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Sample records for 90-nm cmos adaptive

  1. Record RF performance of standard 90 nm CMOS technology

    Tiemeijer, L.F.; Havens, R.J.; Kort, de, YAW Yvonne; Scholten, A.J.; Langevelde, van, H.J.; Klaassen, D.B.M.; Sasse, G.T.; Bouttement, Y.; Petot, C.; Bardy, S.; Gloria, D.; Scheer, P.; Boret, S.; Haaren, van, M.; Clement, C.

    2005-01-01

    We have optimized 3 key RF devices realized in standard logic 90 nm CMOS technology and report a record performance in terms of n-MOS maximum oscillation frequency f/sub max/ (280 GHz), varactor tuning range and varactor and inductor quality factor.

  2. CMOS sensors in 90 nm fabricated on high resistivity wafers: Design concept and irradiation results

    Rivetti, A; Wyss, J; Bisello, D; Costa, M; Kloukinas, K; Demaria, N; Pantano, D; Rousset, J; Battaglia, M; Mansuy, C; Potenza, A; Ikemoto, Y; Giubilato, P; Chalmet, P; Mugnier, H; Silvestrin, L; Marchioro, A

    2013-01-01

    The LePix project aims at improving the radiation hardness and the readout speed of monolithic CMOS sensors through the use of standard CMOS technologies fabricated on high resistivity substrates. In this context, high resistivity means beyond 400 Omega cm, which is at least one order of magnitude greater than the typical value (1-10 Omega cm) adopted for integrated circuit production. The possibility of employing these lightly doped substrates was offered by one foundry for an otherwise standard 90 nm CMOS process. In the paper, the case for such a development is first discussed. The sensor design is then described, along with the key challenges encountered in fabricating the detecting element in a very deep submicron process. Finally, irradiation results obtained on test matrices are reported. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  3. CMOS sensors in 90 nm fabricated on high resistivity wafers: Design concept and irradiation results

    The LePix project aims at improving the radiation hardness and the readout speed of monolithic CMOS sensors through the use of standard CMOS technologies fabricated on high resistivity substrates. In this context, high resistivity means beyond 400Ωcm, which is at least one order of magnitude greater than the typical value (1–10Ωcm) adopted for integrated circuit production. The possibility of employing these lightly doped substrates was offered by one foundry for an otherwise standard 90 nm CMOS process. In the paper, the case for such a development is first discussed. The sensor design is then described, along with the key challenges encountered in fabricating the detecting element in a very deep submicron process. Finally, irradiation results obtained on test matrices are reported

  4. A 2 GS/s 8-bit folding and interpolating ADC in 90 nm CMOS

    A single-channel 2 GS/s 8-bit analog-to-digital converter in 90 nm CMOS process technology is presented. It utilizes cascade folding architecture, which incorporates an additional inter-stage sample-and-hold amplifier between the folding circuits to enhance the quantization time. It also uses the foreground on-chip digital-assisted calibration circuit to improve the linearity of the circuit. The post simulation results demonstrate that it has a differential nonlinearity < ±0.3 LSB and an integral nonlinearity < ±0.25 LSB at the Nyquist frequency. Moreover, 7.338 effective numbers of bits can be achieved at 2 GSPS. The whole chip area is 0.88 × 0.88 mm2 with the pad. It consumes 210 mW from a 1.2 V single supply. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  5. A 90 nm CMOS, 6 μW Power-Proportional Acoustic Sensing Frontend for Voice Activity Detection

    Badami, Komail; Lauwereins, Steven; Meert, Wannes; Verhelst, Marian

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a sub-6 µW acoustic front-end for speech/non-speech classification in a voice activity detection (VAD) in 90 nm CMOS. Power consumption of the VAD system is minimized by architectural design around a new Power-Proportional sensing paradigm and the use of machine-learning assisted moderate-precision analog analytics for classification. Power-Proportional sensing allows for hierarchical and context-aware scaling of the frontend’s power consumption depending on the complexity ...

  6. The temperature dependence of single-event transients in 90-nm CMOS dual-well and triple-well NMOSFETs

    Li Da-Wei; Qin Jun-Rui; Chen Shu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the temperature dependence of single-event transients (SETs) in 90-nm complementary metat-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) dual-well and triple-well negative metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (NMOSFETs).Technology computer-aided design (TCAD) three-dimensional (3D) simulations show that the drain current pulse duration increases from 85 ps to 245 ps for triple-well but only increases from 65 ps to 98 ps for dual-well when the temperature increases from-55 ℃C to 125 ℃C,which is closely correlated with the NMOSFET sources.This reveals that the pulse width increases with temperature in dual-well due to the weakening of the anti-amplification bipolar effect while increases with temperature in triple-well due to the enhancement of the bipolar amplification.

  7. A low power 20 GHz comparator in 90 nm COMS technology

    A low power 20 GHz CMOS dynamic latched regeneration comparator for ultra-high-speed, low-power analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) is proposed. The time constant in both the tracking and regeneration phases of the latch are analyzed based on the small signal model. A dynamic source-common logic (SCL) topology is adopted in the master-slave latch to increase the tracking and regeneration speeds. Implemented in 90 nm CMOS technology, this comparator only occupies a die area of 65 × 150 μm2 with a power dissipation of 14 mW from a 1.2 V power supply. The measurement results show that the comparator can work up to 20 GHz. Operating with an input frequency of 1 GHz, the circuit can oversample up to 20 Giga-sampling-per-second (GSps) with 5 bits resolution; while operating at Nyquist, the comparator can sample up to 20 GSps with 4 bits resolution. The comparator has been successfully used in a 20 GSps flash ADC and the circuit can be also used in other high speed applications. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  8. A low power 20 GHz comparator in 90 nm COMS technology

    Kai, Tang; Qiao, Meng; Zhigong, Wang; Ting, Guo

    2014-05-01

    A low power 20 GHz CMOS dynamic latched regeneration comparator for ultra-high-speed, low-power analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) is proposed. The time constant in both the tracking and regeneration phases of the latch are analyzed based on the small signal model. A dynamic source-common logic (SCL) topology is adopted in the master-slave latch to increase the tracking and regeneration speeds. Implemented in 90 nm CMOS technology, this comparator only occupies a die area of 65 × 150 μm2 with a power dissipation of 14 mW from a 1.2 V power supply. The measurement results show that the comparator can work up to 20 GHz. Operating with an input frequency of 1 GHz, the circuit can oversample up to 20 Giga-sampling-per-second (GSps) with 5 bits resolution; while operating at Nyquist, the comparator can sample up to 20 GSps with 4 bits resolution. The comparator has been successfully used in a 20 GSps flash ADC and the circuit can be also used in other high speed applications.

  9. CMOS continuous-time adaptive equalizers for high-speed serial links

    Gimeno Gasca, Cecilia; Aldea Chagoyen, Concepción

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces readers to the design of adaptive equalization solutions integrated in standard CMOS technology for high-speed serial links. Since continuous-time equalizers offer various advantages as an alternative to discrete-time equalizers at multi-gigabit rates, this book provides a detailed description of continuous-time adaptive equalizers design - both at transistor and system levels-, their main characteristics and performances. The authors begin with a complete review and analysis of the state of the art of equalizers for wireline applications, describing why they are necessary, their types, and their main applications. Next, theoretical fundamentals of continuous-time adaptive equalizers are explored. Then, new structures are proposed to implement the different building blocks of the adaptive equalizer: line equalizer, loop-filters, power comparator, etc.  The authors demonstrate the design of a complete low-power, low-voltage, high-speed, continuous-time adaptive equalizer. Finally, a cost-...

  10. Design of a CMOS Adaptive Charge Pump with Dynamic Current Matching

    2006-01-01

    A novel structure for a charge pump circuit is proposed, in which the charge-pump (CP) current can adaptively regulated according to phase-locked loops (PLL) frequency synthesis demand. The current follow technology is used to make perfect current matching characteristics, and the two differential inverters are implanted to increase the speed of charge pump and decrease output spur due to theory of low voltage difference signal. Simulation results, with 1st silicon 0.25 μm 2.5 V complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) mixed-signal process, show the good current matching characteristics regardless of the charge pump output voltages.

  11. Adaptive Threshold Neural Spike Detector Using Stationary Wavelet Transform in CMOS.

    Yang, Yuning; Boling, C Sam; Kamboh, Awais M; Mason, Andrew J

    2015-11-01

    Spike detection is an essential first step in the analysis of neural recordings. Detection at the frontend eases the bandwidth requirement for wireless data transfer of multichannel recordings to extra-cranial processing units. In this work, a low power digital integrated spike detector based on the lifting stationary wavelet transform is presented and developed. By monitoring the standard deviation of wavelet coefficients, the proposed detector can adaptively set a threshold value online for each channel independently without requiring user intervention. A prototype 16-channel spike detector was designed and tested in an FPGA. The method enables spike detection with nearly 90% accuracy even when the signal-to-noise ratio is as low as 2. The design was mapped to 130 nm CMOS technology and shown to occupy 0.014 mm(2) of area and dissipate 1.7 μW of power per channel, making it suitable for implantable multichannel neural recording systems. PMID:25955990

  12. Design of an adaptive LNA for hand‐held devices in a 1‐V 90‐nm standard RF CMOS technology: From circuit analysis to layout

    Edwin Becerra‐Álvarez

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals the design of a reconfigurable Low‐Noise Amplifier (LNA for the next generation of wireless hand‐held devicesby using a lumped circuit approach based on physical laws. The purpose is not only to present simulation results showing thefulfillment of different standard specifications, but also to demonstrate that each design step has a physical meaning such thatthe mathematical design flow is simple as well as suitable for hand‐work in both laboratory and classroom. The circuit underanalysis, which is designed according to technological design rules of a 90nm CMOS technology, is a two‐stage topologyincluding inductive‐source degeneration, MOS‐varactor based tuning networks, and programmable bias currents. This proposal,with reduced number of inductors and minimum power dissipation, adapts its performance to different standard specifications;the LNA is designed to cope with the requirements of GSM (PCS1900, WCDMA, Bluetooth and WLAN (IEEE 802.11b‐g. In orderto evaluate the effect of technology parasitics on the LNA performance, simulation results demonstrate that the LNA featuresNF16dB, S11‐3.3 dBm over the 1.85‐2.48 GHz band. For all the standards understudy the adaptive power consumption varies from 25.3 mW to 53.3mW at a power supply of 1‐V. The layout of thereconfigurable LNA occupies an area of 1.8mm2.

  13. Low-Power Low-Noise IQ Modulator Designs in 90nm CMOS for GSM/EDGE/WCDMA/LTE

    Johansson, Mattias; Ehrs, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    The current consumption of the IQ modulator is a significant part of the totalcurrent consumption of a mobile transmitter platform and reducing it is of greatinterest. Also, as the WCDMA/LTE standards specifies full duplex transmissionsand Tx and Rx are most often using the same antenna, it is crucial to have asolution with low noise generation. Two new proposals have been studied with theaim to reduce the current consumption and noise contribution of the IQ modulator. A current mode envelope...

  14. FPGA chip performance improvement with gate shrink through alternating PSM 90nm process

    Yu, Chun-Chi; Shieh, Ming-Feng; Liu, Erick; Lin, Benjamin; Ho, Jonathan; Wu, Xin; Panaite, Petrisor; Chacko, Manoj; Zhang, Yunqiang; Lei, Wen-Kang

    2005-11-01

    In the post-physical verification space called 'Mask Synthesis' a key component of design-for-manufacturing (DFM), double-exposure based, dark-field, alternating PSM (Alt-PSM) is being increasingly applied at the 90nm node in addition with other mature resolution enhancement techniques (RETs) such as optical proximity correction (OPC) and sub-resolution assist features (SRAF). Several high-performance IC manufacturers already use alt-PSM technology in 65nm production. At 90nm having strong control over the lithography process is a critical component in meeting targeted yield goals. However, implementing alt-PSM in production has been challenging due to several factors such as phase conflict errors, mask manufacturing, and the increased production cost due to the need for two masks in the process. Implementation of Alt-PSM generally requires phase compliance rules and proper phase topology in the layout and this has been successful for the technology node with these rules implemented. However, this may not be true for a mature, production process technology, in this case 90 nm. Especially, in the foundry-fabless business model where the foundry provides a standard set of design rules to its customers for a given process technology, and where not all the foundry customers require Alt-PSM in their tapeout flow. With minimum design changes, design houses usually are motivated by higher product performance for the existing designs. What follows is an in-depth review of the motivation to apply alt-PSM on a production FPGA, the DFM challenges to each partner faced, its effect on the tapeout flow, and how design, manufacturing, and EDA teams worked together to resolve phase conflicts, tapeout the chip, and finally verify the silicon results in production.

  15. A low power CMOS 3.3 Gbps continuous-time adaptive equalizer for serial link

    Ju Hao; Zhou Yumei; Zhao Jianzhong

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes using a high-speed continuous-time analog adaptive equalizer as the front-end of a receiver for a high-speed serial interface,which is compliant with many serial communication specifications such as USB2.0,PCI-E2.0 and Rapid IO.The low and high frequency loops are merged to decrease the effect of delay between the two paths,in addition,the infinite input impedance facilitates the cascade stages in order to improve the high frequency boosting gain.The implemented circuit architecture could facilitate the wide frequency range from 1 to 3.3 Gbps with different length FR4-PCB traces,which brings as much as 25 dB loss.The replica control circuits are injected to provide a convenient way to regulate common-mode voltage for full differential operation.In addition,AC coupling is adopted to suppress the common input from the forward stage.A prototype chip was fabricated in 0.18-μm 1P6M mixed-signal CMOS technology.The actual area is 0.6 × 0.57 mm2 and the analog equalizer operates up to 3.3 Gbps over FR4-PCB trace with 25 dB loss.The overall power dissipation is approximately 23.4 mW.

  16. Development of CMOS Pixel Sensors fully adapted to the ILD Vertex Detector Requirements

    Winter, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Claus, Gilles; Dorokhov, Andrei; Goffe, Mathieu; Hu-Guo, Christine; Morel, Frederic; Valin, Isabelle; Voutsinas, Georgios; Zhang, Liang

    2012-01-01

    CMOS Pixel Sensors are making steady progress towards the specifications of the ILD vertex detector. Recent developments are summarised, which show that these devices are close to comply with all major requirements, in particular the read-out speed needed to cope with the beam related background. This achievement is grounded on the double- sided ladder concept, which allows combining signals generated by a single particle in two different sensors, one devoted to spatial resolution and the other to time stamp, both assembled on the same mechanical support. The status of the development is overviewed as well as the plans to finalise it using an advanced CMOS process.

  17. DOE experiment for scattering bars optimization at the 90nm node

    Bouton, G.; Connolly, B.; Courboin, D.; Di Giacomo, A.; Gasnier, F.; Lallement, R.; Parker, D.; Pindo, M.; Richoilley, J. C.; Royere, F.; Rameau-Savio, A.; Tissier, M.

    2011-03-01

    Scattering bars (SB) are sub-resolution lines added to the original database during Resolution Enhancement Techniques (RET) treatments. Their goal is stabilizing the CD of the adjacent polygons (by suppressing or reducing secondary diffraction waves). SB increase the process window in the litho process by lowering the first derivative of the CD. Moreover, the detailed knowledge of SB behavior around the fab working point is a must for future shrinks and for preparing the next technology nodes. SB are inserted in the generation of critical levels for STMicroelectronics 90 nm technology embedded memories before invoking the Model for Optical Proximity Corrections (MBOPC). This allows the software to calculate their contribution to the intensity in the aerial image and integrate their effects in Edge Proximity Error (EPE) corrections. However the Rule-Based insertion of these assist features still leaves behind occurrences of conflicting priorities as in the image below. (See manuscript PDF)Detection of Hot Spots in 2D simulations for die treatment validation (done on BRION equipment on each critical level before mask making) is in most cases correlated with SB singularities, at least for CD non-uniformity, bridging issues and necking in correspondence with OPC fragmentation effects. Within the framework of the MaXSSIMM project, we established a joint STMicroelectronics and Toppan Photomasks team to explore the influence of assist features (CD, distance), convex and concave corner rounding and CD uniformity by means of specific test patterns. The proposed study concerns the algorithms used to define the mask shop input as well as the physical mask etching. A set of test cases, based on elementary test patterns, each one including a list of geometrical variations, has been defined. As the number of configurations becomes rapidly very large (tens of thousands) we had to apply Design of Experiments (DOE) algorithms in order to reduce the number of measurements to a

  18. Phase-change memory technology with self-aligned μTrench cell architecture for 90 nm node and beyond

    Pirovano, A.; Pellizzer, F.; Tortorelli, I.; Riganó, A.; Harrigan, R.; Magistretti, M.; Petruzza, P.; Varesi, E.; Redaelli, A.; Erbetta, D.; Marangon, T.; Bedeschi, F.; Fackenthal, R.; Atwood, G.; Bez, R.

    2008-09-01

    A novel self-aligned μTrench-based cell architecture for phase change memory (PCM) process is presented. The low programming current and the good dimensional control of the sub-lithographic features achieved with the μTrench structure are combined with a self-aligned patterning strategy that simplify the integration process in term of alignment tolerances and of number of critical masks. The proposed architecture has been integrated in a 90 nm 128 Mb vehicle based on a pnp bipolar junction transistor for the array selection. The good active and leakage currents achieved by the purposely optimized selecting transistors combined with programming currents of 300 μA of the storage element and good distributions measured on the 128 Mb array demonstrate the suitability of the proposed architecture for the production of high-density PCM arrays at 90 nm and beyond.

  19. Impact of Channel Engineering on Unity Gain Frequency and Noise-Figure in 90nm NMOS Transistor for RF Applications

    Srinivasan, R; Bhat, Navakanta

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied and compared the RF performance metrics, unity gain frequency $(f_t)$ and Noise Figure (NF), of the devices with channel engineering consisting of halo and super steep retrograde channel (SSRC) implants, and the devices with uniform channel doping concentration, using process, device, and mixed mode simulations. The simulation results show that at 90nm gate lengths, for a given off-state leakage constraint $(I_O_F_F)$, devices with uniform channel doping conc...

  20. ESD protection device and circuit design for advanced CMOS technologies

    Semenov, Oleg; Sachdev, Manoj

    2008-01-01

    Strategies for design-oriented ESD protectionDistributed ESD protection networks optimized for sub-90nm CMOS ICsESD protection strategies for smart power ICs used in automotive industryThe impact of burn-in testing (accelerated test methods) on the ESD robustnessThe charge board ESD (CBM) testing used for wireless products

  1. Full on-chip and area-efficient CMOS LDO with zero to maximum load stability using adaptive frequency compensation

    A full on-chip and area-efficient low-dropout linear regulator (LDO) is presented. By using the proposed adaptive frequency compensation (AFC) technique, full on-chip integration is achieved without compromising the LDO's stability in the full output current range. Meanwhile, the use of a compact pass transistor (the compact pass transistor serves as the gain fast roll-off output stage in the AFC technique) has enabled the LDO to be very area-efficient. The proposed LDO is implemented in standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology and occupies an active area as small as 220 x 320 μm2, which is a reduction to 58% compared to state-of-the-art designs using technologies with the same feature size. Measurement results show that the LDO can deliver 0-60 mA output current with 54 μA quiescent current consumption and the regulated output voltage is 1.8 V with an input voltage range from 2 to 3.3 V. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  2. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware utilizing a commercial CMOS process opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  3. Performance Analysis of Si3N4 Capping Layer and SOI Technology in Sub 90 nm PMOS Device

    Rahim, Noor Ashikin Binti Abdul; Abdullah, Mohd. Hanapiah B.; Rusop, Mohamad

    2009-06-01

    This technical paper investigates the electrical analysis in sub 90 nm of PMOS. The investigation was carried out by using two different methods which is PMOS with strained silicon and Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology. Strained silicon engineering has become a key innovation to enhance device on current. Recently, SOI technology has been widely accepted for use in mainstream high performance logic applications due to some advantageous offered over the bulk silicon. The performance of the devices is analyzed by focusing on the electrical characteristics of Id-Vd and Id-Vg curves for three different structures. Firstly, PMOS with strained silicon of Si3N4 capping layer covering the gate area and secondly the device with and without SOI technology. The fabrication process simulation was simulated by using SILVACO TCAD ATHENA simulator and the electrical characteristic was simulated by SILVACO TCAD ATLAS simulator to obtain Id-Vd and Id-Vg curves. A fruitful and knowledgeable results were reported from this paper, it could be seen that high tensile strain introduced to the device causing the drain current to decreased from Id(bulk) = -400 uA/um of bulk to Id(Strain) = -310 uA/um which is about 25% of decrement. Since the drain current decreased, the carrier mobility and the performance also decreased proportional to drain current. However when SOI technology is applied to the PMOS device, the drain current was increased up to Id(SOI) = -431 uA/um over the bulk, the increment of about 9.25% reported. A higher Id-Vg curve and lower threshold of about pVth(SOI) = -0.2178 V also reported from this paper which tells that the device with SOI technology exhibits low power consumption device and fast switching which in turns contribute to a faster performance.

  4. Nano CMOS

    Malay Ranjan Tripathy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS has become major challenge to scaling and integration. However, innovation in transistor structures and integration of novel materials are needed to sustain this performance trend. CMOS variability in the scaling technology becoming very important concern because of limitation of process control over statistical variability related to the fundamental discreteness of charge and matter. Different aspects responsible for device variability are discussed in this article. The challenges and opportunities of nano CMOS technology are outlined here.

  5. Nano CMOS

    Malay Ranjan Tripathy

    2009-01-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) has become major challenge to scaling and integration. However, innovation in transistor structures and integration of novel materials are needed to sustain this performance trend. CMOS variability in the scaling technology becoming very important concern because of limitation of process control over statistical variability related to the fundamental discreteness of charge and matter. Different aspects responsible for device variability are discu...

  6. Hot-carrier degradation for 90 nm gate length LDD-NMOSFET with ultra-thin gate oxide under low gate voltage stress

    Chen Hai-Feng; Hao Yue; Ma Xiao-Hua; Li Kang; Ni Jin-Yu

    2007-01-01

    The hot-carrier degradation for 90 nm gate length lightly-doped drain (LDD) NMOSFET with ultra-thin (1.4 nm) gate oxide under the low gate voltage (LGV) (at Vg=Vth,where Vth is the threshold voltage) stress has been investigated.It is found that the drain current decreases and the threshold voltage increases after the LGV (Vg=Yth) stress.The results are opposite to the degradation phenomena of conventional NMOSFET for the case of this stress.By analysing the gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL) current before and after stresses,it is confirmed that under the LGV stress in uItra-short gate LDD-NMOSFET with ultra-thin gate oxide,the hot holes are trapped at interface in the LDD region and cannot shorten the channel to mask the influence of interface states as those in conventional NMOSFET do.which leads to the different degradation phenomena from those of the conventional NMOS devices.This paper also discusses the degradation in the 90 nm gate length LDD-NMOSFET with 1.4 nm gate oxide under the LGV stress at Vg=Vth with various drain biases.Experimental results show that the degradation slopes(n) range from 0.21 to 0.41.The value of n is less than that of conventional MOSFET(0.5-0.6) and also that of the long gate length LDD MOSFET (~0.8).

  7. A CMOS VLSI cochlea

    Lyon, Richard F.; Mead, Carver A.

    1988-01-01

    An engineered system that hears, such as a speech recognizer, can be designed by modeling the cochlea, or inner ear, and higher levels of the auditory nervous system. To be useful in such a system, a model of the cochlea should incorporate a variety of known effects, such as an asymmetric lowpass/bandpass response at each output channel, a short ringing time, and active adaptation to a wide range of input signal levels. An analog electronic cochlea has been built in CMOS VLSI technology...

  8. CMOS circuits manual

    Marston, R M

    1995-01-01

    CMOS Circuits Manual is a user's guide for CMOS. The book emphasizes the practical aspects of CMOS and provides circuits, tables, and graphs to further relate the fundamentals with the applications. The text first discusses the basic principles and characteristics of the CMOS devices. The succeeding chapters detail the types of CMOS IC, including simple inverter, gate and logic ICs and circuits, and complex counters and decoders. The last chapter presents a miscellaneous collection of two dozen useful CMOS circuits. The book will be useful to researchers and professionals who employ CMOS circu

  9. Nano watt power rail-to-rail CMOS amplifier with adaptive biasing circuits for ultralow-power analog LSIs

    Ozaki, Toshihiro; Hirose, Tetsuya; Tsubaki, Keishi; Kuroki, Nobutaka; Numa, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present a rail-to-rail folded-cascode amplifier (AMP) with adaptive biasing circuits (ABCs). The circuit uses a nano ampere current reference circuit to achieve ultralow-power and ABCs to achieve high-speed operation. The ABCs are based on conventional circuits and modified to be suitable for rail-to-rail operation. The measurement results demonstrated that the AMP with the proposed ABCs can operate with an ultralow-power of 384 nA when the input voltage was 0.9 V and achieve high speeds of 0.162 V/µs at the rise time and 0.233 V/µs at the fall time when the input pulse frequency and the amplitude were 10 kHz and 1.5 Vpp, respectively.

  10. All-Digital Time-Domain CMOS Smart Temperature Sensor with On-Chip Linearity Enhancement

    Chun-Chi Chen; Chao-Lieh Chen; Yi Lin

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the first all-digital on-chip linearity enhancement technique for improving the accuracy of the time-domain complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) smart temperature sensor. To facilitate on-chip application and intellectual property reuse, an all-digital time-domain smart temperature sensor was implemented using 90 nm Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Although the inverter-based temperature sensor has a smaller circuit area and lower complexity, two-point cal...

  11. A novel colour-sensitive CMOS detector

    Langfelder, G.; Longoni, A.; Zaraga, F.

    2009-10-01

    A novel colour-sensitive semiconductor detector is proposed. The device (named Transverse Field Detector (TFD)) can be used to measure the colour of the incident light without any colour filter. The device is completely compatible with standard CMOS processes and is suitable to be integrated in a pixel array for imaging purposes. The working principle is based on the capability of this device to collect at different superficial junctions the carriers, generated at different depths, by means of suitable transverse electric fields. The transverse components of the electric field are generated inside the depleted region by a suitable bias of the superficial junctions. Thanks to the differences in the light absorption coefficients at different wavelengths, the device performs colour separation. Among the advantages of this approach are the capability of an active tuning of the pixel colour response, which can be obtained just by changing the biasing values of collecting junctions, and foreseen higher colour fidelity, thanks to the easy extension to four colour pixels. First test structures of three colours TFD pixels were designed and built in a standard CMOS 90 nm technology. Operative principles of the device and first experimental results are presented.

  12. A 0.76-pJ/Pulse 0.1-1 Gpps Microwatt IR-UWB CMOS Pulse Generator with Adaptive PSD Control Using A Limited Monocycle Precharge Technique

    Shen, Ming; Yin, Ying-Zheng; Jiang, Hao;

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents an ultra-wideband pulse generator topology featuring adaptive control of power spectral density for a broad range of applications with different data rate requirements. The adaptivity is accomplished by employing a limited monocycle precharge approach to control the energy used...... for pulse generation at different desired data rates. By doing so, the need for tuning circuits is eliminated and the radiated power is maintained at the highest level allowed by the Federal Communications Commission. A prototype pulse generator has been implemented using the UMC 180-nm CMOS process...... for validation. The measured results show that the pulse generator can be used for a wide pulse repetition rate range from 100 Mpps to 1 Gpps. In addition, the pulse generator consumes 0.76 pJ/pulse at 1 Gpps, equivalent to 760 μW and has a compact size of 0.09 mm2....

  13. Analog domain adaptive equalizer for low power 40 Gbps DP-QPSK receivers

    Nandakumar Nambath; Pawan Kumar Moyade; Allmin Ansari; Shalabh Gupta

    2014-04-01

    Electrical domain equalization of chromatic and polarization mode dispersion is attractive in coherent optical communication links. Digital coherent receivers used for this purpose are based on high speed ADCs followed by DSP, which dissipate excessive amount of power and are very costly to implement. We propose analog coherent receiver to drastically reduce the power consumption, size and cost. An adaptive feed forward equalizer for 40 Gbps dual polarization quadrature phase shift keying (DP-QPSK) systems, which processes signals in analog domain itself, is demonstrated using circuit and system simulations. The equalizer, designed in 90 nm CMOS technology, consumes 450 mW of power and occupies 1.8 mm × 1.1 mm chip area. System simulations are used to show that blind equalization is also possible when this approach is used in decision directed mode.

  14. Développement de capteurs à pixels CMOS pour un détecteur de vertex adapté au collisionneur ILC

    Fu, Yunan

    2012-01-01

    The thesis has been a priority as taking ownership of vertical integration technologies used in the industry to realize a multistage development, and to evaluate the contributions on CMOS pixel sensors (CPS). 3D integration technologies (3DIT) provide a way to mitigate this hampering correlation between speed and resolution, since they allow to staple layers of readout circuitry on top of the sensing layer, which results in a drastic increase of the functionalities located in (the shadow of) ...

  15. The modulation effect of substrate doping on multi-node charge collection and single-event transient propagation in 90-nm bulk complementary metal-oxidesemiconductor technology

    Qin Jun-Rui; Chen Shu-Ming; Liu Bi-Wei; Liu Zheng; Liang Bin; Du Yan-Kang

    2011-01-01

    Variation of substrate background doping will affect the charge collection of active and passive MOSFETs in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technologies,which are significant for charge sharing,thus affecting the propagated single event transient pulsewidths in circuits.The trends of charge collected by the drain of a positive channel metal-oxide semiconductor (PMOS) and an N metal-oxide semiconductor (NMOS) are opposite as the substrate doping increases.The PMOS source will inject carriers after strike and the amount of charge injected will increase as the substrate doping increases,whereas the source of the NMOS will mainly collect carriers and the source of the NMOS can also inject electrons when the substrate doping is light enough.Additionally,it indicates that substrate doping mainly affects the bipolar amplification component of a single-event transient current,and has little effect on the drift and diffusion.The change in substrate doping has a much greater effect on PMOS than on NMOS.

  16. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems. PMID:27410361

  17. Customized CMOS wavefront sensor

    Monteiro, D. W. L.; Vdovin, G.; Rocha, J.G.; Iordanov, V.; Loktev, M.; Sarro, P.

    2002-01-01

    We report on an integrated Hartmann wavefront sensor (WFS) using passive-pixel architecture and pixels clustered as position-sensitive detectors for dynamic wavefront analysis. This approach substitutes a conventional imager, such as a CCD or CMOS imager, by a customized detector, thus improving the overall speed performance. CMOS (complementary-metal- oxide-semiconductor) technology enables on-chip integration of several analog and digital circuitry. The sensor performance depends on the fea...

  18. Beyond CMOS nanodevices 2

    Balestra, Francis

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art in innovative Beyond-CMOS nanodevices for developing novel functionalities, logic and memories dedicated to researchers, engineers and students. The book will particularly focus on the interest of nanostructures and nanodevices (nanowires, small slope switches, 2D layers, nanostructured materials, etc.) for advanced More than Moore (RF-nanosensors-energy harvesters, on-chip electronic cooling, etc.) and Beyond-CMOS logic and memories applications.

  19. Beyond CMOS nanodevices 1

    Balestra, Francis

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art in innovative Beyond-CMOS nanodevices for developing novel functionalities, logic and memories dedicated to researchers, engineers and students.  It particularly focuses on the interest of nanostructures and nanodevices (nanowires, small slope switches, 2D layers, nanostructured materials, etc.) for advanced More than Moore (RF-nanosensors-energy harvesters, on-chip electronic cooling, etc.) and Beyond-CMOS logic and memories applications

  20. BackTrack Input Vector Algorithm for Leakage Reduction in CMOS VLSI Digital Circuit Design

    Uday Panwar; Kavita Khare

    2014-01-01

    A new algorithm based on Input Vector Control (IVC) technique is proposed, which shifts logic gate of a circuit to its minimum leakage state, when device goes into its idle state. Leakage current in CMOS VLSI circuit has become a major constrain in a battery operated device for technology node below 90nm, as it drains the battery even when a circuit is in standby mode. Major concern is the leakage even in run time condition, here aim is to focus on run time leakage reduction techn...

  1. A Light Source for Testing CMOS Imagers

    Hancock, Jed J.; Baker, Doran

    2003-01-01

    Testing the optical properties of complementary metal oxide (CMOS) imagers requires a light source. The light source must produce stable uniform light with calibrated wavelength and intensity. Available commercial light source units are costly and often unalterable to a custom test setup. The proposed light source is designed to be affordable and adaptable while maintaining the necessary optical quality. The design consists of an array of light emitting diodes (LED), an infrared (IR) cut-off ...

  2. CMOS dot matrix microdisplay

    Venter, Petrus J.; Bogalecki, Alfons W.; du Plessis, Monuko; Goosen, Marius E.; Nell, Ilse J.; Rademeyer, P.

    2011-03-01

    Display technologies always seem to find a wide range of interesting applications. As devices develop towards miniaturization, niche applications for small displays may emerge. While OLEDs and LCDs dominate the market for small displays, they have some shortcomings as relatively expensive technologies. Although CMOS is certainly not the dominating semiconductor for photonics, its widespread use, favourable cost and robustness present an attractive potential if it could find application in the microdisplay environment. Advances in improving the quantum efficiency of avalanche electroluminescence and the favourable spectral characteristics of light generated through the said mechanism may afford CMOS the possibility to be used as a display technology. This work shows that it is possible to integrate a fully functional display in a completely standard CMOS technology mainly geared towards digital design while using light sources completely compatible with the process and without any post processing required.

  3. MicroCMOS design

    Song, Bang-Sup

    2011-01-01

    MicroCMOS Design covers key analog design methodologies with an emphasis on analog systems that can be integrated into systems-on-chip (SoCs). Starting at the transistor level, this book introduces basic concepts in the design of system-level complementary metal-oxide semiconductors (CMOS). It uses practical examples to illustrate circuit construction so that readers can develop an intuitive understanding rather than just assimilate the usual conventional analytical knowledge. As SoCs become increasingly complex, analog/radio frequency (RF) system designers have to master both system- and tran

  4. Wideband CMOS receivers

    Oliveira, Luis

    2015-01-01

    This book demonstrates how to design a wideband receiver operating in current mode, in which the noise and non-linearity are reduced, implemented in a low cost single chip, using standard CMOS technology.  The authors present a solution to remove the transimpedance amplifier (TIA) block and connect directly the mixer’s output to a passive second-order continuous-time Σ∆ analog to digital converter (ADC), which operates in current-mode. These techniques enable the reduction of area, power consumption, and cost in modern CMOS receivers.

  5. DFM in practice: results of a three way partnership between a leading fabless design house, foundry, and EDA company to implement alternating-phase shift mask (Alt-PSM) on a 90-nm FPGA chip

    Yu, Chun-Chi; Shieh, Ming-Feng; Liu, Erick; Lin, Benjamin; Lin, Henry; Chacko, Manoj; Li, Xiaoyang; Lei, Wen-Kang; Ho, Jonathan; Wu, Xin

    2005-05-01

    At the sub 90nm nodes, resolution enhancement techniques (RETs) such as optical proximity correction (OPC), phase-shifting masks (PSM), sub-resolution assist features (SRAF) have become essential steps in the post-physical verification 'Mask Synthesis' process and a key component of design for manufacturing (DFM). Several studies have been conducted and the results have been published on the implication and application of the different types of RETs on mask printability and costs. More specifically, double-exposure-based, dark-field, alternating PSM (Alt-PSM) technology has received lot of attention with respect to the mask manufacturing challenges and its implementation into a production flow, despite its yield and critical dimension (CD) control superiority. Implementation of Alt-PSM generally requires phase compliance rules and proper phase topology in the layout and this has been successful for the technology node with these rules implemented. However, this may not be true for a matured, production process technology, in this case 90 nm. Especially, in the foundry-fabless business model where the foundry provides a standard set of design rules to its customers for a given process technology, and where not all the foundry customers require Alt-PSM in their tapeout flow. What follows is an in-depth review of the DFM challenges to each partner faced, its effect on the tapeout flow, and how design, manufacturing, and EDA teams worked together to resolve phase conflicts, tapeout the chip, and finally verify the silicon results in production.

  6. Further developments on a novel color sensitive CMOS detector

    Langfelder, G.; Longoni, A.; Zaraga, F.

    2009-05-01

    The Transverse Field Detector (TFD) is a recently proposed Silicon pixel device designed to perform color imaging without the use of color filters. The color detection principle is based on the dependence of the Silicon absorption coefficient from the wavelength and relies on the generation of a suitable transverse electric field configuration, within the semiconductor active layer, to drive photocarriers generated at different depths towards different collecting electrodes. Each electrode has in this way a different spectral response with respect to the incoming wavelength. Pixels with three or four different spectral responses can be implemented within ~ 6 μm of pixel dimension. Thanks to the compatibility with standard triple well CMOS processes, the TFD can be used in an Active Pixel Sensor exploiting a dedicated readout topology, based on a single transistor charge amplifier. The overall APS electronics includes five transistors (5T) and a feedback capacitance, with a resulting overall fill factor around 50%. In this work the three colors and four colors TFD pixel simulations and implementations in a 90 nm standard CMOS triple well technology are described. Details on the design of a TFD APS mini matrix are provided and preliminary experimental results on four colors pixels are presented.

  7. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    Toshihiko Noda

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented.

  8. High-Mixed-Voltage Analog and RF Circuit Techniques for Nanoscale CMOS

    Mak, Pui-In

    2012-01-01

    This book presents high-/mixed-voltage analog and radio frequency (RF) circuit techniques for developing low-cost multistandard wireless receivers in nm-length CMOS processes.  Key benefits of high-/mixed-voltage RF and analog CMOS circuits are explained, state-of-the-art examples are studied, and circuit solutions before and after voltage-conscious design are compared. Three real design examples are included, which demonstrate the feasibility of high-/mixed-voltage circuit techniques.    Provides a valuable summary and real case studies of the state-of-the-art in high-/mixed-voltage circuits and systems; Includes novel high-/mixed-voltage analog and RF circuit techniques – from concept to practice; Describes the first high-voltage-enabled mobile-TVRF front-end in 90nm CMOS and the first mixed-voltage full-band mobile-TV Receiver in 65nm CMOS; Demonstrates the feasibility of high-/mixed-voltage circuit techniques with real design examples.  

  9. CMOS Low Power Cell Library for Digital Design

    Kanika Kaur

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, VLSI designers have focused on increasing the speed and reducing the area of digital systems. However, the evolution of portable systems and advanced Deep Sub-Micron fabrication technologies have brought power dissipation as another critical design factor. Low power design reduces cooling cost and increases reliability especially for high density systems. Moreover, it reduces the weight and size of portable devices. The power dissipation in CMOS circuits consists of static and dynamic components. Since dynamic power is proportional to V2 dd and static power is proportional to Vdd, lowering the supply voltage and device dimensions, the transistor threshold voltage also has to be scaled down to achieve the required performance. In case of static power, the power is consumed during the steady state condition i.e when there are no input/output transitions. Static power has two sources: DC power and Leakage power. Consecutively to facilitate voltage scaling without disturbing the performance, threshold voltage has to be minimized. Furthermore it leads to better noise margins and helps to avoid the hot carrier effects in short channel devices. In this paper we have been proposed the new CMOS library for the complex digital design using scaling the supply voltage and device dimensions and also suggest the methods to control the leakage current to obtain the minimum power dissipation at optimum value of supply voltage and transistor threshold. In this paper CMOS Cell library has been implemented using TSMC (0.18um and TSMC (90nm technology using HEP2 tool of IC designing from Mentor Graphics for various analysis and simulations.

  10. CMOS-controlled rapidly tunable photodetectors

    Chen, Ray

    With rapidly increasing data bandwidth demands, wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical access networks seem unavoidable in the near future. To operate WDM optical networks in an efficient scheme, wavelength reconfigurability and scalability of the network are crucial. Unfortunately, most of the existing wavelength tunable technologies are neither rapidly tunable nor spectrally programmable. This dissertation presents a tunable photodetector that is designed for dynamic-wavelength allocation WDM network environments. The wavelength tuning mechanism is completely different from existing technologies. The spectrum of this detector is programmable through low-voltage digital patterns. Since the wavelength selection is achieved by electronic means, the device wavelength reconfiguration time is as fast as the electronic switching time. In this dissertation work, we have demonstrated a tunable detector that is hybridly integrated with its customized CMOS driver and receiver with nanosecond wavelength reconfiguration time. In addition to its nanosecond wavelength reconfiguration time, the spectrum of this detector is digitally programmable, which means that it can adapt to system changes without re-fabrication. We have theoretically developed and experimentally demonstrated two device operating algorithms based on the same orthogonal device-optics basis. Both the rapid wavelength tuning time and the scalability make this novel device very viable for new reconfigurable WDM networks. By taking advantage of CMOS circuit design, this detector concept can be further extended for simultaneous multiple wavelength detection. We have developed one possible chip architecture and have designed a CMOS tunable optical demux for simultaneous controllable two-wavelength detection.

  11. Single photon detection and localization accuracy with an ebCMOS camera

    Cajgfinger, T.; Dominjon, A.; Barbier, R.

    2015-07-01

    The CMOS sensor technologies evolve very fast and offer today very promising solutions to existing issues facing by imaging camera systems. CMOS sensors are very attractive for fast and sensitive imaging thanks to their low pixel noise (1e-) and their possibility of backside illumination. The ebCMOS group of IPNL has produced a camera system dedicated to Low Light Level detection and based on a 640 kPixels ebCMOS with its acquisition system. After reminding the principle of detection of an ebCMOS and the characteristics of our prototype, we confront our camera to other imaging systems. We compare the identification efficiency and the localization accuracy of a point source by four different photo-detection devices: the scientific CMOS (sCMOS), the Charge Coupled Device (CDD), the Electron Multiplying CCD (emCCD) and the Electron Bombarded CMOS (ebCMOS). Our ebCMOS camera is able to identify a single photon source in less than 10 ms with a localization accuracy better than 1 μm. We report as well efficiency measurement and the false positive identification of the ebCMOS camera by identifying more than hundreds of single photon sources in parallel. About 700 spots are identified with a detection efficiency higher than 90% and a false positive percentage lower than 5. With these measurements, we show that our target tracking algorithm can be implemented in real time at 500 frames per second under a photon flux of the order of 8000 photons per frame. These results demonstrate that the ebCMOS camera concept with its single photon detection and target tracking algorithm is one of the best devices for low light and fast applications such as bioluminescence imaging, quantum dots tracking or adaptive optics.

  12. Single photon detection and localization accuracy with an ebCMOS camera

    Cajgfinger, T. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Dominjon, A., E-mail: agnes.dominjon@nao.ac.jp [Université de Lyon, Université de Lyon 1, Lyon 69003 France. (France); Barbier, R. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Université de Lyon, Université de Lyon 1, Lyon 69003 France. (France)

    2015-07-01

    The CMOS sensor technologies evolve very fast and offer today very promising solutions to existing issues facing by imaging camera systems. CMOS sensors are very attractive for fast and sensitive imaging thanks to their low pixel noise (1e-) and their possibility of backside illumination. The ebCMOS group of IPNL has produced a camera system dedicated to Low Light Level detection and based on a 640 kPixels ebCMOS with its acquisition system. After reminding the principle of detection of an ebCMOS and the characteristics of our prototype, we confront our camera to other imaging systems. We compare the identification efficiency and the localization accuracy of a point source by four different photo-detection devices: the scientific CMOS (sCMOS), the Charge Coupled Device (CDD), the Electron Multiplying CCD (emCCD) and the Electron Bombarded CMOS (ebCMOS). Our ebCMOS camera is able to identify a single photon source in less than 10 ms with a localization accuracy better than 1 µm. We report as well efficiency measurement and the false positive identification of the ebCMOS camera by identifying more than hundreds of single photon sources in parallel. About 700 spots are identified with a detection efficiency higher than 90% and a false positive percentage lower than 5. With these measurements, we show that our target tracking algorithm can be implemented in real time at 500 frames per second under a photon flux of the order of 8000 photons per frame. These results demonstrate that the ebCMOS camera concept with its single photon detection and target tracking algorithm is one of the best devices for low light and fast applications such as bioluminescence imaging, quantum dots tracking or adaptive optics.

  13. Automation of CMOS technology migration illustrated by RGB to YCrCb analogue converter

    Naumowicz, M.; Melosik, M.; Katarzynski, P.; Handkiewicz, A.

    2013-09-01

    The paper illustrates a practical example of technology migration applied to the colour space converter realized in CMOS technology. The element has analogue excitation and response signals expressed in current mode. Such converter may be incorporated into an integrated vision sensor for preconditioning acquired image data. The idea of a computer software tool supporting the automated migration and design reuse is presented as the major contribution. The mentioned tools implement the Hooke-Jeeves direct search method for performing the multivariable optimization. Our purpose is to ensure transferring the circuit between usable fabrication technologies and preserving its functional properties. The colour space converter is treated as the case study for performance evaluation of the proposed tool in cooperation with HSPICE simulation software. The original CMOS technology files for Taiwan semiconductor (TSMC) plant were utilized for the research. The automated design migration from 180 nm into 90 nm resulted with obtaining compact IC layout characterized by a smaller area and lower power consumption. The paper is concluded with a brief summary that proves the usability of the proposed tool in designing CMOS cells dedicated for low power image processing.

  14. Design and test challenges in Nano-scale analog and mixed CMOS technology

    Mouna Karmani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The continuous increase of integration densities in Complementary Metal–Oxide–Semiconductor (CMOStechnology has driven the rapid growth of very large scale integrated (VLSI circuit for today's high-techelectronics industries from consumer products to telecommunications and computers. As CMOStechnologies are scaled down into the nanometer range, analog and mixed integrated circuit (IC design andtesting have become a real challenge to ensure the functionality and quality of the product. The first part ofthe paper presents the CMOS technology scaling impact on design and reliability for consumer and criticalapplications. We then propose a discussion on the role and challenges of testing analog and mixed devicesin the nano-scale era. Finally we present the IDDQ testing technique used to detect the most likely defects ofbridging type occurring in analog CMOS circuits during the manufacturing process and creating a resistivepath between VDD supply and the ground.To prove the efficiency of the proposed technique we design a CMOS 90nm operational amplifier (Opamp and a Built in Current Sensor (BICS to validate the technique and correlate it with post layoutsimulation results.

  15. Analysis of EMCCD and sCMOS readout noise models for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor accuracy

    Basden, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, detectors with sub-electron readout noise have been used very effectively in astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare readout noise models for the two key faint flux level detector technologies that are commonly used: EMCCD and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) detectors. We find that in almost all situations, EMCCD technology is advantageous, and that the commonly used simplified model for EMCCD readout is appropriate. We also find that the commonly used simple models for sCMOS readout noise are optimistic, and recommend that a proper treatment of the sCMOS rms readout noise probability distribution should be considered during instrument performance modelling and development.

  16. Comparators in nanometer CMOS technology

    Goll, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the complete spectrum of the fundamentals of clocked, regenerative comparators, their state-of-the-art, advanced CMOS technologies, innovative comparators inclusive circuit aspects, their characterization and properties. Starting from the basics of comparators and the transistor characteristics in nanometer CMOS, seven high-performance comparators developed by the authors in 120nm and 65nm CMOS are described extensively. Methods and measurement circuits for the characterization of advanced comparators are introduced. A synthesis of the largely differing aspects of demands on modern comparators and the properties of devices being available in nanometer CMOS, which are posed by the so-called nanometer hell of physics, is accomplished. The book summarizes the state of the art in integrated comparators. Advanced measurement circuits for characterization will be introduced as well as the method of characterization by bit-error analysis usually being used for characterization of optical receivers. ...

  17. CMOS Nonlinear Signal Processing Circuits

    Hung,; Yu-Cherng,

    2010-01-01

    The chapter describes various nonlinear signal processing CMOS circuits, including a high reliable WTA/LTA, simple MED cell, and low-voltage arbitrary order extractor. We focus the discussion on CMOS analog circuit design with reliable, programmable capability, and low voltage operation. It is a practical problem when the multiple identical cells are required to match and realized within a single chip using a conventional process. Thus, the design of high-reliable circuit is indeed needed. Th...

  18. Adapt

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  19. Advancing interconnect density for spiking neural network hardware implementations using traffic-aware adaptive network-on-chip routers.

    Carrillo, Snaider; Harkin, Jim; McDaid, Liam; Pande, Sandeep; Cawley, Seamus; McGinley, Brian; Morgan, Fearghal

    2012-09-01

    The brain is highly efficient in how it processes information and tolerates faults. Arguably, the basic processing units are neurons and synapses that are interconnected in a complex pattern. Computer scientists and engineers aim to harness this efficiency and build artificial neural systems that can emulate the key information processing principles of the brain. However, existing approaches cannot provide the dense interconnect for the billions of neurons and synapses that are required. Recently a reconfigurable and biologically inspired paradigm based on network-on-chip (NoC) and spiking neural networks (SNNs) has been proposed as a new method of realising an efficient, robust computing platform. However, the use of the NoC as an interconnection fabric for large-scale SNNs demands a good trade-off between scalability, throughput, neuron/synapse ratio and power consumption. This paper presents a novel traffic-aware, adaptive NoC router, which forms part of a proposed embedded mixed-signal SNN architecture called EMBRACE (EMulating Biologically-inspiRed ArChitectures in hardwarE). The proposed adaptive NoC router provides the inter-neuron connectivity for EMBRACE, maintaining router communication and avoiding dropped router packets by adapting to router traffic congestion. Results are presented on throughput, power and area performance analysis of the adaptive router using a 90 nm CMOS technology which outperforms existing NoCs in this domain. The adaptive behaviour of the router is also verified on a Stratix II FPGA implementation of a 4 × 2 router array with real-time traffic congestion. The presented results demonstrate the feasibility of using the proposed adaptive NoC router within the EMBRACE architecture to realise large-scale SNNs on embedded hardware. PMID:22561008

  20. Large area CMOS image sensors

    CMOS image sensors, also known as CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) or Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), are today the dominant imaging devices. They are omnipresent in our daily life, as image sensors in cellular phones, web cams, digital cameras, ... In these applications, the pixels can be very small, in the micron range, and the sensors themselves tend to be limited in size. However, many scientific applications, like particle or X-ray detection, require large format, often with large pixels, as well as other specific performance, like low noise, radiation hardness or very fast readout. The sensors are also required to be sensitive to a broad spectrum of radiation: photons from the silicon cut-off in the IR down to UV and X- and gamma-rays through the visible spectrum as well as charged particles. This requirement calls for modifications to the substrate to be introduced to provide optimized sensitivity. This paper will review existing CMOS image sensors, whose size can be as large as a single CMOS wafer, and analyse the technical requirements and specific challenges of large format CMOS image sensors.

  1. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  2. Electrical Interconnections Through CMOS Wafers

    Rasmussen, Frank Engel

    2003-01-01

    Chips with integrated vias are currently the ultimate miniaturizing solution for 3D packaging of microsystems. Previously the application of vias has almost exclusively been demonstrated within MEMS technology, and only a few of these via technologies have been CMOS compatible. This thesis descri...

  3. CMOS MEMS Fabrication Technologies and Devices

    Hongwei Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems fabrication technologies and enabled micro devices of various sensors and actuators. The technologies are classified based on the sequence of the fabrication of CMOS circuitry and MEMS elements, while SOI (silicon-on-insulator CMOS MEMS are introduced separately. Introduction of associated devices follows the description of the respective CMOS MEMS technologies. Due to the vast array of CMOS MEMS devices, this review focuses only on the most typical MEMS sensors and actuators including pressure sensors, inertial sensors, frequency reference devices and actuators utilizing different physics effects and the fabrication processes introduced. Moreover, the incorporation of MEMS and CMOS is limited to monolithic integration, meaning wafer-bonding-based stacking and other integration approaches, despite their advantages, are excluded from the discussion. Both competitive industrial products and state-of-the-art research results on CMOS MEMS are covered.

  4. From vertex detectors to inner trackers with CMOS pixel sensors

    Besson, A; Spiriti, E; Baudot, J; Claus, G; Goffe, M; Winter, M

    2016-01-01

    The use of CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS) for high resolution and low material vertex detectors has been validated with the 2014 and 2015 physics runs of the STAR-PXL detector at RHIC/BNL. This opens the door to the use of CPS for inner tracking devices, with 10-100 times larger sensitive area, which require therefore a sensor design privileging power saving, response uniformity and robustness. The 350 nm CMOS technology used for the STAR-PXL sensors was considered as too poorly suited to upcoming applications like the upgraded ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS), which requires sensors with one order of magnitude improvement on readout speed and improved radiation tolerance. This triggered the exploration of a deeper sub-micron CMOS technology, Tower-Jazz 180 nm, for the design of a CPS well adapted for the new ALICE-ITS running conditions. This paper reports the R&D results for the conception of a CPS well adapted for the ALICE-ITS.

  5. Nanometer CMOS Sigma-Delta Modulators for Software Defined Radio

    Morgado, Alonso; Rosa, José M

    2012-01-01

    This book presents innovative solutions for the implementation of Sigma-Delta Modulation (SDM) based Analog-to-Digital Conversion (ADC), required for the next generation of wireless hand-held terminals. These devices will be based on the so-called multistandard transceiver chipsets, integrated in nanometer CMOS technologies. One of the most challenging and critical parts in such transceivers is the analog-digital interface, because of the assorted signal bandwidths and dynamic ranges that can be required to handle the A/D conversion for several operation modes.   This book describes new adaptive and reconfigurable SDM ADC topologies, circuit strategies and synthesis methods, specially suited for multi-standard wireless telecom systems and future Software-defined-radios (SDRs) integrated in nanoscale CMOS. It is a practical book, going from basic concepts to the frontiers of SDM architectures and circuit implementations, which are explained in a didactical and systematic way. It gives a comprehensive overview...

  6. Latch-up control in CMOS integrated circuits

    The potential for latch-up, a pnpn self-sustaining low impedance state, is inherent in standard bulk CMOS structures. Under normal bias, the parasitic SCR is in its blocking state, but if subjected to a high-voltage spike or if exposed to an ionizing environment, triggering may occur. Prevention of latch-up has been achieved by lifetime control methods such as gold doping or neutron irradiation and by modifying the structure with buried layers. Smaller, next-generation CMOS designs will enhance parasitic action making the problem a concern for other than military or space applications alone. Latch-up control methods presently employed are surveyed. Their adaptability to VSLI designs is analyzed

  7. Low power analog front-end electronics in deep submicrometer CMOS technology based on gain enhancement techniques

    This paper evaluates the design of front-end electronics in modern technologies to be used in a new generation of heavy ion detectors—HYDE (FAIR, Germany)—proposing novel architectures to achieve high gain in a low voltage environment. As conventional topologies of operational amplifiers in modern CMOS processes show limitations in terms of gain, novel approaches must be raised. The work addresses the design using transistors with channel length of no more than double the feature size and a supply voltage as low as 1.2 V. A front-end system has been fabricated in a 90 nm process including gain boosting techniques based on regulated cascode circuits. The analog channel has been optimized to match a detector capacitance of 5 pF and exhibits a good performance in terms of gain, speed, linearity and power consumption

  8. High-voltage CMOS detectors

    Ehrler, F.; Blanco, R.; Leys, R.; Perić, I.

    2016-07-01

    High-voltage CMOS (HVCMOS) pixel sensors are depleted active pixel sensors implemented in standard commercial CMOS processes. The sensor element is the n-well/p-substrate diode. The sensor electronics are entirely placed inside the n-well which is at the same time used as the charge collection electrode. High voltage is used to deplete the part of the substrate around the n-well. HVCMOS sensors allow implementation of complex in-pixel electronics. This, together with fast signal collection, allows a good time resolution, which is required for particle tracking in high energy physics. HVCMOS sensors will be used in Mu3e experiment at PSI and are considered as an option for both ATLAS and CLIC (CERN). Radiation tolerance and time walk compensation have been tested and results are presented.

  9. Analog filters in nanometer CMOS

    Uhrmann, Heimo; Zimmermann, Horst

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the basics of analog filters and the poor transistor characteristics in nanometer CMOS 10 high-performance analog filters developed by the authors in 120 nm and 65 nm CMOS are described extensively. Among them are gm-C filters, current-mode filters, and active filters for system-on-chip realization for Bluetooth, WCDMA, UWB, DVB-H, and LTE applications. For the active filters several operational amplifier designs are described. The book, furthermore, contains a review of the newest state of research on low-voltage low-power analog filters. To cover the topic of the book comprehensively, linearization issues and measurement methods for the characterization of advanced analog filters are introduced in addition. Numerous elaborate illustrations promote an easy comprehension. This book will be of value to engineers and researchers in industry as well as scientists and Ph.D students at universities. The book is also recommendable to graduate students specializing on nanoelectronics, microelectronics ...

  10. CMOS test and evaluation a physical perspective

    Bhushan, Manjul

    2015-01-01

    This book extends test structure applications described in Microelectronic Test Struc­tures for CMOS Technology (Springer 2011) to digital CMOS product chips. Intended for engineering students and professionals, this book provides a single comprehensive source for evaluating CMOS technology and product test data from a basic knowledge of the physical behavior of the constituent components. Elementary circuits that exhibit key properties of complex CMOS chips are simulated and analyzed, and an integrated view of design, test and characterization is developed. Appropriately designed circuit monitors embedded in the CMOS chip serve to correlate CMOS technology models and circuit design tools to the hardware and also aid in test debug. Impact of silicon process variability, reliability, and power and performance sensitivities to a range of product application conditions are described. Circuit simulations exemplify the methodologies presented, and problems are included at the end of the chapters.

  11. Fabrication of CMOS image sensors

    Malinovich, Yacov; Koltin, Ephie; Choen, David; Shkuri, Moshe; Ben-Simon, Meir

    1999-04-01

    In order to provide its customers with sub-micron CMOS fabrication solutions for imaging applications, Tower Semiconductor initiated a project to characterize the optical parameters of Tower's 0.5-micron process. A special characterization test chip was processed using the TS50 process. The results confirmed a high quality process for optical applications. Perhaps the most important result is the process' very low dark current, of 30-50 pA/cm2, using the entire window of process. This very low dark current characteristic was confirmed for a variety of pixel architectures. Additionally, we have succeeded to reduce and virtually eliminate the white spots on large sensor arrays. As a foundry Tower needs to support fabrication of many different imaging products. Therefore we have developed a fabrication methodology that is adjusted to the special needs of optical applications. In order to establish in-line process monitoring of the optical parameters, Tower places a scribe line optical test chip that enables wafer level measurements of the most important parameters, ensuring the optical quality and repeatability of the process. We have developed complementary capabilities like in house deposition of color filter and fabrication of very large are dice using sub-micron CMOS technologies. Shellcase and Tower are currently developing a new CMOS image sensor optical package.

  12. A Surface Micromachined CMOS MEMS Humidity Sensor

    Jian-Qiu Huang; Fei Li; Min Zhao; Kai Wang

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a CMOS MEMS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor micro electromechanical system) piezoresistive humidity sensor fabricated by a surface micromachining process. Both pre-CMOS and post-CMOS technologies were used to fabricate the piezoresistive humidity sensor. Compared with a bulk micromachined humidity sensor, the machining precision and the sizes of the surface micromachined humidity sensor were both improved. The package and test systems of the sensor were designed. A...

  13. CMOS Image Sensors for High Speed Applications

    M. Jamal Deen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in deep submicron CMOS technologies and improved pixel designs have enabled CMOS-based imagers to surpass charge-coupled devices (CCD imaging technology for mainstream applications. The parallel outputs that CMOS imagers can offer, in addition to complete camera-on-a-chip solutions due to being fabricated in standard CMOS technologies, result in compelling advantages in speed and system throughput. Since there is a practical limit on the minimum pixel size (4~5 μm due to limitations in the optics, CMOS technology scaling can allow for an increased number of transistors to be integrated into the pixel to improve both detection and signal processing. Such smart pixels truly show the potential of CMOS technology for imaging applications allowing CMOS imagers to achieve the image quality and global shuttering performance necessary to meet the demands of ultrahigh-speed applications. In this paper, a review of CMOS-based high-speed imager design is presented and the various implementations that target ultrahigh-speed imaging are described. This work also discusses the design, layout and simulation results of an ultrahigh acquisition rate CMOS active-pixel sensor imager that can take 8 frames at a rate of more than a billion frames per second (fps.

  14. Microelectronic test structures for CMOS technology

    Ketchen, Mark B

    2011-01-01

    Microelectronic Test Structures for CMOS Technology and Products addresses the basic concepts of the design of test structures for incorporation within test-vehicles, scribe-lines, and CMOS products. The role of test structures in the development and monitoring of CMOS technologies and products has become ever more important with the increased cost and complexity of development and manufacturing. In this timely volume, IBM scientists Manjul Bhushan and Mark Ketchen emphasize high speed characterization techniques for digital CMOS circuit applications and bridging between circuit performance an

  15. Absorbed dose by a CMOS in radiotherapy

    Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C. Y.; Guzman G, K. A.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L. C., E-mail: candy_borja@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    Absorbed dose by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuit as part of a pacemaker, has been estimated using Monte Carlo calculations. For a cancer patient who is a pacemaker carrier, scattered radiation could damage pacemaker CMOS circuits affecting patient's health. Absorbed dose in CMOS circuit due to scattered photons is too small and therefore is not the cause of failures in pacemakers, but neutron calculations shown an absorbed dose that could cause damage in CMOS due to neutron-hydrogen interactions. (Author)

  16. A 0.76-pJ/Pulse 0.1-1 Gpps Microwatt IR-UWB CMOS Pulse Generator with Adaptive PSD Control Using A Limited Monocycle Precharge Technique

    Shen, Ming; Yin, Ying-Zheng; Jiang, Hao; Tian, Tong; Jensen, Ole Kiel; Mikkelsen, Jan Hvolgaard

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents an ultra-wideband pulse generator topology featuring adaptive control of power spectral density for a broad range of applications with different data rate requirements. The adaptivity is accomplished by employing a limited monocycle precharge approach to control the energy used for pulse generation at different desired data rates. By doing so, the need for tuning circuits is eliminated and the radiated power is maintained at the highest level allowed by the Federal Communi...

  17. Analysis of EMCCD and sCMOS readout noise models for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor accuracy

    Basden, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, detectors with sub-electron readout noise have been used very effectively in astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare readout noise models for the two key faint flux level detector technologies that are commonly used: EMCCD and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) detectors. We find that in almost all situations, EMCCD technology is advantageous, and that the commonly used simplified model for EMCCD readout is appropriate. We also find that the commonly used simple models fo...

  18. Analysis of electron multiplying charge coupled device and scientific CMOS readout noise models for Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor accuracy.

    Basden, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, detectors with subelectron readout noise have been used very effectively in astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare readout noise models for the two key faint flux level detector technologies that are commonly used: electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) detectors. We find that in almost all situations, EMCCD technology is advantageous, and that the commonly used simplified model for EMCCD readout is appropriate. We also ...

  19. Commercialisation of CMOS Integrated Circuit Technology in Multi-Electrode Arrays for Neuroscience and Cell-Based Biosensors

    Bowen, Chris R.; John Taylor; Anthony H. D. Graham; Jon Robbins

    2011-01-01

    The adaptation of standard integrated circuit (IC) technology as a transducer in cell-based biosensors in drug discovery pharmacology, neural interface systems and electrophysiology requires electrodes that are electrochemically stable, biocompatible and affordable. Unfortunately, the ubiquitous Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) IC technology does not meet the first of these requirements. For devices intended only for research, modification of CMOS by post-processing using cleanr...

  20. JFET-CMOS microstrip front-end

    While the CMOS version of the front-end chip developed for the microstrip vertex detector of the Aleph experiment is ready to go into operation, a new development is being carried on to achieve a reduction in noise. The improvement is related to the use of a JFET-CMOS chip design which is described in the present paper. (orig.)

  1. Design of Current steering DAC using 250nm CMOS Technology

    Vineet Tiwari

    2012-06-01

    applied at the reference terminal. Analog to digital converter performs the reverse operation. It has many era of operations in audio and Video form and whiffletree electromagnetic device uses DAC linkage in typewriter. It describes the 3.3 volt, 65 MHz 8 bit CMOS digital to analog converter, includes two stage current cell matrix. This paper describes a 1v CMOS 8 bit DAC with two stage current cell matrix architecture which consists of 4 MSB and 4 LSB current matrix stage. The symmetric two stage current cell matrix architecture allows the designed DAC to reduce not only the complexity of decoding logic, but also the no of high swing current mirrors. The designed DAC with a by 90 nm nwell CMOS standard process. The experiment is based on settling time, Integrity, or non linearity. The designed DAC is fully operational for power supply down to 1 volt such that DAC is suitable for low voltage and low power applications.

  2. 0.18μm CMOS, MONOLITHIC MSTP ASIC

    Wang Peng; Jin Depeng; Zeng Lieguang

    2006-01-01

    A highly integrated monolithic Multi-Service Transport Platform (MSTP) Application Specified Integrated Circuit (ASIC) MSEOSX8-6 has been fabricated with 0.18μm CMOS technology incorporating 26×106 transistors. The chip is designed to provide standard framing and mapping of 10/100/1000Mbit/s Ethernet, Resilient Packet Ring (RPR) and E1 traffics into protected Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) STM-1 transport payloads using hitless rate adaptation for optimum bandwidth utilization. It consumes 4W of power on average and utilizes 756 pin enhanced BGA package.

  3. Optoelectronic circuits in nanometer CMOS technology

    Atef, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the newest implementations of integrated photodiodes fabricated in nanometer standard CMOS technologies. It also includes the required fundamentals, the state-of-the-art, and the design of high-performance laser drivers, transimpedance amplifiers, equalizers, and limiting amplifiers fabricated in nanometer CMOS technologies. This book shows the newest results for the performance of integrated optical receivers, laser drivers, modulator drivers and optical sensors in nanometer standard CMOS technologies. Nanometer CMOS technologies rapidly advanced, enabling the implementation of integrated optical receivers for high data rates of several Giga-bits per second and of high-pixel count optical imagers and sensors. In particular, low cost silicon CMOS optoelectronic integrated circuits became very attractive because they can be extensively applied to short-distance optical communications, such as local area network, chip-to-chip and board-to-board interconnects as well as to imaging and medical...

  4. Wideband Fully-Programmable Dual-Mode CMOS Analogue Front-End for Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Valente, V.; Demosthenous, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-channel dual-mode CMOS analogue front-end (AFE) for electrochemical and bioimpedance analysis. Current-mode and voltage-mode readouts, integrated on the same chip, can provide an adaptable platform to correlate single-cell biosensor studies with large-scale tissue or organ analysis for real-time cancer detection, imaging and characterization. The chip, implemented in a 180-nm CMOS technology, combines two current-readout (CR) channels and four voltage-readout (VR) ...

  5. Analysis of electron multiplying charge coupled device and scientific CMOS readout noise models for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor accuracy

    Basden, Alastair G.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, detectors with subelectron readout noise have been used very effectively in astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare readout noise models for the two key faint flux level detector technologies that are commonly used: electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) detectors. We find that in almost all situations, EMCCD technology is advantageous, and that the commonly used simplified model for EMCCD readout is appropriate. We also find that the commonly used simple models for sCMOS readout noise are optimistic, and we recommend that a proper treatment of the sCMOS root mean square readout noise probability distribution should be considered during instrument performance modeling and development.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Integration with a CMOS Process

    Maximiliano S. Perez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the integration of a sensor based on carbon nanotubes using CMOS technology. A chip sensor (CS was designed and manufactured using a 0.30 μm CMOS process, leaving a free window on the passivation layer that allowed the deposition of SWCNTs over the electrodes. We successfully investigated with the CS the effect of humidity and temperature on the electrical transport properties of SWCNTs. The possibility of a large scale integration of SWCNTs with CMOS process opens a new route in the design of more efficient, low cost sensors with high reproducibility in their manufacture.

  7. Fully CMOS Memristor Based Chaotic Circuit

    S. C. Yener

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the design of a fully CMOS chaotic circuit consisting of only DDCC based memristor and inductance simulator. Our design is composed of these active blocks using CMOS 0.18 µm process technology with symmetric ±1.25 V supply voltages. A new single DDCC+ based topology is used as the inductance simulator. Simulation results verify that the design proposed satisfies both memristor properties and the chaotic behavior of the circuit. Simulations performed illustrate the success of the proposed design for the realization of CMOS based chaotic applications.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Integration with a CMOS Process

    Perez, Maximiliano S.; Lerner, Betiana; Resasco, Daniel E.; Pareja Obregon, Pablo D.; Julian, Pedro M.; Mandolesi, Pablo S.; Buffa, Fabian A.; Boselli, Alfredo; Lamagna, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    This work shows the integration of a sensor based on carbon nanotubes using CMOS technology. A chip sensor (CS) was designed and manufactured using a 0.30 μm CMOS process, leaving a free window on the passivation layer that allowed the deposition of SWCNTs over the electrodes. We successfully investigated with the CS the effect of humidity and temperature on the electrical transport properties of SWCNTs. The possibility of a large scale integration of SWCNTs with CMOS process opens a new route in the design of more efficient, low cost sensors with high reproducibility in their manufacture. PMID:22319330

  9. Batch Processing of CMOS Compatible Feedthroughs

    Rasmussen, F.E.; Heschel, M.; Hansen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    process scheme allows for post processing of feedthroughs in any kind of fully processed CMOS wafer. The fabrication of the electrical feedthroughs is based on wet etching of through-holes, low temperature deposition of dielectric material, and electrodeposition of photoresist and feedthrough metal. The...... feedthrough technology employs a simple solution to the well-known CMOS compatibility issue of KOH by protecting the CMOS side of the wafer using sputter deposited TiW/Au. The fabricated feedthroughs exhibit excellent electrical performance having a serial resistance of 40 mOmega and a parasitic capacitance...

  10. Ultralow-loss CMOS copper plasmonic waveguides

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu.; Yakubovsky, Dmitry I.; Kirtaev, Roman V.; Volkov, Valentyn S.

    2016-01-01

    microelectronics manufacturing technologies. This prevents plasmonic components from integration with both silicon photonics and silicon microelectronics. Here, we demonstrate ultralow-loss copper plasmonic waveguides fabricated in a simple complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible process, which...

  11. Yield enhancement methodologies for 90-nm technology and beyond

    Allgair, John; Carey, Todd; Dougan, James; Etnyre, Tony; Langdon, Nate; Murray, Brooke

    2006-03-01

    In order to stay competitive in the rapidly advancing international semiconductor industry, a manufacturing company needs to continually focus on several areas including rapid yield learning, manufacturing cost, statistical process control limits, process yield, equipment availability, cycle time, turns per direct labor hour, customer on time delivery and zero customer defects. To hold a competitive position in the semiconductor market, performance to these measurable factors mut be maintained regardless of the technology generation. In this presentation, the methodology applied by Freescale Semiconductor to achieve the fastest yield learning curve in the industry, as cited by Dr. Robert Leachman of UC Berkley in 2003, will be discussed.

  12. BackTrack Input Vector Algorithm for Leakage Reduction in CMOS VLSI Digital Circuit Design

    Uday Panwar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A new algorithm based on Input Vector Control (IVC technique is proposed, which shifts logic gate of a circuit to its minimum leakage state, when device goes into its idle state. Leakage current in CMOS VLSI circuit has become a major constrain in a battery operated device for technology node below 90nm, as it drains the battery even when a circuit is in standby mode. Major concern is the leakage even in run time condition, here aim is to focus on run time leakage reduction technique of integrated Circuit. It is inherited by stacking effect when the series transistors are maximized in OFF state condition. This method is independent of process technology and does not require any additional power supply. This paper gives an optimized solution of input pattern determination of some small circuit to find minimum leakage vector considering promising and non-promising node which helps to reduce the time complexity of the algorithm. Proposed algorithm is simulated using HSPICE simulator for 2 input NAND gate and different standard logic cells and achieved 94.2% and 54.59 % average leakage power reduction for 2 input NAND cell and different logics respectively.

  13. A novel loss compensation technique analysis and design for 60 GHz CMOS SPDT switch

    Zonghua, Zheng; Lingling, Sun; Jun, Liu; Shengzhou, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    A novel loss compensation technique for a series-shunt single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switch is presented operating in the 60 GHz. The feed-forward compensation network which is composed of an NMOS, a couple capacitance and a shunt inductance can reduce the impact of the feed forward capacitance to reduce the insertion loss and improve the isolation of the SPDT switch. The measured insertion loss and isolation characteristics of the switch somewhat deviating from the 60 GHz are analyzed revealing that the inaccuracy of the MOS model can greatly degrade the performance of the switch. The switch is implemented in TSMC 90-nm CMOS process and exhibits an isolation of above 27 dB at transmitter mode, and the insertion loss of 1.8-3 dB at 30-65 GHz by layout simulation. The measured insertion loss is 2.45 dB at 52 GHz and keeps chip size of the proposed switch is 0.5 × 0.95 mm2. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61331006, 61372021).

  14. Device Considerations for Nanophotonic CMOS Global Interconnects

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Lipson, Michal; Young, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce an analytical framework to understand the path for scaling nanophotonic interconnects to meet the energy and footprint requirements of CMOS global interconnects. We derive the device requirements for sub 100 fJ/cm/bit interconnects including tuning power, serialization-deserialization energy, optical insertion losses, extinction ratio and bit error rates. Using CMOS with integrated nanophotonics as an example platform, we derive the energy/bit, linear and areal bandwidth density ...

  15. Terahertz Circuits and Systems in CMOS

    Sherry, Hani Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    This PhD dissertation presents and analyses various room-temperature circuits for Terahertz detection and generation implemented in CMOS 65nm bulk and 28nm FDSOI throughout the course of the thesis. The work discusses the methodology of design and feasibility of fully-integrated focal-plane arrays of detectors in CMOS technologies as potential commercial solutions for various THz applications. The interesting characteristics of the Terahertz portion (300GHz-3THz) of the Electromagnetic sp...

  16. On evolution of CMOS image sensors

    Choubey, Bhaskar; Gouveia, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    CMOS Image Sensors have become the principal technology in majority of digital cameras. They started replacing the film and Charge Coupled Devices in the last decade with the promise of lower cost, lower power requirement, higher integration and the potential of focal plane processing. However, the principal factor behind their success has been the ability to utilise the shrinkage in CMOS technology to make smaller pixels, and thereby have more resolution without increasing the cost. With the...

  17. Fully CMOS Memristor Based Chaotic Circuit

    Yener, S. C.; H. H. Kuntman

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the design of a fully CMOS chaotic circuit consisting of only DDCC based memristor and inductance simulator. Our design is composed of these active blocks using CMOS 0.18 µm process technology with symmetric ±1.25 V supply voltages. A new single DDCC+ based topology is used as the inductance simulator. Simulation results verify that the design proposed satisfies both memristor properties and the chaotic behavior of the circuit. Simulations performed illustrate the succ...

  18. Heavy ion effect on MOS and CMOS structures on insulator (CMOS/SOI)

    The effects of cosmic ions on Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor structures are described. Measurements done at different energies on MOS capacitors and CMOS on insulator transistors (CMOS/SOI) show a substrate funneling which gives rise to a transient current on device electrodes. The pulse amplitude is simply related to capacitor bias, lifetime of substrate minority carriers and range of the impinging ion

  19. CMOS prototype for retinal prosthesis applications with analog processing

    Castillo-Cabrera, G.; García-Lamont, J.; Reyes-Barranca, M. A.; Matsumoto-Kuwabara, Y.; Moreno-Cadenas, J. A.; Flores-Nava, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    A core architecture for analog processing, which emulates a retina's receptive field, is presented in this work. A model was partially implemented and built on CMOS standard technology through MOSIS. It considers that the receptive field is the basic unit for image processing in the visual system. That is why the design is concerned on a partial solution of receptive field properties in order to be adapted in the future as an aid to people with retinal diseases. A receptive field is represented by an array of 3×3 pixels. Each pixel carries out a process based on four main operations. This means that image processing is developed at pixel level. Operations involved are: (1) photo-transduction by photocurrent integration, (2) signal averaging from eight neighbouring pixels executed by a neu-NMOS (ν-NMOS) neuron, (3) signal average gradient between central pixel and the average value from the eight neighbouring pixels (this gradient is performed by a comparator) and finally (4) a pulse generator. Each one of these operations gives place to circuital blocks which were built on 0.5 μm CMOS technology.

  20. Characterization and reliability of CMOS microstructures

    Fedder, Gary K.; Blanton, Ronald D. S.

    1999-08-01

    This paper provides an overview of high-aspect-ratio CMOS micromachining, focusing on materials characterization, reliability, and fault analysis. Composite microstrutural beam widths and gaps down to 1.2 micrometers are etched out of conventional CMOS dielectric, aluminum, and gate-polysilicon thin films using post-CMOS dry etching for both structural sidewall definition and for release from the substrate. Differences in stress between the multiple metal and dielectric layers cause vertical stress gradients and curl, while misalignment between layers causes lateral stress gradients and curl. Cracking is induced in a resonant fatigue structures at 620 MPa of repetitive stress after over 50 million cycles. Beams have withstood over 1.3 billion cycles at 124 MPa stress levels induced by electrostatic actuation. Failures due to process defects are classified according to the geometrical features of the defective structures. Relative probability of occurrence of each defect type is extracted from the process simulation results.

  1. Delay estimation for CMOS functional cells

    Madsen, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Presents a new RC tree network model for delay estimation of CMOS functional cells. The model is able to reflect topological changes within a cell, which is of particular interest when doing performance driven layout synthesis. Further, a set of algorithms to perform worst case analysis on arbitr...... arbitrary CMOS functional cells using the proposed delay model, is presented. Both model and algorithms have been implemented as a part of a cell compiler (CELLO) working in an experimental silicon compiler environment.......Presents a new RC tree network model for delay estimation of CMOS functional cells. The model is able to reflect topological changes within a cell, which is of particular interest when doing performance driven layout synthesis. Further, a set of algorithms to perform worst case analysis on...

  2. Noise in sub-micron CMOS image sensors

    Wang, X.

    2008-01-01

    CMOS image sensors are devices that convert illumination signals (light intensity) into electronic signals. The goal of this thesis has been to analyze dominate noise sources in CMOS imagers and to improve the image quality by reducing the noise generated in the CMOS image sensor pixels.

  3. A Standard CMOS Humidity Sensor without Post-Processing

    Oleg Nizhnik; Kazusuke Maenaka; Kohei Higuchi

    2011-01-01

    A 2 µW power dissipation, voltage-output, humidity sensor accurate to 5% relative humidity was developed using the LFoundry 0.15 µm CMOS technology without post-processing. The sensor consists of a woven lateral array of electrodes implemented in CMOS top metal, a Intervia Photodielectric 8023-10 humidity-sensitive layer, and a CMOS capacitance to voltage converter.

  4. CMOS circuit design, layout and simulation

    Baker, R Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The Third Edition of CMOS Circuit Design, Layout, and Simulation continues to cover the practical design of both analog and digital integrated circuits, offering a vital, contemporary view of a wide range of analog/digital circuit blocks including: phase-locked-loops, delta-sigma sensing circuits, voltage/current references, op-amps, the design of data converters, and much more. Regardless of one's integrated circuit (IC) design skill level, this book allows readers to experience both the theory behind, and the hands-on implementation of, complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) IC design via detailed derivations, discussions, and hundreds of design, layout, and simulation examples.

  5. Modeling of Amperometric Immunosensor for CMOS Integration

    Ce Li; Haigang Yang; Shanhong Xia; Chao Bian

    2006-01-01

    A circuit model of the Amperometric immunosensor for use in the biosensor system-on-chip simulation is proposed in this paper. The model parameters are extracted with several methods and verified by MATLAB and SPICE simulation. A CMOS potentiostat circuit required for conditioning the Amperometric immunosensor is also included in the circuit model. The mean square error norm of the simulated curve against the measured one is 8.65 × 10-17. The whole circuit has been fabricated in a 0.35am CMOS process.

  6. Device Considerations for Nanophotonic CMOS Global Interconnects

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A

    2012-01-01

    We introduce an analytical framework to understand the path for scaling nanophotonic interconnects to meet the energy and footprint requirements of CMOS global interconnects. We derive the device requirements for sub 100 fJ/bit interconnects including tuning power, serialization-deserialization energy, and optical insertion losses. Using silicon photonics as an example platform, we derive the energy/bit, linear and areal bandwidth density of optical interconnects. We also derive the targets for device performance which indicate the need for continued improvements in mode volume (40 Gb/s), tuning power ( 6 channels). We also contrast the figures of merits for CMOS electrical interconnects with nanophotonic interconnects.

  7. Integrated 60GHz RF beamforming in CMOS

    Yu, Yikun; van Roermund, Arthur H M

    2011-01-01

    ""Integrated 60GHz RF Beamforming in CMOS"" describes new concepts and design techniques that can be used for 60GHz phased array systems. First, general trends and challenges in low-cost high data-rate 60GHz wireless system are studied, and the phased array technique is introduced to improve the system performance. Second, the system requirements of phase shifters are analyzed, and different phased array architectures are compared. Third, the design and implementation of 60GHz passive and active phase shifters in a CMOS technology are presented. Fourth, the integration of 60GHz phase shifters

  8. Scaling CMOS devices through alternative structures

    2001-01-01

    The conventional wisdom holds that CMOS devices cannot be scaled much further from where they are today because of several device physics limitations such as the large tunneling current in very thin gate dielectrics. It is shown that alternative device structures can allow CMOS transistors to scale by another 20 times. That is as large a factor of scaling as what the semiconductor industry accomplished in the past 25 years. There will be many opportunities and challenges in finding novel device structures and new processing techniques, and in understanding the physics of future devices.

  9. Radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology

    The evolutionary development of a radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology is reviewed. The metal gate hardened CMOS status is summarized, including both radiation and reliability data. The development of a radiation-hardened bulk silicon gate process which was successfully implemented to a commercial microprocessor family and applied to a new, radiation-hardened, LSI standard cell family is also discussed. The cell family is reviewed and preliminary characterization data is presented. Finally, a brief comparison of the various radiation-hardened technologies with regard to performance, reliability, and availability is made

  10. A Novel Method to Increase LinLog CMOS Sensors’ Performance in High Dynamic Range Scenarios

    Andrés Iborra

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Images from high dynamic range (HDR scenes must be obtained with minimum loss of information. For this purpose it is necessary to take full advantage of the quantification levels provided by the CCD/CMOS image sensor. LinLog CMOS sensors satisfy the above demand by offering an adjustable response curve that combines linear and logarithmic responses. This paper presents a novel method to quickly adjust the parameters that control the response curve of a LinLog CMOS image sensor. We propose to use an Adaptive Proportional-Integral-Derivative controller to adjust the exposure time of the sensor, together with control algorithms based on the saturation level and the entropy of the images. With this method the sensor’s maximum dynamic range (120 dB can be used to acquire good quality images from HDR scenes with fast, automatic adaptation to scene conditions. Adaptation to a new scene is rapid, with a sensor response adjustment of less than eight frames when working in real time video mode. At least 67% of the scene entropy can be retained with this method.

  11. Smart temperature sensors in standard CMOS

    Makinwa, K.A.A.

    2010-01-01

    A smart temperature sensor is an integrated system consisting of a temperature sensor, its bias circuitry and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). When manufactured in CMOS technology, such sensors have found widespread use due to their low cost, small size and ease of use. In this paper the basic

  12. Low energy CMOS for space applications

    Panwar, Ramesh; Alkalaj, Leon

    1992-01-01

    The current focus of NASA's space flight programs reflects a new thrust towards smaller, less costly, and more frequent space missions, when compared to missions such as Galileo, Magellan, or Cassini. Recently, the concept of a microspacecraft was proposed. In this concept, a small, compact spacecraft that weighs tens of kilograms performs focused scientific objectives such as imaging. Similarly, a Mars Lander micro-rover project is under study that will allow miniature robots weighing less than seven kilograms to explore the Martian surface. To bring the microspacecraft and microrover ideas to fruition, one will have to leverage compact 3D multi-chip module-based multiprocessors (MCM) technologies. Low energy CMOS will become increasingly important because of the thermodynamic considerations in cooling compact 3D MCM implementations and also from considerations of the power budget for space applications. In this paper, we show how the operating voltage is related to the threshold voltage of the CMOS transistors for accomplishing a task in VLSI with minimal energy. We also derive expressions for the noise margins at the optimal operating point. We then look at a low voltage CMOS (LVCMOS) technology developed at Stanford University which improves the power consumption over conventional CMOS by a couple of orders of magnitude and consider the suitability of the technology for space applications by characterizing its SEU immunity.

  13. Nanometer CMOS ICS from basics to asics

    Veendrick, Harry

    2008-01-01

    Explores all associated disciplines of nanometer CMOS ICs Includes physics, design, process, yield, packaging, power, variability, reliability and signal integrityIncludes extensive discussions on future trends and challengesAll subjects are described at the same level of clarity Well-suited for self-study

  14. CMOS VHF transconductance-C lowpass filter

    Nauta, B.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results of a VHF CMOS transconductance-C lowpass filter are described. The filter is built with transconductors as published earlier. The cutoff frequency can be tuned from 22 to 98 MHz and the measured filter response is very close to the ideal response

  15. A 24GHz Radar Receiver in CMOS

    Kwok, K.C.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigates the system design and circuit implementation of a 24GHz-band short-range radar receiver in CMOS technology. The propagation and penetration properties of EM wave offer the possibility of non-contact based remote sensing and through-the-wall imaging of distance stationary or

  16. Ultra-low Voltage CMOS Cascode Amplifier

    Lehmann, Torsten; Cassia, Marco

    In this paper, we design a folded cascode operational transconductance amplifier in a standard CMOS process, which has a measured 69 dB DC gain, a 2 MHz bandwidth and compatible input- and output voltage levels at a 1 V power supply. This is done by a novel Current Driven Bulk (CDB) technique...

  17. Low noise monolithic CMOS front end electronics

    Design considerations for low noise charge measurement and their application in CMOS electronics are described. The amplifier driver combination whose noise performance has been measured in detail as well as the analog multiplexing silicon strip detector readout electronics are designed with low power consumption and can be operated in pulsed mode so as to reduce heat dissipation even further in many applications. (orig.)

  18. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Briggs, Justin A., E-mail: jabriggs@stanford.edu [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Naik, Gururaj V.; Baum, Brian K.; Dionne, Jennifer A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Petach, Trevor A.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  19. Analog IC reliability in nanometer CMOS

    Maricau, Elie

    2013-01-01

    This book focuses on modeling, simulation and analysis of analog circuit aging. First, all important nanometer CMOS physical effects resulting in circuit unreliability are reviewed. Then, transistor aging compact models for circuit simulation are discussed and several methods for efficient circuit reliability simulation are explained and compared. Ultimately, the impact of transistor aging on analog circuits is studied. Aging-resilient and aging-immune circuits are identified and the impact of technology scaling is discussed.   The models and simulation techniques described in the book are intended as an aid for device engineers, circuit designers and the EDA community to understand and to mitigate the impact of aging effects on nanometer CMOS ICs.   ·         Enables readers to understand long-term reliability of an integrated circuit; ·         Reviews CMOS unreliability effects, with focus on those that will emerge in future CMOS nodes; ·         Provides overview of models for...

  20. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing

  1. CMOS MEMS capacitive absolute pressure sensor

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and characterization of a capacitive pressure sensor using a commercial 0.18 µm CMOS (complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor) process and postprocess. The pressure sensor is capacitive and the structure is formed by an Al top electrode enclosed in a suspended SiO2 membrane, which acts as a movable electrode against a bottom or stationary Al electrode fixed on the SiO2 substrate. Both the movable and fixed electrodes form a variable parallel plate capacitor, whose capacitance varies with the applied pressure on the surface. In order to release the membranes the CMOS layers need to be applied postprocess and this mainly consists of four steps: (1) deposition and patterning of PECVD (plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition) oxide to protect CMOS pads and to open the pressure sensor top surface, (2) etching of the sacrificial layer to release the suspended membrane, (3) deposition of PECVD oxide to seal the etching holes and creating vacuum inside the gap, and finally (4) etching of the passivation oxide to open the pads and allow electrical connections. This sensor design and fabrication is suitable to obey the design rules of a CMOS foundry and since it only uses low-temperature processes, it allows monolithic integration with other types of CMOS compatible sensors and IC (integrated circuit) interface on a single chip. Experimental results showed that the pressure sensor has a highly linear sensitivity of 0.14 fF kPa−1 in the pressure range of 0–300 kPa. (paper)

  2. Commercialisation of CMOS Integrated Circuit Technology in Multi-Electrode Arrays for Neuroscience and Cell-Based Biosensors

    Chris R. Bowen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The adaptation of standard integrated circuit (IC technology as a transducer in cell-based biosensors in drug discovery pharmacology, neural interface systems and electrophysiology requires electrodes that are electrochemically stable, biocompatible and affordable. Unfortunately, the ubiquitous Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS IC technology does not meet the first of these requirements. For devices intended only for research, modification of CMOS by post-processing using cleanroom facilities has been achieved. However, to enable adoption of CMOS as a basis for commercial biosensors, the economies of scale of CMOS fabrication must be maintained by using only low-cost post-processing techniques. This review highlights the methodologies employed in cell-based biosensor design where CMOS-based integrated circuits (ICs form an integral part of the transducer system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the application of multi-electrode arrays for in vitro neuroscience applications. Identifying suitable IC packaging methods presents further significant challenges when considering specific applications. The various challenges and difficulties are reviewed and some potential solutions are presented.

  3. Graphene/Si CMOS Hybrid Hall Integrated Circuits

    Huang, Le; Xu, Huilong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Chengying; Jiang, Jianhua; Ma, Xiaomeng; Chen, Bingyan; Li, Zishen; Zhong, Hua; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2014-07-01

    Graphene/silicon CMOS hybrid integrated circuits (ICs) should provide powerful functions which combines the ultra-high carrier mobility of graphene and the sophisticated functions of silicon CMOS ICs. But it is difficult to integrate these two kinds of heterogeneous devices on a single chip. In this work a low temperature process is developed for integrating graphene devices onto silicon CMOS ICs for the first time, and a high performance graphene/CMOS hybrid Hall IC is demonstrated. Signal amplifying/process ICs are manufactured via commercial 0.18 um silicon CMOS technology, and graphene Hall elements (GHEs) are fabricated on top of the passivation layer of the CMOS chip via a low-temperature micro-fabrication process. The sensitivity of the GHE on CMOS chip is further improved by integrating the GHE with the CMOS amplifier on the Si chip. This work not only paves the way to fabricate graphene/Si CMOS Hall ICs with much higher performance than that of conventional Hall ICs, but also provides a general method for scalable integration of graphene devices with silicon CMOS ICs via a low-temperature process.

  4. A Zero Suppression Micro-Circuit for Binary Readout CMOS Monolithic Sensors

    Himmi, A; Torheim, O; Hu-Guo, C; Winter, A

    2009-01-01

    The EUDET-JRA1 beam telescope and the STAR vertex detector upgrade will be equipped with CMOS pixel sensors allowing to provide high density tracking adapted to intense particle beams. The EUDET sensor Mimosa26, is designed and fabricated in a CMOS-0.35μm Opto process. Its architecture is based on a matrix of 1152x576 pixels, 1152 column-level Analogue-to-Digital Conversion (ADC) by discriminators and a zero suppression circuitry. This paper focused on the data sparsification architecture, allowing a data compression factor between from 10 and 1000, depending on the hit density per frame. It can be extended to the final sensor for the STAR upgrade.

  5. PALM and STORM: Into large fields and high-throughput microscopy with sCMOS detectors.

    Almada, Pedro; Culley, Siân; Henriques, Ricardo

    2015-10-15

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM) techniques such as Photo-Activation Localization Microscopy (PALM) and Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) enable fluorescence microscopy super-resolution: the overcoming of the resolution barrier imposed by the diffraction of light. These techniques are based on acquiring hundreds or thousands of images of single molecules, locating them and reconstructing a higher-resolution image from the high-precision localizations. These methods generally imply a considerable trade-off between imaging speed and resolution, limiting their applicability to high-throughput workflows. Recent advancements in scientific Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (sCMOS) camera sensors and localization algorithms reduce the temporal requirements for SMLM, pushing it toward high-throughput microscopy. Here we outline the decisions researchers face when considering how to adapt hardware on a new system for sCMOS sensors with high-throughput in mind. PMID:26079924

  6. Modeling and parameter extraction of CMOS on-chip coplanar waveguides up to 67 GHz for mm-wave applications

    Coplanar waveguides (CPW) are widely used in mm-wave circuits designs for their good performance. A novel unified model of various on chip CPWs for mm-wave application, together with corresponding direct parameter extraction methodologies, are proposed and investigated, where standard CPW, grounded CPW (GCPW) and CPW with slotted shield (SCPW) are included. Several kinds of influences of different structures are analyzed and considered into the model to explain the frequency-dependent per-unit-length L, C, R, and G parameters, among which the electromagnetic coupling for CPWs with large lower ground or shield is described by a new C–L–R series path in the parallel branch. The direct extraction procedures are established, which can ensure both accuracy and simplicity compared with other reported methods. Different CPWs are fabricated and measured on 90-nm CMOS processes with Short-Open-Load-Through (SOLT) de-embedding techniques. Excellent agreement between the model and the measured data for different CPWs is achieved up to 67 GHz. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  7. Design of improved CMOS phase-frequency detector and charge-pump for phase-locked loop

    Two essential blocks for the PLLs based on CP, a phase-frequency detector (PFD) and an improved current steering charge-pump (CP), are developed. The mechanisms for widening the phase error detection range and eliminating the dead zone are analyzed and applied in our design to optimize the proposed PFD. To obtain excellent current matching and minimum current variation over a wide output voltage range, an improved structure for the proposed CP is developed by fully utilizing many additional sub-circuits. Implemented in a standard 90-nm CMOS process, the proposed PFD achieves a phase error detection range from −354° to 354° and the improved CP demonstrates a current mismatch of less than 1.1% and a pump-current variation of 4% across the output voltage, swinging from 0.2 to 1.1 V, and the power consumption is 1.3 mW under a 1.2-V supply. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  8. An Implantable CMOS Amplifier for Nerve Signals

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Lehmann, Torsten

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a low noise high gain CMOS amplifier for minute nerve signals is presented. By using a mixture of weak- and strong inversion transistors, optimal noise suppression in the amplifier is achieved. A continuous-time offset-compensation technique is utilized in order to minimize impact on...... the amplifier input nodes. The method for signal recovery from noisy nerve signals is presented. A prototype amplifier is realized in a standard digital 0.5 μm CMOS single poly, n-well process. The prototype amplifier features a gain of 80 dB over a 3.6 kHz bandwidth, a CMRR of more than 87 dB and a...

  9. IR CMOS: infrared enhanced silicon imaging

    Pralle, M. U.; Carey, J. E.; Haddad, Homayoon; Vineis, C.; Sickler, J.; Li, X.; Jiang, J.; Sahebi, F.; Palsule, C.; McKee, J.

    2013-06-01

    SiOnyx has developed visible and infrared CMOS image sensors leveraging a proprietary ultrafast laser semiconductor process technology. This technology demonstrates 10 fold improvements in infrared sensitivity over incumbent imaging technology while maintaining complete compatibility with standard CMOS image sensor process flows. Furthermore, these sensitivity enhancements are achieved on a focal plane with state of the art noise performance of 2 electrons/pixel. By capturing light in the visible regime as well as infrared light from the night glow, this sensor technology provides imaging in daytime through twilight and into nighttime conditions. The measured 10x quantum efficiency at the critical 1064 nm laser node enables see spot imaging capabilities in a variety of ambient conditions. The spectral sensitivity is from 400 to 1200 nm.

  10. Noise in a CMOS digital pixel sensor

    Zhang Chi; Yao Suying; Xu Jiangtao

    2011-01-01

    Based on the study of noise performance in CMOS digital pixel sensor (DPS),a mathematical model of noise is established with the pulse-width-modulation (PWM) principle.Compared with traditional CMOS image sensors,the integration time is different and A/D conversion is implemented in each PWM DPS pixel.Then,the quantitative calculating formula of system noise is derived.It is found that dark current shot noise is the dominant noise source in low light region while photodiode shot noise becomes significantly important in the bright region.In this model,photodiode shot noise does not vary with luminance,but dark current shot noise does.According to increasing photodiode capacitance and the comparator's reference voltage or optimizing the mismatch in the comparator,the total noise can be reduced.These results serve as a guideline for the design of PWM DPS.

  11. Ultralow-Loss CMOS Copper Plasmonic Waveguides.

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu; Yakubovsky, Dmitry I; Kirtaev, Roman V; Volkov, Valentyn S

    2016-01-13

    Surface plasmon polaritons can give a unique opportunity to manipulate light at a scale well below the diffraction limit reducing the size of optical components down to that of nanoelectronic circuits. At the same time, plasmonics is mostly based on noble metals, which are not compatible with microelectronics manufacturing technologies. This prevents plasmonic components from integration with both silicon photonics and silicon microelectronics. Here, we demonstrate ultralow-loss copper plasmonic waveguides fabricated in a simple complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible process, which can outperform gold plasmonic waveguides simultaneously providing long (>40 μm) propagation length and deep subwavelength (∼λ(2)/50, where λ is the free-space wavelength) mode confinement in the telecommunication spectral range. These results create the backbone for the development of a CMOS plasmonic platform and its integration in future electronic chips. PMID:26654281

  12. Noise in a CMOS digital pixel sensor

    Based on the study of noise performance in CMOS digital pixel sensor (DPS), a mathematical model of noise is established with the pulse-width-modulation (PWM) principle. Compared with traditional CMOS image sensors, the integration time is different and A/D conversion is implemented in each PWM DPS pixel. Then, the quantitative calculating formula of system noise is derived. It is found that dark current shot noise is the dominant noise source in low light region while photodiode shot noise becomes significantly important in the bright region. In this model, photodiode shot noise does not vary with luminance, but dark current shot noise does. According to increasing photodiode capacitance and the comparator's reference voltage or optimizing the mismatch in the comparator, the total noise can be reduced. These results serve as a guideline for the design of PWM DPS. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  13. DESIGN AND IMPLEMETTATION OF CMOS IMAGE SENSOR

    Liu Yu; Wang Guoyu

    2007-01-01

    A single Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor based on 0.35 μm process along with its design and implementation is introduced in this paper. The pixel architecture of Active Pixel Sensor (APS) is used in the chip, which comprises a 256×256 pixel array together with column amplifiers, scan array circuits, series interface, control logic and Analog-Digital Converter (ADC). With the use of smart layout design, fill factor of pixel cell is 43%. Moreover, a new method of Dynamic Digital Double Sample (DDDS) which removes Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) is used.The CMOS image sensor chip is implemented based on the 0.35 μm process of chartered by Multi-Project Wafer (MPW). This chip performs well as expected.

  14. Cmos spdt switch for wlan applications

    Bhuiyan, M. A. S.; Reaz, M. B. I.; Rahman, L. F.; Minhad, K. N.

    2015-04-01

    WLAN has become an essential part of our today's life. The advancement of CMOS technology let the researchers contribute low power, size and cost effective WLAN devices. This paper proposes a single pole double through transmit/receive (T/R) switch for WLAN applications in 0.13 μm CMOS technology. The proposed switch exhibit 1.36 dB insertion loss, 25.3 dB isolation and 24.3 dBm power handling capacity. Moreover, it only dissipates 786.7 nW power per cycle. The switch utilizes only transistor aspect ratio optimization and resistive body floating technique to achieve such desired performance. In this design the use of bulky inductor and capacitor is avoided to evade imposition of unwanted nonlinearities to the communication signal.

  15. CMOS Camera Array With Onboard Memory

    Gat, Nahum

    2009-01-01

    A compact CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) camera system has been developed with high resolution (1.3 Megapixels), a USB (universal serial bus) 2.0 interface, and an onboard memory. Exposure times, and other operating parameters, are sent from a control PC via the USB port. Data from the camera can be received via the USB port and the interface allows for simple control and data capture through a laptop computer.

  16. Cantilever-Based Biosensors in CMOS Technology

    Kirstein, K -U; Zimmermann, M; Vancura, C; Volden, T; Song, W H; Lichtenberg, J; Hierlemannn, A

    2011-01-01

    Single-chip CMOS-based biosensors that feature microcantilevers as transducer elements are presented. The cantilevers are functionalized for the capturing of specific analytes, e.g., proteins or DNA. The binding of the analyte changes the mechanical properties of the cantilevers such as surface stress and resonant frequency, which can be detected by an integrated Wheatstone bridge. The monolithic integrated readout allows for a high signal-to-noise ratio, lowers the sensitivity to external interference and enables autonomous device operation.

  17. Air Quality Monitoring Using CCD/ CMOS Devices

    Low, Khee Lam; Joanna, Tan Choay Ee; Sim, Keat; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; and, Khiruddin Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we showed a method for measuring of the air quality index by using the CCD/CMOS sensor. We showed two examples to obtain index values by using webcam and CCTV. Both devices provided a high correlation between the measured and estimated PM10. So, the imaging method is capable to measure PM10 values in the environment. Futher application can be conducted using different devices.

  18. Low Power Oriented CMOS Circuit Optimization Protocol

    Verle, A.; Michel, X.; Azemard, Nadine; Maurine, Philippe; Auvergne, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Low power oriented circuit optimization consists in selecting the best alternative between gate sizing, buffer insertion and logic structure transformation, for satisfying a delay constraint at minimum area cost. In this paper we used a closed form model of delay in CMOS structures to define metrics for a deterministic selection of the optimization alternative. The target is delay constraint satisfaction with minimum area cost. We validate the design space exploration method, defining maximum...

  19. Measurements of Si hybrid CMOS x-ray detector characteristics

    Bongiorno, Stephen D.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Burrows, David N.; Cook, Robert

    2010-07-01

    The recent development of active pixel sensors as X-Ray focal plane arrays will place them in contention with CCDs on future satellite missions. Penn State University (PSU) is working with Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS) to develop X-Ray Hybrid CMOS devices (HCDs), a type of active pixel sensor with fast frame rates, adaptable readout timing and geometry, low power consumption, and inherent radiation hardness. CCDs have been used with great success on the current generation of X-Ray telescopes (e.g. Chandra, XMM, Suzaku, and Swift). However, their bucket-brigade readout architecture, which transfers charge across the chip with discrete component readout electronics, results in clockrate limited readout speeds that cause pileup (saturation) of bright sources and an inherent susceptibility to radiation induced displacement damage that limits mission lifetime. In contrast, HCDs read pixels through the detector substrate with low power, on-chip readout integrated circuits. Faster frame rates, achieved with adaptable readout timing and geometry, will allow the next generation's larger effective area telescopes to observe brighter sources free of pileup. In HCDs, radiation damaged lattice sites affect a single pixel instead of an entire row. The PSU X-ray group is currently testing 4 Teledyne HCDs, with low cross-talk CTIA devices in development. We will report laboratory measurements of HCD readnoise, interpixel-capacitance and its impact on event selection, linearity, and energy resolution as a function of energy.

  20. CMOS imagers from phototransduction to image processing

    Etienne-Cummings, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    The idea of writing a book on CMOS imaging has been brewing for several years. It was placed on a fast track after we agreed to organize a tutorial on CMOS sensors for the 2004 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2004). This tutorial defined the structure of the book, but as first time authors/editors, we had a lot to learn about the logistics of putting together information from multiple sources. Needless to say, it was a long road between the tutorial and the book, and it took more than a few months to complete. We hope that you will find our journey worthwhile and the collated information useful. The laboratories of the authors are located at many universities distributed around the world. Their unifying theme, however, is the advancement of knowledge for the development of systems for CMOS imaging and image processing. We hope that this book will highlight the ideas that have been pioneered by the authors, while providing a roadmap for new practitioners in this field to exploit exc...

  1. A Surface Micromachined CMOS MEMS Humidity Sensor

    Jian-Qiu Huang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a CMOS MEMS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor micro electromechanical system piezoresistive humidity sensor fabricated by a surface micromachining process. Both pre-CMOS and post-CMOS technologies were used to fabricate the piezoresistive humidity sensor. Compared with a bulk micromachined humidity sensor, the machining precision and the sizes of the surface micromachined humidity sensor were both improved. The package and test systems of the sensor were designed. According to the test results, the sensitivity of the sensor was 7 mV/%RH (relative humidity and the linearity of the sensor was 1.9% at 20 °C. Both the sensitivity and linearity were not sensitive to the temperature but the curve of the output voltage shifted with the temperature. The hysteresis of the humidity sensor decreased from 3.2% RH to 1.9% RH as the temperature increased from 10 to 40 °C. The recovery time of the sensor was 85 s at room temperature (25 °C.

  2. A Standard CMOS Humidity Sensor without Post-Processing

    Oleg Nizhnik

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A 2 µW power dissipation, voltage-output, humidity sensor accurate to 5% relative humidity was developed using the LFoundry 0.15 µm CMOS technology without post-processing. The sensor consists of a woven lateral array of electrodes implemented in CMOS top metal, a Intervia Photodielectric 8023-10 humidity-sensitive layer, and a CMOS capacitance to voltage converter.

  3. Interferometric comparison of the performance of a CMOS and sCMOS detector

    Flores-Moreno, J. M.; De la Torre I., Manuel H.; Hernández-Montes, M. S.; Pérez-López, Carlos; Mendoza S., Fernando

    2015-08-01

    We present an analysis of the imaging performance of two state-of-the-art sensors widely used in the nondestructive- testing area (NDT). The analysis is based on the quantification of the signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio from an optical phase image. The calculation of the SNR is based on the relation of the median (average) and standard deviation measurements over specific areas of interest in the phase images of both sensors. This retrieved phase is coming from the vibrational behavior of a large object by means of an out-of-plane holographic interferometer. The SNR is used as a figure-of-merit to evaluate and compare the performance of the CMOS and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) camera as part of the experimental set-up. One of the cameras has a high speed CMOS sensor while the other has a high resolution sCMOS sensor. The object under study is a metallically framed table with a Formica cover with an observable area of 1.1 m2. The vibration induced to the sample is performed by a linear step motor with an attached tip in the motion stage. Each camera is used once at the time to record the deformation keeping the same experimental conditions for each case. These measurements may complement the conventional procedures or technical information commonly used to evaluate a camerás performance such as: quantum efficiency, spatial resolution and others. Results present post processed images from both cameras, but showing a smoother and easy to unwrap optical phase coming from those recorded with the sCMOS camera.

  4. On-chip solar battery structure for CMOS LSI

    Arima, Yutaka; Ehara, Masaya

    2006-01-01

    A built-in method of on-chip solar battery in a CMOS LSI is proposed. The proposed solar battery can be formed using conventional CMOS process technology. It can generate a high voltage of 0.6-0.83 V by a series connection structure of two types of p-n junction diodes formed with the CMOS circuit simultaneously on the LSI chip. The generated voltage is sufficient to drive the conventional CMOS circuit without modi. cation. The test chip was produced experimentally using conventional 0.35 mu m...

  5. Current-mode CMOS hybrid image sensor

    Benyhesan, Mohammad Kassim

    Digital imaging is growing rapidly making Complimentary Metal-Oxide-Semi conductor (CMOS) image sensor-based cameras indispensable in many modern life devices like cell phones, surveillance devices, personal computers, and tablets. For various purposes wireless portable image systems are widely deployed in many indoor and outdoor places such as hospitals, urban areas, streets, highways, forests, mountains, and towers. However, the increased demand on high-resolution image sensors and improved processing features is expected to increase the power consumption of the CMOS sensor-based camera systems. Increased power consumption translates into a reduced battery life-time. The increased power consumption might not be a problem if there is access to a nearby charging station. On the other hand, the problem arises if the image sensor is located in widely spread areas, unfavorable to human intervention, and difficult to reach. Given the limitation of energy sources available for wireless CMOS image sensor, an energy harvesting technique presents a viable solution to extend the sensor life-time. Energy can be harvested from the sun light or the artificial light surrounding the sensor itself. In this thesis, we propose a current-mode CMOS hybrid image sensor capable of energy harvesting and image capture. The proposed sensor is based on a hybrid pixel that can be programmed to perform the task of an image sensor and the task of a solar cell to harvest energy. The basic idea is to design a pixel that can be configured to exploit its internal photodiode to perform two functions: image sensing and energy harvesting. As a proof of concept a 40 x 40 array of hybrid pixels has been designed and fabricated in a standard 0.5 microm CMOS process. Measurement results show that up to 39 microW of power can be harvested from the array under 130 Klux condition with an energy efficiency of 220 nJ /pixel /frame. The proposed image sensor is a current-mode image sensor which has several

  6. Current Development of CMOS Image Sensors%CMOS 图像传感器的发展现状

    王宝元; 吴三灵; 温波; 焦明纲; 周发明

    2000-01-01

    Aim To review the current development of CMOS image sensors. Methods The background, architecture and current development of CMOS image sensors is describled. The trade-offs between the CMOS image sensors and the CCD image sensors are put forword. Results The development tendency of CMOS image sensors is discussed. Conclusion The CMOS image sensor has the potential of a wide range of application.%目的 了解当前CMOS图像传感器的发展状况. 方法 详细介绍了图像传感器的历史背景、发展现状、像素单元的结构、工作原理以及 CMOS 图像传感器芯片的整体结构,并比较了 CMOS 图像传感器和 CCD 图像传感器的优、 缺点. 结果 指出了 CMOS 图像传感器发展趋势. 结论 CMOS 图像传感器具有美好的发展前途.

  7. A new circuit technique for reduced leakage current in Deep Submicron CMOS technologies

    A. Schmitz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern CMOS processes in the Deep Submicron regime are restricted to supply voltages below 2 volts and further to account for the transistors' field strength limitations and to reduce the power per logic gate. To maintain the high switching performance, the threshold voltage must be scaled according with the supply voltage. However, this leads to an increased subthreshold current of the transistors in standby mode (VGS=0. Another source of leakage is gate current, which becomes significant for gate oxides of 3nm and below. We propose a Self-Biasing Virtual Rails (SBVR - CMOS technique which acts like an adaptive local supply voltage in case of standby mode. Most important sources of leakage currents are reduced by this technique. Moreover, SBVR-CMOS is capable of conserving stored information in sleep mode, which is vital for memory circuits. Memories are exposed to radiation causing soft errors. This well-known problem becomes even worse in standby mode of typical SRAMs, that have low driving performance to withstand alpha particle hits. In this paper, a 16-transistor SRAM cell is proposed, which combines the advantage of extremely low leakage currents with a very high soft error stability.

  8. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): developments and future outlook

    R. Turchetta; A. Fant; P. Gasiorek; C. Esbrand; J.A. Griffiths; M.G. Metaxas; G.J. Royle; R. Speller; C. Venanzi; P.F. van der Stelt; H.G.C. Verheij; G. Li; S. Theodoridis; H. Georgiou; D. Cavouras; G. Hall; M. Noy; J. Jones; J. Leaver; D. Machin; S. Greenwood; M. Khaleeq; H. Schulerud; J.M. Østby; F. Triantis; A. Asimidis; D. Bolanakis; N. Manthos; R. Longo; A. Bergamaschi

    2007-01-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end app

  9. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): developments and future outlook

    R. Turchetta; A. Fant; P. Gasiorek; C. Esbrand; J.A. Griffiths; M.G. Metaxas; G.J. Royle; R. Speller; C. Venanzi; P.F. van der Stelt; H.G.C. Verheij; G. Li; S. Theodoridis; H. Georgiou; D. Cavouras; G. Hall; M. Noy; J. Jones; J. Leaver; D. Machin; S. Greenwood; M. Khaleeq; H. Schulerud; J.M. Østby; F. Triantis; A. Asimidis; D. Bolanakis; N. Manthos; R. Longo; A. Bergamaschi

    2006-01-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end app

  10. Charge-Transfer CMOS Image Sensors: Device and Radiation Aspects

    Ramachandra Rao, P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was twofold: investigating the effect of ionizing radiation on 4-T CMOS image sensors and the possibility of realizing a CCD like sensor in standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology (for medical applications). Both the aims are complementary; borrowing and lending many aspects of radia

  11. Scaling and Pixel Crosstalk Considerations for CMOS Image Sensor

    JIN Xiang-liang; CHEN Jie(member,IEEE); QIU Yu-lin

    2003-01-01

    With the scaling development of the minimum lithographic size,the scaling trend of CMOS imager pixel size and fill factor has been computed according to the Moore rule.When the CMOS minimum lithographic feature scales down to 0.35 μm,the CCD image pixel size is not so easy to be reduced and but the CMOS image pixel size benefits from the scaling minimum lithographic feature. However, when the CMOS technology is downscaled to or under 0.35 μm,the fabrication of CMOS image sensors will be limited by the standard CMOS process in both ways of shallow trench isolation and source/drain junction,which results in pixel crosstalk.The impact of the crosstalk on the active pixel CMOS image sensor is analyzed based on the technology scaling.Some suppressed crosstalk methods have been reviewed.The best way is that combining the advantages of CMOS and SOI technology to fabricate the image sensors will reduce the pixel crosstalk.

  12. Charge-Transfer CMOS Image Sensors: Device and Radiation Aspects

    Ramachandra Rao, P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was twofold: investigating the effect of ionizing radiation on 4-T CMOS image sensors and the possibility of realizing a CCD like sensor in standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology (for medical applications). Both the aims are complementary; borrowing and lending many aspects of radiation and device physics amongst each other.

  13. From VHF to UHF CMOS-MEMS Monolithically Integrated Resonators

    Teva, Jordi; Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Uranga, A.;

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and characterization of microresonators exhibiting resonance frequencies in the VHF and UHF bands, fabricated using the available layers of the standard and commercial CMOS technology, AMS-0.35mum. The resonators are released in a post-CMOS process cons...

  14. BioCMOS Interfaces and Co-Design

    Carrara, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    The application of CMOS circuits and ASIC VLSI systems to problems in medicine and system biology has led to the emergence of Bio/CMOS Interfaces and Co-Design as an exciting and rapidly growing area of research. The mutual inter-relationships between VLSI-CMOS design and the biophysics of molecules interfacing with silicon and/or onto metals has led to the emergence of the interdisciplinary engineering approach to Bio/CMOS interfaces. This new approach, facilitated by 3D circuit design and nanotechnology, has resulted in new concepts and applications for VLSI systems in the bio-world. This book offers an invaluable reference to the state-of-the-art in Bio/CMOS interfaces. It describes leading-edge research in the field of CMOS design and VLSI development for applications requiring integration of biological molecules onto the chip. It provides multidisciplinary content ranging from biochemistry to CMOS design in order to address Bio/CMOS interface co-design in bio-sensing applications.

  15. An Implantable CMOS Amplifier for Nerve Signals

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Lehmann, Torsten

    In this paper, a low noise high gain CMOS amplifier for minute nerve signals is presented. The amplifier is constructed in a fully differential topology to maximize noise rejection. By using a mixture of weak- and strong inversion transistors, optimal noise suppression in the amplifier is achieved....... A continuous-time current-steering offset-compensation technique is utilized in order to minimize the noise contribution and to minimize dynamic impact on the amplifier input nodes. The method for signal recovery from noisy nerve signals is presented. A prototype amplifier is realized in a standard...

  16. Measurement device for cmos-mems accelerometer

    Somasundaram, Namitha

    2014-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] This project reports the process of development of the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) - Zephyr for the experimental CMOS MEMS accelerometer testchip, Bailed II. The problem of capacitance mismatch at the input bridge is solved through a simple and innovative arrangement of resistors, jumpers and capacitors on the PCB. A filter is designed with the inductor capacitor pair to filter noise from the DC source. An amplifier with a gain of 10 is designed to amplify the output signals of the B...

  17. Plasmonic Modulator Using CMOS Compatible Material Platform

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a design of ultra-compact plasmonic modulator is proposed and numerically analyzed. The device l ayout utilizes alternative plas monic materials such as tr ansparent conducting oxides and titanium nitride which potentially can be applied for CMOS compatible process. The modulation is...... obtained by varying the ca rrier concentration of th e transparent conducting oxide layer and exciting plasmonic resonance in the structure. The analysis shows that an extinction ratio of 46 dB/μm can be achieved at the telecommunication wavelength. Proposed structure is particularly convenient for...

  18. CMOS biomicrosystems where electronics meets biology

    2011-01-01

    "The book will address the-state-of-the-art in integrated Bio-Microsystems that integrate microelectronics with fluidics, photonics, and mechanics. New exciting opportunities in emerging applications that will take system performance beyond offered by traditional CMOS based circuits are discussed in detail. The book is a must for anyone serious about microelectronics integration possibilities for future technologies. The book is written by top notch international experts in industry and academia. The intended audience is practicing engineers with electronics background that want to learn about integrated microsystems. The book will be also used as a recommended reading and supplementary material in graduate course curriculum"--

  19. Nano-CMOS gate dielectric engineering

    Wong, Hei

    2011-01-01

    According to Moore's Law, not only does the number of transistors in an integrated circuit double every two years, but transistor size also decreases at a predictable rate. At the rate we are going, the downsizing of CMOS transistors will reach the deca-nanometer scale by 2020. Accordingly, the gate dielectric thickness will be shrunk to less than half-nanometer oxide equivalent thickness (EOT) to maintain proper operation of the transistors, leaving high-k materials as the only viable solution for such small-scale EOT. This comprehensive, up-to-date text covering the physics, materials, devic

  20. Plasmonic Modulator Using CMOS Compatible Material Platform

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Naik, Gururaj V.; Ferrera, Marcello; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    In this work, a design of ultra-compact plasmonic modulator is proposed and numerically analyzed. The device l ayout utilizes alternative plas monic materials such as tr ansparent conducting oxides and titanium nitride which potentially can be applied for CMOS compatible process. The modulation is...... obtained by varying the ca rrier concentration of th e transparent conducting oxide layer and exciting plasmonic resonance in the structure. The analysis shows that an extinction ratio of 46 dB/μm can be achieved at the telecommunication wavelength. Proposed structure is particularly convenient for...... integration with existing insulator-metal-insu lator plasmonic waveguides as well as novel photonic/electronic hybrid circuits...

  1. SEU error rates in advanced digital CMOS

    Space-based electronics is exposed to cosmic radiations that result in bit reversal errors or Single Event Upsets. Those errors are generally taken into account through an error-rate quantification expressed in Expected errors per Bit-Day (EBD). A procedure to evaluate this EBD for CMOS memory devices is presented here and applied to a typical data set. This method arises from a development of the upset rate convolution integral. It can be applied to ground-based test data, and provide a realistic upset-rate estimate for space flight conditions. (D.L.). 20 refs., 7 figs

  2. Variation-aware advanced CMOS devices and SRAM

    Shin, Changhwan

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of contemporary issues in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) device design, describing how to overcome process-induced random variations such as line-edge-roughness, random-dopant-fluctuation, and work-function variation, and the applications of novel CMOS devices to cache memory (or Static Random Access Memory, SRAM). The author places emphasis on the physical understanding of process-induced random variation as well as the introduction of novel CMOS device structures and their application to SRAM. The book outlines the technical predicament facing state-of-the-art CMOS technology development, due to the effect of ever-increasing process-induced random/intrinsic variation in transistor performance at the sub-30-nm technology nodes. Therefore, the physical understanding of process-induced random/intrinsic variations and the technical solutions to address these issues plays a key role in new CMOS technology development. This book aims to provide the reade...

  3. Characterization of active CMOS sensors for capacitively coupled pixel detectors

    Hirono, Toko; Gonella, Laura; Janssen, Jens; Hemperek, Tomasz; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Institute of Physics, University of Bonn (Germany); Peric, Ivan [Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Active CMOS pixel sensor is one of the most attractive candidates for detectors of upcoming particle physics experiments. In contrast to conventional sensors of hybrid detectors, signal processing circuit can be integrated in the active CMOS sensor. The characterization and optimization of the pixel circuit are indispensable to obtain a good performance from the sensors. The prototype chips of the active CMOS sensor were fabricated in the AMS 180nm and L-Foundry 150 nm CMOS processes, respectively a high voltage and high resistivity technology. Both chips have a charge sensitive amplifier and a comparator in each pixel. The chips are designed to be glued to the FEI4 pixel readout chip. The signals from 3 pixels of the prototype chips are capacitively coupled to the FEI4 input pads. We have performed lab tests and test beams to characterize the prototypes. In this presentation, the measurement results of the active CMOS prototype sensors are shown.

  4. Theoretical performance analysis for CMOS based high resolution detectors.

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    High resolution imaging capabilities are essential for accurately guiding successful endovascular interventional procedures. Present x-ray imaging detectors are not always adequate due to their inherent limitations. The newly-developed high-resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF-CCD) detector has demonstrated excellent clinical image quality; however, further improvement in performance and physical design may be possible using CMOS sensors. We have thus calculated the theoretical performance of two proposed CMOS detectors which may be used as a successor to the MAF. The proposed detectors have a 300 μm thick HL-type CsI phosphor, a 50 μm-pixel CMOS sensor with and without a variable gain light image intensifier (LII), and are designated MAF-CMOS-LII and MAF-CMOS, respectively. For the performance evaluation, linear cascade modeling was used. The detector imaging chains were divided into individual stages characterized by one of the basic processes (quantum gain, binomial selection, stochastic and deterministic blurring, additive noise). Ranges of readout noise and exposure were used to calculate the detectors' MTF and DQE. The MAF-CMOS showed slightly better MTF than the MAF-CMOS-LII, but the MAF-CMOS-LII showed far better DQE, especially for lower exposures. The proposed detectors can have improved MTF and DQE compared with the present high resolution MAF detector. The performance of the MAF-CMOS is excellent for the angiography exposure range; however it is limited at fluoroscopic levels due to additive instrumentation noise. The MAF-CMOS-LII, having the advantage of the variable LII gain, can overcome the noise limitation and hence may perform exceptionally for the full range of required exposures; however, it is more complex and hence more expensive. PMID:24353390

  5. A CMOS high speed imaging system design based on FPGA

    Tang, Hong; Wang, Huawei; Cao, Jianzhong; Qiao, Mingrui

    2015-10-01

    CMOS sensors have more advantages than traditional CCD sensors. The imaging system based on CMOS has become a hot spot in research and development. In order to achieve the real-time data acquisition and high-speed transmission, we design a high-speed CMOS imaging system on account of FPGA. The core control chip of this system is XC6SL75T and we take advantages of CameraLink interface and AM41V4 CMOS image sensors to transmit and acquire image data. AM41V4 is a 4 Megapixel High speed 500 frames per second CMOS image sensor with global shutter and 4/3" optical format. The sensor uses column parallel A/D converters to digitize the images. The CameraLink interface adopts DS90CR287 and it can convert 28 bits of LVCMOS/LVTTL data into four LVDS data stream. The reflected light of objects is photographed by the CMOS detectors. CMOS sensors convert the light to electronic signals and then send them to FPGA. FPGA processes data it received and transmits them to upper computer which has acquisition cards through CameraLink interface configured as full models. Then PC will store, visualize and process images later. The structure and principle of the system are both explained in this paper and this paper introduces the hardware and software design of the system. FPGA introduces the driven clock of CMOS. The data in CMOS is converted to LVDS signals and then transmitted to the data acquisition cards. After simulation, the paper presents a row transfer timing sequence of CMOS. The system realized real-time image acquisition and external controls.

  6. Vulnerability and failure modes of CMOS/SOS or CMOS/SO: technologies in nuclear and space environments

    Nuclear and space environments consist of several fluxes of ionizing particles. Some of them (photons, electrons, protons) lead to progressive degradation of characteristics. Heavy ions ionize active layers along tracks, and involve specific effects. These effects are discussed in the cases of bipolar (TTL-LS, ECL), CMOS on Sapphire and CMOS on Insulator technologies, through different versions of a unique microprocessor 2901

  7. Challenges of nickel silicidation in CMOS technologies

    Breil, Nicolas [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Lavoie, Christian [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Ozcan, Ahmet [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Baumann, Frieder [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Klymko, Nancy [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Nummy, Karen [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Sun, Bing [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Jordan-Sweet, Jean [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Yu, Jian [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Zhu, Frank [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Narasimha, Shreesh [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Chudzik, Michael [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    In our paper, we review some of the key challenges associated with the Ni silicidation process in the most recent CMOS technologies. The introduction of new materials (e.g.SiGe), and of non-planar architectures bring some important changes that require fundamental investigation from a material engineering perspective. Following a discussion of the device architecture and silicide evolution through the last CMOS generations, we focus our study on a very peculiar defect, termed NiSi-Fangs. We describe a mechanism for the defect formation, and present a detailed material analysis that supports this mechanism. We highlight some of the possible metal enrichment processes of the nickel monosilicide such as oxidation or various RIE (Reactive Ion Etching) plasma process, leading to a metal source available for defect formation. Furthermore, we investigate the NiSi formation and re-formation silicidation differences between Si and SiGe materials, and between (1 0 0) and (1 1 1) orientations. Finally, we show that the thermal budgets post silicidation can lead to the formation of NiSi-Fangs if the structure and the processes are not optimized. Beyond the understanding of the defect and the discussion on the engineering solutions used to prevent its formation, the interest of this investigation also lies in the fundamental learning within the Ni–Pt–Si–Ge system and some additional perspective on Ni-based contacts to advanced microelectronic devices.

  8. Planar pixel sensors in commercial CMOS technologies

    For the upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the high luminosity LHC, an all-silicon tracker is foreseen to cope with the increased rate and radiation levels. Pixel and strip detectors will have to cover an area of up to 200m2. To produce modules in high number at reduced costs, new sensor and bonding technologies have to be investigated. Commercial CMOS technologies on high resistive substrates can provide significant advantages in this direction. They offer cost effective, large volume sensor production. In addition to this, production is done on 8'' wafers allowing wafer-to-wafer bonding to the electronics, an interconnection technology substantially cheaper than the bump bonding process used for hybrid pixel detectors at the LHC. Both active and passive n-in-p pixel sensor prototypes have been submitted in a 150 nm CMOS technology on a 2kΩ cm substrate. The passive sensor design will be used to characterize sensor properties and to investigate wafer-to-wafer bonding technologies. This first prototype is made of a matrix of 36 x 16 pixels of size compatible with the FE-I4 readout chip (i.e. 50 μm x 250 μm). Results from lab characterization of this first submission are shown together with TCAD simulations. Work towards a full size FE-I4 sensor for wafer-to-wafer bonding is discussed.

  9. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition. PMID:26500051

  10. A Biologically Inspired CMOS Image Sensor

    Sarkar, Mukul

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems are a source of inspiration in the development of small autonomous sensor nodes. The two major types of optical vision systems found in nature are the single aperture human eye and the compound eye of insects. The latter are among the most compact and smallest vision sensors. The eye is a compound of individual lenses with their own photoreceptor arrays.  The visual system of insects allows them to fly with a limited intelligence and brain processing power. A CMOS image sensor replicating the perception of vision in insects is discussed and designed in this book for industrial (machine vision) and medical applications. The CMOS metal layer is used to create an embedded micro-polarizer able to sense polarization information. This polarization information is shown to be useful in applications like real time material classification and autonomous agent navigation. Further the sensor is equipped with in pixel analog and digital memories which allow variation of the dynamic range and in-pixel b...

  11. CMOS-NEMS Copper Switches Monolithically Integrated Using a 65 nm CMOS Technology

    Jose Luis Muñoz-Gamarra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates the feasibility to obtain copper nanoelectromechanical (NEMS relays using a commercial complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS technology (ST 65 nm following an intra CMOS-MEMS approach. We report experimental demonstration of contact-mode nano-electromechanical switches obtaining low operating voltage (5.5 V, good ION/IOFF (103 ratio, abrupt subthreshold swing (4.3 mV/decade and minimum dimensions (3.50 μm × 100 nm × 180 nm, and gap of 100 nm. With these dimensions, the operable Cell area of the switch will be 3.5 μm (length × 0.2 μm (100 nm width + 100 nm gap = 0.7 μm2 which is the smallest reported one using a top-down fabrication approach.

  12. Small-area and compact CMOS emulator circuit for CMOS/nanoscale memristor co-design

    Shin, SangHak; Choi, Jun-Myung; Cho, Seongik; Min, Kyeong-Sik

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a CMOS emulator circuit that can reproduce nanoscale memristive behavior is proposed. The proposed emulator circuit can mimic the pinched hysteresis loops of nanoscale memristor memory's current-voltage relationship without using any resistor array, complicated circuit blocks, etc. that may occupy very large layout area. Instead of using a resistor array, other complicated circuit blocks, etc., the proposed emulator circuit can describe the nanoscale memristor's current-voltage...

  13. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) for future vertex detectors

    Turchetta, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) for future vertex detectors. MAPS are developed in a standard CMOS technology. In the imaging field, where the technology found its first applications, they are also known as CMOS Image Sensors. The use of MAPS as a detector for particle physics was first proposed at the end of 1999. Since then, their good performance in terms of spatial resolution, efficiency, radiation hardness have been demonstrated and work is now well under way to deliver the first MAPS-based vertex detectors.

  14. High-Speed Low Power Design in CMOS

    Ghani, Arfan; Usmani, S. H.; Stassen, Flemming

    2004-01-01

    Static CMOS design displays benefits such as low power consumption, dominated by dynamic power consumption. In contrast, MOS Current Mode Logic (MCML) displays static rather than dynamic power consumption. High-speed low-power design is one of the many application areas in VLSI that require...... appropriate domains of performance and power requirements in which MCML presents benefits over standard CMOS. An optimized cell library is designed and implemented in both CMOS and MCML in order to make a comparison with reference to speed and power. Much more time is spent in order to nderstand the...

  15. Ink-Jet Printed CMOS Electronics from Oxide Semiconductors.

    Garlapati, Suresh Kumar; Baby, Tessy Theres; Dehm, Simone; Hammad, Mohammed; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Kruk, Robert; Hahn, Horst; Dasgupta, Subho

    2015-08-01

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology with high transconductance and signal gain is mandatory for practicable digital/analog logic electronics. However, high performance all-oxide CMOS logics are scarcely reported in the literature; specifically, not at all for solution-processed/printed transistors. As a major step toward solution-processed all-oxide electronics, here it is shown that using a highly efficient electrolyte-gating approach one can obtain printed and low-voltage operated oxide CMOS logics with high signal gain (≈21 at a supply voltage of only 1.5 V) and low static power dissipation. PMID:25867029

  16. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) for future vertex detectors

    This paper reviews the development of CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) for future vertex detectors. MAPS are developed in a standard CMOS technology. In the imaging field, where the technology found its first applications, they are also known as CMOS Image Sensors. The use of MAPS as a detector for particle physics was first proposed at the end of 1999. Since then, their good performance in terms of spatial resolution, efficiency, radiation hardness have been demonstrated and work is now well under way to deliver the first MAPS-based vertex detectors

  17. High-speed multicolor photometry with CMOS cameras

    Pokhvala, S M; Reshetnyk, V M

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of testing the commercial digital camera Nikon D90 with a CMOS sensor for high-speed photometry with a small telescope Celestron 11" on Peak Terskol. CMOS sensor allows to perform photometry in 3 filters simultaneously that gives a great advantage compared with monochrome CCD detectors. The Bayer BGR color system of CMOS sensors is close to the Johnson BVR system. The results of testing show that we can measure the stars up to V $\\simeq$ 14 with the precision of 0.01 mag. Stars up to magnitude V $\\sim$ 10 can shoot at 24 frames per second in the video mode.

  18. Development of a CMOS process using high energy ion implantation

    The main interest of this thesis is the use of complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) in electronic technology. Problems in developing a CMOS process are mostly related to the isolation well of p-n junctions. It is shown that by using high energy ion implantation, it is possible to reduce lateral dimensions to obtain a rather high packing density. High energy ion implantation is also presented as a means of simplifying CMOS processing, since extended processing steps at elevated temperatures are superfluous. Process development is also simplified. (Auth.)

  19. Fabrication of CMOS-compatible nanopillars for smart bio-mimetic CMOS image sensors

    Saffih, Faycal

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, nanopillars with heights of 1μm to 5μm and widths of 250nm to 500nm have been fabricated with a near room temperature etching process. The nanopillars were achieved with a continuous deep reactive ion etching technique and utilizing PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) and Chromium as masking layers. As opposed to the conventional Bosch process, the usage of the unswitched deep reactive ion etching technique resulted in nanopillars with smooth sidewalls with a measured surface roughness of less than 40nm. Moreover, undercut was nonexistent in the nanopillars. The proposed fabrication method achieves etch rates four times faster when compared to the state-of-the-art, leading to higher throughput and more vertical side walls. The fabrication of the nanopillars was carried out keeping the CMOS process in mind to ultimately obtain a CMOS-compatible process. This work serves as an initial step in the ultimate objective of integrating photo-sensors based on these nanopillars seamlessly along with the controlling transistors to build a complete bio-inspired smart CMOS image sensor on the same wafer. © 2012 IEEE.

  20. IMEC pushes the limits of CMOS

    George Marsh

    2002-06-01

    Visionary stuff, but although the day of the cyborg may still be some way off, IMEC (Inter-University MicroElectronics Centre — Europe’s leading independent microelectronics research organization — sees its role as expediting some aspects of this future. This means, inter alia, a dedication to maintaining the currency of Moore’s Law, in the belief that this can continue for several years yet before fundamental limits impose insurmountable barriers. Success will require further extension of the boundaries of complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS, that backbone of mainstream electronic technology. Materials, both the manipulation of existing and development of new, are germane to this, as Materials Today discovered on a recent visit.

  1. Timing-Error Detection Design Considerations in Subthreshold: An 8-bit Microprocessor in 65 nm CMOS

    Lauri Koskinen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first known timing-error detection (TED microprocessor able to operate in subthreshold. Since the minimum energy point (MEP of static CMOS logic is in subthreshold, there is a strong motivation to design ultra-low-power systems that can operate in this region. However, exponential dependencies in subthreshold, require systems with either excessively large safety margins or that utilize adaptive techniques. Typically, these techniques include replica paths, sensors, or TED. Each of these methods adds system complexity, area, and energy overhead. As a run-time technique, TED is the only method that accounts for both local and global variations. The microprocessor presented in this paper utilizes adaptable error-detection sequential (EDS circuits that can adjust to process and environmental variations. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the microprocessor, as well as energy savings up to 28%, when using the TED method in subthreshold. The microprocessor is an 8-bit core, which is compatible with a commercial microcontroller. The microprocessor is fabricated in 65 nm CMOS, uses as low as 4.35 pJ/instruction, occupies an area of 50,000 μm2, and operates down to 300 mV.

  2. A Single-Transistor Active Pixel CMOS Image Sensor Architecture

    A single-transistor CMOS active pixel image sensor (1 T CMOS APS) architecture is proposed. By switching the photosensing pinned diode, resetting and selecting can be achieved by diode pull-up and capacitive coupling pull-down of the source follower. Thus, the reset and selected transistors can be removed. In addition, the reset and selected signal lines can be shared to reduce the metal signal line, leading to a very high fill factor. The pixel design and operation principles are discussed in detail. The functionality of the proposed 1T CMOS APS architecture has been experimentally verified using a fabricated chip in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS AMIS technology

  3. CMOS front ends for millimeter wave wireless communication systems

    Deferm, Noël

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on the development of circuit and system design techniques for millimeter wave wireless communication systems above 90GHz and fabricated in nanometer scale CMOS technologies. The authors demonstrate a hands-on methodology that was applied to design six different chips, in order to overcome a variety of design challenges. Behavior of both actives and passives, and how to design them to achieve high performance is discussed in detail. This book serves as a valuable reference for millimeter wave designers, working at both the transistor level and system level.   Discusses advantages and disadvantages of designing wireless mm-wave communication circuits and systems in CMOS; Analyzes the limitations and pitfalls of building mm-wave circuits in CMOS; Includes mm-wave building block and system design techniques and applies these to 6 different CMOS chips; Provides guidelines for building measurement setups to evaluate high-frequency chips.  

  4. Depleted CMOS pixels for LHC proton-proton experiments

    Wermes, N.

    2016-07-01

    While so far monolithic pixel detectors have remained in the realm of comparatively low rate and radiation applications outside LHC, new developments exploiting high resistivity substrates with three or four well CMOS process options allow reasonably large depletion depths and full CMOS circuitry in a monolithic structure. This opens up the possibility to target CMOS pixel detectors also for high radiation pp-experiments at the LHC upgrade, either in a hybrid-type fashion or even fully monolithic. Several pixel matrices have been prototyped with high ohmic substrates, high voltage options, and full CMOS electronics. They were characterized in the lab and in test beams. An overview of the necessary development steps and different approaches as well as prototype results are presented in this paper.

  5. RF CMOS Integrated Circuit: History, Current Status and Future Prospects

    Ishihara, Noboru; Amakawa, Shuhei; Masu, Kazuya

    2011-01-01

    As great advancements have been made in CMOS process technology over the past 20 years, RF CMOS circuits operating in the microwave band have rapidly developed from component circuit levels to multiband/multimode transceiver levels. In the next ten years, it is highly likely that the following devices will be realized: (i) versatile transceivers such as those used in software-defined radios (SDR), cognitive radios (CR), and reconfigurable radios (RR); (ii) systems that operate in the millimet...

  6. CMOS Image Sensors: Electronic Camera On A Chip

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Recent advancements in CMOS image sensor technology are reviewed, including both passive pixel sensors and active pixel sensors. On- chip analog to digital converters and on-chip timing and control circuits permit realization of an electronic camera-on-a-chip. Highly miniaturized imaging systems based on CMOS image sensor technology are emerging as a competitor to charge-coupled devices for low cost uses.

  7. High performances monolithic CMOS detectors for space applications

    Saint-Pé, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Vignon, Bruno; Magnan, Pierre; Farre, Jean; Corbière, Franck; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe

    2001-01-01

    During the last 10 years, research about CMOS image sensors (also called APS -Active Pixel Sensors) has been intensively carried out, in order to offer an alternative to CCDs as image sensors. This is particularly the case for space applications as CMOS image sensors feature characteristics which are obviously of interest for flight hardware: parallel or semi-parallel architecture, on chip control and processing electronics, low power dissipation, high level ofradiation tolerance... Many imag...

  8. A CMOS Humidity Sensor for Passive RFID Sensing Applications

    Fangming Deng; Yigang He; Chaolong Zhang; Wei Feng

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a low-cost low-power CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications. The humidity sensing element is implemented in standard CMOS technology without any further post-processing, which results in low fabrication costs. The interface of this humidity sensor employs a PLL-based architecture transferring sensor signal processing from the voltage domain to the frequency domain. Therefore this architecture allows the use of a fully digital circuit, which can operate ...

  9. Delta Doping High Purity CCDs and CMOS for LSST

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Elliott, S. Tom; Bebek, Chris; Holland, Steve; Kolbe, Bill

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing delta doping high purity CCD's and CMOS for LSST is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of JPL s versatile back-surface process for CCDs and CMOS; 2) Application to SNAP and ORION missions; 3) Delta doping as a back-surface electrode for fully depleted LBNL CCDs; 4) Delta doping high purity CCDs for SNAP and ORION; 5) JPL CMP thinning process development; and 6) Antireflection coating process development.

  10. A Low Power Low Voltage High Performance CMOS Current Mirror

    Sirish Rao,; Sampath Kumar V

    2015-01-01

    The current mirrors are one of the most important circuits in designing the analog and mixed-mode circuit. A low power and low voltage high-performance CMOS current mirror with optimized input and output resistance are presented in this paper. SPICE simulations confirm the high-performance CMOS current mirror with power supply close to the threshold voltage of the transistor. In this paper, for achieving the low input resistance and a very high output resistance, the combination o...

  11. OLED-on-CMOS integration for optoelectronic sensor applications

    Vogel, Uwe; Kreye, Daniel; Reckziegel, Sven; Törker, Michael; Grillberger, Christiane; Amelung, Jörg

    2007-02-01

    Highly-efficient, low-voltage organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are well suitable for post-processing integration onto the top metal layer of CMOS devices. This has been proven for OLED microdisplays so far. Moreover, OLEDon- CMOS technology may also be excellently suitable for various optoelectronic sensor applications by combining highly efficient emitters, use of low-cost materials and cost-effective manufacturing together with silicon-inherent photodetectors and CMOS circuitry. The use of OLEDs on CMOS substrates requires a top-emitting, low-voltage and highly efficient OLED structure. By reducing the operating voltage for the OLED below 5V, the costs for the CMOS process can be reduced, because a process without high-voltage option can be used. Red, orange, white, green and blue OLED-stacks with doped charge transport layers were prepared on different dualmetal layer CMOS test substrates without active transistor area. Afterwards, the different devices were measured and compared with respect to their performance (current, luminance, voltage, luminance dependence on viewing angle, optical outcoupling etc.). Low operating voltages of 2.4V at 100cd/m2 for the red p-i-n type phosphorescent emitting OLED stack, 2.5V at 100cd/m2 for the orange phosphorescent emitting OLED stack and 3.2V at 100cd/m2 for the white fluorescent emitting OLED have been achieved here. Therefore, those OLED stacks are suitable for use in a CMOS process even within a regular 5V process option. Moreover, the operating voltage achieved so far is expected to be reduced further when using different top electrode materials. Integrating such OLEDs on a CMOS-substrate provide a preferable choice for silicon-based optical microsystems targeted towards optoelectronic sensor applications, as there are integrated light barriers, optocouplers, or lab-onchip devices.

  12. CMOS monolithic pixel sensors research and development at LBNL

    D Contarato; J-M Bussat; P Denes; L Griender; T Kim; T Stezeberger; H Weiman; M Battaglia; B Hooberman; L Tompkins

    2007-12-01

    This paper summarizes the recent progress in the design and characterization of CMOS pixel sensors at LBNL. Results of lab tests, beam tests and radiation hardness tests carried out at LBNL on a test structure with pixels of various sizes are reported. The first results of the characterization of back-thinned CMOS pixel sensors are also reported, and future plans and activities are discussed.

  13. Integrating security solutions to support nanoCMOS electronics research

    Sinnott, R.O.; Bayliss, C.; T. Doherty; Martin, D.; Millar, C.; Stewart, G; Watt, J; A. Asenov; Roy, G.; S Roy; Davenhall, C.; Harbulot, B.; Jones, M

    2008-01-01

    The UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) funded Meeting the Design Challenges of nanoCMOS Electronics (nanoCMOS) is developing a research infrastructure for collaborative electronics research across multiple institutions in the UK with especially strong industrial and commercial involvement. Unlike other domains, the electronics industry is driven by the necessity of protecting the intellectual property of the data, designs and software associated with next generation...

  14. CMOS integration of inkjet-printed graphene for humidity sensing

    Santra, S.; Hu, G.; Howe, R. C. T.; De Luca, A.; Ali, S. Z.; Udrea, F.; Gardner, J. W.; S. K. Ray; Guha, P. K.; Hasan, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the integration of inkjet-printed graphene with a CMOS micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) microhotplate for humidity sensing. The graphene ink is produced via ultrasonic assisted liquid phase exfoliation in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) polymer as the stabilizer. We formulate inks with different graphene concentrations, which are then deposited through inkjet printing over predefined interdigitated gold electrodes on a CMOS microhotplate. The graph...

  15. Poly-SiGe for MEMS-above-CMOS sensors

    Gonzalez Ruiz, Pilar; Witvrouw, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Polycrystalline SiGe has emerged as a promising MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) structural material since it provides the desired mechanical properties at lower temperatures compared to poly-Si, allowing the direct post-processing on top of CMOS. This CMOS-MEMS monolithic integration can lead to more compact MEMS with improved performance. The potential of poly-SiGe for MEMS above-aluminum-backend CMOS integration has already been demonstrated. However, aggressive interconnect scaling has led to the replacement of the traditional aluminum metallization by copper (Cu) metallization, due to its lower resistivity and improved reliability. Poly-SiGe for MEMS-above-CMOS sensors demonstrates the compatibility of poly-SiGe with post-processing above the advanced CMOS technology nodes through the successful fabrication of an integrated poly-SiGe piezoresistive pressure sensor, directly fabricated above 0.13 m Cu-backend CMOS. Furthermore, this book presents the first detailed investigation on the influence o...

  16. Advancement of CMOS Doping Technology in an External Development Framework

    Jain, Amitabh; Chambers, James J.; Shaw, Judy B.

    2011-01-01

    The consumer appetite for a rich multimedia experience drives technology development for mobile hand-held devices and the infrastructure to support them. Enhancements in functionality, speed, and user experience are derived from advancements in CMOS technology. The technical challenges in developing each successive CMOS technology node to support these enhancements have become increasingly difficult. These trends have motivated the CMOS business towards a collaborative approach based on strategic partnerships. This paper describes our model and experience of CMOS development, based on multi-dimensional industrial and academic partnerships. We provide to our process equipment, materials, and simulation partners, as well as to our silicon foundry partners, the detailed requirements for future integrated circuit products. This is done very early in the development cycle to ensure that these requirements can be met. In order to determine these fundamental requirements, we rely on a strategy that requires strong interaction between process and device simulation, physical and chemical analytical methods, and research at academic institutions. This learning is shared with each project partner to address integration and manufacturing issues encountered during CMOS technology development from its inception through product ramp. We utilize TI's core strengths in physical analysis, unit processes and integration, yield ramp, reliability, and product engineering to support this technological development. Finally, this paper presents examples of the advancement of CMOS doping technology for the 28 nm node and beyond through this development model.

  17. An RF Energy Harvester System Using UHF Micropower CMOS Rectifier Based on a Diode Connected CMOS Transistor

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new type diode connected MOS transistor to improve CMOS conventional rectifier's performance in RF energy harvester systems for wireless sensor networks in which the circuits are designed in 0.18  μ m TSMC CMOS technology. The proposed diode connected MOS transistor uses a new bulk connection which leads to reduction in the threshold voltage and leakage current; therefore, it contributes to increment of the rectifier's output voltage, output current, and efficiency when ...

  18. Multiband CMOS sensor simplify FPA design

    Wang, Weng Lyang B.; Ling, Jer

    2015-10-01

    Push broom multi-band Focal Plane Array (FPA) design needs to consider optics, image sensor, electronic, mechanic as well as thermal. Conventional FPA use two or several CCD device as an image sensor. The CCD image sensor requires several high speed, high voltage and high current clock drivers as well as analog video processors to support their operation. Signal needs to digitize using external sample / hold and digitized circuit. These support circuits are bulky, consume a lot of power, must be shielded and placed in close to the CCD to minimize the introduction of unwanted noise. The CCD also needs to consider how to dissipate power. The end result is a very complicated FPA and hard to make due to more weighs and draws more power requiring complex heat transfer mechanisms. In this paper, we integrate microelectronic technology and multi-layer soft / hard Printed Circuit Board (PCB) technology to design electronic portion. Since its simplicity and integration, the optics, mechanic, structure and thermal design will become very simple. The whole FPA assembly and dis-assembly reduced to a few days. A multi-band CMOS Sensor (dedicated as C468) was used for this design. The CMOS Sensor, allow for the incorporation of clock drivers, timing generators, signal processing and digitization onto the same Integrated Circuit (IC) as the image sensor arrays. This keeps noise to a minimum while providing high functionality at reasonable power levels. The C468 is a first Multiple System-On-Chip (MSOC) IC. This device used our proprietary wafer butting technology and MSOC technology to combine five long sensor arrays into a size of 120 mm x 23.2 mm and 155 mm x 60 mm for chip and package, respectively. The device composed of one Panchromatic (PAN) and four different Multi- Spectral (MS) sensors. Due to its integration on the electronic design, a lot of room is clear for the thermal design. The optical and mechanical design is become very straight forward. The flight model FPA

  19. Fast Hopping Frequency Generation in Digital CMOS

    Farazian, Mohammad; Gudem, Prasad S

    2013-01-01

    Overcoming the agility limitations of conventional frequency synthesizers in multi-band OFDM ultra wideband is a key research goal in digital technology. This volume outlines a frequency plan that can generate all the required frequencies from a single fixed frequency, able to implement center frequencies with no more than two levels of SSB mixing. It recognizes the need for future synthesizers to bypass on-chip inductors and operate at low voltages to enable the increased integration and efficiency of networked appliances. The author examines in depth the architecture of the dividers that generate the necessary frequencies from a single base frequency and are capable of establishing a fractional division ratio.   Presenting the first CMOS inductorless single PLL 14-band frequency synthesizer for MB-OFDMUWB makes this volume a key addition to the literature, and with the synthesizer capable of arbitrary band-hopping in less than two nanoseconds, it operates well within the desired range on a 1.2-volt power s...

  20. A CMOS readout circuit for microstrip detectors

    In this work, we present the design and the results of a CMOS analog channel for silicon microstrips detectors. The readout circuit was initially conceived for the outer layers of the SuperB silicon vertex tracker (SVT), but can serve more generally other microstrip-based detection systems. The strip detectors considered show a very high stray capacitance and high series resistance. Therefore, the noise optimization was the first priority design concern. A necessary compromise on the best peaking time to achieve an acceptable noise level together with efficiency and timing accuracy has been investigated. The ASIC is composed by a preamplifier, shaping amplifier and a Time over Threshold (T.o.T) block for the digitalization of the signals. The chosen shaping function is the third-order semi-Gaussian function implemented with complex poles. An inverter stage is employed in the analog channel in order to operate with signals delivered from both p and n strips. The circuit includes the possibility to select the peaking time of the shaper output from four values: 250 ns, 375 ns, 500 ns and 750 ns. In this way, the noise performances and the signal occupancy can be optimized according to the real background during the experiment. The ASIC prototype has been fabricated in the 130 nm IBM technology which is considered intrinsically radiation hard. The results of the experimental characterization of a produced prototype are satisfactorily matched with simulation

  1. CMOS absorbance detection system for capillary electrophoresis

    This paper presents a cost-effective portable photodetection system for capillary electrophoresis absorptiometry. By using a CMOS BDJ (buried double p-n junction) detector, a dual-wavelength method for absorbance measurement is implemented. This system includes associated electronics for low-noise pre-amplification and A/D conversion, followed by digital signal acquisition and processing. Two signal processing approaches are adopted to enhance the signal to noise ratio. One is variable time synchronous detection, which optimizes the sensitivity and measuring rate compared to a conventional synchronous detection technique. The other is a statistical approach based on principal component analysis, which allows optimal estimation of detected signal. This system has been designed and tested in capillary electrophoresis conditions. Its operation has been verified with performances comparable to those of a commercialized spectrophotometric system (HP-3D CE). With potential on-chip integration of associated electronics, it may be operated as an integrable detection module for microchip electrophoresis and other microanalysis systems

  2. Electrothermal frequency references in standard CMOS

    Kashmiri, S Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    This book describes an alternative method of accurate on-chip frequency generation in standard CMOS IC processes. This method exploits the thermal-diffusivity of silicon, the rate at which heat diffuses through a silicon substrate.  This is the first book describing thermal-diffusivity-based frequency references, including the complete theoretical methodology supported by practical realizations that prove the feasibility of the method.  Coverage also includes several circuit and system-level solutions for the analog electronic circuit design challenges faced.   ·         Surveys the state-of-the-art in all-silicon frequency references; ·         Examines the thermal properties of silicon as a solution for the challenge of on-chip accurate frequency generation; ·         Uses simplified modeling approaches that allow an electronics engineer easily to simulate the electrothermal elements; ·         Follows a top-down methodology in circuit design, in which system-level des...

  3. Optical detection of ultrasound from optically rough surfaces using a custom CMOS sensor

    The optical detection of ultrasound from optically rough surfaces is severely limited when using a conventional interferometric or optical beam deflection (OBD) setup because the detected light is speckled. This means that complicated and expensive setups are required to detect ultrasound optically on rough surfaces. We present a CMOS integrated circuit that can detect laser ultrasound in the presence of speckle. The detector circuit is based on the simple knife edge detector. It is self-adapting and is fast, inxepensive, compact and robust. The CMOS circuit is implemented as a widefield array of 32×32 pixels. At each pixel the received light is compared with an adjacent pixel in order to determine the local light gradient. The result of this comparison is stored and used to connect each pixel to the positive or negative gradient output as appropriate (similar to a balanced knife edge detector). The perturbation of the surface due to ultrasound preserves the speckle distribution whilst deflecting it. The spatial disturbance of the speckle pattern due to the ultrasound is detected by considering each pair of pixels as a knife edge detector. The sensor can adapt itself to match the received optical speckle pattern in less than 0.1 μs, and then detect the ultrasound within 0.5 μs of adaptation. This makes it possible to repeatedly detect ultrasound from optically rough surfaces very quickly. The detector is capable of independent operation controlled by a local microcontroller, or it may be connected to a computer for more sophisticated configuration and control. We present the theory of its operation and discuss results validating the concept and operation of the device. We also present preliminary results from an improved design which grants a higher bandwidth, allowing for optical detection of higher frequency ultrasound

  4. CMOS image sensor noise reduction method for image signal processor in digital cameras and camera phones

    Yoo, Youngjin; Lee, SeongDeok; Choe, Wonhee; Kim, Chang-Yong

    2007-02-01

    Digital images captured from CMOS image sensors suffer Gaussian noise and impulsive noise. To efficiently reduce the noise in Image Signal Processor (ISP), we analyze noise feature for imaging pipeline of ISP where noise reduction algorithm is performed. The Gaussian noise reduction and impulsive noise reduction method are proposed for proper ISP implementation in Bayer domain. The proposed method takes advantage of the analyzed noise feature to calculate noise reduction filter coefficients. Thus, noise is adaptively reduced according to the scene environment. Since noise is amplified and characteristic of noise varies while the image sensor signal undergoes several image processing steps, it is better to remove noise in earlier stage on imaging pipeline of ISP. Thus, noise reduction is carried out in Bayer domain on imaging pipeline of ISP. The method is tested on imaging pipeline of ISP and images captured from Samsung 2M CMOS image sensor test module. The experimental results show that the proposed method removes noise while effectively preserves edges.

  5. A CMOS pixel sensor prototype for the outer layers of linear collider vertex detector

    Zhang, L.; Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, C.; Himmi, A.; Dorokhov, A.; Hu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) expresses a stringent requirement for high precision vertex detectors (VXD). CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) have been considered as an option for the VXD of the International Large Detector (ILD), one of the detector concepts proposed for the ILC. MIMOSA-31 developed at IPHC-Strasbourg is the first CPS integrated with 4-bit column-level ADC for the outer layers of the VXD, adapted to an original concept minimizing the power consumption. It is composed of a matrix of 64 rows and 48 columns. The pixel concept combines in-pixel amplification with a correlated double sampling (CDS) operation in order to reduce the temporal noise and fixed pattern noise (FPN). At the bottom of the pixel array, each column is terminated with a self-triggered analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The ADC design was optimized for power saving at a sampling frequency of 6.25 MS/s. The prototype chip is fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology. This paper presents the details of the prototype chip and its test results.

  6. A CMOS pixel sensor prototype for the outer layers of linear collider vertex detector

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) expresses a stringent requirement for high precision vertex detectors (VXD). CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) have been considered as an option for the VXD of the International Large Detector (ILD), one of the detector concepts proposed for the ILC. MIMOSA-31 developed at IPHC-Strasbourg is the first CPS integrated with 4-bit column-level ADC for the outer layers of the VXD, adapted to an original concept minimizing the power consumption. It is composed of a matrix of 64 rows and 48 columns. The pixel concept combines in-pixel amplification with a correlated double sampling (CDS) operation in order to reduce the temporal noise and fixed pattern noise (FPN). At the bottom of the pixel array, each column is terminated with a self-triggered analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The ADC design was optimized for power saving at a sampling frequency of 6.25 MS/s. The prototype chip is fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology. This paper presents the details of the prototype chip and its test results

  7. Design and Fabrication of Vertically-Integrated CMOS Image Sensors

    Orit Skorka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Technologies to fabricate integrated circuits (IC with 3D structures are an emerging trend in IC design. They are based on vertical stacking of active components to form heterogeneous microsystems. Electronic image sensors will benefit from these technologies because they allow increased pixel-level data processing and device optimization. This paper covers general principles in the design of vertically-integrated (VI CMOS image sensors that are fabricated by flip-chip bonding. These sensors are composed of a CMOS die and a photodetector die. As a specific example, the paper presents a VI-CMOS image sensor that was designed at the University of Alberta, and fabricated with the help of CMC Microsystems and Micralyne Inc. To realize prototypes, CMOS dies with logarithmic active pixels were prepared in a commercial process, and photodetector dies with metal-semiconductor-metal devices were prepared in a custom process using hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The paper also describes a digital camera that was developed to test the prototype. In this camera, scenes captured by the image sensor are read using an FPGA board, and sent in real time to a PC over USB for data processing and display. Experimental results show that the VI-CMOS prototype has a higher dynamic range and a lower dark limit than conventional electronic image sensors.

  8. CMOS Cell Sensors for Point-of-Care Diagnostics

    Haluk Kulah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions. From this perspective, point-of-care diagnostics is a demanded field in clinics. It is also necessary both for prompt diagnosis and for providing health services evenly throughout the population, including the rural districts. The requirements can only be fulfilled by technologies whose productivity has already been proven, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS. CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities. Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature. CMOS-based sensors for cell studies have the potential to become essential counterparts of point-of-care diagnostics technologies. Hence, this review attempts to inform on the sensors fabricated with CMOS technology for point-of-care diagnostic studies, with a focus on CMOS image sensors and capacitance sensors for cell studies.

  9. Improved Space Object Observation Techniques Using CMOS Detectors

    Schildknecht, T.; Hinze, A.; Schlatter, P.; Silha, J.; Peltonen, J.; Santti, T.; Flohrer, T.

    2013-08-01

    CMOS-sensors, or in general Active Pixel Sensors (APS), are rapidly replacing CCDs in the consumer camera market. Due to significant technological advances during the past years these devices start to compete with CCDs also for demanding scientific imaging applications, in particular in the astronomy community. CMOS detectors offer a series of inherent advantages compared to CCDs, due to the structure of their basic pixel cells, which each contain their own amplifier and readout electronics. The most prominent advantages for space object observations are the extremely fast and flexible readout capabilities, feasibility for electronic shuttering and precise epoch registration, and the potential to perform image processing operations on-chip and in real-time. Presently applied and proposed optical observation strategies for space debris surveys and space surveillance applications had to be analyzed. The major design drivers were identified and potential benefits from using available and future CMOS sensors were assessed. The major challenges and design drivers for ground-based and space-based optical observation strategies have been analyzed. CMOS detector characteristics were critically evaluated and compared with the established CCD technology, especially with respect to the above mentioned observations. Similarly, the desirable on-chip processing functionalities which would further enhance the object detection and image segmentation were identified. Finally, the characteristics of a particular CMOS sensor available at the Zimmerwald observatory were analyzed by performing laboratory test measurements.

  10. CMOS Imaging Sensor Technology for Aerial Mapping Cameras

    Neumann, Klaus; Welzenbach, Martin; Timm, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In June 2015 Leica Geosystems launched the first large format aerial mapping camera using CMOS sensor technology, the Leica DMC III. This paper describes the motivation to change from CCD sensor technology to CMOS for the development of this new aerial mapping camera. In 2002 the DMC first generation was developed by Z/I Imaging. It was the first large format digital frame sensor designed for mapping applications. In 2009 Z/I Imaging designed the DMC II which was the first digital aerial mapping camera using a single ultra large CCD sensor to avoid stitching of smaller CCDs. The DMC III is now the third generation of large format frame sensor developed by Z/I Imaging and Leica Geosystems for the DMC camera family. It is an evolution of the DMC II using the same system design with one large monolithic PAN sensor and four multi spectral camera heads for R,G, B and NIR. For the first time a 391 Megapixel large CMOS sensor had been used as PAN chromatic sensor, which is an industry record. Along with CMOS technology goes a range of technical benefits. The dynamic range of the CMOS sensor is approx. twice the range of a comparable CCD sensor and the signal to noise ratio is significantly better than with CCDs. Finally results from the first DMC III customer installations and test flights will be presented and compared with other CCD based aerial sensors.

  11. VLSI scaling methods and low power CMOS buffer circuit

    Device scaling is an important part of the very large scale integration (VLSI) design to boost up the success path of VLSI industry, which results in denser and faster integration of the devices. As technology node moves towards the very deep submicron region, leakage current and circuit reliability become the key issues. Both are increasing with the new technology generation and affecting the performance of the overall logic circuit. The VLSI designers must keep the balance in power dissipation and the circuit's performance with scaling of the devices. In this paper, different scaling methods are studied first. These scaling methods are used to identify the effects of those scaling methods on the power dissipation and propagation delay of the CMOS buffer circuit. For mitigating the power dissipation in scaled devices, we have proposed a reliable leakage reduction low power transmission gate (LPTG) approach and tested it on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) buffer circuit. All simulation results are taken on HSPICE tool with Berkeley predictive technology model (BPTM) BSIM4 bulk CMOS files. The LPTG CMOS buffer reduces 95.16% power dissipation with 84.20% improvement in figure of merit at 32 nm technology node. Various process, voltage and temperature variations are analyzed for proving the robustness of the proposed approach. Leakage current uncertainty decreases from 0.91 to 0.43 in the CMOS buffer circuit that causes large circuit reliability. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  12. Towards a 10{mu}s, thin and high resolution pixelated CMOS sensor system for future vertex detectors

    De Masi, R., E-mail: rita.demasi@ires.in2p3.f [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Amar-Youcef, S. [IFK, Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Baudot, J.; Bertolone, G.; Brogna, A.; Chon-Sen, N.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Degerli, Y. [IRFU/SEDI (CEA) Saclay (France); Deveaux, M. [IFK, Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Dorokhov, A.; Doziere, G.; Dulinski, W. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Gelin, M. [IRFU/SEDI (CEA) Saclay (France); Goffe, M.; Fontaine, J.C.; Hu-Guo, Ch.; Himmi, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Koziel, M. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)

    2011-02-01

    The physics goals of many high energy experiments require a precise determination of decay vertices, imposing severe constraints on vertex detectors (readout speed, granularity, material budget,...). The IPHC-IRFU collaboration developed a sensor architecture to comply with these requirements. The first full scale CMOS sensor was realised and equips the reference planes of the EUDET beam telescope. Its architecture is being adapted to the needs of the STAR (RHIC) and CBM (FAIR) experiments. It is a promising candidate for the ILC experiments and the ALICE detector upgrade (LHC). A substantial improvement to the CMOS sensor performances, especially in terms of radiation hardness, should come from a new fabrication technology with depleted sensitive volume. A prototype sensor was fabricated to explore the benefits of the technology. The crucial system integration issue is also currently being addressed. In 2009 the PLUME collaboration was set up to investigate the feasibility and performances of a light double sided ladder equipped with CMOS sensors, aimed primarily for the ILC vertex detector but also of interest for other applications such as the CBM vertex detector.

  13. Towards a 10 μs, thin and high resolution pixelated CMOS sensor system for future vertex detectors

    De Masi, R.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Baudot, J.; Bertolone, G.; Brogna, A.; Chon-Sen, N.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Degerli, Y.; Deveaux, M.; Dorokhov, A.; Doziére, G.; Dulinski, W.; Gelin, M.; Goffe, M.; Fontaine, J. C.; Hu-Guo, Ch.; Himmi, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Koziel, M.; Morel, F.; Müntz, C.; Orsini, F.; Santos, C.; Schrader, C.; Specht, M.; Stroth, J.; Valin, I.; Voutsinas, G.; Wagner, F. M.; Winter, M.

    2011-02-01

    The physics goals of many high energy experiments require a precise determination of decay vertices, imposing severe constraints on vertex detectors (readout speed, granularity, material budget,…). The IPHC-IRFU collaboration developed a sensor architecture to comply with these requirements. The first full scale CMOS sensor was realised and equips the reference planes of the EUDET beam telescope. Its architecture is being adapted to the needs of the STAR (RHIC) and CBM (FAIR) experiments. It is a promising candidate for the ILC experiments and the ALICE detector upgrade (LHC). A substantial improvement to the CMOS sensor performances, especially in terms of radiation hardness, should come from a new fabrication technology with depleted sensitive volume. A prototype sensor was fabricated to explore the benefits of the technology. The crucial system integration issue is also currently being addressed. In 2009 the PLUME collaboration was set up to investigate the feasibility and performances of a light double sided ladder equipped with CMOS sensors, aimed primarily for the ILC vertex detector but also of interest for other applications such as the CBM vertex detector.

  14. Radiation Induced Fault Analysis for Wide Temperature BiCMOS Circuits Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — State of the art Radiation Hardened by Design (RHBD) techniques do not account for wide temperature variations in BiCMOS process. Silicon-Germanium BiCMOS process...

  15. Microinjection of antisense c-mos oligonucleotides prevents meiosis II in the maturing mouse egg.

    O'Keefe, S J; Wolfes, H; Kiessling, A A; Cooper, G M

    1989-01-01

    Injection of antisense oligonucleotides was used to investigate the function of c-mos in murine oocytes. Oocytes injected with antisense c-mos oligonucleotides completed the first meiotic division but failed to initiate meiosis II. Instead, loss of c-mos function led to chromosome decondensation, reformation of a nucleus after meiosis I, and cleavage to two cells. Therefore, c-mos is required for meiosis II during murine oocyte maturation.

  16. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): Developments and future outlook

    Turchetta, R. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: r.turchetta@rl.ac.uk; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Esbrand, C.; Griffiths, J.A.; Metaxas, M.G.; Royle, G.J.; Speller, R.; Venanzi, C. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London (United Kingdom); Stelt, P.F. van der; Verheij, H.; Li, G. [Academic Centre for Dentistry, Vrije Universiteit and University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Theodoridis, S.; Georgiou, H. [Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, University of Athens (Greece); Cavouras, D. [Medical Image and Signal Processing Laboratory, Department of Medical Instrument Technology, Technological Education Institution of Athens (Greece); Hall, G.; Noy, M.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Machin, D. [High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2007-12-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end applications, for example web-cams, and is slowly pervading the high-end applications, for example in prosumer digital cameras. Higher specifications are required for scientific applications: very low noise, high speed, high dynamic range, large format and radiation hardness are some of these requirements. This paper will present a brief overview of the CMOS Image Sensor technology and of the requirements for scientific applications. As an example, a sensor for X-ray imaging will be presented. This sensor was developed within a European FP6 Consortium, intelligent imaging sensors (I-ImaS)

  17. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): Developments and future outlook

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end applications, for example web-cams, and is slowly pervading the high-end applications, for example in prosumer digital cameras. Higher specifications are required for scientific applications: very low noise, high speed, high dynamic range, large format and radiation hardness are some of these requirements. This paper will present a brief overview of the CMOS Image Sensor technology and of the requirements for scientific applications. As an example, a sensor for X-ray imaging will be presented. This sensor was developed within a European FP6 Consortium, intelligent imaging sensors (I-ImaS)

  18. Study of CMOS integrated signal processing circuit in capacitive sensors

    CAO Yi-jiang; YU Xiang; WANG Lei

    2007-01-01

    A CMOS integrated signal processing circuit based on capacitance resonance principle whose structure is simple in capacitive sensors is designed. The waveform of output voltage is improved by choosing bootstrap reference current mirror with initiate circuit, CMOS analogy switch and positive feedback of double-stage inverter in the circuit. Output voltage of this circuit is a symmetric square wave signal. The variation of sensitive capacitance, which is part of the capacitive sensors, can be denoted by the change of output voltage's frequency. The whole circuit is designed with 1.5 μm P-well CMOS process and simulated by PSpice software.Output frequency varies from 261.05 kHz to 47.93 kHz if capacitance varies in the range of 1PF~15PF. And the variation of frequency can be easily detected using counter or SCU.

  19. VHF NEMS-CMOS piezoresistive resonators for advanced sensing applications

    Arcamone, Julien; Dupré, Cécilia; Arndt, Grégory; Colinet, Eric; Hentz, Sébastien; Ollier, Eric; Duraffourg, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    This work reports on top-down nanoelectromechanical resonators, which are among the smallest resonators listed in the literature. To overcome the fact that their electromechanical transduction is intrinsically very challenging due to their very high frequency (100 MHz) and ultimate size (each resonator is a 1.2 μm long, 100 nm wide, 20 nm thick silicon beam with 100 nm long and 30 nm wide piezoresistive lateral nanowire gauges), they have been monolithically integrated with an advanced fully depleted SOI CMOS technology. By advantageously combining the unique benefits of nanomechanics and nanoelectronics, this hybrid NEMS-CMOS device paves the way for novel breakthrough applications, such as NEMS-based mass spectrometry or hybrid NEMS/CMOS logic, which cannot be fully implemented without this association.

  20. Design and characterization of avalanche photodiodes in submicron CMOS technologies

    Pancheri, L.; Bendib, T.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Stoppa, D.

    2014-03-01

    The fabrication of Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs) in CMOS processes can be exploited in several application domains, including telecommunications, time-resolved optical detection and scintillation detection. CMOS integration allows the realization of systems with a high degree of parallelization which are competitive with hybrid solutions in terms of cost and complexity. In this work, we present a linear-mode APD fabricated in a 0.15μm process, and report its gain and noise characterization. The experimental observations can be accurately predicted using Hayat dead-space noise model. Device simulations based on dead-space model are then used to discuss the current status and the perspectives for the integration of high-performance low-noise devices in standard CMOS processes.

  1. Low-voltage CMOS operational amplifiers theory, design and implementation

    Sakurai, Satoshi

    1995-01-01

    Low-Voltage CMOS Operational Amplifiers: Theory, Design and Implementation discusses both single and two-stage architectures. Opamps with constant-gm input stage are designed and their excellent performance over the rail-to-rail input common mode range is demonstrated. The first set of CMOS constant-gm input stages was introduced by a group from Technische Universiteit, Delft and Universiteit Twente, the Netherlands. These earlier versions of circuits are discussed, along with new circuits developed at the Ohio State University. The design, fabrication (MOSIS Tiny Chips), and characterization of the new circuits are now complete. Basic analog integrated circuit design concepts should be understood in order to fully appreciate the work presented. However, the topics are presented in a logical order and the circuits are explained in great detail, so that Low-Voltage CMOS Operational Amplifiers can be read and enjoyed by those without much experience in analog circuit design. It is an invaluable reference boo...

  2. Fabrication of the planar angular rotator using the CMOS process

    Dai, Ching-Liang; Chang, Chien-Liu; Chen, Hung-Lin; Chang, Pei-Zen

    2002-05-01

    In this investigation we propose a novel planar angular rotator fabricated by the conventional complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. Following the 0.6 μm single poly triple metal (SPTM) CMOS process, the device is completed by a simple maskless, post-process etching step. The rotor of the planar angular rotator rotates around its geometric center with electrostatic actuation. The proposed design adopts an intelligent mechanism including the slider-crank system to permit simultaneous motion. The CMOS planar angular rotator could be driven with driving voltages of around 40 V. The design proposed here has a shorter response time and longer life, without problems of friction and wear, compared to the more common planar angular micromotor.

  3. IGBT scaling principle toward CMOS compatible wafer processes

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Omura, Ichiro

    2013-02-01

    A scaling principle for trench gate IGBT is proposed. CMOS technology on large diameter wafer enables to produce various digital circuits with higher performance and lower cost. The transistor cell structure becomes laterally smaller and smaller and vertically shallower and shallower. In contrast, latest IGBTs have rather deeper trench structure to obtain lower on-state voltage drop and turn-off loss. In the aspect of the process uniformity and wafer warpage, manufacturing such structure in the CMOS factory is difficult. In this paper, we show the scaling principle toward shallower structure and better performance. The principle is theoretically explained by our previously proposed "Structure Oriented" analytical model. The principle represents a possibility of technology direction and roadmap for future IGBT for improving the device performance consistent with lower cost and high volume productivity with CMOS compatible large diameter wafer technologies.

  4. 77 FR 26787 - Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same; Notice of Receipt of Complaint...

    2012-05-07

    ... COMMISSION Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same; Notice of Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same, DN 2895; the Commission is... importation of certain CMOS image sensors and products containing same. The complaint names as...

  5. Spectrometer with CMOS demodulation of fiber optic Bragg grating sensors

    Christiansen, Martin Brokner

    A CMOS imager based spectrometer is developed to interrogate a network containing a large number of Bragg grating sensors. The spectrometer uses a Prism-Grating- Prism (PGP) to spectrally separate serially multiplexed Bragg reflections on a single fiber. As a result, each Bragg grating produces a discrete spot on the CMOS imager that shifts horizontally as the Bragg grating experiences changes in strain or temperature. The reflected wavelength of the spot can be determined by finding the center of the spot produced. The use of a randomly addressable CMOS imager enables a flexible sampling rate. Some fibers can be interrogated at a high sampling rate while others can be interrogated at a low sampling rate. However, the use of a CMOS imager leads to several unique problems in terms of signal processing. These include a logarithmic pixel response, a low signal-to-noise ratio, a long pixel time constant, and software issues. The expected capabilities of the CMOS imager based spectrometer are determined with a theoretical model. The theoretical model tests three algorithms for determining the center of the spot: single row centroid, single row parabolic fit, and entire spot centroid. The theoretical results are compared to laboratory test data and field test data. The CMOS based spectrometer is capable of interrogating many optical fibers, and in the configuration tested, the fiber bundle consisted of 23 fibers. Using this system, a single fiber can be interrogated from 778 nm to 852 nm at 2100 Hz or multiple fibers can be interrogated over the same wavelength so that the total number of fiber interrogations is up to 2100 per second. The reflected Bragg wavelength can be determined within +/-3pm, corresponding to a +/-3μɛ uncertainty.

  6. E-Beam Effects on CMOS Active Pixel Sensors

    Three different CMOS active pixel structures manufactured in a deep submicron process have been evaluated with electron beam. The devices were exposed to 1 MeV electron beam up to 5kGy. Dark current increased after E-beam irradiation differently at each pixel structure. Dark current change is dependent on CMOS pixel structures. CMOS image sensors are now good candidates in demanding applications such as medical image sensor, particle detection and space remote sensing. In these situations, CISs are exposed to high doses of radiation. In fact radiation is known to generate trapped charge in CMOS oxides. It can lead to threshold voltage shifts and current leakages in MOSFETs and dark current increase in photodiodes. We studied ionizing effects in three types of CMOS APSs fabricated by 0.25 CMOS process. The devices were irradiated by a Co60 source up to 50kGy. All irradiation took place at room temperature. The dark current in the three different pixels exhibits increase with electron beam exposure. From the above figure, the change of dark current is dependent on the pixel structure. Double junction structure has shown relatively small increase of dark current after electron beam irradiation. The dark current in the three different pixels exhibits increase with electron beam exposure. The contribution of the total ionizing dose to the dark current increase is small here, since the devices were left unbiased during the electron beam irradiation. Radiation hardness in dependent on the pixel structures. Pixel2 is relatively vulnerable to radiation exposure. Pixel3 has radiation hardened structure

  7. A linear 180 nm SOI CMOS antenna switch module using integrated passive device filters for cellular applications

    A broadband monolithic linear single pole, eight throw (SP8T) switch has been fabricated in 180 nm thin film silicon-on-insulator (SOI) CMOS technology with a quad-band GSM harmonic filter in integrated passive devices (IPD) technology, which is developed for cellular applications. The antenna switch module (ASM) features 1.2 dB insertion loss with filter on 2G bands and 0.4 dB insertion loss in 3G bands, less than −45 dB isolation and maximum −103 dB intermodulation distortion for mobile front ends by applying distributed architecture and adaptive supply voltage generator. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  8. Linear CMOS RF power amplifiers a complete design workflow

    Ruiz, Hector Solar

    2013-01-01

    The work establishes the design flow for the optimization of linear CMOS power amplifiers from the first steps of the design to the final IC implementation and tests. The authors also focuses on design guidelines of the inductor's geometrical characteristics for power applications and covers their measurement and characterization. Additionally, a model is proposed which would facilitate designs in terms of transistor sizing, required inductor quality factors or minimum supply voltage. The model considers limitations that CMOS processes can impose on implementation. The book also provides diffe

  9. Low-voltage CMOS log companding analog design

    Serra-Graells, Francisco; Huertas, Jos ̌L 0

    2004-01-01

    This work presents in detail state-of-the-art analog circuit techniques for the very low-voltage and low-power design of systems-on-chip in CMOS technologies. The proposed strategy is mainly based on two bases: the Instantaneous Log Companding Theory, and the MOSFET operating in the subthreshold region. The former allows inner compression of the voltage dynamic-range for very low-voltage operation, while the latter is compatible with CMOS technologies and suitable for low-power circuits. The required background on the specific modelling of the MOS transistor for Companding is supplied at the b

  10. From vertex detectors to inner trackers with CMOS pixel sensors

    Besson, A.; Pérez, A. Pérez; Spiriti, E.; Baudot, J.; Claus, G; Goffe, M.; de Winter, M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS) for high resolution and low material vertex detectors has been validated with the 2014 and 2015 physics runs of the STAR-PXL detector at RHIC/BNL. This opens the door to the use of CPS for inner tracking devices, with 10-100 times larger sensitive area, which require therefore a sensor design privileging power saving, response uniformity and robustness. The 350 nm CMOS technology used for the STAR-PXL sensors was considered as too poorly suited to upcoming ...

  11. Process optimization of radiation-hardened CMOS integrated circuits

    The effects of processing steps on the radiation hardness of MOS devices have been systematically investigated. Quantitative relationships between the radiation-induced voltage shifts and processing parameters have been determined, where possible. Using the results of process optimization, a controlled baseline fabrication process for aluminum-gate CMOS has been defined. CMOS inverters which can survive radiation exposures well in excess of 108 rads (Si) have been fabricated. Restrictions that the observed physical dependences place upon possible models for the traps responsible for radiation-induced charging in SiO2 are discussed

  12. A 0.5-GHz CMOS digital RF memory chip

    Schnaitter, W. M.; Lewis, E. T.; Gordon, B. E.

    1986-10-01

    Digital RF memories (DRFM's) are key elements for modern radar jamming. An RF signal is sampled, stored in random access memory (RAM), and later recreated from the stored data. Here the first CMOS DRFM chip, integrating static RAM, control circuitry, and two channels of shift registers, on a single chip is described. The sample rate achieved was 0.5 GHz, VLSI density was made possible by the low-power dissipation of quiescent CMOS circuits. An 8K RAM prototype chip has been built and tested.

  13. Proton therapy beam dosimetry with silicon CMOS image sensors

    In a previous publication, it has been shown how neutron and proton beams in a quite broad energy interval, could be simply monitored with a position sensitive CMOS image detector. The direct read out, the lack of pile up effects, the stability of the signal, the detector linear response with proton energy and current and the very low costs of the device could make the CMOS detector a good candidate in addition to other well established detectors for proton radiation dosimetry. (N.T.)

  14. Effects of Proton Irradiation on a CMOS Image Sensor

    HUANG Qiang; MENG Xiang-Ti

    2007-01-01

    We perform 9 MeV proton irradiation of a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor at doses from 1×109 to 4×1010 cm-2. In general, the average brightness of dark output images increases with an increasing dose, and reaches the maximum at 1×1010 cm-2. The captured colour images become very blurry at 4×1010 cm-2. These can be explained by change of concentrations of irradiation-induced electron-hole pairs and vacancies in the various layers of CMOS image sensor calculated by the TRIM simulation programme with dose.

  15. New Active Digital Pixel Circuit for CMOS Image Sensor

    2001-01-01

    A new active digital pixel circuit for CMOS image sensor is designed consisting of four components: a photo-transducer, a preamplifier, a sample & hold (S & H) circuit and an A/D converter with an inverter. It is optimized by simulation and adjustment based on 2μm standard CMOS process. Each circuit of the components is designed with specific parameters. The simulation results of the whole pixel circuits show that the circuit has such advantages as low distortion, low power consumption, and improvement of the output performances by using an inverter.

  16. CMOS sensor as charged particles and ionizing radiation detector

    This paper reports results of CMOS sensor suitable for use as charged particles and ionizing radiation detector. The CMOS sensor with 640 × 480 pixels area has been integrated into an electronic circuit for detection of ionizing radiation and it was exposed to alpha particle (Am-241, Unat), beta (Sr-90), and gamma photons (Cs-137). Results show after long period of time (168 h) irradiation the sensor had not loss of functionality and also the energy of the charge particles and photons were very well obtained

  17. CMOS voltage references an analytical and practical perspective

    Kok, Chi-Wah

    2013-01-01

    A practical overview of CMOS circuit design, this book covers the technology, analysis, and design techniques of voltage reference circuits.  The design requirements covered follow modern CMOS processes, with an emphasis on low power, low voltage, and low temperature coefficient voltage reference design. Dedicating a chapter to each stage of the design process, the authors have organized the content to give readers the tools they need to implement the technologies themselves. Readers will gain an understanding of device characteristics, the practical considerations behind circuit topology,

  18. An equivalent doping profile for CMOS substrate characterization

    Quaresma, Henrique J.; Mendonça dos Santos, P.; Cruz Serra, A.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a non-destructive methodology to accurately estimate an equivalent substrate doping profile of a typical CMOS process. The methodology is based on simple experimental resistive measurements at different temperatures, obtained from a set of basic integrated test structures, and in 3D semiconductor simulations, to compute an estimate for the unknown CMOS process parameters. It is demonstrated that the resultant box distribution equivalent doping profile could be used to evaluate the variation of the substrate impedance as a function of temperature and substrate contact distance.

  19. High Q-factor CMOS-MEMS inductor

    Dai, Ching-Liang; Hong, Jin-Yu; Liu, Mao-Chen

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates a high Q-factor spiral inductor fabricated by the CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) process and a post-process. The spiral inductor is manufactured on silicon substrate using the 0.35 micrometers CMOS process. In order to reduce the substrate loss and enhance the Q-factor of the inductor, silicon substrate under the inductor is removed using a post-process. The post-process uses RIE (reactive ion etching) to etch the sacrificial layer of silicon dioxide, a...

  20. Low-power CMOS circuit design for fast infrared imagers

    Margarit Taule, Josep Maria

    2008-01-01

    La present tesi de màster detalla novedoses tècniques circuitals per al disseny de circuits integrats digitals CMOS de lectura compactes, de baixa potència i completament programables, destinats a aplicacions d'IR d'alta velocitat operant a temperatura ambient. En aquest sentit, el treball recull i amplia notablement la recerca iniciada en el Projecte Final de Carrera "Tècniques de disseny CMOS per a sistemes de visió híbrids de pla focal modular" obtenint-se resultats específics en tres dife...

  1. A 65 nm CMOS LNA for Bolometer Application

    Huang, Tom Nan; Boon, Chirn Chye; Zhu, Forest Xi; Yi, Xiang; He, Xiaofeng; Feng, Guangyin; Lim, Wei Meng; Liu, Bei

    2016-04-01

    Modern bolometers generally consist of large-scale arrays of detectors. Implemented in conventional technologies, such bolometer arrays suffer from integrability and productivity issues. Recently, the development of CMOS technologies has presented an opportunity for the massive production of high-performance and highly integrated bolometers. This paper presents a 65-nm CMOS LNA designed for a millimeter-wave bolometer's pre-amplification stage. By properly applying some positive feedback, the noise figure of the proposed LNA is minimized at under 6 dB and the bandwidth is extended to 30 GHz.

  2. New Curvature-Compensated CMOS Bandgap Voltage Reference

    Lu Shen; Ning Ning; Qi Yu; Yan Luo; Chun-Sheng Li

    2007-01-01

    A novel curvaturecompensated CMOS bandgap voltage reference is presented. The reference utilizes two first order temperature compensations generated from the nonlinearity of the finite current gain β of vertical pnp bipolar transistor. The proposed circuit,designed in a standard 0.18 μm CMOS process, achieves a good temperature coefficient of 2.44 ppm/℃ with temperature range from 40 ℃ to 85 ℃, and about 4 mV supply voltage variation in the range from 1.4 V to 2.4 V. With a 1.8 V supply voltage, the power supply rejection ratio is 56 dB at 10 MHz.

  3. CMOS sigma-delta converters practical design guide

    De la Rosa, Jose M

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of Sigma-Delta Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs) and a practical guide to their design in nano-scale CMOS for optimal performance. This book presents a systematic and comprehensive compilation of sigma-delta converter operating principles, the new advances in architectures and circuits, design methodologies and practical considerations - going from system-level specifications to silicon integration, packaging and measurements, with emphasis on nanometer CMOS implementation. The book emphasizes practical design issues - from high-level behavioural modelling i

  4. CMOS capacitive sensors for lab-on-chip applications a multidisciplinary approach

    Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2010-01-01

    The main components of CMOS capacitive biosensors including sensing electrodes, bio-functionalized sensing layer, interface circuitries and microfluidic packaging are verbosely explained in chapters 2-6 after a brief introduction on CMOS based LoCs in Chapter 1. CMOS Capacitive Sensors for Lab-on-Chip Applications is written in a simple pedagogical way. It emphasises practical aspects of fully integrated CMOS biosensors rather than mathematical calculations and theoretical details. By using CMOS Capacitive Sensors for Lab-on-Chip Applications, the reader will have circuit design methodologies,

  5. A 128 x 128 CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensor for Highly Integrated Imaging Systems

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A new CMOS-based image sensor that is intrinsically compatible with on-chip CMOS circuitry is reported. The new CMOS active pixel image sensor achieves low noise, high sensitivity, X-Y addressability, and has simple timing requirements. The image sensor was fabricated using a 2 micrometer p-well CMOS process, and consists of a 128 x 128 array of 40 micrometer x 40 micrometer pixels. The CMOS image sensor technology enables highly integrated smart image sensors, and makes the design, incorporation and fabrication of such sensors widely accessible to the integrated circuit community.

  6. Design and Implementation of a Hybrid SET-CMOS Based Sequential Circuits

    Anindya Jana

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Single Electron Transistor is a hot cake in the present research area of VLSI design and Microelectron-ics technology. It operates through one-by-one tunneling of electrons through the channel, utilizing the Coulomb blockade Phenomenon. Due to nanoscale feature size, ultralow power dissipation, and unique Coulomb blockade oscillation characteristics it may replace Field Effect Transistor FET. SET is very much advantageous than CMOS in few points. And in few points CMOS is advantageous than SET. So it has been seen that Combination of SET and CMOS is very much effective in the nanoscale, low power VLSI circuits. This paper has given a idea to make different sequential circuits using the Hybrid SET-CMOS. The MIB model for SET and BSIM4 model for CMOS are used. The operations of the proposed circuits are verified in Tanner environment. The performances of CMOS and Hybrid SET-CMOS based circuits are compared. The hybrid SET-CMOS circuit is found to consume lesser power than the CMOS based circuit. Further it is established that hybrid SET-CMOS based circuit is much faster compared to CMOS based circuit.

  7. Thermal-Diffusivity-Based Frequency References in Standard CMOS

    Kashmiri, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, a lot of research has been devoted to the realization of accurate integrated frequency references. A thermal-diffusivity-based (TD) frequency reference provides an alternative method of on-chip frequency generation in standard CMOS technology. A frequency-locked loop locks the outpu

  8. A CMOS Camera-Based Pulse Oximetry Imaging System

    Humphries, K.; Ward, T.; Markham, C.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a CMOS camera-based system for non-contact pulse oximetry imaging in transmission mode is described. Attention is drawn to the current uses of conventional pulse oximetry and the potential application of pulse oximetry imaging to developing objective wound assessment systems

  9. Single-chip RF communications systems in CMOS

    Olesen, Ole

    The paper describes the state of the art of the Nordic mobile communication project ConFront. This is a cooperation project with 3 Nordic universities and local industry. The ultimate goal is to make a CMOS one-chip mobile phone....

  10. Monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) in a VLSI CMOS technology

    Turchetta, R; Manolopoulos, S; Tyndel, M; Allport, P P; Bates, R; O'Shea, V; Hall, G; Raymond, M

    2003-01-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) designed in a standard VLSI CMOS technology have recently been proposed as a compact pixel detector for the detection of high-energy charged particle in vertex/tracking applications. MAPS, also named CMOS sensors, are already extensively used in visible light applications. With respect to other competing imaging technologies, CMOS sensors have several potential advantages in terms of low cost, low power, lower noise at higher speed, random access of pixels which allows windowing of region of interest, ability to integrate several functions on the same chip. This brings altogether to the concept of 'camera-on-a-chip'. In this paper, we review the use of CMOS sensors for particle physics and we analyse their performances in term of the efficiency (fill factor), signal generation, noise, readout speed and sensor area. In most of high-energy physics applications, data reduction is needed in the sensor at an early stage of the data processing before transfer of the data to ta...