the national Agency for radwaste management (ARAO) started with most urgent activities to improve the utilization of the storage facility. One of the main tasks has also been the rearrangement of the already stored radioactive waste in order to reduce volume of the waste and to collect same radioisotopes in the containers. The latest campaign, performed in 2002/2003, was repacking of all Co-60 spent sealed sources in the storage facility and also at the producer's premises which were after conditioning put into two drums with concrete matrix and stored back to the Central interim storage. The preparation works together with the implementation are described in the paper. (author)

  15. 200 Area stack contamination. Interim report, August 2, 1948--October 11, 1948

    Lapple, C.E.

    1948-10-11

    In connection with the problem of eliminating contamination of the atmosphere by the exhaust from the 221 Building ventilation air stacks, sand filters were previously recommended. Construction of a sand filter in West Area is about completed and construction of a filter in East Area is well underway. This report summarizes the status, technical findings, and comments and suggestions since the writer`s last Interim Report, dated August 6, 1948, was issued.

  16. Democratic Republic of the Congo; Interim Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper Preparation Status Report

    International Monetary Fund

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the implementation of the activities under the interim poverty reduction strategy and progress toward the elaboration of poverty reduction strategy are described. Institutional framework is strengthened by the creation of the inter-ministerial committee on the implementation of the National Strategy for Poverty Reduction. The goal is to identify priorities and strategies at the community level, and their capacity to operationalize sectoral and thematic poverty reduction strateg...

  17. Detailed Rules for Implementing the Interim Regulations of the People's Republic of China on Business Tax

    2009-01-01

    @@ Article 1 The Detailed Rules are formulated in accordance with the Interim Regulations of the People's Republic of China on Busi-ness Tax (hereinafter referred to as the Regulations). Article 2 "Services" as mentioned in Article 1 of the Regulations refers to services within the scope of taxable items in the trans-portation, construction, finance and insurance, posts and tele-communications, culture and sports, entertainment and service industries (hereinafter referred to as taxable services).

  18. Record of Decision Colorado River Interim Surplus Guidelines Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Secretary of the Department of the Interior

    2001-01-01

    This document constitutes the Record of Decision (ROD) of the Department of the Interior, regarding the preferred alternative for Colorado River Interim Surplus Guidelines (Guidelines). The Secretary of the Interior (Secretary) is vested with the responsibility of managing the mainstream waters of the lower Colorado River pursuant to federal law. This responsibility is carried out consistent with applicable federal law. Reclamation, as the agency that is designated to act on the Secretary’s b...

  19. The British Society of Gastroenterology early gastric cancer/dysplasia survey: an interim report.

    De Dombal, F T; Price, A. B.; Thompson, H; Williams, G. T.; Morgan, A G; Softley, A; Clamp, S E; Unwin, B J

    1990-01-01

    This presentation describes interim findings in a series of 319 patients referred from 41 hospitals on the basis of histopathological findings of 'early gastric cancer', 'dysplasia', or 'worrying mucosal appearances'. Data were recorded using a predefined proforma, and histopathological material circulated amongst a 'panel' of three further pathologists. After this process, 132 patients were classified as having early gastric cancer and 63 as dysplasia. There was good agreement between pathol...

  20. Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel before Final Disposal in Germany - Regulator's view

    For spent nuclear fuel management in Germany the concept of dry interim storage in dual purpose casks before direct disposal is applied. The Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) is the competent authority for licensing of interim storage facilities. The competent authority for surveillance of operation is the responsible authority of the respective federal state (Land). Currently operation licenses for storage facilities have been granted for a storage time of 40 years and are based on safety demonstrations for all safety issues as safe enclosure, shielding, sub-criticality and decay heat removal under consideration of operation conditions. In addition, transportability of the casks for the whole storage period has to be provided. Due to current delay in site selection and exploration of a disposal site, an extension of the storage time beyond 40 years could be needed. This will cause appropriate actions by the licensee and the competent authorities as well. A brief description of the regulatory base of licensing and surveillance of interim storage is given from the regulators view. Furthermore the current planning for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high level waste and its interconnections between storage and disposal concepts are shortly explained. Finally the relevant aspects for licensing of extended storage time beyond 40 years will be discussed. Current activities on this issue, which have been initiated by the Federal Government, will be addressed. On the regulatory side a review and amendment of the safety guideline for interim storage of spent fuel has been performed and the procedure of periodic safety review is being implemented. A guideline for implementing an ageing management programme is available in a draft version. Regarding safety of long term storage a study focussing on the identification and evaluation of long term effects as well as gaps of knowledge has been finished in 2010. A continuation and update is currently underway

  1. Interim action record of decision remedial alternative selection: TNX area groundwater operable unit

    This document presents the selected interim remedial action for the TNX Area Groundwater Operable Unit at the Savannah River Site (SRS), which was developed in accordance with CERCLA of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution contingency Plan (NCP). This decision is based on the Administrative Record File for this specific CERCLA unit

  2. Comprehensive Medical Management of Rosacea: An Interim Study Report and Literature Review

    Del Rosso, James Q.; Baum, Eric W.

    2008-01-01

    Rosacea is a common inflammatory facial dermatosis seen in adults that exhibits considerable variety in clinical presentation. Multiple medical therapeutic options are available including topical and oral treatments. Optimal medical management of rosacea includes assessment of subtype and disease severity and use of appropriate skin care to reduce epidermal barrier dysfunction. This article provides an overall discussion of the medical management of rosacea and reviews interim results from a ...

  3. Limnological survey of the Cheshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire Meres. Interim data report

    Moss, B; McGowan, S.

    1992-01-01

    This is the Limnological survey of the Cheshire, Shropshire, and Staffordshire Meres: Interim data report produced by the University of Liverpool in 1992. This report looks at the Limnological survey data from Cheshire, Shropshire and Staffordshire Meres. Limnological data of the report covers: changes in water conductivity, Phenolphthalein Alkalinity, Total Alkalinity, pH, Chloride concentrations, Soluble reactive Phosphorus, Total Phosphorus, Nitrate Nitrogen, Ammonium Nitrogen, Silicate, C...

  4. An Evaluation of the Individual Training Account/Eligible Training Provider Demonstration. Final Interim Report.

    Ronald D'Amico; Alexandria Martinez; Jeffrey Salzman; Robin Wagner

    2001-01-01

    Presents interim findings from an evaluation of 13 grantees' efforts to deliver training services through the use of Individual Training Accounts, which participants can use to procure the training of their choice, as long as it is state-approved. Describes policies and practices at about the midpoint of the grant period. Discusses how eligible programs were selected and reviews the information available to participants for use in making training choices.

  5. An interim safety analysis of hepatocellular carcinoma patients administrating oral vitamin K with or without sorafenib

    Jung, Dong-Hwan; Hwang, Shin; Song, Gi-Won; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Kim, Nayoung; Tak, Eunyoung; Hong, Hea-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Vitamin K may plays a role in controlling hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell growth. In this study, we intended to present 5-year experience of 72 patients receiving oral vitamin K with or without sorafenib. Its end-point was to evaluate the safety of combination therapy using sorafenib and vitamin K. Methods An interim analysis was performed as a single-arm cross-sectional study, including 72 HCC patients who underwent liver resection or transplantation and administered ora...

  6. Operations and Maintenance Concept Plan for the Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW) Interim Storage Facility

    This OandM Concept looks at the future operations and maintenance of the IHLW/CSB interim storage facility. It defines the overall strategy, objectives, and functional requirements for the portion of the building to be utilized by Project W-464. The concept supports the tasks of safety basis planning, risk mitigation, alternative analysis, decision making, etc. and will be updated as required to support the evolving design

  7. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase I. Interim definition of terms

    This report documents interim definitions of terms in the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). Intent is to establish a common-based terminology integral to the probabilistic methods that predict more realistically the behavior of nuclear power plants during an earthquake. These definitions are a response to a request by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards at its meeting held November 15-16, 1979

  8. Solid rocket technology advancement for Space Tug and IUS applications. [Interim Upper Stage

    Ascher, W.; Bailey, R. L.; Behm, J. W.; Gin, W.

    1975-01-01

    Two-burn restartable solid propellant rocket motors for the kick stage (auxiliary stage) of the Shuttle Tug, or Interim Upper Stage, are described, with details on features and test results of the ignition and quench (thrust termination) systems and procedures, fabrication of propellant and insulation, explosion hazards of propellants, and comparative data on present and future motor design. These rocket motor systems are designed for upper stage augmentation of launch vehicles and possible service in Shuttle-launched outer planet spacecraft.

  9. Development of a novel interim bulk fuel storage facility for the PBMR / W.F. Fuls

    Fuls, Wilhelm Franz

    2004-01-01

    The PBMR is the first High Temperature Reactor being designed for commercial power generation in South Africa. It makes use of spherical fuel elements, containing coated uranium oxide particles encapsulated in a graphite matrix. The spent fuel generated from the reactor is stored in a storage system before final disposal. Such storage systems are called interim storage facilities, and normally make use of small transportable containers. The PBMR design makes use of bulk storage containers...

  10. An Evaluation of the Individual Training Account/Eligible Training Provider Demonstration: Final Interim Report

    Ronald D'Amico; Alexandria Martinez; Jeffrey Salzman; Robin Wagner

    2001-01-01

    Presents interim findings from an evaluation of 13 grantees' efforts to deliver training services through the use of Individual Training Accounts, which participants can use to procure the training of their choice, as long as it is state-approved. Describes policies and practices at about the midpoint of the grant period. Discusses how eligible programs were selected and reviews the information available to participants for use in making training choices.

  11. Interim sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. First and second quarters 1996

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Eight wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Interim Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site. These wells are sampled semiannually to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Modified Municipal Solid Waste Permit 025500-1120 and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. This document contains the analytical groundwater sampling data for these eight wells for the first two quarters of 1996.

  12. The Gorleben situation. Radwaste interim storage facility, conditioning pilot plant, exploration mine

    The radwaste interim storage facility has been in operation since 1983, the conditioning pilot plant is under construction, and exploration work is well under way in the mine for preparing the site for service as a radwaste repository. The name Gorleben practically has become a synonym term for ultimate radwaste disposal strategy, and for determined opposition against atomic energy. Dagmar Roehrlich has been on site on behalf of Energie Spektrum and reports the current situation. (orig.)

  13. Neuroplasticity-Based Cognitive Training in Schizophrenia: An Interim Report on the Effects 6 Months Later

    Fisher, Melissa; Holland, Christine; Subramaniam, Karuna; Vinogradov, Sophia

    2009-01-01

    Background: New cognitive treatments for schizophrenia are needed that drive persistent gains in cognition and functioning. Using an innovative neuroplasticity-based cognitive training approach, we report our interim findings on the effects on cognition and functional outcome at 6 months after treatment. Methods: Thirty-two clinically stable schizophrenia subjects were randomly assigned to either targeted cognitive training (TCT, N = 22) or a computer games (CGs) control condition (N = 10). T...

  14. The role of interim storage facilities in the nuclear waste management policy of Germany

    The article discusses the role of interim storage of spent fuel elements in the current nuclear waste management policy in Germany, and possible demand for additional interim storage facilities in the future, as a consequence of the shift in the radioactive waste disposal concept and the nuclear power opt-out policy of the Federal Government. Success or failure of the consensus on the nuclear power phase-out strategy, agreed between the Federal Government and the nuclear power industry on 14 June 2000, hinges not only but essentially on the availability of sufficient interim storage facilities for spent fuel elements accrued over the negotiated remaining operating periods of nuclear power plants. The NPP operators say the present radioactive waste management concept has to be put on a different basis and needs amending in response to the change in energy policy. For the electric utilities, the crucial test is whether the Federal Government will be able to fulfill their promise made during the consensus negotiations, namely that there will be no premature shutdowns of nuclear power plants because of a bottleneck in spent fuel storage capacity. (orig./CB)

  15. Safety of interim storage solutions of used nuclear fuel during extended term

    In 2013, the total amount of stored used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the world will reach 225,000 T HM. The UNF inventory in wet storage will take up over 80% of the available total spent fuel pool (SFP) capacity. Interim storage solutions are needed. They give flexibility to the nuclear operators and ensure that nuclear reactors continue to operate. However, we need to keep in mind that they are also an easy way to differ final decision and implementation of a UNF management approach (recycling or final disposal). In term of public perception, they can have a negative impact overtime as it may appear that nuclear industry may have significant issues to resolve. In countries lacking an integrated UNF management approach, the UNF are being discharged from the SFPs to interim storage (mostly to dry storage) at the same rate as UNF is being discharged from reactors, as the SFPs at the reactor sites are becoming full. This is now the case in USA, Taiwan, Switzerland, Spain, South Africa and Germany. For interim storage, AREVA has developed different solutions in order to allow the continued operation of reactors while meeting the current requirements of Safety Authorities: -) Dry storage canisters on pads, -) Dual-purpose casks (dry storage and transportation), -) Vault dry storage, and -) Centralized pool storage

  16. Lessons learned from the Siting Process of an Interim Storage Facility in Spain - 12024

    On 29 December 2009, the Spanish government launched a site selection process to host a centralised interim storage facility for spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. It was an unprecedented call for voluntarism among Spanish municipalities to site a controversial facility. Two nuclear municipalities, amongst a total of thirteen municipalities from five different regions, presented their candidatures to host the facility in their territories. For two years the government did not make a decision. Only in November 30, 2011, the new government elected on 20 November 2011 officially selected a non-nuclear municipality, Villar de Canas, for hosting this facility. This paper focuses on analysing the factors facilitating and hindering the siting of controversial facilities, in particular the interim storage facility in Spain. It demonstrates that involving all stakeholders in the decision-making process should not be underestimated. In the case of Spain, all regional governments where there were candidate municipalities willing to host the centralised interim storage facility, publicly opposed to the siting of the facility. (author)

  17. Application of NUREG/CR-5999 interim fatigue curves to selected nuclear power plant components

    Recent test data indicate that the effects of the light water reactor (LWR) environment could significantly reduce the fatigue resistance of materials used in the reactor coolant pressure boundary components of operating nuclear power plants. Argonne National Laboratory has developed interim fatigue curves based on test data simulating LWR conditions, and published them in NUREG/CR-5999. In order to assess the significance of these interim fatigue curves, fatigue evaluations of a sample of the components in the reactor coolant pressure boundary of LWRs were performed. The sample consists of components from facilities designed by each of the four U.S. nuclear steam supply system vendors. For each facility, six locations were studied, including two locations on the reactor pressure vessel. In addition, there are older vintage plants where components of the reactor coolant pressure boundary were designed to codes that did not require an explicit fatigue analysis of the components. In order to assess the fatigue resistance of the older vintage plants, an evaluation was also conducted on selected components of three of these plants. This report discusses the insights gained from the application of the interim fatigue curves to components of seven operating nuclear power plants

  18. Release of radionuclides following severe accident in interim storage facility. Source term determination

    Among the severe accidents that can cause the release of radionuclides from an interim storage facility, with a consequent relevant radiological impact on the population, there is the impact of an aircraft on the facility. In this work, a safety assessment analysis for the case of an aircraft crash into an interim storage facility is tackled. To this aim a methodology, based upon DOE, IAEA and NUREG standard procedures and upon conservative yet realistic hypothesis, has been developed in order to evaluate the total radioactivity, source term, released to the biosphere in consequence of the impact, without recurring to the use of complicated numerical codes. The procedure consists in the identification of the accidental scenarios, in the evaluation of the consequent damage to the building structures and to the waste packages and in the determination of the total release of radionuclides through the building-atmosphere interface. The methodology here developed has been applied to the case of an aircraft crash into an interim storage facility currently under design. Results show that in case of perforation followed by a fire incident the total released activity would be greater of some orders of magnitude with respect to the case of mere perforation. (author)

  19. Research on HLW and ILW Interim Storage Complementary to Deep Geological Disposal

    According to the Act (28 June 2006), interim storage is a research route for the sustainable management of HLW and intermediate level long lived radioactive waste (ILW) in France, along with partitioning/transmutation and reversible disposal in a deep geological formation. Interim storage is intended to play a complementary role to the geological reversible repository. ANDRA is responsible for defining and coordinating the research on both interim storage and reversible disposal of HLW/ILW. A long storage duration as considered before 2006 (up to 300 years) is no more an objective for the research. The paper details the role of interim storage complementary to the reversible repository, with respect to the origin and characteristics of various HLW and ILW to be considered. In particular, it will make it possible for HLW to benefit of thermal decay. ANDRA cooperates with the operators of existing storage facilities at production sites. Working groups have been created. The objectives are the following: - to learn from the experience gained at designing, building and operating the facilities, - to check the capability of existing and projected facilities to meet with the requirements of the National plan for the management of the radioactive matters and waste. In 2008, French waste producers updated the National inventory of radioactive waste and matters. According to the Act, they have incorporated an inventory of their storage facilities. ANDRA has made a review of these inventories to provide the Government with an evaluation of needs for new facilities. ANDRA has also investigated new design options of storage facilities on both production and disposal sites. On the repository site, interim storage above ground and in shallow geological formation have been studied. The waste packages are stored as produced, eventually secured in handling cask, or over-packed for disposal in steel (HLW) or concrete containers (ILW). A service life as long as one hundred years may

  20. Surface Water Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action Plan/Environmental Assessment and Decision Document, South Walnut Creek Basin, Operable Unit No. 2

    Volume 2 of this IM/IRA Plan contains OU 2 surface water, sediment, ground water and soil chemistry data, as well as the South Walnut Creek Basin Surface Water IM/IRA schedule and a tabulation of ARARs. (FL)