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Sample records for 85rb atoms trapped

  1. Realization of an 85Rb Atomic Fountain

    An atomic fountain with 85Rb cold atoms is reported. A series of time-of-flight signals is obtained, and the measured temperature of the cold atomic cloud is about 2.4 μK. It will have potential new applications in the precise measurement of fundamental constants and the proof of the Einstein's equivalence principle. (atomic and molecular physics)

  2. Transference of cold 85Rb atoms from a mirror MOT to U-MOT on an external atom chip

    We have designed an atom chip for manipulating cold atoms with magnetic fields generated by electric currents. Electric wires with a U shape for a quadrupole trap and a Z shape for the Ioffe-Pritchard trap were printed on the 26 mm x 26 mm chip. This chip was bonded on a 16 x 16 x 70 mm3 glass cell. The glass cell was for a mirror MOT. 85Rb atoms are magneto optically trapped near the chip's surface (mirror-MOT); then, the trapped atoms are transferred from the mirror-MOT to the U-MOT by gradually decreasing the magnetic field for the mirror-MOT while increasing the current for the U-MOT. A transfer efficiency of 27.1% was measured by comparing the fluorescence from the atoms of U-MOT and the mirror-MOT.

  3. Interspecies collision-induced losses in a dual species 7Li–85Rb magneto-optical trap

    In this article, we report the measurement of collision-induced loss rate coefficients βLi,Rb and βRb,Li, and also discuss means to significantly suppress such collision-induced losses. We first describe our dual-species magneto-optical trap (MOT) that allows us to simultaneously trap ≥5 × 1087Li atoms loaded from a Zeeman slower and ≥2 × 10885Rb atoms loaded from a dispenser. We observe strong interspecies collision-induced losses in the MOTs which dramatically reduce the maximum atom number achievable in the MOTs. We measure the trap loss rate coefficients βLi,Rb and βRb,Li, and, from a study of their dependence on the MOT parameters, determine the cause for the losses observed. Our results provide valuable insights into ultracold collisions between 7Li and 85Rb, guide our efforts to suppress collision-induced losses, and also pave the way for the production of ultracold 7Li85Rb molecules. (paper)

  4. Elastic Scattering between Ultracold 23Na and 85Rb Atoms in the Triplet State

    HU Qiu-Bo; ZHANG Yong-Sheng; SUN Jin-Feng; YU Ke

    2011-01-01

    @@ The elastic scattering Properties between ultracold 23Na and 85Rd atoms for the triplet state(a3∑u+ )are researched.The s-wave scattering lengts of 23Na and 85Rb are calculate by the Numerov ana semtc asstc method with two kinds of interatomic potentials, which are the interpolation potential and Lennard-Jones potential(LJ12,6)by the same phase 4φ Shape resonances appear clearly in the l= 5 partial waves for the a- Lu state.Moreover, the s-wave scattering cross section, total cross section and energy positions of shape resonances are also discussed.%The elastic scattering properties between ultracold 23Na and 85 Rb atoms for the triplet state (a3Σu+ ) are researched. The s-wave scattering lengths of 23Na and 85Rb are calculated by the Numerov and semiclassical method with two kinds of interatomic potentials, which are the interpolation potential and Lennard-Jones potential (LJ12,6) by the same phase φ. Shape resonances appear clearly in the l= 5 partial waves for the a3 Σu+state. Moreover, the s-wave scattering cross section, total cross section and energy positions of shape resonances are also discussed.

  5. Dependence of the 85Rb coherent population trapping resonance characteristic on the pressure of N2 buffer gas

    In order to exploit its potential applications, we experimentally study the dependence of 85Rb-based coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance on N2 buffer gas with 6 vapor cells filled with natural rubidium and N2. The experiments are carried out at different pressures and temperatures, and the results reveal that higher cell temperature makes the resonance more sensitive to N2 pressure. Thus, it is important to choose a proper buffer gas pressure at a given cell temperature. This work provides valuable data for the application of 85Rb CPT resonance with a buffer gas of N2. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  6. Spectral dependence of diffuse light dynamics in ultracold atomic 85Rb

    Balik, S; Sukenik, C I; Havey, M D; Datsuk, V M; Kupriyanov, D V; Sokolov, I M

    2015-01-01

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical simulation of multiply scattered light dynamics in an ultracold gas of 85Rb atoms. Measurements of the spectral dependence of the time-decay of the scattered light intensity, following pulsed excitation with near resonance radiation, reveals that the decay for long times is nearly exponential, with a decay constant that is largely independent of detuning from resonance. Monte Carlo simulations of the multiple scattering process show that, for large detunings, near resonance scattering of Fourier components of the excitation pulse plays a significant role in the effect. This interpretation is supported by the observations, and successful modelling, of beating between Rayleigh scattered light at the excitation carrier frequency with the Fourier components of the excitation pulse that overlap significantly with the atomic resonance.

  7. 85Rb tunable-interaction Bose-Einstein condensate machine

    We describe our experimental setup for creating stable Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of 85Rb with tunable interparticle interactions. We use sympathetic cooling with 87Rb in two stages, initially in a tight Ioffe-Pritchard magnetic trap and subsequently in a weak, large-volume, crossed optical dipole trap, using the 155 G Feshbach resonance to manipulate the elastic and inelastic scattering properties of the 85Rb atoms. Typical 85Rb condensates contain 4x104 atoms with a scattering length of a=+200a0. Many aspects of the design presented here could be adapted to other dual-species BEC machines, including those involving degenerate Fermi-Bose mixtures. Our minimalist apparatus is well suited to experiments on dual-species and spinor Rb condensates, and has several simplifications over the 85Rb BEC machine at JILA, which we discuss at the end of this article.

  8. Splitting of N-type optical resonance formed in Λ-system of 85Rb atoms in a strong transverse magnetic field

    N-type narrow-band optical resonance formed in Λ-system of 85Rb atoms has been studied. Even for the case of thin optical cells (micrometer thickness) usage the N-type resonance has a high contrast. Two continuous narrow-band diode laser radiations were used. The peculiarities of N-type resonance splitting to the six components in strong transverse magnetic fields are experimentally and theoretically studied and the evidence of the Paschen-Back regime on the hyperfine structure of 85Rb atoms is observed

  9. Enhanced light-assisted-collision rate via excitation to the long-lived 5S1/2-5D5/2 molecular potential in an 85Rb magneto-optical trap

    We report measurements of a significant increase in the two-body loss rate in an 85Rb magneto-optic trap (MOT) caused by the addition of light resonant with the 5P3/2-to-5D5/2 transition (776 nm) in Rb. Exposure to the additional light resulted in up to a factor of 5 decrease in the steady-state number of atoms in the MOT. This loss is attributed to more than an order of magnitude increase in the light-assisted collision rate brought about by the 776-nm light. By measuring the intensity dependence of the loss rate, the loss channel was identified to be the relatively long-lived 5S1/2-5D5/2 molecular potential.

  10. Two-Photon Atomic Coherence Effect of Transition 5S1/2-5P3/2-4D5/2(4D3/2) of 85Rb atoms

    DING Dong-Sheng; ZHOU Zhi-Yuan; SHI Bao-Sen; ZOU Xu-Bo; GUO Guang-Can

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally observe the counterintuitive absorption peaks in the transition spectra of 5S1/2-5P3/2-4D5/2 and 5S1/2-5.P3/2-4.D3/2 in a hot 85Rb vapor. These spectra are very different from the spectra observed via double resonance optical pumping or electromagnetically induced transparency in the same transitions. These absorption peaks are from electromagnetically induced absorption due to the two-photon atomic coherence effect. We also investigate the relations between these peaks and the powers of the coupling laser and the probe laser experimen tally.%We experimentally observe the counterintuitive absorption peaks in the transition spectra of 5S1/2-5P3/2-4D5/2 and 5S1/2-5P3/2-4D3/2 in a hot 85Rb vapor.These spectra are very different from the spectra observed via double resonance optical pumping or electromagnetically induced transparency in the same transitions.These absorption peaks are from electromagnetically induced absorption due to the two-photon atomic coherence effect.We also investigate the relations between these peaks and the powers of the coupling laser and the probe laser experimentally.

  11. Power and polarization dependences of ultra-narrow electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) spectra of 85 Rb atoms in degenerate two-level system

    Qureshi, Muhammad Mohsin; Rehman, Hafeez Ur; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated ultra-narrow EIA spectral features with respect to variations of polarizations and powers of pump laser beam in a degenerate two-level system of the transition of 85 Rb D2 transition line. Polarizations of the probe laser beam in two separate experiments were fixed at right circular and horizontal linear polarizations, respectively while the polarizations of the pump lasers were varied from initial polarizations same as the probe laser beams to orthogonal to probe polarizations. One homemade laser combined with AOMs was used to the pump and probe laser beams instead of two different lasers to overcome broad linewidths of the homemade lasers. Theoretically, probe absorption coefficients have been calculated from optical Bloch equations of the degenerate two level system prepared by a pump laser beam. In the case of the circular polarization, EIA signal was obtained as expected theoretically although both pump and probe beams have same polarization. The EIA signal become smaller as power increases and polarizations of the pump and probe beams were same. When the polarization of the pump beam was linear polarization, maximum EIA signal was obtained theoretically and experimentally. Experimental EIA spectral shapes with respect to variations of the pump beam polarization shows similar trends as the theoretical results.

  12. Directly Trapping Atoms in a U-Shaped Magneto-Optical Trap Using a Mini Atom Chip

    We experimentally demonstrate the trapping of 85Rb atoms directly on a chip-size U-shaped magneto-optical trap (U-MOT). The trap includes a U-shaped wire on the chip, two bias magnetic field coils and laser beams. The capture volume of the U-MOT is theoretically calculated, and the trap is experimentally realized. With 2 A current applied to the U-shaped wire and 2-Gauss horizontal bias field, more than 2 × 106 atoms are trapped. In contrast with an ordinary mirror-MOT, this U-MOT captures atoms directly from the background, thus the trap size is greatly reduced. Based on this mini trap scheme, it is possible to realize a chip-size atom trap array for quantum information processing. (atomic and molecular physics)

  13. Optical Guiding of Trapped Atoms by a Blue-Detuned Hollow Laser Beam in the Horizontal Direction

    JIANG Kai-Jun; LI Ke; WANG Jin; ZHAN Ming-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ Optical guiding of 85 Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) by a blue-detuned horizontal hollow laser beam is demonstrated experimentally. The guiding efficiency and the velocity distribution of the guided atoms are found to have strong dependence on the detuning of the guiding laser. In particular, the optimum guiding occurs when the blue detuning of the hollow laser beam is approximately equal to the hyperfine structure splitting of the 85Rb ground states, in good agreement with the theoretical analysis based on a three-level model.

  14. A definitive number of atoms on demand: controlling the number of atoms in a-few-atom magneto-optical trap

    Yoon, S; Park, S; Kim, J; Lee, J H; An, K; Yoon, Seokchan; Choi, Youngwoon; Park, Sangbum; Kim, Jaisoon; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon

    2006-01-01

    A few 85Rb atoms were trapped in a micron-size magneto-optical trap with a high quadrupole magnetic-field gradient and the number of atoms was precisely controlled by suppressing stochastic loading and loss events via real-time feedback on the magnetic field gradient. The measured occupation probability of single atom was as high as 99%. Atoms up to five were also trapped with high occupation probabilities. The present technique could be used to make a deterministic atom source.

  15. Neutral atom traps.

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  16. A dynamic magneto-optical trap for atom chips

    Rushton, Jo; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matt

    2016-01-01

    We describe a dynamic magneto-optical trap (MOT) suitable for the use with vacuum systems in which optical access is limited to a single window. This technique facilitates the long-standing desire of producing integrated atom chips, many of which are likely to have severely restricted optical access compared with conventional vacuum chambers. This "switching-MOT" relies on the synchronized pulsing of optical and magnetic fields at audio frequencies. The trap's beam geometry is obtained using a planar mirror surface, and does not require a patterned substrate or bulky optics inside the vacuum chamber. Central to the design is a novel magnetic field geometry that requires no external quadrupole or bias coils which leads toward a very compact system. We have implemented the trap for $^{85}$Rb and shown that it is capable of capturing 2 million atoms and directly cooling below the Doppler temperature.

  17. Characteristics of integrated magneto-optical traps for atom chips

    Pollock, S; Laliotis, A; Ramirez-Martinez, F; Hinds, E A

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the operation of pyramidal magneto-optical traps (MOTs) microfabricated in silicon. Measurements of the loading and loss rates give insight into the role of the nearby surface in the MOT dynamics. Studies of the fluorescence versus laser frequency and intensity allow us to develop a simple theory of operation. The number of $^{85}$Rb atoms trapped in the pyramid is approximately $L^6$, where $L \\lesssim 6$ is the size in mm. This follows quite naturally from the relation between capture velocity and size and differs from the $L^{3.6}$ often used to describe larger MOTs. Our results constitute substantial progress towards fully integrated atomic physics experiments and devices.

  18. Collisional cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms

    Dutta, Sourav; Rangwala, S A

    2015-01-01

    The most generic cooling and thermalization pathway at the lowest temperatures is via elastic collisions. In hybrid ion-atom traps, ion cooling to temperatures where low partial wave collisions dominate require the collisional cooling mechanism to be well understood and controlled. There exists great uncertainty on whether cooling of light ions by heavier neutral atoms is possible. Here we experimentally demonstrate the cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms for the first time. We show that trapped 39K+ ions are cooled by localized ultracold neutral 85Rb atoms for an ion-atom mass ratio where most theoretical models predict ion heating. We demonstrate, based on detailed numerical simulation of our ion-cooling model, which is in excellent agreement with experiments, that cooling of ions by localized cold atoms is possible for any mass ratio. Our result opens up the possibility of studying quantum collisions and chemistry in trapped atom-ion systems.

  19. Atom trap trace analysis

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  20. Atomic Coherent Trapping and Properties of Trapped Atom

    YANG Guo-Jian; XIA Li-Xin; XIE Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the theory of velocity-selective coherent population trapping, we investigate an atom-laser system where a pair of counterpropagating laser fields interact with a three-level atom. The influence of the parametric condition on the properties of the system such as velocity at which the atom is selected to be trapped, time needed for finishing the coherent trapping process, and possible electromagnetically induced transparency of an altrocold atomic medium,etc., is studied.

  1. Photodissociation of trapped Rb$^+_2$ : Implications for hybrid molecular ion-atom trapping

    Jyothi, S; Dutta, Sourav; Allouche, A R; Vexiau, Romain; Dulieu, Olivier; Rangwala, S A

    2016-01-01

    We observe direct photodissociation of trapped $^{85}$Rb$_2^+$ molecular ions in the presence of cooling light for the $^{85}$Rb magneto optical trap (MOT). Vibrationally excited Rb$_{2}^{+}$ ions are created by photoionization of Rb$_{2}$ molecules formed photoassociatively in the rubidium (Rb) MOT and are trapped in a modified spherical Paul trap co-centric with the MOT. The decay rate of the trapped Rb$_{2}^{+}$ ion signal in the presence of the MOT cooling light is measured and agreement with our calculated rates for molecular ion photodissociation is established. The photodissociation mechanism due to the MOT light is expected to be active and therefore universal for all homonuclear diatomic alkali metal molecular ions.

  2. Observation of Deeply-Bound 85 Rb2 Vibrational Levels Using Feshbach Optimized Photoassociation

    Krzyzewski, Sean; Akin, Tom; Dizikes, James; Morrison, Michael; Abraham, Eric

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate Feshbach optimized photoassociation (FOPA) into the 0g-(5 S1/2 + 5 P1/2) state in 85 Rb2. FOPA uses the enhancement of the amplitude of the initial atomic scattering wave function due to a Feshbach resonance to increase the molecular formation rate from photoassociation. We observe three vibrational levels, v = 127 , 140, and 150, with previously unmeasured binding energies of 256, 154, and 96 cm-1. We measure the frequency, central magnetic field position, and magnetic field width of each Feshbach resonance. Our findings experimentally confirm that this technique can measure vibrational levels lower than those accessible to traditional photoassociative spectroscopy. We present theory concerning the polarization dependence of FOPA for this system, and discuss implications of using this system to measure the time-variation of the electron/proton mass ratio.

  3. Microchip-Based Trapped-Atom Clocks

    Vuletic, Vladan; Leroux, Ian D.; Schleier-Smith, Monika H.

    2011-01-01

    This is a chapter of a recently published book entitled Atom Chips, edited by Jakob Reichel and Vladan Vuletic. The contents of this chapter include: Basic Principles; Atomic-Fountain versus Trapped-Atom Clocks; Optical-Transition Clocks versus Microwave Clocks; Clocks with Magnetically Trapped Atoms--Fundamental Limits and Experimental Demonstrations; Readout in Trapped-Atom Clocks; and Spin Squeezing.

  4. Spectroscopy of the Double Minimum $3\\,^3 \\Pi_{\\Omega}$ Electronic State of $^{39}$K$^{85}$Rb

    Banerjee, Jayita; Carollo, Ryan; Bellos, Michael; Eyler, Edward E; Gould, Phillip L; Stwalley, William C

    2013-01-01

    We report the observation and analysis of the $3\\,^3\\Pi_{\\Omega}$ double-minimum electronic excited state of $^{39}$K$^{85}$Rb. The spin-orbit components ($0^{+}, 0^{-}, 1$ and 2) of this state are investigated based on potentials developed from the available \\emph{ab initio} potential curves. We have assigned the vibrational levels $v'=2-11$ of the $3\\,^3\\Pi_{1,2}$ potentials and $v'=2-12$ of the $3\\,^3\\Pi_{0^{+/-}}$ potential. We compare our experimental observations of the $3\\,^3\\Pi_{\\Omega}$ state with predictions based on theoretical potentials. The observations are based on resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of ultracold KRb in vibrational levels $v"=14-25$ of the $a\\,^3\\Sigma^+$ state. These \\emph{a}-state ultracold molecules are formed by photoassociation of ultracold $^{39}$K and $^{85}$Rb atoms to the 5(1) state of KRb followed by spontaneous emission to the \\emph{a} state.

  5. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Long-Range Molecular States of 85Rb_2

    Carollo, Ryan; Eyler, Edward E.; Bruneau, Yoann; Gould, Phillip; Stwalley, W. C.

    2015-06-01

    We present analysis of low-n long-range molecular Rydberg states in 85Rb_2, based on high-resolution spectra. The weakly bound states are accessed by bound-bound transitions from high-v levels of the a ^3 σ _u^+ state, which are prepared by photoassociation of laser-cooled atoms. Single-photon transitions to target states near the 5s + 7p asymptote are excited by a frequency-doubled pulse-amplified CW laser with a narrow linewidth, under 200 MHz. The long-range portion of the bonding potential is dominated by the elastic scattering interaction of the Rydberg electron of a perturbed 7p atom and a nearby ground-state atom, in much the same manner as trilobite states. We use time of flight to selectively measure molecular ions, which are formed via autoionization. This technique gives a two orders-of-magnitude improvement in linewidth over our previous work, reported in Ref. [1]. We also present calculations of a proposed scheme for STIRAP transfer from the current v''=35 level of the a ^3 σ _u^+ state to the v''=39 level. The long-range states accessible to us are defined in large part by the Franck-Condon factors, which are dominated by the outer lobe of the wavefunction. Thus, choosing a v'' sets R, and determines the Franck-Condon window. The proposed v'' = 39 level has a classical outer turning point at ˜ 72 a_0, and will provide access to higher-n states with longer-range wells. This work is supported by the NSF and AFOSR. [1] M. A. Bellos et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 053001 (2013)

  6. Cold atoms in videotape micro-traps

    Sinclair, C. D. J.; Retter, J. A.; Curtis, E. A.; Hall, B. V.; Llorente Garcia, I.; Eriksson, S.; Sauer, B. E.; Hinds, E. A.

    2005-08-01

    We describe an array of microscopic atom traps formed by a pattern of magnetisation on a piece of videotape. We describe the way in which cold atoms are loaded into one of these micro-traps and how the trapped atom cloud is used to explore the properties of the trap. Evaporative cooling in the micro-trap down to a temperature of 1~μK allows us to probe the smoothness of the trapping potential and reveals some inhomogeneity produced by the magnetic film. We discuss future prospects for atom chips based on microscopic permanent-magnet structures.

  7. Cold atoms in videotape micro-traps

    Sinclair, C D J; Curtis, E A; Hall, B V; Garcia, I L; Eriksson, S; Sauer, B E; Hinds, E A

    2005-01-01

    We describe an array of microscopic atom traps formed by a pattern of magnetisation on a piece of videotape. We describe the way in which cold atoms are loaded into one of these micro-traps and how the trapped atom cloud is used to explore the properties of the trap. Evaporative cooling in the micro-trap down to a temperature of 1 microkelvin allows us to probe the smoothness of the trapping potential and reveals some inhomogeneity produced by the magnetic film. We discuss future prospects for atom chips based on microscopic permanent-magnet structures.

  8. Characterizing optical dipole trap via fluorescence of trapped cesium atoms

    LIU; Tao; GENG; Tao; YAN; Shubin; LI; Gang; ZHANG; Jing; WANG; Junmin; PENG; Kunchi; ZHANG; Tiancai

    2006-01-01

    Optical dipole trap (ODT) is becoming an important tool of manipulating neutral atoms. In this paper ODT is realized with a far-off resonant laser beam strongly focused in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) of cesium atoms. The light shift is measured by simply monitoring the fluorescence of the atoms in the magneto-optical trap and the optical dipole trap simultaneously. The advantages of our experimental scheme are discussed, and the effect of the beam waist and power on the potential of dipole trap as well as heating rate is analyzed.

  9. Determination of the hyperfine structure constants of the 87Rb and 85Rb 4 D5 /2 state and the isotope hyperfine anomaly

    Wang, Jie; Liu, Huifeng; Yang, Guang; Yang, Baodong; Wang, Junmin

    2014-11-01

    The hyperfine structure (hfs) splittings of the 4 D5 /2 state for two isotopes of 87Rb and 85Rb atoms are measured based on double-resonance optical pumping spectra in a 5 S1 /2-5 P3 /2-4 D5 /2 ladder-type atomic system. The frequency calibration is performed by employing a wideband fiber-pigtailed phase-type electro-optic modulator together with a Fabry-Pérot cavity to cancel the error arising from nonlinear frequency scanning. The hfs magnetic dipole constant A of the 4 D5 /2 state is determined to be -16.801 ± 0.005 MHz for 87Rb and -4.978 ± 0.004 MHz for 85Rb . The hfs electric quadrupole constant B of the 4 D5 /2 state is determined to be 3.645 ± 0.030 MHz for 87Rb and 6.560 ± 0.052 MHz for 85Rb . The values of A and B for the 87Rb4 D5 /2 state are twice as accurate as previous work with thermal atoms using a femtosecond laser comb and the values of A and B for the 85Rb4 D5 /2 state are 3 times and 25 times more accurate than previous work in laser-cooled atoms using Fabry-Pérot interferometer, respectively. According to this high precision of the hfs constants and the previously measured nuclear g factors of the two isotopes, the value of the d -electron hyperfine anomaly 87Δ85(4 D5 /2 ) is derived to be -0.0041 ± 0.0009.

  10. The determination of potential energy curve and dipole moment of the (5)0+ electronic state of 85Rb133Cs molecule by high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy

    We present the formation of ultracold 85Rb133Cs molecules in the (5)0+ electronic state by photoassociation and their detection via resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization. Up to v = 47 vibrational levels including the lowest v = 0 vibrational and lowest J = 0 levels are identified with rotationally resolved high resolution photoassociation spectra. Precise Dunham coefficients are determined for the (5)0+ state with high accuracy, then the Rydberg-Klein-Rees potential energy curve is derived. The electric dipole moments with respect to the vibrational numbers of the (5)0+ electronic state of 85Rb133Cs molecule are also measured in the range between 1.9 and 4.8 D. These comprehensive studies on previously unobserved rovibrational levels of the (5)0+ state are helpful to understand the molecular structure and discover suitable transition pathways for transferring ultracold atoms to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state

  11. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms

    The basic ideas of laser cooling and atom trapping will be discussed. These techniques have applications in spectroscopy, metrology, nuclear physics, biophysics, geophysics, and polymer science. (author)

  12. Magnetic Trapping of Cold Bromine Atoms

    Rennick, C J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the milliKelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br$_2$ molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are only lost by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential...

  13. Trapping atoms on a transparent permanent-magnet atom chip

    Shevchenko, A; Jaakkola, A; Kaivola, M; Lindvall, T; Pfau, T; Tittonen, I

    2006-01-01

    We describe experiments on trapping of atoms in microscopic magneto-optical traps on an optically transparent permanent-magnet atom chip. The chip is made of magnetically hard ferrite-garnet material deposited on a dielectric substrate. The confining magnetic fields are produced by miniature magnetized patterns recorded in the film by magneto-optical techniques. We trap Rb atoms on these structures by applying three crossed pairs of counter-propagating laser beams in the conventional magneto-optical trapping (MOT) geometry. We demonstrate the flexibility of the concept in creation and in-situ modification of the trapping geometries through several experiments.

  14. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms

    Townsend Christopher G.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed experimental and theoretical investigation of a magneto-optical trap for caesium atoms is presented. Particular emphasis has been placed on achieving high spatial number densities and low temperatures. Optimizing both of these together enables efficient evaporative cooling from a conservative trap, a procedure which has recently led to the first observations of Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute atomic vapour. The behaviour of a magneto-optical trap is nomina...

  15. Laser trapping of 21Na atoms

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive 21Na (tl/2 = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped 21Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of 21Na → 21Ne + Β+ + ve, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, 21Na atoms were produced by bombarding 24Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The 21Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined

  16. An Atom Trap Relying on Optical Pumping

    Bouyer, P; Dahan, M B; Michaud, A; Salomon, C; Dalibard, J

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated a new radiation pressure trap which relies on optical pumping and does not require any magnetic field. It employs six circularly polarized divergent beams and works on the red of a $J_{g} \\longrightarrow J_{e} = J_{g} + 1$ atomic transition with $J_{g} \\geq 1/2$. We have demonstrated this trap with cesium atoms from a vapour cell using the 852 nm $J_{g} = 4 \\longrightarrow J_{e} = 5$ resonance transition. The trap contained up to $3 \\cdot 10^{7}$ atoms in a cloud of $1/\\sqrt{e}$ radius of 330 $\\mu$m.

  17. A Bose-condensed, simultaneous dual-species Mach–Zehnder atom interferometer

    This paper presents the first realization of a simultaneous 87Rb–85Rb Mach–Zehnder atom interferometer with Bose-condensed atoms. A number of ambitious proposals for precise terrestrial and space based tests of the weak equivalence principle rely on such a system. This implementation utilizes hybrid magnetic-optical trapping to produce spatially overlapped condensates with a repetition rate of 20 s. A horizontal optical waveguide with co-linear Bragg beamsplitters and mirrors is used to simultaneously address both isotopes in the interferometer. We observe a non–linear phase shift on a non-interacting 85Rb interferometer as a function of interferometer time, T, which we show arises from inter-isotope scattering with the co-incident 85Rb interferometer. A discussion of implications for future experiments is given. (paper)

  18. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Atomic Strontium

    Barker, D S; Pisenti, N C; Campbell, G K

    2015-01-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the 3P1 to 3S1 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  19. Nanostructured optical nanofibres for atom trapping

    Daly, Mark; Phelan, Ciarán; Deasy, Kieran; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    We propose an optical dipole trap for cold neutral atoms based on the electric field produced from the evanescent fields in a hollow rectangular slot cut through an optical nanofibre. In particular, we discuss the trap performance in relation to laser-cooled rubidium atoms and show that a far off-resonance, blue-detuned field combined with the attractive surface-atom interaction potential from the dielectric material forms a stable trapping configuration. With the addition of a red-detuned field, we demonstrate how three dimensional confinement of the atoms at a distance of 140 - 200 nm from the fibre surface within the slot can be accomplished. This scheme facilitates optical coupling between the atoms and the nanofibre that could be exploited for quantum communication schemes using ensembles of laser-cooled atoms.

  20. Suppression of Dephasing of Optically Trapped Atoms

    Andersen, M F; Grünzweig, T; Davidson, N

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-cold atoms trapped in an optical dipole trap and prepared in a coherent superposition of their hyperfine ground states, decohere as they interact with their environment. We demonstrate than the loss in coherence in an "echo" experiment, which is caused by mechanisms such as Rayleigh scattering, can be suppressed by the use of a new pulse sequence. We also show that the coherence time is then limited by mixing to other vibrational levels in the trap and by the finite lifetime of the internal quantum states of the atoms.

  1. Collisional trap losses of cold, magnetically-trapped Br atoms

    Lam, J; Softley, T P

    2014-01-01

    Near-threshold photodissociation of Br$_2$ from a supersonic beam produces slow bromine atoms that are trapped in the magnetic field minimum formed between two opposing permanent magnets. Here, we quantify the dominant trap loss rate due to collisions with two sources of residual gas: the background limited by the vacuum chamber base pressure, and the carrier gas during the supersonic gas pulse. The loss rate due to collisions with residual Ar in the background follows pseudo first-order kinetics, and the bimolecular rate coefficient for collisional loss from the trap is determined by measurement of this rate as a function of the background Ar pressure. This rate coefficient is smaller than the total elastic collision rate coefficient, as it only samples those collisions that lead to trap loss, and is determined to be $\\langle\

  2. Formation of ultracold 7Li85Rb molecules in the lowest triplet electronic state by photoassociation and their detection by ionization spectroscopy

    We report the formation of ultracold 7Li85Rb molecules in the a3Σ+ electronic state by photoassociation (PA) and their detection via resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With our dual-species Li and Rb magneto-optical trap apparatus, we detect PA resonances with binding energies up to ∼62 cm−1 below the 7Li 2s 2S1/2 + 85Rb 5p 2P1/2 asymptote. In addition, we use REMPI spectroscopy to probe the a3Σ+ state and excited electronic 33Π and 43Σ+ states and identify a3Σ+ (v″ = 7–13), 33Π (vΠ′ = 0–10), and 43Σ+ (vΣ′ = 0–5) vibrational levels. Our line assignments agree well with ab initio calculations. These preliminary spectroscopic studies on previously unobserved electronic states are crucial to discovering transition pathways for transferring ultracold LiRb molecules created via PA to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state

  3. Formation of ultracold (7)Li(85)Rb molecules in the lowest triplet electronic state by photoassociation and their detection by ionization spectroscopy.

    Altaf, Adeel; Dutta, Sourav; Lorenz, John; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Chen, Yong P; Elliott, D S

    2015-03-21

    We report the formation of ultracold (7)Li(85)Rb molecules in the a(3)Σ(+) electronic state by photoassociation (PA) and their detection via resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With our dual-species Li and Rb magneto-optical trap apparatus, we detect PA resonances with binding energies up to ∼62 cm(-1) below the (7)Li 2s (2)S1/2 + (85)Rb 5p (2)P1/2 asymptote. In addition, we use REMPI spectroscopy to probe the a(3)Σ(+) state and excited electronic 3(3)Π and 4(3)Σ(+) states and identify a(3)Σ(+) (v″ = 7-13), 3(3)Π (vΠ' = 0-10), and 4(3)Σ(+) (vΣ' = 0-5) vibrational levels. Our line assignments agree well with ab initio calculations. These preliminary spectroscopic studies on previously unobserved electronic states are crucial to discovering transition pathways for transferring ultracold LiRb molecules created via PA to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state. PMID:25796252

  4. Tightly confined atoms in optical dipole traps

    This thesis reports on the design and setup of a new atom trap apparatus, which is developed to confine few rubidium atoms in ultrahigh vacuum and make them available for controlled manipulations. To maintain low background pressure, atoms of a vapour cell are transferred into a cold atomic beam by laser cooling techniques, and accumulated by a magneto-optic trap (MOT) in a separate part of the vacuum system. The laser cooled atoms are then transferred into dipole traps made of focused far-off-resonant laser fields in single- or crossed-beam geometry, which are superimposed with the center of the MOT. Gaussian as well as hollow Laguerre-Gaussian (LG$(01)$) beam profiles are used with red-detuned or blue-detuned light, respectively. Microfabricated dielectric phase objects allow efficient and robust mode conversion of Gaussian into Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams. Trap geometries can easily be changed due to the highly flexible experimental setup. The dipole trap laser beams are focused to below 10 microns at a power of several hundred milliwatts. Typical trap parameters, at a detuning of several ten nanometers from the atomic resonance, are trag depths of few millikelvin, trap frequencies near 30-kHz, trap light scattering rates of few hundred photons per atom and second, and lifetimes of several seconds. The number of dipole-trapped atoms ranges from more than ten thousand to below ten. The dipole-trapped atoms are detected either by a photon counting system with very efficient straylight discrimination, or by recapture into the MOT, which is imaged onto a sensitive photodiode and a CCD-camera. Due to the strong AC-Stark shift imposed by the high intensity trapping light, energy-selective resonant excitation and detection of the atoms is possible. The measured energy distribution is consistent with a harmonic potential shape and allows the determination of temperatures and heating rates. In first measurements, the thermal energy is found to be about 10 % of the trap

  5. Single photon from a single trapped atom

    Full text: A quantum treatment of the interaction between atoms and light usually begins with the simplest model system: a two-level atom interacting with a monochromatic light wave. Here we demonstrate an elegant experimental realization of this system using an optically trapped single rubidium atom illuminated by resonant light pulses. We observe Rabi oscillations, and show that this system can be used as a highly efficient triggered source of single photons with a well-defined polarisation. In contrast to other sources based on neutral atoms and trapped ions, no optical cavity is required. We achieved a flux of single photons of about 104 s-1 at the detector, and observe complete antibunching. This source has potential applications for distributed atom-atom entanglement using single photons. (author)

  6. Atomic hydrogen in a magnetic trap

    This thesis describes the construction and application of a static magnetic trap for atomic hydrogen. It is demonstrated that densities of up to 3*1014 cm-3 at temperatures of 80 to 200 mK can be achieved with a technically simple method of filling the trap. Double polarization is shown to occur spontaneously in the trapped gas, and the dipolar relaxation rate and its field dependance are measured confirming theoretical predictions. These results show that atomic hydrogen is a promising material for the achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation, provided that apart from the present method of cooling the gas, which is shown to impose a lower limit on the temperature, another cooling mechanism is supplied to reach lower temperatures. The density reached was two orders of magnitude higher than that of trapping experiments done at MIT where the technique of evaporate cooling was used to reach a temperature lower than 3 mK. (author). 138 refs.; 27 figs

  7. Virial theorems for trapped cold atoms

    Werner, Félix

    2008-01-01

    A few small corrections We present a general virial theorem for quantum particles with arbitrary zero-range or finite-range interactions in an arbitrary external potential. We deduce virial theorems for several situations relevant to trapped cold atoms: zero-range interactions with and without Efimov effect, hard spheres, narrow Feshbach resonances, and finite-range interactions. If the scattering length $a$ is varied adiabatically in the BEC-BCS crossover, we find that the trapping potent...

  8. Introduction to light forces, atom cooling, and atom trapping

    Savage, Craig

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces and reviews light forces, atom cooling and atom trapping. The emphasis is on the physics of the basic processes. In discussing conservative forces the semi-classical dressed states are used rather than the usual quantized field dressed states.

  9. Photoassociation and ionization spectroscopy of ultracold $^{7}$Li$^{85}$Rb molecules

    Altaf, Adeel; Lorenz, John; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Chen, Yong P; Elliott, D S

    2014-01-01

    We report spectroscopic studies of ultracold $^{7}$Li$^{85}$Rb molecules using multiphoton ionization detection. With our dual-species Li and Rb MOT apparatus, we create ultracold LiRb molecules via photoassociation (PA), and explore new PA resonances, with binding energies up to ~62 cm^{-1}. Furthermore, we measure the resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra as a probe of ground and excited state vibrational levels. We identify vibrational levels of the $a^{3}\\Sigma^{+} (v" = 7 - 13)$, $3^{3} \\Pi (v'_{\\Pi} = 0 - 10)$ and $4^{3} \\Sigma^{+} (v'_{\\Sigma} = 0 - 5)$ electronic states. Our line assignments agree well with ab initio calculations. These spectroscopic studies are crucial to discovering transition pathways for transferring ultracold LiRb molecules created via PA to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state.

  10. Suppression of the stellar enhancement factor and the reaction 85Rb(p,n)85Sr

    Rauscher, T; Gyürky, Gy; Simon, A; Fülöp, Z; Somorjai, E

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that a Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement factor occurs in many endothermic reactions at and far from stability. Contrary to common assumptions, reaction measurements for astrophysics with minimal impact of stellar enhancement should be preferably performed for those reactions instead of their reverses, despite of their negative reaction Q-value. As a demonstration, the cross section of the astrophysically relevant 85Rb(p,n)85Sr reaction has been measured by activation between 2.16<=E_{c.m.}<= 3.96 MeV and the astrophysical reaction rates at p-process temperatures for (p,n) as well as (n,p) are directly inferred from the data. Additionally, our results confirm a previously derived modification of a global optical proton potential. The presented arguments are also relevant for other alpha- and proton-induced reactions in the p-, rp-, and nu-p-processes.

  11. Anisotropic optical trapping of ultracold erbium atoms

    Dulieu, Olivier; Lepers, Maxence; Wyart, Jean-Francois

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the complex dynamic dipole polarizability of ground-state erbium, a rare-earth atom that was recently Bose-condensed. This quantity determines the trapping conditions of cold atoms in an optical trap. The polarizability is calculated with the sum-over-state formula inherent to second-order perturbation theory. The summation is performed on transition energies and transition dipole moments from ground-state erbium, which are computed using the Racah-Slater least-square fitting procedure provided by the Cowan codes. This allows us to predict several yet unobserved energy levels in the range 25000-31000 cm-1 above the ground state. Regarding the trapping potential, we find that ground-state erbium essentially behaves like a spherically-symmetric atom, in spite of its large electronic angular momentum. We find a mostly isotropic van der Waals interaction between two ground-state erbium atoms, with a coefficient C6iso= 1760 a.u.. On the contrary, the photon-scattering rate is strongly anisotropic with respect to the polarization of the trapping light. also at LERMA, UMR8112, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Meudon, France.

  12. Quantum state control of trapped Holmium atoms

    Hostetter, James; Yip, Christopher; Milner, William; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey; Saffman, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Neutral Holmium with its large number of hyperfine ground states provides a promising approach for collective encoding of a multi-qubit register. A prerequisite for collective encoding is the ability to prepare different states in the 128 state hyperfine ground manifold. We report progress towards optical pumping and control of the hyperfine Zeeman state of trapped Ho atoms. Atoms are transferred from a 410.5 nm MOT into a 455 nm optical dipole trap. The atoms can be optically pumped using light driving the ground 6s2 , F = 11 to 6 s 6 p ,F' = 11 transition together with a F = 10 to F' = 11 repumper. Microwave fields are then used to drive transitions to hyperfine levels with 4 <= F <= 11 . Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  13. Magneto-Optical Trapping of Holmium Atoms

    Miao, J; Stratis, G; Saffman, M

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate sub-Doppler laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the rare earth element Holmium. Atoms are loaded from an atomic beam source and captured in six-beam $\\sigma_+ - \\sigma_-$ molasses using a strong $J=15/2 \\leftrightarrow J=17/2$ cycling transition at $\\lambda=410.5~\\rm nm$. Due to the small difference in hyperfine splittings and Land\\'e $g$-factors in the lower and upper levels of the cooling transition the MOT is self-repumped without additional repump light, and deep sub-Doppler cooling is achieved with the magnetic trap turned on. We measure the leakage out of the cycling transition to metastable states and find a branching ratio $\\sim 10^{-5}$ which is adequate for state resolved measurements on hyperfine encoded qubits.

  14. Continuous magnetic trapping of laser cooled atoms

    The authors present here initial results of the deceleration of a thermal atomic beam from -- 1000 to -- 100 m/s. The experiment was conducted in the 1.4-m long vertical superconducting solenoid which produced the slowing field. The fluorescence of the slowed atomic beam has been studied as a function of laser frequency. Figure 2 is a 12-GHz scan showing the fluorescence at a position 150 cm from the beginning of the solenoid. The wide peak corresponds to unslowed atoms with generally the initial velocity distribution. The second, narrower, peak corresponds to slowed atoms with a velocity of -- 150 m/s. Similar spectra have been obtained for various positions along the magnetic slower and trap. These data should allow better understanding of the cooling process and will be compared to computer models

  15. Two dipolar atoms in a harmonic trap

    Ołdziejewski, Rafał; Górecki, Wojciech; Rzążewski, Kazimierz

    2016-05-01

    Two identical dipolar atoms moving in a harmonic trap without an external magnetic field are investigated. Using the algebra of angular momentum we reduce the problem to a simple numerics. We show that the internal spin-spin interactions between the atoms couple to the orbital angular momentum causing an analogue of the Einstein-de Haas effect. We show a possibility of adiabatically pumping our system from the s-wave to the d-wave relative motion. The effective spin-orbit coupling occurs at anti-crossings of the energy levels.

  16. Tunneling of trapped-atom Bose condensates

    Subodh R Shenoy

    2002-02-01

    We obtain the dynamics in number and phase difference, for Bose condensates that tunnel between two wells of a double-well atomic trap, using the (nonlinear) Gross–Pitaevskii equation. The dynamical equations are of the canonical form for the two conjugate variables, and the Hamiltonian corresponds to that of a momentum-shortened pendulum, supporting a richer set of tunneling oscillation modes than for a superconductor Josephson junction, that has a fixed-length pendulum as a mechanical model. Novel modes include ‘inverted pendulum’ oscillations with an average angle of ; and oscillations about a self-maintained population imbalance that we term ‘macroscopic quantum self-trapping’. Other systems with this phase-number nonlinear dynamics include two-component (interconverting) condensates in a single harmonic trap, and He3B superfluids in two containers connected by micropores.

  17. Anisotropic optical trapping of ultracold erbium atoms

    Lepers, Maxence; Dulieu, Olivier; --,

    2013-01-01

    Ultracold atoms confined in a dipole trap are submitted to a potential whose depth is proportional to the real part of their dynamic dipole polarizability. The atoms also experience photon scattering whose rate is proportional to the imaginary part of their dynamic dipole polarizability. In this article we calculate the complex dynamic dipole polarizability of ground-state erbium, a rare-earth atom that was recently Bose-condensed. The polarizability is calculated with the sum-over-state formula inherent to second-order perturbation theory. The summation is performed on transition energies and transition dipole moments from ground-state erbium, which are computed using the Racah-Slater least-square fitting procedure provided by the Cowan codes. This allows us to predict 9 unobserved odd-parity energy levels of total angular momentum J=5, 6 and 7, in the range 25000-31000 cm-1 above the ground state. Regarding the trapping potential, we find that ground-state erbium essentially behaves like a spherically-symme...

  18. The influence of optical molasses in loading a shallow optical trap

    Hamilton, Mathew S.; Gorges, Anthony R.; Roberts, Jacob L.

    2008-01-01

    We have examined loading of 85Rb atoms into a shallow Far-Off-Resonance Trap (FORT) from an optical molasses and compared it to loading from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). We found that substantially more atoms could be loaded into the FORT via an optical molasses as compared to loading from the MOT alone. To determine why this was the case, we measured the rate of atoms loaded into the FORT and the losses from the FORT during the loading process. For both MOT and molasses loading, we examined...

  19. Combined ion and atom trap for low temperature ion-atom physics

    Ravi, K.; LEE, Seunghyun; Sharma, Arijit; Werth, G.; Rangwala, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    We report an experimental apparatus and technique which simultaneously traps ions and cold atoms with spatial overlap. Such an apparatus is motivated by the study of ion-atom processes at temperatures ranging from hot to ultra-cold. This area is a largely unexplored domain of physics with cold trapped atoms. In this article we discuss the general design considerations for combining these two traps and present our experimental setup. The ion trap and atom traps are characterized independently ...

  20. Cold atom-ion experiments in hybrid traps

    Härter, Arne; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2013-01-01

    In the last 5 years, a novel field of physics and chemistry has developed in which cold trapped ions and ultracold atomic gases are brought into contact with each other. Combining ion traps with traps for neutral atoms yields a variety of new possibilities for research and experiments. These range from studies of cold atom-ion collisions and atom-ion chemistry to applications in quantum information science and condensed matter related research. In this article we give a brief introduction int...

  1. Holographic generation of micro-trap arrays for single atoms

    Bergamini, S; Jones, M; Jacubowiez, L; Browaeys, A; Grangier, P; Bergamini, Silvia; Darquie, Benoit; Jones, Matt; Jacubowiez, Lionel; Browaeys, Antoine; Grangier, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    We have generated multiple micron-sized optical dipole traps for neutral atoms using holographic techniques with a programmable liquid crystal spatial light modulator. The setup allows the storing of a single atom per trap, and the addressing and manipulation of individual trapping sites.

  2. Circular magneto-optical trap for neutral atoms

    Morinaga, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel scheme to magneto-optically trap neutral atoms in a ring shaped trap that can be used to transfer atoms into a circular magnetic trap with high density. This inturn enables to evaporatively cool atoms and study the behaviour of ultra cold gases in a periodic 2-dimensional potential. The circular magneto-optical trap itself is also of interest to investigate the properties of magneto-optical trap of deformed shape, such as reduction of photon-r...

  3. Shaking-induced dynamics of cold atoms in magnetic traps

    García, I Llorente; Sinclair, C D J; Curtis, E A; Tachikawa, M; Hudson, J J; Hinds, E A

    2013-01-01

    We describe an experiment in which cold rubidium atoms, confined in an elongated magnetic trap, are excited by transverse oscillation of the trap centre. The temperature after excitation exhibits resonance as a function of the driving frequency. We measure these resonances at several different trap frequencies. In order to interpret the experiments, we develop a simple model that incorporates both collisions between atoms and the anharmonicity of the real three-dimensional trapping potential. As well as providing a precise connection between the transverse harmonic oscillation frequency and the temperature resonance frequency, this model gives insight into the heating and loss mechanisms, and into the dynamics of driven clouds of cold trapped atoms.

  4. Doppler cooling of an optically dense cloud of trapped atoms

    Schmidt, P O; Werner, J; Binhammer, T; Görlitz, A; Pfau, T; Schmidt, Piet O.; Hensler, Sven; Binhammer, Thomas; G\\"{o}rlitz, Axel; Pfau, Tilman

    2002-01-01

    We have studied a general technique for laser cooling a cloud of polarized trapped atoms down to the Doppler temperature. A one-dimensional optical molasses using polarized light cools the axial motional degree of freedom of the atoms in the trap. Cooling of the radial degrees of freedom can be modelled by reabsorption of scattered photons in the optically dense cloud. We present experimental results for a cloud of chromium atoms in a magnetic trap. A simple model based on rate equations shows quantitative agreement with the experimental results. This scheme allows us to readily prepare a dense cloud of atoms in a magnetic trap with ideal starting conditions for evaporative cooling.

  5. Cooling and trapping neutral atoms with radiative forces

    Techniques to slow and trap neutral atoms at high densities with radiative forces are discussed in this review articles. Among several methods of laser cooling, it is emphasized Zeeman Tuning of the electronic levels and frequency-sweeping techniques. Trapping of neutral atoms and recent results obtained in light and magnetic traps are discussed. Techniques to further cool atoms inside traps are presented and the future of laser cooling of neutral atoms by means of radiation pressure is discussed. (A.C.A.S.)

  6. Trapping atoms in the vacuum field of a cavity

    Schön, C

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to find ways to trap an atom in a cavity. In contrast to other approaches we propose a method where the cavity is basically in the vacuum state and the atom in the ground state. The idea is to induce a spatial dependent AC Stark shift by irradiating the atom with a weak laser field, so that the atom experiences a trapping force. The main feature of our setup is that dissipation can be strongly suppressed. We estimate the lifetime of the atom as well as the trapping potential parameters and compare our estimations with numerical simulations.

  7. A toroidal trap for cold {}^{87}{Rb} atoms using an rf-dressed quadrupole trap

    Chakraborty, A.; Mishra, S. R.; Ram, S. P.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the trapping of cold {}87{Rb} atoms in a toroidal geometry using a radio frequency (rf) dressed quadrupole magnetic trap formed by superposing a strong rf-field on a quadrupole trap. This rf-dressed quadrupole trap has the minimum potential away from the quadrupole trap centre on a circular path which facilitates trapping in toroidal geometry. In these experiments, the laser cooled atoms were first trapped in a quadrupole trap, then cooled evaporatively using a weak rf-field, and finally trapped in an rf-dressed quadrupole trap. The radius of the toroid could be varied by varying the frequency of the dressing rf-field. It has also been demonstrated that a single rf source and an antenna can be used for the rf-evaporative cooling as well as for the rf-dressing of atoms. The atoms trapped in the toroidal trap may have applications in the realization of an atom gyroscope as well as in studying the quantum gases in low dimensions.

  8. A toroidal trap for the cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms using a rf-dressed quadrupole trap

    Chakraborty, A; Ram, S P; Tiwari, S K; Rawat, H S

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the trapping of cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms in a toroidal geometry using a rf-dressed quadrupole magnetic trap formed by superposing a strong radio frequency (rf) field on a quadrupole trap. This rf-dressed quadrupole trap has minimum of the potential away from the quadrupole trap centre on a circular path which facilitates the trapping in the toroidal geometry. In the experiments, the laser cooled atoms were first trapped in the quadrupole trap, then cooled evaporatively using a weak rf-field, and finally trapped in the rf-dressed quadrupole trap. The radius of the toroid could be varied by varying the frequency of the dressing rf-field. It has also been demonstrated that a single rf source and an antenna can be used for the rf-evaporative cooling as well as for rf-dressing of atoms. The atoms trapped in the toroidal trap may have applications in realization of an atom gyroscope as well as in studying the quantum gases in low dimensions.

  9. Studies on cold atoms trapped in a Quasi-Electrostatic optical dipole trap

    We discuss the results of measurements of the temperature and density distribution of cold Rubidium atoms trapped and cooled in an optical dipole trap formed by focussed CO2 laser beams at a wavelength of 10.6 μm from a cold, collimated and intense atomic beam of flux 2 x 1010 atoms/s produced using an elongated 2D+MOT. A large number of rubidium atoms (≥ 1010) were trapped in the MOT and the number density of atoms were further increased by making a temporal dark MOT to prevent density-limiting processes like photon rescattering by atoms at the trap centre. Subsequently, between 107 to 108 cold atoms at a temperature below 30 μK were transferred into a Quasi-Electrostatic trap (QUEST) formed by focussed CO2 laser beams at the MOT centre. Both single beam and crossed dual beam dipole traps were studied with a total output power of 50 W from the CO2 laser with focal spot sizes less than 100 microns. Various measurements were done on the cold atoms trapped in the dipole trap. The total atom number in the dipole trap and the spatial atom number density distribution in the trap was measured by absorption imaging technique. The temperature was determined from time-of-flight (TOF) data as well as from the absorption images after ballistic expansion of the atom cloud released from the dipole trap. The results from measurements are used to maximize the initial phase-space density prior to forced evaporative cooling to produce a Bose-Einstein Condensate

  10. Bichromatic State-insensitive Trapping of Caesium Atoms

    Metbulut, M. M.; Renzoni, F.

    2015-01-01

    State-insensitive dipole trapping of multilevel atoms can be achieved by an appropriate choice of the wavelength of the trapping laser, so that the interaction with the different transitions results in equal AC Stark shifts for the ground and excited states of interest. However this approach is severely limited by the availability of coherent sources at the required wavelength and of appropriate power. This work investigates state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms for which the required w...

  11. A metastable helium trap for atomic collision physics

    Full text: Metastable helium in the 23S state is an important species for atom optics and atomic collision physics. Because of its large internal energy (20eV), long lifetime (∼8000s) and large collision cross section for a range of processes, metastable helium plays an important role in atmospheric physics, plasma discharges and gas laser physics. We have embarked on a program of studies on atom-atom and electron-atom collision processes involving cold metastable helium. We confine metastable helium atoms in a magneto-optic trap (MOT), which is loaded by a transversely collimated, slowed and 2-D focussed atomic beam. We employ diode laser tuned to the 1083 nm (23S1 - 23P21) transition to generate laser cooling forces in both the loading beam and the trap. Approximately 10 million helium atoms are trapped at temperatures of ∼ 1mK. We use phase modulation spectroscopy to measure the trapped atomic density. The cold, trapped atoms can collide to produce either atomic He+ or molecular He2+ ions by Penning Ionisation (PI) or Associative Ionisation (AI). The rate of formation of these ions is dependant upon the detuning of the trapping laser from resonance. A further laser can be used to connect the 23S1 state to another higher lying excited state, and variation of the probe laser detuning used to measure interatomic collision potential. Electron-atom collision processes are studied using a monochromatic electron beam with a well defined spatial current distribution. The total trap loss due to electron collisions is measured as a function of electron energy. Results will be presented for these atomic collision physics measurements involving cold, trapped metastable helium atoms. Copyright (1999) Australian Optical Society

  12. Analysis of the atom-number correlation function in a few-atom trap

    Choi, Youngwoon; Yoon, Seokchan; Kang, Sungsam; Kim, Woongnae; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic properties of loading and loss mechanism in a few atom trap are analyzed. An approximate formula is derived for the atom-number correlation function for the trapped atoms in the limit of reasonably small two-atom loss rate. Validity of the approximate formula is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  13. Production of rovibronic ground-state 85 Rb133 Cs molecules via photoassociation to Ω = 1 states

    Shimasaki, Toshihiko; Kim, Jin Tae; Demille, David

    2016-05-01

    We have extensively investigated short-range photoassociation (PA) to the (2) 3Π1 , (2) 1Π1 , and (3) 3Σ1+ states of 85 Rb133 Cs in the region between 11650 cm-1 and 12100 cm-1, where strong mixing between triplet and singlet states is expected. In contrast to the previously observed two-photon cascade decay from the (2) 3Π0 states, here we observe that the PA excited states can directly decay to the rovibronic ground state X1Σ+(v = 0 , J = 0) by a one-photon transition. We have observed rich hyperfine structures of the PA states, which were unresolved in previous cold beam experiments in the same region. Based on the analysis of vibrational and rotational branching ratios in the decay process to the X1Σ+ state, we will discuss the molecule production rate in comparison with that for PA to the (2) 3Π0 states. We will also report on a similar study of PA to the B1 Π and (2) 3Σ1+ states of 85 Rb133 Cs, which also produce the rovibronic ground state X1Σ+(v = 0 , J = 0) via direct one-photon decay.

  14. Cold atom interferometers and their applications in precision measurements

    Jin WANG; Lin ZHO; Run-bing LI; Min LIU; Ming-sheng ZHAN

    2009-01-01

    Experimental realization of cold 85Rb atom interferometers and their applications in precision meademonstrated: Detailed descriptions of the interferometers are given including manipulation of cold atoms, Rabi oscillation, stimulated Raman transitions, and optical pumping. As an example of using atom interferometers in precision measurements, the quadratic Zeeman shift of hyperfine sublevels of 85Rb was determined.

  15. Polarization criteria for magnetostatic traps for neutral atoms

    We investigated the limits of magnetostatic methods of trapping neutral atoms in a spot of small size and small polarization misalignment. General criteria on the trapping temperature as a function of size and misalignment parameters are established for various types of static magnetic field traps and for a type with rotating field invented recently by E.A. Cornell. In particular, we show that the upper temperature bound for a class of typical traps does not depend on the magnetic field magnitude. Also we found a variant of rotating field trap with new features. (author). 8 refs., 1 fig

  16. Dynamics of atom trapping in an rf-dressed potential

    Chakraborty, A; Ram, S P; Tiwari, S K; Rawat, H S

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of atom trapping in a radio-frequency-dressed-state potential formed by static and radio frequency (rf) fields has been studied using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. Using the simulations, a case of formation of a toroidal trap for cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms is investigated for atoms trapped in a static quadrupole magnetic trap and exposed to an rf-field with temporally increasing amplitude and decreasing frequency. We first calculate the adiabatic rf-dressed potential for an atom interacting with these fields and then apply DSMC algorithm to simulate the motion of the atom in this time dependent adiabatic potential. In the simulations the Landau-Zener (LZ) transition probability is calculated to know if the atom is in the trappable or untrappable dressed state. The results show that, initially at lower rf-field strength, the rf-field ejects atoms from the trap and leads to evaporative cooling of the atom cloud. However at higher rf-field strength, the atoms make LZ transition to th...

  17. Trapping fermionic and bosonic helium atoms

    Stas, R.J.W.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental and theoretical work performed at the Laser Centre of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam to study laser-cooled metastable triplet helium atoms. Samples containing about 3x10^8 helium atoms-either fermionic helium-3 atoms, bosonic helium-4 atoms or mixtures thereof

  18. Optical molasses, laser traps, and ultracold atoms

    There is dramatic progress in the demonstration of the mechanical effects of light on atoms. The laser cooling and stopping of atoms in an atomic beam were followed by the 3-D cooling and confinement of atoms with laser light. The authors survey the recent major experimental advances and try to point out some interesting physics that can be done in this newly accessible domain of gaseous atoms at low temperatures and possibly high densities

  19. The determination of potential energy curve and dipole moment of the (5)0{sup +} electronic state of {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule by high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy

    Yuan, Jinpeng; Zhao, Yanting, E-mail: zhaoyt@sxu.edu.cn; Ji, Zhonghua; Li, Zhonghao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Laser Spectroscopy, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Kim, Jin-Tae, E-mail: kimjt@Chosun.ac.kr [Department of Photonic Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-14

    We present the formation of ultracold {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecules in the (5)0{sup +} electronic state by photoassociation and their detection via resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization. Up to v = 47 vibrational levels including the lowest v = 0 vibrational and lowest J = 0 levels are identified with rotationally resolved high resolution photoassociation spectra. Precise Dunham coefficients are determined for the (5)0{sup +} state with high accuracy, then the Rydberg-Klein-Rees potential energy curve is derived. The electric dipole moments with respect to the vibrational numbers of the (5)0{sup +} electronic state of {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule are also measured in the range between 1.9 and 4.8 D. These comprehensive studies on previously unobserved rovibrational levels of the (5)0{sup +} state are helpful to understand the molecular structure and discover suitable transition pathways for transferring ultracold atoms to deeply bound rovibrational levels of the electronic ground state.

  20. Energy fluctuations induced by stochastic frequency changes in atom traps

    We study the quantum description of energy fluctuations induced by stochastic changes in the frequency of atom traps. Using the connection between classical and quantum descriptions of parametric oscillators, the classical cumulant expansion method is used to obtain quantum results beyond standard perturbation theory. Both the case of static and time-dependent traps are explicitly worked out

  1. A Novel Gravito-Optical Surface Trap for Neutral Atoms

    XIE Chun-Xia; WANG Zhengling; YIN Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a novel gravito-optical surface trap (GOST) for neutral atoms based on one-dimensional intensity gradient cooling. The surface optical trap is composed of a blue-detuned reduced semi-Gaussian laser beam (SGB), a far-blue-detuned dark hollow beam and the gravity field.

  2. Manipulating Neutral Atoms in Chip-Based Magnetic Traps

    Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Kohel, James

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques for manipulating neutral atoms (more precisely, ultracold clouds of neutral atoms) in chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides have been demonstrated. Such traps and waveguides are promising components of future quantum sensors that would offer sensitivities much greater than those of conventional sensors. Potential applications include gyroscopy and basic research in physical phenomena that involve gravitational and/or electromagnetic fields. The developed techniques make it possible to control atoms with greater versatility and dexterity than were previously possible and, hence, can be expected to contribute to the value of chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides. The basic principle of these techniques is to control gradient magnetic fields with suitable timing so as to alter a trap to exert position-, velocity-, and/or time-dependent forces on atoms in the trap to obtain desired effects. The trap magnetic fields are generated by controlled electric currents flowing in both macroscopic off-chip electromagnet coils and microscopic wires on the surface of the chip. The methods are best explained in terms of examples. Rather than simply allowing atoms to expand freely into an atomic waveguide, one can give them a controllable push by switching on an externally generated or a chip-based gradient magnetic field. This push can increase the speed of the atoms, typically from about 5 to about 20 cm/s. Applying a non-linear magnetic-field gradient exerts different forces on atoms in different positions a phenomenon that one can exploit by introducing a delay between releasing atoms into the waveguide and turning on the magnetic field.

  3. Eliminating light shifts in single-atom optical traps

    Hutzler, Nicholas R; Yu, Yichao; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Microscopically controlled neutral atoms in optical tweezers and lattices have led to exciting advances in the study of quantum information and quantum many-body systems. The light shifts of atomic levels from the trapping potential in these systems can result in detrimental effects such as fluctuating dipole force heating, inhomogeneous detunings, and inhibition of laser cooling, which limits the atomic species that can be manipulated. In particular, these light shifts can be large enough to prevent loading into optical tweezers directly from a magneto-optical trap. We present a general solution to these limitations by loading, cooling, and imaging single atoms with temporally alternating beams. Because this technique does not depend on any specific spectral properties, we expect it to enable the optical tweezer method to control nearly any atomic or molecular species that can be laser cooled and optically trapped. Furthermore, we present an analysis of the role of heating and required cooling for single ato...

  4. In-trap fluorescence detection of atoms in a microscopic dipole trap

    Hilliard, A J; Sompet, P; Carpentier, A V; Andersen, M F

    2015-01-01

    We investigate fluorescence detection using a standing wave of blue-detuned light of one or more atoms held in a deep, microscopic dipole trap. The blue-detuned standing wave realizes a Sisyphus laser cooling mechanism so that an atom can scatter many photons while remaining trapped. When imaging more than one atom, the blue detuning limits loss due to inelastic light-assisted collisions. Using this standing wave probe beam, we demonstrate that we can count from one to the order of 100 atoms in the microtrap with sub-poissonian precision.

  5. Deep optical trap for cold alkaline-Earth atoms.

    Cruz, Luciano S; Sereno, Milena; Cruz, Flavio C

    2008-03-01

    We describe a setup for a deep optical dipole trap or lattice designed for holding atoms at temperatures of a few mK, such as alkaline-Earth atoms which have undergone only regular Doppler cooling. We use an external optical cavity to amplify 3.2 W from a commercial single-frequency laser at 532 nm to 523 W. Powers of a few kW, attainable with low-loss optics or higher input powers, allow larger trap volumes for improved atom transfer from magneto-optical traps. We analyze possibilities for cooling inside the deep trap, the induced Stark shifts for calcium, and a cancellation scheme for the intercombination clock transition using an auxiliary laser. PMID:18542375

  6. Analysis of a single-atom dipole trap

    We describe a simple experimental technique which allows us to store a single 87Rb atom in an optical dipole trap. Due to light-induced two-body collisions during the loading stage of the trap the maximum number of captured atoms is locked to one. This collisional blockade effect is confirmed by the observation of photon antibunching in the detected fluorescence light. The spectral properties of single photons emitted by the atom were studied with a narrow-band scanning cavity. We find that the atomic fluorescence spectrum is dominated by the spectral width of the exciting laser light field. In addition we observe a spectral broadening of the atomic fluorescence light due to the Doppler effect. This allows us to determine the mean kinetic energy of the trapped atom corresponding to a temperature of 105 μK. This simple single-atom trap is the key element for the generation of atom-photon entanglement required for future applications in quantum communication and a first loophole-free test of Bell's inequality

  7. Trapping fermionic and bosonic helium atoms

    Stas, R. J. W.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental and theoretical work performed at the Laser Centre of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam to study laser-cooled metastable triplet helium atoms. Samples containing about 3x10^8 helium atoms-either fermionic helium-3 atoms, bosonic helium-4 atoms or mixtures thereof-are cooled to a temperature around 1 mK and form the starting point of the presented studies. The studies include an investigation of cold ionizing collisions in the absence of resonant light, an i...

  8. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  9. Atom-molecule collisions in an optically trapped gas

    Zahzam, Nassim; Vogt, Thibault; Mudrich, Marcel; Comparat, Daniel; Pillet, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Cold inelastic collisions between confined cesium (Cs) atoms and Cs$\\_2$ molecules are investigated inside a CO$\\_2$ laser dipole trap. Inelastic atom-molecule collisions can be observed and measured with a rate coefficient of $\\sim 2.5 \\times 10^{-11} $cm$^3$ s$^{-1}$, mainly independent of the molecular ro-vibrational state populated. Lifetimes of purely atomic and molecular samples are essentially limited by rest gas collisions. The pure molecular trap lifetime ranges 0,3-1 s, four times s...

  10. PYRAMIDAL-HOLLOW-BEAM DIPOLE TRAP FOR ALKALI ATOMS

    YIN JIAN-PING; GAO WEI-JIAN; WANG YU-ZHU; ZHU YI-FU; WANG YI-QIU

    2000-01-01

    We propose a dark gravito-optical dipole trap, for alkali atoms, consisting of a blue-detuned, pyramidal-hollow laser beam propagating upward and the gravity field. When cold atoms from a magneto-optical trap are loaded into the pyramidal-hollow beam and bounce inside the pyramidal-hollow beam, they experience efficient Sisyphus cooling and geometric cooling induced by the pyramidal-hollow beam and the weak repumping beam propagating downward. Our study shows that an ultracold and dense atomic sample with an equilibrium 3D momentum of ~ 3hk and an atomic density above the point of Bose-Einstein condensation may be obtained in this pure optical trap.

  11. Oscillation Frequencies for Simultaneous Trapping of Heteronuclear Alkali Atoms

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillation frequencies for simultaneous trapping of more than one type of alkali atoms in a common optical lattice. For this purpose, we present numerical results for magic trapping conditions, where the oscillation frequencies for two different kind of alkali atoms using laser lights in the wavelength range 500-1200 nm are same. These wavelengths will be of immense interest for studying static and dynamic properties of boson-boson, boson-fermion, fermion-fermion, and boson-boson-boson mixtures involving different isotopes of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs and Fr alkali atoms. In addition to this, we were also able to locate a magic wavelength around 808.1 nm where all the three Li, K, and Rb atoms are found to be suitable for oscillating at the same frequency in a common optical trap.

  12. A quasi-electrostatic trap for neutral atoms

    This thesis reports on the realization of a ''quasi-electrostatic trap'' (QUEST) for neutral atoms. Cesium (133Cs) and Lithium (7Li) atoms are stored, which represents for the first time a mixture of different species in an optical dipole trap. The trap is formed by the focused Gaussian beam of a 30 W cw CO2-laser. For a beam waist of 108 μm the resulting trap depth is κB x 118 μK for Cesium and κB x 48 μK for Lithium. We transfer up to 2 x 106 Cesium and 105 Lithium atoms from a magneto-optical trap into the QUEST. When simultaneously transferred, the atom number currently is reduced by roughly a factor of 10. Since photon scattering from the trapping light can be neglected, the QUEST represents an almost perfect conservative trapping potential. Atoms in the QUEST populate the electronic ground state sublevels. Arbitrary sublevels can be addressed via optical pumping. Due to the very low background gas pressure of 2 x 10-11 mbar storage times of several minutes are realized. Evaporative cooling of Cesium is observed. In addition, laser cooling is applied to the trapped Cesium sample, which reduces the temperature from 25 μK to a value below 7 μK. If prepared in the upper hyper-fine ground state sublevel, spin changing collisions are observed not only within one single species, but also between the two different species. The corresponding relaxation rates are quantitatively analyzed. (orig.)

  13. Collisional properties of trapped cold chromium atoms

    Pavlovich, Z; Côté, R; Sadeghpour, H R; Pavlovic, Zoran; Roos, Bjoern O.; Côté, Robin

    2004-01-01

    We report on calculations of the elastic cross section and thermalization rate for collision between two maximally spin-polarized chromium atoms in the cold and ultracold regimes, relevant to buffer-gas and magneto-optical cooling of chromium atoms. We calculate ab initio potential energy curves for Cr2 and the van der Waals coefficient C6, and construct interaction potentials between two colliding Cr atoms. We explore the effect of shape resonances on elastic cross section, and find that they dramatically affect the thermalization rate. Our calculated value for the s-wave scattering length is compared in magnitude with a recent measurement at ultracold temperatures.

  14. Cold Atom Source Containing Multiple Magneto-Optical Traps

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Lim, Lawrence; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that serves as a source of a cold beam of atoms contains multiple two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical traps (MOTs). (Cold beams of atoms are used in atomic clocks and in diverse scientific experiments and applications.) The multiple-2D-MOT design of this cold atom source stands in contrast to single-2D-MOT designs of prior cold atom sources of the same type. The advantages afforded by the present design are that this apparatus is smaller than prior designs.

  15. Construction of a single atom trap for quantum information protocols

    Shea, Margaret E.; Baker, Paul M.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Duke Physics Department Team

    2016-05-01

    The field of quantum information science addresses outstanding problems such as achieving fundamentally secure communication and solving computationally hard problems. Great progress has been made in the field, particularly using photons coupled to ions and super conducting qubits. Neutral atoms are also interesting for these applications and though the technology for control of neutrals lags behind that of trapped ions, they offer some key advantages: primarily coupling to optical frequencies closer to the telecom band than trapped ions or superconducting qubits. Here we report progress on constructing a single atom trap for 87 Rb. This system is a promising platform for studying the technical problems facing neutral atom quantum computing. For example, most protocols destroy the trap when reading out the neutral atom's state; we will investigate an alternative non-destructive state detection scheme. We detail the experimental systems involved and the challenges addressed in trapping a single atom. All of our hardware components are off the shelf and relatively inexpensive. Unlike many other systems, we place a high numerical aperture lens inside our vacuum system to increase photon collection efficiency. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the ARO through Grant # W911NF1520047.

  16. Laser cooling, trapping, and Rydberg spectroscopy of neutral holmium atoms

    Hostetter, James Allen

    This thesis focuses on progress towards using ensembles of neutral holmium for use in quantum computing operations. We are particularly interested in using a switchable interaction between neutral atoms, the Rydberg blockade, to implement a universal set of quantum gates in a collective encoding scheme that presents many benefits over quantum computing schemes which rely on physically distinct qubits. We show that holmium is uniquely suited for operations in a collective encoding basis because it has 128 ground hyperfine states, the largest number of any stable, neutral atom. Holmium is a rare earth atom that is very poorly described for our purposes as it has never been cooled and trapped, its spectrum is largely unknown, and it presents several unique experimental challenges related to its complicated atomic structure and short wavelength transitions. We demonstrate important progress towards overcoming these challenges. We produce the first laser cooling and trapping of holmium into a MOT. Because we use a broad cooling transition, our cooling technique does not require the use of a Zeeman slower. Using MOT depletion spectroscopy, we provide precise measurements of holmium's Rydberg states and its ionization potential. Our work continues towards cooling holmium into a dipole trap by calculating holmium's AC polarizability and demonstrating the results of early attempts at an optical dipole trap. We provide details of future upgrades to the experimental apparatus and discuss interesting potential for using holmium in quantum computing using single atoms in a magnetically trapped lattice. This thesis shows several promising indicators for continued work in this field.

  17. Trapping cold molecules and atoms: Simultaneous magnetic deceleration and trapping of cold molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms

    Akerman, Nitzan; Karpov, Michael; Segev, Yair; Bibelink, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-05-01

    Cooling molecules to the ultra-cold regime remains a major challenge in the growing field of cold molecules. The molecular internal degrees of freedom complicate the effort of direct application of laser cooling. An alternative and general path towards ultra-cold molecules relies on sympathetic cooling via collisions with laser-cooled atoms. Here, we demonstrate the first step towards application of sympathetic cooling by co-trapping of molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms in a magnetic trap at a temperature of 300 mK. Our experiment begins with a pulsed supersonic beam which is a general source for cold high-flux atomic and molecular beams. Although the supersonic expansion efficiently cools the beam to temperatures below 1K, it also accelerates the beam to high mean velocities. We decelerate a beam of O2 in a moving magnetic trap decelerator from 375 m/s to a stop. We entrained the molecular beam with Li atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading the molecules and atoms into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate 109 trapped molecules with background limited lifetime of 0.6 Sec. Our achievement enables application of laser cooling on the Li atoms in order to sympathetically cool the O2.

  18. Proposed magneto-electrostatic ring trap for neutral atoms

    Hopkins, A; Mabuchi, H; Hopkins, Asa; Lev, Benjamin; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    We propose a novel trap for confining cold neutral atoms in a ring using a magneto-electrostatic potential. The trapping potential is derived from a combination of a repulsive magnetic field from a hard drive atom mirror and the attractive potential produced by a charged disk patterned on the hard drive surface. We calculate a trap frequency of [29.8, 42.8, 63.1] kHz and a depth of [16.3, 21.6, 21.6] MHz for [133Cs, 87Rb, 40K], and discuss a simple loading scheme and a method for fabrication. This device provides a one-dimensional potential in a ring geometry that may be of interest to the study of trapped quantum degenerate one-dimensional gases.

  19. Design of a dual species atom interferometer for space

    Schuldt, Thilo; Krutzik, Markus; Bote, Lluis Gesa; Gaaloul, Naceur; Hartwig, Jonas; Ahlers, Holger; Herr, Waldemar; Posso-Trujillo, Katerine; Rudolph, Jan; Seidel, Stephan; Wendrich, Thijs; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Sven; Kubelka-Lange, André; Milke, Alexander; Rievers, Benny; Rocco, Emanuele; Hinton, Andrew; Bongs, Kai; Oswald, Markus; Franz, Matthias; Hauth, Matthias; Peters, Achim; Bawamia, Ahmad; Wicht, Andreas; Battelier, Baptiste; Bertoldi, Andrea; Bouyer, Philippe; Landragin, Arnaud; Massonnet, Didier; Lévèque, Thomas; Wenzlawski, Andre; Hellmig, Ortwin; Windpassinger, Patrick; Sengstock, Klaus; von Klitzing, Wolf; Chaloner, Chris; Summers, David; Ireland, Philip; Mateos, Ignacio; Sopuerta, Carlos F; Sorrentino, Fiodor; Tino, Guglielmo M; Williams, Michael; Trenkel, Christian; Gerardi, Domenico; Chwalla, Michael; Burkhardt, Johannes; Johann, Ulrich; Heske, Astrid; Wille, Eric; Gehler, Martin; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Gürlebeck, Norman; Braxmaier, Claus; Rasel, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Atom interferometers have a multitude of proposed applications in space including precise measurements of the Earth's gravitational field, in navigation & ranging, and in fundamental physics such as tests of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and gravitational wave detection. While atom interferometers are realized routinely in ground-based laboratories, current efforts aim at the development of a space compatible design optimized with respect to dimensions, weight, power consumption, mechanical robustness and radiation hardness. In this paper, we present a design of a high-sensitivity differential dual species $^{85}$Rb/$^{87}$Rb atom interferometer for space, including physics package, laser system, electronics and software. The physics package comprises the atom source consisting of dispensers and a 2D magneto-optical trap (MOT), the science chamber with a 3D-MOT, a magnetic trap based on an atom chip and an optical dipole trap (ODT) used for Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) creation and interferometry...

  20. Experimental study of vapor-cell magneto-optical traps for efficient trapping of radioactive atoms

    We have studied magneto-optical traps (MOTs) for efficient on-line trapping of radioactive atoms. After discussing a model of the trapping process in a vapor cell and its efficiency, we present the results of detailed experimental studies on Rb MOTs. Three spherical cells of different sizes were used. These cells can be easily replaced, while keeping the rest of the apparatus unchanged: atomic sources, vacuum conditions, magnetic field gradients, sizes and power of the laser beams, detection system. By direct comparison, we find that the trapping efficiency only weakly depends on the MOT cell size. It is also found that the trapping efficiency of the MOT with the smallest cell, whose diameter is equal to the diameter of the trapping beams, is about 40% smaller than the efficiency of larger cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the importance of two factors: a long coated tube at the entrance of the MOT cell, used instead of a diaphragm; and the passivation with an alkali vapor of the coating on the cell walls, in order to minimize the losses of trappable atoms. These results guided us in the construction of an efficient large-diameter cell, which has been successfully employed for on-line trapping of Fr isotopes at INFN's national laboratories in Legnaro, Italy. (authors)

  1. Nonperturbative and perturbative treatments of parametric heating in atom traps

    Jauregui, R

    2001-01-01

    We study the quantum description of parametric heating in harmonic potentials both nonperturbatively and perturbatively, having in mind atom traps. The first approach establishes an explicit connection between classical and quantum descriptions; it also gives analytic expressions for properties such as the width of fractional frequency parametric resonances. The second approach gives an alternative insight into the problem and can be directly extended to take into account nonlinear effects. This is specially important for shallow traps.

  2. Atomic physics experiments with trapped and cooled highly charged ions

    Kluge, H.-J.; Quint, W; Winters, D. F. A

    2007-01-01

    Trapping and cooling techniques have become very important for many fundamental experiments in atomic physics. When applied to highly charged ions confined in Penning traps, these procedures are very effective for testing quantum electrodynamics in extreme electromagnetic fields produced by heavy highly charged ions such as uranium U$^{91+}$. In addition, fundamental constants or nuclear ground state properties can be determined with high accuracy in these simple systems. Finally, by studying...

  3. Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis

    Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

    2014-03-18

    A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

  4. Theory of output coupling for trapped fermionic atoms

    We develop a dynamic theory of output coupling for fermionic atoms initially confined in a magnetic trap. We consider an exactly soluble one-dimensional model, with a spatially localized δ-type coupling between the atoms in the trap and a continuum of free-particle external modes. The transient dynamics of the atoms, as they leave the trap, is investigated in detail. Two important special cases are considered for the confinement potential: the infinite box and the harmonic oscillator. We establish that in both cases a bound state of the coupled system appears for any value of the coupling constant, implying that the trap population does not vanish in the infinite-time limit. For weak coupling, the infinite-time spectral distribution of the outgoing atoms exhibits peaks corresponding to the initially occupied energy levels in the trap; the heights of these peaks increase with the energy. As the coupling gets stronger, the infinite-time spectral distribution is displaced towards dressed energies of the fermions in the trap. The corresponding dressed states result from the coupling between the unperturbed fermionic states in the trap, mediated by the coupling between these states and the continuum. In the strong-coupling limit, there is a reinforcement of the lowest-energy dressed mode, which contributes to the spectral distribution of the outgoing beam more strongly than the other modes. This effect is especially pronounced for the one-dimensional box, which indicates that the efficiency of the mode-reinforcement mechanism depends on the steepness of the confinement potential. In this case, a quasimonochromatic antibunched atomic beam is obtained. Results for a bosonic sample are also shown for comparison

  5. Dark Optical Lattice of Ring Traps for Cold Atoms

    Courtade, E; Houde, O; Verkerk, P; Courtade, Emmanuel; Hennequin, Daniel; Houde, Olivier; Verkerk, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new geometry of optical lattice for cold atoms, namely a lattice made of a 1D stack of dark ring traps. It is obtained through the interference pattern of a standard Gaussian beam with a counter-propagating hollow beam obtained using a setup with two conical lenses. The traps of the resulting lattice are characterized by a high confinement and a filling rate much larger than unity, even if loaded with cold atoms from a MOT. We have implemented this system experimentally, and obtained a lattice of ring traps populated with typically 40 atoms per site with a life time of 30 ms. Applications in statistical physics, quantum computing and Bose-Einstein condensate dynamics are conceivable.

  6. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms

    Amole, C; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom’s stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured1 and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and—by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen—the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state2, 3 of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave...

  7. Bichromatic State-insensitive Trapping of Caesium Atoms

    Metbulut, M M

    2015-01-01

    State-insensitive dipole trapping of multilevel atoms can be achieved by an appropriate choice of the wavelength of the trapping laser, so that the interaction with the different transitions results in equal AC Stark shifts for the ground and excited states of interest. However this approach is severely limited by the availability of coherent sources at the required wavelength and of appropriate power. This work investigates state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms for which the required wavelength of 935.6 nm is inconvenient in terms of experimental realization. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping is proposed to overcome the lack of suitable laser sources. We first consider pairs of laser wavelengths in the ratio 1:2 and 1:3, as obtained via second- and third- harmonic generation. We found that the wavelength combinations 931.8-1863.6 nm and 927.5-2782.5 nm are suitable for state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms. In addition, we examine bichromatic state-insensitive trapping produced by pairs of l...

  8. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms

    Metbulut, M. M.; Renzoni, F.

    2015-12-01

    State-insensitive dipole trapping of multilevel atoms can be achieved by an appropriate choice of the wavelength of the trapping laser, so that the interaction with the different transitions results in equal AC Stark shifts for the ground and excited states of interest. However this approach is severely limited by the availability of coherent sources at the required wavelength and of appropriate power. This work investigates state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms for which the required wavelength of 935.6 nm is inconvenient in terms of experimental realization. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping is proposed to overcome the lack of suitable laser sources. We first consider pairs of laser wavelengths in the ratio 1:2 and 1:3, as obtained via second- and third- harmonic generation. We found that the wavelength combinations 931.8-1863.6 nm and 927.5-2782.5 nm are suitable for state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms. In addition, we examine bichromatic state-insensitive trapping produced by pairs of laser wavelengths corresponding to currently available high power lasers. These wavelength pairs were found to be in the range of 585-588 nm and 623-629 for one laser and 1064-1080 nm for the other.

  9. Resonator-Enhanced Optical Dipole Trap for Fermionic Lithium Atoms

    Mosk, A P; Moritz, H; Elsaesser, T; Weidemüller, M; Grimm, R; Elsaesser, Th.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical dipole trap which is based on the enhancement of the optical power density of a Nd:YAG laser beam in a resonator. The trap is particularly suited for experiments with ultracold gases, as it combines a potential depth of order 1 mK with storage times of several tens of seconds. We study the interactions in a gas of fermionic lithium atoms in our trap and observe the influence of spin-changing collisions and off-resonant photon scattering. A key element in reaching long storage times is an ultra-low noise laser. The dependence of the storage time on laser noise is investigated.

  10. Resonator-Enhanced Optical Dipole Trap for Fermionic Lithium Atoms

    Mosk, A.; Jochim, S.; Moritz, H.; Elsaesser, Th.; Weidemueller, M.; Grimm, R

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical dipole trap which is based on the enhancement of the optical power density of a Nd:YAG laser beam in a resonator. The trap is particularly suited for experiments with ultracold gases, as it combines a potential depth of order 1 mK with storage times of several tens of seconds. We study the interactions in a gas of fermionic lithium atoms in our trap and observe the influence of spin-changing collisions and off-resonant photon scattering. A key element in reachin...

  11. Theoretical evaluation of matrix effects on trapped atomic levels

    We suggest a theoretical model for calculating the matrix perturbation on the spectra of atoms trapped in rare gas systems. The model requires the ''potential curves'' of the diatomic system consisting of the trapped atom interacting with one from the matrix and relies on the approximation that the total matrix perturbation is a scalar sum of the pairwise interactions with each of the lattice sites. Calculations are presented for the prototype systems Na in Ar. Attempts are made to obtain ab initio estimates of the Jahn-Teller effects for excited states. Comparison is made with our recent Matrix-Isolation Spectroscopic (MIS) data. 10 refs., 3 tabs

  12. Atom trap trace analysis of {sup 39}Ar

    Welte, Joachim

    2011-12-14

    Detection of {sup 39}Ar in natural water samples can be employed for radiometric dating on a timescale of 50 to 1000 years before present. This experimental work comprises the setup of an atomic beam and trap apparatus that captures and detects {sup 39}Ar atoms by the laser-cooling technique ''Atom Trap Trace Analysis''. With this approach, the limitations of low-level counting, regarding sample size and measurement time, could be overcome. In the course of this work, the hyperfine structure spectrum of the cooling transition 1s{sub 5}-2p{sub 9} has been experimentally determined. A high intensity, optically collimated beam of slow metastable argon atoms has been set up and fluorescence detection of individual {sup 39}Ar atoms in a magneto-optical trap is realized. {sup 39}Ar count rates of 1 atom in about 4 hours have been achieved for atmospheric argon. Recent improvements further suggest that even higher count rates of 1 atom/hour are within reach.

  13. Cold atoms in microscopic traps from wires to chips

    Cassettari, D

    2000-01-01

    Ioffe-Pritchard trap. In the latter we have achieved the trapping parameters required in the experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates with much reduced power consumption. In a second time we have replaced the free standing wires with an atom chip, which we have used to compress the atomic cloud in potentials with trap frequencies above 100 kHz and ground state sizes below 100 nm. Such potentials are especially interesting for quantum information proposals of performing quantum gate operations with controlled collisions between trapped atoms. Finally, by combining two wire guides we have experimentally realized an innovative kind of beam splitter for guided atoms. We have investigated the splitting potential generated by a Y-shaped wire which has one input, i.e. the central arm of the Y, and two outputs corresponding to the left and right arms of the Y. By tuning the current ratio in the two outputs we have observed atoms switching from left to right as well as symmetric splitting. This and other similar des...

  14. Vapor generation and atom traps: Atomic absorption spectrometry at the ng/L level

    Atom-trapping atomic absorption spectrometry is a technique that allows detection at the ng/L level for several analytes such as As, Se, Sb, Pb, Bi, Cd, In, Tl, Te, Sn and Hg. The principle involves generation of volatile species, usually hydrides, trapping these species on the surface of an atom trap held at an optimized temperature and, finally, revolatilizing the analyte species by rapid heating of the trap and transporting them in a carrier gas to a heated quartz tube, as commonly used with hydride generation AAS systems. A transient signal having, in most cases, a full width at half maximum of less than 1 s is obtained. The atom trap may be a quartz surface or a W-coil; the former is heated externally and the latter is heated resistively. Both collection and revolatilization temperatures are optimized. In some cases, the W-coil itself is used as an electrothermal atomizer and a heated quartz tube is then not needed. The evolution of these traps starts with the well-known Watling's slotted quartz tube (SQT), continues with atom trapping SQT and finally reaches the present traps mentioned above. The analytical figures of merit for these traps need to be standardized. Naturally, enhancement is on characteristic concentration, C0, where the change in characteristic mass, m0, can be related to trapping efficiency. Novel terms are suggested for E, enhancement factor; such as Emax, maximum enhancement factor; Et, enhancement for 1.0 minute sampling and Ev, enhancement for 1.0 mL of sample. These figures will allow easy comparison of results from different laboratories as well as different analytes and/or traps

  15. Vapor generation and atom traps: Atomic absorption spectrometry at the ng/L level

    Ataman, O. Yavuz [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ataman@metu.edu.tr

    2008-08-15

    Atom-trapping atomic absorption spectrometry is a technique that allows detection at the ng/L level for several analytes such as As, Se, Sb, Pb, Bi, Cd, In, Tl, Te, Sn and Hg. The principle involves generation of volatile species, usually hydrides, trapping these species on the surface of an atom trap held at an optimized temperature and, finally, revolatilizing the analyte species by rapid heating of the trap and transporting them in a carrier gas to a heated quartz tube, as commonly used with hydride generation AAS systems. A transient signal having, in most cases, a full width at half maximum of less than 1 s is obtained. The atom trap may be a quartz surface or a W-coil; the former is heated externally and the latter is heated resistively. Both collection and revolatilization temperatures are optimized. In some cases, the W-coil itself is used as an electrothermal atomizer and a heated quartz tube is then not needed. The evolution of these traps starts with the well-known Watling's slotted quartz tube (SQT), continues with atom trapping SQT and finally reaches the present traps mentioned above. The analytical figures of merit for these traps need to be standardized. Naturally, enhancement is on characteristic concentration, C{sub 0}, where the change in characteristic mass, m{sub 0}, can be related to trapping efficiency. Novel terms are suggested for E, enhancement factor; such as E{sub max}, maximum enhancement factor; E{sub t}, enhancement for 1.0 minute sampling and E{sub v}, enhancement for 1.0 mL of sample. These figures will allow easy comparison of results from different laboratories as well as different analytes and/or traps.

  16. Vapor generation and atom traps: Atomic absorption spectrometry at the ng/L level

    Ataman, O. Yavuz

    2008-08-01

    Atom-trapping atomic absorption spectrometry is a technique that allows detection at the ng/L level for several analytes such as As, Se, Sb, Pb, Bi, Cd, In, Tl, Te, Sn and Hg. The principle involves generation of volatile species, usually hydrides, trapping these species on the surface of an atom trap held at an optimized temperature and, finally, revolatilizing the analyte species by rapid heating of the trap and transporting them in a carrier gas to a heated quartz tube, as commonly used with hydride generation AAS systems. A transient signal having, in most cases, a full width at half maximum of less than 1 s is obtained. The atom trap may be a quartz surface or a W-coil; the former is heated externally and the latter is heated resistively. Both collection and revolatilization temperatures are optimized. In some cases, the W-coil itself is used as an electrothermal atomizer and a heated quartz tube is then not needed. The evolution of these traps starts with the well-known Watling's slotted quartz tube (SQT), continues with atom trapping SQT and finally reaches the present traps mentioned above. The analytical figures of merit for these traps need to be standardized. Naturally, enhancement is on characteristic concentration, C0, where the change in characteristic mass, m0, can be related to trapping efficiency. Novel terms are suggested for E, enhancement factor; such as Emax, maximum enhancement factor; Et, enhancement for 1.0 minute sampling and Ev, enhancement for 1.0 mL of sample. These figures will allow easy comparison of results from different laboratories as well as different analytes and/or traps.

  17. Atom trapping: application to electron collision studies of metastable helium

    Full text: We report on the first measurements of electron scattering from metastable helium atoms (He) confined in a magneto-optic trap (MOT). Using conventional crossed beam techniques, measurement of electron scattering cross sections for He is experimentally very difficult, due the intrinsically low atomic densities produced by nozzle discharge sources, and the need to locate the interaction region well away from stray electric and magnetic fields. Electron interactions with excited state atoms are fundamentally important to many naturally processes in atmospheric and astrophysical chemistry, gas lasers and plasma processing. Until these experiments, no data for He existed in the intermediate (10-100 eV) range to verify theoretical predictions. Our MOT contains up to 108 atoms at temperatures of ∼1mK that act as a high (∼109 cm-3) density target for a pulsed electron beam. We employ optical molasses to reduce the atomic velocity, and hence the trap decay time when released from the optical and magnetic fields. The total cross section is determined using phase modulation spectroscopy to measure the fractional loss rate of the trapped atoms with the electron gun on, and the electron current density is measured using scanning wire techniques to yield the absolute total cross section

  18. Quantum computing with trapped ions, atoms and light

    We consider experimental issues relevant to quantum computing, and discuss the best way to achieve the essential requirements of reliable quantum memory and gate operations. Nuclear spins in trapped ions or atoms are a very promising candidate for the qubits. We estimate the parameters required to couple atoms using light via cavity QED in order to achieve quantum gates. We briefly comment on recent improvements to the Cirac-Zoller method for coupling trapped ions via their vibrational degree of freedom. Error processes result in a trade-off between quantum gate speed and failure probability. A useful quantum computer does appear to be feasible using a combination of ion trap and optical methods. The best understood method to stabilize a large computer relies on quantum error correction. The essential ideas of this are discussed, and recent estimates of the noise requirements in a quantum computing device are given

  19. An architecture for quantum computation with magnetically trapped Holmium atoms

    Saffman, Mark; Hostetter, James; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Outstanding challenges for scalable neutral atom quantum computation include correction of atom loss due to collisions with untrapped background gas, reduction of crosstalk during state preparation and measurement due to scattering of near resonant light, and the need to improve quantum gate fidelity. We present a scalable architecture based on loading single Holmium atoms into an array of Ioffe-Pritchard traps. The traps are formed by grids of superconducting wires giving a trap array with 40 μm period, suitable for entanglement via long range Rydberg gates. The states | F = 5 , M = 5 > and | F = 7 , M = 7 > provide a magic trapping condition at a low field of 3.5 G for long coherence time qubit encoding. The F = 11 level will be used for state preparation and measurement. The availability of different states for encoding, gate operations, and measurement, spectroscopically isolates the different operations and will prevent crosstalk to neighboring qubits. Operation in a cryogenic environment with ultra low pressure will increase atom lifetime and Rydberg gate fidelity by reduction of blackbody induced Rydberg decay. We will present a complete description of the architecture including estimates of achievable performance metrics. Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  20. Harmonic trap resonance enhanced synthetic atomic spin-orbit coupling

    Wu, Ling-Na; Luo, Xinyu; Xu, Zhi-Fang; Ueda, Masahito; Wang, Ruquan; You, Li

    2016-05-01

    The widely adopted scheme for synthetic atomic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is based on the momentum sensitive Raman coupling, which is easily implemented in one spatial dimension. Recently, schemes based on pulsed or periodically modulating gradient magnetic field (GMF) were proposed and the main characteristic features have subsequently been demonstrated. The present work reports an experimental discovery and the associated theoretical understanding of tuning the SOC strength synthesized with GMF through the motional resonance of atomic center-of-mass in a harmonic trap. In some limits, we observe up to 10 times stronger SOC compared to the momentum impulse from GMF for atoms in free space.

  1. Large amplitude spin oscillations in a collisionless trapped atomic gas

    Piechon, F; Laloë, F

    2009-01-01

    We propose an explanation of the recently observed strong spin segregation in a trapped Fermi gas by Du et al. Numerical and analytical solutions of a spin 1/2 kinetic equation in a collisionless regime explain quantitatively the observation of an "anomalous" large time scale and amplitude of the segregation. The key difference with previous experiment on bosons rests more in the diluteness of the gas than in the quantum statistics of the atoms. When they undergo fast ballistic oscillations in the trap, they average the inhomogeneous external field in an energy dependent way, so that their transverse spin precession frequency becomes proportional to their energy. Interactions between atoms of different energies and different spin directions then involve the identical spin rotation effect (ISRE), which transfers atoms to the up or down spin state in an energy dependent way. Since low energy atoms are closer to the center of the trap than high energy atoms, which can visit its edges, the final outcome is a stro...

  2. Influence of realistic atom wall potentials in quantum reflection traps

    Madroñero, Javier; Friedrich, Harald

    2007-02-01

    We study the influence of atom-surface interactions close to the surface on the confinement properties in a recently proposed model [A. Jurisch and H. Friedrich, Phys. Lett. A 349, 230 (2006)] for quantum reflection traps and test the reliability of the sharp-step approximation used there. Accurate numerical calculations show a dependence of the surviving particle fraction on characteristic potential lengths determined by the behavior of the interaction in the limits r→0 and r→∞ of the atom-surface distance r . For interactions dominated by the retarded potential proportional to 1/r4 we find that the simplified sharp-step potential reproduces the behavior of the trapped atoms well, both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  3. Coherence properties of nanofiber-trapped cesium atoms

    Reitz, D; Mitsch, R; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized 200 nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time $T_2^\\ast=0.6$ ms and an irreversible dephasing time $T_2^\\prime=3.7$ ms. By theoretically modelling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, $T_2^\\ast$ and $T_2^\\prime$ are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  4. Coherence Properties of Nanofiber-Trapped Cesium Atoms

    Reitz, D.; Sayrin, C.; Mitsch, R.; Schneeweiss, P.; Rauschenbeutel, A.

    2013-06-01

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized ˜200nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time of T2*=0.6ms and an irreversible dephasing time of T2'=3.7ms. By modeling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, T2* and T2' are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  5. Determination of antimony by using tungsten trap atomic absorption spectrometry

    An electrically heated tungsten coil was used as a trap in the determination of antimony. The technique consists of three steps. Initially, SbH3 is formed by hydride generation procedure; then the analyte species in vapor form are transported to W-coil trap heated at 370 deg. C. Following the preconcentration step, the trap is heated to 895 deg. C; analyte species are revolatilized and transported to the flame-heated quartz atom cell where atomization and the formation of signal take place. The experimental parameters were optimized both for trap and no-trap studies. The most important experimental parameters are concentrations of HCl and NaBH4 solutions, H2 and Ar gas flow rates, and collection and revolatilization temperatures of W-coil. Accuracy was tested using a certified reference material, waste water EU-L-1. Limit of detection for the system is 16 ng l-1 using a sample of 36 ml collected in 4.0 min. Enhancement factor in sensitivity was 17

  6. Arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold atoms and their applications in atom optics

    印建平; 高伟建; 胡建军

    2002-01-01

    A single microscopic magnetic trap for neutral atoms using planar current-carrying wires was proposed and studiedtheoretically by Weinstein et al. In this paper, we propose three structures of composite current-carrying wires to provide1D, 2D and 3D arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold alkali atoms. The spatial distributions of magnetic fieldsgenerated by these structures are calculated and the field gradient and curvature in each single microtrap are analysed.Our study shows that arrays of microscopic magnetic traps can be used to provide 1D, 2D or 3D atomic magneticlattices, and even to realize 1D, 2D and 3D arrays of magneto-optical traps, and so on.

  7. Single atom detection of calcium isotopes by atom trap trace analysis

    Hoekstra, S; Morgenstern, R; Wilschut, H W; Hoekstra, R

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate a combination of an isotopically purified atom beam and a magneto-optical trap which enables the single atom detection of all stable isotopes of calcium (40, 42, 43, 44, 46 and 48). These isotopes range in abundance from 96.9 % (40Ca) to 0.004 (46Ca). The trap is loaded from an atomic beam which is decelerated in a Zeeman slower and subsequently deflected over an angle of 30 degrees by optical molasses. The isotope selectivity of the Zeeman slower and the deflection stage is investigated experimentally and compared with Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Atomic physics experiments with trapped and cooled highly charged ions

    Kluge, H -J; Winters, D F A

    2007-01-01

    Trapping and cooling techniques have become very important for many fundamental experiments in atomic physics. When applied to highly charged ions confined in Penning traps, these procedures are very effective for testing quantum electrodynamics in extreme electromagnetic fields produced by heavy highly charged ions such as uranium U$^{91+}$. In addition, fundamental constants or nuclear ground state properties can be determined with high accuracy in these simple systems. Finally, by studying a single trapped radioactive ion, its nuclear decay can be studied in detail by observing the disappearance of the signal of the mother and the appearance of that of the daughter isotope. Such experiments on highly charged ions at extremely low energy will become possible by the HITRAP facility which is currently being built up at GSI. Also the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will be briefly described which is expected to be operational by 2014.

  9. Extremely nonlocal optical nonlinearities in atoms trapped near a waveguide

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Stimming, Hans Peter; Mazets, Igor; Kurizki, Gershon

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena are typically local. Here we predict the possibility of highly nonlocal optical nonlinearities for light propagating in atomic media trapped near a nano-waveguide, where long-range interactions between the atoms can be tailored. When the atoms are in an electromagnetically-induced transparency configuration, the atomic interactions are translated to long-range interactions between photons and thus to highly nonlocal optical nonlinearities. We derive and analyze the governing nonlinear propagation equation, finding a roton-like excitation spectrum for light and the emergence of long-range order in its output intensity. These predictions open the door to studies of unexplored wave dynamics and many-body physics with highly-nonlocal interactions of optical fields in one dimension.

  10. Nonperturbative and perturbative treatments of parametric heating in atom traps

    Jauregui, R.

    2001-01-01

    We study the quantum description of parametric heating in harmonic potentials both nonperturbatively and perturbatively, having in mind atom traps. The first approach establishes an explicit connection between classical and quantum descriptions; it also gives analytic expressions for properties such as the width of fractional frequency parametric resonances. The second approach gives an alternative insight into the problem and can be directly extended to take into account nonlinear effects. T...

  11. Spin diffusion in trapped clouds of strongly interacting cold atoms

    Bruun, G. M.; Pethick, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    We show that puzzling recent experimental results on spin diffusion in a strongly interacting atomic gas may be understood in terms of the predicted spin diffusion coefficient for a generic strongly interacting system. Three important features play a central role: a) Fick's law for diffusion must be modified to allow for the trapping potential, b) the diffusion coefficient is inhomogeneous, due to the density variations in the cloud and c) the diffusion approximation fails in the outer parts ...

  12. High contrast atomic magnetometer based on coherent population trapping

    We present an experimental and theoretical investigation of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance excited on the D1 line of 87Rb atoms by bichromatic linearly polarized laser light. The experimental results show that a lin ‖ lin transition scheme is a promising alternative to the conventional circular—circular transition scheme for an atomic magnetometer. Compared with the circular light transition scheme, linear light accounts for high-contrast transmission resonances, which makes this excitation scheme promising for high-sensitivity magnetometers. We also use linear light and circular light to detect changes of a standard magnetic field, separately. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  13. Coherent Population Trapping-Ramsey Interference in Cold Atoms

    CHEN Xi; YANG Guo-Qing; WANG Jin; ZHAN Ming-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate an experimental observation of coherent population trapping-Ramsey interference in cold 87Rb atoms by employing the time-domain separated oscillatory fields' method. The interference fringe with line width of 80Hz is obtained. We propose a novel method to measure the cold atom number. The measurement is insensitive to the pump beam intensity, the single photon detuning and even the initial state population. We use this method to normalize the interference signal and to improve the signal-to-noise ratio significantly.

  14. Time-Optimal Frictionless Atom Cooling in Harmonic Traps

    Stefanatos, Dionisis; Li, Jr-Shin

    2012-01-01

    Frictionless atom cooling in harmonic traps is formulated as a time-optimal control problem and a synthesis of optimal controlled trajectories is obtained. This work has already been used to determine the minimum time for transition between two thermal states and to show the emergence of the third law of classical thermodynamics from quantum thermodynamics. It can also find application in the fast adiabatic-like expansion of Bose-Einstein condensates, with possible applications in atom interferometry. This paper is based on our recently published article in SIAM J. Control Optim.

  15. Atom trapping in a bottle beam created by a diffractive optical element

    Ivanov, V V; Saffman, M; Kemme, S A; Ellis, A R; Brady, G R; Wendt, J R; Biedermann, G W; Samora, S

    2013-01-01

    A diffractive optical element (DOE) has been fabricated for creating blue detuned atomic bottle beam traps. The DOE integrates several diffractive lenses for trap creation and imaging of atomic fluorescence. We characterize the performance of the DOE and demonstrate trapping of cold Cesium atoms inside a bottle beam.

  16. Effects of the Centre-of-Mass Motion on the Population Trapping of Ultracold Atoms

    熊锦; 张智明

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the atomic centre-of-mass motion on atomic population trapping in a two-mode micromaser injected with ultracold A-type three-level atoms.We find that in the mazer regime(the case in which the atomic kinetic energy is much smaller than the atom-field interaction energy),the interplay between reflection and transmission of the ultracold atom leads to the destruction of the atomic population trapping.

  17. Thermally stable single-atom platinum-on-ceria catalysts via atom trapping.

    Jones, John; Xiong, Haifeng; DeLaRiva, Andrew T; Peterson, Eric J; Pham, Hien; Challa, Sivakumar R; Qi, Gongshin; Oh, Se; Wiebenga, Michelle H; Pereira Hernández, Xavier Isidro; Wang, Yong; Datye, Abhaya K

    2016-07-01

    Catalysts based on single atoms of scarce precious metals can lead to more efficient use through enhanced reactivity and selectivity. However, single atoms on catalyst supports can be mobile and aggregate into nanoparticles when heated at elevated temperatures. High temperatures are detrimental to catalyst performance unless these mobile atoms can be trapped. We used ceria powders having similar surface areas but different exposed surface facets. When mixed with a platinum/aluminum oxide catalyst and aged in air at 800°C, the platinum transferred to the ceria and was trapped. Polyhedral ceria and nanorods were more effective than ceria cubes at anchoring the platinum. Performing synthesis at high temperatures ensures that only the most stable binding sites are occupied, yielding a sinter-resistant, atomically dispersed catalyst. PMID:27387946

  18. Thermally stable single-atom platinum-on-ceria catalysts via atom trapping

    Jones, John; Xiong, Haifeng; DelaRiva, Andrew; Peterson, Eric J.; Pham, Hien; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Qi, Gongshin; Oh, Se H.; Wiebenga, Michelle H.; Pereira Hernandez, Xavier I.; Wang, Yong; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts based on single atoms of scarce precious metals can lead to more efficient use through enhanced reactivity and selectivity. However, single atoms on catalyst supports can be mobile and aggregate into nanoparticles when heated at elevated temperatures. High temperatures are detrimental to catalyst performance unless these mobile atoms can be trapped. We used ceria powders having similar surface areas but different exposed surface facets. When mixed with a platinum/ aluminum oxide catalyst and aged in air at 800°C, the platinum transferred to the ceria and was trapped. Polyhedral ceria and nanorods were more effective than ceria cubes at anchoring the platinum. Performing synthesis at high temperatures ensures that only the most stable binding sites are occupied, yielding a sinter-resistant, atomically dispersed catalyst.

  19. Portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping

    Shi, Fan; Yang, Renfu; Nian, Feng; Zhang, Zhenwei; Cui, Yongshun; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Nuanrang; Feng, Keming

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping is designed and demonstrated. To achieve a portable prototype, in the system, a single transverse mode 795nm VCSEL modulated by a 3.4GHz RF source is used as a pump laser which generates coherent light fields. The pump beams pass through a vapor cell containing atom gas and buffer gas. This vapor cell is surrounded by a magnetic shield and placed inside a solenoid which applies a longitudinal magnetic field to lift the Zeeman energy levels' degeneracy and to separate the resonance signal, which has no first-order magnetic field dependence, from the field-dependent resonances. The electrical control system comprises two control loops. The first one locks the laser wavelength to the minimum of the absorption spectrum; the second one locks the modulation frequency and output standard frequency. Furthermore, we designed the micro physical package and realized the locking of a coherent population trapping atomic frequency standard portable prototype successfully. The short-term frequency stability of the whole system is measured to be 6×10-11 for averaging times of 1s, and reaches 5×10-12 at an averaging time of 1000s.

  20. Coherent population trapping in a Raman atom interferometer

    Cheng, Bing; Merlet, Sébastien; Santos, Franck Pereira dos

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of coherent population trapping (CPT) in an atom inter-ferometer gravimeter based on the use of stimulated Raman transitions. We find that CPT leads to significant phase shifts, of order of a few mrad, which may compromise the accuracy of inertial measurements. We show that this effect is rejected by the k-reversal technique, which consists in averaging inertial measurements performed with two opposite orientations of the Raman wavevector k, provided that internal states at the input of the interferometer are kept identical for both configurations.

  1. Coherent population trapping in a Raman atom interferometer

    Cheng, B.; Gillot, P.; Merlet, S.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the effect of coherent population trapping (CPT) in an atom interferometer gravimeter based on the use of stimulated Raman transitions. We find that CPT leads to significant phase shifts, on the order of a few mrad, which may compromise the accuracy of inertial measurements. We show that this effect is rejected by the k -reversal technique, which consists of averaging inertial measurements performed with two opposite orientations of the Raman wave vector k , provided that internal states at the input of the interferometer are kept identical for both configurations.

  2. Stability of a trapped atom clock on a chip

    Szmuk, Ramon; Maineult, Wilfried; Reichel, Jakob; Rosenbusch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present a compact atomic clock interrogating ultracold 87Rb magnetically trapped on an atom chip. Very long coherence times sustained by spin self-rephasing allow us to interrogate the atomic transition with 85% contrast at 5 s Ramsey time. The clock exhibits a fractional frequency stability of $5.8\\times 10^{-13}$ at 1 s and is likely to integrate into the $1\\times10^{-15}$ range in less than a day. A detailed analysis of 7 noise sources explains the measured frequency stability. Fluctuations in the atom temperature (0.4 nK shot-to-shot) and in the offset magnetic field ($5\\times10^{-6}$ relative fluctuations shot-to-shot) are the main noise sources together with the local oscillator, which is degraded by the 30% duty cycle. The analysis suggests technical improvements to be implemented in a future second generation set-up. The results demonstrate the remarkable degree of technical control that can be reached in an atom chip experiment.

  3. Rapid Cooling to Quantum Degeneracy with Dynamically Shaped Atom Traps

    Roy, Richard; Bowler, Ryan; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-01-01

    We report on a general method for the rapid production of quantum degenerate gases. Using 174Yb, we achieve an experimental cycle time as low as (1.6-1.8) s for the production of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of (0.5-1) x 10^5 atoms. While laser cooling to 30\\muK proceeds in a standard way, evaporative cooling is highly optimized by performing it in an optical trap that is dynamically shaped by utilizing the time-averaged potential of a single laser beam moving rapidly in one dimension. We also produce large (>10^6) atom number BECs and successfully model the evaporation dynamics over more than three orders of magnitude in phase space density. Our method provides a simple and general approach to solving the problem of long production times of quantum degenerate gases.

  4. Trapping and cooling cesium atoms in a speckle field

    We present the results of two experiments where cold cesium atoms are trapped in a speckle field. In the first experiment, a YAG laser creates the speckle pattern and induces a far-detuned dipole potential which is a nearly-conservative potential. Localization of atoms near the intensity maxima of the speckle field is observed. In a second experiment we use two counterpropagating laser beams tuned close to a resonance line of cesium and in the lin perpendicular to lin configuration, one of them being modulated by a holographic diffuser that creates the speckle field. Three-dimensional cooling is observed. Variations of the temperature and of the spatial diffusion coefficient with the size of a speckle grain are presented. (orig.)

  5. Magneto-optical trap for neutral mercury atoms

    Due to its low sensitivity to blackbody radiation, neutral mercury is a good candidate for the most accurate optical lattice clock. Here we report the observation of cold mercury atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Because of the high vapor pressure at room temperature, the mercury source and the cold pump were cooled down to −40 °C and −70 °C, respectively, to keep the science chamber in an ultra-high vacuum of 6 × 10−9 Pa. Limited by the power of the UV cooling laser, the one beam folded MOT configuration was adopted, and 1.5×105 Hg-202 atoms were observed by fluorescence detection. (rapid communication)

  6. Magneto-optical trap for neutral mercury atoms

    Liu Hong-Li; Yin Shi-Qi; Liu Kang-Kang; Qian Jun; Xu Zhen; Hong Tao; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Due to its low sensitivity to blackbody radiation,neutral mercury is a good candidate for the most accurate optical lattice clock.Here we report the observation of cold mercury atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT).Because of the high vapor pressure at room temperature,the mercury source and the cold pump were cooled down to-40 ℃ and-70 ℃,respectively,to keep the science chamber in an ultra-high vacuum of 6× 10-9 Pa.Limited by the power of the UV cooling laser,the one beam folded MOT configuration was adopted,and 1.5× 105 Hg-202 atoms were observed by fluorescence detection.

  7. Evaporative Cooling of Atoms to Quantum Degeneracy in an Optical Dipole Trap

    We discuss our experimental results on forced evaporative cooling of cold rubidium 87Rb atoms to quantum degeneracy in an Optical Dipole Trap. The atoms are first trapped and cooled in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) loaded from a continuous beam of cold atoms. More than 1010 atoms are trapped in the MOT and then about 108 atoms are transferred to a Quasi-Electrostatic Trap (QUEST) formed by tightly focused CO2 laser (λ = 10.6μm) beams intersecting at their foci in an orthogonal configuration in the horizontal plane. Before loading the atoms into the dipole trap, the phase-space density of the atomic ensemble was increased making use of sub-doppler cooling at large detuning and the temporal dark MOT technique. In a MOT the phase-space density of the atomic ensemble is six orders of magnitude less than what is required to achieve quantum degeneracy. After transferring atoms into the dipole trap efficiently, phase-space density increases by a factor of 103. Further increase in phase-space density to quantum degeneracy is achieved by forced evaporative cooling of atoms in the dipole trap. The evaporative cooling process involves a gradual reduction of the trap depth by ramping down the trapping laser intensity over a second. The temperature of the cold atomic cloud was measured by time-of-flight (TOF) technique. The spatial distribution of the atoms is measured using absorption imaging. We report results of evaporative cooling in a single beam and in a crossed double-beam dipole traps. Due to the large initial phase space density, and large initial number of atoms trapped, the quantum phase transition occurs after about 600 ms of evaporative cooling in our optimized crossed dipole trap

  8. Holographic optical traps for atom-based topological Kondo devices

    Buccheri, F.; Bruce, G. D.; Trombettoni, A.; Cassettari, D.; Babujian, H.; Korepin, V. E.; Sodano, P.

    2016-07-01

    The topological Kondo (TK) model has been proposed in solid-state quantum devices as a way to realize non-Fermi liquid behaviors in a controllable setting. Another motivation behind the TK model proposal is the demand to demonstrate the quantum dynamical properties of Majorana fermions, which are at the heart of their potential use in topological quantum computation. Here we consider a junction of crossed Tonks–Girardeau gases arranged in a star-geometry (forming a Y-junction), and we perform a theoretical analysis of this system showing that it provides a physical realization of the TK model in the realm of cold atom systems. Using computer-generated holography, we experimentally implement a Y-junction suitable for atom trapping, with controllable and independent parameters. The junction and the transverse size of the atom waveguides are of the order of 5 μm, leading to favorable estimates for the Kondo temperature and for the coupling across the junction. Since our results show that all the required theoretical and experimental ingredients are available, this provides the demonstration of an ultracold atom device that may in principle exhibit the TK effect.

  9. Optical control of a magneto-optical trap for cesium atoms

    Loading of a magneto-optical trap for cesium atoms is studied in presence of an auxiliary (control) laser beam that is tuned to 6s1/2 F=4 → 6p3/2 F' = 3,4,5 hyperfine manifold. It is shown that the steady state number of trapped atoms is enhanced or suppressed depending on the frequency, intensity and position of the control beam in the trap. The overall result is to provide an ability to optically control the number of trapped atoms without having to change the parameters of the trap. Detailed parametric studies of the control laser assisted optical manipulation of a MOT are presented

  10. An atomic beam fluorescence locked magneto-optical trap for krypton atoms

    We report here an atomic beam loaded magneto-optical trap (MOT) for metastable krypton atoms in which the fluorescence signal from the atomic beam is used to lock the cooling laser frequency. The fluorescence signal is generated by exciting the metastable krypton atomic beam using a probe laser beam (i.e. part of the cooling laser beam) intersecting the atomic beam at an angle. A spectral shift in the fluorescence signal can be achieved by varying the angle between the probe laser beam and the atomic beam to obtain the desired frequency detuning to lock the cooling laser frequency. This has been used to optimize the number of cold atoms in the MOT. The dependence of the peak height and slope of the atomic beam fluorescence (ABF) locking signal on the RF power in the discharge tube and pressure in the observation chamber of the setup has been studied to correlate its effect on the number of atoms in the MOT. (paper)

  11. Laser Cooling without Repumping: A Magneto-Optical Trap for Erbium Atoms

    We report on a novel mechanism that allows for strong laser cooling of atoms that do not have a closed cycling transition. This mechanism is observed in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for erbium, an atom with a very complex energy level structure with multiple pathways for optical-pumping losses. We observe surprisingly high trap populations of over 106 atoms and densities of over 1011 atoms cm-3, despite the many potential loss channels. A model based on recycling of metastable and ground state atoms held in the quadrupole magnetic field of the trap explains the high trap population, and agrees well with time-dependent measurements of MOT fluorescence. The demonstration of trapping of a rare-earth atom such as erbium opens a wide range of new possibilities for practical applications and fundamental studies with cold atoms

  12. Box traps on an atom chip for one-dimensional quantum gases

    van Es, J J P; van Amerongen, A H; Rétif, C; Whitlock, S; van Druten, N J

    2009-01-01

    We present the implementation of tailored trapping potentials for ultracold gases on an atom chip. We realize highly elongated traps with box-like confinement along the long, axial direction combined with conventional harmonic confinement along the two radial directions. The design, fabrication and characterization of the atom chip and the box traps is described. We load ultracold ($\\lesssim1 \\mu$K) clouds of $^{87}$Rb in a box trap, and demonstrate Bose-gas focusing as a means to characterize these atomic clouds in arbitrarily shaped potentials. Our results show that box-like axial potentials on atom chips are very promising for studies of one-dimensional quantum gases.

  13. Observation of cooperatively enhanced atomic dipole forces from NV centers in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    Juan, M L; Besga, B; Brennen, G; Molina-Terriza, G; Volz, T

    2015-01-01

    Since the early work by Ashkin in 1970, optical trapping has become one of the most powerful tools for manipulating small particles, such as micron sized beads or single atoms. The optical trapping mechanism is based on the interaction energy of a dipole and the electric field of the laser light. In atom trapping, the dominant contribution typically comes from the allowed optical transition closest to the laser wavelength, whereas for mesoscopic particles it is given by the bulk polarizability of the material. These two different regimes of optical trapping have coexisted for decades without any direct link, resulting in two very different contexts of applications: one being the trapping of small objects mainly in biological settings, the other one being dipole traps for individual neutral atoms in the field of quantum optics. Here we show that for nanoscale diamond crystals containing artificial atoms, so-called nitrogen vacancy (NV) color centers, both regimes of optical trapping can be observed at the same...

  14. Integrated Optical Dipole Trap for Cold Neutral Atoms with an Optical Waveguide Coupler

    Lee, J; Mittal, S; Dagenais, M; Rolston, S L

    2013-01-01

    An integrated optical dipole trap uses two-color (red and blue-detuned) traveling evanescent wave fields for trapping cold neutral atoms. To achieve longitudinal confinement, we propose using an integrated optical waveguide coupler, which provides a potential gradient along the beam propagation direction sufficient to confine atoms. This integrated optical dipole trap can support an atomic ensemble with a large optical depth due to its small mode area. Its quasi-TE0 waveguide mode has an advantage over the HE11 mode of a nanofiber, with little inhomogeneous Zeeman broadening at the trapping region. The longitudinal confinement eliminates the need for a 1-D optical lattice, reducing collisional blockaded atomic loading, potentially producing larger ensembles. The waveguide trap allows for scalability and integrability with nano-fabrication technology. We analyze the potential performance of such integrated atom traps.

  15. Highly uniform holographic microtrap arrays for single atom trapping using a feedback optimization of in-trap fluorescence measurements.

    Tamura, Hikaru; Unakami, Tomoyuki; He, Jun; Miyamoto, Yoko; Nakagawa, Ken'ichi

    2016-04-18

    We report on the novel optimization method to realize highly uniform microtrap arrays for single atom trapping with a spatial light modulator (SLM). This method consists of two iterative feedback loops with the measurements of both diffracted light intensities and in-trap fluorescence intensities from each microtrap. By applying this method to the single 87Rb atom trapping, we can reduce the variance of trap depths from 20.8% to 1.7% for 4 × 4 square arrays and less than 4% for various arrays with up to 62 sites. The detection error of individual single atoms is also reduced from 1.7% to 0.0054% on average. PMID:27137252

  16. Experimental single-impulse magnetic focusing of launched cold atoms

    Smith, D A; Hughes, I G; Pritchard, M J; Arnold, Aidan S.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Pritchard, Matthew J.; Smith, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional magnetic focusing of cold atoms with a single magnetic impulse has been observed for the first time. We load 7x10^7 85-Rb atoms into a magneto-optical trap, precool the atoms with optical molasses, then use moving molasses to launch them vertically through 20.5cm to the apex of flight. In transit the atoms are optically pumped, prior to the single magnetic lens impulse that occurs 16.5cm above the MOT. Fluorescence images at the apex of flight characterise the widths of the focussed cloud. Results were obtained for four different configurations of the baseball lens, which tuned the relationship between the axial and radial frequencies of the lens. Compact focused clouds were seen for all four configurations.

  17. Comparison of hyperfine anomalies in the 5S_{1/2} and 6S_{1/2} levels of ^{85}Rb and ^{87}Rb

    Galvan, A Perez; Orozco, L A; Gómez, E; Lange, A D; Baumer, F; Sprouse, G D

    2008-01-01

    We observe a hyperfine anomaly in the measurement of the hyperfine splitting of the 6S_{1/2} excited level in rubidium. We perform two step spectroscopy using the 5S_{1/2}->5P_{1/2}->6S_{1/2} excitation sequence. We measure the splitting of the 6S1/2 level and obtain for the magnetic dipole constants of ^{85}Rb and ^{87}Rb A = 239.18(4) MHz and A=807.66(8) MHz, respectively. The hyperfine anomaly difference of_{87}delta_{85}=-0.0036(2) comes from the Bohr Weisskopf effect: a correction to the point interaction between the finite nuclear magnetization and the electrons, and agrees with that obtained in the 5S_{1/2} ground state.

  18. Determination of lead traces in water and liqueurs by derivative atom trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Sun, H. [Department of Chemistry, Hebei University, Baoding, 071002 (China); Yang Lili [Department of Chemistry, Hebei University, Baoding, 071002 (China); Zhang Deqiang [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing (China); Wang Weixiao [Department of Chemistry, Hebei University, Baoding, 071002 (China); Sun Jianmin [Department of Chemistry, Hebei University, Baoding, 071002 (China)

    1997-07-01

    A new method for the direct determination of lead traces using derivative atom trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry (DAT-FAAS) with an improved water-cooled stainless steel trapping equipment in an air-acetylene flame was investigated. The optimum conditions concerning the sensitivity were studied. For a 1 min collection, the characteristic concentration (given as derivative absorbance of 0.0044) and the detection limit (3s) were 1.4 ng/mL and 0.27 ng/mL, respectively. This is 361 and 74-fold better than those of the conventional flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and comparable to those of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The detection limit and sensitivity of DAT-FAAS for a 3 min collection time were 2 and 3 orders of magnitude higher than those of conventional FAAS. The present method was applied to the determination of lead in water and liqueur samples with a recovery range of 94-108% and a relative standard deviation of 3.5-5.6%. (orig.). With 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  20. Optical trap potential control in N-type four level atoms by femtosecond Gaussian pulses

    Chakraborty, Subhadeep

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a scheme to control the optical dipole trap potential in an N-type four-level atomic system by using chirped femtosecond Gaussian pulses. The spatial size of the trap can be well controlled by tuning the beam waist of the Gaussian pulse and the detuning frequency. The trapping potential splits with increasing Rabi frequency about the center of the trap, a behavior analogous to the one observed experimentally in the context of trapping of nanoparticles with femtosecond pulses. An attempt is made to explain the physics behind this phenomenon by studying the spatial probability distribution of the atomic populations.

  1. Dynamics in a two-level atom magneto-optical trap

    Alkaline-earth-metal atoms present an ideal platform for exploring magneto-optic trap (MOT) dynamics, enabling unique and definitive tests of laser cooling and trapping mechanisms. We have measured the trapping beam intensity, detuning, magnetic-field gradient, trap density, and lifetime dependence of the spring constant κ and damping coefficient α for a 1S0-1P188Sr MOT by fitting the oscillatory response of the atom cloud to a step-function force. We find that the observed behavior of κ and α provide a unified and consistent picture of trap dynamics that agrees with Doppler cooling theory at the level of 10%. Additionally, we demonstrate that the trapped atom temperature can be determined directly from measured value of κ and the trap size, in excellent agreement with free-expansion temperature measurements. However, the experimentally determined temperature is much higher than Doppler cooling theory, implying significant additional heating mechanisms

  2. A two-dimensional lattice of blue detuned atom traps using a projected Gaussian beam array

    Piotrowicz, M J; Maller, K; Li, G; Zhang, S; Isenhower, L; Saffman, M

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new type of blue detuned optical lattice for atom trapping which is intrinsically two dimensional, while providing three-dimensional atom localization. The lattice is insensitive to optical phase fluctuations since it does not depend on field interference between distinct optical beams. The array is created using a novel arrangement of weakly overlapping Gaussian beams that creates a two-dimensional array of dark traps which are suitable for magic trapping of ground and Rydberg states. We analyze the spatial localization that can be achieved and demonstrate trapping and detection of single Cs atoms in 6 and 49 site two-dimensional arrays.

  3. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping of cold133Cs-87Rb atomic mixtures

    Metbulut, M. M.; Renzoni, F.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate simultaneous state-insensitive trapping of a mixture of two different atomic species, Caesium and Rubidium. The magic wavelengths of the Caesium and Rubidium atoms are different, $935.6$ nm and $789.9$ nm respectively, thus single-frequency simultaneous state-insensitive trapping is not possible. We thus identify bichromatic trapping as a viable approach to tune the two magic wavelengths to a common value. Correspondingly, we present several common magic wavelength combinations appropriate for simultaneous state-insensitive trapping of the two atomic species.

  4. Inhomogeneous broadening of optical transitions of 87Rb atoms in an optical nanofiber trap

    Lee, J; Hoffman, J E; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate optical trapping of 87Rb atoms using a two-color evanescent field around an optical nanofiber. In our trapping geometry, a blue-detuned traveling wave whose polarization is nearly parallel to the polarization of a red-detuned standing wave produce significant vector light shifts that lead to broadening of the absorption profile of a near-resonant beam at the trapping site. A model that includes scalar, vector, and tensor light shifts of the probe transition $5S_{1/2}$-$5P_{3/2}$ from the trapping beams; weighted by the temperature-dependent position of the atoms in the trap qualitatively describe the observed asymmetric profile, and explained differences with previous experiments that used Cs atoms. The model provides a consistent way to extract the number of atoms in the trap.

  5. Accelerated Thermalisation of 39K atoms in a Magnetic Trap with Superimposed Optical Potential

    Nath, Dipankar; Rajalakshmi, G; Unnikrishnan, C S

    2013-01-01

    We report the rapid accelerated thermalisation of Potassium 39 K atoms loaded in a magnetic trap, in the presence of a single dipole trap beam. More than an order of magnitude reduction in the thermalisation time, to less than a second, is observed with the focused off- resonant beam occupying only 0.01% of the volume of the magnetic trap. The cold atoms are loaded from a Magneto-Optical Trap(MOT) of 39 K that has gone through a compressed MOT and sub-Doppler cooling stage. The atoms are prepared in the magnetically stretched |F = 2, mF = 2> state prior to loading into the hybrid trap. We also report a direct loading of 39 K atoms, prepared in the state |F = 1>, into a single beam dipole trap.

  6. 3D modeling of magnetic atom traps on type-II superconductor chips

    Magnetic traps for cold atoms have become a powerful tool in cold atom physics and condensed matter research. The traps on superconducting chips allow one to increase the trapped atom lifetime and coherence time by decreasing the thermal noise by several orders of magnitude compared to that of the typical normal-metal conductors. A thin superconducting film in the mixed state is, usually, the main element of such a chip. Using a finite element method to analyze thin film magnetization and transport current in type-II superconductivity, we study magnetic traps recently employed in experiments. The proposed approach allows us to predict important characteristics of the magnetic traps (their depth, shape, distance from the chip surface, etc) that are necessary when designing magnetic traps in cold atom experiments. (paper)

  7. Hexapole-compensated magneto-optical trap on a mesoscopic atom chip

    Jöllenbeck, S.; Mahnke, J.; Randoll, R.;

    2011-01-01

    Magneto-optical traps on atom chips are usually restricted to small atomic samples due to a limited capture volume caused primarily by distorted field configurations. Here we present a magneto-optical trap based on a millimeter-sized wire structure which generates a magnetic field with minimized...

  8. Bichromatic State-Insensitive Trapping of Cold 133Cs-87Rb Atomic Mixtures

    Metbulut, M. M.; Renzoni, F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate simultaneous state-insensitive trapping of a mixture of two different atomic species, Caesium and Rubidium. The magic wavelengths of the Caesium and Rubidium atoms are different, $935.6$ nm and $789.9$ nm respectively, thus single-frequency simultaneous state-insensitive trapping is not possible. We thus identify bichromatic trapping as a viable approach to tune the two magic wavelengths to a common value. Correspondingly, we present several common magic wavelength combinations...

  9. Ultracold atomic collisions in tight harmonic traps: Perturbation theory, ionization losses and application to metastable helium atoms

    Beams, T J; Whittingham, I B

    2004-01-01

    Collisions between tightly confined atoms can lead to ionization and hence to loss of atoms from the trap. We develop second-order perturbation theory for a tensorial perturbation of a spherically symmetric system and the theory is then applied to processes mediated by the spin-dipole interaction. Redistribution and loss mechanisms are studied for the case of spin-polarized metastable helium atoms and results obtained for the five lowest s states in the trap and trapping frequencies ranging from 1 kHz to 10 MHz.

  10. Reconfigurable self-sufficient traps for ultracold atoms based on a superconducting square

    Siercke, M; Zhang, B; Beian, M; Lim, M J; Dumke, R

    2012-01-01

    We report on the trapping of ultracold atoms in the magnetic field formed entirely by persistent supercurrents induced in a thin film type-II superconducting square. The supercurrents are carried by vortices induced in the 2D structure by applying two magnetic field pulses of varying amplitude perpendicular to its surface. This results in a self-sufficient quadrupole trap that does not require any externally applied fields. We investigate the trapping parameters for different supercurrent distributions. Furthermore, to demonstrate possible applications of these types of supercurrent traps we show how a central quadrupole trap can be split into four traps by the use of a bias field.

  11. Nonlinear magneto-optical resonances at D1 excitation of 85Rb and 87Rb in an extremely thin cell

    Auzinsh, M; Gahbauer, F; Jarmola, A; Kalvans, L; Papoyan, A; Sarkisyan, D

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear magneto-optical resonances have been measured in an extremely thin cell (ETC) for the D1 transition of rubidium in an atomic vapor of natural isotopic composition. All hyperfine transitions of both isotopes have been studied for a wide range of laser power densities, laser detunings, and ETC wall separations. Dark resonances in the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) were observed as expected when the ground state total angular momentum F_g was greater than or equal to the excited state total angular momentum F_e. Unlike the case of ordinary cells, the width and contrast of dark resonances formed in the ETC dramatically depended on the detuning of the laser from the exact atomic transition. A theoretical model based on the optical Bloch equations was applied to calculate the shapes of the resonance curves. The model averaged over the contributions from different atomic velocity groups, considered all neighboring hyperfine transitions, took into account the splitting and mixing of magnetic sublevels in ...

  12. Nonlinear magneto-optical resonances at D1 excitation of 85Rb and 87Rb in an extremely thin cell

    Nonlinear magneto-optical resonances have been measured in an extremely thin cell (ETC) for the D1 transition of rubidium in an atomic vapor of natural isotopic composition. All hyperfine transitions of both isotopes have been studied for a wide range of laser power densities, laser detunings, and ETC wall separations. Dark resonances in the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) were observed as expected when the ground-state total angular momentum Fg was greater than or equal to the excited-state total angular momentum Fe. Unlike the case of ordinary cells, the width and contrast of dark resonances formed in the ETC dramatically depended on the detuning of the laser from the exact atomic transition. A theoretical model based on the optical Bloch equations was applied to calculate the shapes of the resonance curves. The model, which had been developed previously for ordinary vapor cells, averaged over the contributions from different atomic velocity groups, considered all neighboring hyperfine transitions, took into account the splitting and mixing of magnetic sublevels in an external magnetic field, and included a detailed treatment of the coherence properties of the laser radiation. Such a theoretical approach had successfully described nonlinear magneto-optical resonances in ordinary vapor cells. However, to describe the resonances in the ETC, key parameters such as the ground-state relaxation rate, excited-state relaxation rate, Doppler width, and Rabi frequency had to be modified significantly in accordance with the ETC's unique features. The level of agreement between the measured and calculated resonance curves achieved for the ETC was similar to what could be accomplished for ordinary cells. However, in the case of the ETC, it was necessary to fine-tune parameters such as the background and the Rabi frequency for different transitions, whereas for the ordinary cells, these parameters were identical for all transitions.

  13. Compact atomic clock prototype based on coherent population trapping

    Danet Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toward the next generations of compact atomic clocks, clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT offer a very interesting alternative. Thanks to CPT, a quantum interfering process, this technology has made a decisive step in the miniaturization direction. Fractional frequency stability of 1.5x10-10 at 1 s has been demonstrated in commercial devices of a few cm3. The laboratory prototype presented here intends to explore what could be the ultimate stability of a CPT based device. To do so, an original double-Λ optical scheme and a pulsed interrogation have been implemented in order to get a good compromise between contrast and linewidth. A study of two main sources of noise, the relative intensity and the local oscillator (LO noise, has been performed. By designing simple solutions, it led to a new fractional frequency limitation lower than 4x10-13 at 1 s integration. Such a performance proves that such a technology could rival with classical ones as double resonance clocks.

  14. Magneto-Optical Trapping of Ytterbium Atoms with a 398.9 nm Laser

    ZHAO Peng-Yi; XIONG Zhuan-Xian; LIANG Jie; HE Ling-Xiang; LU Bao-Long

    2008-01-01

    We report the realization of ytterbium magneto-optical trap (MOT) operating on the dipole-allowed 1S0 - 1P1 transition at 398.9nm. The MOT is loaded by a slowed atomic beam produced by a Zeeman slower. All seven stable isotopes of Yb atoms could be trapped separately at different laser detuning values. Over 107 174Yb atoms are collected in the MOT, whereas the atom number of fermionic isotope 171Yb is roughly 2.3 × 106 due to a lower abundance. Without the Zeeman slower, the trapped atom numbers are one order of magnitude lower.Both the even and odd isotopes are recognized as excellent candidates of optical clock transition, so the cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms by the blue MOT is an important step for building an optical clock.

  15. Magneto-optical trapping of ytterbium atoms with a 398.9 nm laser

    We report the realization of ytterbium magneto-optical trap (MOT) operating on the dipole-allowed 1S0-1P1 transition at 398.9 nm. The MOT is loaded by a slowed atomic beam produced by a Zeeman slower. All seven stable isotopes of Yb atoms could be trapped separately at different laser detuning values. Over 107 174Yb atoms are collected in the MOT, whereas the atom number of fermionic isotope 171Yb is roughly 2.3 × 106 due to a lower abundance. Without the Zeeman slower, the trapped atom numbers are one order of magnitude lower. Both the even and odd isotopes are recognized as excellent candidates of optical clock transition, so the cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms by the blue MOT is an important step for building an optical clock. (authors)

  16. Self-organization effects and light amplification of collective atomic recoil motion in a harmonic trap

    Zhang, L.; Yang, G. J.; Xia, L. X.

    2005-01-01

    Self-organization effects related to light amplification in the collective atomic recoil laser system with the driven atoms confined in a harmonic trap are investigated further. In the dispersive parametric region, our study reveals that the spontaneously formed structures in the phase space contributes an important role to the light amplification of the probe field under the atomic motion being modified by the trap.

  17. Magnetic levitation for effective loading of cold cesium atoms in a crossed dipole trap

    Li, Yuqing; Feng, Guosheng; Xu, Rundong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Jizhou; Chen, Gang; Dai, Xingcan; Ma, Jie; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2015-05-01

    We report a detailed study of effective magnetically levitated loading of cold atoms in a crossed dipole trap: an appropriate magnetic field gradient precisely compensates for the destructive gravitational force of the atoms and an additional bias field simultaneously eliminates the antitrapping potential induced by the magnetic field gradient. The magnetic levitation is required for a large-volume crossed dipole trap to form a shallow but very effective loading potential, making it a promising method for loading and trapping more cold atoms. For cold cesium atoms in the F =3 , m F =3 state prepared by three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling, a large number of atoms ˜3.2 ×106 have been loaded into a large-volume crossed dipole trap with the help of the magnetic levitation technique. The dependence of the number of atoms loaded and trapped in the dipole trap on the magnetic field gradient and bias field, respectively, is in good agreement with the theoretical analysis. The optimum magnetic field gradient of 31.13 G/cm matches the theoretical value of 31.3 G/cm well. This method can be used to obtain more cold atoms or a large number of Bose-Einstein condensation atoms for many atomic species in high-field seeking states.

  18. Design, fabrication and characterization of tunable external cavity diode laser and atom trapping chips for atomic physics

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao

    External cavity diode laser systems (ECDLs) have been well documented for their suitability in the fields of laser cooling and atom trapping, and are now widely used in optical and atomic physics. A particularly simple implementation of this idea uses feedback from a diffraction grating mounted in the Littrow configuration and the typical size of this laser is quite large (120mmx90mmx90mm). For atom optics, the current atom trapping chips are not in a feedthrough configuration, which makes the chips to glass cell assembly process complicated and the wires and solder areas vulnerable, resulting in an unreliable vacuum seal. Recent experimental realizations of atom optical devices such as atomic waveguides, beam splitters, and on-chip Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) sources have opened a new field for the development of more complex devices such as, e.g., BEC-based atom transistor. This work focuses on micro/nano fabrication techniques to build three different devices for the miniature BEC system. The research work focuses on the development of new ECDLs, a novel fabrication process of feedthrough atom trapping chips for atomic optics and a fabrication process for atom transistor chips. In the ECDLs part, we describe a new method for constructing a smaller external-cavity diode laser by use of a micromachined silicon flexure and a VHG (Volume Holographic Grating). It is much smaller, inexpensive and easy to build because it is based on simple modifications of a few commercial optical and mechanical components but with a specific silicon flexure design enabled by micro-fabrication technology for the laser frequency tuning. In the feedthrough chips part, we present a novel fabrication process for feedthrough atom trapping chips in atomic condensate optics cells using the copper electroplating to seal the vias. The advantages of using feedthrough atom trapping chips are the simple microfabrication process and reduction of the overall chip area bonded on the glass atom-trapping

  19. Emission spectrum of a harmonically trapped A-type three-level atom

    Guo Hong; Tang Pei

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the emission spectrum for a ∧-type three-level atom trapped in the node of a standing wave.We show that the atomic center-of-mass motion not only directly affects the peak number,peak position,and peak height in the atomic emission spectrum,but also influences the effects of the cavity field and the atomic initial state on atomic emission spectrum.

  20. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    Montoya, Cris; Geraci, Andrew A; Eardley, Matthew; Moreland, John; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance in an ensemble of laser-cooled trapped Rb atoms is excited using a micro- cantilever with a magnetic tip. The cantilever is mounted on a multi-layer chip designed to capture, cool, and magnetically transport cold atoms. The coupling is observed by measuring the loss from a magnetic trap as the oscillating cantilever induces Zeeman state transitions in the atoms. Interfacing cold atoms with mechanical devices could enable probing and manipulating atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity, leading to new capabilities in quantum computation, quantum simulation, or precision sensing.

  1. Fiber-pigtailed optical tweezer for single-atom trapping and single-photon generation

    Garcia, Sébastien; Hohmann, Leander; Reichel, Jakob; Long, Romain

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a miniature, fiber-coupled optical tweezer to trap a single atom. The same fiber is used to trap a single atom and to read out its fluorescence. To obtain a low background level, the tweezer light is chopped, and we measure the influence of the chopping frequency on the atom's lifetime. We use the single atom as a single-photon source at 780 nm and measure the second-order correlation function of the emitted photons. Because of its miniature, robust, fiber-pigtailed design, this tweezer can be implemented in a broad range of experiments where single atoms are used as a resource.

  2. A double-well atom trap for fluorescence detection at the Heisenberg limit

    Stroescu, Ion; Oberthaler, Markus K

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an atom number detector capable of simultaneous detection of two mesoscopic ensembles with single atom resolution. Such a sensitivity is a prerequisite for going beyond quantum metrology with spin-squeezed states. Our system is based on fluorescence detection of atoms in a novel hybrid trap in which a dipole barrier divides a magneto-optical trap into two separated wells. We introduce a noise model describing the various sources contributing to the measurement error and report a limit of up to 500 atoms for the exact determination of the atom number difference.

  3. First principles investigation of cluster consisting of hydrogen–helium atoms interstitially-trapped in tungsten

    We evaluate the binding energies of mixed helium and hydrogen clusters consisted of interstitially trapped atoms in bcc tungsten by first-principles calculations based on density functional theories. It is shown that helium-rich interstitially-trapped clusters have the positive binding energies and the low electron-density region expand as the number of helium in the cluster increase. Thus, the helium-rich interstitially trapped clusters can act as a trapping site for hydrogen, and interstitially trapped helium interrupts or disturbs the hydrogen diffusion in tungsten

  4. Observation of single neutral atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap

    Wang Jing; He Jun; Qiu Ying; Yang Bao-Dong; Zhao Jiang-Yan; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2008-01-01

    Single caesium atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap have been identified. The trapping of individual atoms is marked by the steps in fluorescence signal corresponding to the capture or loss of single atoms. The typical magnetic gradient is about 29 mT/cm, which evidently reduces the capture rate of magneto-optical trap.

  5. Fast compression of a cold atomic cloud using a blue detuned crossed dipole trap

    Bienaime, Tom; de Lepinay, Laure Mercier; Bellando, Louis; Chabe, Julien; Kaiser, Robin

    2012-01-01

    We present the experimental realization of a compressible blue detuned crossed dipole trap for cold atoms allowing for fast dynamical compression (~ 5 - 10 ms) of 5x10^7 Rubidium atoms up to densities of ~ 10^13 cm^-3. The dipole trap consists of two intersecting tubes of blue-detuned laser light. These tubes are formed using a single, rapidly rotating laser beam which, for sufficiently fast rotation frequencies, can be accurately described by a quasi-static potential. The atomic cloud is compressed by dynamically reducing the trap volume leading to densities close to the Ioffe-Reggel criterion for light localization.

  6. Continuous loading of $^{1}$S$_{0}$ calcium atoms into an optical dipole trap

    Yang, C. Y.; Halder, P.; Appel, O.; Hansen, D.; Hemmerich, A.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate an efficient scheme for continuous trap loading based upon spatially selective optical pumping. We discuss the case of $^{1}$S$_{0}$ calcium atoms in an optical dipole trap (ODT), however, similar strategies should be applicable to a wide range of atomic species. Our starting point is a reservoir of moderately cold ($\\approx 300 \\mu$K) metastable $^{3}$P$_{2}$-atoms prepared by means of a magneto-optic trap (triplet-MOT). A focused 532 nm laser beam produces a strongly elongate...

  7. Continuous loading of cold atoms into a Ioffe-Pritchard magnetic trap

    Schmidt, P O; Werner, J; Binhammer, T; Görlitz, A; Pfau, T; Schmidt, Piet O.; Hensler, Sven; Werner, Joerg; Binhammer, Thomas; Goerlitz, Axel; Pfau, Tilman

    2002-01-01

    We present a robust continuous optical loading scheme for a Ioffe-Pritchard (IP) type magnetic trap. Atoms are cooled and trapped in a modified magneto-optical trap (MOT) consisting of a conventional 2D-MOT in radial direction and an axial molasses. The radial magnetic field gradient needed for the operation of the 2D-MOT is provided by the IP trap. A small axial curvature and offset field provide magnetic confinement and suppress spin-flip losses in the center of the magnetic trap without altering the performance of the 2D-MOT. Continuous loading of atoms into the IP trap is provided by radiative leakage from the MOT to a metastable level which is magnetically trapped and decoupled from the MOT light. We are able to accumulate 30 times more atoms in the magnetic trap than in the MOT. The absolute number of $2\\times 10^8$~atoms is limited by inelastic collisions. A model based on rate equations shows good agreement with our data. Our scheme can also be applied to other atoms with similar level structure like ...

  8. Single-atom trapping in holographic 2D arrays of microtraps with arbitrary geometries

    Nogrette, Florence; Ravets, Sylvain; Barredo, Daniel; Béguin, Lucas; Vernier, Aline; Lahaye, Thierry; Browaeys, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate single-atom trapping in two-dimensional arrays of microtraps with arbitrary geometries. We generate the arrays using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), with which we imprint an appropriate phase pattern on an optical dipole trap beam prior to focusing. We trap single $^{87}{\\rm Rb}$ atoms in the sites of arrays containing up to $\\sim100$ microtraps separated by distances as small as $3\\;\\mu$m, with complex structures such as triangular, honeycomb or kagome lattices. Using a closed-loop optimization of the uniformity of the trap depths ensures that all trapping sites are equivalent. This versatile system opens appealing applications in quantum information processing and quantum simulation, e.g. for simulating frustrated quantum magnetism using Rydberg atoms.

  9. Trapping atoms in the evanescent field of laser written wave guides

    Jukic, Dario; Walther, P; Szameit, A; Pohl, T; Götte, J B

    2016-01-01

    We analyze evanescent fields of laser written waveguides and show that they can be used to trap atoms close to the surface of an integrated optical atom chip. In contrast to subwavelength nanofibres it is generally not possible to create a stable trapping potential using only the fundamental modes. This is why we create a stable trapping potential by using two different laser colors, such that the waveguide supports two modes for the blue detuned laser, while for the red detuned light the waveguide has only a single mode. In particular, we study such a two-color trap for Cesium atoms, and calculate both the potential and losses for the set of parameters that are within experimental reach. We also optimize system parameters in order to minimize trap losses due to photon scattering and tunneling to the surface.

  10. Bose-Einstein condensation of trapped atoms with dipole interactions

    The path-integral Monte Carlo method is used to simulate dilute trapped Bose gases and to investigate the equilibrium properties at finite temperatures. The quantum particles have a long-range dipole-dipole interaction and a short-range s-wave interaction. Using an anisotropic pseudopotential for the long-range dipolar interaction and a hard-sphere potential for the short-range s-wave interaction, we calculate the energetics and structural properties as a function of temperature and the number of particles. Also, in order to determine the effects of dipole-dipole forces and the influence of the trapping field on the dipolar condensate, we use two cylindrically symmetric harmonic confinements (a cigar-shaped trap and a disk-shaped trap). We find that the net effect of dipole-dipole interactions is governed by the trapping geometry. For a cigar-shaped trap, the net contribution of dipolar interactions is attractive and the shrinking of the density profiles is observed. For a disk-shaped trap, the net effect of long-range dipolar forces is repulsive and the density profiles expand

  11. Magneto-optical trapping of radioactive atoms for test of the fundamental symmetries

    Kawamura, Hirokazu, E-mail: hirokazu.kawamura.c2@tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University, Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences (Japan); Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T. [Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (Japan); Inoue, T. [Tohoku University, Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences (Japan); Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Köhler, L.; Mathis, J.; Sakamoto, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y. [Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    We are planning test experiments of fundamental symmetries based on the intrinsic properties of francium. It is expected that the laser cooling and trapping of francium will produce precision measurements. The pilot experiment using rubidium was performed with the goal of francium trapping. The ion beam generated with a francium ion source was investigated using a Wien filter. Each piece of equipment still must be studied in more detail, and the equipment should be upgraded in order to trap radioactive atoms.

  12. Magneto-optical trapping of radioactive atoms for test of the fundamental symmetries

    We are planning test experiments of fundamental symmetries based on the intrinsic properties of francium. It is expected that the laser cooling and trapping of francium will produce precision measurements. The pilot experiment using rubidium was performed with the goal of francium trapping. The ion beam generated with a francium ion source was investigated using a Wien filter. Each piece of equipment still must be studied in more detail, and the equipment should be upgraded in order to trap radioactive atoms

  13. Influence of the atomic-wall collision elasticity on the coherent population trapping resonance shape

    Kazakov, G A; Litvinov, A. N.; Matisov, B. G.; Romanenko, V. I.; Yatsenko, L. P.; Romanenko, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    We studied theoretically a coherent population trapping resonance formation in cylindrical cell without buffer gas irradiated by a narrow laser beam. We take into account non-zero probabilities of elastic ("specular") and inelastic ("sticking") collision between the atom and the cell wall. We have developed a theoretical model based on averaging over the random Ramsey pulse sequences of times that atom spent in and out of the beam. It is shown that the shape of coherent population trapping re...

  14. Strong Coupling between a Trapped Single Atom and an All-Fiber Cavity.

    Kato, Shinya; Aoki, Takao

    2015-08-28

    We demonstrate an all-fiber cavity quantum electrodynamics system with a trapped single atom in the strong coupling regime. We use a nanofiber Fabry-Perot cavity, that is, an optical nanofiber sandwiched by two fiber-Bragg-grating mirrors. Measurements of the cavity transmission spectrum with a single atom in a state-insensitive nanofiber trap clearly reveal the vacuum Rabi splitting. PMID:26371652

  15. Photoassociative Cooling and Trapping of Center-of-Mass Motion of Atom-Pairs

    Saha, Subrata; Deb, Bimalendu

    2015-01-01

    We show that it is possible to cool and trap the center-of-mass (COM) motion of atom-pairs by a lin$\\perp$lin Sisyphus-like method using counter-propagating photoassociation lasers. This method relies on the photoassociative coupling between an excited molecular bound state and a single-channel continuum of states of scattering between ground-state atoms. We demonstrate that one can generate molecular spin-dependent periodic potentials by this method for trapping the COM motion of pairs of ground-state atoms. We illustrate this with numerical calculations using fermionic $^{171}$Yb atoms as an example.

  16. Entanglement and quantum state transfer between two atoms trapped in two indirectly coupled cavities

    Zheng, Bin; Shen, Li-Tuo; Chen, Ming-Feng

    2016-05-01

    We propose a one-step scheme for implementing entanglement generation and the quantum state transfer between two atomic qubits trapped in two different cavities that are not directly coupled to each other. The process is realized through engineering an effective asymmetric X-Y interaction for the two atoms involved in the gate operation and an auxiliary atom trapped in an intermediate cavity, induced by virtually manipulating the atomic excited states and photons. We study the validity of the scheme as well as the influences of the dissipation by numerical simulation and demonstrate that it is robust against decoherence.

  17. Trapping of ultra cold atoms in a 3He/4He dilution refrigerator

    Jessen, F; Bell, S C; Vergien, P; Hattermann, H; Weiss, P; Rudolph, M; Reinschmidt, M; Meyer, K; Gaber, T; Cano, D; Guenther, A; Bernon, S; Koelle, D; Kleiner, R; Fortagh, J

    2013-01-01

    We describe the preparation of ultra cold atomic clouds in a dilution refrigerator. The closed cycle 3He/4He cryostat was custom made to provide optical access for laser cooling, optical manipulation and detection of atoms. We show that the cryostat meets the requirements for cold atom experiments, specifically in terms of operating a magneto-optical trap, magnetic traps and magnetic transport under ultra high vacuum conditions. The presented system is a step towards the creation of a quantum hybrid system combining ultra cold atoms and solid state quantum devices.

  18. Bose-Einstein atoms in atomic traps with predominantly attractive two-body interactions

    Using the Perron-Frobenius theorem, we prove that the results by Wilkin, Gunn, and Smith [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 2265 (1998)] for the ground states at angular momentum L of N harmonically trapped Bose atoms, interacting via weak attractive δ2(r) forces, are valid for a broad class of predominantly attractive interactions V(r), not necessarily attractive for any r. This class is described by sufficient conditions on the two-body matrix elements of the potential V(r). It includes, in particular, the Gaussian attraction of arbitrary radius, -1/r-Coulomb and log(r)-Coulomb forces, as well as all the short-range interactions satisfying inequality ∫d2r-vectorV(r)<0. In the precollapse regime, the angular momentum L is concentrated in the collective 'center-of-mass' mode, and there is no condensation at high L

  19. Trapping atoms in a bottle beam generated by a diffractive optical element

    Ivanov, V.; Isaacs, J.; Saffman, M.; Kemme, S. A.; Brady, G. R.; Ellis, A. R.; Wendt, J. R.

    2012-06-01

    Highly excited Rydberg states have been used to demonstrate a neutral atom quantum gate, two-atom entanglement and hold promise for studies of surface potentials, such as the Casimir-Polder potential. Blue detuned Optical Bottle Beam (BoB) traps where atoms are confined in intensity minima trap both ground and Rydberg state atoms. This minimizes qubit decoherence and allows accurate measurements of the frequencies of the Rydberg transitions. We have generated optical bottle beam traps using a segmented diffractive optical element with π phase shift between the inner and outer regions. The idea for this trap follows the approach used by Ozeri, et al. Phys. Rev. A 59, R1750 (1999) but integrates the phase shift and focusing lens into a single diffractive element fabricated at Sandia National Lab. Measured profiles of the trap light intensity are compared with numerical predictions using a Fresnel diffraction code. Progress towards atom trapping in the bottle for studies of atom-surface interactions will be presented.

  20. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    Li, Y; Feng, G; Nute, J; Piano, S; Hackermuller, L; Ma, J; Xiao, L; Jia, S

    2015-01-01

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loading magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load $1.5 \\times 10^7$ atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 $\\mu$K to 1.7 $\\mu$K within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about $1.2 \\times 10^7$. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  1. Multiscale quantum-defect theory for two interacting atoms in a symmetric harmonic trap

    Chen, Yujun; Gao, Bo

    2007-01-01

    We present a multiscale quantum-defect theory (QDT) for two identical atoms in a symmetric harmonic trap that combines the quantum-defect theory for the van der Waals interaction [B. Gao, Phys. Rev. A \\textbf{64}, 010701(R) (2001)] at short distances with a quantum-defect theory for the harmonic trapping potential at large distances. The theory provides a systematic understanding of two atoms in a trap, from deeply bound molecular states and states of different partial waves, to highly excite...

  2. Trapping of Neutral Mercury Atoms and Prospects for Optical Lattice Clocks

    Hachisu, H.; Miyagishi, K.; Porsev, S. G.; Derevianko, A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.; Pal'chikov, V. G.; Takamoto, M.; Katori, H.

    2007-01-01

    We report a vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the ${}^1S_0-{}^3P_1$ intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest non-radioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for ``new physics'' beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than $10^{-18}$. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based ...

  3. Trapping of neutral mercury atoms and prospects for optical lattice clocks.

    Hachisu, H; Miyagishi, K; Porsev, S G; Derevianko, A; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G; Takamoto, M; Katori, H

    2008-02-01

    We report vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the (1)S(0)-(3)P(1) intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest nonradioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for "new physics" beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than 10;{-18}. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant. PMID:18352368

  4. Trapping of Neutral Mercury Atoms and Prospects for Optical Lattice Clocks

    Hachisu, H; Porsev, S G; Derevianko, A; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G; Takamoto, M; Katori, H

    2007-01-01

    We report a vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the ${}^1S_0-{}^3P_1$ intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest non-radioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for ``new physics'' beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than $10^{-18}$. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant.

  5. Simultaneous Magneto-Optical Trapping of Fermionic 40K and Bosonic 87Rb Atoms

    WEI Dong; XIONG De-Zhi; CHEN Hai-Xia; WANG Peng-Jun; GUO Lu; ZHANG Jing

    2007-01-01

    We report on simultaneous magneto-optical trapping of fermionic 40K and bosonic 87Rb atoms. This trap is the first step towards quantum degenerate fermi gas 40K. Laser lights for the two-species magneto-optical trap (MOT) are generated from diode lasers and tapered amplifier. The enriched 40K dispenser is utilized in the experimental setup. We obtain up to 107 ~108 40K and 108 ~109 87Rb atoms respectively in the steady-state single-species MOT.

  6. The influence of optical molasses in loading a shallow optical trap

    Hamilton, Mathew S; Roberts, Jacob L

    2008-01-01

    We have examined loading of 85Rb atoms into a shallow Far-Off-Resonance Trap (FORT) from an optical molasses and compared it to loading from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). We found that substantially more atoms could be loaded into the FORT via an optical molasses as compared to loading from the MOT alone. To determine why this was the case, we measured the rate of atoms loaded into the FORT and the losses from the FORT during the loading process. For both MOT and molasses loading, we examined atom load rate and losses over a range of detunings as well as hyperfine pump powers. We found that the losses induced during MOT loading were essentially the same as the losses induced during molasses loading at the same MOT/molasses detuning. In contrast, load rate of the molasses was higher than that of a MOT at a given detuning. This caused the optical molasses to be able to load more atoms than the MOT. Optimization of FORT loading form an optical molasses improved the number of atoms we could trap by a factor of tw...

  7. Lattices of ultracold atom traps over arrays of nano- and mesoscopic superconducting disks

    Sokolovsky, Vladimir; Prigozhin, Leonid

    2016-04-01

    A lattice of traps for ultracold neutral atoms is a promising tool for experimental investigation in quantum physics and quantum information processing. We consider regular arrays of thin film type-II superconducting nanodisks, with only one pinned vortex in each of them, and also arrays of mesoscopic disks, each containing many vortices whose distribution is characterized by the superconducting current density. In both cases we show theoretically that the induced magnetic field can create a 3D lattice of magnetic traps for cold atoms without any additional bias field. Applying a bias DC field parallel to the superconductor surface, one can control the depth and sizes of the traps, their heights above the chip surface, potential barriers between the traps, as well as the structure and dimension of the lattices. In the adiabatic approximation the atom cloud shape is represented by the shape of a closed iso-surface of the magnetic field magnitude chosen in accordance with the atom cloud temperature. The computed trap sizes, heights and the distances between the neighboring traps are typically from tens to hundreds nanometers for nanodisks and of the order of 1 μm for mesoscopic disks. Our calculations show that the depth of magnetic traps on mesoscopic disks is, typically, between 0.3 G and 7.6 G; for the nanodisks the depth is about 0.3 G.

  8. Coherence preservation of a single neutral atom qubit transferred between magic-intensity optical traps

    Yang, Jiaheng; Guo, Ruijun; Xu, Peng; Wang, Kunpeng; Sheng, Cheng; Liu, Min; Wang, Jin; Derevianko, Andrei; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the coherence of a single mobile atomic qubit can be well preserved during a transfer process among different optical dipole traps (ODTs). This is a prerequisite step in realizing a large-scale neutral atom quantum information processing platform. A qubit encoded in the hyperfine manifold of $^{87}$Rb atom is dynamically extracted from the static quantum register by an auxiliary moving ODT and reinserted into the static ODT. Previous experiments were limited by decoherences induced by the differential light shifts of qubit states. Here we apply a magic-intensity trapping technique which mitigates the detrimental effects of light shifts and substantially enhances the coherence time to $225 \\pm 21\\,\\mathrm{ms}$. The experimentally demonstrated magic trapping technique relies on the previously neglected hyperpolarizability contribution to the light shifts, which makes the light shift dependence on the trapping laser intensity to be parabolic. Because of the parabolic dependence, at a certain ...

  9. Possibility of triple magic trapping of clock and Rydberg states of divalent atoms in optical lattices

    Topcu, T

    2016-01-01

    We predict the possibility of "triply-magic" optical lattice trapping of neutral divalent atoms. In such a lattice, the ${^1}\\!S_{0}$ and ${^3}\\!P_{0}$ clock states and an additional Rydberg state experience identical optical potentials, fully mitigating detrimental effects of the motional decoherence. In particular, we show that this triply magic trapping condition can be satisfied for Yb atom at optical wavelengths and for various other divalent systems (Ca, Mg, Hg and Sr) in the UV region. We assess the quality of triple magic trapping conditions by estimating the probability of excitation out of the motional ground state as a result of the excitations between the clock and the Rydberg states. We also calculate trapping laser-induced photoionization rates of divalent Rydberg atoms at magic frequencies. We find that such rates are below the radiative spontaneous-emission rates, due to the presence of Cooper minima in photoionization cross-sections.

  10. New cryogenic trap design for speciation analysis of arsenic by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry

    Svoboda, Milan; Kratzer, Jan; Dědina, Jiří

    Praha, 2014. s. 240-240. ISBN 978-80-905704-1-2. [European Symposium on Atomic Spectrometry ESAS 2014 & Czech-Slovak Spectroscopic Conference /15./. 16.03.2014-21.03.2014, Praha] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311202 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : atomic absorption spectrometry * hydride generation * cryogenic trapping Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  11. Generation of Three-Dimensional Entangled States for Two Atoms Trapped in Different Cavities

    ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    @@ We propose a scheme for generating three-dimensional entangled states for two atoms trapped in two separate cavities. The scheme is based on the detection of photons leaking from the cavities after the atom-cavity interaction.The scheme is useful for the test of quantum nonlocality and quantum information processing.

  12. Velocity tuning of friction with two trapped atoms

    Gangloff, Dorian; Counts, Ian; Jhe, Wonho; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-01-01

    Friction is the basic, ubiquitous mechanical interaction between two surfaces that results in resistance to motion and energy dissipation. In spite of its technological and economic significance, our ability to control friction remains modest, and our understanding of the microscopic processes incomplete. At the atomic scale, mismatch between the two contacting crystal lattices can lead to a reduction of stick-slip friction (structural lubricity), while thermally activated atomic motion can give rise to a complex velocity dependence, and nearly vanishing friction at sufficiently low velocities (thermal lubricity). Atomic force microscopy has provided a wealth of experimental results, but limitations in the dynamic range, time resolution, and control at the single-atom level have hampered a full quantitative description from first principles. Here, using an ion-crystal friction emulator with single-atom, single substrate-site spatial resolution and single-slip temporal resolution, we measure the friction force...

  13. Exact spatial density of ideal Bose atoms in a one-dimensional harmonic trap

    Cheng, Ze

    2016-05-01

    We have proposed an exact analytical solution to the problem of Bose–Einstein condensation (BEC) of harmonically trapped, one-dimensional, and ideal atoms. It is found that the number of atoms in vapor is characterized by an analytical function, which involves a q -digamma function in mathematics. We employ the q -digamma function to calculate the spatial density n(z;T, N) of ideal Bose atoms in a one-dimensional harmonic trap. The first main finding in this paper is that when Bose atoms are in the normal state, the density profile exhibits Friedel oscillations. The second main finding is that when Bose atoms are in the BEC state, the density profile exhibits a sharp peak with extremely narrow width. The third main finding is that the central peak of the spatial density is a monotonically increasing function of the number of atoms N but is a monotonically decreasing function of temperature T.

  14. Design and fabrication of diffractive atom chips for laser cooling and trapping

    Cotter, J P; Griffin, P F; Rabey, I M; Docherty, K; Riis, E; Arnold, A S; Hinds, E A

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been shown that optical reflection gratings fabricated directly into an atom chip provide a simple and effective way to trap and cool substantial clouds of atoms [1,2]. In this article we describe how the gratings are designed and micro-fabricated and we characterise their optical properties, which determine their effectiveness as a cold atom source. We use simple scalar diffraction theory to understand how the morphology of the gratings determines the power in the diffracted beams.

  15. Laser cooling of rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    Hopkins, Stephen Anthony

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes theoretical and experimental work concerning radiation forces on atoms, with particular reference to rubidium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap. After a short history of the field of laser cooling, a review of the semiclassical theory of mechanical interactions between two-level atoms and electromagnetic radiation is given. Different formulations of the semiclassical theory are discussed, including a new formulation in terms of momentum transfer amongst the pl...

  16. Ultraviolet light-induced atom desorption for large rubidium and potassium magneto-optical traps

    We show that light-induced atom desorption (LIAD) can be used as a flexible atomic source for large 87Rb and 40K magneto-optical traps. The use of LIAD at short wavelengths allows for fast switching of the desired vapor pressure and permits experiments with long trapping and coherence times. The wavelength dependence of the LIAD effect for both species was explored in a range from 630 to 253 nm in an uncoated quartz cell and a stainless steel chamber. Only a few mW/cm2 of near-UV light produce partial pressures that are high enough to saturate a magneto-optical trap at 3.5x10987Rb atoms or 7x10740K atoms. Loading rates as high as 1.2x10987Rb atoms/s and 8x10740K atoms/s were achieved without the use of a secondary atom source. After the desorption light is turned off, the pressure quickly decays back to equilibrium with a time constant as short as 200 μs, allowing for long trapping lifetimes after the MOT loading phase

  17. Trapping and cooling of rf-dressed atoms in a quadrupole magnetic field

    Morizot, Olivier; Pottie, Paul-Eric; Lorent, Vincent; Perrin, Hélène

    2007-01-01

    We observe the spontaneous evaporation of atoms confined in a bubble-like rf-dressed trap (Zobay and Garraway, 2001). The atoms are confined in a quadrupole magnetic trap and are dressed by a linearly polarized rf field. The evaporation is related to the presence of holes in the trap, at the positions where the rf coupling vanishes, due to its vectorial character. The final temperature results from a competition between residual heating and evaporation efficiency, which is controlled via the height of the holes with respect to the bottom of the trap. The experimental data are modeled by a Monte-Carlo simulation predicting a small increase in phase space density limited by the heating rate. This increase was within the phase space density determination uncertainty of the experiment.

  18. Action Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions and Studies of Cold Collsions in a Hybrid Atom-Ion Trap

    Schowalter, Steven

    2016-01-01

    This Dissertation details the development of state-of-the-art hybrid atom-ion trapping architecture and technique towards increasing the quantum control of matter and the detection of chemical processes at cold temperatures. Experimental work discussed herein is performed primarily using the second-generation of the MOTion trap, a hybrid atom-ion trap consisting of a co-located magneto-optical trap (MOT) and a linear quadrupole trap (LQT), with which $^{40}$Ca and a variety of atomic and mol...

  19. Tunneling theory for tunable open quantum systems of ultracold atoms in one-dimensional traps

    Lundmark, Rikard; Forssén, Christian; Rotureau, Jimmy

    2015-01-01

    The creation of tunable open quantum systems is becoming feasible in current experiments with ultracold atoms in low-dimensional traps. In particular, the high degree of experimental control over these systems allows detailed studies of tunneling dynamics, e.g., as a function of the trapping geometry and the interparticle interaction strength. In order to address this exciting opportunity we present a theoretical framework for two-body tunneling based on the rigged Hilbert space formulation. ...

  20. Influence of trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Mazzarella, G.; De Siena, S.

    2004-01-01

    We study the effect of external trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices. We introduce a generalized Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian that includes the structure of the energy levels of the trapping potential, and show that these levels are in general populated both at finite and zero temperature. We characterize the properties of the superfluid transition for this situation and compare them with those of the standard Bose-Hubbard description. We briefly discuss s...

  1. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Politechn Poznanska, Poznan (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation - integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H{sub 2}Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangernents (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an 'integrated trap') was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3{sigma}), was 0.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Te. For a 2 min in situ preconcentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% (n = 6) for Te. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  2. Low-Velocity Intense Source of Atoms from a Magneto-optical Trap

    We have produced and characterized an intense, slow, and highly collimated atomic beam extracted from a standard vapor cell magneto-optical trap (MOT).The technique used is dramatically simpler than previous methods for producing very cold atomic beams. We have created a 0.6mm diameter rubidium atomic beam with a continuous flux of 5x109/s and a pulsed flux 10times greater. Its longitudinal velocity distribution is centered at 14 m/s with a FWHM of 2.7 m/s. Through an efficient recycling process, 70% of the atoms trapped in the MOT are loaded into the atomic beam. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. Light-induced atomic desorption for loading a sodium magneto-optical trap

    We report studies of photon-stimulated desorption, also known as light-induced atomic desorption, of sodium atoms from a vacuum-cell glass surface used for loading a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Fluorescence detection was used to record the trapped atom number and the desorption rate. We observed a steep wavelength dependence of the desorption process above 2.6 eV photon energy, a result significant for estimations of sodium vapor density in the lunar atmosphere. Our data fit well to a simple model for the loading of the MOT dependent only on the sodium desorption rate and residual gas density. Up to 3.7x107 Na atoms were confined under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions, creating promising loading conditions for a vapor-cell-based atomic Bose-Einstein condensate of sodium.

  4. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry. PMID:27440516

  5. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-07-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry.

  6. Noise-induced heating of squeezed states in atom traps

    We present a general model of a quantum parametric oscillator heated by coupled fluctuating fields. Two kinds of external fields are considered: an external fluctuating driving force, and a noise in the basic frequency of the oscillator. The energy increase and the change in the square variances of position and momentum produced in such systems are calculated. As a particular example, we study the case of a Paul trap and the evolution of coherent and squeezed states under general conditions. The analysis is also extended to the evolution of superpositions of coherent states

  7. Noise-induced heating of squeezed states in atom traps

    Hacyan, S; Jauregui, R [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 20-364, Mexico DF 01000 (Mexico)

    2003-04-01

    We present a general model of a quantum parametric oscillator heated by coupled fluctuating fields. Two kinds of external fields are considered: an external fluctuating driving force, and a noise in the basic frequency of the oscillator. The energy increase and the change in the square variances of position and momentum produced in such systems are calculated. As a particular example, we study the case of a Paul trap and the evolution of coherent and squeezed states under general conditions. The analysis is also extended to the evolution of superpositions of coherent states.

  8. Bose-Einstein condensation of trapped atoms with dipole interactions

    Nho, Kwangsik; Landau, D. P.

    2005-01-01

    The path integral Monte Carlo method is used to simulate dilute trapped Bose gases and to investigate the equilibrium properties at finite temperatures. The quantum particles have a long-range dipole-dipole interaction and a short-range s-wave interaction. Using an anisotropic pseudopotential for the long-range dipolar interaction and a hard-sphere potential for the short-range s-wave interaction, we calculate the energetics and structural properties as a function of temperature and the numbe...

  9. Quantum information entropies of ultracold atomic gases in a harmonic trap

    Tutul Biswas; Tarun Kanti Ghosh

    2011-10-01

    The position and momentum space information entropies of weakly interacting trapped atomic Bose–Einstein condensates and spin-polarized trapped atomic Fermi gases at absolute zero temperature are evaluated. We find that sum of the position and momentum space information entropies of these quantum systems containing atoms confined in a $D(≤ 3)$-dimensional harmonic trap has a universal form as $S^{(D)}_t = N(a D − b ln N)$, where ∼ 2.332 and = 2 for interacting bosonic systems and a ∼ 1.982 and = 1 for ideal fermionic systems. These results obey the entropic uncertainty relation given by Beckner, Bialynicki-Birula and Myceilski.

  10. A model of optical trapping cold atoms using a metallic nano wire with surface plasmon effect

    Thi Phuong Lan, Nguyen; Thi Nga, Do; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we construct a new model of optical trapping cold atoms with a metallic nano wire by using surface plasmon effect generated by strong field of laser beams. Using the skin effect, we send a strong oscillated electromagnetic filed through the surface of a metallic nano wire. The local field generated by evanescent effect creates an effective attractive potential near the surface of metallic nano wires. The consideration of some possible boundary and frequency conditions might lead to non-trivial bound state solution for a cold atom. We discus also the case of the laser reflection optical trap with shell-core design, and compare our model with another recent schemes of cold atom optical traps using optical fibers and carbon nanotubes.

  11. Fluorescence spectra of atomic ensembles in a magneto-optical trap as an optical lattice

    Yoon, Seokchan; Kang, Sungsam; Kim, Wook-Rae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) as an optical lattice. Fluorescence spectra of atoms trapped in a MOT with a passively phase-stabilized beam configuration have been measured by means of the photon-counting heterodyne spectroscopy. We observe a narrow Rayleigh peak and well-resolved Raman sidebands in the fluorescence spectra which clearly show that the MOT itself behaves as a three-dimensional optical lattice. Optical-lattice-like properties of the phase-stabilized MOT such as vibrational frequencies and lineshapes of Rayleigh peak and Raman sidebands are investigated systematically for various trap conditions.

  12. Antiferromagnetic Heisenberg Spin Chain of a Few Cold Atoms in a One-Dimensional Trap

    Murmann, S.; Deuretzbacher, F.; Zürn, G.; Bjerlin, J.; Reimann, S. M.; Santos, L.; Lompe, T.; Jochim, S.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the deterministic preparation of antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin chains consisting of up to four fermionic atoms in a one-dimensional trap. These chains are stabilized by strong repulsive interactions between the two spin components without the need for an external periodic potential. We independently characterize the spin configuration of the chains by measuring the spin orientation of the outermost particle in the trap and by projecting the spatial wave function of one spin component on single-particle trap levels. Our results are in good agreement with a spin-chain model for fermionized particles and with numerically exact diagonalizations of the full few-fermion system.

  13. Measurement of the trapping lifetime close to a cold metallic surface on a cryogenic atom-chip

    Emmert, Andreas; Nogues, Gilles; Brune, Michel; Raimond, Jean-Michel; Haroche, Serge

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the trapping lifetime of magnetically trapped atoms in a cryogenic atom-chip experiment. An ultracold atomic cloud is kept at a fixed distance from a thin gold layer deposited on top of a superconducting trapping wire. The lifetime is studied as a function of the distances to the surface and to the wire. Different regimes are observed, where loss rate is determined either by the technical current noise in the wire or the Johnson-Nyquist noise in the metallic gold layer, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Far from the surface, we observe exceptionally long trapping times for an atom-chip, in the 10-minutes range.

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Ultracold Few-Body Processes in Atomic Traps

    Melezhik V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss computational aspects of the developed mathematical models for ultracold few-body processes in atomic traps. The key element of the elaborated computational schemes is a nondirect product discrete variable representation (npDVR we have suggested and applied to the time-dependent and stationary Schrödinger equations with a few spatial variables. It turned out that this approach is very effcient in quantitative analysis of low-dimensional ultracold few-body systems arising in confined geometry of atomic traps. The effciency of the method is demonstrated here on two examples. A brief review is also given of novel results obtained recently.

  15. Investigation of ultracold atoms and molecules in a dark magneto-optical trap

    Wang Li-Rong; Ji Zhong-Hua; Yuan Jin-Peng; Yang Yan; Zhao Yan-Ting; Ma Jie; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,ultracold atoms and molecules in a dark magneto-optical trap (MOT) are studied via depumping the cesium cold atoms into the dark hyperfine ground state.The collision rate is reduced to 0.45 s-1 and the density of the atoms is increased to 5.6 × 1011 cm-3 when the fractional population of the atoms in the bright hyperfine ground state is as low as 0.15.The vibrational spectra of the ultracold cesium molecules are also studied in a standard MOT and in a dark MOT separately.The experimental results are analyzed by using the perturbative quantum approach.

  16. Observation of Entanglement of a Single Photon with a Trapped Atom

    We report the observation of entanglement between a single trapped atom and a single photon at a wavelength suitable for low-loss communication over large distances, thereby achieving a crucial step towards long range quantum networks. To verify the entanglement, we introduce a single atom state analysis. This technique is used for full state tomography of the atom-photon qubit pair. The detection efficiency and the entanglement fidelity are high enough to allow in a next step the generation of entangled atoms at large distances, ready for a final loophole-free Bell experiment

  17. An apparatus for immersing trapped ions into an ultracold gas of neutral atoms.

    Schmid, Stefan; Härter, Arne; Frisch, Albert; Hoinka, Sascha; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2012-05-01

    We describe a hybrid vacuum system in which a single ion or a well-defined small number of trapped ions (in our case Ba(+) or Rb(+)) can be immersed into a cloud of ultracold neutral atoms (in our case Rb). This apparatus allows for the study of collisions and interactions between atoms and ions in the ultracold regime. Our setup is a combination of a Bose-Einstein condensation apparatus and a linear Paul trap. The main design feature of the apparatus is to first separate the production locations for the ion and the ultracold atoms and then to bring the two species together. This scheme has advantages in terms of stability and available access to the region where the atom-ion collision experiments are carried out. The ion and the atoms are brought together using a moving one-dimensional optical lattice transport which vertically lifts the atomic sample over a distance of 30 cm from its production chamber into the center of the Paul trap in another chamber. We present techniques to detect and control the relative position between the ion and the atom cloud. PMID:22667603

  18. Entangled Radiation through an Atomic Reservoir Controlled by Coherent Population Trapping

    We show that it is possible to generate Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen (EPR) entangled radiation using an atomic reservoir controlled by coherent population trapping. A beam of three-level atoms is initially prepared in near-coherent population trapping (CPT) state and acts as a long-lived coherence-controlled reservoir. Four-wave mixing leads to amplification of cavity modes resonant with Rabi sidebands of the atomic dipole transitions. The cavity modes evolve into an EPR state, whose degree of entanglement is controlled by the intensities and the frequencies of the driving fields. This scheme uses the long-lived CPT coherence and is robust against spontaneous emission of the atomic beam. At the same time, this scheme is implemented in a one-step procedure, not in a two-step procedure as was required in Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 (2007) 240401. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  19. Trap losses induced by near-resonant Rydberg dressing of cold atomic gases

    Aman, J. A.; DeSalvo, B. J.; Dunning, F. B.; Killian, T. C.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2016-04-01

    The near-resonant dressing of cold strontium gases and Bose-Einstein condensates contained in an optical dipole trap (ODT) with the 5 s 30 s S31 Rydberg state is investigated as a function of the effective two-photon Rabi frequency, detuning, and dressing time. The measurements demonstrate that a rapid decrease in the ground-state atom population in the ODT occurs even for weak dressing and when well detuned from resonance. This decrease is attributed to Rydberg atom excitation, which can lead to direct escape from the trap and to population of very long-lived 5 s 5 p 0, 2 3P metastable states. The effects of interactions between Rydberg atoms, including those populated by blackbody radiation, are analyzed. The work has important implications when considering the use of Rydberg dressing to control the interactions between dressed ground-state atoms.

  20. Search for Electric dipole moment (EDM) in laser cooled and trapped 225Ra atoms

    Kalita, Mukut; Bailey, Kevin; Dietrich, Matthew; Green, John; Holt, Roy; Korsch, Wolfgang; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Lemke, Nathan; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Tom; Parker, Richard; Singh, Jaideep; Trimble, Will; Argonne National Laboratory Collaboration; University Of Chicago Collabration; University Of Kentucky Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We are searching for an EDM of the diamagnetic 225Ra atom. 225Ra has nuclear spin I =1/2. Experimental sensitivity to its EDM is enhanced due to its heavy mass and the increased Schiff moment of its octupole deformed nucleus. Our experiment involves collecting laser cooled Ra atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), transporting them 1 meter with a far off-resonant optical dipole trap (ODT) and then transferring the atoms to a second standing-wave ODT in our experimental chamber. We will report our recent experiences in polarizing and observing Larmor precession of 225Ra atoms in parallel electric and magnetic fields in a magnetically shielded region and progress towards a first measurement of the EDM of 225Ra. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and contract No. DE-FG02-99ER41101.

  1. Enhancement in the number of trapped atoms in a cesium magneto-optical trap by a near-resonant control laser

    We demonstrate enhancement in the number of trapped cesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) using a control laser that illuminates only a small faction of the capture region of the trap without interacting with the cold cloud of atoms. The enhancement is maximized when the laser is slightly blue detuned with respect to the cooling transition. Trap loading curves point to approximately a twofold increase in the capture rate, which as a consequence results in the increase in the steady state number of trapped atoms. Enhanced loading is confirmed by MOT loading and decay curves taken under the modulation of the control laser beam. Optical pumping of the inaccessible Zeeman states into the stretched states is suggested as a possible mechanism

  2. Laser cooling of single trapped atoms to the ground state: a dark state in position space

    Morigi, Giovanna; Cirac Sasturáin, Juan Ignacio,; Ellinger, K; Zoller, P.

    1997-01-01

    We propose a scheme that allows us to laser cool trapped atoms to the ground state of a one-dimensional confining potential. The scheme is based on the creation of a dark state by designing the laser profile, so that the hottest atoms are coherently pumped to another internal level, and then repumped back. The scheme works beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit. We present results of a full quantum treatment for a one-dimensional model.

  3. Direct Observation of Coherent Population Trapping in a Superconducting Artificial Atom

    Kelly, William R.; Dutton, Zachary; Schlafer, John; Mookerji, Bhaskar; Ohki, Thomas A.; Kline, Jeffrey S.; Pappas, David P.

    2009-01-01

    The phenomenon of Coherent Population Trapping (CPT) of an atom (or solid state "artificial atom"), and the associated effect of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT), are clear demonstrations of quantum interference due to coherence in multi-level quantum systems. We report observation of CPT in a superconducting phase qubit by simultaneously driving two coherent transitions in a $\\Lambda$-type configuration, utilizing the three lowest lying levels of a local minimum of a phase qubi...

  4. Non-Ground-State Bose-Einstein Condensates of Trapped Atoms

    V. I. Yukalov; Yukalova, E. P.; V. S. Bagnato

    1997-01-01

    The possibility of creating a Bose condensate of trapped atoms in a non-ground state is suggested. Such a nonequilibrium Bose condensate can be formed if one, first, obtains the conventional Bose condensate in the ground state and then transfers the condensed atoms to a non-ground state by means of a resonance pumping. The properties of ground and non-ground states are compared and plausible applications of such nonequilibrium condensates are discussed.

  5. Three-body loss of trapped ultracold $^{87}$Rb atoms due to a Feshbach resonance

    Yurovsky, V A

    2002-01-01

    The loss of ultracold trapped atoms in the vicinity of a Feshbach resonance is treated as a two-stage reaction, using the Breit-Wigner theory. The first stage is the formation of a resonant diatomic molecule, and the second one is its deactivation by inelastic collisions with other atoms. This model is applied to the analysis of recent experiments on $^{87}$Rb, leading to an estimated value of $6\\times 10^{-11}$ cm$^{3}/$s for the deactivation rate coefficient.

  6. Atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy of individual electron trap states using force detected dynamic tunnelling

    We report the first atomic scale imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electron trap states in completely non-conducting surfaces by dynamic tunnelling force microscopy/spectroscopy. Single electrons are dynamically shuttled to/from individual states in thick films of hafnium silicate and silicon dioxide. The new method opens up surfaces that are inaccessible to the scanning tunnelling microscope for imaging and spectroscopy on an atomic scale.

  7. Preparation of Bose Einstein condensates in realistc trapping potentials for precision atom interferometry

    Posso Trujillo, Katerine; Rasel, Ernst M.; Gaaloul, Naceur; Quantus Team

    Preparation of Bose Einstein condensates in realistc trapping potentials for precision atom interferometry Theoretical studies of the ground state and the dynamical properties of Bose Einstein condensates (BECs) are typically realized by considering the ensemble as being initiaally trapped by a harmonic potential. Dramatic discrepancies were found by comparing numerical results of the long-time expansion of BECs after being released from the harmonic trap, and measurements of the free evolution and delta-kick cooling (DKC) of a 87Rb BEC on large timescales of up to 2 s in micro-gravity (micro-g) environment such as those performed in the QUANTUS project from our group. The modification in the dynamics of a 87Rb BEC with the application of DKC by using experimentally implemented trapping geometries and the effect of gravity have been studied. Three different configurations have been considered: atom chip-based potential, dipole trap and the time-averaged orbiting potential. Such discrepancies may be crucial in high precision atom interferometry experiments in micro-g and zero-g platforms in which the implementation of DKC is mandatory to achieve the long-expansion times required

  8. Coherence of a qubit stored in Zeeman levels of a single optically trapped atom

    Rosenfeld, Wenjamin; Weinfurter, Harald [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-80799 Muenchen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Volz, Juergen; Weber, Markus [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-80799 Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    We experimentally investigate the coherence properties of a qubit stored in the Zeeman substates of the 5{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}, F=1 hyperfine ground level of a single optically trapped {sup 87}Rb atom. Larmor precession of a single atomic spin-1 system is observed by preparing the atom in a defined initial spin state and then measuring the resulting state after a programmable period of free evolution. Additionally, by performing quantum-state tomography, maximum knowledge about the spin coherence is gathered. By using an active magnetic field stabilization and without application of a magnetic guiding field, we achieve transverse and longitudinal dephasing times of T{sub 2}{sup *}=75-150 {mu}s and T{sub 1}>0.5 ms, respectively. We derive the light-shift distribution of a single atom in the approximately harmonic potential of a dipole trap and show that the measured atomic spin coherence is limited mainly by residual position- and state-dependent effects in the optical trapping potential. The improved understanding enables longer coherence times, an important prerequisite for future applications in long-distance quantum communication and computation with atoms in optical lattices, or for a loophole-free test of Bell's inequality.

  9. Optimizing the production of metastable calcium atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    Gruenert, J; Gruenert, Jan; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the production of long lived metastable (3P2, n=4) calcium atoms in a magneto-optical trap operating on the 1S0 to 1P1 transition at 423 nm. For excited 1P1-atoms a weak decay channel into the triplet states 3P2 and 3P1 exists via the singlet 1D2 (n=3) state. The undesired 3P1-atoms decay back to the ground state within 0.4 ms and can be fully recaptured if the illuminated trap volume is sufficiently large. We obtain a flux of above 10^10 atoms/s into the 3P2-state. We find that our MOT life time of 23 ms is mainly limited by this loss channel and thus the 3P2-production is not hampered by inelasic collisions. If we close the loss channel by repumping the 1D2-atoms with a 671 nm laser back into the MOT cycling transition, a non-exponential 72 ms trap decay is observed indicating the presence of inelastic two-body collisions between 1S0 and 1P1 atoms.

  10. An apparatus for immersing trapped ions into an ultracold gas of neutral atoms

    Schmid, Stefan; Frisch, Albert; Hoinka, Sascha; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2012-01-01

    We describe a hybrid vacuum system in which a single ion or a well defined small number of trapped ions (in our case Ba$^+$ or Rb$^+$) can be immersed into a cloud of ultracold neutral atoms (in our case Rb). This novel apparatus allows for the study of collisions and interactions between atoms and ions in the ultracold regime. Our setup is a combination of a Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) apparatus and a linear Paul trap. The main design feature of the apparatus is to first separate the production locations for the ion and the ultracold atoms and then to bring the two species together. This scheme has advantages in terms of stability and available access to the region where the atom-ion collision experiments are carried out. The ion and the atoms are brought together using a novel moving 1-dimensional optical lattice transport which vertically lifts the atomic sample over a distance of 30$\\,$cm from its production chamber into the center of the Paul trap in another chamber. We present techniques to detect ...