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Sample records for 84-year-old hispanic man

  1. Rhizina undulatu on stem and roots of 84-year-old Scots pine trees

    Zbigniew Sierota

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Apothecia of Rhizina undulata Fr. were found on and around 84-year-old Scots pine trees in fire-free managed forest. The trees were weakened: crowns were strongly transparent, needles were yellowish or red MI part of the crown, the 1997 height increment of shoots decreased by about 60. One apothecium developed on the stem of tree. 7 cm above the ground level. The other 8 were associated with the roots. Three weeks after ascocarps had been removed 8 new ones were found. Some details referring to apothecia are given: distances from the root collar, dimensions, fresh weight, moisture and "index of undulativity" (Fw.

  2. Would screening for lung cancer benefit 75- to 84-year-old residents of the United States?

    JohnVarlotto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The National Lung Screening Trial demonstrated that screening for lung cancer improved overall survival (OS and reduced lung cancer mortality in the 55-74-year-old age group by increasing the proportion of cancers detected at an early stage. Because of the increasing life expectancy of the American population, we investigated whether screening for lung cancer might benefit men and women aged 75-84 years. Materials/Methods: Rates of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC from 2000-2009 were calculated in both these younger and older age groups using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Reporting (SEER database. OS and lung cancer -specific survival (LCSS in patients with Stage I NSCLC diagnosed from 2004-2009 were analyzed to determine the effects of age and treatment. Results: The per capita incidence of NSCLC decreased in the 55-74 cohort, but increased in the 75-84 cohort over the study period. Crude lung cancer death rates in the two age groups who had no specific treatment were 39.5% and 44.9%, respectively. These rates fell in both age groups when increasingly aggressive treatment was used. Rates of OS and LCSS improved significantly with increasingly aggressive treatment in the 75-84 age group. The survival benefits of increasingly aggressive treatment in 75-84 year old females did not differ from their counterparts in the younger cohort. Conclusions: Screening for lung cancer might be of benefit to individuals at increased risk of lung cancer in the age 75-84 group. The survival benefits of aggressive therapy are similar in females between 55-74 and 75-84 years old.

  3. Obesity and Hispanic Americans

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Obesity Obesity and Hispanic Americans Among Mexican American women, 77 ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  4. Would screening for lung cancer benefit 75- to 84-year-old residents of the United States?

    JohnVarlotto; MalcolmM.DeCamp; JohnFlickinger; JessicaLake; AbramRecht; ChandraBelani; NengliangYao

    2014-01-01

    Background: The National Lung Screening Trial demonstrated that screening for lung cancer improved overall survival (OS) and reduced lung cancer mortality in the 55-74-year-old age group by increasing the proportion of cancers detected at an early stage. Because of the increasing life expectancy of the American population, we investigated whether screening for lung cancer might benefit men and women aged 75-84 years. Materials/Methods: Rates of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from 2000-20...

  5. Would Screening for Lung Cancer Benefit 75- to 84-Year-Old Residents of the United States?

    Varlotto, John M.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Flickinger, John C; Lake, Jessica; Recht, Abram; Belani, Chandra. P.; Reed, Michael F.; Toth, Jennifer W; Mackley, Heath B.; Sciamanna, Christopher N.; Lipton, Alan; Ali, Suhail M.; Mahraj, Richkesvar P. M.; Gilbert, Christopher R.; Yao, Nengliang (Aaron)

    2014-01-01

    Background: The National Lung Screening Trial demonstrated that screening for lung cancer improved overall survival (OS) and reduced lung cancer mortality in the 55- to 74-year-old age group by increasing the proportion of cancers detected at an early stage. Because of the increasing life expectancy of the American population, we investigated whether screening for lung cancer might benefit men and women aged 75–84 years. Materials/Methods: Rates of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from 2...

  6. Hispanic Higher Education and HSIs. Fact Sheet

    Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents facts about Hispanic higher education. Facts on the following topics are presented: (1) Hispanic demographics; (2) Hispanic academic attainment; (3) Hispanic higher education; and (4) Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs).

  7. Hispanic American Heritage, Intermediate.

    Shepherd, Mike

    This resource book features the cultural heritage of Hispanics living within the United States and includes ideas, materials, and activities to be used with students in the intermediate grades and middle school. This book explores the definition of the term "Hispanic Americans" and suggests a multilayered population with a variety of cultural…

  8. Diabetes and Hispanic Americans

    ... Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices Hispanic/Latino Asthma Cancer Chronic Liver Disease Diabetes Heart Disease Hepatitis HIV/AIDS Immunizations Infant Heath & Mortality Mental Health Obesity Organ and Tissue Donation Stroke Stay Connected ...

  9. Bicultural Advertising and Hispanic Acculturation

    Tsai, Wan-Hsiu Sunny; Li, Cong

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the moderating effects of acculturation modes (assimilated, integrated, and separated) on Hispanic consumers' responses to three advertising targeting strategies (Caucasian targeted, bicultural, and Hispanic targeted). The hypotheses were empirically tested in a 3 x 3 factorial experiment with 155 self-identified Hispanic adult…

  10. Hispanics in Fast Food Jobs.

    Charner, Ivan; Fraser, Bryna Shore

    A study examined the employment of Hispanics in the fast-food industry. Data were obtained from a national survey of employees at 279 fast-food restaurants from seven companies in which 194 (4.2 percent) of the 4,660 respondents reported being Hispanic. Compared with the total sample, Hispanic fast-food employees were slightly less likely to be…

  11. Hispanic Health PSA (:60)

    2015-05-05

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the May 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. About one in six people living in the U.S. are Hispanic. The two leading causes of death in this group are heart disease and cancer, accounting for two out of five deaths. Unfortunately, many Hispanics face considerable barriers to getting high quality health care, including language and low income. Learn what can be done to reduce the barriers.  Created: 5/5/2015 by Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE).   Date Released: 5/5/2015.

  12. Education's Hispanic Challenge

    Georges Vernez

    1998-01-01

    Thirty years of increasing immigration from Mexico, Central America, and South America, has led to a rapid increase in the population of Hispanic origin in the United States. Hispanic children and youths will enter an economy that has changes significantly over the past few decades. The number of well-paying manufacturing jobs that have been the backbone of the U.S. economy are stagnating and are projected to provide employment for only 11 percent of the economy by 2005 (U.S. Department of La...

  13. Top Hispanic Degree Producers

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a list of the top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M.H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy students at the Indiana University Bloomington. For the year 2012, the listings focus on Hispanic students. Data for…

  14. Unusual presentation of cactus spines in the flank of an elderly man: a case report

    Freeman Scott

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Splinters and spines of plant matter are common foreign bodies in skin wounds of the extremities, and often present embedded in the dermis or subcutaneous tissue. Vegetative foreign bodies are highly inflammatory and, if not completely removed, can cause infection, toxic reactions, or granuloma formation. Older patients are at increased risk for infection from untreated plant foreign bodies. The most common error in plant splinter and spine management is failure to detect their presence. Case presentation Here we report a case of cactus spines in an 84-year-old Caucasian man presenting on the right flank as multiple, red papules with spiny extensions. This presentation was unusual both in location and the spinous character of the lesions, and only after punch biopsy analysis was a diagnosis of cactus matter spines made. Conclusions Our patient presented with an unusual case of cactus spines that required histopathology for identification. Skin lesions with neglected foreign bodies are a common cause of malpractice claims. If not removed, foreign bodies of the skin, particularly in elderly individuals, can result in inflammatory and infectious sequela. This report underscores the importance of thoroughly evaluating penetrating skin lesions for the presence of foreign bodies, such as splinters and spines.

  15. Exposure of Hispanic Youth to Alcohol Advertising.

    2003

    Hispanics are the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States. This Hispanic population is also younger than the general population: 40% of Hispanics are under 21, versus 30% of the entire population. The number of Hispanics under the age of 21 grew 61% between 1990 and 2000, totaling 17% of the nation's youth under 21 in 2000. The Center on…

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Hispanic Health

    ... can go a long way. Doctors and other healthcare professionals can: Work with interpreters to eliminate language barriers, ... to help improve Hispanic health. Doctors and other healthcare professionals can Work with interpreters to eliminate language barriers, ...

  17. Profile: Hispanic/Latino Americans

    ... Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. According to the ... are: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV/AIDS, obesity, suicide, and liver disease. Other Health Concerns: Hispanics ...

  18. Infant Mortality and Hispanic Americans

    ... Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices Hispanic/Latino Asthma Cancer Chronic Liver Disease Diabetes Heart Disease Hepatitis HIV/AIDS Immunizations Infant Heath & Mortality Mental Health Obesity Organ and Tissue Donation Stroke Stay Connected ...

  19. Self-Harm Experiences among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Young Adults

    Croyle, Kristin L.

    2007-01-01

    Very little research exists on self-harm in Hispanic populations, although there is a strong literature that addresses suicidality in Hispanics. This study compares self-reported rates of self-harm in 255 non-Hispanic White (NHW) and 187 Hispanic (predominantly Mexican American) undergraduate students. Results indicated that self-harm is…

  20. A Comparison of Perinatal HIV Prevention Opportunities for Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Women in California

    Kropp, Rhonda Y.; Sarnquist, Clea C.; Montgomery, Elizabeth T.; Ruiz, Juan D.; Maldonado, Yvonne A.

    2006-01-01

    Using a semi-structured survey and convenience sample of pregnant/recently delivered Hispanic (n = 453) and non-Hispanic (n = 904) women in four California counties, this study compared rates of timely prenatal care (PNC) initiation, HIV test counseling, test offering, and test acceptance in PNC between Hispanic and non-Hispanic women. Hispanic…

  1. Genes Might Explain Hispanics' Added Longevity

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160528.html Genes Might Explain Hispanics' Added Longevity Differences in 'genetic ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Hispanic American Health Recent Health ...

  2. Educating Hispanic Students: Effective Instructional Practices

    N.Padrón, Yolanda; C.Waxman, Hersh; H.Rivera, Héctor

    2002-01-01

    Effective instructional practices are crucial to addressing the educational crisis facing many Hispanic students in the United States. The number of Hispanic students attending public schools has increased dramatically in recent decades, yet Hispanic students as a group have the lowest levels of education and the highest dropout rate of any student group. Conditions of poverty and health, as well as other social problems have made it difficult for some Hispanics living in the U.S. to improve ...

  3. Education Level of Catholic Hispanic Deacons

    Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed self-reported religiosity, spirituality, faith-related behaviors, leadership styles, and personality dimensions of 156 Hispanic Catholic deacons, based on varied educational degrees assisting in Hispanic (n = 91) or non-Hispanic (n = 65) parishes. Results found no significant differences on any self-reported variables…

  4. Hispanic Self-Employment: Does Gender Matter?

    Zuiker, Virginia Solis; Katras, Mary Jo; Montalto, Catherine P.; Olson, Patricia D.

    2003-01-01

    Drawing on human capital, social capital, and acculturation theories, gender differences in income were examined among 7,760 self-employed Hispanic Americans in California, using 1990 census data. Hispanic self-employed women earned less than Hispanic self-employed men and were more likely to be in service occupations. Having less than a high…

  5. Teaching Hispanic Linguistics: Strategies to Engage Learners

    Knouse, Stephanie M.; Gupton, Timothy; Abreau, Laurel

    2015-01-01

    Even though many post-secondary institutions offer a variety of Hispanic linguistics classes (Hualde 2006; Lipski 2006), research on the pedagogy of Hispanic linguistics is an underdeveloped or non-existent area of the discipline. Courses in Hispanic linguistics can present not only linguistic challenges for non-native speakers of Spanish, but…

  6. Remeasuring man.

    Weisberg, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Samuel George Morton (1799-1851) was the most highly regarded American scientist of the early and middle 19th century. Thanks largely to Stephen Jay Gould's book The Mismeasure of Man, Morton's cranial capacity measurements of different races is now held up as a prime example of and cautionary tale against scientific racism. A team of anthropologists recently reevaluated Morton's work and argued that it was Gould, not Morton, who was biased in his analysis. This article is a reexamination of the Morton and Gould controversy. It argues that most of Gould's arguments against Morton are sound. Although Gould made some errors and overstated his case in a number of places, he provided prima facia evidence, as yet unrefuted, that Morton did indeed mismeasure his skulls in ways that conformed to 19th century racial biases. Gould's critique of Morton ought to remain as an illustration of implicit bias in science. PMID:24761929

  7. Alcohol and the Hispanic Community

    ... Origin Trends in drinking among Hispanics vary by country of origin. Among men, Puerto Ricans tend to drink the ... drinks per week (beer, wine, and liquor) by country/nation of origin Country/Nation of Origin »» Puerto Rico »» Mexico »» South/ ...

  8. Asthma in Hispanics. An 8-year update.

    Rosser, Franziska J; Forno, Erick; Cooper, Philip J; Celedón, Juan C

    2014-06-01

    This review provides an update on asthma in Hispanics, a diverse group tracing their ancestry to countries previously under Spanish rule. A marked variability in the prevalence and morbidity from asthma remains among Hispanic subgroups in the United States and Hispanic America. In the United States, Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans have high and low burdens of asthma, respectively (the "Hispanic Paradox"). This wide divergence in asthma morbidity among Hispanic subgroups is multifactorial, likely reflecting the effects of known (secondhand tobacco smoke, air pollution, psychosocial stress, obesity, inadequate treatment) and potential (genetic variants, urbanization, vitamin D insufficiency, and eradication of parasitic infections) risk factors. Barriers to adequate asthma management in Hispanics include economic and educational disadvantages, lack of health insurance, and no access to or poor adherence with controller medications such as inhaled corticosteroids. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of asthma in Hispanic subgroups, many questions remain. Studies of asthma in Hispanic America should focus on environmental or lifestyle factors that are more relevant to asthma in this region (e.g., urbanization, air pollution, parasitism, and stress). In the United States, research studies should focus on risk factors that are known to or may diverge among Hispanic subgroups, including but not limited to epigenetic variation, prematurity, vitamin D level, diet, and stress. Clinical trials of culturally appropriate interventions that address multiple aspects of asthma management in Hispanic subgroups should be prioritized for funding. Ensuring high-quality healthcare for all remains a pillar of eliminating asthma disparities. PMID:24881937

  9. Breast cancer characteristics and outcomes among Hispanic Black and Hispanic White women

    Banegas, Matthew P.; Li, Christopher I.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluating breast cancer outcomes specific to Hispanics of different race (e.g. Hispanic Black, Hispanic White) may further explain variations in the burden of breast cancer among Hispanic women. Using data from the SEER 17 population-based registries, we evaluated the association between race/ethnicity and tumor stage, hormone receptor status, and breast cancer-specific mortality. The study cohort of 441,742 women, aged 20–79, who were diagnosed with primary invasive breast cancer between Ja...

  10. Colorectal Cancer Test Use Among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic U.S. Populations

    Lori A. Pollack, MD, MPH

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Although colorectal cancer mortality rates in the general U.S. population declined slightly from 1992 to 2000, the rates for Hispanic men and women did not. Disparity in colorectal cancer screening among Hispanics may be an important factor in the unchanged mortality trends. This study examined rates of colorectal cancer test use among Hispanic and non-Hispanic adults in the United States. Methods Using sampling weights and logistic regression, we analyzed colorectal cancer test use among 5680 Hispanic and 104,733 non-Hispanic adults aged 50 years and older who participated in the 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. We estimated the percentages and adjusted odds ratios (ORs of the respondents’ reported test use by sociodemographic characteristics, health care access, and state or territory of residence. Results Hispanic respondents aged 50 and older reported having had either a fecal occult blood test within the past year or a lower endoscopy (sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy within 10 years less frequently (41.9% than non-Hispanic respondents (55.2%. Rates of test use were lower for respondents who reported less education, lower income, no health insurance, and no usual source of health care, regardless of Hispanic ethnicity. After adjusting for differences in education, income, insurance, and having a usual source of health care, Hispanic respondents remained less likely than non-Hispanic respondents to report colorectal cancer testing (OR for fecal occult blood test, 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56–0.81; OR for lower endoscopy, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.77–0.99. Greater disparity in screening rates between Hispanics and non-Hispanics was observed in Colorado, California, and Texas than in other states. Conclusion A disparity exists between Hispanic and non-Hispanic U.S. adults in colorectal cancer test use. This disparity varies among the states, highlighting the diverse health care experience of Hispanic adults in

  11. Differences in Household Saving between Non-Hispanic White and Hispanic Households

    Fisher, Patti J.; Hsu, Chungwen

    2012-01-01

    This study uses the 2007 Survey of Consumer Finances to empirically explore differences in saving behavior between Hispanic (N = 533) and non-Hispanic White (N = 2,473) households. The results of the logistic regression model show that self-employed Hispanics were more likely to save, while self-employment was not significant for Whites. Being…

  12. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17 "chistes" (jokes), 1…

  13. Hispanic Population Growth and Rural Income Inequality

    Parrado, Emilio A.; Kandel, William A.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between Hispanic population growth and changes in U.S. rural income inequality from 1990 through 2000. Applying comparative approaches used for urban areas we disentangle Hispanic population growth's contribution to inequality by comparing and statistically modeling changes in the family income Gini coefficient across…

  14. 25 Great Ideas for Hispanic Heritage

    Instructor, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Hispanic Heritage Month, celebrated September 15th through October 15th, is a great opportunity to kick off a whole year of cultural discovery. This article presents 25 great ideas for Hispanic heritage. These 25 fresh ideas--from Aztec math to Carnaval masks--are easy to put together, and they offer students the chance to celebrate their own…

  15. Reversing the Trend of Hispanic Undereducation.

    National Council of La Raza, Washington, DC.

    This paper answers specific questions about present and future issues concerning the undereducation of Hispanic students. The following topics are covered: (1) the educational status of Hispanics; (2) the role of federal education programs--including Head Start, Education Consolidation and Improvement Act, Chapter 1, Pell Grants, and bilingual…

  16. Hispanic Cultural Influence on Environmental Concern.

    Noe, Francis P.; Snow, Rob

    1990-01-01

    The New Environmental Paradigm scale of environmental concern was applied in two survey populations to determine whether differences in ethnic background influenced preferences toward the environment. Results indicated that Hispanic users were ecologically attuned to the environment on a par with non-Hispanics from the general population.…

  17. Hispanic Teenage Pregnancy: Overview and Implications.

    Lopez, Norma Y.

    Although teenage pregnancy among Hispanics has reached alarming levels, researchers generally have not separated this population out for separate analysis. The data are incomplete, but this report is an attempt to address the need for specific information about Hispanic teenage pregnancy and parenthood by subgroup and state. Data are presented…

  18. Diabetes in Hispanic American Youth

    Lawrence, Jean M.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; Reynolds, Kristi; Beyer, Jennifer; Pettitt, David J.; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Marcovina, Santica M.; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Hamman, Richard F.; ,

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To report the 2001 prevalence and 2002–2005 incidence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in Hispanic American youth and to describe the demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of these youth. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Data from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study, a population-based multicenter observational study of youth aged 0–19 years with physician-diagnosed diabetes, were used to estimate the prevalence and incidence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Information obt...

  19. Comparing the T scores from bone sonometer measurements in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women

    Droege M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethnicity is an important risk factor for the development of osteoporosis. Non-Hispanic white or Asian women are commonly considered at higher risk than other ethnicities. Hispanics in the U.S. are of Mexican, Caribbean, Central American, or South American descent. Conclusive data on the relative risk of osteoporosis in Hispanic women based upon heritage within the Hispanic population are not available. Objective: To investigate whether Hispanic white women are at a significantly lower risk than non-Hispanic whites for the development of osteoporosis. Methods: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Community health screenings. Participants: Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women. Intervention: Bone density measurements of the non-dominant heel. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics including regression analyses were performed using SPSS 14.0. Main Outcomes Measure: T scores. Results: Overall, measurements were obtained from 352 women (209 Hispanic & 143 non-Hispanic white ranging in age from 55-97 years old. The mean T score obtained for Hispanic women was -1.194 and -1.280 for non-Hispanic white women. The correlation between the obtained T score and age was negative (r = -0.36, p<0.01, reflecting bone loss with increasing age. Regression analysis using age and ethnicity showed that ethnicity was a non-significant contributor to the best-fit regression line (t=0.60, p=0.55. Conclusion: This study indicates that Hispanic white women may be at comparable risk of developing osteoporosis as non-Hispanic white women.

  20. Hispanics/Latinos & Cardiovascular Disease: Statistical Fact Sheet

    ... 7%), non- Hispanic white men (23.9%), and American Indian or Alaska Native men (24.6%). Similarly, Asian women (5.5%) and Hispanic women (9.6%) were less likely to be current smokers than non- Hispanic black women (17.6%), non-Hispanic ... and American Indian or Alaska Native women (20.7%). Physical ...

  1. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000-2013.

    Nelson, Christina A; Starr, J Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Mead, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000-2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months. PMID:26889721

  2. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000–2013

    Starr, J. Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J.; Mead, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000–2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months. PMID:26889721

  3. The oldest man ever?

    Wilmoth, J; Skytthe, A; Friou, D;

    1996-01-01

    accurate. Based on the available information, it also seems a reasonable conjecture that he may be the oldest man alive today and perhaps the oldest man who has ever lived. This study documents an extreme example of human longevity and records characteristics of the man's life that may provide clues about...

  4. Clinical Characteristics and Awareness of Skin Cancer in Hispanic Patients

    Javed, Saba; Javed, Syed A; Mays, Rana M; Tyring, Stephen K.

    2013-01-01

    Skin cancer in darker skin is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. We sought to assess the clinical characteristics of cutaneous malignancy amongst Hispanic skin cancer patients and compare them to age-matched non-Hispanic Caucasians.  In this retrospective study, 150 Hispanic skin cancer patients were identified from electronic medical records and age-matched to 150 non-Hispanic Caucasian controls with skin cancer.  The incidence of actinic keratoses (AKs) in Hispanic skin c...

  5. Hispanics and Higher Education: Multicultural Myopia.

    Erlach, David

    2000-01-01

    Hispanic Americans are underrepresented in higher education and in business faculty. Their career development is often hindered by discrimination and they are often channeled into two-year colleges where attrition is higher. (SK)

  6. Lung Cancer and Hispanics: Know the Facts

    ... cause among Hispanic women. November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, a good time to separate myth from fact when it comes to lung cancer. So what are the facts?  Smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer. Not ...

  7. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    ... Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices Hispanic/Latino Asthma Cancer Chronic Liver Disease Diabetes Heart Disease Hepatitis HIV/AIDS Immunizations Infant Heath & Mortality Mental Health Obesity Organ and Tissue Donation Stroke Stay Connected ...

  8. Are Hispanic Women Happier About Unintended Births?

    Hartnett, Caroline Sten

    2012-01-01

    Reducing unintended pregnancies – particularly among Hispanic and Black women, who have relatively high rates – is a key public health goal in the United States. However, descriptive literature has suggested that Hispanic women are happier about these pregnancies compared with White and Black women, which could mean that there is variation across groups in the consequences of the resulting births. The purpose of this study was to examine variations in happiness about unintended births by race...

  9. Friendships Influence Hispanic Students' Implicit Attitudes toward White Non-Hispanics Relative to African Americans

    Aberson, Christopher L.; Porter, Michael K.; Gaffney, Amber M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the role of Hispanic students' friendships with White non-Hispanics (n-Hs) and African Americans (AAs) in predicting implicit and explicit prejudices toward these groups. Participants (N = 73) completed implicit and explicit attitude measures and a friendship questionnaire. Friendships were associated with implicit attitudes…

  10. Participation in Physical Activity among Normal- and Overweight Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Adolescents

    Stovitz, Steven D.; Steffen, Lyn M.; Boostrom, Ardys

    2008-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between weight status and participation in physical activity (PA) among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white (NHW) adolescent boys and girls. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, height and weight were measured and a modified 2001 Youth Risk Behavior Survey was administered to 1302…

  11. One-man band

    Stillman, R.

    2013-01-01

    This website presents practice-based research related to solo simultaneous instrumental performance ('one-man band'). The site was conceived as a creative and widely accessible platform for music and ideas resulting from one-man band activates carried out between 2008 and 2013. Central to this project is an interest in how one-man band technique informs compositional process, including studio production. Through presentation and analysis of the author’s own creative practice, the site exp...

  12. A Pre-Hispanic Head

    Bianucci, Raffaella; Jeziorska, Maria; Lallo, Rudy; Mattutino, Grazia; Massimelli, Massimo; Phillips, Genevieve; Appenzeller, Otto

    2008-01-01

    This report on a male head revealed biologic rhythms, as gleaned from hydrogen isotope ratios in hair, consistent with a South-American origin and Atomic Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon dating (AMS) compatible with the last pre-Hispanic period (1418–1491 AD, 95.4% probability). Biopsies showed exceptionally well-preserved tissues. The hair contained high levels of toxic elements (lead, arsenic and mercury) incompatible with life. There was no evidence for lead deposition in bone consistent with post-mortem accumulation of this toxic element in the hair. We propose that the high content of metals in hair was the result of metabolic activity of bacteria leading to metal complexation in extra cellular polymeric substances (EPS). This is a recognized protective mechanism for bacteria that thrive in toxic environments. This mechanism may account for the tissues preservation and gives a hint at soil composition where the head was presumably buried. Our results have implications for forensic toxicology which has, hitherto, relied on hair analyses as one means to reconstruct pre-mortem metabolism and for detecting toxic elements accumulated during life. Our finding also has implications for other archaeological specimens where similar circumstances may distort the results of toxicological studies. PMID:18446229

  13. HISPANIC ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT OUTREACH PROJECT

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) in cooperation with the Self Reliance Foundation (SRF) is conducting the Hispanic Environmental and Waste Management Outreach Project (HEWMO) to increase science and environmental literacy, specifically that related to nuclear engineering and waste management in the nuclear industry, among the US Hispanic population. The project will encourage Hispanic youth and young adults to pursue careers through the regular presentation of Spanish-speaking scientists and engineers and other role models, as well as career information on nationally broadcast radio programs reaching youth and parents. This project will encourage making science, mathematics, and technology a conscious part of the everyday life experiences of Hispanic youth and families. The SRF in collaboration with the Hispanic Radio Network (HRN) produces and broadcasts radio programs to address the topics and meet the objectives as outlined in the Environmental Literacy Plan and DOE-EM Communications Plan in this document. The SRF has in place a toll-free ''800'' number Information and Resource Referral (I and RR) service that national radio program listeners can call to obtain information and resource referrals as well as give their reactions to the radio programs that will air. HRN uses this feature to put listeners in touch with local organizations and resources that can provide them with further information and assistance on the related program topics

  14. The Green Man

    Watson-Newlin, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The Jolly Green Giant. Robin Hood. The Bamberg Cathedral. Tales of King Arthur. Ecology. What do they have in common? What legends and ancient myths are shrouded in the tales of the Green Man? Most often perceived as an ancient Celtic symbol as the god of spring and summer, the Green Man disappears and returns year after year, century after…

  15. Science Is "Ciencia": Meeting the Needs of Hispanic American Students.

    Rakow, Steven J.; Bermudez, Andrea B.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews some of the factors known to influence the achievement and retention of Hispanic Americans in technologically related fields. Discusses directions in which research should focus to meet the needs of Hispanic-American students. (PR)

  16. Sociocultural Contexts of Time to First Sex among Hispanic Adolescents.

    Upchurch, Dawn M.; Aneshensel, Carol S.; Mudgal, Jyoti; McNeely, Clea Sucoff

    2001-01-01

    Examines the sociocultural influences on risk of first sex among Hispanic teens living in Los Angeles County. Hispanic teens living in low-density Hispanic neighborhoods have significantly higher risk of sex than do teens living in neighborhoods with higher levels of ambient hazards. Results highlight the importance of characterizing sociocultural…

  17. CDC Vital Signs-Hispanic Health

    2015-05-05

    This podcast is based on the May 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. About one in six people living in the U.S. are Hispanic. The two leading causes of death in this group are heart disease and cancer, accounting for two out of five deaths. Unfortunately, many Hispanics face considerable barriers to getting high quality health care, including language and low income. Learn what can be done to reduce the barriers.  Created: 5/5/2015 by Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE).   Date Released: 5/5/2015.

  18. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Perception and Knowledge: A Comparison of Hispanic and White College Students in a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    McMahan, Shari; Cathorall, Michelle; Romero, Devan R.

    2007-01-01

    There are clear health conditions that disproportionately affect the Hispanic population. One hundred twenty-four (45%) Hispanic and 153 (55%) White college students completed a questionnaire on cardiovascular disease (CVD) awareness, knowledge, and perceptions of risk. Results indicated that Hispanic students rated themselves as poorer in health,…

  19. Manned Flight Simulator (MFS)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Aircraft Simulation Division, home to the Manned Flight Simulator (MFS), provides real-time, high fidelity, hardware-in-the-loop flight simulation capabilities...

  20. Manned systems technology discipline

    Bretoi, Remus

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on manned systems technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: crew-systems interfaces and interactions; crew training; on-board systems maintenance and support; habitability and environment; and computational human factors.

  1. Rekordhind Man Ray eest

    1998-01-01

    Ameerika sürrealistliku fotograafi Man Ray 1926. a. Pariisis pildistatud foto 'Must ja valge, Pariis (positiiv ja negatiiv)', mis kujutab Ray armukese Kiki de Montparnasse'i portreed, maksis New Yorgi fotooksjonil 7, 3 miljonit Eesti krooni

  2. Cervical cancer incidence and mortality in New Mexico's Hispanics, American Indians, and non-Hispanic whites.

    Becker, T M; Wheeler, C. M.; Key, C R; Samet, J M

    1992-01-01

    High rates of cervical cancer were reported in New Mexico in the early 1970s, with especially high rates for minority women. We examined data collected from 1970 to 1987 for invasive cervical cancer and cervical carcinoma in situ for New Mexico's Hispanic, American Indian, and non-Hispanic white women to determine whether changes had occurred in cervical cancer rates since earlier reports. To further characterize the epidemiology of cervical cancer in New Mexico, we reviewed state vital stati...

  3. Hypertension among rural Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites: the San Luis Valley Diabetes Study.

    Rewers, M.; Shetterly, S M; Hamman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    IN THE SAN LUIS VALLEY DIABETES STUDY (SLVDS) researchers studied hypertension morbidity and risk factors in 1788 Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites (NHW) from the rural San Luis Valley in Colorado. Hypertension was defined by The Fifth Report of the Joint National Committee on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC-V) criteria. In this population-based study, the prevalence, incidence, and risk factors for hypertension did not differ significantly between non-diabeti...

  4. A Language Challenge to the Hispanic American.

    Nino, Miguel A.

    The Hispanic-American, because he or she is bilingual and bicultural, could play an important role in the future economic development of the United States. Declines in steel, automotive, and electronics industries due to foreign competition and market saturation have caused industrial displacement and unemployment. The Maquiladora or Twin Plant…

  5. Brief Counseling with Hispanic American College Students.

    Littrell, John M.; Cruz, Jeannette

    1998-01-01

    Hispanic-American college students (N=16) met with a Puerto-Rican counselor for two brief counseling sessions. Brief counseling was a viable and effective approach in helping the students reach their goals. Examined types of student concerns about, and student perceptions of, brief counseling. (Author)

  6. The Demographic Wave: Rethinking Hispanic AP Trends

    Edwards, Kelcey; Sawtell, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Presented at the Advanced Placement Annual Conference (APAC) in Las Vegas, NV in July 2013. This presentation reviews new research examining the AP® experience of Hispanic graduates over the past decade. Topics include an in-depth look at the AP Spanish Language and Culture gateway hypothesis and trends in family characteristics such as parent…

  7. High School Exit Exams and Hispanics

    Adam, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with the report, entitled "State High School Exit Exams: A Maturing Reform", that addressed the achievement gaps that exist for minority and English language learner (ELL) populations. In this article, the author shows how Hispanics and ELLs lag behind Caucasians in terms of passing percentage in different subject areas. The…

  8. Media and Sex: Perspectives from Hispanic Teens

    Johnston Polacek, Georgia N. L.; Rojas, Viviana; Levitt, Steven; Mika, Virginia Seguin

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about Hispanic teens' sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors and their relationship to media influences. Information about this relationship could contribute to an understanding of the early onset of sexual behavior and early teen pregnancy. This paper reports preliminary findings from a pilot project conducted to determine…

  9. Hispanic Culture and Relational Cultural Theory

    Ruiz, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Traditional personality theories do not consider the impact of culture on personality development. Yet, to provide culturally relevant services to the increasing Hispanic population in the U.S., more culturally relevant theories must be identified. This paper presents Relational Cultural Theory (RCT) as an alternative model to understanding…

  10. Prevalence and spectrum of p53 mutations in white Hispanic and non-Hispanic women with breast cancer.

    Lai, Hong; Lai, Shenghan; Ma, Fangchao; Meng, Lou; Trapido, Edward

    2003-09-01

    Hispanic women differ from non-Hispanics in breast cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis, and survival. Ethnic differences in genetic makeup, reproductive patterns, diet, socioeconomic status, physical activity, and other unidentified cultural factors may be responsible for the disparity. This study investigated occurrences of p53 tumor suppressor gene mutations in South Florida white Hispanic and white non-Hispanic women with primary breast cancer. Tumor tissues were obtained from a consecutive series of women with breast cancer who underwent breast resection at the Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida between 1984 and 1986. A total of 231 women with primary breast cancer, aged 31-85 years, were included in the study. Among them, 64 (27.7%) were white Hispanic and 167 (72.3%) were white non-Hispanic. The majority of the patients were white non-Hispanics (72.3%). Compared to white non-Hispanics, however, white Hispanics had significantly higher proportions of tumors larger than 2 cm (53.1% v.s. 28.7%, p = 0.00) as well as larger tumor size at diagnosis (mean: 4.2 v.s. 3.0 cm, p = 0.00). The p53 gene mutation rate was significantly lower in white Hispanics than in white non-Hispanics (51.6% v.s. 70.7%, p = 0.01). Furthermore, among node-negative breast cancer patients, after adjustment for tumor size at diagnosis, logistic regression results showed that white Hispanics were 71% less likely than white non-Hispanics to carry p53 mutations (OR = 0.29 and 95% CI = 0.09-0.91). We conclude that white Hispanic women with breast cancer might have lower p53 gene mutation prevalence than white non-Hispanic women. PMID:14531497

  11. Hispanic Medical Organizations' Support for LGBT Health Issues.

    Sánchez, John Paul; Sola, Orlando; Ramallo, Jorge; Sánchez, Nelson Felix; Dominguez, Kenneth; Romero-Leggott, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    Hispanics represent the fastest growing ethnic segment of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community in the United States and are disproportionately burdened by LGBT-related health issues and limited political support from Hispanic medical organizations. Recently, the Latino Medical Student Association, the National Hispanic Medical Association, and the Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools, representing over 60,000 Hispanic students and providers and 35 institutions, collaborated to support a resolution opposing discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity and recognizing the obstacles encountered by LGBTQ Hispanics. The resolution provides an important framework for organizational members and leaders to address LGBT health issues and serve to support a more positive sociopolitical climate for the Hispanic LGBT community nationally and internationally. PMID:26789708

  12. "万能的"man

    刘晓帆

    2002-01-01

    @@ man是一个内涵广而搭配、派生力极强的词,既可以放在词首构成合成词,如man-eater,man-power,man-size,manslaughter等,也可以放在词尾构成合成词,还可以与of等介词连用,构成词组或短语,如man of letters,man of sense,man of the world,man of one's words等.本文拟就man与各类词的"万能"搭配作一简要归纳.

  13. Symbolism in prehistoric man.

    Facchini, F

    2000-12-01

    The aptitude for symbolization, characteristic of man, is revealed not only in artistic representations and funerary practices. It is exhibited by every manifestation of human activity or representation of natural phenomena that assumes or refers to a meaning. We can recognize functional symbolism (tool-making, habitative or food technology), social symbolism, (language and social communication) and spiritual symbolism (funerary practices and artistic expressions). On the basis of these concepts, research into symbolism in prehistoric man allows us to recognize forms of symbolism already in the manifestations of the most ancient humans, starting with Homo habilis (or rudolfensis). Toolmaking, social organization and organization of the territory are oriented toward survival and the life of the family group. They attest to symbolic behaviors and constitute symbolic systems by means of which man expresses himself, lives and transmits his symbolic world. The diverse forms of symbolism are discussed with reference to the different phases of prehistoric humanity. PMID:11216422

  14. Man, energy, society

    Cook, E.F.

    1976-01-01

    The use of energy is examined considering technical, social, economic, and political factors. From a geographical viewpoint, the history of energy consumption is reviewed, current energy problems are delineated, and possible solutions to the energy dilemma are discussed. The following chapters are included: Energy, Environment, and Evolution; Man and Other Engines; Renewable Energy Resources; Non-Renewable Energy Resources; the Physical Economy of Energy Use; the Conservation of Free Energy; Social Evolution and Energy; Life Styles, Government, and Energy; the Geography of Energy; the Social Economy of Energy Use; Energy and the United States; Decisions About Energy; Depletion of Geologic Resources; Ethical and Moral Aspects of Energy Use; and Alternative Energy Futures. It is concluded that man must ultimately rely on renewable energy forms, but there is no promise that these energy sources can be made available at costs low enough to ensure man's survival. (165 references) (BYB)

  15. Man - Machine Communication

    Petersen, Peter; Nielsen, Henning

    1984-01-01

    This report describes a Man-to-Machine Communication module which together with a STAC can take care of all operator inputs from the touch-screen, tracker balls and mechanical buttons. The MMC module can also contain a G64 card which could be a GPIB driver but many other G64 cards could be used. The soft-ware services the input devices and makes the results accessible from the CAMAC bus. NODAL functions for the Man Machine Communication is implemented in the STAC and in the ICC.

  16. The ManShed

    Savitsky, Matthew Port

    2015-01-01

    Hot House highlights the current evolution of The ManShed, an ongoing solo project that takes the form of a multi- screen video installation and accompanying film set. Beginning in summer 2013, The ManShed refers to an enclosed, two-roomed meeting place built from conjoined panels that plays host to a series of sexual encounters between myself and other men. Under its roof, an infrastructure of hidden cameras documents these interactions between my body, a stranger's, and material forms that ...

  17. Copyrights and Literature: The Hispanic Perspective

    Jose, Alan V.

    2011-01-01

    Does the Hispanic tradition offer an alternative perspective to the problem of copyrights and digital piracy? This dissertation examines the narrative that connects copyrights and creativity. It focuses on how prevailing representations of the practice, circulation, and experience of creativity that link it to copyrights are governed by specific epistemological structures and a rhetoric of fear. The dissertation focuses on three competing and overlapping traditions of conceiving and codifying...

  18. Cystic Fibrosis in a Hispanic Adolescent

    Lin, Jenny H.; Collaco, Joseph M.; Paranjape, Shruti M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the presentation of a Hispanic adolescent with chronic respiratory symptoms and poor growth that led to a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) based on an indeterminate sweat chloride result and DNA sequence analysis that revealed a single new frameshift mutation, Nt3878insATCAG, which results in a premature stop codon in exon 20 of the CFTR gene. This case, highlighted by the identification of a deleterious, disease-causing mutation, illustrates the importance of maintaining both a ...

  19. Hunting the Wild Man

    2011-01-01

    Scientists and volunteers plan a new Shennongjia exploration for Bigfoot After being shelved for many years, a plan to search for the wild man in the Shennongjia forestry district is once again under way. This time, scientists want to raise as much as 10 million yuan ($1.6 million) to employ advanced technology and recruit staff worldwide for the project.

  20. 6-man chess solved

    Haworth, Guy McCrossan

    2005-01-01

    Eugene Nalimov has completed the computation of a set of endgame tables for 6-man chess, and independently, Marc Bourzutschky has completed tables for 3-3 chess and for 4-2 chess where Black is not just ‘KP’. The ICGA salutes both achievements and looks ahead.

  1. Reference Man anatomical model

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  2. Ethology and Man

    Biology and Human Affairs, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Reviews four texts and compilations of papers in an effort to assess the relevance of animal behavior studies to anthropology and sociology. Concludes that where a basic element of behavior occurs widely throughout the animal kingdom, especially in the higher mammals and primates, we may expect to find a manifestation in man." Limitations of the…

  3. EVALUATING THE POTENTIAL FOR LOCAL FOOD PRODUCTS IN HISPANIC MARKETS

    Martinez, Samuel Cardona; Patterson, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    Evaluations on the effectiveness of state and origin branding programs remain relatively scant and generally have not focused on specific target populations, including the fastest growing group-Hispanic consumers. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the Arizona Grown brand and the nascent Mexico Selected Quality brand in differentiating and promoting food products in Hispanic markets. It was found that Hispanic consumers tend to view these food product brands as nearly identical in perc...

  4. Physical Activity and Gestational Weight Gain in Hispanic Women

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Silveira, Marushka; Lynch, Kristine E.; Pekow, Penelope; Solomon, Caren G.; Markenson, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hispanic women have high rates of excessive and inadequate gestational weight gain (GWG) according to Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines. Observational studies suggest that physical activity may be associated with GWG but have been conflicting and were largely conducted in non-Hispanic white populations. Design and Methods We prospectively evaluated the association between physical activity and compliance with GWG guidelines, total GWG, and rate of GWG among 1,276 Hispanic parti...

  5. Physical Activity and Gestational Weight Gain in Hispanic Women

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Silveira, Marushka; Lynch, Kristine E.; Pekow, Penelope; Solomon, Caren G.; Markenson, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Hispanic women have high rates of excessive and inadequate gestational weight gain (GWG) according to Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines. Observational studies suggest that physical activity may be associated with GWG but have been conflicting and were largely conducted in non-Hispanic white populations. Design and Methods We prospectively evaluated the association between physical activity and compliance with GWG guidelines, total GWG, and rate of GWG among 1,276 Hispanic part...

  6. SOCIOECONOMIC, CULTURAL, AND BEHAVIORAL FACTORS AFFECTING HISPANIC HEALTH OUTCOMES

    Morales, Leo S.; Lara, Marielena; Raynard S. Kington; VALDEZ, ROBERT O.; Escarce, José J.

    2002-01-01

    Evidence suggests that social and economic factors are important determinants of health. Yet, despite higher poverty rates, less education, and worse access to health care, health outcomes of many Hispanics living in the United States today are equal to, or better than, those of non-Hispanic whites. This paradox is described in the literature as the epidemiological paradox or Hispanic health paradox. In this paper, the authors selectively review data and research supporting the existence of t...

  7. Differences between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Families in Social Capital and Child Development: First-Year Findings from an Experimental Study

    Gamoran, Adam; Turley, Ruth N. Lopez; Turner, Alyn; Fish, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Disadvantages faced by Hispanic children in the U.S., compared to non-Hispanic Whites, have been widely reported. Economic differences account for some of the gaps, but the social isolation of Hispanic families also serves as a barrier to children's success. Whereas Hispanic families tend to have strong kinship networks, their social ties often do…

  8. Man and computer

    The discussion of cultural and sociological consequences of computer evolution is hindered by human prejudice. For example the sentence 'a computer is at best as intelligent as its programmer' veils actual developments. Theoretical limits of computer intelligence are the limits of intelligence in general. Modern computer systems replace not only human labour, but also human decision making and thereby human responsibility. The historical situation is unique. Human head-work is being automated and man is loosing function. (orig.)

  9. Symbolism in Prehistoric Man

    Facchini, F.

    2000-01-01

    The aptitude for symbolization, characteristic of man, is revealed not only in artistic representations and funerary practices. It is exhibited by every manifestation of human activity or representation of natural phenomena that assumes or refers to a meaning.We can recognize functional symbolism (tool-making, habitative or food technology), social symbolism, (language and social communication) and spiritual symbolism (funerary practices and artistic expressions). On the basis ...

  10. Constructing EuroMan

    Sandberg, Marie; Andersen, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    -called globalisation-processes, particularly the increased international extension of market-forces and a corresponding restructuring of the European nation-state and integration-processes.   In this article, we shed light on 'EuroMan': an actor-type which can be seen as an effect of the new regional policies and...... approaches. Eurman is possessing the ability and will to pursue rational-strategic goals and he appears in the form of an economic agent as well as a participant in political processes. Regionalisation, identity-formation and the key characteristics of EuroMan unite in EU regional policies and New...... Regionalism. In the first two parts of the article, this connection is analysed in detail. In the last part, we will illustrate how EuroMan is enacted in the Spanish region Catalonia and in the border town Görlitz-Zgorzelec in the Polish-German borderland. These two examples have been made possible by...

  11. Typhoon Man-Yi

    2007-01-01

    Typhoon Man-Yi was pummeling the Japanese island of Okinawa with winds between 230 and 295 kilometers per hour (125-160 knots, 144-184 miles per hour) and heavy rain on the morning of July 13, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image. The immense storm covered hundreds of kilometers with spiraling bands of thunderstorms, though it had lost the distinctive cloud-free eye it exhibited the day before. Typhoons are common in Japan, but powerful typhoons usually strike the island nation later in the year. The Japan Meteorological Agency said that Man-Yi is the fourth typhoon of the 2007 season and may be the most powerful ever observed in the northwest Pacific in July, reported Kyodo News. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expected the typhoon to strike Kyushu, a southern Japanese island, on July 14, and then curve northeast along the eastern shore of Japan. By the time the storm reaches Tokyo on July 15, it should be degraded to a tropical storm. As of July 13, Typhoon Man-Yi had injured eight and flooded twenty houses in Okinawa, and forced airlines to cancel hundreds of flights, said Kyodo News. The storm was expected to bring heavy rain to Japan's Pacific coast. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the MODIS Rapid Response team.

  12. Man-machine supervision

    Today's complexity of systems where man is involved has led to the development of more and more sophisticated information processing systems where decision making has become more and more difficult. The operator task has moved from operation to supervision and the production tool has become indissociable from its numerical instrumentation and control system. The integration of more and more numerous and sophisticated control indicators in the control room does not necessary fulfill the expectations of the operation team. It is preferable to develop cooperative information systems which are real situation understanding aids. The stake is not the automation of operators' cognitive tasks but the supply of a reasoning help. One of the challenges of interactive information systems is the selection, organisation and dynamical display of information. The efficiency of the whole man-machine system depends on the communication interface efficiency. This article presents the principles and specificities of man-machine supervision systems: 1 - principle: operator's role in control room, operator and automation, monitoring and diagnosis, characteristics of useful models for supervision; 2 - qualitative reasoning: origin, trends, evolutions; 3 - causal reasoning: causality, causal graph representation, causal and diagnostic graph; 4 - multi-points of view reasoning: multi flow modeling method, Sagace method; 5 - approximate reasoning: the symbolic numerical interface, the multi-criteria decision; 6 - example of application: supervision in a spent-fuel reprocessing facility. (J.S.)

  13. Differences between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Families in Social Capital and Child Development: First-Year Findings from an Experimental Study

    Gamoran, Adam; Turley, Ruth N. López; Turner, Alyn; Fish, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Disadvantages faced by Hispanic children in the U.S., compared to non-Hispanic Whites, have been widely reported. Economic differences account for some of the gaps, but the social isolation of Hispanic families also serves as a barrier to children’s success. Whereas Hispanic families tend to have strong kinship networks, their social ties often do not encompass the school and other authority systems. As a result, Hispanic families may have less access to social capital, that is, relations of ...

  14. The Coming Black/Hispanic Coalition. A Black View and An Hispanic View.

    Calhoun, Lillian; Arias, Ron

    1980-01-01

    Two journalists discuss political, economic, and social issues which unite Blacks and Hispanics and consider the problems which impede the formation of a formal political coalition between the two groups. Among the common issues identified are police brutality, voter registration, unemployment, health, housing, and the media. (GC)

  15. Developing a Leadership Identity as a Hispanic Woman at a Hispanic- Serving Institution

    Onorato, Suzanne; Musoba, Glenda Droogsma

    2015-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are uniquely positioned to educate tomorrow's leaders and initiate change in the number and ethnic diversity of women in leadership roles. The purpose of our study was to understand the essence of Hispanic college women's leadership identity development with participants and researchers co-constructing meaning. We…

  16. Ethnic Identity: Formation and Transmission among Hispanics and Other Minorities. SUNY Series, United States Hispanic Studies.

    Bernal, Martha E., Ed.; Knight, George P., Ed.

    This book contains 14 research papers and reviews on the development of ethnic identity in childhood and adolescence and the transmission of ethnic identity within families and across family generations. The research focuses on Hispanic-Americans, particularly Mexican-Americans; some studies include Blacks, American Indians, Asian-Americans, and…

  17. The Viability of Ethnographic Research for Hispanic Consumer Research.

    Asahina, Roberta R.

    A study explored whether ethnographic research is appropriate and feasible for Hispanic consumer research. Subjects, 41 Hispanic advertising executives (out of an original group of 80) in advertising agencies listed in the Standard Directory of Advertising Agencies from New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, and San Antonio, answered a 23-item…

  18. The "Nuevo" New South: Hispanic Immigration to Alabama.

    Mohl, Raymond A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes Hispanic migration trends in Alabama, discussing how Alabama's demographic and cultural transformation and recent changes in the global economy are connected. The new Hispanic labor force has become an essential ingredient in Alabama's rural and urban economies. However, anti-immigrant sentiments have surfaced in some areas. Adjustment…

  19. 78 FR 45580 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    2013-07-29

    ... Chief of Staff of the Office of Personnel Management and the Chair of the National Hispanic Leadership... MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Cancelling..., the Council shall advise the Director of the Office of Personnel Management on matters involving...

  20. 78 FR 12107 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    2013-02-21

    ... Chief of Staff of the Office of Personnel Management and the Chair of the National Hispanic Leadership... MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Scheduling..., the Council shall advise the Director of the Office of Personnel Management on matters involving...

  1. 78 FR 65010 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    2013-10-30

    ... Chief of Staff of the Office of Personnel Management and the Chair of the National Hispanic Leadership... MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Cancelling..., the Council shall advise the Director of the Office of Personnel Management on matters involving...

  2. AIDS prevention among Hispanics: needs, risk behaviors, and cultural values.

    Marin, G

    1989-01-01

    Data from different sources show that Hispanics are over-represented in reported cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (twice their proportion of the population) and that their rate of infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is three times higher than among non-Hispanic whites. The behavior risk factors most frequently associated with infection in AIDS cases are IV drug use in the Northeast and high-risk sexual behavior in the West. HIV infection prevention strategies for Hispanics need to address high risk behaviors, taking into consideration associated culture-specific characteristics. Strategies need to address as well conditions such as racism and ethnic prejudices that keep many Hispanic homosexuals and bisexuals away from white or non-Hispanic gay organizations and publications, the lack of culturally appropriate drug treatment centers, the level of mis-information among Hispanics, and the possible high incidence among men of sexual intercourse with prostitutes. Prevention campaigns need to include such Hispanic cultural values as simpatia, familialism, personalismo, and power distance, if prevention campaigns are going to be perceived as relevant by Hispanics. Appropriate wording and communication channels need to be identified in order to transmit messages that will be perceived as credible and that will reach the largest possible audience. PMID:2508169

  3. Hispanics in the Criminal Justice System--the "Nonexistent" Problem.

    Mandel, Jerry

    1979-01-01

    Though hidden from view by being considered "non-existent", the meager evidence indicates that Hispanics have an unusually high arrest and incarceration rate. Hispanic background is rarely asked on the six major sources of criminal justice statistics--statistics of arrests, courts, prisoners, juvenile delinquency, crime victimization, and public…

  4. Mapping Hispanic-Serving Institutions: A Typology of Institutional Diversity

    Núñez, Anne-Marie; Crisp, Gloria; Elizondo, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs), institutions that enroll at least 25% Hispanic students, are institutionally diverse, including a much wider array of institutional types than other Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs). Furthermore, they have distinctive institutional characteristics from those typically emphasized in institutional typologies…

  5. Sexual Initiation, Parent Practices, and Acculturation in Hispanic Seventh Graders

    Morales-Campos, Daisy Y.; Markham, Christine; Peskin, Melissa Fleschler; Fernandez, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hispanic youths have high rates of sexually transmitted infections and pregnancies, yet little research has targeted multiple protective/risk factors for early sexual initiation in this group. This study examined two main factors--parenting practices and acculturation--on early sexual initiation among Hispanic middle school students in…

  6. Art Therapy with Hispanic Clients: Results of a Survey Study

    Bermudez, Diana; ter Maat, Mercedes

    2006-01-01

    Despite the growing number of Hispanics in the US and in caseloads of art therapists, previous literature on this topic is scarce and predominantly based on case studies. This survey assessed the perceptions of 27 art therapists from large metropolitan areas regarding the use of art therapy with Hispanic clients. These perceptions included client…

  7. 77 FR 77121 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    2012-12-31

    ... workplace. The Council is an advisory committee composed of Federal employees and Hispanic organizations. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Veronica E. Villalobos, Director, Office of Diversity and Inclusion... barriers to the recruitment, hiring, retention and advancement of Hispanics in the Federal workplace....

  8. Overweight, Body Image, and Depression in Asian and Hispanic Adolescents

    Xie, Bin; Unger, Jennifer B.; Gallaher, Peggy; Johnson, C. Anderson; Wu, Qiaobing; Chou, Chih-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively investigate associations between overweight and depressive symptoms in Asian and Hispanic adolescents. Methods: Data included 780 Hispanic and 375 Asian students. Structural equation model was used to prospectively explore moderation effects of gender, ethnicity, and acculturation on associations of overweight, body…

  9. Hispanic AIDS education in South Texas.

    Sanchez, J

    1988-04-01

    The Hispanic AIDS Committee for Education and Resources (HACER) was established in 1987 as an AIDS education program targeted at the Mexicano population of South Texas. The word "Mexicano" is used because "Hispanic" refers to a larger, more diversified group. "Mexicano" refers specifically to people of South Texas who are either Mexican-Americans (people of Mexican descent, born and educated in the US) or Mexicans (people born and educated in Mexico). Mexicanos constitute 56% of the population of South Texas and 54% of the population of San Antonio. Mexican-Americans, in general, speak and read English and listen to English-language television and radio. Mexicans are poorer and less educated, Spanish-speaking, and often illiterate. The Mexicanos do not constitute a high risk group for AIDS; at present there are only 64 Mexicano AIDS patients in San Antonio. AIDS education campaigns on television which are directed at the whole Hispanic community may be counter-productive when directed at the Mexicano population because they know that AIDS is not yet a serious problem among them, and scare tactics only cause hysteria. AIDS education is essential, but it must be specifically geared to the Mexicano community, which, in general, is a very conservative community, in which subjects like sex, homosexuality, condoms, or anal intercourse are not discussed in public. But it is also a community of young (median age 23) sexually active people. An AIDS education program directed at them must use simple, elementary language in standard Mexican Spanish for the Mexicans and in English for the young Mexican-Americans. The single most effective way to reach the Mexicano population would be public service announcements aired on television during the time when the telenovelas (soap operas) are on. Not only are the telenovelas widely watched, but their actors are popular heros, who will be listened to by their audience. The use of radio for public service announcements would be useful

  10. Time and man

    Elton, LRB

    2014-01-01

    Time and Man focuses on the endeavors of humans to probe the mysteries of time and to elucidate its properties. The discussions are both philosophical and factual in nature and encompass science as well as the physical sciences, biology and related disciplines (for example, evolution), and the humanities (for example, religion). Factual information is presented to help the reader gain a better understanding of the concepts associated with time.Comprised of nine chapters, this volume first considers the passage of time and the experiences which humans associate with the concept of time before r

  11. Forest and Man

    Edition of this publication 'Forest and Man' was initiated by Lembit Muiste and the major part of the papers was collected by the end of 1994. These papers give a good review of problems of Estonian forestry and also the experiences in abroad. After his death, the edition was continued. Lembit Muiste was an outstanding forest researcher and teacher of the post-war generation and now this publication is dedicated to his 75. anniversary. In addition to his everyday work, he was socially active and participated in the work of different organizations connected with nature conservation. Commission for Nature Conservation remembers Lembit Muiste as an unforgettable colleague. (author)

  12. Play the Man!

    Edelberg, Peter

    This book investigates ideas of men and masculinities in interwar Britain in three different areas: psychology, physical education and sex. Using a broad range of sources from different walks of life it explores how men and masculinities were constructed in different ways for different purposes...... opposites towards a heterosexual matrimonial ideal wherein men could try to establish a masculine identity. This tendency created new frontiers where homosexuals, 'perverts', 'misfits' and 'freaks' were seen as opposites of the 'real man' in the symbolic world of the early twentieth century....

  13. Spider-man

    路遇

    2002-01-01

    Spider-Man was first introduced in the comic(连环画) Amazing Fantasy #15(August 1962).Peter Parker,a Senior at Midtown High School,receives his powers when bitten by a exhibition(转基因) spider in a science demonstration(展览).This bite endowed(赋予) him with the proportional(相应的) strength and agility(敏捷) of a spider along with a keen “spider sense”.

  14. Radiation and man

    The radiation preservation of food has been receiving attention in South Africa since 1961 when a radioactive cobalt-60 unit was installed in Stellenbosch. In this unit, as in all similar units throughout the world, special attention was given to measures ensuring the safety of workers at the unit as well as that of the public. Man himself, the food he eats and the air he breathes are naturally radioactive and life on earth is impossible without nuclear reactions in the sun. These facts are elucidated so that the irradiation of food can be seen in true perspective

  15. Recruitment and Retention of Hispanic Nursing Students: Through the Lens of Associate Degree Nursing Program Administrators and Hispanic Nursing Students

    Handlos DeVoe, Debra Jean

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic population in the United States is changing and will constitute 30% of the population in 2050; however, the Hispanic registered nurse population is less than 3%. Cultural differences between patients and nurses may cause harm and a mistrust that can affect patient outcomes. A mixed methods convergent research study was done by an…

  16. Rural Community-Dwelling Elders' Reports of Access to Care: Are There Hispanic versus Non-Hispanic White Disparities?

    Borders, Tyrone F.

    2004-01-01

    Consumer reports can provide useful information about the dimensions of access in need of improvement for particular population subgroups. To determine if there are Hispanic versus non- Hispanic white disparities in rural elders' reports of their health care access. A telephone survey was conducted among 2,097 rural community-dwelling elders in…

  17. Acculturation, Enculturation, and Symptoms of Depression in Hispanic Youth: The Roles of Gender, Hispanic Cultural Values, and Family Functioning

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Soto, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The risk for depression increases as Hispanic youth acculturate to U.S. society. This association is stronger for Hispanic girls than boys. To better understand the influence of culture and family on depressive symptoms, we tested a process-oriented model of acculturation, cultural values, and family functioning. The data came from Project RED,…

  18. Pathways to man

    The study of radionuclide pathways leading to man generally has the goal of allowing us to predict human exposure from measurements of the radionuclide concentration in some segment of the environment. This modelling process provides a valuable tool in both the regulatory and health protection fields. However, most of the models in the regulatory field and in the health physics profession were designed to maximize exposure estimates. It is preferable to have scientifically defensible estimates and to add suitable safety factors at the end. Thus we are still faced with the development and validation of suitable models for many of the radionuclides of interest. The most useful models will include means of assessing variability and uncertainty. In this case variability might be considered as the differences in behavior due to age, sex or other factors in animals or man and those differences among plant species or animal species that determine their uptake factors. The uncertainty, on the other hand, would be the estimate of possible error in the experimental measurements. Model parameters would always have some variability even for site-specific cases and broad averages for population groups would have to include a factor expressing the possible variabilty and uncertainity. Thus any exposure calculation would have to be expressed with some range and valid assessments of this range are required

  19. Having a Diagnosis of Diabetes Is Not Associated with General Diabetes Knowledge in Rural Hispanics

    Ceballos, Rachel M.; Coronado, Gloria D.; Thompson, Beti

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The prevalence of diabetes among Hispanics in Washington State is 30% greater than it is for non-Hispanic whites. Hispanics also have higher rates of diabetes-related complications and mortality due to the disease. Although interventions have been developed for the Hispanic community, studies in rural settings are limited. To address this…

  20. Breast Cancer Screening in Black and Hispanic Subpopulations

    Sarah J. Miller

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary objective was to examine and compare the breast cancer screening adherence rates between black (African American and Afro-Caribbean and Hispanic (foreign born Hispanic and US-born Hispanic subpopulations. Methods: Study data was collected in community settings in New York City between the years of 2011-2012. Participants (N=592 were black and Hispanic individuals who attended a breast cancer screening community outreach program. Breast cancer screening rates as well as demographic data were collected. Results: Results revealed that Afro-Caribbean and foreign-born Hispanics are at a greater risk for non-adherence in breast cancer screening compared with African Americans and US-born Hispanics. Conclusions: The majority of breast screening research and community outreach programs categorize people into broad racial and ethnic groups (e.g., black and Hispanic. The results revealed significant variability within these broader racial/ethnic categories with regard to breast cancer screening. Community outreach programs and future research efforts should target the subpopulations that are at particular risk for breast cancer screening non-adherence.

  1. Hispanic immigrants in the USA: social and mental health perspectives.

    Alarcón, Renato D; Parekh, Amrita; Wainberg, Milton L; Duarte, Cristiane S; Araya, Ricardo; Oquendo, María A

    2016-09-01

    Hispanic immigration in the USA and its effect on many areas of US society are of great relevance to health care, public health, mental health, and medical and social sciences. In this report, we review and discuss pertinent literature on causes, procedures, and eventual outcomes of Hispanic migration waves throughout the last four decades. Hispanic immigrants do not constitute a monolithic group, despite the clear predominance of Mexican and Mexican-American segments. Common features of Hispanic immigrants include a younger average age, higher presence of married households, and lower educational levels than the overall US population. Differences within the Hispanic immigrant population are present in naturalisation figures, English language fluency, occupational and income status, health insurance coverage, and sense of accomplishment in the host society. We examine most of these aspects in the context of the so-called Hispanic paradox, presented as both a cause and a result of a heavily discussed acculturative process. We investigate prevalence and other data on depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and psychotic syndromes, with emphasis on the need to do further neurobiological, epigenetic, and sociocultural research in the Hispanic population. PMID:27568273

  2. The relation between stress and alcohol use among Hispanic adolescents.

    Goldbach, Jeremy T; Berger Cardoso, Jodi; Cervantes, Richard C; Duan, Lei

    2015-12-01

    We explored the relation between 8 domains of Hispanic stress and alcohol use and frequency of use in a sample of Hispanic adolescents between 11 and 19 years old (N = 901). Independent t tests were used to compare means of domains of Hispanic stress between adolescents who reported alcohol use and those who reported no use. In addition, multinomial logistic regression was used to examine whether domains of Hispanic stress were related to alcohol use and whether the relation differed by gender and age. Multiple imputation was used to address missing data. In the analytic sample, 75.8% (n = 683) reported no use and 24.2% (n = 218) reported alcohol use during the previous 30 days. Higher mean Hispanic stress scores were observed among youths who reported alcohol use during the previous 30 days in 5 domains: acculturation gap, community and gang violence, family economic, discrimination, and family and drug-related stress. Increased community and gang violence, family and drug, and acculturative gap stress were found to be associated with some alcohol use categories beyond the effect of other domains. Few differences in the association between Hispanic stress and alcohol use by gender and age were observed. Study findings indicate that family and drug-related, community and gang violence, and acculturative gap stress domains are salient factors related to alcohol use among Hispanic adolescents, and their implications for prevention science are discussed. PMID:26551265

  3. Merging education with measurement: a focus on the Hispanic community.

    Larson, C O; Stroebel, C K; Perkey, B N

    2001-07-01

    There is an increasing need for community health promotion efforts directed to populations that are often disenfranchised from the health care system. The rapidly growing Hispanic population can benefit from outreach efforts that provide health education and promote community awareness of health status and health problems. This article describes a cost effective survey system that measured health status, health needs and provided individualized health feedback and education to Hispanic residents. The results underscore the importance of culturally and linguistically appropriate community-based initiatives that assess health status to aid in setting policy, eliminate health disparities, and determine priorities to meet the health needs of the growing Hispanic population. PMID:11433553

  4. The Hispanic Paradox and Older Adults’ Disabilities: Is There a Healthy Migrant Effect?

    Ferrah Raza; Dawn Richardson; Amani Nuru-Jeter; Esme Fuller Thomson; Meredith Minkler

    2013-01-01

    The “Hispanic Paradox” suggests that despite rates of poverty similar to African Americans, Hispanics have far better health and mortality outcomes, more comparable to non-Hispanic White Americans. Three prominent possible explanations for the Hispanic Paradox have emerged. The “Healthy Migrant Effect” suggests a health selection effect due to the demands of migration. The Hispanic lifestyle hypothesis focuses on Hispanics’ strong social ties and better health behaviors. The reverse migration...

  5. Acculturation, Enculturation, and Symptoms of Depression in Hispanic Youth: The Roles of Gender, Hispanic Cultural Values, and Family Functioning

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Soto, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The risk for depression increases as Hispanic youth acculturate to U.S. society. This association is stronger for Hispanic girls than boys. To better understand the influence of culture and family on depressive symptoms, we tested a process-oriented model of acculturation, cultural values, and family functioning. The data came from Project RED, which included 1,922 Hispanic students (53 % girls; 86 % were 14 years old; and 84 % were U.S. born) from Southern California. We used data from 9th t...

  6. Disparities in Birth Weight Between Non-Hispanic Blacks and Non-Hispanic Whites: The Effect of Rural Residency

    Fedor, Theresa Marie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of low birth weight among non-Hispanic Blacks and non-Hispanic Whites along the rural/urban continuum, as well as the combined effect of being both non-Hispanic Black and residing in a completely rural county. Degree of social isolation and lack of support are proposed mechanisms for explaining disparities in low birth weight for Blacks in rural counties. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the N...

  7. FastStats: Health of Hispanic or Latino Population

    ... Button NCHS Home Health of Hispanic or Latino Population Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Source: Summary Health Statistics Tables for the U.S. Population: National Health Interview Survey, 2014, Table P-1c [ ...

  8. Health Snapshot: Hispanic Adolescents in the United States

    ... Hispanic families: Stability and change. Annual Review of Sociology, 33, 381-405. 4 Fry, R., & Passel, J.S. ( ... X., and Zhang, J. (2012). The Condition of Education 2012 (NCES 2012-045). U.S. Department of Education, ...

  9. Global metabolomic profiling targeting childhood obesity in the Hispanic population

    Metabolomics may unravel important biological pathways involved in the pathophysiology of childhood obesity. We aimed to 1) identify metabolites that differ significantly between nonobese and obese Hispanic children; 2) collapse metabolites into principal components (PCs) associated with obesity and...

  10. AIDS prevention among Hispanics: needs, risk behaviors, and cultural values.

    Marin, G.

    1989-01-01

    Data from different sources show that Hispanics are over-represented in reported cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (twice their proportion of the population) and that their rate of infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is three times higher than among non-Hispanic whites. The behavior risk factors most frequently associated with infection in AIDS cases are IV drug use in the Northeast and high-risk sexual behavior in the West. HIV infection prevention strategies for...

  11. Intimate Partner Violence Among Hispanics: A Review of the Literature

    Cummings, Amanda M.; Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M.; Sandoval, Melanie F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzed the existing literature on risk and protective factors for intimate partner violence among Hispanics using the four-level social-ecological model of prevention. Three popular search engines, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Google Scholar, were reviewed for original research articles published since the year 2000 that specifically examined factors associated with intimate partner violence (IPV) among Hispanics. Factors related to perpetration and victimization for both males and fema...

  12. Do hispanic neighborhoods in Chicago promote or hinder homeownership opportunities?

    Robin G. Newberger; Maude Toussaint-Comeau

    2004-01-01

    Hispanics are one of the fastest-growing populations in the nation, yet they have one of the lowest rates of homeownership of all racial/ethnic groups. For a large proportion of Hispanic immigrants, particularly those from Mexico and other Latin American countries, housing needs remain critical. Researchers have found that Latino immigrants living in metropolitan areas are much more likely to live in crowded and severely inadequate housing and/or to experience a severe housing cost burden. Wh...

  13. Occupational sunscreen use among US Hispanic outdoor workers

    Day, Ashley K.; Stapleton, Jerod L.; Natale-Pereira, Ana M.; Goydos, James S.; Coups, Elliot J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Occupational ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is a risk factor for skin cancer, and Hispanic individuals are over-represented in a number of outdoor occupations (e.g., farming, landscaping). This study examined predictors of occupational sunscreen use in a group of US Hispanic adults who work outdoors. Results A population-based sample of outdoor workers (n = 149, 85 % male) completed survey measures regarding their demographics, melanoma risk, perceived skin cancer risk, skin ...

  14. Inherited Susceptibility in Childhood Leukemia among a California Hispanic Population

    Hsu, Ling-I

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been found to be nearly 20% higher among Hispanics than non-Hispanic Whites in California. Ethnic differences in ALL incidences may be attributed to the differences in the frequency of genetic factors or increased Native American ancestry. In addition to biological factors, suggestive evidence exists for other factors including agricultural pesticide usage, socioeconomic status, and timing of early exposure to infectious agents or other ...

  15. Light in man's environment.

    Marshall, J

    2016-02-01

    Light in the form of solar radiation influenced early civilisations and resulted in the independent development of a number of sun-worshipping dieties. These were of particular importance as hunter gatherers transformed into settled agricultural societies. All artificial light sources were synonymous with fire, and early civilisations began to expand their visual day by burning brands, oil, and candles. Fire-based light sources extended for thousands of years and were still present in the era of gas lighting. Light meant fire risk. The advent of incandescent bulbs and the era of electric lighting really only expanded in the early part of the twentieth century. Fluorescent lighting became available in the 1940s, and today the drive for low energy has resulted in a plethora of novel light sources-in particular, light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Evolution governed the development of the eye in relation to roughly 12 h of light gradually changing to 12 h of darkness. Today almost daylight levels can be achieved abruptly at the flick of a switch. Many studies have demonstrated the spectral dependence of eye health, with the retinal hazard zone associated with wavelengths in the blue, peaking at 441 nm- many of today's low-energy sources peak in this region. Given the increased longevity and artificial light sources emitting at biologically unfriendly wavelengths, attention has to be directed towards light in man's environment as a risk factor in age-related ocular diseases. PMID:26742864

  16. A Pilot Examination of Differences in College Adjustment Stressors and Depression and Anxiety Symptoms between White, Hispanic and White, Non-Hispanic Female College Students

    Holliday, Ryan; Anderson, Elizabeth; Williams, Rush; Bird, Jessica; Matlock, Alyse; Ali, Sania; Edmondson, Christine; Morris, E. Ellen; Mullen, Kacy; Surís, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Differences in four adjustment stressors (family, interpersonal, career, and academic), and depression and anxiety symptoms were examined between White, non-Hispanic and White, Hispanic undergraduate college female students. White, Hispanic female college students reported significantly greater academic and family adjustment stressors than White,…

  17. "Det man hører, er man selv"

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2015-01-01

    ”Det man hører, er man selv” er Danmarks Radios P3s yderst velkendte slogan. Det dukkede op i begyndelsen af (20)00erne som opfindsom og populær afspejling af en moderne forståelse af den rolle musik og medieforbrug spiller for den voksne dansker. Denne artikel handler ikke om P3 som musikkanal...

  18. Garbage Man from Tulip Kingdom

    ZHOUCHAO

    2005-01-01

    ON Erfei Hill of Liufang Mountain Range, Jiangxia District, Wuhan City stands a huge garbage dump, manned by an industrious-looking dungaree-clad foreigner. He is 37-year-old Henry Fantven, a Dutch waste disposal engineer.

  19. Dose-to-man studies

    Dose-to-Man Studies focused on developing computer data handling and computer modules which permit easy, rapid assessment of the dose to southeastern United States populations from routine or accidental releases of radionuclides to atmospheric and stream systems

  20. Manned Mars mission cost estimate

    Hamaker, Joseph; Smith, Keith

    1986-01-01

    The potential costs of several options of a manned Mars mission are examined. A cost estimating methodology based primarily on existing Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) parametric cost models is summarized. These models include the MSFC Space Station Cost Model and the MSFC Launch Vehicle Cost Model as well as other modes and techniques. The ground rules and assumptions of the cost estimating methodology are discussed and cost estimates presented for six potential mission options which were studied. The estimated manned Mars mission costs are compared to the cost of the somewhat analogous Apollo Program cost after normalizing the Apollo cost to the environment and ground rules of the manned Mars missions. It is concluded that a manned Mars mission, as currently defined, could be accomplished for under $30 billion in 1985 dollars excluding launch vehicle development and mission operations.

  1. 6-man chess and zugzwangs

    Bleicher, Eiko; Haworth, Guy McCrossan

    2010-01-01

    With 6-man Chess essentially solved, the available 6-man Endgame Tables (EGTs) have been scanned for zugzwang positions where, unusually, having the move is a disadvantage. Review statistics together with some highlights and positions are provided here: the complete information is available on the ICGA website. An outcome of the review is the observation that the definition of zugzwang should be revisited, if only because the presence of en passant capture moves gives rise to three new, as...

  2. Stress and Multiple Substance Use Behaviors Among Hispanic Adolescents.

    Cardoso, Jodi Berger; Goldbach, Jeremy T; Cervantes, Richard C; Swank, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Hispanic adolescents reported a higher annual prevalence of use of nearly all major drugs compared to non-Hispanic White and African American adolescents. Cultural or minority stressors, such as those related to the acculturation process, discrimination, immigration, poverty, and community violence, have been implicated in these outcomes. Unfortunately, few studies have examined how these stressors may have a differential or additive effect when considered simultaneously. The current study examined the relation between stress and multiple substance use behaviors in a sample of Hispanic adolescents (n = 1036), age 11-19 years old. Latent class analysis identified subgroups of Hispanic adolescents based on combinations of substance use behaviors. General linear models were used to examine mean differences by class among the eight domains of stress. Fit statistics revealed a six-class structure: no substance use risk, predominately alcohol use, low polysubstance use, high polysubstance use, illicit drug use, and predominately marijuana use. Differences in stress across the six classes were identified for four of the eight domains: family economic, acculturation gap, community and gang, and family and drug stress. The effect sizes revealed the largest mean differences in stress between the no substance use group and the two polysubstance use groups and between the no risk group and alcohol use group. The findings from this study support the use of interventions that target stress to affect multiple substance use behaviors in Hispanic adolescents. PMID:26319617

  3. Breastfeeding rates: Is the Ross mother's survey underestimating breastfeeding rates of Hispanic women?

    Among Hispanics in the United States, breastfeeding initiation and duration decrease with acculturation. Therefore, in communities with significant Hispanic immigrant populations, surveys of breastfeeding rates conducted in English will provide a biased picture of feeding behaviors. Three major su...

  4. Multiple Health Behaviors: Patterns and Correlates of Diet and Exercise in a Hispanic College Sample

    Hu, Dixie; Taylor, Thom; Blow, Julie; Cooper, Theodore V.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity rates are alarming in various ethnocultural groups, particularly in Hispanics. With Hispanics being the fastest growing group to enter college, the aims of the current study were to examine patterns and correlates of exercise and dietary behaviors in Hispanic college students. Data were collected from 693 Hispanic undergraduates who enrolled online and received course extra credit for participation. Individuals completed questionnaires assessing constructs of the transtheoretical mode...

  5. The representation of Hispanic masculinity in US cinema 1998-2008: genre, stardom and machismo

    Kearley, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines how the conventions of four distinct genres, the star personas of two key Hispanic male stars and conceptions of Hispanic men as 'macho' intersected in constructing images of Hispanic masculinity in Hollywood between the years 1998 and 2008. The work makes an original contribution to knowledge as the first extensive study of Hispanic masculinity in contemporary Hollywood and affording new insights into the way in which genre conventions and star personas contributed to th...

  6. Epidemiology of hypertension from childhood to young adulthood in black, white, and Hispanic population samples.

    Berenson, G. S.; Wattigney, W A; Webber, L S

    1996-01-01

    RESEARCHERS RECORDED BLOOD PRESSURE LEVELS of children and adolescents in the Bogalusa Heart Study (black and white populations) and in the Brooks Country Study (Hispanic population). Hispanic children had smaller stature, while whites and Hispanics tended to be fatter than blacks in childhood. In Bogalusa, black boys showed higher blood pressure levels. Hispanic girls showed lower systolic blood pressure than the other ethnic groups. In cultures with a high prevalence of hypertension, such a...

  7. Coping Styles and Depression Among Undocumented Hispanic Immigrants.

    Cobb, Cory L; Xie, Dong; Sanders, Gardiner L

    2016-08-01

    This cross-sectional study examined coping strategies and their relationship with depression among undocumented Hispanic immigrants. A community sample of 122 self-identified undocumented Hispanics filled out questionnaires measuring coping and depression. The authors categorized coping strategies as problem-focused, active-emotional, or avoidant-emotional. Findings indicated that coping through "prayer and meditation" (problem-focused), "get comfort from someone" (active-emotional), and "see bad things positively" (active-emotional) were more frequently used by undocumented Hispanics. Contrary to past research and predictions, problem-focused and active-emotional coping were both positively related to depression. What is more, problem-focused coping accounted for additional variance of depression above and beyond active-emotional coping. The insoluble nature of many of the problems faced by undocumented immigrants may explain the counterintuitive finding that as problem-focused and active-emotional coping increased, so too did depression. PMID:26330154

  8. A Systematic Review of Physical Activity Interventions in Hispanic Adults

    Healthy People 2020 aims to achieve health equity, eliminate disparities, and improve the health of all groups. Regular physical activity (PA) improves overall health and fitness and has the capability to reduce risk for chronic diseases. Identifying barriers which relate to the Hispanic population is important when designing PA interventions. Therefore, the purpose was to review existing PA interventions targeting Hispanic adults published between 1988 and 2011. This paper was limited to interventions which included more than 35% Hispanic adults (n=20). Most of the interventions were community based (n=16), although clinical, family-based, and faith-based settings were also represented. Interventions incorporated theory (n=16), with social cognitive theory and trans theoretical model being used most frequently. Social support was integral, building on the assumption that it is a strong motivator of PA. Each of the interventions reported success related to PA, social support, and/or BMI. Lessons learned should be incorporated into future interventions.

  9. Center Stage: New York's Repertorio Espanol Promotes and Preserves Hispanic Theater.

    Dominguez, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Currently the only Hispanic company that rotates productions daily, New York-based nonprofit Repertorio Espanol performs classical and contemporary Hispanic plays in Spanish with simultaneous English translation. To develop appreciation of Hispanic literature and culture in a new generation of theatergoers, the troupe performs discount matinees…

  10. Pragmatism as a Philosophy of Education in the Hispanic World: A Response

    Pappas, Gregario Fernando; Garrison, Jim

    2005-01-01

    We concentrate on four questions among the many posed by this special collection of papers on Pragmatism and the Hispanic world. They are, first, what took pragmatism beyond the borders of the United States and into the Hispanic world? Next, what are the ideas of Dewey (or pragmatism) that have had the greatest impact on Hispanic culture? Third,…

  11. Views and Preferences of Low-Literate Hispanics regarding Diabetes Education: Results of Formative Research

    Rosal, Milagros C.; Goins, Karin Valentine; Carbone, Elena T.; Cortes, Dharma E.

    2004-01-01

    Hispanics are twice as likely as non-Hispanic Whites to have diabetes and are also at higher risk for diabetes-related complications and poorer outcomes. The prevalence of diabetes is inversely related to educational status. Low literacy is common, especially among older Hispanics. Little literature exists on formative research to create diabetes…

  12. 3 CFR 8417 - Proclamation 8417 of September 15, 2009. National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2009

    2010-01-01

    ... Hispanic Heritage Month, 2009 8417 Proclamation 8417 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8417 of September 15, 2009 Proc. 8417 National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2009By the President of the United... issue annually a proclamation designating September 15 through October 15 as “National Hispanic...

  13. Higher Rate of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Hispanic Patients with Cerebral Cavernous Malformation

    Jenson, Amanda V.; Rodriguez, Gustavo J.; Alvarado, Luis A.; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Maud, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular malformations prone to intracerebral hemorrhage and epilepsy. Studies about the natural history and clinical presentation in the Hispanic population are lacking [7]. Retrospectively, we identified demographics and clinical features of Hispanic patients with CCM in our neurology clinic. Comparison with studies in the non-Hispanic White population with CCM was conducted.

  14. Promotores de Salud: Educating Hispanic Communities on Heart-Healthy Living

    Medina, Amanda; Balcazar, Hector; Hollen, Mary Luna; Nkhoma, Ella; Mas, Francisco Soto

    2007-01-01

    Background: Age-adjusted cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality rates for Hispanics are lower than for non-Hispanics. However, CVD is the leading cause of death among Hispanics, and there is an increasing heart health problem among this population. One strategy for preventing CVD is the use of community health workers (CHWs). A CHW is a member of…

  15. Beyond the Hispanic/Latina/o Label: Counseling Students from Four Representative Nations

    Hannigan, Terence P.

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians working with students of Hispanic/Latina/o background may tend to categorize these students as Hispanic/Latino/a regardless of their or their ancestors' country of origin. This article challenges the wisdom of using such broad terminology, because it masks considerable differences among Hispanic/Latina/o students, and proposes instead…

  16. Hispanic and White College Students' Sexual Behavior: More Similar than Different?

    Oswalt, Sara B.; Wyatt, Tammy Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Public health data have shown higher rates of unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections for Hispanic individuals as compared with White individuals in the United States. This study compared sexual health behaviors and sexual outcomes between Hispanic and White college students (N = 1,008) at a Hispanic serving institution. Using…

  17. Assessing the Anomalous Research on Hispanic Victimization: A Methodological Critique of a Victimological Enigma

    Brown, Ben

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an overview and critique of the research on Hispanic victimization. Analyses of data gathered prior to the mid- to late 1990s consistently show Hispanics were victimized at disproportionately high rates, but numerous recent studies indicate Hispanics were not victimized at disproportionately high rates. Given that research…

  18. Trends in Hispanic Teen Births: Differences across States. Research Brief. Publication #2007-22

    Franzetta, Kerry; Schelar, Erin; Manlove, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Hispanics represent one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. population, and this rapid growth is projected to be even more dramatic for Hispanic teens. The number of Hispanic teens is projected to increase by 50 percent by 2025, even though the total teen population is expected to increase by only 6 percent in the same time period.…

  19. The Role of Skin Color on Hispanic Women's Perceptions of Attractiveness

    Stephens, Dionne P.; Fernandez, Paula

    2012-01-01

    This study relies on qualitative methods to investigate Hispanic women's skin color perceptions. The primary goal is to identify the relevance of these perceptions on their beliefs about their own physical attractiveness. Thirty-four self-identified White-Hispanic women attending a large Hispanic Serving Institution in the southeastern United…

  20. ERPs to Alcohol Images among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Female College Freshmen

    Natalie Ceballos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that young women, particularly Latinas, may be at risk for problem drinking during the home-to-college transition. In this study, we used ERP cue-reactivity to explore physiological correlates of alcohol use and expectancies across the freshman year in Hispanic (H and Non-Hispanic White (N-H women. In the fall (t1 and spring (t2 semesters of their freshman year of college, 40 women (16 H reported alcohol use and expectancies. At each session, N200 and P300 ERPs were elicited by two oddball tasks (counterbalanced within session: 1 to detect alcohol targets while ignoring control items (household object distracters and frequently presented nonsense shapes and 2 to detect object targets while ignoring alcohol distracters and nonsense shapes. P300 amplitude was larger for targets (versus non-targets and for alcohol images (versus control images, but did not change over time or differ by ethnicity. P300 latency results included time x target and ethnicity x target interactions. Latency differences for target images were attenuated at t2, and N-Hs were more reactive to stimuli classed as targets regardless of whether these depicted alcohol or control images. N200s had higher amplitude and longer latency at t2, suggesting a change with acclimation to the college setting, but did not differ by target status, image type or ethnic group. P300 latency was positively correlated with the personalismo subscale of acculturation indicating that individuals with more social, people-oriented personalities were more distracted by alcohol images when they appeared as non-targets. N200 amplitude was correlated with positive alcohol expectancies, and this pattern changed over time (t1 versus t2, suggesting subtle, expectancy-related changes in alcohol processing as students acclimated to the college setting. Taken together, these results suggest that the cue-reactivity paradigm described here may be a useful tool for examining subtle physiological

  1. The rights of man and animal experimentation.

    Martin, J.

    1990-01-01

    Since emotions give contradictory signals about animal experimentation in medical science, man's relationship to animals must be based upon reason. Thomas Aquinas argues that man is essentially different from animals because man's intellectual processes show evidence of an abstract mechanism not possessed by animals. Man's rights arise in association with this essential difference. The consequence is that only man possesses true rights by Aquinas's definition; animals have them only by analog...

  2. Trees Are Useful to Man

    赵明

    2005-01-01

    Trees are useful to man in three impor-tant ways. They provide him with wood and other products;they give him shade;they help prevent drought(干旱)and floods. Unfortunately,in many parts of the world, man has not realized that the third one is the most important. Two thousand years ago a rich and pow-erful country cut down its trees to build war-ships, with which to gain itself an empire. It gained the empire,however,without its trees, its soil became hard and poor. When the em-pire fell to pieces, the home c...

  3. Ken Thompson's 6-man Tables

    Tamplin, John T; Haworth, Guy McCrossan

    2001-01-01

    Ken Thompson recently communicated some results mined from his set of 64 6-man endgame tables. These list some positions of interest, namely, mutual zugzwangs and those of maximum depth. The results have been analysed by the authors and found to be identical or compatible with the available or published findings of Karrer, Nalimov, Stiller and Wirth.

  4. Man...An Endangered Species?

    Department of the Interior, Washington, DC.

    The general theme of this 1968 yearbook is that man is a threatened species, facing overpopulation and unbridled technology - both self induced. The presentation is broad, relating to many aspects of conservation and natural resources in the United States in a descriptive, non-technical style. The yearbook is divided into major topics: Land…

  5. Lymphocyte migration studies in man

    In this paper the author outlines what is known of the migration and recirculation of the lymphocyte in man and animals. He then attempts to demonstrate how a better grasp of these phenomena may contribute to an understanding of the pathophysiology of human diseases such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, Hodgkin's, and other diseases

  6. Insects Affecting Man. MP-21.

    Lawson, Fred A.; Spackman, Everett

    The insects discussed in this document are those which have a direct effect upon humans either through a permanent association, as with lice, or a temporary association in the case of flies, bees, wasps, and spiders. In each case, life cycles and identifying characteristics are presented with remarks about the specific effect incurred by man. (CS)

  7. Manning of nuclear merchant ships

    The manning of nuclear propelled merchant ships bases on two principles: safe management of the vessel from the starting port to the place of destination, including cargo handling; qualification for operating a nuclear plant. The German Atomic Law requires the proof of sufficient qualifications of the personnel running land-based power stations. These requirements are applied analogously at the technical crews of nuclear powered ships. After dealing with the differences of plant operation on board ship and land-based plants the education of technical crews will be discussed. At the example of NS OTTO HAHN, the manning, education of the key positions, and responsibility of the ship's management are presented. For reasons of comparison the crews of NS SAVANNAH and NS MUTSU are opposed to this. A hint will be given on the new developments in the manning field of conventional ships, and at least a view into the future will be given under the aspect of progressive studies on the questions of manning future ships, and the work carried out by IMCO for a code of nuclear powered merchant ships

  8. The Reception of Dewey in the Hispanic World

    Nubiola, Jaime

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe Dewey's reception in the Spanish-speaking countries that constitute the Hispanic world. Without any doubt, it can be said that in the past century Spain and the countries of South America have been a world apart, lagging far behind the mainstream Western world. It includes a number of names and facts about the…

  9. Determinants of CPAP Adherence in Hispanics with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Montserrat Diaz-Abad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We hypothesized that socioeconomic factors and a language barrier would impact adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP among Hispanics with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Methods. Patients with OSA who were prescribed CPAP for at least 1 year and completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic data, socioeconomic status, and CPAP knowledge and adherence participated in the study. Results. Seventy-nine patients (26 males; 53±11 yrs; body mass index (BMI=45±9 kg/m2 with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI 33±30 events/hr completed the study. Included were 25 Hispanics, 39 African Americans, and 15 Caucasians, with no difference in age, AHI, CPAP use, or BMI between the groups. While there was a difference in educational level (P=0.006, income level (P<0.001, and employment status (P=0.03 between the groups, these did not influence CPAP adherence. Instead, overall improvement in quality of life and health status and perceived benefit from CPAP influenced adherence, both for the group as a whole (P=0.03, P=0.004, and P=0.001, resp., as well as in Hispanics (P=0.02, P=0.02, P=0.03, resp.. Conclusion. In Hispanic patients with OSA, perceived benefit with therapy, rather than socioeconomic status or a language barrier, appears to be the most important factor in determining CPAP adherence.

  10. Determinants of CPAP Adherence in Hispanics with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Diaz-Abad, Montserrat; Chatila, Wissam; Lammi, Matthew R; Swift, Irene; D'Alonzo, Gilbert E; Krachman, Samuel L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesized that socioeconomic factors and a language barrier would impact adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) among Hispanics with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. Patients with OSA who were prescribed CPAP for at least 1 year and completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic data, socioeconomic status, and CPAP knowledge and adherence participated in the study. Results. Seventy-nine patients (26 males; 53 ± 11 yrs; body mass index (BMI) = 45 ± 9 kg/m(2)) with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) 33 ± 30 events/hr completed the study. Included were 25 Hispanics, 39 African Americans, and 15 Caucasians, with no difference in age, AHI, CPAP use, or BMI between the groups. While there was a difference in educational level (P = 0.006), income level (P improvement in quality of life and health status and perceived benefit from CPAP influenced adherence, both for the group as a whole (P = 0.03, P = 0.004, and P = 0.001, resp.), as well as in Hispanics (P = 0.02, P = 0.02, P = 0.03, resp.). Conclusion. In Hispanic patients with OSA, perceived benefit with therapy, rather than socioeconomic status or a language barrier, appears to be the most important factor in determining CPAP adherence. PMID:24649371

  11. A Psychoecological Model of Academic Performance among Hispanic Adolescents

    Chun, Heejung; Dickson, Ginger

    2011-01-01

    Although the number of students who complete high school continues to rise, dramatic differences in school success remain across racial/ethnic groups. The current study addressed Hispanic adolescents' academic performance by investigating the relationships of parental involvement, culturally responsive teaching, sense of school belonging, and…

  12. Hispanic-Serving Institutions and the Struggle for Cognitive Justice

    Garcia, Herman S.

    2012-01-01

    Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) colleges and universities were initiated as an enterprise for investing in the academy as a way to provide opportunities for Latin@ students. However, HSIs in colleges and universities have had measured success in that significant numbers of Latin@ students continue to leave campuses with unfinished business. An…

  13. Bridges and Barriers: Educational Mobility of Hispanic Nurses.

    Villarruel, Antonia M.; Canales, Mary; Torres, Sara

    2001-01-01

    Focus groups with 37 Hispanic nurses who completed bachelor's or master's degrees identified barriers they faced: financial burdens, perceived discrimination, and the limitations of cultural values such as prescribed gender roles. Conversely, peer, family, and faculty supports for degree completion were also found. (Contains 33 references.) (SK)

  14. New Mafia: Black, Hispanic,and Italian Styles

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    1974-01-01

    To research the nature of organized crime in America a major study using anthropological field work techniques was undertaken: although we focused on the patterns of blacks and Hispanic crime activists, previous research on Italian-American patterns was utilized for comparison. (Author/JM)

  15. 77 FR 5582 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    2012-02-03

    ... MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Scheduling... workforce. The Council is co-chaired by the Chief of Staff of the Office of Personnel Management and the... meeting is open to the public. Please contact the Office of Personnel Management at the address...

  16. 77 FR 37077 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    2012-06-20

    ... MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Scheduling... other responsibilities, the Council shall advise the Director of the Office of Personnel Management on... Council is co-chaired by the Chief of Staff of the Office of Personnel Management and the...

  17. 77 FR 23513 - Hispanic Council on Federal Employment

    2012-04-19

    ... MANAGEMENT Hispanic Council on Federal Employment AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Scheduling... other responsibilities, the Council shall advise the Director of the Office of Personnel Management on... Council is co-chaired by the Chief of Staff of the Office of Personnel Management and the...

  18. Transitioning Hispanic Seniors from High School to College

    Marsico, Melisa; Getch, Yvette Q.

    2009-01-01

    Hispanic seniors who were on track to graduate in May 2006 were invited to participate in a program to help them make a successful transition from high school to college. Data indicated that this group might benefit from direct assistance in the college application process. The goal of the intervention was to work with the identified students…

  19. Hispanic Women: Schooling for Conformity in Public Education.

    Moore, Helen A.

    1983-01-01

    Teacher norms for students are specified on three dimensions --behavioral, social, and academic. Teacher expectations for their students' success are analyzed using 1,000 Hispanic and Anglo sixth-grade students and their classroom teachers. Findings indicated that teachers reward assertiveness, leadership, and action when considering success in…

  20. Eating Disorders: Explanatory Variables in Caucasian and Hispanic College Women

    Aviña, Vanessa; Day, Susan X.

    2016-01-01

    The authors explored Hispanic and Caucasian college women's (N = 264) behavioral and attitudinal symptoms of eating disorders after controlling for body mass index and internalization of the thinness ideal, as well as the roles of ethnicity and ethnic identity in symptomatology. Correlational analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, and…

  1. Linkage analysis of circulating levels of adiponectin in hispanic children

    Adiponectin, a hormone produced exclusively by adipose tissue, is inversely associated with insulin resistance and pro-inflammatory conditions. The aim of this study was to find quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that affect circulating levels of adiponectin in Hispanic children participating in the VVA...

  2. Ethical Perceptions among Hispanic Students: Differences by Major and Gender

    Landry, Raymond, Jr.; Moyes, Glen D.; Cortes, Angelica C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined ethical perceptions of Hispanic students by analyzing differences between (a) accounting and nonaccounting business majors and (b) women and men. The authors used the following five constructs: justice, relativism, egoism, utilitarianism, and deontology. Their study incorporated 12 moral characteristics into…

  3. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid in Hispanics

    Lily Koo Lin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lily Koo Lin1, Han Lee2, Eli Chang11Department of Oculoplastics, Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Dermatology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USABackground: Pigmented basal cell carcinoma (PBCC of the eyelid has not been well cited in the literature, and is often overlooked in the differential diagnosis of pigmented eyelid lesions. We aim to describe PBCC of the eyelid in Hispanic patients.Methods: Retrospective review of patients with eyelid skin cancer who presented to the Department of Dermatology at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California and the Doheny Eye Institute from January 2002 to November 2005.Results: Sixty-nine of the 79 patients with eyelid skin cancer had basal cell carcinoma. Eight of these patients were Hispanic. Four of the eight Hispanic patients had PBCC.Conclusions: Although eyelid PBCC is regarded as a rare condition, it may occur more commonly in the Hispanic population and should be remembered in the differential diagnosis of pigmented eyelid lesions.Keywords: pigmented basal cell carcinoma, eyelid, skin cancer, lesions

  4. HPV Knowledge and Vaccine Acceptability among Hispanic Fathers

    Kornfeld, Julie; Byrne, Margaret M.; Vanderpool, Robin; Shin, Sarah; Kobetz, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge and vaccine acceptability in a convenience sample of immigrant Hispanic men, many of whom are parents of adolescents. Data on 189 male callers were collected from the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service Spanish-language call center. Most participants…

  5. Pedagogy for Equity: Teaching in a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Nunez, Anne-Marie; Ramalho, Elizabeth Murakami; Cuero, Kimberley K.

    2010-01-01

    Three female tenure-track faculty members at a Hispanic-Serving Institution explored how their cultural backgrounds inform their pedagogical approaches toward equity. They drew upon Mills's (1959) and Collins's (1993) frameworks to examine how their personal biographies, local social contexts, and broader systemic institutions affect their…

  6. ANCA-associated vasculitis in Hispanic Americans: an unrecognized severity.

    Sreih, Antoine G; Mandhadi, Ranadeep; Aldaghlawi, Fadi; Khan, Asad; Irshad, Vajiha; Finn, Katherine; Block, Joel A

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to compare the severity and outcomes of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) between Hispanics and Caucasians living in the same geographical area. All patients diagnosed with AAV at two academic institutions in Chicago from January 2006 to December 2012 were retrospectively and prospectively identified. Disease activity was measured with the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS), and disease damage was measured with the Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI). Student's t test and chi-square tests were employed; p ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Seventy patients with AAV were identified; 15 patients were excluded. Fifty-five patients were included in the study: 23 Hispanics and 32 Caucasians, 35 patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's), 12 with microscopic polyangiitis, 7 with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and 1 with renal-limited vasculitis. Compared to Caucasians, Hispanics had a higher BVAS at presentation (16.3 ± 7.6 versus 10.7 ± 7.5, p = 0.006), a higher VDI at presentation (2.90 ± 1.50 versus 2.06 ± 1.30, p = 0.030), and a cumulative VDI (3.90 ± 1.70 versus 2.50 ± 1.90, p = 0.010). Renal involvement was more common among Hispanics (85 % of Hispanics versus 48 % of Caucasians, p = 0.01). Seventy percent of Hispanics had acute renal failure (mean creatinine = 3.37 ± 4.4 mg/dl) of whom seven (50 %) required dialysis, versus 25 % of Caucasians (mean creatinine = 1.78 ± 1.57 mg/dl, p = 0.03) and only two requiring dialysis. Compared to Caucasians, Hispanics with AAV present with more severe disease and higher damage indices. Larger studies are required to confirm these findings and delineate the respective roles of environment and genetics in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24752347

  7. Voices of Hispanic College Students: A Content Analysis of Qualitative Research within the "Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences"

    Storlie, Cassandra A.; Moreno, Luis S.; Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe

    2014-01-01

    As Hispanic students continue to be an underrepresented cultural group in higher education, researchers are called to uncover the challenging and complex experience of this diverse group of students. Using the constant comparative method, these researchers conducted a content analysis of the qualitative research on the experiences of Hispanic…

  8. Developing a Leadership Identity: A Case Study Exploring a Select Group of Hispanic Women at a Hispanic Serving Institution

    Onorato, Suzanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Leadership is a socially constructed concept shaped by the context, values and experiences of society (Klenke, 1996); the historical context of gender and ethnicity in society affects views about leadership and who merits a leadership role. Therefore, developing an understanding of Hispanic women students' leadership identity development is…

  9. Teleoperators: Man's Machine Partners

    Corliss, William R.

    1972-01-01

    This booklet is about teleoperators, a class of machines that augment man rather than replace him. Teleoperators have the ability to add to man's strength, his reach, and his ability to work in hostile environments.

  10. Hispanic-White Differences in Lifespan Variability in the United States.

    Lariscy, Joseph T; Nau, Claudia; Firebaugh, Glenn; Hummer, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    This study is the first to investigate whether and, if so, why Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites in the United States differ in the variability of their lifespans. Although Hispanics enjoy higher life expectancy than whites, very little is known about how lifespan variability-and thus uncertainty about length of life-differs by race/ethnicity. We use 2010 U.S. National Vital Statistics System data to calculate lifespan variance at ages 10+ for Hispanics and whites, and then decompose the Hispanic-white variance difference into cause-specific spread, allocation, and timing effects. In addition to their higher life expectancy relative to whites, Hispanics also exhibit 7 % lower lifespan variability, with a larger gap among women than men. Differences in cause-specific incidence (allocation effects) explain nearly two-thirds of Hispanics' lower lifespan variability, mainly because of the higher mortality from suicide, accidental poisoning, and lung cancer among whites. Most of the remaining Hispanic-white variance difference is due to greater age dispersion (spread effects) in mortality from heart disease and residual causes among whites than Hispanics. Thus, the Hispanic paradox-that a socioeconomically disadvantaged population (Hispanics) enjoys a mortality advantage over a socioeconomically advantaged population (whites)-pertains to lifespan variability as well as to life expectancy. Efforts to reduce U.S. lifespan variability and simultaneously increase life expectancy, especially for whites, should target premature, young adult causes of death-in particular, suicide, accidental poisoning, and homicide. We conclude by discussing how the analysis of Hispanic-white differences in lifespan variability contributes to our understanding of the Hispanic paradox. PMID:26682740

  11. 'Lion and man' : upper and lower bounds

    Alonso, Laurent; Goldstein, Arthur S.; Reingold, Edward M.

    1992-01-01

    Given a lion and a man, their initial position, and restrictions on their ranges and speeds, how quickly can the lion get within a given distance from the man? We consider the case in which the lion and man are restricted to the interior of a circle and each is limited to the same speed

  12. Psychological Stress of Hispanics Living on the Border.

    Craddock, Christopher S; Folse, Kimberly A

    2016-08-01

    This paper examines before and after perceived stress scores (PSS) of Hispanic women participating in a brief community health promotion program. Scores declined dramatically and significantly after the intervention, approximating those of Hispanics nationally. Post PSS were significantly correlated with language preference (Spanish), educational level, employment, having gone to jail or been in detention, and income. In the regression model, language preference and income were significant. We suggest emotional fear at the onset of participation in the program may exert an influence on pre-PSS scores, and that increased familiarity/rapport with program staff and having social psychological needs met may ameliorate this fear. Preference for Spanish, the language spoken at home for the majority of participants, may indicate a resistance to acculturating to mainstream culture, and, consequently, create a buffer against perceived stress. PMID:26472548

  13. Developing a center for Hispanic youth violence prevention.

    Mirabal-Colón, Brenda

    2003-03-01

    Youth violence is a serious public health problem, described by the Surgeon General's Report on Youth Violence (2001). Homicide is the second cause of death for the 15-24 age population in the USA and Puerto Rico; intentional injuries also result in significant morbidity. Youth are at greater risk of being victims than perpetrators of violence. African American and Hispanic youth are at particular risk. Effective, community-based initiatives to prevent youth violence are necessary to interrupt the cycle of violence. In 2000, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the Department of Health and Human Services awarded grants to establish ten Academic Centers of Excellence for Youth Violence Prevention. This article describes the development of the Center for Hispanic Youth Violence Prevention, of the FILIUS Institute of the University of Puerto Rico. PMID:12733449

  14. Familism and Health Care Provision to Hispanic Older Adults.

    Savage, Brittany; Foli, Karen J; Edwards, Nancy E; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Familism and Health Care Provision to Hispanic Older Adults" found on pages 21-29, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until December 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain familism and its potential effect on health care provision to Hispanic older adults. 2. Describe cultural

  15. Self-Reported Cancer Prevalence among Hispanics in the US: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Penedo, Frank J; Yanez, Betina; Castañeda, Sheila F; Gallo, Linda; Wortman, Katy; Gouskova, Natalia; Simon, Melissa; Arguelles, William; Llabre, Maria; Sanchez-Johnsen, Lisa; Brintz, Carrie; Gonzalez, Patricia; Van Horn, Linda; Rademaker, Alfred W; Ramirez, Amelie G

    2016-01-01

    Cancer has surpassed heart disease as the leading cause of death among Hispanics in the U.S., yet data on cancer prevalence and risk factors in Hispanics in regard to ancestry remain scarce. This study sought to describe (a) the prevalence of cancer among Hispanics from four major U.S. metropolitan areas, (b) cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry, and (c) identify correlates of self-reported cancer prevalence. Participants were 16,415 individuals from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central or South American. All data were collected at a single time point during the HCHS/SOL baseline clinic visit. The overall self-reported prevalence rate of cancer for the population was 4%. The rates varied by Hispanic ancestry group, with individuals of Cuban and Puerto Rican ancestry reporting the highest cancer prevalence. For the entire population, older age (OR = 1.47, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.26-1.71) and having health insurance (OR = 1.93, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.42-2.62) were all significantly associated with greater prevalence, whereas male sex was associated with lower prevalence (OR = 0.56, p < .01, 95% CI, .40-.79). Associations between study covariates and cancer prevalence also varied by Hispanic ancestry. Findings underscore the importance of sociodemographic factors and health insurance in relation to cancer prevalence for Hispanics and highlight variations in cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry groups. Characterizing differences in cancer prevalence rates and their correlates is critical to the development and implementation of effective prevention strategies across distinct Hispanic ancestry groups. PMID:26808047

  16. Determinants of CPAP Adherence in Hispanics with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Montserrat Diaz-Abad; Wissam Chatila; Matthew R. Lammi; Irene Swift; Gilbert E. D’Alonzo; Krachman, Samuel L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesized that socioeconomic factors and a language barrier would impact adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) among Hispanics with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. Patients with OSA who were prescribed CPAP for at least 1 year and completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic data, socioeconomic status, and CPAP knowledge and adherence participated in the study. Results. Seventy-nine patients (26 males; 53 ± 11 yrs; body mass index (BMI) = 45 ± 9 ...

  17. Isoniazid hepatitis among pregnant and postpartum Hispanic patients.

    Franks, A L; Binkin, N J; Snider, D E; Rokaw, W M; Becker, S.

    1989-01-01

    On request of local health officials, the authors investigated isoniazid (INH) hepatitis morbidity and mortality among patients attending an Hispanic prenatal clinic. Among 3,681 women treated with INH during and after pregnancy to prevent tuberculosis (TB), 5 developed INH hepatitis, and 2 of the 5 women died. Comparison with previously collected Public Health Service data concerning 3,948 nonpregnant women, using the Cox proportional hazards model, revealed a 2.5-fold increased risk of INH ...

  18. Inferential Statistics from Black Hispanic Breast Cancer Survival Data

    Khan, Hafiz M. R.; Anshul Saxena; Elizabeth Ross; Venkataraghavan Ramamoorthy; Diana Sheehan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we test the statistical probability models for breast cancer survival data for race and ethnicity. Data was collected from breast cancer patients diagnosed in United States during the years 1973–2009. We selected a stratified random sample of Black Hispanic female patients from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database to derive the statistical probability models. We used three common model building criteria which include Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), Ba...

  19. Acculturation and smoking patterns among Hispanics - A review

    BETHEL, J. W.; Schenker, Marc B.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a systematic review of published studies investigating the association of acculturation and smoking patterns among Hispanic men and women in the United States. Methods: Online bibliographic databases were searched from 1985 to 2003 using three key search terms. The methodology and findings of all retrieved articles were critically evaluated. Data were extracted from each article regarding study population, study methods, exposure assessment, outcomes measured, acculturat...

  20. Developing responsiveness to the health needs of Hispanic children and families.

    Guendelman, S

    1983-01-01

    Admission to a tertiary care pediatric hospital is a stressful experience for the Hispanic child and family. The stress partially stems from the institutional barriers that conflict with the psycho-social needs of Hispanic families. This article identifies six psycho-social needs of Hispanics and examines related risks for coping disturbances encountered during the hospitalization process. These risks can be reduced by increasing health providers' understanding of the psycho-social needs of Hispanics and by specifying culturally appropriate interventions. The development of cross-cultural committees, protocols and hospital based Hispanic self-help networks represent distinct modalities for improving responsiveness to the health needs of Hispanic families in a hospital setting. PMID:6623301

  1. A Profile of Mexican American, Puerto Rican, and Other Hispanic STEM Doctorates: 1983 TO 1997

    Quintana-Baker, Maricel

    This article describes the characteristics of Hispanic U. S. citizens who earned doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) from institutions in the United States between 1983 and 1997. The data on this population •were disaggregated by gender and by Hispanic subgroup (i.e., Mexican American, Puerto Rican and other Hispanic). The profile for this population includes parental education, type of financial assistance during time of study, and level of debt on receipt of doctorate. In addition, this research identified and ranked the doctorate-granting institutions according to the absolute number of STEM doctoral degrees they granted to Hispanics during the 15-year period of the study. The results indicate that there are differences among the Hispanic subgroups in this study. Therefore, it is critical thai future researchers understand that studies that analyze Hispanics as one single homogeneous group produce results that are not truly representative and that research, policy, and programmatic efforts must be targeted accordingly.

  2. Condom use among unmarried students in a Hispanic-serving university.

    Kim, Sunny; De La Rosa, Mario; Trepka, Mary Jo; Kelley, Megan

    2007-10-01

    This study compares the prevalence of risky sexual behavior between unmarried Hispanic and non-Hispanic students in southern Florida and assesses the role of substance use in risky sexual behavior. Among 815 unmarried respondents, approximately 35% had two or more sexual partners within the past 12 months. Compared with non-Hispanic White students, Hispanic students were less likely to engage in unprotected sex under the influence of alcohol (25% vs. 16%) but also less likely to have been tested for HIV infection (55% vs. 43%). The percentage of students using a condom during their last sexual encounter was 8% (oral), 35% (anal), and 50% (vaginal). For both Hispanic and non-Hispanic students, condom use was low regardless of smoking, heavy alcohol consumption, and marijuana use. From the problem behavior theory perspective, condom use and substance use may have different behavioral origins. These findings can help target and guide the development of prevention programs in university settings. PMID:17967114

  3. Inferential Statistics from Black Hispanic Breast Cancer Survival Data

    Hafiz M. R. Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we test the statistical probability models for breast cancer survival data for race and ethnicity. Data was collected from breast cancer patients diagnosed in United States during the years 1973–2009. We selected a stratified random sample of Black Hispanic female patients from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER database to derive the statistical probability models. We used three common model building criteria which include Akaike Information Criteria (AIC, Bayesian Information Criteria (BIC, and Deviance Information Criteria (DIC to measure the goodness of fit tests and it was found that Black Hispanic female patients survival data better fit the exponentiated exponential probability model. A novel Bayesian method was used to derive the posterior density function for the model parameters as well as to derive the predictive inference for future response. We specifically focused on Black Hispanic race. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method was used for obtaining the summary results of posterior parameters. Additionally, we reported predictive intervals for future survival times. These findings would be of great significance in treatment planning and healthcare resource allocation.

  4. Predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors among gay Hispanic men.

    De Santis, Joseph P; Layerla, Dennys Martin; Barroso, Susana; Gattamorta, Karina A; Sanchez, Michael; Prado, Guillermo J

    2012-04-01

    Gay men are a vulnerable population at risk for a number of health disparities, but little is known about eating disorders among gay Hispanic men. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of eating attitudes and behaviors with alcohol abuse, body image, depression, self-esteem, and sexual behaviors to determine predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors in a community sample of gay Hispanic men. Significant numbers of the participants were at risk for eating disorders (13%), alcohol abuse (18%), body image disturbance (29%), depression (25%), low self-esteem (12%), and high-risk sexual behaviors (34%). Alcohol abuse, body image, depression, self-esteem, and sexual behaviors were significant predictors of eating attitudes and behaviors and accounted for 38% of the variance in eating attitudes and behaviors. Nurses providing care to this population of gay men must be aware of this cluster of related mental health conditions that are experienced by these men. Addressing and treating these health conditions as a group of related mental health conditions are necessary. More research is needed to further explore this cluster of health issues among gay Hispanic men. PMID:22449559

  5. The occupational assimilation of Hispanics in the U.S.: evidence from panel data

    Maude Toussaint-Comeau

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates whether Hispanic immigrants assimilate in occupational status with natives and the factors that determine occupational status. A theoretical framework is proposed that models occupational status and convergence of Hispanics relative to U.S.-born non-Hispanics as a function of human capital and demographic exogenous variables, U.S. experience (assimilation effects) and periods of migration (cohort effects). In addition, the model also controls for aggregate economic con...

  6. The Hispanic View of E-mail, Popup, and Banner Advertising

    Pradeep K. Korgaonkar; Ronnie Silverblatt; Enrique P. Becerra

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the authors broadly investigate Hispanic consumer attitudes and their sociological behaviors toward online advertising. The study documents the correlation between Hispanic attitudes, behaviors, and three types of online advertising that have an effect on cultural distinctions. Additionally, the study compares the group’s attitudes toward TV advertising vis-Ã -vis the three types of online advertising to compare the two medium’s similarities and differences. Notably, Hispanics ...

  7. The Hispanic Paradox and older adults' disabilities: is there a healthy migrant effect?

    Thomson, Esme Fuller; Nuru-Jeter, Amani; Richardson, Dawn; Raza, Ferrah; Minkler, Meredith

    2013-05-01

    The "Hispanic Paradox" suggests that despite rates of poverty similar to African Americans, Hispanics have far better health and mortality outcomes, more comparable to non-Hispanic White Americans. Three prominent possible explanations for the Hispanic Paradox have emerged. The "Healthy Migrant Effect" suggests a health selection effect due to the demands of migration. The Hispanic lifestyle hypothesis focuses on Hispanics' strong social ties and better health behaviors. The reverse migration argument suggests that the morbidity profile in the USA is affected when many Hispanic immigrants return to their native countries after developing a serious illness. We analyzed data from respondents aged 55 and over from the nationally representative 2006 American Community Survey including Mexican Americans (13,167 U.S. born; 11,378 immigrants), Cuban Americans (314 U.S. born; 3,730 immigrants), and non-Hispanic White Americans (629,341 U.S. born; 31,164 immigrants). The healthy migrant effect was supported with SES-adjusted disability comparable between Mexican, Cuban and non-Hispanic Whites born in the USA and all immigrants having lower adjusted odds of functional limitations than U.S. born non-Hispanic Whites. The reverse migration hypothesis was partially supported, with citizenship and longer duration in the USA associated with higher rates of SES-adjusted disability for Mexican Americans. The Hispanic healthy life-style explanation had little support in this study. Our findings underline the importance of considering nativity when planning for health interventions to address the needs of the growing Hispanic American older adult population. PMID:23644828

  8. Childbearing characteristics of U.S.- and foreign-born Hispanic mothers.

    Ventura, S J; Taffel, S M

    1985-01-01

    This study compares maternal and infant health and sociodemographic characteristics of U.S.-born and foreign- or Puerto Rican-born Hispanic mothers and their babies, using data from the national vital statistics system and the 1980 National Natality Survey. While nearly half of all Hispanic mothers and Mexican and Puerto Rican mothers were born in the United States, less than 10 percent of Cuban and other Hispanic mothers were U.S. born. Compared with foreign- or Puerto Rican-born Hispanic mo...

  9. Chinese Manned Space Utility Project

    Gu, Y.

    Since 1992 China has been carrying out a conspicuous manned space mission A utility project has been defined and created during the same period The Utility Project of the Chinese Manned Space Mission involves wide science areas such as earth observation life science micro-gravity fluid physics and material science astronomy space environment etc In the earth observation area it is focused on the changes of global environments and relevant exploration technologies A Middle Revolution Image Spectrometer and a Multi-model Micro-wave Remote Sensor have been developed The detectors for cirrostratus distribution solar constant earth emission budget earth-atmosphere ultra-violet spectrum and flux have been manufactured and tested All of above equipment was engaged in orbital experiments on-board the Shenzhou series spacecrafts Space life science biotechnologies and micro-gravity science were much concerned with the project A series of experiments has been made both in ground laboratories and spacecraft capsules The environmental effect in different biological bodies in space protein crystallization electrical cell-fusion animal cells cultural research on separation by using free-low electrophoresis a liquid drop Marangoni migration experiment under micro-gravity as well as a set of crystal growth and metal processing was successfully operated in space The Gamma-ray burst and high-energy emission from solar flares have been explored A set of particle detectors and a mass spectrometer measured

  10. Man-machine interactions 3

    Czachórski, Tadeusz; Kozielski, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Man-Machine Interaction is an interdisciplinary field of research that covers many aspects of science focused on a human and machine in conjunction.  Basic goal of the study is to improve and invent new ways of communication between users and computers, and many different subjects are involved to reach the long-term research objective of an intuitive, natural and multimodal way of interaction with machines.  The rapid evolution of the methods by which humans interact with computers is observed nowadays and new approaches allow using computing technologies to support people on the daily basis, making computers more usable and receptive to the user's needs.   This monograph is the third edition in the series and presents important ideas, current trends and innovations in  the man-machine interactions area.  The aim of this book is to introduce not only hardware and software interfacing concepts, but also to give insights into the related theoretical background. Reader is provided with a compilation of high...

  11. Man's Impact on Groundwater Systems

    Water is an essential component of ecosystems and man's health. As the world population is growing, the need for more food, man's shift to urban areas and the progressive industrialisation all affect water resources in a qualitative and quantitative way. Connected to these general developments the following problems arise: - water exploitation increasingly concentrates on local areas with high water demands at low cost; - urbanisation contributes to the disequilibration of groundwater recharge, either by sealing the surface against infiltration or by leakage processes from the underground water transport system; - the groundwater quality is affected by leakage and accidental spills of liquid and solid wastes gathered in a few places, generally untreated or unconditionedly released, thus presenting serious dangers of pollution; - the excessive use of agrochemicals influences the natural functioning of both the soil and the aquifer, thus hampering the self-attenuation processes; - emissions from fuel and waste combustion are concentrated in few places, in the vicinity of the emission source provoking strong and quasi immediate contamination, also in the more distant surroundings slowly increasing impacts on water resources and ecosystems by dry or wet deposition; - the expansion of man's activities in arid and semi-arid regions often lead to the deterioration of resources, either by overexploitation or by desertification; - deforestation disturbs the water balance and water quality, and enhances erosion. Since water resources react on changes of land and water use with a long delay time, man's activities should be better adapted to basic hydrodynamic conditions in order to better satisfy the needs of a safe drinking water supply, flood protection, and the food and industrial production. Such basic hydrodynamic conditions comprise e.g. resource replenishment, steady state or transient dynamics and chemical stratification, which all may contribute to develop

  12. Tattoo types and frequencies in New Mexican white hispanics and white non-hispanics: autopsy data from homicidal and accidental deaths, 2002-2005.

    Komar, Debra; Lathrop, Sarah

    2008-12-01

    Tattoos serve as a form of forensic personal identification and providing evidence of possible gang affiliation, incarceration history, and high-risk lifestyle factors such as drug use. Despite their forensic applications, tattoo typology and frequencies in specific ethnic and racial groups are underreported and poorly understood. This study examined autopsy records from the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator from 2002 to 2005. A total of 3430 individuals (1666 white Hispanics; 1764 white non-Hispanics), aged 18 to 100 years, with homicidal or accidental manners of death were included in the study. In addition to demographic information, data were recorded on the presence/absence of tattoos, singular or multiple tattoos, and the language of text tattoos. Tattoos depicting gang or religious symbolism were also recorded. Results indicate statistically significant differences in tattoo frequencies by ethnicity (52% Hispanic vs. 29.5% non-Hispanic), sex (46.8% men vs. 25.9% women) and age cohort. Hispanics were more likely to have multiple tattoos than non-Hispanics (41% and 19%, respectively), and were 4.67 times more likely to have a religious tattoo and 7.13 times more likely to have a gang tattoo than non-Hispanics. Significant patterns in language of text tattoos and correlations with manner of death were also noted. PMID:19259010

  13. The Hispanic Paradox and Older Adults’ Disabilities: Is There a Healthy Migrant Effect?

    Ferrah Raza

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The “Hispanic Paradox” suggests that despite rates of poverty similar to African Americans, Hispanics have far better health and mortality outcomes, more comparable to non-Hispanic White Americans. Three prominent possible explanations for the Hispanic Paradox have emerged. The “Healthy Migrant Effect” suggests a health selection effect due to the demands of migration. The Hispanic lifestyle hypothesis focuses on Hispanics’ strong social ties and better health behaviors. The reverse migration argument suggests that the morbidity profile in the USA is affected when many Hispanic immigrants return to their native countries after developing a serious illness. We analyzed data from respondents aged 55 and over from the nationally representative 2006 American Community Survey including Mexican Americans (13,167 U.S. born; 11,378 immigrants, Cuban Americans (314 U.S. born; 3,730 immigrants, and non-Hispanic White Americans (629,341 U.S. born; 31,164 immigrants. The healthy migrant effect was supported with SES-adjusted disability comparable between Mexican, Cuban and non-Hispanic Whites born in the USA and all immigrants having lower adjusted odds of functional limitations than U.S. born non-Hispanic Whites. The reverse migration hypothesis was partially supported, with citizenship and longer duration in the USA associated with higher rates of SES-adjusted disability for Mexican Americans. The Hispanic healthy life-style explanation had little support in this study. Our findings underline the importance of considering nativity when planning for health interventions to address the needs of the growing Hispanic American older adult population.

  14. HIV Testing Among Black and Hispanic Immigrants in the United States.

    Ojikutu, Bisola O; Mazzola, Emanuele; Fullem, Andrew; Vega, Rodolfo; Landers, Stewart; Gelman, Rebecca S; Bogart, Laura M

    2016-07-01

    Late presentation is common among black and Hispanic US immigrants living with HIV. Little is known about HIV testing in this population because data are aggregated into racial and ethnic categories without regard to nativity. This study was undertaken to determine HIV testing patterns in these populations. We used data from the National Health Interview Survey (2007-2010), a nationally representative source of HIV testing data disaggregated by nativity. The sample consisted of 10,397 immigrants (83.9% Hispanic white, 13.1% non-Hispanic black, and 3.0% Hispanic black). The majority of participants were from the Caribbean, Central America, and Mexico (81.5%). Hispanic white immigrants were least likely to have undergone testing compared with non-Hispanic and Hispanic black immigrants (46.7% vs. 70.5% and 65.8%). Among immigrants with known risk factors or prior STDs, 59.2% and 74.8% reported previous HIV testing. Immigrants who had not recently talked to a healthcare provider were less likely to report testing: Hispanic white (AOR 0.65, 95% CI 0.58-0.72), non-Hispanic black (AOR 0.64, 95% CI 0.48-0.85), and Hispanic black (AOR 0.26, 95% CI 0.14-0.48). Only 17.2% of all immigrants intended to undergo HIV testing in the 12 months following participation in the survey. Among all three racial and ethnic groups, immigrants who reported a history of prior STDs were more likely to intend to test for HIV in the future. Many black and Hispanic immigrants to the United States have not undergone HIV testing. Interventions to increase access to HIV testing and awareness of transmission risk should be developed. PMID:27410494

  15. Tesla man out of time

    Cheney, Margaret

    1981-01-01

    Called a madman by some, a genius by others, and an enigma by nearly everyone, Nikola Tesla created astonishing, world-transforming devises that were virtually without theoretical precedent. Tesla not only discovered the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating current machinery, but also introduced the fundamentals of robotry, computers, and missile science and helped pave the way for such technologies as satellites, microwaves, beam weapons, and nuclear fusion. Almost supernaturally gifted, Tesla was also unusually erratic, flamboyant, and neurotic. He was J. P. Morgan's client, counted Mark Twain as a friend, and considered Thomas Edison an enemy. But above all, he was the hero and mentor to many of the last century's most famous scientists. In a meticulously researched, engagingly written biography, Margaret Cheney presents the many different dimensions of this extraordinary man, capturing his human qualities and quirks as she chronicles a lifetime of discoveries that continue to alter our ...

  16. Deformation of Man Made Objects

    Ibrahim, Mohamed

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a framework for 3D object deformation with primary focus on man-made objects. Our framework enables a user to deform a model while preserving its defining characteristics. Moreover, our framework enables a user to set constraints on a model to keep its most significant features intact after the deformation process. Our framework supports a semi-automatic constraint setting environment, where some constraints could be automatically set by the framework while others are left for the user to specify. Our framework has several advantages over some state of the art deformation techniques in that it enables a user to add new features to the deformed model while keeping its general look similar to the input model. In addition, our framework enables the rotation and extrusion of different parts of a model.

  17. Trace element speciation in man

    The toxicological properties associated with an element depend upon its chemical form since this will dictate the metabolic pathway that the compound follows in the body. The speciation of the element is determinant for its physiological behaviour in a living system. The complicated interactions of the different forms of trace elements in human metabolism were reviewed and the species present were categorised into seven groups. The complexity of the tasks involved in a study of trace element speciation in man was illustrated and many of the pitfalls were identified together with an example of the detective approach that must be followed to elucidate the intricacies of the associations between trace elements and biomolecular moieties

  18. Biosafety in manned space flight

    The main goal of manned exploration is to achieve a prolonged stay in space, for example in an orbital station (such as the International Space Station (ISS)) or in planetary bases on the Moon and/or Mars. It goes without saying that such missions can only be realized when the astronaut's health and well-being is secured. In this respect, the characterization of the microbiological contamination on board spacecraft and orbital stations and the influence of cosmic radiation and microgravity are of paramount importance. Microbial contamination may originate from different sources and includes the initial contamination of space flight materials during manufacturing and assembly, the delivery of supplies to the orbital station, the supplies themselves, secondary contamination during the lifetime of the orbital station, the crew and any other biological material on board e.g. animals, plants, micro-organisms used in scientific experiments. Although most microorganisms do not threaten human health, it has been reported that in a confined environment, such as a space cabin, microorganisms may produce adverse effects on the optimal performance of the space crew and the integrity of the spacecraft or habitat. These effects range from infections, allergies, and toxicities to degradation of air and water supplies. Biodegradation of critical materials may result in system failure and this may jeopardize the crew. The research aims at monitoring the biological airborne and surface contamination during manned space flight. The ISS has been selected as primary test bed for this study. The majority of the investigations are being done by the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP), which is responsible for monitoring the biological contamination in the habitable compartments of the ISS for safety and hygienic reasons. Within the frame of a collaboration between IBMP and the European Space Agency (ESA), SCK-CEN is able to participate in the analyses

  19. Becoming and development of man: anthroposophistic approach.

    Ionova E.N.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthroposophistic orientated view of R.Shtayner to development of a man during all life is systematized. Anthroposophistic conception of development of a man is based on such substantive provisions: unity corporal-heartfelt-spiritual life; connection of component parts of psyche with physiological organization of man; an interconditionality of physiological, heartfelt and spiritual development is in the rhythm of seven years. It is rotined that a health, heartfelt rest and happiness, is the result of harmonic development. All three aspects are the legal certificates of constituents life of man.

  20. Strategies for recruiting Hispanic women into a prospective cohort study of modifiable risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus

    Hastings Valerie; Fortner Renée T; Chasan-Taber Lisa; Markenson Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this article was to describe effective strategies for recruitment of Hispanic women into a prospective cohort study of modifiable risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Although Hispanic women have two to four times the risk of developing GDM compared with non-Hispanic white women, few GDM prevention studies have included Hispanic women. Methods The study was conducted in the ambulatory obstetrical practices of Baystate Medical Center located ...

  1. Hispanics: A Diverse Population of Students to Influence the Landscape of Higher Education

    Page, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Hispanic students are a growing and pervasive population within higher education. This position paper examines population characteristics and educational patterns of Hispanic students that underscore failures of the higher education system in serving these students, in addition to institutional issues and cultural values that further complicate…

  2. Risks, Assets, and Negative Health Behaviors among Arkansas' Hispanic Adolescents

    Fitzpatrick, Kevin M.; Choudary, Wendie; Kearney, Anne; Piko, Bettina F.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between risk, assets, and negative health behaviors among a large sample of Hispanic adolescents. Data were collected from over 1,000 Hispanic youth in grades 6, 8, 10, and 12 attending school in a moderate size school district in Northwest Arkansas. Logistic regression models examined the variation in the odds…

  3. Developmental Assets and Ethnic Identity as Predictors of Thriving in Hispanic Adolescents

    Alvarado, Melissa; Ricard, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the confluence of developmental assets, ethnic identity, and acculturative stress in the prediction of thriving among Hispanic adolescents. Thriving is used to encompass youth who are not only doing well now but who are also on the trajectory toward overall success. Study participants included 130 self-reported Hispanic middle…

  4. Measuring Economic Discrimination of Hispanic-Owned Architecture and Engineering Firms in South Florida

    Carvajal, Manuel J.

    2004-01-01

    Using data developed for the U.S. District Court, this study compared the performance of Hispanic-owned firms and two groupings of non-Hispanic-owned firms in three South Florida markets: architecture (n= 176), structural engineering (n= 144), and civil engineering (n = 200). Within each market, firms?earnings are expressed as functions of…

  5. Adolescent pregnancy prevention for Hispanic youth: the role of schools, families, and communities.

    Brindis, C

    1992-09-01

    A sociodemographic profile of Hispanic youth is presented as well as a description of the incidence of adolescent pregnancy and parenting in this population. Strategies and recommendations that should be implemented to provide Hispanic youth with viable options and assistance in delaying early childbearing also are offered. PMID:1434564

  6. Novel genetic loci identified for the pathophysiology of childhood obesity in the Hispanic population

    Genetic variants responsible for susceptibility to obesity and its comorbidities among Hispanic children have not been identified. The VIVA LA FAMILIA Study was designed to genetically map childhood obesity and associated biological processes in the Hispanic population. A genome-wide association stu...

  7. Public Policy and Hispanic-Serving Institutions: From Invention to Accountability

    Santiago, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental premise for creating the Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) designation assumes that a critical mass of students motivates an institution to change how it operates to better serve these students to degree attainment. Increasing Hispanic degree attainment is in the national interest, and programs created by public policy to support…

  8. A Model of Academic Self-Concept for High School Hispanic Students in New York

    Calero, Flor R.; Dalley, Christopher; Fernandez, Nicole; Davenport-Dalley, Tania Marie; Morote, Elsa-Sofia; Tatum, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how Hispanic students' academic self-concept influences the independent variables of family academic expectations, peer relationships, schoolwork, and student-teacher relationships. A survey was administered to 222 ninth-grade students in Long Island, New York, 99 of whom self-identified as Hispanic. A structural equation…

  9. The Cultural Assimilation and Identity Transformation of Hispanics: A Conceptual Paradigm.

    Quiles, Jose A.

    This paper discusses the processes of cultural assimilation and identity transformation experienced by Hispanic Americans. The process of acculturation for Hispanics in the United States, which requires adaptation to a different set of cultural, societal, and racial/ethnic demands, is explored by using a paradigm model. The conceptual paradigm…

  10. The Politics of Hispanic Education. Un Paso pa'lante y dos pa'tras.

    Meier, Kenneth J.; Stewart, Joseph, Jr.

    This book presents an in-depth examination of 142 U.S. school districts (containing at least 5,000 students and 5 percent Hispanic enrollment) in order to understand Hispanic inequities in education and what can be done to correct these inequities. Chapter 1 presents political theory of educational policy. Chapter 2 presents an overview of the…

  11. What Is the Impact of Full Access to Technology on the Achievement of the Hispanic Student?

    Carr, John E., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The problem studied in this research was whether the impact of full access to technology both at home and in school would affect the achievement of Hispanic students. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the access to technology and the achievement of the Hispanic students at a suburban middle school. What are the…

  12. Trends in the Residential Segregation of Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians: 1970-1980.

    Massey, Douglas S.; Denton, Nancy A.

    1987-01-01

    Examines trends in residential segregation for Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians in 60 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSAs) between 1970 and 1980. Black-Anglo segregation remained high in the North, but decreased in some smaller Southern and Western SMSAs. Hispanic segregation was markedly below that of Blacks, but has increased. Asian…

  13. Changing Demographics of African Americans and Hispanic/Latinos in the Charlotte Region of North Carolina

    Bobbie J. Everett

    2005-01-01

    North Carolina recorded a 394% increase in Hispanic population in the 1990s. The mean increase of income for Hispanics was about the same as for the Black population, but less than that for Whites. Data are presented in 11 figures and 6 tables

  14. Online Health Information Seeking Behaviors of Hispanics in New York City

    Lee, Young Ji

    2013-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest-growing minority group in the United States, but they are the most underserved population in terms of access to online health information. The specific aims of this descriptive, correlational study were to examine factors associated with online health information seeking behaviors of Hispanics and to examine the…

  15. Hispanic Acculturation in a Predominately Black High School: Application of an Adapted Model

    Hughes, Carolyn; Hollander, Matthew J.; Martinez, Amber W.

    2009-01-01

    The authors applied an adaptation of prior models of acculturation to all 16 Hispanic students attending a predominately Black, high-poverty, urban high school (n = 1,267 students) identified by No Child Left Behind standards as failing. No published study to date has investigated Hispanic acculturation within such a setting. Findings reveal that…

  16. Risky Sexual Behaviors in First and Second Generation Hispanic Immigrant Youth

    Trejos-Castillo, Elizabeth; Vazsonyi, Alexander T.

    2009-01-01

    Though official data document that Hispanic youth are at a great risk for early sexual intercourse, STDs, and teen pregnancy, only few etiological studies have been conducted on Hispanic youth; almost no work has examined potential generational differences in these behaviors, and thus, these behaviors may have been mistakenly attributed to…

  17. Hispanic Graduate Students' Mentoring Themes: Gender Roles in a Bicultural Context

    Rudolph, Bonnie A.; Castillo, Carlos P.; Garcia, Vanessa G.; Martinez, Alina; Navarro, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Male and female focus groups at a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) discussed mentoring of Hispanic graduate students. Using Thematic Analysis, investigators identified three main themes: Relationship Initiation and Development, Valued Relationship Qualities, and Context and Barriers. Relationship themes included mentor openness, trust,…

  18. Assessing dietary intake of drug abusing Hispanic adults with and without HIV infection

    Drug abuse is an important risk factor for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among Hispanics in the Northeastern United States and both drug abuse and HIV are associated with nutritional deficiencies. The selection of a dietary assessment method most appropriate for Hispanic adults with/without HIV...

  19. Stories of Success: Understanding Academic Achievement of Hispanic Students in Science

    Harris, Amanda

    A review of the literature shows that there is much evidence to suggest the challenges facing Hispanic students in American public schools. Hispanic enrollment in K--12 public schools has increased from 6 to 19% in the last thirty years, yet schools have not made adequate adjustments to accommodate this changing population. Issues such as remedial tracking and cultural differences have led to low high school graduate rates for Hispanic students and inequities in schooling experiences (Gay, 2000). Particularly in the area of science, Hispanic students struggle with academic success (Cole & Espinoza, 2008). Despite these obstacles, some Hispanic students are academically successful (Rochin & Mello, 2007; Merisotis & Kee, 2006). This dissertation tells the stories of these Hispanic students who have been successful in science in secondary public schools. This study followed a grounded theory methodology and utilized individual interviews to collect data about Hispanics who have demonstrated achievement in the area of science. Through the analysis of these interviews, factors were identified which may have contributed to the success of these Hispanics in the field of science. Implications for future practice in public schools are also discussed.

  20. Developmental Trajectories of Acculturation in Hispanic Adolescents: Associations with Family Functioning and Adolescent Risk Behavior

    Schwartz, Seth J.; Des Rosiers, Sabrina; Huang, Shi; Zamboanga, Byron L.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Knight, George P.; Pantin, Hilda; Szapocznik, Jose

    2013-01-01

    This study examined longitudinal acculturation patterns, and their associations with family functioning and adolescent risk behaviors, in Hispanic immigrant families. A sample of 266 Hispanic adolescents (M[subscript age] = 13.4) and their primary parents completed measures of acculturation, family functioning, and adolescent conduct problems,…

  1. The Influence of Social Capital Factors on African-American and Hispanic High School Student Achievement

    Davis, Jacqueline L.

    2009-01-01

    The underachievement of African American and Hispanic students has been an ongoing problem for schools in the United States. The purpose of this investigation was to add to the existing body of knowledge concerning social capital of African American and Hispanic high school students' academic achievement. Using a nationally representative sample…

  2. The Status of Equity for Hispanics in Public Higher Education in Florida and Texas

    Perna, Laura W.; Li, Chunyan; Walsh, Erin; Raible, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    This article uses descriptive analyses of data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System to examine the status of equity for Hispanic students in public higher education institutions in Florida and Texas. The analyses show substantial inequities for Hispanics in enrollment, full-time faculty, and executive, administrative, and…

  3. Reducing Hispanic Teenage Pregnancy and Family Poverty: A Replication Guide. Final Version.

    Perez, Sonia M.; Duany, Luis A.

    This guide was designed to help Hispanic American community-based organizations develop and establish a teenage pregnancy prevention or teenage parenting program for Hispanic American adolescents. The guide does not assume prior knowledge of the scope of the teenage pregnancy problem in the United States, but it does underscore the critical role…

  4. Increasing Melanoma Screening among Hispanic/Latino Americans: A Community-Based Educational Intervention

    Chung, Grace Y.; Brown, Gina; Gibson, Desmond

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma incidence is increasing among Hispanics/Latinos in California. This community-based project reached out to a rural Hispanic/Latino community in North San Diego County to provide melanoma prevention and screening education. At a local community health fair, bilingual volunteer lay health workers led 10- to 15-minute-long information…

  5. Prenatal Care Initiation in Low-Income Hispanic Women: Risk and Protective Factors

    Luecken, Linda J.; Purdom, Catherine L.; Howe, Rose

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the psychosocial risk (distress, stress, unintended pregnancy) and protective factors (social support, mastery, familism) associated with entry into prenatal care among low-income Hispanic women. Methods: Between April and September 2005, 483 postpartum Medicaid-eligible Hispanic women completed a survey at the hospital.…

  6. Enhancing the Quality of Life for Hispanic Individuals Through Career Preparation

    Jones, Wash A.; Larke, Jr., Alvin

    2005-01-01

    With the rapid population increase of Hispanic (Spanish, Latin American, or Spanish Indian heritage) individuals in the United States, ensuring economic prosperity and stability of this group is critical. This should include increasing their dwindling participation in agriculture-related fields. Hispanic youths often overlook an…

  7. Cancer Facts and Figures for Hispanics/Latinos 2012-2014

    ... linguistic factors, as well as discrimination and provider bias. 169-172 In the US, health care access is closely related to insurance coverage. Hispan- ics are the least likely to have health insurance of any racial or ethnic group. 32 Within the Hispanic population, ...

  8. HISPANIC-STYLE CHEESE RESEARCH BY DAIRY PROCESSING AND PRODUCTS RESEARCH UNIT

    Hispanic-style (or Latin American) cheeses are cheeses that were developed in Mexico, Latin America, and the Caribbean. They have seen tremendous growth in the U.S. over the last decade because of the expanding Hispanic population and the growing popularity of Latino cuisine. Currently, it is diff...

  9. Symptom Severity in Bilingual Hispanics as a Function of Clinician Ethnicity and Language of Interview.

    Malgady, Robert G.; Costantino, Giuseppe

    1998-01-01

    In this study, 148 Hispanic Americans with schizophrenia, depression, and anxiety disorders were interviewed in English, Spanish, or both. Hispanic clinicians rated symptoms more severely than did Anglo clinicians, and severity was rated highest in bilingual interviews, followed by Spanish, and lowest in English. Implications for diagnosis and…

  10. Hispanic Student Performance on Advanced Placement Exams: A Multiyear, National Investigation

    Jara, Teresa Dianne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the Advanced Placement exams that Hispanic students complete and to compare their overall performance with the performance of White students from 2000 to 2012. A second purpose was to determine which Advanced Placement exams were the most difficult exams for Hispanic students and which Advanced…