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Sample records for 8-oxoguanine-repair-deficient mutator phenotype

  1. A MATE-family efflux pump rescues the Escherichia coli 8-oxoguanine-repair-deficient mutator phenotype and protects against H(2O(2 killing.

    Javier R Guelfo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypermutation may accelerate bacterial evolution in the short-term. In the long-term, however, hypermutators (cells with an increased rate of mutation can be expected to be at a disadvantage due to the accumulation of deleterious mutations. Therefore, in theory, hypermutators are doomed to extinction unless they compensate the elevated mutational burden (deleterious load. Different mechanisms capable of restoring a low mutation rate to hypermutators have been proposed. By choosing an 8-oxoguanine-repair-deficient (GO-deficient Escherichia coli strain as a hypermutator model, we investigated the existence of genes able to rescue the hypermutable phenotype by multicopy suppression. Using an in vivo-generated mini-MudII4042 genomic library and a mutator screen, we obtained chromosomal fragments that decrease the rate of mutation in a mutT-deficient strain. Analysis of a selected clone showed that the expression of NorM is responsible for the decreased mutation rate in 8-oxoguanine-repair-deficient (mutT, mutY, and mutM mutY strains. NorM is a member of the multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE family of efflux pumps whose role in E. coli cell physiology remains unknown. Our results indicate that NorM may act as a GO-system backup decreasing AT to CG and GC to TA transversions. In addition, the ability of NorM to reduce the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in a GO-deficient strain and protect the cell from oxidative stress, including protein carbonylation, suggests that it can extrude specific molecules-byproducts of bacterial metabolism-that oxidize the guanine present in both DNA and nucleotide pools. Altogether, our results indicate that NorM protects the cell from specific ROS when the GO system cannot cope with the damage.

  2. A MATE-Family Efflux Pump Rescues the Escherichia coli 8-Oxoguanine-Repair-Deficient Mutator Phenotype and Protects Against H2O2 Killing

    Guelfo, Javier R.; Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas; Ivan Matic; Jesús Blázquez

    2010-01-01

    Hypermutation may accelerate bacterial evolution in the short-term. In the long-term, however, hypermutators (cells with an increased rate of mutation) can be expected to be at a disadvantage due to the accumulation of deleterious mutations. Therefore, in theory, hypermutators are doomed to extinction unless they compensate the elevated mutational burden (deleterious load). Different mechanisms capable of restoring a low mutation rate to hypermutators have been proposed. By choosing an 8-oxog...

  3. The behavioral phenotype of FMR1 mutations.

    Boyle, Lia; Kaufmann, Walter E

    2010-11-15

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the behavioral phenotype of FMR1 mutations, including fragile X syndrome (FXS) in order to better understand the clinical involvement of individuals affected by mutations in this gene. FXS is associated with a wide range of intellectual and behavioral problems, some relatively mild and others quite severe. FXS is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and one of the most prevalent genetic causes of autism spectrum disorder. Learning difficulties, attentional problems, anxiety, aggressive behavior, stereotypies, and mood disorders are also frequent in FXS. Recent studies of children and adults have identified associations between FMR1 premutation and many of the same disorders. We examine the neurobehavioral phenotypes of FXS and FMR1 premutation as they manifest across the lifespan of the individual. PMID:20981777

  4. Mutator phenotypes due to DNA replication infidelity

    Arana, Mercedes E.; Kunkel, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the fidelity of DNA replication performed by eukaryotic DNA polymerases involved in replicating the nuclear genome. DNA replication fidelity can vary widely depending on the DNA polymerase, the composition of the error, the flanking sequence, the presence of DNA damage and the ability to correct errors. As a consequence, defects in processes that determine DNA replication fidelity can confer strong mutator phenotypes whose specificity can help determine the molecular na...

  5. RDH12 retinopathy: novel mutations and phenotypic description

    Mackay, D. S.; Borman, A. D.; Moradi, P; Henderson, R. H.; Li, Z.; Wright, G. A.; Waseem, N; M. Gandra; Thompson, D.A.; Bhattacharya, S S; Holder, G E; Webster, A. R.; Moore, A T

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To identify patients with autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene, retinal dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12), and to report the associated phenotype.Methods: After giving informed consent, all patients underwent full clinical evaluation. Patients were selected for mutation analysis based upon positive results from the Asper Ophthalmics Leber congenital amaurosis arrayed primer extansion (APEX) microarray screening, linkage analysis, or their clinical phenotype. A...

  6. Cardiac sodium channel mutations: why so many phenotypes?

    Liu, Man; Yang, Kai-Chien; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the cardiac sodium channel (Nav1.5) can induce gain or loss of channel function. Gain-of-function mutations can cause long QT syndrome type 3 and possibly atrial fibrillation, whereas loss-of-function mutations are associated with a variety of phenotypes, such as Brugada syndrome, cardiac conduction disease, sick sinus syndrome, and possibly dilated cardiomyopathy. The phenotypes produced by Nav1.5 mutations vary according to the direct effect of the mutation on channel biophysics, but also with age, sex, body temperature, and between regions of the heart. This phenotypic variability makes genotype–phenotype correlations difficult. In this Perspectives article, we propose that phenotypic variability not ascribed to mutation-dependent changes in channel function might be the result of additional modifiers of channel behaviour, such as other genetic variation and alterations in transcription, RNA processing, translation, post-translational modifications, and protein degradation. Consideration of these modifiers might help to improve genotype–phenotype correlations and lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:24958080

  7. Correlated Mutations: A Hallmark of Phenotypic Amino Acid Substitutions

    Kowarsch, Andreas; Fuchs, Angelika; Frishman, Dmitrij; Pagel, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    Point mutations resulting in the substitution of a single amino acid can cause severe functional consequences, but can also be completely harmless. Understanding what determines the phenotypical impact is important both for planning targeted mutation experiments in the laboratory and for analyzing naturally occurring mutations found in patients. Common wisdom suggests using the extent of evolutionary conservation of a residue or a sequence motif as an indicator of its functional importance an...

  8. IDH Mutations: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation and Prognostic Impact

    Xiao-Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IDH1/2 mutation is the most frequent genomic alteration found in gliomas, affecting 40% of these tumors and is one of the earliest alterations occurring in gliomagenesis. We investigated a series of 1305 gliomas and showed that IDH mutation is almost constant in 1p19q codeleted tumors. We found that the distribution of IDH1R132H, IDH1nonR132H, and IDH2 mutations differed between astrocytic, mixed, and oligodendroglial tumors, with an overrepresentation of IDH2 mutations in oligodendroglial phenotype and an overrepresentation of IDH1nonR132H in astrocytic tumors. We stratified grade II and grade III gliomas according to the codeletion of 1p19q and IDH mutation to define three distinct prognostic subgroups: 1p19q and IDH mutated, IDH mutated—which contains mostly TP53 mutated tumors, and none of these alterations. We confirmed that IDH mutation with a hazard ratio = 0.358 is an independent prognostic factor of good outcome. These data refine current knowledge on IDH mutation prognostic impact and genotype-phenotype associations.

  9. Prominent Phenotypic Variability Associated with Mutations in Progranulin

    Kelley, Brendan J.; Haidar, Wael; Boeve, Bradley F.; Baker, Matt; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Krefft, Thomas; Frank, Andrew R; Jack, Clifford R.; Shiung, Maria; Knopman, David S.; Josephs, Keith A.; Parashos, Sotirios A.; Rademakers, Rosa; Hutton, Mike; Pickering-Brown, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in progranulin (PGRN) are associated with frontotemporal dementia with or without parkinsonism. We describe the prominent phenotypic variability within and among eight kindreds evaluated at Mayo Clinic Rochester and/or Mayo Clinic Jacksonville in whom mutations in PGRN were found. All available clinical, genetic, neuroimaging and neuropathologic data was reviewed. Age of onset ranged from 49 to 88 years and disease duration ranged from 1 to 14 years. Clinical diagnoses included fron...

  10. The cardiac phenotype in patients with a CHD7 mutation

    Corsten-Janssen, Nicole; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S; du Marchie Sarvaas, Gideon J;

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in CHD7 cause Coloboma, Heart Disease, Atresia of Choanae, Retardation of Growth and/or Development, Genital Hypoplasia, and Ear Abnormalities With or Without Deafness (CHARGE) syndrome, a variable combination of multiple congenital malformations including heart defects....... Heart defects are reported in 70% to 92% of patients with a CHD7 mutation, but most studies are small and do not provide a detailed classification of the defects. We present the first, detailed, descriptive study on the cardiac phenotype of 299 patients with a CHD7 mutation and discuss the role of CHD7...

  11. TGIF Mutations in Human Holoprosencephaly: Correlation between Genotype and Phenotype.

    Keaton, A A; Solomon, B D; Kauvar, E F; El-Jaick, K B; Gropman, A L; Zafer, Y; Meck, J M; Bale, S J; Grange, D K; Haddad, B R; Gowans, G C; Clegg, N J; Delgado, M R; Hahn, J S; Pineda-Alvarez, D E; Lacbawan, F; Vélez, J I; Roessler, E; Muenke, M

    2010-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE), which results from failed or incomplete midline forebrain division early in gestation, is the most common forebrain malformation. The etiology of HPE is complex and multifactorial. To date, at least 12 HPE-associated genes have been identified, including TGIF (transforming growth factor beta-induced factor), located on chromosome 18p11.3. TGIF encodes a transcriptional repressor of retinoid responses involved in TGF-β signaling regulation, including Nodal signaling. TGIF mutations are reported in approximately 1-2% of patients with non-syndromic, non-chromosomal HPE. We combined data from our comprehensive studies of HPE with a literature search for all individuals with HPE and evidence of mutations affecting TGIF in order to establish the genotypic and phenotypic range. We describe 2 groups of patients: 34 with intragenic mutations and 21 with deletions of TGIF. These individuals, which were ascertained from our research group, in collaboration with other centers, and through a literature search, include 38 probands and 17 mutation-positive relatives. The majority of intragenic mutations occur in the TGIF homeodomain. Patients with mutations affecting TGIFrecapitulate the entire phenotypic spectrum observed in non-chromosomal, non-syndromic HPE. We identified a statistically significant difference between the 2 groups with respect to inheritance, as TGIF deletions were more likely to be de novo in comparison to TGIF mutations (χ(2) ((2)) = 6.97, p(permutated) = 0.0356). In addition, patients with TGIF deletions were also found to more commonly present with manifestations beyond the craniofacial and neuroanatomical features associated with HPE (p = 0.0030). These findings highlight differences in patients with intragenic mutations versus deletions affecting TGIF, and draw attention to the homeodomain region, which appears to be particularly relevant to HPE. These results may be useful for genetic counseling of affected patients. PMID

  12. Mutations of the prion protein gene phenotypic spectrum.

    Kovács, Gábor G; Trabattoni, Gianriccardo; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Ironside, James W; Knight, Richard S G; Budka, Herbert

    2002-11-01

    Prion diseases are inherited in 5-15 % of cases. They are classified according to changes in the prion protein gene ( PRNP) or conventionally according to phenotype as Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI), or familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). Point mutations and insertions within PRNP form the genetic background. We report the results of a systematic analysis of over 500 case reports of patients with PRNP abnormalities. We compare clinical, neuropathological and molecular data in five groups, namely GSS, FFI, fCJD, base pair insertion (BPI), and all cases collectively. Clinical presentation overlaps between mutations, but some have characteristic features (e. g. P105L, D178N-129M, T183A). Some mutations, especially in the lack of sufficient family history, in earlier phases tend to resemble other neurodegenerative disorders like multiple system atrophy, corticobasal degeneration or familial diseases such as late-onset spinocerebellar ataxia, spastic paraparesis, frontotemporal dementia, or Alzheimer's disease. The codon 129 polymorphism has a phenotypic influence in inherited prion diseases, as in non-genetic forms, but additional factors might be considered as background for phenotypic variability. PMID:12420099

  13. Correlated mutations: a hallmark of phenotypic amino acid substitutions.

    Andreas Kowarsch

    Full Text Available Point mutations resulting in the substitution of a single amino acid can cause severe functional consequences, but can also be completely harmless. Understanding what determines the phenotypical impact is important both for planning targeted mutation experiments in the laboratory and for analyzing naturally occurring mutations found in patients. Common wisdom suggests using the extent of evolutionary conservation of a residue or a sequence motif as an indicator of its functional importance and thus vulnerability in case of mutation. In this work, we put forward the hypothesis that in addition to conservation, co-evolution of residues in a protein influences the likelihood of a residue to be functionally important and thus associated with disease. While the basic idea of a relation between co-evolution and functional sites has been explored before, we have conducted the first systematic and comprehensive analysis of point mutations causing disease in humans with respect to correlated mutations. We included 14,211 distinct positions with known disease-causing point mutations in 1,153 human proteins in our analysis. Our data show that (1 correlated positions are significantly more likely to be disease-associated than expected by chance, and that (2 this signal cannot be explained by conservation patterns of individual sequence positions. Although correlated residues have primarily been used to predict contact sites, our data are in agreement with previous observations that (3 many such correlations do not relate to physical contacts between amino acid residues. Access to our analysis results are provided at http://webclu.bio.wzw.tum.de/~pagel/supplements/correlated-positions/.

  14. Correlated mutations: a hallmark of phenotypic amino acid substitutions.

    Kowarsch, Andreas; Fuchs, Angelika; Frishman, Dmitrij; Pagel, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    Point mutations resulting in the substitution of a single amino acid can cause severe functional consequences, but can also be completely harmless. Understanding what determines the phenotypical impact is important both for planning targeted mutation experiments in the laboratory and for analyzing naturally occurring mutations found in patients. Common wisdom suggests using the extent of evolutionary conservation of a residue or a sequence motif as an indicator of its functional importance and thus vulnerability in case of mutation. In this work, we put forward the hypothesis that in addition to conservation, co-evolution of residues in a protein influences the likelihood of a residue to be functionally important and thus associated with disease. While the basic idea of a relation between co-evolution and functional sites has been explored before, we have conducted the first systematic and comprehensive analysis of point mutations causing disease in humans with respect to correlated mutations. We included 14,211 distinct positions with known disease-causing point mutations in 1,153 human proteins in our analysis. Our data show that (1) correlated positions are significantly more likely to be disease-associated than expected by chance, and that (2) this signal cannot be explained by conservation patterns of individual sequence positions. Although correlated residues have primarily been used to predict contact sites, our data are in agreement with previous observations that (3) many such correlations do not relate to physical contacts between amino acid residues. Access to our analysis results are provided at http://webclu.bio.wzw.tum.de/~pagel/supplements/correlated-positions/. PMID:20862353

  15. Targeted next-generation sequencing extends the phenotypic and mutational spectrums for EYS mutations

    Gu, Shun; Tian, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aim to determine genetic lesions with a phenotypic correlation in four Chinese families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Medical histories were carefully reviewed. All patients received comprehensive ophthalmic evaluations. The next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach targeting a panel of 205 retinal disease–relevant genes and 15 candidate genes was selectively performed on probands from the four recruited families for mutation detection. Online predictive software and crystal structure modeling were also applied to test the potential pathogenic effects of identified mutations. Results Of the four families, two were diagnosed with RP sino pigmento (RPSP). Patients with RPSP claimed to have earlier RP age of onset but slower disease progression. Five mutations in the eyes shut homolog (EYS) gene, involving two novel (c.7228+1G>A and c.9248G>A) and three recurrent mutations (c.4957dupA, c.6416G>A and c.6557G>A), were found as RP causative in the four families. The missense variant c.5093T>C was determined to be a variant of unknown significance (VUS) due to the variant’s colocalization in the same allele with the reported pathogenic mutation c.6416G>A. The two novel variants were further confirmed absent in 100 unrelated healthy controls. Online predictive software indicated potential pathogenicity of the three missense mutations. Further, crystal structural modeling suggested generation of two abnormal hydrogen bonds by the missense mutation p.G2186E (c.6557G>A) and elongation of its neighboring β-sheet induced by p.G3083D (c.9248G>A), which could alter the tertiary structure of the eys protein and thus interrupt its physicochemical properties. Conclusions Taken together, with the targeted NGS approach, we reveal novel EYS mutations and prove the efficiency of targeted NGS in the genetic diagnoses of RP. We also first report the correlation between EYS mutations and RPSP. The genotypic-phenotypic relationship in all

  16. Discordant phenotypes in monozygotic twins with identical de novo WT1 mutation

    Yu, Zihua; Yang, Yonghui; Feng, Dongning

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the WT1 gene, leading to Denys-Drash syndrome and Frasier syndrome, can also cause isolated steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (ISRNS). Previous studies have reported six pairs of monozygotic twins with WT1 mutations, including one presenting with discordant phenotypes with identical WT1 mutations being of paternal origin and five pairs of monozygotic twins presenting the same phenotype with identical WT1 mutations. In this study, we report on female monozygotic twins showing d...

  17. Studies on biological effects of ion beams on lethality, molecular nature of mutation, mutation rate, and spectrum of mutation phenotype for mutation breeding in higher plants

    Recently, heavy ions or ion beams have been used to generate new mutants or varieties, especially in higher plants. It has been found that ion beams show high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of growth inhibition, lethality, and so on, but the characteristics of ion beams on mutation have not been clearly elucidated. To understand the effect of ion beams on mutation induction, mutation rates were investigated using visible known Arabidopsis mutant phenotypes, indicating that mutation frequencies induced by carbon ions were 20-fold higher than by electrons. In chrysanthemum and carnation, flower-color and flower-form mutants, which are hardly produced by gamma rays or X rays, were induced by ion beams. Novel mutants and their responsible genes, such as UV-B resistant, serrated petals and sepals, anthocyaninless, etc. were induced by ion beams. These results indicated that the characteristics of ion beams for mutation induction are high mutation frequency and broad mutation spectrum and therefore, efficient induction of novel mutants. On the other hand, PCR and sequencing analyses showed that half of all mutants induced by ion beams possessed large DNA alterations, while the rest had point-like mutations. Both mutations induced by ion beams had a common feature that deletion of several bases were predominantly induced. It is plausible that ion beams induce a limited amount of large and irreparable DNA damage, resulting in production of a null mutation that shows a new mutant phenotype. (author)

  18. POMT2 mutation in a patient with 'MEB-like' phenotype.

    Mercuri, E.; D'Amico, A.; Tessa, A.; Berardinelli, A.; Pane, M.; Messina, S.; Reeuwijk, J. van; Bertini, E.; Muntoni, F.; Santorelli, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in POMT2 have so far only been reported in patients with Walker-Warburg phenotype. We report heterozygous POMT2 mutations in an a girl with a milder phenotype characterized by mental retardation, microcephaly, hypertrophy of the quadriceps and calf muscles, and structural brain changes mos

  19. Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes and Genotypes Associated with Mutations in Presenilin 2

    Jayadev, Suman; Leverenz, James B.; Steinbart, Ellen; Stahl, Justin; Klunk, William; Yu, Cheng-En; Bird, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin 2 are rare causes of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Eighteen presenilin 2 mutations have been reported, although not all have been confirmed pathogenic. Much remains to be learned about the range of phenotypes associated with these mutations. We have analysed our unique collection of 146 affected cases in 11…

  20. Transmission of the P250R mutation of the FGFR3 gene in four generations with highly variable phenotype

    Hove, Hanne Buciek; Dunø, Morten; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette;

    Transmission of the P250R mutation of the FGFR3 gene in four generations with highly variable phenotype.......Transmission of the P250R mutation of the FGFR3 gene in four generations with highly variable phenotype....

  1. Phenotype-Optimized Sequence Ensembles Substantially Improve Prediction of Disease-Causing Mutation in Cystic Fibrosis

    Masica, David L.; Sosnay, Patrick R.; Cutting, Garry R; Karchin, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation is associated with a phenotypic spectrum that includes cystic fibrosis (CF). The disease liability of some common CFTR mutations is known, but rare mutations are seen in too few patients to categorize unequivocally, making genetic diagnosis difficult. Computational methods can predict the impact of mutation, but prediction specificity is often below that required for clinical utility. Here, we present a novel supervised learn...

  2. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E;

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We ident...

  3. Molecular Analysis Expands the Spectrum of Phenotypes Associated with GLI3 Mutations

    J.J. Johnston; J.C. Sapp; J.T. Turner; D. Amor; S. Aftimos; K.A. Aleck; M. Bocian; J.N. Bodurtha; G.F. Cox; C.J. Curry; R. Day; D. Donnai; M. Field; I. Fujiwara; M. Gabbett; M. Gal; J.M. Graham Jr; P. Hedera; R.C.M. Hennekam; J.H. Hersh; R.J. Hopkin; H. Kayserili; A.M.J. Kidd; V. Kimonis; A.E. Lin; S.A. Lynch; M. Maisenbacher; S. Mansour; J. McGaughran; L. Mehta; H. Murphy; M. Raygada; N.H. Robin; A.F. Rope; K.N. Rosenbaum; G.B. Schaefer; A. Shealy; W. Smith; M. Soller; A Sommer; H.J. Stalker; B. Steiner; M.J. Stephan; D. Tilstra; S. Tomkins; P. Trapane; A.C.H. Tsai; M.I. van Allen; P.C. Vasudevan; B. Zabel; J. Zunich; G.C.M. Black; L.G. Biesecker

    2010-01-01

    A range of phenotypes including Greig cephalopolysyndactyly and Pallister-Hall syndromes (GCPS, PHS) are caused by pathogenic mutation of the GLI3 gene. To characterize the clinical variability of GLI3 mutations, we present a subset of a cohort of 174 probands referred for GLI3 analysis. Eighty-one

  4. Temporal lobe epilepsy and GEFS+ phenotypes associated with SCN1B mutations.

    Scheffer, Ingrid E; Harkin, Louise A; Grinton, Bronwyn E; Dibbens, Leanne M; Turner, Samantha J; Zielinski, Marta A; Xu, Ruwei; Jackson, Graeme; Adams, Judith; Connellan, Mary; Petrou, Steven; Wellard, R Mark; Briellmann, Regula S; Wallace, Robyn H; Mulley, John C; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2007-01-01

    SCN1B, the gene encoding the sodium channel beta 1 subunit, was the first gene identified for generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). Only three families have been published with SCN1B mutations. Here, we present four new families with SCN1B mutations and characterize the associated phenotypes. Analysis of SCN1B was performed on 402 individuals with various epilepsy syndromes. Four probands with missense mutations were identified. Detailed electroclinical phenotyping was performed on all available affected family members including quantitative MR imaging in those with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Two new families with the original C121W SCN1B mutation were identified; novel mutations R85C and R85H were each found in one family. The following phenotypes occurred in the six families with SCN1B missense mutations: 22 febrile seizures, 20 febrile seizures plus, five TLE, three other GEFS+ phenotypes, two unclassified and ten unaffected individuals. All individuals with confirmed TLE had the C121W mutation; two underwent temporal lobectomy (one with hippocampal sclerosis and one without) and both are seizure free. We confirm the role of SCN1B in GEFS+ and show that the GEFS+ spectrum may include TLE alone. TLE with an SCN1B mutation is not a contraindication to epilepsy surgery. PMID:17020904

  5. Mutational and phenotypical spectrum of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency in Denmark

    Bayat, A.; Yasmeen, S.; Lund, A.;

    2016-01-01

    We describe the genotypes of the complete cohort, from 1967 to 2014, of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients in Denmark, in total 376 patients. A total of 752 independent alleles were investigated. Mutations were identified on 744 PKU alleles (98.9%). In total, 82 different mutations were present in th...

  6. Laminin 5 mutations in junctional epidermolysis bullosa: molecular basis of Herlitz vs. non-Herlitz phenotypes.

    Nakano, Aoi; Chao, Sheau-Chiou; Pulkkinen, Leena; Murrell, Dedee; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Pfendner, Ellen; Uitto, Jouni

    2002-01-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a group of heritable blistering diseases in which tissue separation occurs within the lamina lucida of the cutaneous basement membrane zone. Clinically, two broad subcategories have been recognized: The Herlitz variant (H-JEB; OMIM 226700) is characterized by early demise of the affected individuals, usually within the first year of life, while non-Herlitz (nH-JEB; OMIM 226650) patients show a milder phenotype with life-long blistering, yet with normal lifespan. In this study, we have examined a cohort of 27 families, 15 with Herlitz and 12 with non-Herlitz JEB, for mutations in the candidate genes, LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2, encoding the subunit polypeptides of laminin 5. The mutation detection strategy consisted of PCR amplification of all exons in these genes, followed by heteroduplex scanning and nucleotide sequencing. We were able to identify pathogenic mutations in both alleles of each proband, the majority of the mutations being in the LAMB3 gene. Examination of the mutation database revealed that most cases with Herlitz JEB harbored premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in both alleles. In non-Herlitz cases, the PTC mutation was frequently associated with a missense mutation or a putative splicing mutation in trans. In three cases with putative splicing mutations, RT-PCR analysis revealed a repertoire of splice variants in-frame, predicting the synthesis of either shortened or lengthened, yet partly functional, polypeptides. These observations would explain the relatively mild phenotype in cases with splicing mutations. Collectively, these findings, together with the global laminin 5 mutation database, contribute to our understanding of the genotype/phenotype correlations explaining the Herlitz vs non-Herlitz phenotypes. PMID:11810295

  7. Evidence of a Mild Mutator Phenotype in Cambodian Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Parasites.

    Lee, Andrew H; Fidock, David A

    2016-01-01

    Malaria control efforts have been continuously stymied by drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum, which typically originate in Southeast Asia prior to spreading into high-transmission settings in Africa. One earlier proposed explanation for Southeast Asia being a hotbed of resistance has been the hypermutability or "Accelerated Resistance to Multiple Drugs" (ARMD) phenotype, whereby multidrug-resistant Southeast Asian parasites were reported to exhibit 1,000-fold higher rates of resistance to unrelated antimalarial agents when compared to drug-sensitive parasites. However, three recent studies do not recapitulate this hypermutability phenotype. Intriguingly, genome sequencing of recently derived multidrug-resistant Cambodian isolates has identified a high proportion of DNA repair gene mutations in multidrug-resistant parasites, suggesting their potential role in shaping local parasite evolution. By adapting fluctuation assays for use in P. falciparum, we have examined the in vitro mutation rates of five recent Cambodian isolates and three reference laboratory strains. For these studies we also generated a knockout parasite line lacking the DNA repair factor Exonuclease I. In these assays, parasites were typed for their ability to acquire resistance to KAE609, currently in advanced clinical trials, yielding 13 novel mutations in the Na+/H+-ATPase PfATP4, the primary resistance determinant. We observed no evidence of hypermutability. Instead, we found evidence of a mild mutator (up to a 3.4-fold increase in mutation rate) phenotype in two artemisinin-resistant Cambodian isolates, which carry DNA repair gene mutations. We observed that one such mutation in the Mismatch Repair protein Mlh1 contributes to the mild mutator phenotype when modeled in yeast (scmlh1-P157S). Compared to basal rates of mutation, a mild mutator phenotype may provide a greater overall benefit for parasites in Southeast Asia in terms of generating drug resistance without incurring

  8. Spectrum of mutations and genotype-phenotype analysis in Currarino syndrome.

    Köchling, J; Karbasiyan, M; Reis, A

    2001-08-01

    The triad of a presacral tumour, sacral agenesis and anorectal malformation constitutes the Currarino syndrome which is caused by dorsal-ventral patterning defects during embryonic development. The syndrome occurs in the majority of patients as an autosomal dominant trait associated with mutations in the homeobox gene HLXB9 which encodes the nuclear protein HB9. However, genotype-phenotype analyses have been performed only in a few families and there are no reports about the specific impact of HLXB9 mutations on HB9 function. We performed a mutational analysis in 72 individuals from nine families with Currarino syndrome. We identified a total of five HLXB9 mutations, four novel and one known mutation, in four out of four families and one out of five sporadic cases. Highly variable phenotypes and a low penetrance with half of all carriers being clinically asymptomatic were found in three families, whereas affected members of one family showed almost identical phenotypes. However, an obvious genotype-phenotype correlation was not found. While HLXB9 mutations were diagnosed in 23 patients, no mutation or microdeletion was detected in four sporadic patients with Currarino syndrome. The distribution pattern of here and previously reported HLXB9 mutations indicates mutational predilection sites within exon 1 and the homeobox. Furthermore, sequence homology to Drosophila homeobox genes suggest that some of these mutations located within the homeobox may alter the DNA-binding specificity of HB9 while those in sequences homologous to a recently identified NLS motif of the human homeobox gene PDX-1 may impair nuclear translocation of the mutated protein. PMID:11528505

  9. MYH9-related disease: five novel mutations expanding the spectrum of causative mutations and confirming genotype/phenotype correlations.

    De Rocco, Daniela; Zieger, Barbara; Platokouki, Helen; Heller, Paula G; Pastore, Annalisa; Bottega, Roberta; Noris, Patrizia; Barozzi, Serena; Glembotsky, Ana C; Pergantou, Helen; Balduini, Carlo L; Savoia, Anna; Pecci, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is a rare autosomal dominant syndromic disorder caused by mutations in MYH9, the gene encoding for the heavy chain of non-muscle myosin IIA (myosin-9). MYH9-RD is characterized by congenital macrothrombocytopenia and typical inclusion bodies in neutrophils associated with a variable risk of developing sensorineural deafness, presenile cataract, and/or progressive nephropathy. The spectrum of mutations responsible for MYH9-RD is limited. We report five families, each with a novel MYH9 mutation. Two mutations, p.Val34Gly and p.Arg702Ser, affect the motor domain of myosin-9, whereas the other three, p.Met847_Glu853dup, p.Lys1048_Glu1054del, and p.Asp1447Tyr, hit the coiled-coil tail domain of the protein. The motor domain mutations were associated with more severe clinical phenotypes than those in the tail domain. PMID:23123319

  10. Expanding the phenotypic and mutational spectrum in microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I.

    Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Issa, Mahmoud; Magdy, Ahmed; El-Kotoury, Ahmed; Amr, Khalda

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in the RNU4ATAC gene cause microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I. It encodes U4atac, a small nuclear RNA that is a component of the minor spliceosome. Six distinct mutations in 30 patients diagnosed as microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I have been described. We report on three additional patients from two unrelated families presenting with a milder phenotype of microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I and metopic synostosis. Patient 1 had two novel heterozygous mutations in the 3' prime stem-loop, g.66G > C and g.124G > A while Patients 2 and 3 had a homozygous mutation g.55G > A in the 5' prime stem-loop. Although they manifested the known spectrum of clinical features of microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I, they lacked evidence of severe developmental delay and neurological symptoms. These findings expand the mutational and phenotypic spectrum of this syndrome. PMID:22581640

  11. MERRF-like phenotype associated with a rare mitochondrial trnaile mutation (m.4284 G>A).

    Hahn, A; Schänzer, A; Neubauer, B A; Gizewski, E; Ahting, U; Rolinski, B

    2011-08-01

    Nearly all patients affected by myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibres (MERRF) harbour a mutation in the mitochondrial transfer RNALys gene. We report on an 8-year-old girl with clinical and diagnostic features of MERRF. After excluding one of the common mutations associated with MERRF, a complete sequence analysis of the mitochondrial genome revealed an m.4284 G>A mutation in the mitochondrial transfer RNAIle gene. This mutation has only once been described in a family with variable clinical symptoms, but has not yet been linked to MERRF. This case extends the mutational spectrum associated with the MERRF phenotype, and demonstrates the importance of performing a comprehensive mutational analysis in patients with suspected mitochondrial disease when common mutations have been ruled out. PMID:21766266

  12. Genetic testing in familial AD and FTD: mutation and phenotype spectrum in a Danish cohort

    Lindquist, S G; Schwartz, M; Batbayli, M; Waldemar, G; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal dominantly transmitted Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are genetically heterogeneous disorders. To date, three genes have been identified in which mutations cause early-onset autosomal dominant inherited AD: APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2. Mutations in two genes on...... chromosome 17, the MAPT and the PGRN genes, are associated with autosomal dominant inherited FTD. The aim of this study was to characterize the mutation spectrum and describe genotype-phenotype correlations in families with inherited dementia. The identification of novel mutations and/or atypical genotype...

  13. Clinical phenotype of 5 females with a CDKL5 mutation

    Stalpers, X.L.; Spruijt, L.; Yntema, H.G.; Verrips, A.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked cyclin dependent kinase like 5 (CDKL5) gene have been reported in approximately 80 patients since the first description in 2003. The clinical presentation partly corresponds with Rett syndrome, considering clinical features as intellectual disability, hypotonia, and poor vi

  14. A Systematic Review of Phenotypic Features Associated With Cardiac Troponin I Mutations in Hereditary Cardiomyopathies

    Mogensen, Jens; Hey, Thomas; Lambrecht, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic investigations have established that mutations in proteins of the contractile unit of the myocardium, known as the sarcomere, may be associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). It has become clinical...... in relation to phenotypic features reported to be associated with mutations in cardiac troponin I (cTnI; TNNI3), which is a recognized sarcomeric disease gene in all 3 cardiomyopathies. RESULTS: The results of this review did not identify specific genotype-phenotype relations in HCM or DCM, and c...

  15. WDR35 Mutation in Siblings with Sensenbrenner Syndrome: A Ciliopathy With Variable Phenotype

    Bacino, Carlos A.; Dhar, Shweta U.; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lee, Brendan; Bonnen, Penelope E

    2012-01-01

    Sensenbrenner syndrome and unclassified short rib-polydactyly conditions are ciliopathies with overlapping phenotypes and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in WDR35 were identified recently in a sub-group of patients with Sensenbrenner syndrome and in a single family that presented with an unclassified form of short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome. We report on siblings with an unusual combination of phenotypes: narrow thorax, short stature, minor anomalies, developmental delay, and severe hepa...

  16. MC1R Mutations Modify the Classic Phenotype of Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 (OCA2)

    Richard A. King; Willaert, Rebecca K.; Schmidt, Ramona M.; Pietsch, Jacy; Savage, Sarah; Brott, Marcia J.; Fryer, James P.; Summers, C Gail; William S Oetting

    2003-01-01

    The heterogeneous group of disorders known as oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) shares cutaneous and ocular hypopigmentation associated with common developmental abnormalities of the eye. Mutations of at least 11 loci produce this phenotype. The majority of affected individuals develop some cutaneous melanin; this is predominantly seen as yellow/blond hair, whereas fewer have brown hair. The OCA phenotype is dependent on the constitutional pigmentation background of the family, with more OCA pigm...

  17. The Y141C knockin mutation in RDS leads to complex phenotypes in the mouse

    Stuck, Michael W.; Conley, Shannon M.; Naash, Muna I.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the photoreceptor-specific gene peripherin-2 (PRPH-2, also known as retinal degeneration slow/RDS) cause incurable retinal degeneration with a high degree of phenotypic variability. Patient phenotypes range from retinitis pigmentosa to various forms of macular and pattern dystrophy. Macular and pattern dystrophy in particular are associated with complex, poorly understood disease mechanisms, as severe vision loss is often associated both with defects in the photoreceptors, as wel...

  18. Mutation in collagen II alpha 1 isoforms delineates Stickler and Wagner syndrome phenotypes

    Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Soler, Vincent; Quiette, Valencia; POWELL, CALDWELL; Yanovitch, Tammy; Metlapally, Ravikanth; Luo, Xiaoyan; Katsanis, Nicholas; Nading, Erica; Young, Terri L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Stickler syndrome is an arthro-ophthalmopathy with phenotypic overlap with Wagner syndrome. The common Stickler syndrome type I is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, with causal mutations in collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1). Wagner syndrome is associated with mutations in versican (VCAN), which encodes for a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. A three-generation Caucasian family variably diagnosed with either syndrome was screened for sequence variants in the COL2A1 and VCAN gen...

  19. DMD Mutations in 576 Dystrophinopathy Families: A Step Forward in Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    Jonas Juan-Mateu; Lidia Gonzalez-Quereda; Maria Jose Rodriguez; Manel Baena; Edgard Verdura; Andres Nascimento; Carlos Ortez; Montserrat Baiget; Pia Gallano

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) require precise genetic diagnosis because most therapeutic strategies are mutation-specific. To understand more about the genotype-phenotype correlations of the DMD gene we performed a comprehensive analysis of the DMD mutational spectrum in a large series of families. Here we provide the clinical, pathological and genetic features of 576 dystrophinopathy patients. DMD gene analysis was performed using the MLPA techn...

  20. Autosomal recessive transmission of MYBPC3 mutation results in malignant phenotype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Yilu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM due to mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins is most commonly inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Since nearly 50% of HCM cases occur in the absence of a family history, a recessive inheritance pattern may be involved. METHODS: A pedigree was identified with suspected autosomal recessive transmission of HCM. Twenty-six HCM-related genes were comprehensively screened for mutations in the proband with targeted second generation sequencing, and the identified mutation was confirmed with bi-directional Sanger sequencing in all family members and 376 healthy controls. RESULTS: A novel missense mutation (c.1469G>T, p.Gly490Val in exon 17 of MYBPC3 was identified. Two siblings with HCM were homozygous for this mutation, whereas other family members were either heterozygous or wild type. Clinical evaluation showed that both homozygotes manifested a typical HCM presentation, but none of others, including 5 adult heterozygous mutation carriers up to 71 years of age, had any clinical evidence of HCM. CONCLUSIONS: Our data identified a MYBPC3 mutation in HCM, which appeared autosomal recessively inherited in this family. The absence of a family history of clinical HCM may be due to not only a de novo mutation, but also recessive mutations that failed to produce a clinical phenotype in heterozygous family members. Therefore, consideration of recessive mutations leading to HCM is essential for risk stratification and genetic counseling.

  1. Normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to TAC3/TACR3 mutations: characterization of neuroendocrine phenotypes and novel mutations.

    Bruno Francou

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: TAC3/TACR3 mutations have been reported in normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH (OMIM #146110. In the absence of animal models, studies of human neuroendocrine phenotypes associated with neurokinin B and NK3R receptor dysfunction can help to decipher the pathophysiology of this signaling pathway. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of TAC3/TACR3 mutations, characterize novel TACR3 mutations and to analyze neuroendocrine profiles in nCHH caused by deleterious TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations. RESULTS: From a cohort of 352 CHH, we selected 173 nCHH patients and identified nine patients carrying TAC3 or TACR3 variants (5.2%. We describe here 7 of these TACR3 variants (1 frameshift and 2 nonsense deleterious mutations and 4 missense variants found in 5 subjects. Modeling and functional studies of the latter demonstrated the deleterious consequence of one missense mutation (Tyr267Asn probably caused by the misfolding of the mutated NK3R protein. We found a statistically significant (p<0.0001 higher mean FSH/LH ratio in 11 nCHH patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations than in 47 nCHH patients with either biallelic mutations in KISS1R, GNRHR, or with no identified mutations and than in 50 Kallmann patients with mutations in KAL1, FGFR1 or PROK2/PROKR2. Three patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations had an apulsatile LH profile but low-frequency alpha-subunit pulses. Pulsatile GnRH administration increased alpha-subunit pulsatile frequency and reduced the FSH/LH ratio. CONCLUSION: The gonadotropin axis dysfunction associated with nCHH due to TAC3/TACR3 mutations is related to a low GnRH pulsatile frequency leading to a low frequency of alpha-subunit pulses and to an elevated FSH/LH ratio. This ratio might be useful for pre-screening nCHH patients for TAC3/TACR3 mutations.

  2. JP-HHT phenotype in Danish patients with SMAD4 mutations

    Jelsig, A M; Tørring, P M; Kjeldsen, A D;

    2016-01-01

    Patients with germline mutations in SMAD4 can present symptoms of both juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT): the JP-HHT syndrome. The complete phenotypic picture of this syndrome is only just emerging. We describe the clinical characteristics of 14...

  3. A Computational Protein Phenotype Prediction Approach to Analyze the Deleterious Mutations of Human MED12 Gene.

    Banaganapalli, Babajan; Mohammed, Kaleemuddin; Khan, Imran Ali; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Elango, Ramu; Shaik, Noor Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Genetic mutations in MED12, a subunit of Mediator complex are seen in a broad spectrum of human diseases. However, the underlying basis of how these pathogenic mutations elicit protein phenotype changes in terms of 3D structure, stability and protein binding sites remains unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the structural and functional impacts of MED12 mutations, using computational methods as an alternate to traditional in vivo and in vitro approaches. The MED12 gene mutations details and their corresponding clinical associations were collected from different databases and by text-mining. Initially, diverse computational approaches were applied to categorize the different classes of mutations based on their deleterious impact to MED12. Then, protein structures for wild and mutant types built by integrative modeling were analyzed for structural divergence, solvent accessibility, stability, and functional interaction deformities. Finally, this study was able to identify that genetic mutations mapped to exon-2 region, highly conserved LCEWAV and Catenin domains induce biochemically severe amino acid changes which alters the protein phenotype as well as the stability of MED12-CYCC interactions. To better understand the deleterious nature of FS-IDs and Indels, this study asserts the utility of computational screening based on their propensity towards non-sense mediated decay. Current study findings may help to narrow down the number of MED12 mutations to be screened for mediator complex dysfunction associated genetic diseases. This study supports computational methods as a primary filter to verify the plausible impact of pathogenic mutations based on the perspective of evolution, expression and phenotype of proteins. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2023-2035, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26813965

  4. Phenotypic heterogeneity in British patients with a founder mutation in the FHL1 gene

    Sarkozy, Anna; Windpassinger, Christian; Hudson, Judith; Dougan, Charlotte F; Lecky, Bryan; Hilton-Jones, David; Eagle, Michelle; Charlton, Richard; Barresi, Rita; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 (FHL1) gene, which encodes a 280-amino-acid protein containing four LIM domains and a single zinc-finger domain in the N-terminal region, have been associated with a broad clinical spectrum of X-linked muscle diseases encompassing a variety of different phenotypes. Patients might present with a scapuloperoneal myopathy, a myopathy with postural muscle atrophy and generalized hypertrophy, an Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, or an early onset myopathy with reducing bodies. It has been proposed that the phenotypic variability is related to the position of the mutation within the FHL1 gene. Here, we report on three British families with a heterogeneous clinical presentation segregating a single FHL1 gene mutation and haplotype, suggesting that this represents a founder mutation. The underlying FHL1 gene mutation was detected by direct sequencing and the founder effect was verified by haplotype analysis of the FHL1 gene locus. A 3-bp insertion mutation (p.Phe127_Thr128insIle) within the second LIM domain of the FHL1 gene was identified in all available affected family members of the three families. Haplotype analysis of the FHL1 region on Xq26 revealed that the families shared a common haplotype. The p.Phe127_Thr128insIle mutation in the FHL1 gene therefore appears to be a British founder mutation and FHL1 gene screening, in particular of exon 6, should therefore be indicated in British patients with a broad phenotypic spectrum of X-linked muscle diseases. PMID:21629301

  5. Classical MERRF phenotype associated with mitochondrial tRNA(Leu) (m.3243A>G) mutation.

    Brackmann, Florian; Abicht, Angela; Ahting, Uwe; Schröder, Rolf; Trollmann, Regina

    2012-05-01

    Myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibres (MERRF) and mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) are established phenotypes of mitochondrial encephalopathies. Nearly all patients affected by MERRF harbour a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Lys) gene. We report a 13-year-old patient who presented with the classical phenotype of MERRF but was found with the typical mutation of MELAS. The patient presented with myoclonic epilepsy beginning at 10 years of age, a muscle biopsy with ragged red fibres and some COX negative fibres and progressive bilateral MRI hyperintensitivities in the basal ganglia constituting MERRF syndrome but lacked clinical characteristics of MELAS. In particular, stroke-like episodes or lactic acidosis were not present. None of the tRNA mutations described in MERRF were found. However, further analyses showed the tRNA(Leu) mutation m.3243A>G usually found in MELAS to be responsible for the condition in this patient. This report highlights the broad phenotypic variability of mitochondrial encephalopathies with juvenile onset. It shows that m.3243A>G mutations can cause classical MERRF and emphasises the significance of comprehensive genetic studies if mitochondrial disease is suspected clinically. PMID:22270878

  6. Heterogeneity of phenotype in two cystic fibrosis patients homozygous for the CFTR exon 11 mutation G551D.

    Parad, R B

    1996-01-01

    In the heterozygous state, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) exon 11 mutation G551D has been described as "severe," causing pancreatic insufficiency. Two cystic fibrosis (CF) patients homozygous for this mutation showed a mild rather than severe pancreatic phenotype and a variable pulmonary phenotype.

  7. The kinetochore protein, CENPF, is mutated in human ciliopathy and microcephaly phenotypes

    Waters, Aoife M; Asfahani, Rowan; Carroll, Paula; Bicknell, Louise; Lescai, Francesco; Bright, Alison; Chanudet, Estelle; Brooks, Anthony; Christou-Savina, Sonja; Osman, Guled; Walsh, Patrick; Bacchelli, Chiara; Chapgier, Ariane; Vernay, Bertrand; Bader, David M; Deshpande, Charu; O' Sullivan, Mary; Ocaka, Louise; Stanescu, Horia; Stewart, Helen S; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Otto, Edgar; Johnson, Colin A; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Katsanis, Nicholas; Davis, Erica; Kleta, Robert; Hubank, Mike; Doxsey, Stephen; Jackson, Andrew; Stupka, Elia; Winey, Mark; Beales, Philip L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in microtubule-regulating genes are associated with disorders of neuronal migration and microcephaly. Regulation of centriole length has been shown to underlie the pathogenesis of certain ciliopathy phenotypes. Using a next-generation sequencing approach, we identified...... mutations in a novel centriolar disease gene in a kindred with an embryonic lethal ciliopathy phenotype and in a patient with primary microcephaly. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole exome sequencing data from a non-consanguineous Caucasian kindred exhibiting mid-gestation lethality and ciliopathic malformations...... microcephaly, we identified two CENPF mutations [c.1744G>T, p.E582X; c.8692 C>T, p.R2898X] by whole exome sequencing. We found that CENP-F colocalised with Ninein at the subdistal appendages of the mother centriole in mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells. Intraflagellar transport protein-88 (IFT-88...

  8. Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome: new mutation with a mild phenotype.

    Prasad, Chitra; Marles, Sandra; Prasad, Asuri N; Nikkel, Sarah; Longstaffe, Sally; Peabody, Deborah; Eng, Barry; Wright, Sarah; Waye, John S; Nowaczyk, Małgorzata J M

    2002-02-15

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, OMIM, 2001, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/ for SLOS, MIM 270400) is an autosomal recessive disorder of cholesterol biosynthesis caused by mutations of the 3beta-hydroxysterol Delta(7)-reductase gene, DHCR7. We report on a female infant with an exceptionally mild phenotype of SLOS, in whom molecular studies identified a new mutation in DHCR7. The proposita initially presented with feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, hypotonia, mild developmental delay, and oral tactile aversion. She had minor facial anomalies and 2-3 syndactyly of her toes in both feet. The plasma cholesterol was borderline low at 2.88 mmol/L (normal 2.97-4.40 mmol/L). Elevated plasma 7-dehydrocholesterol level of 200.0 micromol/L confirmed the clinical diagnosis of SLOS. Molecular analysis demonstrated compound heterozygosity for IVS8-1G -->C and Y280C, a new missense mutation in DHCR7. Since the other mutation in this patient is a known null mutation, this newly discovered mutation is presumably associated with significant residual enzyme activity and milder expression of clinical phenotype. PMID:11857552

  9. Identification of novel KIF11 mutations in patients with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy and a phenotypic analysis.

    Li, Jia-Kai; Fei, Ping; Li, Yian; Huang, Qiu-Jing; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Xiang; Rao, Yu-Qing; Li, Jing; Zhao, Peiquan

    2016-01-01

    KIF11 gene mutations cause a rare autosomal dominant inheritable disease called microcephaly with or without chorioretinopathy, lymphedema, or mental retardation (MCLMR). Recently, such mutations were also found to be associated with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR). Here, we report 7 novel KIF11 mutations identified by targeted gene capture in a cohort of 142 probands with FEVR who were diagnosed in our clinic between March 2015 and November 2015. These mutations were: p.L171V, c.790-2A>C, p.Q525*, p.Q842*, p.S936*, p.L983fs and p.R1025G. Phenotypic analysis revealed that all of the affected probands had advanced FEVR (stage 4 or above). Three had microcephaly, and one had chorioretinopathy, which indicated a phenotypic overlap with MCLMR. Two mutations were also found in the families of the affected probands. One parent with a p.R1025G mutation had an avascular peripheral retina and abnormal looping vessels. However, one parent with p.L983fs had normal retina, which indicated incomplete penetration of the genotype. Our results further confirmed that KIF11 is causative of FEVR in an autosomal dominant manner. We also suggest the examination of MCLMR-like features, such as microcephaly, chorioretinopathy, for patients with FEVR and wide-field fundus photography for patients with MCLMR in future practice. PMID:27212378

  10. Interplay between DMD point mutations and splicing signals in Dystrophinopathy phenotypes.

    Jonàs Juan-Mateu

    Full Text Available DMD nonsense and frameshift mutations lead to severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy while in-frame mutations lead to milder Becker muscular dystrophy. Exceptions are found in 10% of cases and the production of alternatively spliced transcripts is considered a key modifier of disease severity. Several exonic mutations have been shown to induce exon-skipping, while splice site mutations result in exon-skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites. However, factors determining the splicing pathway are still unclear. Point mutations provide valuable information regarding the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and elements defining exon identity in the DMD gene. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of 98 point mutations related to clinical phenotype and their effect on muscle mRNA and dystrophin expression. Aberrant splicing was found in 27 mutations due to alteration of splice sites or splicing regulatory elements. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to test the ability of the available algorithms to predict consequences on mRNA and to investigate the major factors that determine the splicing pathway in mutations affecting splicing signals. Our findings suggest that the splicing pathway is highly dependent on the interplay between splice site strength and density of regulatory elements.

  11. Regenerant arabidopsis lineages display a distinct genome-wide spectrum of mutations conferring variant phenotypes

    Jiang, Caifu

    2011-07-28

    Multicellular organisms can be regenerated from totipotent differentiated somatic cell or nuclear founders [1-3]. Organisms regenerated from clonally related isogenic founders might a priori have been expected to be phenotypically invariant. However, clonal regenerant animals display variant phenotypes caused by defective epigenetic reprogramming of gene expression [2], and clonal regenerant plants exhibit poorly understood heritable phenotypic ("somaclonal") variation [4-7]. Here we show that somaclonal variation in regenerant Arabidopsis lineages is associated with genome-wide elevation in DNA sequence mutation rate. We also show that regenerant mutations comprise a distinctive molecular spectrum of base substitutions, insertions, and deletions that probably results from decreased DNA repair fidelity. Finally, we show that while regenerant base substitutions are a likely major genetic cause of the somaclonal variation of regenerant Arabidopsis lineages, transposon movement is unlikely to contribute substantially to that variation. We conclude that the phenotypic variation of regenerant plants, unlike that of regenerant animals, is substantially due to DNA sequence mutation. 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity of epidermolytic ichthyosis associated with a new missense mutation in keratin 10.

    Abdul-Wahab, A; Takeichi, T; Liu, L; Stephens, C; Akiyama, M; McGrath, J A

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in the keratin 10 gene (KRT10) have been shown to underlie several forms of epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI), including generalized, annular and naevoid variants. We investigated an autosomal dominant pedigree with ichthyosis in which there was intrafamilial clinical heterogeneity, with the affected individual family members presenting with features of either erythrokeratoderma progressiva, annular EI, localized or superficial EI, or more generalized EI. Sanger sequencing identified a new heterozygous missense mutation (c.457C>A; p.Leu153Met) in KRT10 in all affected individuals. No additional mutations were identified in the genes for keratin 1 (KRT1) keratin 2 (KRT2), connexin 31 (GJB3) or connexin 30.3 (GJB4) that might account for the clinical heterogeneity seen in this family. Our findings illustrate the intrafamilial variability in phenotype and diverse clinical presentations that can occur in EI resulting from a single mutation in KRT10. PMID:26338057

  13. DMD Mutations in 576 Dystrophinopathy Families: A Step Forward in Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

    Jonas Juan-Mateu

    Full Text Available Recent advances in molecular therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD require precise genetic diagnosis because most therapeutic strategies are mutation-specific. To understand more about the genotype-phenotype correlations of the DMD gene we performed a comprehensive analysis of the DMD mutational spectrum in a large series of families. Here we provide the clinical, pathological and genetic features of 576 dystrophinopathy patients. DMD gene analysis was performed using the MLPA technique and whole gene sequencing in blood DNA and muscle cDNA. The impact of the DNA variants on mRNA splicing and protein functionality was evaluated by in silico analysis using computational algorithms. DMD mutations were detected in 576 unrelated dystrophinopathy families by combining the analysis of exonic copies and the analysis of small mutations. We found that 471 of these mutations were large intragenic rearrangements. Of these, 406 (70.5% were exonic deletions, 64 (11.1% were exonic duplications, and one was a deletion/duplication complex rearrangement (0.2%. Small mutations were identified in 105 cases (18.2%, most being nonsense/frameshift types (75.2%. Mutations in splice sites, however, were relatively frequent (20%. In total, 276 mutations were identified, 85 of which have not been previously described. The diagnostic algorithm used proved to be accurate for the molecular diagnosis of dystrophinopathies. The reading frame rule was fulfilled in 90.4% of DMD patients and in 82.4% of Becker muscular dystrophy patients (BMD, with significant differences between the mutation types. We found that 58% of DMD patients would be included in single exon-exon skipping trials, 63% from strategies directed against multiexon-skipping exons 45 to 55, and 14% from PTC therapy. A detailed analysis of missense mutations provided valuable information about their impact on the protein structure.

  14. Phenotypic variability of hyperandrogenemia in females heterozygous for CYP21A2 mutations

    Vassos Neocleous

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective was to seek evidence on the prevalence and consequences of heterozygous CYP21A2 mutations in girls, adolescent, and adult females with clinical manifestation of androgen excess. Patients and Methods: The study included 64 girls diagnosed with premature adrenarche (PA in childhood and 141 females with clinical hyperandrogenemia manifested in adolescence or adulthood. Direct DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis were used to identify mutations in the CYP21A2 gene. Results: (1 Thirty-four patients were diagnosed with nonclassical-congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NC-CAH based on the 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP levels and the presence of two mutations in CYP21A2 and therefore were excluded from the study, 66 were found to be heterozygotes and finally 105 had no identifiable mutations. The most frequent mutations among the carriers were the mild p.Val281 Leu and p.Qln318stop. Higher levels of mean stimulated 17-OHP were found in the carriers of the p.Val281 Leu. (2 A notable increased allelic frequency for the known p.Asn493 Ser polymorphism was observed in the pool of females with hyperandrogenemia in whom no mutation was identified. (3 In girls, who presented early with PA, 26.6% were diagnosed with NC-CAH and carried two mutations, 28.7% were identified as heterozygotes 43.7% had no identifiable genetic defect in the translated region of the CYP21A2 gene. On the contrary, in the group of 141 females with late onset hyperandrogenemia, the presence of 2 mutations was detected in 12%, 1 mutation in 33.4% and no mutation in 54.6%. Conclusions: The carrier status for 21-OHD, may be an important factor in the variable phenotype of hyperandrogenism and may be a contributing factor for the early manifestation of the disease.

  15. DMD Mutations in 576 Dystrophinopathy Families: A Step Forward in Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

    Juan-Mateu, Jonas; Gonzalez-Quereda, Lidia; Rodriguez, Maria Jose; Baena, Manel; Verdura, Edgard; Nascimento, Andres; Ortez, Carlos; Baiget, Montserrat; Gallano, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) require precise genetic diagnosis because most therapeutic strategies are mutation-specific. To understand more about the genotype-phenotype correlations of the DMD gene we performed a comprehensive analysis of the DMD mutational spectrum in a large series of families. Here we provide the clinical, pathological and genetic features of 576 dystrophinopathy patients. DMD gene analysis was performed using the MLPA technique and whole gene sequencing in blood DNA and muscle cDNA. The impact of the DNA variants on mRNA splicing and protein functionality was evaluated by in silico analysis using computational algorithms. DMD mutations were detected in 576 unrelated dystrophinopathy families by combining the analysis of exonic copies and the analysis of small mutations. We found that 471 of these mutations were large intragenic rearrangements. Of these, 406 (70.5%) were exonic deletions, 64 (11.1%) were exonic duplications, and one was a deletion/duplication complex rearrangement (0.2%). Small mutations were identified in 105 cases (18.2%), most being nonsense/frameshift types (75.2%). Mutations in splice sites, however, were relatively frequent (20%). In total, 276 mutations were identified, 85 of which have not been previously described. The diagnostic algorithm used proved to be accurate for the molecular diagnosis of dystrophinopathies. The reading frame rule was fulfilled in 90.4% of DMD patients and in 82.4% of Becker muscular dystrophy patients (BMD), with significant differences between the mutation types. We found that 58% of DMD patients would be included in single exon-exon skipping trials, 63% from strategies directed against multiexon-skipping exons 45 to 55, and 14% from PTC therapy. A detailed analysis of missense mutations provided valuable information about their impact on the protein structure. PMID:26284620

  16. Mutations in Hirschsprung disease : When does a mutation contribute to the phenotype

    Hofstra, RMW; Osinga, J; Buys, CHCM

    1997-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease is a congenital disorder clinically characterized by the absence of colonic ganglia and genetically by extensive heterogeneity. Genes involved include RET, GDNF, EDNRB and EDN3. Mutations of these genes may give dominant, recessive, or polygenic patterns of inheritance. In parti

  17. Association between genotype and phenotype in families with mutations in the ABCA4 gene

    Kjellström, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the genotype and phenotype in families with adenosine triphosphate–binding cassette, sub-family A, member 4 (ABCA4)–associated retinal degeneration. Methods Three families with at least one family member with known homozygous or compound heterozygote mutations in the ABCA4 gene were studied. The investigations included full field electroretinography (ff-ERG), multifocal ERG (mERG), Goldmann visual fields, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and standard ophthalmological...

  18. Additive dominant effect of a SOX10 mutation underlies a complex phenotype of PCWH.

    Ito, Yukiko; Inoue, Naoko; Inoue, Yukiko U; Nakamura, Shoko; Matsuda, Yoshiki; Inagaki, Masumi; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Asami, Junko; Terakawa, Youhei W; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Goto, Yu-ichi; Akazawa, Chihiro; Inoue, Takayoshi; Inoue, Ken

    2015-08-01

    Distinct classes of SOX10 mutations result in peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease, collectively known as PCWH. Meanwhile, SOX10 haploinsufficiency caused by allelic loss-of-function mutations leads to a milder non-neurological disorder, Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease. The cellular pathogenesis of more complex PCWH phenotypes in vivo has not been thoroughly understood. To determine the pathogenesis of PCWH, we have established a transgenic mouse model. A known PCWH-causing SOX10 mutation, c.1400del12, was introduced into mouse Sox10-expressing cells by means of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis. By crossing the multiple transgenic lines, we examined the effects produced by various copy numbers of the mutant transgene. Within the nervous systems, transgenic mice revealed a delay in the incorporation of Schwann cells in the sciatic nerve and the terminal differentiation of oligodendrocytes in the spinal cord. Transgenic mice also showed defects in melanocytes presenting as neurosensory deafness and abnormal skin pigmentation, and a loss of the enteric nervous system. Phenotypes in each lineage were more severe in mice carrying higher copy numbers, suggesting a gene dosage effect for mutant SOX10. By uncoupling the effects of gain-of-function and haploinsufficiency in vivo, we have demonstrated that the effect of a PCWH-causing SOX10 mutation is solely pathogenic in each SOX10-expressing cellular lineage in a dosage-dependent manner. In both the peripheral and central nervous systems, the primary consequence of SOX10 mutations is hypomyelination. The complex neurological phenotypes in PCWH patients likely result from a combination of haploinsufficiency and additive dominant effect. PMID:25959061

  19. Intra-familiar discordant PKU phenotype explained by mutation analysis in three pedigrees.

    Trunzo, Roberta; Santacroce, Rosa; D'Andrea, Giovanna; Longo, Vittoria; De Girolamo, Giuseppe; Dimatteo, Claudia; Leccese, Angelica; Lillo, Vincenza; Papadia, Francesco; Margaglione, Maurizio

    2014-02-01

    Classical phenylketonuria (PKU) and mild hyperphenylalaninemia (MHP) are two phenotypes of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) deficiency with different degrees of severity. We have analyzed three families in which classical PKU, MHP and a normal phenotype occurred within each family due to the different combinations of three mutations segregating within the family. Indeed, sequence PAH analysis revealed three different alleles segregating in each family. This report suggests that when discordant phenotypes occur in a family, complete analysis of the PAH gene may be performed in order to support the diagnosis and assist in accurate genetic counseling and patient management. We further support the marked heterogeneity of hyperphenylalaninemia primarily due to allelic heterogeneity at the PAH locus. PMID:24296287

  20. JP-HHT phenotype in Danish patients with SMAD4 mutations.

    Jelsig, A M; Tørring, P M; Kjeldsen, A D; Qvist, N; Bojesen, A; Jensen, U B; Andersen, M K; Gerdes, A M; Brusgaard, K; Ousager, L B

    2016-07-01

    Patients with germline mutations in SMAD4 can present symptoms of both juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT): the JP-HHT syndrome. The complete phenotypic picture of this syndrome is only just emerging. We describe the clinical characteristics of 14 patients with SMAD4-mutations. The study was a retrospective, register-based study. SMAD4 mutations carriers were identified through the Danish HHT-registry, the genetic laboratories - and the genetic departments in Denmark. The medical files from relevant departments were reviewed and symptoms of HHT, JPS, aortopathy and family history were noted. We detected 14 patients with SMAD4 mutations. All patients had polyps removed and 11 of 14 fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for JPS. Eight patients were screened for HHT-symptoms and seven of these fulfilled the Curaçao criteria. One patient had aortic root dilation. Our findings support that SMAD4 mutations carriers have symptoms of both HHT and JPS and that the frequency of PAVM and gastric involvement with polyps is higher than in patients with HHT or JPS not caused by a SMAD4 mutation. Out of eight patients screened for aortopathy, one had aortic root dilatation, highlighting the need for additional screening for aortopathy. PMID:26572829

  1. ADAMTSL4-associated isolated ectopia lentis: Further patients, novel mutations and a detailed phenotype description.

    Neuhann, Teresa M; Stegerer, Annette; Riess, Angelika; Blair, Edward; Martin, Thomas; Wieser, Stefanie; Kläs, Rüdiger; Bouman, Arjan; Kuechler, Alma; Rittinger, Olaf

    2015-10-01

    ADAMTSL4 mutations seem to be the most common cause of isolated ectoplia lentis (EL) and thus are important concerning the differential diagnosis of connective tissue syndromes with EL as main feature. In this study, we describe an additional cohort of patients with apparently isolated EL. All underwent a detailed clinical exam with cardiac evaluation combined with ADAMTSL4 mutation analysis. Mutations were identified in 12/15 patients with EL. Besides the European founder mutation p. (Gln256Profs*38) we identified five further mutations not yet described in the literature: p. (Leu249Tyrfs*21), p. (Ala388Glyfs*8), p. (Arg746His), p. (Gly592Ser), and p. (Arg865His). Clinical evaluation showed common additional ocular features such as high myopia, but no major systemic findings. In particular: no dilatation of the aortic root was reported on. This report increases the total number of patients with ADAMTSL4 mutations reported on today and reviews in detail the clinical findings in all patients reported on to date demonstrate, that these patients have a mainly ocular phenotype. There are no consistent systemic findings. The differentiation between syndromic and isolated EL is crucial for the further surveillance, treatment, and counseling of these patients, especially in young children. PMID:25975359

  2. TILLING in two-rowed spring barley: mutation frequencies and phenotypes

    TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) searches the genomes of mutagenized organisms for mutations in a chosen gene, and allows functional analysis in the context of the whole organism. Moreover, TILLING extends reverse genetics to mutation breeding, since it can generate large allelic series of economically interesting genes. As part of the GABI-TILL consortium (GABI II) we have established a TILLING platform for the two-rowed, malting barley cultivar 'Barke'. The population comprises 10,492 M2 plants, and the respective DNA was arranged in 8-fold two dimensional (2D)-pools for mutation screening. Mutations were detected by following the original TILLING procedure of Cel I based hetero-duplex analysis. By screening ten gene fragments for mutations in 7,348 M2 lines 81 mutations were identified, yielding an average mutation frequency of approximately 1 mutation per 0.5 Mb. Seventy-nine percent of these mutations were located in coding regions of the analysed gene fragments of which 45% represented missense alleles inducing a change of amino acid in the protein. Five percent of the mutations provided truncation mutations either by elimination of a splice junction or by insertion of a premature stop codon. For instance for the vrs1 gene (Komatsuda et al. 2007), which is the major factor that controls row-type morphology of the barley spike, thirty-one mutations were identified by screening a 1,270bp fragment. Three of the identified mutants either exhibited a 6-rowed or an intermediate phenotype. One mutant displayed a spikelet morphology that was significantly altered compared to 'Barke' wild-type. The barley TILLING activity is going to be extended into the GABI-Future program. Additionally, tests to improve mutation frequency in barley will be undertaken. Furthermore, attempts for generating an instantly homozygous TILLING-Population by Barley microspore culture mutagenesis are underway in co-operation with the group of Jochen Kumlehn (Co-PI GABI

  3. WDR35 Mutation in Siblings with Sensenbrenner Syndrome: A Ciliopathy With Variable Phenotype

    Bacino, Carlos A.; Dhar, Shweta U.; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lee, Brendan; Bonnen, Penelope E.

    2014-01-01

    Sensenbrenner syndrome and unclassified short rib-polydactyly conditions are ciliopathies with overlapping phenotypes and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in WDR35 were identified recently in a sub-group of patients with Sensenbrenner syndrome and in a single family that presented with an unclassified form of short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome. We report on siblings with an unusual combination of phenotypes: narrow thorax, short stature, minor anomalies, developmental delay, and severe hepatic fibrosis leading to liver failure and early death in two of the children. Both parents were unaffected suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. The family and their affected children were followed over a decade. Exome sequencing was performed in one affected individual. It showed a homozygous missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the WDR35 gene. This family represents aWDR35-ciliopathy with a complex clinical presentation that includes significant overlap of the phenotypes described in Sensenbrenner syndrome and the unclassified SRPs. The accurate molecular diagnosis of this family exemplifies the power of exome sequencing in the diagnosis of Mendelian disorders and enabled us to broaden and refine our understanding of Sensenbrenner syndrome and SRP. Detailed genotype–phenotype information is provided as well as discussion of previously reported cases. PMID:22987818

  4. Two Siblings With a CDKL5 Mutation: Genotype and Phenotype Evaluation.

    Hagebeuk, Eveline E O; Marcelis, Carlo L; Alders, Mariëlle; Kaspers, Ageeth; de Weerd, Al W

    2015-10-01

    This is the second report of a family with a recurrence of a CDKL5 mutation (c. 283-3_290del) in 2 sisters. Both parents tested negative for the mutation in all tissues, but germline mosaicism is likely. Clinically CDKL5 patients resemble those with Rett syndrome, caused by a MECP2 mutation, who experience a regression, after an initial normal development. Even though both siblings showed a typical CDKL5 phenotype, their presentation is different. From birth, the oldest daughter had a severe developmental delay, feeding problems, and hypotonia and experienced daily refractory seizures. The youngest daughter appeared to be normal until age 3 months. At that age seizures started, deterioration and regression became evident, and an epileptic encephalopathy developed. This report of familial recurrence, with suspected germline mosaicism in a healthy parent, has important consequences for genetic counseling. Although it is not possible to predict an exact recurrence risk, it is likely to be increased. PMID:25762588

  5. The molecular basis of variable phenotypic severity among common missense mutations causing Rett syndrome.

    Brown, Kyla; Selfridge, Jim; Lagger, Sabine; Connelly, John; De Sousa, Dina; Kerr, Alastair; Webb, Shaun; Guy, Jacky; Merusi, Cara; Koerner, Martha V; Bird, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, which encodes a chromosomal protein that binds to methylated DNA. Mouse models mirror the human disorder and therefore allow investigation of phenotypes at a molecular level. We describe an Mecp2 allelic series representing the three most common missense Rett syndrome (RTT) mutations, including first reports of Mecp2[R133C] and Mecp2[T158M] knock-in mice, in addition to Mecp2[R306C] mutant mice. Together these three alleles comprise ∼25% of all RTT mutations in humans, but they vary significantly in average severity. This spectrum is mimicked in the mouse models; R133C being least severe, T158M most severe and R306C of intermediate severity. Both R133C and T158M mutations cause compound phenotypes at the molecular level, combining compromised DNA binding with reduced stability, the destabilizing effect of T158M being more severe. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that the R133C mutation exclusively abolishes binding to hydroxymethylated DNA, as interactions with DNA containing methyl-CG, methyl-CA and hydroxymethyl-CA are all reduced in vivo. We find that MeCP2[T158M] is significantly less stable than MeCP2[R133C], which may account for the divergent clinical impact of the mutations. Overall, this allelic series recapitulates human RTT severity, reveals compound molecular aetiologies and provides a valuable resource in the search for personalized therapeutic interventions. PMID:26647311

  6. CAV3 mutations causing exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis: Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies.

    Scalco, Renata Siciliani; Gardiner, Alice R; Pitceathly, Robert D S; Hilton-Jones, David; Schapira, Anthony H; Turner, Chris; Parton, Matt; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Barresi, Rita; Marsh, Julie; Manzur, Adnan Y; Childs, Anne-Marie; Feng, Lucy; Murphy, Elaine; Lamont, Phillipa J; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Wallefeld, William; Davis, Mark R; Laing, Nigel G; Holton, Janice L; Fialho, Doreen; Bushby, Kate; Hanna, Michael G; Phadke, Rahul; Jungbluth, Heinz; Houlden, Henry; Quinlivan, Ros

    2016-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is often due to a combination of environmental trigger(s) and genetic predisposition; however, the underlying genetic cause remains elusive in many cases. Mutations in CAV3 lead to various neuromuscular phenotypes with partial overlap, including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD1C), rippling muscle disease, distal myopathy and isolated hyperCKemia. Here we present a series of eight patients from seven families presenting with exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis caused by mutations in CAV3 diagnosed by next generation sequencing (NGS) (n = 6). Symptoms included myalgia (n = 7), exercise intolerance (n = 7) and episodes of rhabdomyolysis (n = 2). Percussion-induced rapid muscle contractions (PIRCs) were seen in five out of six patients examined. A previously reported heterozygous mutation in CAV3 (p.T78M) and three novel variants (p.V14I, p.F41S, p.F54V) were identified. Caveolin-3 immunolabeling in muscle was normal in 3/4 patients; however, immunoblotting showed more than 50% reduction of caveolin-3 in five patients compared with controls. This case series demonstrates that exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis may be caused by CAV3 mutations and broadens the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies. In our series, immunoblotting was a more sensitive method to detect reduced caveolin-3 levels than immunohistochemistry in skeletal muscle. Patients presenting with muscle pain, exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis should be routinely tested for PIRCs as this may be an important clinical clue for caveolinopathies, even in the absence of other "typical" features. The use of NGS may expand current knowledge concerning inherited diseases, and unexpected/atypical phenotypes may be attributed to well-known human disease genes. PMID:27312022

  7. Mutations in the human UBR1 gene and the associated phenotypic spectrum.

    Sukalo, Maja; Fiedler, Ariane; Guzmán, Celina; Spranger, Stephanie; Addor, Marie-Claude; McHeik, Jiad N; Oltra Benavent, Manuel; Cobben, Jan M; Gillis, Lynette A; Shealy, Amy G; Deshpande, Charu; Bozorgmehr, Bita; Everman, David B; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Liebelt, Jan; Keller, Klaus-Michael; Bertola, Débora Romeo; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Bergmann, Carsten; Liu, Zhifeng; Düker, Gesche; Rezaei, Nima; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Oğur, Gönül; Alrajoudi, Abdullah; Venegas-Vega, Carlos A; Verbeek, Nienke E; Richmond, Erick J; Kirbiyik, Ozgür; Ranganath, Prajnya; Singh, Ankur; Godbole, Koumudi; Ali, Fouad A M; Alves, Crésio; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Witt, Heiko; Zenker, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, typical facial features, dental anomalies, hypothyroidism, sensorineural hearing loss, scalp defects, urogenital and anorectal anomalies, short stature, and cognitive impairment of variable degree. This syndrome is caused by a defect of the E3 ubiquitin ligase UBR1, which is part of the proteolytic N-end rule pathway. Herein, we review previously reported (n = 29) and a total of 31 novel UBR1 mutations in relation to the associated phenotype in patients from 50 unrelated families. Mutation types include nonsense, frameshift, splice site, missense, and small in-frame deletions consistent with the hypothesis that loss of UBR1 protein function is the molecular basis of JBS. There is an association of missense mutations and small in-frame deletions with milder physical abnormalities and a normal intellectual capacity, thus suggesting that at least some of these may represent hypomorphic UBR1 alleles. The review of clinical data of a large number of molecularly confirmed JBS cases allows us to define minimal clinical criteria for the diagnosis of JBS. For all previously reported and novel UBR1 mutations together with their clinical data, a mutation database has been established at LOVD. PMID:24599544

  8. Mutations in genes involved in nonsense mediated decay ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber stop mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Aubert Sylvie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presenilin proteins are part of a complex of proteins that can cleave many type I transmembrane proteins, including Notch Receptors and the Amyloid Precursor Protein, in the middle of the transmembrane domain. Dominant mutations in the human presenilin genes PS1 and PS2 lead to Familial Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans sel-12 presenilin gene cause a highly penetrant egg-laying defect due to reduction of signalling through the lin-12/Notch receptor. Mutations in six spr genes (for suppressor of presenilin are known to strongly suppress sel-12. Mutations in most strong spr genes suppress sel-12 by de-repressing the transcription of the largely functionally equivalent hop-1 presenilin gene. However, how mutations in the spr-2 gene suppress sel-12 is unknown. Results We show that spr-2 mutations increase the levels of sel-12 transcripts with Premature translation Termination Codons (PTCs in embryos and L1 larvae. mRNA transcripts from sel-12 alleles with PTCs undergo degradation by a process known as Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD. However, spr-2 mutations do not appear to affect NMD. Mutations in the smg genes, which are required for NMD, can restore sel-12(PTC transcript levels and ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber PTCs. However, the phenotypic suppression of sel-12 by smg genes is nowhere near as strong as the effect of previously characterized spr mutations including spr-2. Consistent with this, we have identified only two mutations in smg genes among the more than 100 spr mutations recovered in genetic screens. Conclusion spr-2 mutations do not suppress sel-12 by affecting NMD of sel-12(PTC transcripts and appear to have a novel mechanism of suppression. The fact that mutations in smg genes can ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 alleles with amber PTCs suggests that some read-through of sel-12(amber alleles occurs in smg backgrounds.

  9. Phenotypic similarities and differences in patients with a p.Met112Ile mutation in SOX10.

    Pingault, Veronique; Pierre-Louis, Laurence; Chaoui, Asma; Verloes, Alain; Sarrazin, Elisabeth; Brandberg, Goran; Bondurand, Nadege; Uldall, Peter; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie

    2014-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is characterized by an association of pigmentation abnormalities and sensorineural hearing loss. Four types, defined on clinical grounds, have been delineated, but this phenotypic classification correlates imperfectly with known molecular anomalies. SOX10 mutations have been found in patients with type II and type IV WS (i.e., with Hirschsprung disease), more complex syndromes, and partial forms of the disease. The phenotype induced by SOX10 mutations is highly variable and, except for the neurological forms of the disease, no genotype-phenotype correlation has been characterized to date. There is no mutation hotspot in SOX10 and most cases are sporadic, making it particularly difficult to correlate the phenotypic and genetic variability. This study reports on three independent families with SOX10 mutations predicted to result in the same missense mutation at the protein level (p.Met112Ile), offering a rare opportunity to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying phenotypic variability. The pigmentation defects of these patients are very similar, and the neurological symptoms showed a somewhat similar evolution over time, indicating a potential partial genotype-phenotype correlation. However, variability in gastrointestinal symptoms suggests that other genetic factors contribute to the expression of these phenotypes. No correlation between the rs2435357 polymorphism of RET and the expression of Hirschsprung disease was found. In addition, one of the patients has esophageal achalasia, which has rarely been described in WS. PMID:24845202

  10. A mild mutator phenotype arises in a mouse model for malignancies associated with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Defects in genes that control DNA repair, proliferation, and apoptosis can increase genomic instability, and thus promote malignant progression. Although most tumors that arise in humans with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are benign, these individuals are at increased risk for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). To characterize additional mutations required for the development of MPNST from benign plexiform neurofibromas, we generated a mouse model for these tumors by combining targeted null mutations in Nf1 and p53, in cis. CisNf1+/-; p53+/- mice spontaneously develop PNST, and these tumors exhibit loss-of-heterozygosity at both the Nf1 and p53 loci. Because p53 has well-characterized roles in the DNA damage response, DNA repair, and apoptosis, and because DNA repair genes have been proposed to act as modifiers in NF1, we used the cisNf1+/-; p53+/- mice to determine whether a mutator phenotype arises in NF1-associated malignancies. To quantitate spontaneous mutant frequencies (MF), we crossed the Big Blue mouse, which harbors a lacI transgene, to the cisNf1+/-; p53+/- mice, and isolated genomic DNA from both tumor and normal tissues in compound heterozygotes and wild-type siblings. Many of the PNST exhibited increased mutant frequencies (MF = 4.70) when compared to normal peripheral nerve and brain (MF = 2.09); mutations occurred throughout the entire lacI gene, and included base substitutions, insertions, and deletions. Moreover, the brains, spleens, and livers of these cisNf1+/-; p53+/- animals exhibited increased mutant frequencies when compared to tissues from wild-type littermates. We conclude that a mild mutator phenotype arises in the tumors and tissues of cisNf1+/-; p53+/- mice, and propose that genomic instability influences NF1 tumor progression and disease severity

  11. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E; Lapin, Morten; Kristjansdottir, Karen; Petersen, Ulrika S S; Bang, Jeanne Mari V; Guerra, Barbara; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Carey, John C; Yu, Ping; Vaughn, Cecily; Calhoun, Amy; Larsen, Martin R; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Stevenson, David A; Andresen, Brage S

    2016-05-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE) and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS). We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping. PMID:27195699

  12. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    Anne-Mette Hartung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome (CS may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS. We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping.

  13. Comprehensive analysis of gene mutation and phenotype of tuberous sclerosis complex in China

    Guo-qiang HUANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical features of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC, the distribution and description of TSC gene, and to probe into the correlation of genotype with phenotype.  Methods According to the 1998 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Diagnostic Criteria, a total of 163 TSC patients with pathogenic mutation in TSC gene (3 cases were detected in our hospital, and the other 160 cases were collected from other institutions in China were enrolled, and their gene detection results and clinical data were analyzed.  Results Among 163 cases, TSC1 mutation (31 cases accounted for 19.02% [32.26% (10/31 in exon 15, 16.13% (5/31 in exon 21, 12.90% (4/31 in exon 18], and TSC2 mutation (132 cases accounted for 80.98% [9.85% (13/132 in exon 37, 7.58% (10/132 in exon 40, 6.82%(9/132 in exon 33]. The proportion of base replacement in TSC1 was 41.94% (13/31, and 52.27% (69/132 in TSC2. Male patients exhibited significantly more subependymal nodules or calcifications than thefemale patients (χ2 = 8.016, P = 0.005. Sporadic patients exhibited significantly more cortical tubers than familial patients (χ2 = 6.273, P = 0.012. Patients with TSC2 mutations had significantly higher frequencies of hypomelanotic macules than patients with TSC1 mutations (χ2 = 6.756, P = 0.009. Patients with missense mutations were more likely to have facial angiofibromas compared with patients with other mutations (χ2 = 4.438, P = 0.035.  Conclusions Exon 15, 21 and 18 of TSC1 and exon 37, 40 and 33 of TSC2 accounted for higher percentage of mutations. Correlating genotypes with phenotypes should facilitate the individualized treatment and prognostic assessment of tuberous sclerosis complex. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.04.013

  14. Characterization of broadly pleiotropic phenotypes caused by an hfq insertion mutation in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Tsui, H C; Leung, H C; Winkler, M E

    1994-07-01

    The region immediately downstream from the miaA tRNA modification gene at 94.8 min contains the hfq gene and the hflA region, which are important in the bacteriophage Q beta and lambda life cycles. The roles of these genes in bacteria remain largely unknown. We report here the characterization of two chromosomal hfq insertion mutations. An omega (omega) cassette insertion near the end of hfq resulted in phenotypes only slightly different from the parent, although transcript mapping demonstrated that the insertion was completely polar on hflX expression. In contrast, an equally polar omega cassette insertion near the beginning of hfq caused pronounced pleiotropic phenotypes, including decreased growth rates and yields, decreased negative supercoiling of plasmids in stationary phase, increased cell size, osmosensitivity, increased oxidation of carbon sources, increased sensitivity to ultraviolet light, and suppression of bgl activation by hns mutations. hfq::omega mutant phenotypes were distinct from those caused by omega insertions early in the miaA tRNA modification gene. On the other hand, both hfq insertions interfered with lambda phage plaque formation, probably by means of polarity at the hflA region. Together, these results show that hfq function plays a fundamental role in Escherichia coli physiology and that hfq and the hflA-region are in the amiB-mutL-miaA-hfq-hflX superoperon. PMID:7984093

  15. ADA2 deficiency: case report of a new phenotype and novel mutation in two sisters.

    Uettwiller, F; Sarrabay, G; Rodero, M P; Rice, G I; Lagrue, E; Marot, Y; Deiva, K; Touitou, I; Crow, Y J; Quartier, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to: describe the phenotype compound heterozygote for mutations in CECR1 in two children. We describe the clinical and immunological phenotype, including the assessment of ADA2 activity, cytokine expression, interferon-stimulated and neutrophil-stimulated gene signatures, and the results of CECR1 sequencing. The first patient presented with intermittent fever, cutaneous vasculitis, myalgia and muscle inflammation on MRI leading to a provisional diagnosis of periarteritis nodosa. Subsequently, two cerebral lacunar lesions were identified following a brain stroke. Clinical features improved on anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy. The first patient's sister demonstrated early-onset, long-lasting anaemia with mild biological inflammation; at the ages of 3 and 5 years, she had presented 2 acute, transient neurological events with lacunar lesions on MRI. CECR1 sequencing identified both sisters to be compound heterozygous for a p.Tyr453Cys mutation and a previously undescribed deletion of exon 7. ADA2 activity was reduced by 50%. Neutrophil-stimulated genes were not overexpressed, but interferon-stimulated genes were. The expression of a panel of other cytokine transcripts was not significantly altered. In conclusion, searching for CECR1 mutation or assessing ADA2 activity should be considered in patients with an atypical presentation of inflammatory disease. PMID:27252897

  16. MRI findings of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease correlated with phenotypes and genetic mutation

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of MRI features and phenotypes and genetic mutations in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. Methods: Sixteen boys with clinical diagnosis of Pelizaeus- Merzbacher disease (PMD) were included in this study. Their ages ranged from 22 months to 9 years. They were examined by pediatric neurologists, and clinical classification was made according to the symptoms and physical signs. An experienced radiologist reviewed the cranial MRI images and analyzed the brain involvement, including pallidus globus, pyramidal tract, corpus callosum, cerebellar white matter, semioval centrum, brain atrophy and tigroid sign. Results: There were 8 patients with classic form, 7 patients with transitional form and one patient with connatal form. They all showed diffuse delayed myelination in the white matter, with involvement of pallidus globus in 13 cases, pyramidal tract in 7 cases, corpus callosum in 11 cases, cerebellar white matter in 7 cases, semioval centrum in 12 cases. Cerebral atrophy was found in 5 patients and cerebellar atrophy was found in one patient. Five cases depicted tigroid sign. In patients with PLP1 gene point mutation, pyramidal tract and cerebellar white matter involvement showed a high incidence. Cerebellar white matter lesions were relatively frequent in children with transitional form and connatal form. In contrast, tigroid sign was often related to classic form, which indicated a better myelination and outcome. Conclusion: PMD patients show distinct imaging features in their brains, which may be correlated with the phenotype and genetic mutation. (authors)

  17. ADA2 deficiency: case report of a new phenotype and novel mutation in two sisters

    Uettwiller, F; Sarrabay, G; Rodero, M P; Rice, G I; Lagrue, E; Marot, Y; Deiva, K; Touitou, I; Crow, Y J; Quartier, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to: describe the phenotype compound heterozygote for mutations in CECR1 in two children. We describe the clinical and immunological phenotype, including the assessment of ADA2 activity, cytokine expression, interferon-stimulated and neutrophil-stimulated gene signatures, and the results of CECR1 sequencing. The first patient presented with intermittent fever, cutaneous vasculitis, myalgia and muscle inflammation on MRI leading to a provisional diagnosis of periarteritis nodosa. Subsequently, two cerebral lacunar lesions were identified following a brain stroke. Clinical features improved on anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy. The first patient's sister demonstrated early-onset, long-lasting anaemia with mild biological inflammation; at the ages of 3 and 5 years, she had presented 2 acute, transient neurological events with lacunar lesions on MRI. CECR1 sequencing identified both sisters to be compound heterozygous for a p.Tyr453Cys mutation and a previously undescribed deletion of exon 7. ADA2 activity was reduced by 50%. Neutrophil-stimulated genes were not overexpressed, but interferon-stimulated genes were. The expression of a panel of other cytokine transcripts was not significantly altered. In conclusion, searching for CECR1 mutation or assessing ADA2 activity should be considered in patients with an atypical presentation of inflammatory disease. PMID:27252897

  18. Phenotypic and molecular insights into spinal muscular atrophy due to mutations in BICD2.

    Rossor, Alexander M; Oates, Emily C; Salter, Hannah K; Liu, Yang; Murphy, Sinead M; Schule, Rebecca; Gonzalez, Michael A; Scoto, Mariacristina; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline A; Houlden, Henry; Jordanova, Albena; Tournev, Iyailo; Chamova, Teodora; Litvinenko, Ivan; Zuchner, Stephan; Herrmann, David N; Blake, Julian; Sowden, Janet E; Acsadi, Gyuda; Rodriguez, Michael L; Menezes, Manoj P; Clarke, Nigel F; Auer Grumbach, Michaela; Bullock, Simon L; Muntoni, Francesco; Reilly, Mary M; North, Kathryn N

    2015-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a disorder of lower motor neurons, most commonly caused by recessive mutations in SMN1 on chromosome 5q. Cases without SMN1 mutations are subclassified according to phenotype. Spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity-predominant, is characterized by lower limb muscle weakness and wasting, associated with reduced numbers of lumbar motor neurons and is caused by mutations in DYNC1H1, which encodes a microtubule motor protein in the dynein-dynactin complex and one of its cargo adaptors, BICD2. We have now identified 32 patients with BICD2 mutations from nine different families, providing detailed insights into the clinical phenotype and natural history of BICD2 disease. BICD2 spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity predominant most commonly presents with delayed motor milestones and ankle contractures. Additional features at presentation include arthrogryposis and congenital dislocation of the hips. In all affected individuals, weakness and wasting is lower-limb predominant, and typically involves both proximal and distal muscle groups. There is no evidence of sensory nerve involvement. Upper motor neuron signs are a prominent feature in a subset of individuals, including one family with exclusively adult-onset upper motor neuron features, consistent with a diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia. In all cohort members, lower motor neuron features were static or only slowly progressive, and the majority remained ambulant throughout life. Muscle MRI in six individuals showed a common pattern of muscle involvement with fat deposition in most thigh muscles, but sparing of the adductors and semitendinosus. Muscle pathology findings were highly variable and included pseudomyopathic features, neuropathic features, and minimal change. The six causative mutations, including one not previously reported, result in amino acid changes within all three coiled-coil domains of the BICD2 protein, and include a possible 'hot spot' mutation, p.Ser107Leu

  19. De novo heterozygous mutations in SMC3 cause a range of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-overlapping phenotypes

    Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Deardorff, Matthew A; Ansari, Morad;

    2015-01-01

    LS-like features caused by mutations in SMC3. Modeling of the mutation effects on protein structure suggests a dominant-negative effect on the multimeric cohesin complex. When compared with typical CdLS, many SMC3-associated phenotypes are also characterized by postnatal microcephaly but with a less distinctive...

  20. Phenotypic Changes Resulting from Distinct Point Mutations in the Azospirillum brasilense glnA Gene, Encoding Glutamine Synthetase

    Van Dommelen, Anne; Keijers, Veerle; Wollebrants, An; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2003-01-01

    Sequencing the glnA genes of two chemically induced Azospirillum brasilense glutamine synthetase mutants revealed an Arg→Cys mutation, corresponding to the glutamate binding site, in one mutant and an Asp→Asn mutation, corresponding to the ammonium binding site, in the second mutant. The phenotypic changes in these mutants are discussed in relation to their genotypes.

  1. Stickler syndrome and the vitreous phenotype: Mutations in COL2A1 and COL11A1

    Richards, Allan; McNinch, Annie; Martin, Howard; Oakhill, Kim; Rai, Harjeet; WALLER, SARAH; Treacy, Becky; Whittaker, Joanne; Meredith, Sarah; Poulson, Arabella; Snead, Martin P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Stickler syndrome is a dominantly inherited disorder affecting the fibrillar type II/XI collagen molecules expressed in vitreous and cartilage. Mutations have been found in COL2A1, COL11A1 and COL11A2. It has a highly variable phenotype that can include midline clefting, hearing loss, premature osteoarthritis, congenital high myopia and blindness through retinal detachment. Although the systemic phenotype is highly variable, the vitreous phenotype has been used successfull...

  2. Mutation spectrum in the large GTPase dynamin 2, and genotype-phenotype correlation in autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy

    Böhm, Johann; Biancalana, Valérie; Dechene, Elizabeth T;

    2012-01-01

    regulating cytoskeleton and membrane trafficking in cells. To date, 40 families with CNM-related DNM2 mutations have been described, and here we report 60 additional families encompassing a broad genotypic and phenotypic spectrum. In total, 18 different mutations are reported in 100 families and our cohort...... protein structure. Defects in membrane trafficking due to DNM2 mutations potentially represent a common pathological mechanism in CNM and CMT....

  3. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    Mortier, Geert; Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal; Rosenberg, Thomas; Beemer, Frits A; Leroy, Jules G; Bendix, Laila; Björck, Erik; Bonduelle, Dr.; Boute, Odile; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; De Die-Smulders, Christine E.M.; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Dollfus, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation in COL2A1. In 188 probands with the clinical diagnosis of Stickler syndrome, the COL2A1 gene was analyzed by either a mutation scanning technique or bidirectional fluorescent DNA sequencing. The effec...

  4. Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce CCL20 up-regulation promoting tumorigenic phenotypes

    Sligh, James [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Janda, Jaroslav [University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Jandova, Jana, E-mail: jjandova@email.arizona.edu [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Alterations in mitochondrial DNA are commonly found in various human cancers. • Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce up-regulation of chemokine CCL20. • Increased growth and motility of mtBALB cells is associated with CCL20 levels. • mtDNA changes in BALB induce in vivo tumor growth through CCL20 up-regulation. • Mutations in mitochondrial DNA play important roles in keratinocyte neoplasia. - Abstract: mtDNA mutations are common in human cancers and are thought to contribute to the process of neoplasia. We examined the role of mtDNA mutations in skin cancer by generating fibroblast cybrids harboring a mutation in the gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA for arginine. This somatic mutation (9821insA) was previously reported in UV-induced hyperkeratotic skin tumors in hairless mice and confers specific tumorigenic phenotypes to mutant cybrids. Microarray analysis revealed and RT-PCR along with Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in mtBALB haplotype containing the mt-Tr 9821insA allele compared to wild type mtB6 haplotype. Based on reported role of CCL20 in cancer progression we examined whether the hyper-proliferation and enhanced motility of mtBALB haplotype would be associated with CCL20 levels. Treatment of both genotypes with recombinant CCL20 (rmCCL20) resulted in enhanced growth and motility of mtB6 cybrids. Furthermore, the acquired somatic alteration increased the in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids through the up-regulation of CCL20 since neutralizing antibody significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth of these cells; and tumors from anti-CCL20 treated mice injected with mtBALB cybrids showed significantly decreased CCL20 levels. When rmCCL20 or mtBALB cybrids were used as chemotactic stimuli, mtB6 cybrids showed increased motility while anti-CCL20 antibody decreased the migration and in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids. Moreover, the inhibitors of MAPK signaling and NF

  5. Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce CCL20 up-regulation promoting tumorigenic phenotypes

    Highlights: • Alterations in mitochondrial DNA are commonly found in various human cancers. • Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce up-regulation of chemokine CCL20. • Increased growth and motility of mtBALB cells is associated with CCL20 levels. • mtDNA changes in BALB induce in vivo tumor growth through CCL20 up-regulation. • Mutations in mitochondrial DNA play important roles in keratinocyte neoplasia. - Abstract: mtDNA mutations are common in human cancers and are thought to contribute to the process of neoplasia. We examined the role of mtDNA mutations in skin cancer by generating fibroblast cybrids harboring a mutation in the gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA for arginine. This somatic mutation (9821insA) was previously reported in UV-induced hyperkeratotic skin tumors in hairless mice and confers specific tumorigenic phenotypes to mutant cybrids. Microarray analysis revealed and RT-PCR along with Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in mtBALB haplotype containing the mt-Tr 9821insA allele compared to wild type mtB6 haplotype. Based on reported role of CCL20 in cancer progression we examined whether the hyper-proliferation and enhanced motility of mtBALB haplotype would be associated with CCL20 levels. Treatment of both genotypes with recombinant CCL20 (rmCCL20) resulted in enhanced growth and motility of mtB6 cybrids. Furthermore, the acquired somatic alteration increased the in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids through the up-regulation of CCL20 since neutralizing antibody significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth of these cells; and tumors from anti-CCL20 treated mice injected with mtBALB cybrids showed significantly decreased CCL20 levels. When rmCCL20 or mtBALB cybrids were used as chemotactic stimuli, mtB6 cybrids showed increased motility while anti-CCL20 antibody decreased the migration and in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids. Moreover, the inhibitors of MAPK signaling and NF

  6. An atypical Dent's disease phenotype caused by co-inheritance of mutations at CLCN5 and OCRL genes

    Addis, Maria; Meloni, Cristiana; Tosetto, Enrica; Ceol, Monica; Cristofaro, Rosalba; Melis, Maria Antonietta; Vercelloni, Paolo; Del Prete, Dorella; Marra, Giuseppina; Anglani, Franca

    2012-01-01

    Dent's disease is an X-linked renal tubulopathy caused by mutations mainly affecting the CLCN5 gene. Defects in the OCRL gene, which is usually mutated in patients with Lowe syndrome, have been shown to lead to a Dent-like phenotype called Dent disease 2. However, about 20% of patients with Dent's disease carry no CLCN5/OCRL mutations. The disease's genetic heterogeneity is accompanied by interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity. We report on a case of Dent's disease with a ve...

  7. Inheritance patterns and phenotypic features of myofibrillar myopathy associated with a BAG3 mutation

    Odgerel, Zagaa; Sarkozy, Anna; Lee, Hee-Suk; McKenna, Caoimhe; Rankin, Julia; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Paola, Francalanci; D’Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Goldfarb, Lev G

    2010-01-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFMs) are a heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by disintegration of myofibrils. The inheritance pattern in MFMs is commonly autosomal dominant, but there has been a striking absence of secondary cases noted in a BAG3-associated subtype. We studied three families with BAG3 p.Pro209Leu mutation showing a severe phenotype of myofibrillar myopathy and axonal neuropathy with giant axons. In one family, transmission to a pair of siblings has occurred from their asymptomatic father who showed somatic mosaicism. In two other families, neither of the parents was affected or showed detectable level of somatic mosaicism. These observations suggest that the BAG3 variant of MFM may result from a spontaneous mutation at an early point of embryonic development and that transmission from a mosaic parent may occur more than once. The study underlines the importance of parental evaluation as it may have implications for genetic counseling. PMID:20605452

  8. Novel MASP1 mutations are associated with an expanded phenotype in 3MC1 syndrome

    Kayserili Karabey, Hülya; Tahir Atik; Asuman Koparir; Guney Bademci; Joseph Foster II; Umut Altunoglu; Gül Yesiltepe Mutlu; Sarah Bowdin; Nursel Elcioglu; Gulsen A. Tayfun; Sevinc Sahin Atik; Mustafa Ozen; Ferda Ozkinay; Yasemin Alanay; Steffen Thiel and Mustafa Tekin

    2015-01-01

    RESEARCH Open Access Novel MASP1 mutations are associated with an expanded phenotype in 3MC1 syndrome Tahir Atik1,2†, Asuman Koparir3†, Guney Bademci1, Joseph Foster II1, Umut Altunoglu4, Gül Yesiltepe Mutlu5, Sarah Bowdin6, Nursel Elcioglu7, Gulsen A. Tayfun7, Sevinc Sahin Atik8, Mustafa Ozen3,9, Ferda Ozkinay2, Yasemin Alanay10, Hulya Kayserili4,11, Steffen Thiel12 and Mustafa Tekin1* Abstract Background: 3MC1 syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterize...

  9. The phenotypic spectrum of neutral lipid storage myopathy due to mutations in the PNPLA2 gene.

    Reilich, Peter; Horvath, Rita; Krause, Sabine; Schramm, Nicolai; Turnbull, Doug M; Trenell, Michael; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Gorman, Grainne S; Hans, Volkmar H; Reimann, Jens; MacMillan, Andrée; Turner, Lesley; Schollen, Annette; Witte, Gregor; Czermin, Birgit; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Walter, Maggie C; Schoser, Benedikt; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2011-11-01

    Neutral lipid storage disease is caused by mutations in the CGI-58 or the PNPLA2 genes. Lipid storage can be detected in various cell types including blood granulocytes. While CGI-58 mutations are associated with Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, a condition characterized by lipid storage and skin involvement (ichthyosis), mutations in the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 2 gene (PNPLA2) were reported with skeletal and cardiac muscle disease only. We describe clinical, myopathological, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and genetic findings of six patients carrying different recessive PNPLA2 mutations. Pulse-chase labeling of control and patient cells with supplementation of clenbuterol, salmeterol, and dexamethasone was performed in vitro. The patients share a recognizable phenotype with prominent shoulder girdle weakness and mild pelvic girdle and distal muscle weakness, with highly elevated creatine kinase (CK) and cardiomyopathy developing at later stages. Muscle histology invariably reveals massive accumulation of lipid droplets. New muscle or whole-body MRI techniques may assist diagnosis and may become a useful tool to quantify intramuscular lipid storage. Four novel and two previously reported mutations were detected, affecting different parts of the PNPLA2 gene. Activation of hormone-sensitive lipase by beta-adrenergic substances such as clenbuterol appears to bypass the enzymatic block in PNPLA2-deficient patient cells in vitro. PNPLA2 deficiency is a slowly progressive myopathy with onset around the third decade. Cardiac involvement is relatively common at a later stage. Muscle MRI may detect increased lipid in a characteristic distribution, which could be used for monitoring disease progression. Beta-adrenergic agents may be beneficial in improving triacylglycerol breakdown in patients with PNPLA2 mutations. PMID:21544567

  10. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  11. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  12. Further defining the phenotypic spectrum of B4GALT7 mutations.

    Salter, Claire G; Davies, Justin H; Moon, Rebecca J; Fairhurst, Joanna; Bunyan, David; Foulds, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Proteoglycans are components of the extracellular matrix with diverse biological functions. Defects in proteoglycan synthesis have been linked to several human diseases with common features of short stature, hypermobility, joint dislocations, and skeletal dysplasia. B4GALT7 encodes galactosyltransferase-I that catalyzes the addition of a galactose moiety to a xylosyl group in the tetrasaccharide linker of proteoglycans. Mutations in this gene have been associated with the rare progeroid form of Ehlers Danlos syndrome and in addition more recently found to underlie Larsen of Reunion Island syndrome. Nine individuals have been reported with a diagnosis of the progeroid form of Ehlers Danlos syndrome, four of whom have had molecular characterization showing homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in B4GALT7. We report two newly described patients with compound heterozygous mutations in B4GALT7, and show that the six individuals with confirmed mutations do not have the progeroid features described in the original five patients with a clinical diagnosis of the progeroid form of Ehlers Danlos syndrome. We suggest that galactosyltransferase-I deficiency does not cause the progeroid form of Ehlers Danlos syndrome, but instead results in a clinically recognizable syndrome comprising short stature, joint hypermobility, radioulnar synostosis, and severe hypermetropia. This group of syndromic patients are on a phenotypic spectrum with individuals who have Larsen of Reunion Island syndrome, although the key features of osteopenia, fractures and hypermetropia have not been reported in patients from Reunion Island. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26940150

  13. A single point-mutation within the melanophilin gene causes the lavender plumage colour dilution phenotype in the chicken

    Tixier-Boichard Michèle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lavender phenotype in the chicken causes the dilution of both black (eumelanin and red/brown (phaeomelanin pigments. Defects in three genes involved in intracellular melanosomal transport, previously described in mammals, give rise to similar diluted pigmentation phenotypes as those seen in lavender chickens. Results We have used a candidate-gene approach based on an expectation of homology with mammals to isolate a gene involved in pigmentation in chicken. Comparative sequence analysis of candidate genes in the chicken identified a strong association between a mutation in the MLPH gene and the diluted pigmentation phenotype. This mutation results in the amino acid change R35W, at a site also associated with similar phenotypes in mice, humans and cats. Conclusion This is the first time that an avian species with a mutation in the MLPH gene has been reported.

  14. Impact of JAK2V617F Mutational Status on Phenotypic Features in Essential Thrombocythemia and Primary Myelofibrosis

    İpek Yönal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The JAK2V617F mutation is present in the majority of patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. The impact of this mutation on disease phenotype in ET and PMF is still a matter of discussion. This study aims to determine whether there are differences in clinical presentation and disease outcome between ET and PMF patients with and without the JAK2V617F mutation. Materials and Methods: In this single-center study, a total of 184 consecutive Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms, 107 cases of ET and 77 cases of PMF, were genotyped for JAK2V617F mutation using the JAK2 Ipsogen MutaScreen assay, which involves allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. Results: ET patients positive for JAK2V617F mutation had higher hemoglobin (Hb and hematocrit (Hct levels, lower platelet counts, and more prevalent splenomegaly at diagnosis compared to patients negative for the JAK2V617F mutation, but rates of major thrombotic events, arterial thrombosis, and venous thrombosis were comparable between the groups. At presentation, PMF patients with JAK2V617F mutation had significantly higher Hb and Hct levels and leukocyte counts than patients without the mutation. Similar to the findings of ET patients, thromboembolic rates were similar in PMF patients with and without theJAK2V617F mutation. For ET and PMF patients, no difference was observed in rates of death with respect to JAK2V617F mutational status. Moreover, leukemic transformation rate was not different in our PMF patients with and without JAK2V617F mutation. Conclusion: We conclude that JAK2V617F-mutated ET patients express a polycythemia vera-like phenotype and JAK2V617F mutation in PMF patients is associated with a more pronounced myeloproliferative phenotype.

  15. Mutations in MC1R Gene Determine Black Coat Color Phenotype in Chinese Sheep

    Guang-Li Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R plays a central role in regulation of animal coat color formation. In this study, we sequenced the complete coding region and parts of the 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions of the MC1R gene in Chinese sheep with completely white (Large-tailed Han sheep, black (Minxian Black-fur sheep, and brown coat colors (Kazakh Fat-Rumped sheep. The results showed five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: two non-synonymous mutations previously associated with coat color (c.218 T>A, p.73 Met>Lys. c.361 G>A, p.121 Asp>Asn and three synonymous mutations (c.429 C>T, p.143 Tyr>Tyr; c.600 T>G, p.200 Leu>Leu. c.735 C>T, p.245 Ile>Ile. Meanwhile, all mutations were detected in Minxian Black-fur sheep. However, the two nonsynonymous mutation sites were not in all studied breeds (Large-tailed Han, Small-tailed Han, Gansu Alpine Merino, and China Merino breeds, all of which are in white coat. A single haplotype AATGT (haplotype3 was uniquely associated with black coat color in Minxian Black-fur breed (P=9.72E-72, chi-square test. The first and second A alleles in this haplotype 3 represent location at 218 and 361 positions, respectively. Our results suggest that the mutations of MC1R gene are associated with black coat color phenotype in Chinese sheep.

  16. A splicing mutation of the HMGA2 gene is associated with Silver-Russell syndrome phenotype.

    De Crescenzo, Agostina; Citro, Valentina; Freschi, Andrea; Sparago, Angela; Palumbo, Orazio; Cubellis, Maria Vittoria; Carella, Massimo; Castelluccio, Pia; Cavaliere, Maria Luigia; Cerrato, Flavia; Riccio, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by intrauterine and post-natal growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features and body asymmetry. About 50% of the patients carry (epi)genetic alterations involving chromosomes 7 or 11.The high proportion of patients with unidentified molecular etiology suggests the involvement of other genes. Interestingly, SRS patients share clinical features with the 12q14 microdeletion syndrome, characterized by several deletions with a 2.6 Mb region of overlap. Among the genes present in this interval, high mobility AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) appears to be the most likely cause of the growth deficiency, due to its described growth control function. To define the role of HMGA2 in SRS, we looked for 12q14 chromosome imbalances and HMGA2 mutations in a cohort of 45 patients with growth retardation and SRS-like phenotype but no 11p15 (epi)mutations or maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (matUPD7). We identified a novel 7 bp intronic deletion in HMGA2 present in heterozygosity in the proband and her mother both displaying the typical features of SRS. We demonstrated that the deletion affected normal splicing, indicating that it is a likely cause of HMGA2 deficiency. This study provides the first evidence that a loss-of-function mutation of HMGA2 can be associated with a familial form of SRS. We suggest that HMGA2 mutations leading to haploinsufficiency should be investigated in the SRS patients negative for the typical 11p15 (epi)mutations and matUPD7. PMID:25809938

  17. Highly prevalent LIPH founder mutations causing autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis in Japan and the genotype/phenotype correlations.

    Kana Tanahashi

    Full Text Available Mutations in LIPH cause of autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis (ARWH, and the 2 missense mutations c.736T>A (p.Cys246Ser and c.742C>A (p.His248Asn are considered prevalent founder mutations for ARWH in the Japanese population. To reveal genotype/phenotype correlations in ARWH cases in Japan and the haplotypes in 14 Japanese patients from 14 unrelated Japanese families. 13 patients had woolly hair, and 1 patient had complete baldness since birth. An LIPH mutation search revealed homozygous c.736T>A mutations in 10 of the patients. Compound heterozygous c.736T>A and c.742C>A mutations were found in 3 of the patients, and homozygous c.742C>A mutation in 1 patient. The phenotype of mild hypotrichosis with woolly hair was restricted to the patients with the homozygous c.736T>A mutation. The severe phenotype of complete baldness was seen in only 1 patient with homozygous c.742C>A. Haplotype analysis revealed that the alleles containing the LIPH c.736T>A mutation had a haplotype identical to that reported previously, although 4 alleles out of 5 chromosomes containing the LIPH c.742C>A mutation had a different haplotype from the previously reported founder allele. These alleles with c.742C>A are thought to be the third founder LIPH mutation causing ARWH. To accurately determine the prevalence of the founder mutations, we investigated allele frequencies of those mutations in 819 Japanese controls. Heterozygous c.736T>A mutations were found in 13 controls (allele frequency: 0.0079; carrier rate: 0.016, and heterozygous c.742C>A mutations were found in 2 controls (allele frequency: 0.0012; carrier rate: 0.0024. In conclusion, this study confirms the more accurate allele frequencies of the pathogenic founder mutations of LIPH and shows that there is a third founder mutation in Japan. In addition, the present findings suggest that the mutation patterns of LIPH might be associated with hypotrichosis severity in ARWH.

  18. Mutation Breeding and Selection for Phenotypic Mutants in Standard Rice Varieties by Ion Beam

    Full text: Effects of 80 keV ion beam (1016 ion/cm2 on mutations of RD6 and Sanpatong 1 rice varieties were studied in 2006. In order to obtain the phenotypic mutants, each variety was sown in the laboratory and under field conditions at Maejo University in 2007 dry season. Seed germination noticeably declined. For RD6, only 45.1% germinated in the laboratory, and 18.1% were established under the field condition. Similarly, 62.3% of Sanpatong 1 germinated in the laboratory and 31.4% established in the field. No phenotypic mutants were observed in the first generation (M1). The M2 seeds were harvested separately from 3 panicles of each M plant in RD6 and Sanpatong1, totaling 810 and 1,878 lines, respectively. In 2007 rainy season, they were planted on a panicle to row basis. It was found that more phenotypic mutants were observed in the M2 for Sanpatong 1 than for RD6. The mutant characters included dwarf plants, early maturity, male sterility and larger panicle sizes. As a result, about 420 within line selections were collected and the M3 seeds were harvested for further field condition and gene markers evaluations

  19. Genotype-phenotype characteristics and baseline natural history of heritable neuropathies caused by mutations in the MPZ gene.

    Sanmaneechai, Oranee; Feely, Shawna; Scherer, Steven S; Herrmann, David N; Burns, Joshua; Muntoni, Francesco; Li, Jun; Siskind, Carly E; Day, John W; Laura, Matilde; Sumner, Charlotte J; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Rosemary R; Grider, Tiffany; Bacon, Chelsea; Finkel, Richard S; Yum, Sabrina W; Moroni, Isabella; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M; Shy, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to characterize genotype-phenotype correlations and establish baseline clinical data for peripheral neuropathies caused by mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. MPZ mutations are the second leading cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. Recent research makes clinical trials for patients with MPZ mutations a realistic possibility. However, the clinical severity varies with different mutations and natural history data on progression is sparse. We present cross-sectional data to begin to define the phenotypic spectrum and clinical baseline of patients with these mutations. A cohort of patients with MPZ gene mutations was identified in 13 centres of the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium - Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortium (INC-RDCRC) between 2009 and 2012 and at Wayne State University between 1996 and 2009. Patient phenotypes were quantified by the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease paediatric scale outcome instruments. Genetic testing was performed in all patients and/or in first- or second-degree relatives to document mutation in MPZ gene indicating diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B. There were 103 patients from 71 families with 47 different MPZ mutations with a mean age of 40 years (range 3-84 years). Patients and mutations were separated into infantile, childhood and adult-onset groups. The infantile onset group had higher Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and slower nerve conductions than the other groups, and severity increased with age. Twenty-three patients had no family history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Sixty-one patients wore foot/ankle orthoses, 19 required walking assistance or support, and 10 required wheelchairs. There was hearing loss in 21 and scoliosis in 17. Forty-two patients did not begin walking until after 15 months of age. Half of the infantile onset patients then required ambulation aids or wheelchairs for

  20. Delineation of the Marfan phenotype associated with mutations in exons 23-32 of the FBN1 gene

    Putnam, E.A.; Cho, M.; Milewicz, D.M. [Univ. of Texas-Houston Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-29

    Marfan syndrome is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder with a wide range of phenotypic severity. The condition is the result of mutations in FBN1, a large gene composed of 65 exons encoding the fibrillin-1 protein. While mutations causing classic manifestations of Marfan syndrome have been identified throughout the FBN1 gene, the six previously characterized mutations resulting in the severe, perinatal lethal form of Marfan syndrome have clustered in exons 24-32 of the gene. We screened 8 patients with either neonatal Marfan syndrome or severe cardiovascular complications of Marfan syndrome for mutations in this region of the gene. Using intron-based exon-specific primers, we amplified exons 23-32 from genomic DNAs, screened these fragments by single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis, and sequenced indicated exons. This analysis documented mutations in exons 25-27 of the FBN1 mutations in 6 of these patients. These results, taken together with previously published FBN1 mutations in this region, further define the phenotype associated with mutations in exons 24-32 of the FBN1 gene, information important for the development of possible diagnostic tests and genetic counseling. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Neurological phenotype in Waardenburg syndrome type 4 correlates with novel SOX10 truncating mutations and expression in developing brain.

    Touraine, R L; Attié-Bitach, T; Manceau, E; Korsch, E.; Sarda, P; PINGAULT, V.; Encha-Razavi, F; Pelet, A.; Augé, J; Nivelon-Chevallier, A.; Holschneider, A M; Munnes, M; Doerfler, W; Goossens, M.; Munnich, A

    2000-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4), also called Shah-Waardenburg syndrome, is a rare neurocristopathy that results from the absence of melanocytes and intrinsic ganglion cells of the terminal hindgut. WS4 is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait attributable to EDN3 or EDNRB mutations. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant condition when SOX10 mutations are involved. We report on three unrelated WS4 patients with growth retardation and an as-yet-unreported neurological phenotype with im...

  2. Hypo- and hypermorphic FOXC1 mutations in dominant glaucoma: transactivation and phenotypic variability.

    Cristina Medina-Trillo

    Full Text Available Dominant glaucoma, a heterogeneous, infrequent and irreversible optic neuropathy, is often associated with elevated intraocular pressure and early-onset. The role of FOXC1 in this type of glaucoma was investigated in twelve Spanish probands via nucleotide variation screening of its proximal promoter and unique exon. Functional evaluations of the identified variants included analyses of the transcriptional activity, protein stability, DNA binding ability and subcellular localization. Four different mutations that were identified in four probands (33.3% were associated with remarkable phenotypic variability and were functionally classified as either hypermorphic (p.Y47X, p.Q106X and p.G447_G448insDG or hypomorphic (p.I126S alleles. To the best of our knowledge, three of the variants are novel (p.Y47X, p.I126S and p.G447_G448insDG and, in addition, hypermorphic FOXC1 mutations are reported herein for the first time. The presence of an intact N-terminal activation domain in the truncated proteins p.Y47X and p.Q106X may underlie their associated transactivation hyperactivity by a gain-of-function mechanism involving dysregulated protein-protein interactions. Similarly, altered molecular interactions may also lead to increased p.G447_G448insDG activity. In contrast, the partial loss-of-function associated with p.I126S was due to impaired protein stability, DNA binding, protein phosphorylation and subcellular distribution. These results support that moderate and variable FOXC1 transactivation changes are associated with moderate goniodysgenesis, dominant glaucoma and remarkable phenotypic variability.

  3. Molecular and phenotypic characteristics of seven novel mutations causing branched-chain organic acidurias.

    Stojiljkovic, M; Klaassen, K; Djordjevic, M; Sarajlija, A; Brasil, S; Kecman, B; Grkovic, S; Kostic, J; Rodriguez-Pombo, P; Desviat, L R; Pavlovic, S; Perez, B

    2016-09-01

    Specific mitochondrial enzymatic deficiencies in the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids cause methylmalonic aciduria (MMA), propionic acidemia (PA) and maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). Disease-causing mutations were identified in nine unrelated branched-chain organic acidurias (BCOA) patients. We detected eight previously described mutations: p.Asn219Tyr, p.Arg369His p.Val553Glyfs*17 in MUT, p.Thr198Serfs*6 in MMAA, p.Ile144_Leu181del in PCCB, p.Gly288Valfs*11, p.Tyr438Asn in BCKDHA and p.Ala137Val in BCKDHB gene. Interestingly, we identified seven novel genetic variants: p.Leu549Pro, p.Glu564*, p.Leu641Pro in MUT, p.Tyr206Cys in PCCB, p.His194Arg, p.Val298Met in BCKDHA and p.Glu286_Met290del in BCKDHB gene. In silico and/or eukaryotic expression studies confirmed pathogenic effect of all novel genetic variants. Aberrant enzymes p.Leu549Pro MUT, p.Leu641Pro MUT and p.Tyr206Cys PCCB did not show residual activity in activity assays. In addition, activity of MUT enzymes was not rescued in the presence of vitamin B12 precursor in vitro which was in accordance with non-responsiveness or partial responsiveness of patients to vitamin B12 therapy. Our study brings the first molecular genetic data and detailed phenotypic characteristics for MMA, PA and MSUD patients for Serbia and the whole South-Eastern European region. Therefore, our study contributes to the better understanding of molecular landscape of BCOA in Europe and to general knowledge on genotype-phenotype correlation for these rare diseases. PMID:26830710

  4. The Y141C knockin mutation in RDS leads to complex phenotypes in the mouse.

    Stuck, Michael W; Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2014-12-01

    Mutations in the photoreceptor-specific gene peripherin-2 (PRPH-2, also known as retinal degeneration slow/RDS) cause incurable retinal degeneration with a high degree of phenotypic variability. Patient phenotypes range from retinitis pigmentosa to various forms of macular and pattern dystrophy. Macular and pattern dystrophy in particular are associated with complex, poorly understood disease mechanisms, as severe vision loss is often associated both with defects in the photoreceptors, as well as the choroid and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Since there is currently no satisfactory model to study pattern dystrophy disease mechanisms, we generated a knockin mouse model expressing an RDS pattern dystrophy mutation, Y141C. Y141C mice exhibited clinical signs similar to those in patients including late-onset fundus abnormalities characteristic of RPE and choroidal defects and electroretinogram defects. Ultrastructural examination indicated that disc formation was initiated by the Y141C protein, but proper sizing and alignment of discs required wild-type RDS. The biochemical mechanism underlying these abnormalities was tied to defects in the normal process of RDS oligomerization which is required for proper RDS function. Y141C-RDS formed strikingly abnormal disulfide-linked complexes which were localized to the outer segment (OS) where they impaired the formation of proper OS structure. These data support a model of pattern dystrophy wherein a primary molecular defect occurring in all photoreceptors leads to secondary sequellae in adjacent tissues, an outcome which leads to macular vision loss. An understanding of the role of RDS in the interplay between these tissues significantly enhances our understanding of RDS-associated pathobiology and our ability to design rational treatment strategies. PMID:25001182

  5. Nif- phenotype of Azotobacter vinelandii UW97. Characterization and mutational analysis.

    Pulakat, L; Hausman, B S; Lei, S; Gavini, N

    1996-01-26

    We have identified the molecular basis for the nitrogenase negative phenotype exhibited by Azotobacter vinelandii UW97. This strain was initially isolated following nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Recently, it was shown that this strain lacks the Fe protein activity, which results in the synthesis of a FeMo cofactor-deficient apodinitrogenase. Activation of this apodinitrogenase requires the addition of both MgATP and wild-type Fe protein to the crude extracts made by A. vinelandii UW97 (Allen, R.M., Homer, M.J., Chatterjee R., Ludden, P.W., Roberts, G.P., and Shah, V.K. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268 23670-23674). Earlier, we proposed the sequence of events in the MoFe protein assembly based on the biochemical and spectroscopic analysis of the purified apodinitrogenase from A. vinelandii DJ54 (Gavini, N., Ma, L., Watt, G., and Burgess, B.K. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 11842-11849). Taken together, these results imply that the assembly process of apodinitrogenase is arrested at the same step in both of these strains. Since A. vinelandii DJ54 is a delta nifH strain, this strain is not useful in identifying the features of the Fe protein involved in the MoFe protein assembly. Here, we report a systematic analysis of an A. vinelandii UW97 mutant and show that, unlike A. vinelandii DJ54, the nifH gene of A. vinelandii UW97 has no deletion in either coding sequence or the surrounding sequences. The specific mutation responsible for the Nif- phenotype of A. vinelandii UW97 is the substitution of a non-conserved serine at position 44 of the Fe protein by a phenylalanine as shown by DNA sequencing. Furthermore, oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis was employed to confirm that the Nif- phenotype in A. vinelandii UW97 is exclusively due to the substitution of the Fe protein residue serine 44 by phenylalanine. By contrast, replacing Ser-44 with alanine did not affect the Nif phenotype of A. vinelandii. Therefore, it seems that the Nif- phenotype of A. vinelandii UW97 is caused by a

  6. Hereditary Angioedema Due to C1 Inhibitor Deficiency in Serbia: Two Novel Mutations and Evidence of Genotype-Phenotype Association

    Andrejević, Slađana; Korošec, Peter; Šilar, Mira; Košnik, Mitja; Mijanović, Radovan; Bonači-Nikolić, Branka; Rijavec, Matija

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent life-threatening oedemas and/or abdominal pain and caused by mutations affecting the C1 inhibitor gene, SERPING1. We sought to investigate the spectrum of SERPING1 mutations in Serbia and the possible genotype-phenotype association. C1-INH-HAE was diagnosed on the basis of clinical and laboratory criteria in 40 patients from 27 families; four were asymptomatic. Mutational analysis of the SERPING1 gene was performed by sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Disease-causing mutations in SERPING1 were identified in all patients. In C1-INH-HAE type I, we identified 19 different mutations, including 6 missense mutations, 6 nonsense mutations, 2 small deletions, 1 small insertion, 2 splicing defects and 2 large deletions. Two of the mutations (c.300C>T and c.1184_1185insTA) are reported here for the first time. All C1-INH-HAE type II patients from three families harboured the same substitution (c.1396C>T). Based on the type of mutation identified in the SERPING1 gene, patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (nonsense, frameshift, large deletions/insertions, splicing defect, and mutations at Arg444) or group 2 (missense, excluding mutations at Arg444). Significant differences were found in the clinical severity score (P = 0.005), prevalence of laryngeal (P = 0.040) and facial (P = 0.013) oedema, and long-term prophylaxis (P = 0.023) between the groups with different types of mutations. Because our population consisted of related subjects, differences in the severity score between mutation groups were further confirmed using the generalized estimating equation (P = 0.038). Our study identified 20 different disease-causing mutations, including two novel mutations, in all C1-INH-HAE patients, highlighting the heterogeneity of mutations in the SERPING1 gene. Furthermore, it appears that mutations with a clear effect

  7. p.R301X Mutation and Variable Phenotypic Appearance of Fabry Disease.

    Ozelsancak, Ruya; Uyar, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder. Due to deficiency of the enzyme a-galactosidase A, neutral glycosphingolipids (primarily globotriaosylceramide) progressively accumulate within lysosomes of cells in various organ systems, resulting in a multi-system disorder, affecting both men and women. Misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis are common because of the nature of Fabry disease. CASE REPORT We report a case of Fabry disease with a p.R301X (c.901 C>T) mutation in a 39-year-old man who was being treated for chronic sclerosing glomerulonephritis for 2 years. Family screening tests showed that the proband's mother, sister, and daughter had the same mutation with different phenotypes. Levels of α-galactosidase A were low in the proband and his mother and sister. Cornea verticillata and heart involvement were present in multiple family members. Agalsidase alfa treatment was started in patients where indicated. CONCLUSIONS Pedigree analysis is still a powerful, readily available tool to identify individuals at risk for genetic diseases and allows earlier detection and management of disease. PMID:27156739

  8. The phenotype of the musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to CHST14 mutations.

    Janecke, Andreas R; Li, Ben; Boehm, Manfred; Krabichler, Birgit; Rohrbach, Marianne; Müller, Thomas; Fuchs, Irene; Golas, Gretchen; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Ziegler, Shira G; Gahl, William A; Wilnai, Yael; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Geller, Herbert M; Giunta, Cecilia; Slavotinek, Anne; Steinmann, Beat

    2016-01-01

    The musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (MC-EDS) has been recently recognized as a clinical entity. MC-EDS represents a differential diagnosis within the congenital neuromuscular and connective tissue disorders spectrum. Thirty-one and three patients have been reported with MC-EDS so far with bi-allelic mutations identified in CHST14 and DSE, respectively, encoding two enzymes necessary for dermatan sulfate (DS) biosynthesis. We report seven additional patients with MC-EDS from four unrelated families, including the follow-up of a sib-pair originally reported with the kyphoscoliotic type of EDS in 1975. Brachycephaly, a characteristic facial appearance, an asthenic build, hyperextensible and bruisable skin, tapering fingers, instability of large joints, and recurrent formation of large subcutaneous hematomas are always present. Three of seven patients had mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. The oldest patient was blind due to retinal detachment at 45 years and died at 59 years from intracranial bleeding; her affected brother died at 28 years from fulminant endocarditis. All patients in this series harbored homozygous, predicted loss-of-function CHST14 mutations. Indeed, DS was not detectable in fibroblasts from two unrelated patients with homozygous mutations. Patient fibroblasts produced higher amounts of chondroitin sulfate, showed intracellular retention of collagen types I and III, and lacked decorin and thrombospondin fibrils compared with control. A great proportion of collagen fibrils were not integrated into fibers, and fiber bundles were dispersed into the ground substance in one patient, all of which is likely to contribute to the clinical phenotype. This report should increase awareness for MC-EDS. PMID:26373698

  9. Genotype phenotype correlations of cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain mutations in Indian patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy

    Rai, Taranjit Singh; Ahmad, Shamim; Bahl, Ajay; Ahuja, Monica; Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh; Singh, Balvinder; Talwar, K K; Khullar, Madhu

    The aim of the current study was to determine the frequency of mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) in a cohort of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and their families, and to investigate correlations between genotype and phenotype. About 130...... consecutive patients diagnosed with HCM or DCM (69 with HCM and 61 with DCM) attending the cardiology clinic of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research were screened for mutations in the MYH7 gene. The control group for genetic studies consisted of 100 healthy subjects. We report 14...... mutations in 6 probands (5 probands in HCM and 1 proband in DCM) and their family members. Out of these 6 mutations, 3 are new and are being reported for the first time. One known mutation (p.Gly716Arg) was found to be "de novo" which resulted in severe asymmetric septal hypertrophy (31 mm) and resulted in...

  10. Severe congenital neutropenia with neurological impairment due to a homozygous VPS45 p.E238K mutation: A case report suggesting a genotype-phenotype correlation.

    Meerschaut, Ilse; Bordon, Victoria; Dhooge, Catharina; Delbeke, Patricia; Vanlander, Arnaud V; Simon, Amos; Klein, Christoph; Kooy, R Frank; Somech, Raz; Callewaert, Bert

    2015-12-01

    VPS45 mutations cause severe congenital neutropenia (SCN). We report on a girl with SCN and neurological impairment harboring a homozygous p.E238K mutation in VPS45 (vacuolar sorting protein 45). She successfully underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Our findings delineate the phenotype and indicate a possible genotype-phenotype correlation for neurological involvement. PMID:26358756

  11. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia: a complex phenotype associated with a new SPG4 gene mutation

    Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Johnson, B; Koefoed, Pernille;

    2004-01-01

    identified in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the...... significantly relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations......Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...

  12. An atypical Dent's disease phenotype caused by co-inheritance of mutations at CLCN5 and OCRL genes.

    Addis, Maria; Meloni, Cristiana; Tosetto, Enrica; Ceol, Monica; Cristofaro, Rosalba; Melis, Maria Antonietta; Vercelloni, Paolo; Del Prete, Dorella; Marra, Giuseppina; Anglani, Franca

    2013-06-01

    Dent's disease is an X-linked renal tubulopathy caused by mutations mainly affecting the CLCN5 gene. Defects in the OCRL gene, which is usually mutated in patients with Lowe syndrome, have been shown to lead to a Dent-like phenotype called Dent disease 2. However, about 20% of patients with Dent's disease carry no CLCN5/OCRL mutations. The disease's genetic heterogeneity is accompanied by interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity. We report on a case of Dent's disease with a very unusual phenotype (dysmorphic features, ocular abnormalities, growth delay, rickets, mild mental retardation) in which a digenic inheritance was discovered. Two different, novel disease-causing mutations were detected, both inherited from the patient's healthy mother, that is a truncating mutation in the CLCN5 gene (A249fs*20) and a donor splice-site alteration in the OCRL gene (c.388+3A>G). The mRNA analysis of the patient's leukocytes revealed an aberrantly spliced OCRL mRNA caused by in-frame exon 6 skipping, leading to a shorter protein, but keeping intact the central inositol 5-phosphatase domain and the C-terminal side of the ASH-RhoGAP domain. Only wild-type mRNA was observed in the mother's leukocytes due to a completely skewed X inactivation. Our results are the first to reveal the effect of an epistatic second modifier in Dent's disease too, which can modulate its expressivity. We surmise that the severe Dent disease 2 phenotype of our patient might be due to an addictive interaction of the mutations at two different genes. PMID:23047739

  13. Mice with missense and nonsense NF1 mutations display divergent phenotypes compared with human neurofibromatosis type I

    Kairong Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 is a common genetic disorder characterized by the occurrence of nerve sheath tumors and considerable clinical heterogeneity. Some translational studies have been limited by the lack of animal models available for assessing patient-specific mutations. In order to test therapeutic approaches that might restore function to the mutated gene or gene product, we developed mice harboring NF1 patient-specific mutations including a nonsense mutation (c.2041C>T; p.Arg681* and a missense mutation (c.2542G>C; p.Gly848Arg. The latter is associated with the development of multiple plexiform neurofibromas along spinal nerve roots. We demonstrate that the human nonsense NF1Arg681* and missense NF1Gly848Arg mutations have different effects on neurofibromin expression in the mouse and each recapitulates unique aspects of the NF1 phenotype, depending upon the genetic context when assessed in the homozygous state or when paired with a conditional knockout allele. Whereas the missense Nf1Gly848Arg mutation fails to produce an overt phenotype in the mouse, animals homozygous for the nonsense Nf1Arg681* mutation are not viable. Mice with one Nf1Arg681* allele in combination with a conditional floxed Nf1 allele and the DhhCre transgene (Nf14F/Arg681*; DhhCre display disorganized nonmyelinating axons and neurofibromas along the spinal column, which leads to compression of the spinal cord and paralysis. This model will be valuable for preclinical testing of novel nonsense suppression therapies using drugs to target in-frame point mutations that create premature termination codons in individuals with NF1.

  14. Different mutations at V363 MAPT codon are associated with atypical clinical phenotypes and show unusual structural and functional features.

    Rossi, Giacomina; Bastone, Antonio; Piccoli, Elena; Morbin, Michela; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Beeg, Marten; Del Favero, Elena; Cantù, Laura; Motta, Simona; Salsano, Ettore; Pareyson, Davide; Erbetta, Alessandra; Elia, Antonio Emanuele; Del Sorbo, Francesca; Silani, Vincenzo; Morelli, Claudia; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2014-02-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) is one of the major genes linked to frontotemporal lobar degeneration, a group of neurodegenerative diseases clinically, pathologically, and genetically heterogeneous. In particular, MAPT mutations give rise to the subgroup of tauopathies. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the MAPT mutations so far described are the decreased ability of tau protein to promote microtubule polymerization (missense mutations) or the altered ratio of tau isoforms (splicing mutations), both leading to accumulation of hyperphosphorylated filamentous tau protein. Following a genetic screening of patients affected by frontotemporal lobar degeneration, we identified 2 MAPT mutations, V363I and V363A, leading to atypical clinical phenotypes, such as posterior cortical atrophy. We investigated in vitro features of the recombinant mutated tau isoforms and revealed unusual functional and structural characteristics such as an increased ability to promote microtubule polymerization and a tendency to form oligomeric instead of filamentous aggregates. Thus, we disclosed a greater than expected complexity of abnormal features of mutated tau isoforms. Overall our findings suggest a high probability that these mutations are pathogenic. PMID:24018212

  15. A new family with an SLC9A6 mutation expanding the phenotypic spectrum of Christianson syndrome.

    Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Piton, Amélie; Chancenotte, Sophie; Redin, Claire; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Henrenger, Yvan; Minot, Delphine; Creppy, Audrey; Ruffier-Bourdet, Marie; Thevenon, Julien; Kuentz, Paul; Lehalle, Daphné; Curie, Aurore; Blanchard, Gaelle; Ghosn, Ezzat; Bonnet, Marlene; Archimbaud-Devilliers, Mélanie; Huet, Frédéric; Perret, Odile; Philip, Nicole; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Faivre, Laurence

    2016-08-01

    Using targeted next generation sequencing, we have identified a splicing mutation (c.526-9_526-5del) in the SLC9A6 gene in a 9-year-old boy with mild intellectual disability (ID), microcephaly, and social interaction disabilities. This intronic microdeletion leads to the skipping of exon 3 and to an in-frame deletion of 26 amino acids in the TM4 domain. It segregates with cognitive impairment or learning difficulties in other members of the family. Mutations in SLC9A6 have been reported in X-linked Christianson syndrome associating severe to profound intellectual deficiency and an Angelman-like phenotype with microcephaly, absent speech, ataxia with progressive cerebellar atrophy, ophthalmoplegia, epilepsy, and neurological regression. The proband and his maternal uncle both have an attenuated phenotype with mild ID, attention deficit disorder, speech difficulties, and mild asymptomatic cerebellar atrophy. The proband also have microcephaly. The mutation cosegregated with learning disabilities and speech difficulties in the female carriers (mother and three sisters of the proband). Detailed neuropsychological, speech, and occupational therapy investigations in the female carriers revealed impaired oral and written language acquisition, with dissociation between verbal and performance IQ. An abnormal phenotype, ranging from learning disability with predominant speech difficulties to mild intellectual deficiency, has been described previously in a large proportion of female carriers. Besides broadening the clinical spectrum of SLC9A6 gene mutations, we present an example of a monogenic origin of mild learning disability. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27256868

  16. Mutation screen reveals novel variants and expands the phenotypes associated with DYNC1H1.

    Strickland, Alleene V; Schabhüttl, Maria; Offenbacher, Hans; Synofzik, Matthis; Hauser, Natalie S; Brunner-Krainz, Michaela; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Moore, Steven A; Windhager, Reinhard; Bender, Benjamin; Harms, Matthew; Klebe, Stephan; Young, Peter; Kennerson, Marina; Garcia, Avencia Sanchez Mejias; Gonzalez, Michael A; Züchner, Stephan; Schule, Rebecca; Shy, Michael E; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2015-09-01

    Dynein, cytoplasmic 1, heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1) encodes a necessary subunit of the cytoplasmic dynein complex, which traffics cargo along microtubules. Dominant DYNC1H1 mutations are implicated in neural diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity dominance (SMA-LED), intellectual disability with neuronal migration defects, malformations of cortical development, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 2O. We hypothesized that additional variants could be found in these and novel motoneuron and related diseases. Therefore, we analyzed our database of 1024 whole exome sequencing samples of motoneuron and related diseases for novel single nucleotide variations. We filtered these results for significant variants, which were further screened using segregation analysis in available family members. Analysis revealed six novel, rare, and highly conserved variants. Three of these are likely pathogenic and encompass a broad phenotypic spectrum with distinct disease clusters. Our findings suggest that DYNC1H1 variants can cause not only lower, but also upper motor neuron disease. It thus adds DYNC1H1 to the growing list of spastic paraplegia related genes in microtubule-dependent motor protein pathways. PMID:26100331

  17. A unique mutation in a MYB gene cosegregates with the nectarine phenotype in peach.

    Vendramin, Elisa; Pea, Giorgio; Dondini, Luca; Pacheco, Igor; Dettori, Maria Teresa; Gazza, Laura; Scalabrin, Simone; Strozzi, Francesco; Tartarini, Stefano; Bassi, Daniele; Verde, Ignazio; Rossini, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Nectarines play a key role in peach industry; the fuzzless skin has implications for consumer acceptance. The peach/nectarine (G/g) trait was described as monogenic and previously mapped on chromosome 5. Here, the position of the G locus was delimited within a 1.1 cM interval (635 kb) based on linkage analysis of an F2 progeny from the cross 'Contender' (C, peach) x 'Ambra' (A, nectarine). Careful inspection of the genes annotated in the corresponding genomic sequence (Peach v1.0), coupled with variant discovery, led to the identification of MYB gene PpeMYB25 as a candidate for trichome formation on fruit skin. Analysis of genomic re-sequencing data from five peach/nectarine accessions pointed to the insertion of a LTR retroelement in exon 3 of the PpeMYB25 gene as the cause of the recessive glabrous phenotype. A functional marker (indelG) developed on the LTR insertion cosegregated with the trait in the CxA F2 progeny and was validated on a broad panel of genotypes, including all known putative donors of the nectarine trait. This marker was shown to efficiently discriminate between peach and nectarine plants, indicating that a unique mutational event gave rise to the nectarine trait and providing a useful diagnostic tool for early seedling selection in peach breeding programs. PMID:24595269

  18. Clinical variability and novel mutations in the NHEJ1 gene in patients with a Nijmegen breakage syndrome-like phenotype.

    Dutrannoy, Véronique; Demuth, Ilja; Baumann, Ulrich; Schindler, Detlev; Konrat, Kateryna; Neitzel, Heidemarie; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Radszewski, Janina; Rothe, Susanne; Schellenberger, Mario T; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Teik, Keng Wee; Nallusamy, Revathy; Reis, André; Sperling, Karl; Digweed, Martin; Varon, Raymonda

    2010-09-01

    We have previously shown that mutations in the genes encoding DNA Ligase IV (LIGIV) and RAD50, involved in DNA repair by nonhomologous-end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination, respectively, lead to clinical and cellular features similar to those of Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS). Very recently, a new member of the NHEJ repair pathway, NHEJ1, was discovered, and mutations in patients with features resembling NBS were described. Here we report on five patients from four families of different ethnic origin with the NBS-like phenotype. Sequence analysis of the NHEJ1 gene in a patient of Spanish and in a patient of Turkish origin identified homozygous, previously reported mutations, c.168C>G (p.Arg57Gly) and c.532C>T (p.Arg178Ter), respectively. Two novel, paternally inherited truncating mutations, c.495dupA (p.Asp166ArgfsTer20) and c.526C>T (p.Arg176Ter) and two novel, maternal genomic deletions of 1.9 and 6.9 kb of the NHEJ1 gene, were found in a compound heterozygous state in two siblings of German origin and in one Malaysian patient, respectively. Our findings confirm that patients with NBS-like phenotypes may have mutations in the NHEJ1 gene including multiexon deletions, and show that considerable clinical variability could be observed even within the same family. PMID:20597108

  19. Long-term bezafibrate treatment improves skin and spleen phenotypes of the mtDNA mutator mouse.

    Lloye M Dillon

    Full Text Available Pharmacological agents, such as bezafibrate, that activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs and PPAR γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α pathways have been shown to improve mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutator mouse is a mouse model of aging that harbors a proofreading-deficient mtDNA polymerase γ. These mice develop many features of premature aging including hair loss, anemia, osteoporosis, sarcopenia and decreased lifespan. They also have increased mtDNA mutations and marked mitochondrial dysfunction. We found that mutator mice treated with bezafibrate for 8-months had delayed hair loss and improved skin and spleen aging-like phenotypes. Although we observed an increase in markers of fatty acid oxidation in these tissues, we did not detect a generalized increase in mitochondrial markers. On the other hand, there were no improvements in muscle function or lifespan of the mutator mouse, which we attributed to the rodent-specific hepatomegaly associated with fibrate treatment. These results showed that despite its secondary effects in rodent's liver, bezafibrate was able to improve some of the aging phenotypes in the mutator mouse. Because the associated hepatomegaly is not observed in primates, long-term bezafibrate treatment in humans could have beneficial effects on tissues undergoing chronic bioenergetic-related degeneration.

  20. Broadening of cohesinopathies: exome sequencing identifies mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with Cornelia de Lange-overlapping phenotype.

    Parenti, I; Gervasini, C; Pozojevic, J; Graul-Neumann, L; Azzollini, J; Braunholz, D; Watrin, E; Wendt, K S; Cereda, A; Cittaro, D; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; Lazarevic, D; Mariani, M; Russo, S; Werner, R; Krawitz, P; Larizza, L; Selicorni, A; Kaiser, F J

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and KBG syndrome are two distinct developmental pathologies sharing common features such as intellectual disability, psychomotor delay, and some craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Mutations in one of the five genes NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, HDAC8 or RAD21, were identified in at least 70% of the patients with CdLS. Consequently, additional causative genes, either unknown or responsible of partially merging entities, possibly account for the remaining 30% of the patients. In contrast, KBG has only been associated with mutations in ANKRD11. By exome sequencing we could identify heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with the clinical diagnosis of CdLS. Both patients show features reminiscent of CdLS such as characteristic facies as well as a small head circumference which is not described for KBG syndrome. Patient A, who carries the mutation in a mosaic state, is a 4-year-old girl with features reminiscent of CdLS. Patient B, a 15-year-old boy, shows a complex phenotype which resembled CdLS during infancy, but has developed to a more KBG overlapping phenotype during childhood. These findings point out the importance of screening ANKRD11 in young CdLS patients who were found to be negative for mutations in the five known CdLS genes. PMID:25652421

  1. Mutation screening of familial Mediterranean fever in the Azeri Turkish population: Genotype-phenotype correlation and the clinical profile variability

    Gharesouran Jalal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean fever is known as a most frequent hereditary autoin-Xammatory among the autoinflammatory syndromes characterized by fever, arthritis and serosal inflammation. Clinically, the foremost severe symptom of the disease is amyloidosis, which may cause to renal failure. MEFV renal failure consists of ten exons and conservative mutations clustered in exon ten (M694V, V726A, M680I, M694I and exon two (E148Q are considered more common mutations within this coding region and that they are detected with a distinct frequency changes in line with ethnicity. The aim of this study was to research the spectrum of mutations in Azeri Turkish population. We evaluated the molecular test results of 82 patients and their parents from eighty families identified as having FMF clinical symptoms referred to Molecular Genetics Laboratory of the Department of Medical Genetics. Patients were referred by their physicians for MEFV mutation detection. The most frequent mutations were M694V respectively followed by M680I (G/C, V726A, M694I and E148Q mutations. A phenotypic variability was also ascertained between patients with different mutations and it must be considered within the daily management of FMF patients.

  2. Alzheimer disease-like clinical phenotype in a family with FTDP-17 caused by a MAPT R406W mutation

    Lindquist, S.G.; Holm, I.E.; Schwartz, M.;

    2008-01-01

    We report clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological features of a Danish family with autosomal dominant inherited dementia, a clinical phenotype resembling Alzheimer's disease and a pathogenic mutation (R406W) in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. Pre-symptomatic and...... hippocampi. Microscopy revealed abundant numbers of tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles in all cortical areas and in some brainstem nuclei corresponding to a diagnosis of frontotemporal lobe degeneration on the basis of a MAPT mutation. The clinical and genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant inherited...

  3. Reciprocal mouse and human limb phenotypes caused by gain- and loss-of-function mutations affecting Lmbr1.

    Clark, R.M.; Marker, P. C.; Roessler, E.; Dutra, A.; Schimenti, J C; Muenke, M; Kingsley, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The major locus for dominant preaxial polydactyly in humans has been mapped to 7q36. In mice the dominant Hemimelic extra toes (Hx) and Hammertoe (Hm) mutations map to a homologous chromosomal region and cause similar limb defects. The Lmbr1 gene is entirely within the small critical intervals recently defined for both the mouse and human mutations and is misexpressed at the exact time that the mouse Hx phenotype becomes apparent during limb development. This result suggests that Lmbr1 may un...

  4. Phenotypic Characterization of the Komeda Miniature Rat Ishikawa, an Animal Model of Dwarfism Caused by a Mutation in Prkg2

    Tsuchida, Atsuko; Yokoi, Norihide; Namae, Misako; Fuse, Masanori; Masuyama, Taku; Sasaki, Masashi; Kawazu, Shoji; Komeda, Kajuro

    2008-01-01

    The Komeda miniature rat Ishikawa (KMI) is a spontaneous animal model of dwarfism caused by a mutation in Prkg2, which encodes cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II (cGKII). This strain has been maintained as a segregating inbred strain for the mutated allele mri. In this study, we characterized the phenotype of the KMI strain, particularly growth traits, craniofacial measurements, and organ weights. The homozygous mutant (mri/mri) animals were approximately 70% to 80% of the size of normal, ...

  5. HFE gene mutation (C282Y) and phenotypic expression among a hospitalised population in a high prevalence area of haemochromatosis

    DISTANTE, S; Berg, J.; Lande, K.; Haug, E.; Bell, H.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Previous studies have shown that up to 0.5% of the Caucasian population is homozygous for the HFE gene C282Y mutation. High prevalence values have been reported in Northern Europe. To what extent the presence of this mutation is associated with overt clinical haemochromatosis is unclear.
AIM—To determine the prevalence of the C282Y allele in a hospitalised population of an acute medical department, and study the phenotypic expression in the homozygotes.
METHODS—Blood samples were o...

  6. Variable clinical expression in patients with a germline MEN1 disease gene mutation: clues to a genotype-phenotype correlation

    Cornelis J. Lips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is an inherited endocrine tumor syndrome, predominantly characterized by tumors of the parathyroid glands, gastroenteropancreatic tumors, pituitary adenomas, adrenal adenomas, and neuroendocrine tumors of the thymus, lungs or stomach. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is caused by germline mutations of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 tumor suppressor gene. The initial germline mutation, loss of the wild-type allele, and modifying genetic and possibly epigenetic and environmental events eventually result in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 tumors. Our understanding of the function of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 gene product, menin, has increased significantly over the years. However, to date, no clear genotype-phenotype correlation has been established. In this review we discuss reports on exceptional clinical presentations of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, which may provide more insight into the pathogenesis of this disorder and offer clues for a possible genotype-phenotype correlation.

  7. Spontaneous phenotypic suppression of GacA-defective Vibrio fischeri is achieved via mutation of csrA and ihfA

    Foxall, Randi L.; Ballok, Alicia E.; Avitabile, Ashley; Whistler, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Symbiosis defective GacA-mutant derivatives of Vibrio fischeri are growth impaired thereby creating a selective advantage for growth-enhanced spontaneous suppressors. Suppressors were isolated and characterized for effects of the mutations on gacA-mutant defects of growth, siderophore activity and luminescence. The mutations were identified by targeted and whole genome sequencing. Results: Most mutations that restored multiple phenotypes were non-null mutations that mapped to cons...

  8. MYH9-related disease: Five novel mutations expanding the spectrum of causative mutations and confirming genotype/phenotype correlations

    De Rocco, Daniela; Zieger, Barbara; Platokouki, Helen; Heller, Paula G.; Pastore, Annalisa; Bottega, Roberta; Noris, Patrizia; Barozzi, Serena; Glembotsky, Ana C.; Pergantou, Helen; Balduini, Carlo L.; Savoia, Anna; Pecci, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is a rare autosomal dominant syndromic disorder caused by mutations in MYH9, the gene encoding for the heavy chain of non-muscle myosin IIA (myosin-9). MYH9-RD is characterized by congenital macrothrombocytopenia and typical inclusion bodies in neutrophils associated with a variable risk of developing sensorineural deafness, presenile cataract, and/or progressive nephropathy. The spectrum of mutations responsible for MYH9-RD is limited. We report five families, ...

  9. Exome Sequencing Reveals De Novo WDR45 Mutations Causing a Phenotypically Distinct, X-Linked Dominant Form of NBIA

    Haack, Tobias B.; Hogarth, Penelope; Kruer, Michael C.; Gregory, Allison; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Sanford, Lynn; Meyer, Esther; Kara, Eleanna; Cuno, Stephan M.; Harik, Sami I.; Dandu, Vasuki H.; Nardocci, Nardo; Zorzi, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by abnormal iron deposition in the basal ganglia. We report that de novo mutations in WDR45, a gene located at Xp11.23 and encoding a beta-propeller scaffold protein with a putative role in autophagy, cause a distinctive NBIA phenotype. The clinical features include early-onset global developmental delay and further neurological deterioration (parkinsonism, dystonia, and dementia developing by ...

  10. On the traces of XPD: cell cycle matters - untangling the genotype-phenotype relationship of XPD mutations

    Cameroni Elisabetta; Stettler Karin; Suter Beat

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in the human gene coding for XPD lead to segmental progeria - the premature appearance of some of the phenotypes normally associated with aging - which may or may not be accompanied by increased cancer incidence. XPD is required for at least three different critical cellular functions: in addition to participating in the process of nucleotide excision repair (NER), which removes bulky DNA lesions, XPD also regulates transcription as part of the general transcription factor ...

  11. Phenotypic variations in a family with retinal dystrophy as result of different mutations in the ABCR gene

    Klevering, B; van Driel, M.; van de Pol, D. J R; Pinckers, A; Cremers, F; Hoyng, C.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To describe two phenotypic variations of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy occurring in a consanguineous family in a pseudodominant pattern, resulting from mutations in the ATP binding cassette transporter (ABCR) gene.
METHODS—Patients of this family underwent an extensive ophthalmic evaluation, including fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and electroretinography (ERG). Genetic analysis comprised sequence analysis of the retina specific ABCR gene.
RESULTS—Five patients pres...

  12. A cytoplasmically transmissible hypovirulence phenotype associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations in the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica.

    Monteiro-Vitorello, C B; Bell, J. A.; Fulbright, D W; Bertrand, H

    1995-01-01

    Mutations causing mitochondrial defects were induced in a virulent strain of the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica (Murr.) Barr. Virulence on apples and chestnut trees was reduced in four of six extensively characterized mutants. Relative to the virulent progenitor, the attenuated mutants had reduced growth rates, abnormal colony morphologies, and few asexual spores, and they resembled virus-infected strains. The respiratory defects and attenuated virulence phenotypes (hypovirul...

  13. Behavioral phenotypic properties of a natural occurring rat model of congenital stationary night blindness with Cacna1f mutation.

    An, Jing; Wang, Li; Guo, Qun; Li, Li; Xia, Feng; Zhang, Zuoming

    2012-09-01

    Cacna1f gene mutation could lead to incomplete congenital stationary night blindness (iCSNB) disease. The CSNB-like phenotype rat is a spontaneous rat model caused by Cacna1f gene mutation. The present study explored the phenotypic properties of behavior performance in CSNB rats further. The vision-related behaviors of CSNB rats were assessed with a Morris water maze (MWM), passive avoidance tests, and open-field test. Motor ability was evaluated with a rotarod test and a wire hang test, and mechanical pain and thermalgia were used to evaluate sensory system function. Electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded to evaluate the function of the retina. The vision-related results showed that longer latencies of escape and reduced probe trial in MWM for CSNB rats. There were more errors in avoidance test; CSNB rats were more active in the open field and presented a different pattern of exploration. The locomotor-related behaviors showed shorter falling latencies in the rotarod test and shorter gripping time in CSNB rats. And mechanical thresholds of pain increased in CSNB rats. The ERGs indicated that both the amplitude and latency of rod and cone systems were impaired in the CSNB rats. In summary, Cacna1f gene mutation changed the performance of various behaviors in the CSNB rat aside from vision-related phenotype. Cacna1f gene might play a role in a wide range of responses in the organism. These results confirm the importance of a comprehensive profile for understanding the behavior phenotype of Cacna1f gene mutation in CSNB rat. PMID:22800190

  14. The expanding phenotypic spectrum of female SLC9A6 mutation carriers: a case series and review of the literature.

    Sinajon, Pierre; Verbaan, Deborah; So, Joyce

    2016-08-01

    Christianson syndrome (OMIM 300243), caused by mutations in the X-linked SLC9A6 gene, is characterized by severe global developmental delay and intellectual disability, developmental regression, epilepsy, microcephaly and impaired ocular movements. It shares many common features with Angelman syndrome. Carrier females have been described as having learning difficulties with mild to moderate intellectual disability, behavioural issues and psychiatric illnesses. There is little literature on the carrier female phenotype of Christianson syndrome. We describe a large extended family with three affected males, four carrier females, one presumed carrier female and one obligate carrier female with a c.190G>T, p.E64X mutation known to cause a premature stop codon in SLC9A6. We characterize and expand the clinical phenotype of female SLC9A6 mutation carriers by comparing our described family with female carriers previously discussed in the literature. In particular, we highlight the neurodevelopmental and psychiatric phenotypes observed in our family and previous reports. PMID:27142213

  15. The Ames dwarf mutation attenuates Alzheimer's disease phenotype of APP/PS1 mice.

    Puig, Kendra L; Kulas, Joshua A; Franklin, Whitney; Rakoczy, Sharlene G; Taglialatela, Giulio; Brown-Borg, Holly M; Combs, Colin K

    2016-04-01

    APP/PS1 double transgenic mice expressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) demonstrate robust brain amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide containing plaque deposition, increased markers of oxidative stress, behavioral dysfunction, and proinflammatory gliosis. On the other hand, lack of growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone due to a recessive mutation in the Prop 1 gene (Prop1df) in Ames dwarf mice results in a phenotype characterized by potentiated antioxidant mechanisms, improved learning and memory, and significantly increased longevity in homozygous mice. Based on this, we hypothesized that a similar hormone deficiency might attenuate disease changes in the brains of APP/PS1 mice. To test this idea, APP/PS1 mice were crossed to the Ames dwarf mouse line. APP/PS1, wild-type, df/+, df/df, df/+/APP/PS1, and df/df/APP/PS1 mice were compared at 6 months of age through behavioral testing and assessing amyloid burden, reactive gliosis, and brain cytokine levels. df/df mice demonstrated lower brain growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations. This correlated with decreased astrogliosis and microgliosis in the df/df/APP/PS1 mice and, surprisingly, reduced Aβ plaque deposition and Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 concentrations. The df/df/APP/PS1 mice also demonstrated significantly elevated brain levels of multiple cytokines in spite of the attenuated gliosis. These data indicate that the df/df/APP/PS1 line is a unique resource in which to study aging and resistance to disease and suggest that the affected pituitary hormones may have a role in regulating disease progression. PMID:26973101

  16. Biallelic Mutations in TMEM126B Cause Severe Complex I Deficiency with a Variable Clinical Phenotype.

    Alston, Charlotte L; Compton, Alison G; Formosa, Luke E; Strecker, Valentina; Oláhová, Monika; Haack, Tobias B; Smet, Joél; Stouffs, Katrien; Diakumis, Peter; Ciara, Elżbieta; Cassiman, David; Romain, Nadine; Yarham, John W; He, Langping; De Paepe, Boel; Vanlander, Arnaud V; Seneca, Sara; Feichtinger, René G; Płoski, Rafal; Rokicki, Dariusz; Pronicka, Ewa; Haller, Ronald G; Van Hove, Johan L K; Bahlo, Melanie; Mayr, Johannes A; Van Coster, Rudy; Prokisch, Holger; Wittig, Ilka; Ryan, Michael T; Thorburn, David R; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most common biochemical phenotype observed in individuals with mitochondrial disease. With 44 structural subunits and over 10 assembly factors, it is unsurprising that complex I deficiency is associated with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies including custom, targeted gene panels or unbiased whole-exome sequencing (WES) are hugely powerful in identifying the underlying genetic defect in a clinical diagnostic setting, yet many individuals remain without a genetic diagnosis. These individuals might harbor mutations in poorly understood or uncharacterized genes, and their diagnosis relies upon characterization of these orphan genes. Complexome profiling recently identified TMEM126B as a component of the mitochondrial complex I assembly complex alongside proteins ACAD9, ECSIT, NDUFAF1, and TIMMDC1. Here, we describe the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in six cases of mitochondrial disease from four unrelated families affected by biallelic (c.635G>T [p.Gly212Val] and/or c.401delA [p.Asn134Ilefs(∗)2]) TMEM126B variants. We provide functional evidence to support the pathogenicity of these TMEM126B variants, including evidence of founder effects for both variants, and establish defects within this gene as a cause of complex I deficiency in association with either pure myopathy in adulthood or, in one individual, a severe multisystem presentation (chronic renal failure and cardiomyopathy) in infancy. Functional experimentation including viral rescue and complexome profiling of subject cell lines has confirmed TMEM126B as the tenth complex I assembly factor associated with human disease and validates the importance of both genome-wide sequencing and proteomic approaches in characterizing disease-associated genes whose physiological roles have been previously undetermined. PMID:27374774

  17. Report of a patient with a constitutional missense mutation in SMARCB1, Coffin-Siris phenotype, and schwannomatosis.

    Gossai, Nathan; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Messiaen, Ludwine; Berry, Susan A; Moertel, Christopher L

    2015-12-01

    We report a patient with a constitutional missense mutation in SMARCB1, Coffin-Siris Syndrome (CSS), and schwannomatosis. CSS is a rare congenital syndrome with characteristic clinical findings. This thirty-three-year-old man was diagnosed early in life with the constellation of moderate intellectual disability, hypotonia, mild microcephaly, coarse facies, wide mouth with full lips, hypoplasia of the digits, and general hirsutism. At age 26, he was found to have schwannomatosis after presenting with acute spinal cord compression. Blood and tissue analysis of multiple subsequent schwannoma resections revealed a germline missense mutation of SMARCB1, acquired loss of 22q including SMARCB1 and NF2 and mutation of the remaining NF2 wild-type allele-thus completing the four-hit, three-event mechanism associated with schwannomatosis. Variations in five genes have been associated with the Coffin-Siris phenotype: ARID1A, ARID1B, SMARCA4, SMARCB1, and SMARCE1. Of these genes, SMARCB1 has a well-established association with schwannomatosis and malignancy. This is the first report of a patient with a constitutional missense mutation of SMARCB1 resulting in CSS and subsequent development of schwannomatosis. This finding demonstrates that a SMARCB1 mutation may be the initial "hit" (constitutional) for a genetic disorder with subsequent risk of developing schwannomas and other malignancies, and raises the possibility that other patients with switch/sucrose non-fermenting (SWI/SNF) mutations may be at increased risk for tumors. PMID:26364901

  18. A mutation in the {beta}-myosin rod associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has an unexpected molecular phenotype

    Armel, Thomas Z. [Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Leinwand, Leslie A., E-mail: leslie.leinwand@colorado.edu [Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common, autosomal dominant disorder primarily characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in youth. HCM is caused by mutations in several sarcomeric proteins, with mutations in MYH7, encoding {beta}-MyHC, being the most common. While many mutations in the globular head region of the protein have been reported and studied, analysis of HCM-causing mutations in the {beta}-MyHC rod domain has not yet been reported. To address this question, we performed an array of biochemical and biophysical assays to determine how the HCM-causing E1356K mutation affects the structure, stability, and function of the {beta}-MyHC rod. Surprisingly, the E1356K mutation appears to thermodynamically destabilize the protein, rather than alter the charge profile know to be essential for muscle filament assembly. This thermodynamic instability appears to be responsible for the decreased ability of the protein to form filaments and may be responsible for the HCM phenotype seen in patients.

  19. Craniosynostosis and Noonan syndrome with KRAS mutations: Expanding the phenotype with a case report and review of the literature.

    Addissie, Yonit A; Kotecha, Udhaya; Hart, Rachel A; Martinez, Ariel F; Kruszka, Paul; Muenke, Maximilian

    2015-11-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome caused by germline mutations in genes coding for components of the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (RAS-MAPK) pathway. Features include short stature, characteristic facies, congenital heart anomalies, and developmental delay. While there is considerable clinical heterogeneity in NS, craniosynostosis is not a common feature of the condition. Here, we report on a 2 month-old girl with Noonan syndrome associated with a de novo mutation in KRAS (p.P34Q) and premature closure of the sagittal suture. We provide a review of the literature of germline KRAS mutations and find that approximately 10% of published cases have craniosynostosis. Our findings expand on the NS phenotype and suggest that germline mutations in the KRAS gene are causally involved in craniosynostosis, supporting the role of the RAS-MAPK pathway as a mediator of aberrant bone growth in cranial sutures. The inclusion of craniosynostosis as a possible phenotype in KRAS-associated Noonan Syndrome has implications in the differential diagnosis and surgical management of individuals with craniosynostosis. PMID:26249544

  20. A novel type II collagen gene mutation in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and extensive intrafamilial phenotypic diversity

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sakamoto, Yuma; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by a novel type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation and the family’s phenotypic diversity. Clinical and radiographic examinations of skeletal dysplasia were conducted on seven affected family members across two generations. The entire coding region of COL2A1, including the flanking intron regions, was analyzed with PCR and direct sequencing. The stature of the subjects ranged from extremely short to within normal height range. Hip deformity and advanced osteoarthritis were noted in all the subjects, ranging from severe coxa plana to mild acetabular dysplasia. Atlantoaxial subluxation combined with a hypoplastic odontoid process was found in three of the subjects. Various degrees of platyspondyly were confirmed in all subjects. Genetically, a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala) was identified in all the affected family members; however, it was not present in the one unaffected family member tested. We described a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala). Phenotypes were diverse even among individuals with the same mutation and within the same family. PMID:27274858

  1. Systems-Level Response to Point Mutations in a Core Metabolic Enzyme Modulates Genotype-Phenotype Relationship

    Shimon Bershtein

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Linking the molecular effects of mutations to fitness is central to understanding evolutionary dynamics. Here, we establish a quantitative relation between the global effect of mutations on the E. coli proteome and bacterial fitness. We created E. coli strains with specific destabilizing mutations in the chromosomal folA gene encoding dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR and quantified the ensuing changes in the abundances of 2,000+ E. coli proteins in mutant strains using tandem mass tags with subsequent LC-MS/MS. mRNA abundances in the same E. coli strains were also quantified. The proteomic effects of mutations in DHFR are quantitatively linked to phenotype: the SDs of the distributions of logarithms of relative (to WT protein abundances anticorrelate with bacterial growth rates. Proteomes hierarchically cluster first by media conditions, and within each condition, by the severity of the perturbation to DHFR function. These results highlight the importance of a systems-level layer in the genotype-phenotype relationship.

  2. Two Siblings With a CDKL5 Mutation: Genotype and Phenotype Evaluation

    Hagebeuk, E.E.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Alders, M.; Kaspers, A.; Weerd, A.W. de

    2015-01-01

    This is the second report of a family with a recurrence of a CDKL5 mutation (c. 283-3_290del) in 2 sisters. Both parents tested negative for the mutation in all tissues, but germline mosaicism is likely. Clinically CDKL5 patients resemble those with Rett syndrome, caused by a MECP2 mutation, who exp

  3. New mitochondrial DNA mutations in tRNA associated with three severe encephalopamyopathic phenotypes: neonatal, infantile, and childhood onset.

    del Mar O'Callaghan, María; Emperador, Sonia; López-Gallardo, Ester; Jou, Cristina; Buján, Nuria; Montero, Raquel; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gonzaga, Diana; Ferrer, Isidre; Briones, Paz; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Pineda, Mercè; Artuch, Rafael; Montoya, Julio

    2012-08-01

    The reported cases showed clinical, biochemical, histopathological, and molecular features lending support to the hypothesis of a pathogenic effect of the detected mutations. Case 1 was a neonatal presentation who showed multiple mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme defects in muscle associated with a new homoplasmic m.5514A > G transition in the tRNA(Trp) gene. Case 2 was a late infantile presentation who also showed mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme deficiencies in muscle together with a new m.1643A > G tRNA(Val) mutation in homoplasmy. Case 3 showed a MERRF phenotype presented in childhood associated with the once previously reported m.15923A > G mutation in heteroplasmy in all the tissues studied. PMID:22638997

  4. Phenotypic diversity associated with the mitochondrial m.8313G>A point mutation.

    O'Rourke, Killian

    2012-02-01

    We report the clinical, histochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a patient with progressive mitochondrial cytopathy due to the m.8313G>A point mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Lys) (MTTK) gene. The clinical features in this case are severe, including short stature, myopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and osteoporosis, while extensive analysis of maternal relatives indicate that the mutation has arisen de novo and was not maternally inherited. This report of a second case, together with single muscle fiber mutation analysis that shows clear segregation of mutation load with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency, confirms that the mutation is pathologic.

  5. Frequency of mutations in Mediterranean fever gene, with gender and genotype–phenotype correlations in a Turkish population

    Salih Coşkun; Serkan Kurtgöz; Ece Keskin; Ferah Sönmez; Gökay Bozkurt

    2015-12-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common hereditary inflammatory periodic disease, characterized by recurrent episodes of fever, abdominal pain, synovitis and pleurisy. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and distribution of Mediterranean fever () gene mutations and to investigate the clinical characteristics and genotype–phenotype correlation in patients with FMF in Aydın, a province in western Anatolia, Turkey. Therefore, we retrospectively analysed gene mutations in 383 patients with suspected FMF and the clinical features of 327 among them. The gene mutations were investigated using the reverse dot-blot hybridization technique. We detected 26 different genotypes and 11 different mutations. The most common mutations in our cohort were p.M694V (41.15%), p.E148Q (20.35%), p.M680I(G/C) (12.39%) and p.R761H (9.73%). Abdominal pain (86.2%), fever (80.7%), arthralgia (57.2%), vomiting (36.1%), arthritis (34.6%), fatigue (31.5%), anorexia (22.9%) and chest pain (19.0%) were the most prevalent clinical features in our patients. This is the first study from Aydın in which the distribution of gene mutations and clinical features were evaluated in patients with FMF. We found that the most common mutation was p.M694V in our region, while the frequency of the p.R761H mutation was higher compared to other regions of Turkey with respect to extracted data from previous similar studies. Presented results supported the clinical findings in the literature that the homozygous p.M694V and compound heterozygous genotype were associated with more severe courses in FMF patients.

  6. Expanded phenotypic spectrum of the m.8344A>G "MERRF" mutation: data from the German mitoNET registry.

    Altmann, Judith; Büchner, Boriana; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Schäfer, Jochen; Jackson, Sandra; Lehmann, Diana; Deschauer, Marcus; Kopajtich, Robert; Lautenschläger, Ronald; Kuhn, Klaus A; Karle, Kathrin; Schöls, Ludger; Schulz, Jörg B; Weis, Joachim; Prokisch, Holger; Kornblum, Cornelia; Claeys, Kristl G; Klopstock, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The m.8344A>G mutation in the MTTK gene, which encodes the mitochondrial transfer RNA for lysine, is traditionally associated with myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fibres (MERRF), a multisystemic mitochondrial disease that is characterised by myoclonus, seizures, cerebellar ataxia, and mitochondrial myopathy with ragged-red fibres. We studied the clinical and paraclinical phenotype of 34 patients with the m.8344A>G mutation, mainly derived from the nationwide mitoREGISTER, the multicentric registry of the German network for mitochondrial disorders (mitoNET). Mean age at symptom onset was 24.5 years ±10.9 (6-48 years) with adult onset in 75 % of the patients. In our cohort, the canonical features seizures, myoclonus, cerebellar ataxia and ragged-red fibres that are traditionally associated with MERRF, occurred in only 61, 59, 70, and 63 % of the patients, respectively. In contrast, other features such as hearing impairment were even more frequently present (72 %). Other common features in our cohort were migraine (52 %), psychiatric disorders (54 %), respiratory dysfunction (45 %), gastrointestinal symptoms (38 %), dysarthria (36 %), and dysphagia (35 %). Brain MRI revealed cerebral and/or cerebellar atrophy in 43 % of our patients. There was no correlation between the heteroplasmy level in blood and age at onset or clinical phenotype. Our findings further broaden the clinical spectrum of the m.8344A>G mutation, document the large clinical variability between carriers of the same mutation, even within families and indicate an overlap of the phenotype with other mitochondrial DNA-associated syndromes. PMID:26995359

  7. Exome sequencing identified mutations in CASK and MYBPC3 as the cause of a complex dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype.

    Reinstein, Eyal; Tzur, Shay; Bormans, Concetta; Behar, Doron M

    2016-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing for clinical applications is now an integral part of medical genetics practice. Though most studies are performed in order to establish diagnoses in individuals with rare and clinically unrecognizable disorders, due to the constantly decreasing costs and commercial availability, whole-exome sequencing has gradually become the initial tool to study patients with clinically recognized disorders when more than one gene is responsible for the phenotype or in complex phenotypes, when variants in more than one gene can be the cause for the disease. Here we report a patient presenting with a complex phenotype consisting of severe, adult-onset, dilated cardiomyopathy, hearing loss and developmental delay, in which exome sequencing revealed two genetic variants that are inherited from a healthy mother: a novel missense variant in the CASK gene, mutations in which cause a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations, and a second variant, in MYBPC3, that is associated with hereditary cardiomyopathy. We conclude that although the potential for co-occurrence of rare diseases is higher when analyzing undefined phenotypes in consanguineous families, it should also be given consideration in the genetic evaluation of complex phenotypes in non-consanguineous families. PMID:27173948

  8. High incidence of Noonan syndrome features including short stature and pulmonic stenosis in patients carrying NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809: genotype-phenotype correlation

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W; Basel, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype-phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple cafe-au-lait macules (CALM)...

  9. A novel mutation at the JK locus causing Jknull phenotype in a Chinese family

    MENG; Yan

    2005-01-01

    [1]Olivès, B., Mattei, M. G., Huet, M. et al., Kidd blood group and urea transport of human erythrocytes are carried by the same pro-tein, J. Biol. Chem., 1995, 270(26): 15607―15610.[2]Sands, J. M., Timmer, R. T., Gunn, R. B., Urea transporters in kidney and erythrocytes, Am. J. Physiol.,1997, 273: F321―F339.[3]Heaton, D. C., McLoughlin, K., Jk(a-b-) red blood cells resist urea lysis, Transfusion, 1982, 22(1): 70―71.[4]Sands, J. M., Gargus, J. J., Frohlich, O. et al., Urinary concentrating ability in patients with Jk(a-b-) blood type who lack carrier-mediated urea transport, J. Am. Soc. Nephrol., 1992, 2(12): 1689―1696.[5]Nidal, M., Irshaid, N. I., Eicher, H. H. et al., Novel alleles at the JK blood group locus explain the absence of the erythrocyte urea transporter in European families, Br. J. Heaematol., 2002, 116(2): 445―453.[6]Okubo, Y., Yamaguchi, H., Nagao, N. et al., Heterogeneity of the pheno type JK(a-,b-) found in Japanese, Transfusion, 1986, 26(3): 237―239.[7]Olives, B., Merriman, M., Bailly, P. et al., The molecular basis of the Kidd blood group polymorphism and its lack of association with type 1 diabetes susceptibility, Hum. Mol. Genet., 1997, 6(7): 1017―1020.[8]Fr(o)hlich, O., Macey, R. I., Edwards-Moulds, J. et al., Urea transport deficiency in Jk(ab) erythrocytes, Am. J. Physiol., 1991, 260: C778―C783.[9]Irshaid, N. M., Hustinx, H., Olsson, M. L., A novel molecular basis of the JK(a-b-) phenotype in a Swiss family, Vox. Sanguinis, 2000, 78(suppl 1): O019.[10]Lucien, N., Chiaroni, J., Cartron, J. P. et al., Partial deletion in the JK locus causing a Jk(null ) phenotype, Blood, 2002, 99(3): 1079―1081.[11]Yang, B., Verkman, A. S., Analysis of double knockout mice lacking aquaporin-1 and urea transporter UT-B: Evidence for UT-B facilitated water transport in erythrocytes, J. Biol. Chem., 2002, 277(39): 36782―36786.[12]Van Hoek, A. N., Verkman, A. S., Functional reconstitution of the isolated erythrocyte water channel CHIP28, J

  10. Novel MASP1 mutations are associated with an expanded phenotype in 3MC1 syndrome

    Kayserili Karabey, Hülya; Tahir Atik; Asuman Koparir; Guney Bademci; Joseph Foster II; Umut Altunoglu; Gül Yesiltepe Mutlu; Sarah Bowdin; Nursel Elcioglu; Gulsen A. Tayfun; Sevinc Sahin Atik; Mustafa Ozen; Ferda Ozkinay; Yasemin Alanay; Steffen Thiel and Mustafa Tekin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 3MC1 syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intellectual disability, short stature and distinct craniofacial, umbilical, and sacral anomalies. Five mutations in MASP1, encoding lectin complement pathway enzymes MASP-1 and MASP-3, have thus far been reported to cause 3MC1 syndrome. Only one previously reported mutation affects both MASP-1 and MASP-3, while the other mutations affect only MASP-3. METHODS: We evaluated six unrelated individuals with...

  11. Confounders of mutation-rate estimators: selection and phenotypic lag in Thermus thermophilus

    Kissling, Grace E.; Grogan, Dennis W.; John W Drake

    2013-01-01

    In a recent description of the rate and character of spontaneous mutation in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus, the mutation rate was observed to be substantially lower than seen in several mesophiles. Subsequently, a report appeared indicating that this bacterium maintains an average of about 4.5 genomes per cell. This number of genomes might result in a segregation lag for the expression of a recessive mutation and might therefore lead to an underestimate of the rate of m...

  12. Mutation update and uncommon phenotypes in a French cohort of 96 patients with WFS1-related disorders.

    Chaussenot, A; Rouzier, C; Quere, M; Plutino, M; Ait-El-Mkadem, S; Bannwarth, S; Barth, M; Dollfus, H; Charles, P; Nicolino, M; Chabrol, B; Vialettes, B; Paquis-Flucklinger, V

    2015-05-01

    WFS1 mutations are responsible for Wolfram syndrome (WS) characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy, and for low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL). Our aim was to analyze the French cohort of 96 patients with WFS1-related disorders in order (i) to update clinical and molecular data with 37 novel affected individuals, (ii) to describe uncommon phenotypes and, (iii) to precise the frequency of large-scale rearrangements in WFS1. We performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 13 patients, carrying only one heterozygous variant, to identify large-scale rearrangements in WFS1. Among the 37 novel patients, 15 carried 15 novel deleterious putative mutations, including one large deletion of 17,444 base pairs. The analysis of the cohort revealed unexpected phenotypes including (i) late-onset symptoms in 13.8% of patients with a probable autosomal recessive transmission; (ii) two siblings with recessive optic atrophy without diabetes mellitus and, (iii) six patients from four families with dominantly-inherited deafness and optic atrophy. We highlight the expanding spectrum of WFS1-related disorders and we show that, even if large deletions are rare events, they have to be searched in patients with classical WS carrying only one WFS1 mutation after sequencing. PMID:24890733

  13. Phenotypic reversion of an IS1-mediated deletion mutation: a combined role for point mutations and deletions in transposon evolution.

    Lida, S; Marcoli, R; Bickle, T A

    1982-01-01

    We have physically characterised a deletion mutant of the R plasmid R100 which has lost all of the antibiotic resistances, including chloramphenicol resistance (Cmr), coded by its IS1-flanked r-determinant. The deletion was mediated by one of the flanking IS1 elements and terminates within the carboxyl terminus of the Cmr gene. DNA sequence analysis showed that the mutated gene would produce a protein 20 amino acids longer than the wild-type due to fusion with an open reading frame in the IS element. Surprisingly for a deletion mutation, rare, spontaneous Cmr revertants could be recovered. Two of the four revertants studied had frame shifts due to the insertion of a single AT base pair at the same position; the revertants would code for a protein five amino acids shorter than the wild-type. The other two revertants had acquired duplications of the 34-bp inverted terminal repeat sequences of the IS1 element and would direct the synthesis of a protein six amino acids longer than the wild-type. The reverted Cmr markers were still capable of transposition. These observations suggest a role for point mutations and small DNA rearrangements in the formation of new gene organisations produced by mobile genetic elements. PMID:6329702

  14. Mutation spectrum in RAB3GAP1, RAB3GAP2, and RAB18 and genotype-phenotype correlations in warburg micro syndrome and Martsolf syndrome.

    Handley, Mark T; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J; Brown, Stephen; Macdonald, Fiona; Hardy, Carol; Bem, Danai; Carpanini, Sarah M; Borck, Guntram; Martorell, Loreto; Izzi, Claudia; Faravelli, Francesca; Accorsi, Patrizia; Pinelli, Lorenzo; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Peretz, Gabriela; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Zaki, Maha S; Jansen, Anna; Mowat, David; Glass, Ian; Stewart, Helen; Mancini, Grazia; Lederer, Damien; Roscioli, Tony; Giuliano, Fabienne; Plomp, Astrid S; Rolfs, Arndt; Graham, John M; Seemanova, Eva; Poo, Pilar; García-Cazorla, Angels; Edery, Patrick; Jackson, Ian J; Maher, Eamonn R; Aligianis, Irene A

    2013-05-01

    Warburg Micro syndrome and Martsolf syndrome (MS) are heterogeneous autosomal-recessive developmental disorders characterized by brain, eye, and endocrine abnormalities. Causative biallelic germline mutations have been identified in RAB3GAP1, RAB3GAP2, or RAB18, each of which encode proteins involved in membrane trafficking. This report provides an up to date overview of all known disease variants identified in 29 previously published families and 52 new families. One-hundred and forty-four Micro and nine Martsolf families were investigated, identifying mutations in RAB3GAP1 in 41% of cases, mutations in RAB3GAP2 in 7% of cases, and mutations in RAB18 in 5% of cases. These are listed in Leiden Open source Variation Databases, which was created by us for all three genes. Genotype-phenotype correlations for these genes have now established that the clinical phenotypes in Micro syndrome and MS represent a phenotypic continuum related to the nature and severity of the mutations present in the disease genes, with more deleterious mutations causing Micro syndrome and milder mutations causing MS. RAB18 has not yet been linked to the RAB3 pathways, but mutations in all three genes cause an indistinguishable phenotype, making it likely that there is some overlap. There is considerable genetic heterogeneity for these disorders and further gene identification will help delineate these pathways. PMID:23420520

  15. Identification of a Novel Mutation (867delA) in the Glucose-6-phosphatase Gene in Two Siblings with Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia with Different Phenotypes

    Rake, Jan Peter; ten Berge, Annelies M.; Visser, Gepke; Verlind, Edwin; Niezen-Koning, Klary E.; Buys, Charles H. C. M.; Smit, G. Peter A.; Scheffer, Hans

    2000-01-01

    We identified a novel mutation (867delA) in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene of two siblings with glycogen storage disease type Ia. Although both siblings share the same mutations, their phenotype regarding adult height and hepatomegaly differs. In glycogen storage disease type Ia, substantial heterog

  16. Exome Sequencing Identification of EP300 Mutation in a Proband with Coloboma and Imperforate Anus: Possible Expansion of the Phenotypic Spectrum of Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome

    Masuda, Koji; Akiyama, Kazuhiro; Arakawa, Michiko; Nishi, Eriko; Kitazawa, Noritaka; Higuchi, Tsukasa; Katou, Yuki; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Izumi, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a multisystem developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphisms, broad thumbs and halluces, growth retardation, and intellectual disability. In about 8% of RSTS cases, mutations are found in EP300. Previously, the EP300 mutation has been shown to cause the highly variable RSTS phenotype. Using exome sequencing, we identified a de novo EP300 frameshift mutation in a proband with coloboma, facial asymmetry and imperforate anus with minimal RSTS feat...

  17. Maternal genetic mutations as gestational and early life influences in producing psychiatric disease-like phenotypes in mice

    Georgia eGleason

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors for psychiatric disorders have traditionally been classified as genetic or environmental. Risk (candidate genes, although typically possessing small effects, represent a clear starting point to elucidate downstream cellular/molecular pathways of disease. Environmental effects, especially during development, can also lead to altered behavior and increased risk for disease. An important environmental factor is the mother, demonstrated by the negative effects elicited by maternal gestational stress and altered maternal care. These maternal effects can also have a genetic basis (e.g. maternal genetic variability and mutations. The focus of this review is maternal genotype effects that influence the emotional development of the offspring resulting in life-long psychiatric disease-like phenotypes. We have recently found that genetic inactivation of the serotonin1A receptor (5-HT1AR and the fmr-1 gene (encoding the fragile X mental retardation protein in mouse dams results in psychiatric disease-like phenotypes in their genetically unaffected offspring. 5-HT1AR deficiency in dams results in anxiety and increased stress responsiveness in their offspring. Mice with 5-HT1AR deficient dams display altered development of the hippocampus, which could be linked to their anxiety-like phenotype. Maternal inactivation of fmr-1, like its inactivation in the offspring, results in a hyperactivity-like condition and is associated with receptor alterations in the striatum. These data indicate a high sensitivity of the offspring to maternal mutations and suggest that maternal genotype effects can increase the impact of genetic risk factors in a population by increasing the risk of the genetically normal offspring as well as by enhancing the effects of offspring mutations.

  18. A study of familial MELAS: Evaluation of A3243G mutation, clinical phenotype, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy-monitored progression

    Chunnuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical manifestations of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes syndrome (MELAS syndrome are nonspecific and can easily be misdiagnosed. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS-based detection of lactate in the brain has been found to be of diagnostic help in MELAS syndrome, however, the issue of whether MRS features vary by stage remains unresolved. We assessed the causative mutation and radiological features of a family of MELAS. Four of the family members harbored the A3243G mutation, probably of maternal inheritance. However, the clinical phenotypic expression was different in these patients. MRS showed a lactate peak, decreased N-acetylaspartate, choline, and creatine, which became more pronounced with progression of the disease, demonstrating that brain-MRS-based detection of lactate may be a suitable way to monitor the progression and treatment of MELAS.

  19. Dental phenotype in Jalili syndrome due to a c.1312 dupC homozygous mutation in the CNNM4 gene.

    Hans U Luder

    Full Text Available Jalili syndrome denotes a recessively inherited combination of an eye disease (cone-rod dystrophy and a dental disorder (amelogenesis imperfecta, which is caused by mutations in the CNNM4 gene. Whereas the ophthalmic consequences of these mutations have been studied comprehensively, the dental phenotype has obtained less attention. A defective transport of magnesium ions by the photoreceptors of the retina is assumed to account for the progressive visual impairment. Since magnesium is also incorporated in the mineral of dental hard tissues, we hypothesized that magnesium concentrations in defective enamel resulting from mutations in CNNM4 would be abnormal, if a similar deficiency of magnesium transport also accounted for the amelogenesis imperfecta. Thus, a detailed analysis of the dental hard tissues was performed in two boys of Kosovan origin affected by Jalili syndrome. Retinal dystrophy of the patients was diagnosed by a comprehensive eye examination and full-field electroretinography. A mutational analysis revealed a c.1312 dupC homozygous mutation in CNNM4, a genetic defect which had already been identified in other Kosovan families and putatively results in loss-of-function of the protein. The evaluation of six primary teeth using light and scanning electron microscopy as well as energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that dental enamel was thin and deficient in mineral, suggesting a hypoplastic/hypomineralized type of amelogenesis imperfecta. The reduced mineral density of enamel was accompanied by decreased amounts of calcium, but significantly elevated levels of magnesium. In dentin, however, a similar mineral deficiency was associated with reduced magnesium and normal calcium levels. It is concluded that the c.1312 dupC mutation of CNNM4 results in mineralization defects of both enamel and dentin, which are associated with significantly abnormal magnesium concentrations. Thus, we could not disprove the hypothesis that a

  20. Claudin-19 mutations and clinical phenotype in Spanish patients with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis.

    Félix Claverie-Martín

    Full Text Available Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is an autosomal recessive tubular disorder characterized by excessive renal magnesium and calcium excretion and chronic kidney failure. This rare disease is caused by mutations in the CLDN16 and CLDN19 genes. These genes encode the tight junction proteins claudin-16 and claudin-19, respectively, which regulate the paracellular ion reabsorption in the kidney. Patients with mutations in the CLDN19 gene also present severe visual impairment. Our goals in this study were to examine the clinical characteristics of a large cohort of Spanish patients with this disorder and to identify the disease causing mutations. We included a total of 31 patients belonging to 27 unrelated families and studied renal and ocular manifestations. We then analyzed by direct DNA sequencing the coding regions of CLDN16 and CLDN19 genes in these patients. Bioinformatic tools were used to predict the consequences of mutations. Clinical evaluation showed ocular defects in 87% of patients, including mainly myopia, nystagmus and macular colobomata. Twenty two percent of patients underwent renal transplantation and impaired renal function was observed in another 61% of patients. Results of the genetic analysis revealed CLDN19 mutations in all patients confirming the clinical diagnosis. The majority of patients exhibited the previously described p.G20D mutation. Haplotype analysis using three microsatellite markers showed a founder effect for this recurrent mutation in our cohort. We also identified four new pathogenic mutations in CLDN19, p.G122R, p.I41T, p.G75C and p.G75S. A strategy based on microsequencing was designed to facilitate the genetic diagnosis of this disease. Our data indicate that patients with CLDN19 mutations have a high risk of progression to chronic renal disease.

  1. Novel CDKL5 Mutations in Czech Patients with Phenotypes of Atypical Rett Syndrome and Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy.

    Záhoráková, D; Langová, M; Brožová, K; Laštůvková, J; Kalina, Z; Rennerová, L; Martásek, P

    2016-01-01

    The X-linked CDKL5 gene, which encodes cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 protein, has been implicated in early-onset encephalopathy and atypical Rett syndrome with early-onset seizures. The CDKL5 protein is a kinase required for neuronal development and morphogenesis, but its precise functions are still largely unexplored. Individuals with CDKL5 mutations present with severe global developmental delay, intractable epilepsy, and Rett-like features. A clear genotype-phenotype correlation has not been established due to an insufficient number of reported cases. The aim of this study was to analyse the CDKL5 gene in Czech patients with early-onset seizures and Rett-like features. We performed mutation screening in a cohort of 83 individuals using high-resolution melting analysis, DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification. Molecular analyses revealed heterozygous pathogenic mutations in three girls with severe intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy starting at the age of two months. All three identified mutations, c.637G>A, c.902_977+29del105, and c.1757_1758delCT, are novel, thus significantly extending the growing spectrum of known pathogenic CDKL5 sequence variants. Our results support the importance of genetic testing of the CDKL5 gene in patients with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy and Rett-like features with early-onset seizures. This is the first study referring to molecular defects of CDKL5 in Czech cases. PMID:27187038

  2. Reciprocal mouse and human limb phenotypes caused by gain- and loss-of-function mutations affecting Lmbr1.

    Clark, R M; Marker, P C; Roessler, E; Dutra, A; Schimenti, J C; Muenke, M; Kingsley, D M

    2001-01-01

    The major locus for dominant preaxial polydactyly in humans has been mapped to 7q36. In mice the dominant Hemimelic extra toes (Hx) and Hammertoe (Hm) mutations map to a homologous chromosomal region and cause similar limb defects. The Lmbr1 gene is entirely within the small critical intervals recently defined for both the mouse and human mutations and is misexpressed at the exact time that the mouse Hx phenotype becomes apparent during limb development. This result suggests that Lmbr1 may underlie preaxial polydactyly in both mice and humans. We have used deletion chromosomes to demonstrate that the dominant mouse and human limb defects arise from gain-of-function mutations and not from haploinsufficiency. Furthermore, we created a loss-of-function mutation in the mouse Lmbr1 gene that causes digit number reduction (oligodactyly) on its own and in trans to a deletion chromosome. The loss of digits that we observed in mice with reduced Lmbr1 activity is in contrast to the gain of digits observed in Hx mice and human polydactyly patients. Our results suggest that the Lmbr1 gene is required for limb formation and that reciprocal changes in levels of Lmbr1 activity can lead to either increases or decreases in the number of digits in the vertebrate limb. PMID:11606546

  3. Two coexisting heterozygous frameshift mutations in PROP1 are responsible for a different phenotype of combined pituitary hormone deficiency.

    Ziemnicka, K; Budny, B; Drobnik, K; Baszko-Błaszyk, D; Stajgis, M; Katulska, K; Waśko, R; Wrotkowska, E; Słomski, R; Ruchała, M

    2016-08-01

    The role of genetic background in childhood-onset combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) has been extensively studied. The major contributors are the PROP1, POU1F1, LHX3, LHX4 and HESX1 genes coding transcription factors implicated in pituitary organogenesis. The clinical consequences of mutations encompass impaired synthesis of a growth hormone (GH) and one or more concurrent pituitary hormones (i.e. LH, FSH, TSH, PRL). Manifestation of the disorder may vary due to various mutation impacts on the final gene products or an influence of environmental factors during pituitary organogenesis. We describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of two brothers aged 47 and 39 years presenting an uncommon manifestation of congenital hypopituitarism. Sequencing of the PROP1, POU1F1, LHX3, LHX4 and HESX1 genes was performed to confirm the genetic origin of the disorder. A compound heterozygosity in the PROP1 gene has been identified for both probands. The first change represents a mutational hot spot (c.150delA, p.R53fsX164), whereas the second is a novel alteration (p.R112X) that leads to protein disruption. Based on precise genetic diagnosis, an in silico prediction of a p.R112X mutation on protein architecture was performed. The resulting clinical phenotype was surprisingly distinct compared to most patients with genetic alterations in PROP1 reported in the current literature. This may be caused by a residual activity of a newly identified p.R112X protein that preserves over 70 % of the homeodomain structure. This examination may confirm a key role of a DNA-binding homeodomain in maintaining PROP1 functionality and suggests a conceivable explanation of an unusual phenotype. PMID:26608600

  4. POLG1 p.R722H mutation associated with multiple mtDNA deletions and a neurological phenotype

    Finnilä Saara

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The c.2447G>A (p.R722H mutation in the gene POLG1 of the catalytic subunit of human mitochondrial polymerase gamma has been previously found in a few occasions but its pathogenicity has remained uncertain. We set out to ascertain its contribution to neuromuscular disease. Methods Probands from two families with probable mitochondrial disease were examined clinically, muscle and buccal epithelial DNA were analyzed for mtDNA deletions, and the POLG1, POLG2, ANT1 and Twinkle genes were sequenced. Results An adult proband presented with progressive external ophthalmoplegia, sensorineural hearing impairment, diabetes mellitus, dysphagia, a limb myopathy and dementia. Brain MRI showed central and cortical atrophy, and 18F-deoxyglucose PET revealed reduced glucose uptake. Histochemical analysis of muscle disclosed ragged red fibers and cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers. Electron microscopy showed subsarcolemmal aggregates of morphologically normal mitochondria. Multiple mtDNA deletions were found in the muscle, and sequencing of the POLG1 gene revealed a homozygous c.2447G>A (p.R722H mutation. His two siblings were also homozygous with respect to the p.R722H mutation and presented with dementia and sensorineural hearing impairment. In another family the p.R722H mutation was found as compound heterozygosity with the common p.W748S mutation in two siblings with mental retardation, ptosis, epilepsy and psychiatric symptoms. The estimated carrier frequency of the p.R722H mutation was 1:135 in the Finnish population. No mutations in POLG2, ANT1 and Twinkle genes were found. Analysis of the POLG1 sequence by homology modeling supported the notion that the p.R722H mutation is pathogenic. Conclusions The recessive c.2447G>A (p.R722H mutation in the linker region of the POLG1 gene is pathogenic for multiple mtDNA deletions in muscle and is associated with a late-onset neurological phenotype as a homozygous state. The onset of the disease

  5. White matter lesions in FTLD: distinct phenotypes characterize GRN and C9ORF72 mutations

    Ameur, Fatima; Colliot, Olivier; Caroppo, Paola; Stroer, Sebastian; Dormont, Didier; Brice, Alexis; Azuar, Carole; Dubois, Bruno; Le Ber, Isabelle; Bertrand, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) has a high frequency of genetic forms; the 2 most common are GRN (progranulin) and C9ORF72 mutations. Recently, our group reported extensive white matter (WM) lesions in 4 patients with FTLD caused by GRN mutation, in the absence of noteworthy cardiovascular risk factors,1 in line with other studies in GRN mutation carriers.2,3 Here we compared the characteristics of frontal WM lesions in patients with behavioral variant of FTLD (bv-FTLD) caused by GRN...

  6. Hereditary and Sporadic Papillary Renal Carcinomas with c-met Mutations Share a Distinct Morphological Phenotype

    Irina A. Lubensky; Schmidt, Laura; Zhuang, Zhengping; Weirich, Gregor; Pack, Svetlana; Zambrano, Norman; WALTHER, McCLELLAN M.; Choyke, Peter; Linehan, W. Marston; Zbar, Berton

    1999-01-01

    Germline mutations of c-met oncogene at 7q31 have been detected in patients with hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma. In addition, c-met mutations were shown to play a role in 13% of patients with papillary renal cell carcinoma and no family history of renal tumors. The histopathology of papillary renal cell carcinoma with c-met mutations has not been previously described. We analyzed the histopathology of 103 bilateral archival papillary renal cell carcinomas and 4 metastases in 29 pat...

  7. Exome Sequencing Identification of EP300 Mutation in a Proband with Coloboma and Imperforate Anus: Possible Expansion of the Phenotypic Spectrum of Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome.

    Masuda, Koji; Akiyama, Kazuhiro; Arakawa, Michiko; Nishi, Eriko; Kitazawa, Noritaka; Higuchi, Tsukasa; Katou, Yuki; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Izumi, Kosuke

    2015-07-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a multisystem developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphisms, broad thumbs and halluces, growth retardation, and intellectual disability. In about 8% of RSTS cases, mutations are found in EP300. Previously, the EP300 mutation has been shown to cause the highly variable RSTS phenotype. Using exome sequencing, we identified a de novo EP300 frameshift mutation in a proband with coloboma, facial asymmetry and imperforate anus with minimal RSTS features. Previous molecular studies have demonstrated the importance of EP300 in oculogenesis, supporting the possibility that EP300 mutation may cause ocular coloboma. Since a wide phenotypic spectrum is well known in EP300-associated RSTS cases, the atypical phenotype identified in our proband may be an example of rare manifestations of RSTS. PMID:26279656

  8. Mutations of the KIT (Mast/Stem cell growth factor receptor) proto-oncogene account for a continuous range of phenotypes in human piebaldism

    Spritz, R.A.; Holmes, S.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)); Ramesar, R.; Greenberg, J.; Beighton, P.; Curtis, D.

    1992-11-01

    Piebaldism is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of pigmentation, characterized by congenital patches of white skin and hair from which melanocytes are absent. The authors have previously shown that piebaldism can result from missense and frameshift mutations of the KIT proto-oncogene, which encodes the cellular receptor tyrosine kinase for the mast/stem cell growth factor. Here, the authors report two novel KIT mutations associated with human piebaldism. A proximal frameshift is associated with a mild piebald phenotype, and a splice-junction mutation is associated with a highly variable piebald phenotype. They discuss the apparent relationship between the predicted impact of specific KIT mutations on total KIT-dependent signal transduction and the severity of the resultant piebald phenotypes. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations in cancer escape purifying selection and high pathogenicity mutations lead to the oncocytic phenotype: pathogenicity analysis of reported somatic mtDNA mutations in tumors

    The presence of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in cancer cells has been interpreted in controversial ways, ranging from random neutral accumulation of mutations, to positive selection for high pathogenicity, or conversely to purifying selection against high pathogenicity variants as occurs at the population level. Here we evaluated the predicted pathogenicity of somatic mtDNA mutations described in cancer and compare these to the distribution of variations observed in the global human population and all possible protein variations that could occur in human mtDNA. We focus on oncocytic tumors, which are clearly associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The protein variant pathogenicity was predicted using two computational methods, MutPred and SNPs&GO. The pathogenicity score of the somatic mtDNA variants were significantly higher in oncocytic tumors compared to non-oncocytic tumors. Variations in subunits of Complex I of the electron transfer chain were significantly more common in tumors with the oncocytic phenotype, while variations in Complex V subunits were significantly more common in non-oncocytic tumors. Our results show that the somatic mtDNA mutations reported over all tumors are indistinguishable from a random selection from the set of all possible amino acid variations, and have therefore escaped the effects of purifying selection that act strongly at the population level. We show that the pathogenicity of somatic mtDNA mutations is a determining factor for the oncocytic phenotype. The opposite associations of the Complex I and Complex V variants with the oncocytic and non-oncocytic tumors implies that low mitochondrial membrane potential may play an important role in determining the oncocytic phenotype

  10. Genotype-Phenotype Correlations Emerging from the Identification of Missense Mutations in MBTPS2

    Bornholdt, D.; Atkinson, T.P.; Bouadjar, B.; Catteau, B.; Cox, H.; Silva, D. De; Fischer, J.; Gunasekera, C.N.; Hadj-Rabia, S.; Happle, R.; Holder-Espinasse, M.; Kaminski, E.; Konig, A.; Megarbane, A.; Megarbane, H.; Neidel, U.; Oeffner, F.; Oji, V.; Theos, A.; Traupe, H.; Vahlquist, A.; Bon, B.W. van; Virtanen, M.; Grzeschik, K.H.

    2013-01-01

    Missense mutations affecting membrane-bound transcription factor protease site 2 (MBTPS2) have been associated with Ichthyosis Follicularis with Atrichia and Photophobia (IFAP) syndrome with or without BRESHECK syndrome, with keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans, and Olmsted syndrome. This met

  11. Clinical spectrum of SIX3-associated mutations in holoprosencephaly: correlation between genotype, phenotype and function

    Lacbawan, F; Solomon, B.D.; Roessler, E.; El-Jaick, K.; Domené, S.; Vélez, J I; Zhou, N.; Hadley, D; Balog, J Z; Long, R.(Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom); Fryer, A.; Smith, W.; Omar, S; McLean, S.D.; Clarkson, K.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common structural malformation of the human forebrain. There are several important HPE mutational target genes, including the transcription factor SIX3, which encodes an early regulator of Shh, Wnt, Bmp and Nodal signalling expressed in the developing forebrain and eyes of all vertebrates. OBJECTIVE: To characterise genetic and clinical findings in patients with SIX3 mutations. METHODS: Patients with HPE and their family members were tested for ...

  12. A range of clinical phenotypes associated with mutations in CRX, a photoreceptor transcription-factor gene.

    Sohocki, M M; Sullivan, L S; Mintz-Hittner, H A; Birch, D.; Heckenlively, J R; Freund, C L; McInnes, R R; Daiger, S P

    1998-01-01

    Mutations in the retinal-expressed gene CRX (cone-rod homeobox gene) have been associated with dominant cone-rod dystrophy and with de novo Leber congenital amaurosis. However, CRX is a transcription factor for several retinal genes, including the opsins and the gene for interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein. Because loss of CRX function could alter the expression of a number of other retinal proteins, we screened for mutations in the CRX gene in probands with a range of degenerative re...

  13. Genotype-phenotype correlation in a large population of muscular dystrophy patients with LAMA2 mutations.

    Geranmayeh, Fatemeh

    2010-04-01

    Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy 1A (MDC1A) results from mutations in the LAMA2 gene. We report 51 patients with MDC1A and examine the relationship between degree of merosin expression, genotype and clinical features. Thirty-three patients had absence of merosin and 13 showed some residual merosin. Compared to the residual merosin group, patients with absent merosin had an earlier presentation (<7days) (P=0.0073), were more likely to lack independent ambulation (P=0.0215), or require enteral feeding (P=0.0099) and ventilatory support (P=0.0354). We identified 33 novel LAMA2 mutations; these were distributed throughout the gene in patients with absent merosin, with minor clusters in exon 27, 14, 25 and 26 (55% of mutations). Patients with residual merosin often carried at least one splice site mutation and less frequently frameshift mutations. This large study identified novel LAMA2 mutations and highlights the role of immunohistochemical studies for merosin status in predicting clinical severity of MDC1A.

  14. Local amino acid sequence patterns dominate the heterogeneous phenotype for the collagen connective tissue disease Osteogenesis Imperfecta resulting from Gly mutations.

    Xiao, Jianxi; Yang, Zhangfu; Sun, Xiuxia; Addabbo, Rayna; Baum, Jean

    2015-10-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), a hereditary connective tissue disease in collagen that arises from a single Gly → X mutation in the collagen chain, varies widely in phenotype from perinatal lethal to mild. It is unclear why there is such a large variation in the severity of the disease considering the repeating (Gly-X-Y)n sequence and the uniform rod-like structure of collagen. We systematically evaluate the effect of local (Gly-X-Y)n sequence around the mutation site on OI phenotype using integrated bio-statistical approaches, including odds ratio analysis and decision tree modeling. We show that different Gly → X mutations have different local sequence patterns that are correlated with lethal and nonlethal phenotypes providing a mechanism for understanding the sensitivity of local context in defining lethal and non-lethal OI. A number of important trends about which factors are related to OI phenotypes are revealed by the bio-statistical analyses; most striking is the complementary relationship between the placement of Pro residues and small residues and their correlation to OI phenotype. When Pro is present or small flexible residues are absent nearby a mutation site, the OI case tends to be lethal; when Pro is present or small flexible residues are absent further away from the mutation site, the OI case tends to be nonlethal. The analysis also reveals the dominant role of local sequence around mutation sites in the Major Ligand Binding Regions that are primarily responsible for collagen binding to its receptors and shows that non-lethal mutations are highly predicted by local sequence considerations alone whereas lethal mutations are not as easily predicted and may be a result of more complex interactions. Understanding the sequence determinants of OI mutations will enhance genetic counseling and help establish which steps in the collagen hierarchy to target for drug therapy. PMID:25980613

  15. p.L18P: a novel IDUA mutation that causes a distinct attenuated phenotype in mucopolysaccharidosis type I patients.

    Pasqualim, G; Ribeiro, M G; da Fonseca, G G G; Szlago, M; Schenone, A; Lemes, A; Rojas, M V M; Matte, U; Giugliani, R

    2015-10-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of α-l-iduronidase (IDUA) which leads to a wide spectrum of clinical severity. Here, we describe the case of four male patients who present the previously undescribed p.L18P mutation. Patient 1 (p.L18P/p.L18P) presents, despite multiple joint contractures, an attenuated phenotype. Patient 2 (p.L18P/p.W402X) was diagnosed at 4 years of age with bone dysplasia, coarse facies, limited mobility, claw hands and underwent bilateral carpal tunnel surgery at 6 years of age. Patients 3 and 4 (both p.L18P/p.L18P) are brothers. Patient 3 was diagnosed at 4 years of age, when presented claw hands, lower limb and shoulder pain, restricted articular movement and bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. Patient 4 was diagnosed at 17 months of age when presented lower limb pain at night, respiratory allergy and repeated upper airways infections. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that p.L18P mutation reduces the signal peptide to 25 amino acids and alters its secondary structure. In conclusion, we report a new IDUA variant that alters the structure of the signal peptide, which likely impairs transport to lysosomes. Moreover, it leads to a distinct attenuated phenotype with mainly bone and cartilage symptoms, without visceromegalies, heart disease, or cognitive impairment. PMID:25256405

  16. Phenotypic expressions of a Gly154Arg mutation in type II collagen in two unrelated patients with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD)

    Kaitila, I.; Marttinen, E. [Helsinki Univ. Hospital (Finland); Koerkkoe, J.; Ala-Kokko, L. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-05-03

    Type II collagenopathies consist of chondrodysplasia ranging from lethal to mild in severity. A large number of mutations has been found in the COL2A1 gene. Glycine substitutions have been the most common types of mutation. Genotype-phenotype correlations in type II collagenopathies have not been established, partly because of insufficient clinical and radiographic description of the patients. We found a glycine-to-arginine substitution at position 154 in type II collagen in two unrelated isolated propositi with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and provide a comparative clinical and radiographic analysis from birth to young adulthood for this condition. The clinical phenotype was disproportionate short stature with varus/valgus deformities of the lower limbs requiring corrective osteotomies, and lumbar lordosis. The skeletal radiographs showed an evolution from short tubular bones, delayed epiphyseal development, and mild vertebral involvement to severe metaphyseal dysplasia with dappling irregularities, and hip {open_quotes}dysplasia.{close_quotes} The metaphyseal abnormalities disappeared by adulthood. 27 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Unusual phenotype of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) with a novel mutation of the CYP21A2 gene.

    Raisingani, Manish; Contreras, Maria F; Prasad, Kris; Pappas, John G; Kluge, Michelle L; Shah, Bina; David, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    Gonadotropin independent sexual precocity (SP) may be due to congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), and its timing usually depends on the type of mutation in the CYP21A2 gene. Compound heterozygotes are common and express phenotypes of varying severity. The objective of this case report was to investigate the hormonal pattern and unusual genetic profile in a 7-year-old boy who presented with pubic hair, acne, an enlarged phallus, slightly increased testicular volume and advanced bone age. Clinical, hormonal and genetic studies were undertaken in the patient as well as his parents. We found elevated serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) and androstenedione that were suppressed with dexamethasone, and elevated testosterone that actually rose after giving dexamethasone, indicating activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. An initial search for common mutations was negative, but a more detailed genetic analysis of the CYP21A2 gene revealed two mutations including R341W, a non-classical mutation inherited from his mother, and g.823G>A, a novel not previously reported consensus donor splice site mutation inherited from his father, which is predicted to be salt wasting. However, the child had a normal plasma renin activity. He was effectively treated with low-dose dexamethasone and a GnRH agonist. His father was an unaffected carrier, but his mother had evidence of mild non-classical CAH. In a male child presenting with gonadotropin independent SP it is important to investigate adrenal function with respect to the androgen profile, and to carry out appropriate genetic studies. PMID:27180336

  18. Absence of mutations in NR2E1 and SNX3 in five patients with MMEP (microcephaly, microphthalmia, ectrodactyly, and prognathism and related phenotypes

    Simpson Elizabeth M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A disruption of sorting nexin 3 (SNX3 on 6q21 was previously reported in a patient with MMEP (microcephaly, microphthalmia, ectrodactyly, and prognathism and t(6;13(q21;q12 but no SNX3 mutations were identified in another sporadic case of MMEP, suggesting involvement of another gene. In this work, SNX3 was sequenced in three patients not previously studied for this gene. In addition, we test the hypothesis that mutations in the neighbouring gene NR2E1 may underlie MMEP and related phenotypes. Methods Mutation screening was performed in five patients: the t(6;13(q21;q12 MMEP patient, three additional patients with possible MMEP or a related phenotype, and one patient with oligodactyly, ulnar aplasia, and a t(6;7(q21;q31.2 translocation. We used sequencing to exclude SNX3 coding mutations in three patients not previously studied for this gene. To test the hypothesis that mutations in NR2E1 may contribute to MMEP or related phenotypes, we sequenced the entire coding region, complete 5' and 3' untranslated regions, consensus splice-sites, and evolutionarily conserved regions including core and proximal promoter in all five patients. Two-hundred and fifty control subjects were genotyped for any candidate mutation. Results We did not detect any synonymous nor nonsynonymous coding mutations of NR2E1 or SNX3. In one patient with possible MMEP, we identified a candidate regulatory mutation that has been reported previously in a patient with microcephaly but was not found in 250 control subjects examined here. Conclusion Our results do not support involvement of coding mutations in NR2E1 or SNX3 in MMEP or related phenotypes; however, we cannot exclude the possibility that regulatory NR2E1 or SNX3 mutations or deletions at this locus may underlie abnormal human cortical development in some patients.

  19. Analysis of large phenotypic variability of EEC and SHFM4 syndromes caused by K193E mutation of the TP63 gene.

    Jianhua Wei

    Full Text Available EEC (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting; OMIM 604292 is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder resulting mainly from pathogenic mutations of the DNA-binding domain (DBD of the TP63 gene. In this study, we showed that K193E mutation in nine affected individuals of a four-generation kindred with a large degree of phenotypic variability causes four different syndromes or TP63-related disorders: EEC, Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia (EE, isolated ectodermal dysplasia, and isolated Split Hand/Foot Malformation type 4 (SHFM4. Genotype-phenotype and DBD structural modeling analysis showed that the K193-located loop L2-A is associated with R280 through hydrogen bonding interactions, while R280 mutations also often cause large phenotypic variability of EEC and SHFM4. Thus, we speculate that K193 and several other DBD mutation-associated syndromes may share similar pathogenic mechanisms, particularly in the case of the same mutation with different phenotypes. Our study and others also suggest that the phenotypic variability of EEC is attributed, at least partially, to genetic and/or epigenetic modifiers.

  20. A MITF mutation associated with a dominant white phenotype and bilateral deafness in German Fleckvieh cattle.

    Ute Philipp

    Full Text Available A dominantly inherited syndrome associated with hypopigmentation, heterochromia irides, colobomatous eyes and bilateral hearing loss has been ascertained in Fleckvieh cattle (German White Fleckvieh syndrome. This syndrome has been mapped to bovine chromosome (BTA 22 using a genome-wide association study with the bovine high density single nucleotide polymorphism array. An R210I missense mutation has been identified within microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF as responsible for this syndrome. The mutation is located in the highly conserved basic region of the protein and causes a negative-dominant effect. SOX10 and PAX3 promoter binding site mutations in MITF could be ruled out as causative for the German White Fleckvieh syndrome. Molecular characterization of this newly detected bovine syndrome means a large animal model is now available for the Tietz syndrome in humans.

  1. Uracil-DNA glycosylase-deficient yeast exhibit a mitochondrial mutator phenotype

    Chatterjee, Aditi; Keshav K Singh

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been reported in cancer and are involved in the pathogenesis of many mitochondrial diseases. Uracil-DNA glycosylase, encoded by the UNG1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, repairs uracil in DNA formed due to deamination of cytosine. Our study demonstrates that inactivation of the UNG1 gene leads to at least a 3-fold increased frequency of mutations in mtDNA compared with the wild-type. Using a Ung1p–green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion construct, w...

  2. Hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome: Worldwide mutations and phenotype of an increasingly diagnosed genetic disorder

    Millonig Gunda; Muckenthaler Martina U; Mueller Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The hereditary hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome (HHCS) is characterised by an autosomal dominant cataract and high levels of serum ferritin without iron overload. The cataract develops due to L-ferritin deposits in the lens and its pulverulent aspect is pathognomonic. The syndrome is caused by mutations within the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin. These mutations prevent efficient binding of iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 to the IRE in L-ferritin mRNA, resulting in an unle...

  3. An ultra-dense library resource for rapid deconvolution of mutations that cause phenotypes in Escherichia coli

    Nehring, Ralf B.; Gu, Franklin; Lin, Hsin-Yu; Gibson, Janet L.; Blythe, Martin J.; Wilson, Ray; Bravo Núñez, María Angélica; Hastings, P. J.; Louis, Edward J.; Frisch, Ryan L.; Hu, James C.; Rosenberg, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    With the wide availability of whole-genome sequencing (WGS), genetic mapping has become the rate-limiting step, inhibiting unbiased forward genetics in even the most tractable model organisms. We introduce a rapid deconvolution resource and method for untagged causative mutations after mutagenesis, screens, and WGS in Escherichia coli. We created Deconvoluter—ordered libraries with selectable insertions every 50 kb in the E. coli genome. The Deconvoluter method uses these for replacement of untagged mutations in the genome using a phage-P1-based gene-replacement strategy. We validate the Deconvoluter resource by deconvolution of 17 of 17 phenotype-altering mutations from a screen of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutants. The Deconvoluter resource permits rapid unbiased screens and gene/function identification and will enable exploration of functions of essential genes and undiscovered genes/sites/alleles not represented in existing deletion collections. This resource for unbiased forward-genetic screens with mapping-by-sequencing (‘forward genomics’) demonstrates a strategy that could similarly enable rapid screens in many other microbes. PMID:26578563

  4. The congenital "ant-egg" cataract phenotype is caused by a missense mutation in connexin46

    Hansen, Lars; Yao, Wenliang; Eiberg, Hans; Funding, Mikkel; Riise, Ruth; Kjær, Klaus Wilbrandt; Hejtmancik, James Fielding; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    "Ant-egg" cataract is a rare, distinct variety of congenital/infantile cataract that was reported in a large Danish family in 1967. This cataract phenotype is characterized by ant-egg-like bodies embedded in the lens in a laminar configuration and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. We r...

  5. Epistatic Mutations And Unpredictable Phenotypes In Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Andresen, Eva Kammer; Abou Hachem, Maher; Jelsbak, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, able to adapt to stressful environments such as the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. Adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the CF environment is associated with phenotypic changes, such as switch in mucoidy, antibiotic resistance and loss of virulence...

  6. Postlingual hearing loss as a mitochondrial 3243A>G mutation phenotype.

    Katarzyna Iwanicka-Pronicka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of isolated hearing loss (HL associated with the m.3243A>G mutation is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and heteroplasmy level of the m.3243A>G mutation in a large group of Polish patients with postlingual bilateral sensorineural HL of unidentified cause. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A molecular search was undertaken in the archival blood DNA of 1482 unrelated patients with isolated HL that had begun at ages between 5 and 40 years. Maternal relatives of the probands were subsequently investigated and all carriers underwent audiological tests. The m.3243A>G mutation was found in 16 of 1482 probands (an incidence of 1.08% and 18 family members. Of these 34 individuals, hearing impairment was detected in 29 patients and the mean onset of HL was at 26 years. Some 42% of the identified m.3243A>G carriers did not develop multisystem symptomatology over the following 10 years. Mean heteroplasmy level of m.3243A>G was lowest in blood at a level of 14% and highest in urine at 58%. These values were independent of the manifested clinical severity of the disease. CONCLUSIONS: A single m.3243A>G carrier can usually be found among each 100 individuals who have postlingual hearing loss of unknown cause. Urine samples are best for detecting the m.3243A>G mutation and diagnosing mitochondrially inherited hearing loss.

  7. Mutational spectrum and phenotypes in Danish families with hereditary angioedema because of C1 inhibitor deficiency

    Bygum, A; Fagerberg, C R; Ponard, D; Monnier, N; Lunardi, J; Drouet, C

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE), type I and II, is an autosomal dominant disease with deficiency of functional C1 inhibitor protein causing episodic swellings of skin, mucosa and viscera. HAE is a genetically heterogeneous disease with more than 200 different mutations in the SERPING1 gene. A genotype...

  8. Arrhythmogenic Biophysical Phenotype for SCN5A Mutation S1787N Depends upon Splice Variant Background and Intracellular Acidosis.

    Rou-Mu Hu

    Full Text Available SCN5A is a susceptibility gene for type 3 long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and sudden infant death syndrome. INa dysfunction from mutated SCN5A can depend upon the splice variant background in which it is expressed and also upon environmental factors such as acidosis. S1787N was reported previously as a LQT3-associated mutation and has also been observed in 1 of 295 healthy white controls. Here, we determined the in vitro biophysical phenotype of SCN5A-S1787N in an effort to further assess its possible pathogenicity.We engineered S1787N in the two most common alternatively spliced SCN5A isoforms, the major isoform lacking a glutamine at position 1077 (Q1077del and the minor isoform containing Q1077, and expressed these two engineered constructs in HEK293 cells for electrophysiological study. Macroscopic voltage-gated INa was measured 24 hours after transfection with standard whole-cell patch clamp techniques. We applied intracellular solutions with pH7.4 or pH6.7. S1787N in the Q1077 background had WT-like INa including peak INa density, activation and inactivation parameters, and late INa amplitude in both pH 7.4 and pH 6.7. However, with S1787N in the Q1077del background, the percentages of INa late/peak were increased by 2.1 fold in pH 7.4 and by 2.9 fold in pH 6.7 when compared to WT.The LQT3-like biophysical phenotype for S1787N depends on both the SCN5A splice variant and on the intracellular pH. These findings provide further evidence that the splice variant and environmental factors affect the molecular phenotype of cardiac SCN5A-encoded sodium channel (Nav1.5, has implications for the clinical phenotype, and may provide insight into acidosis-induced arrhythmia mechanisms.

  9. Low Penetrance Pancreatitis Phenotype in a Venezuelan Kindred with a PRSS1 R122H Mutation

    Sheila Solomon

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Hereditary pancreatitis is typically caused by the PRSS1 R122H or N29I mutations resulting in high penetrance (about 80% autosomal dominant disorder that is usually reported in North America, Northern Europe and Northeast Asia, but not South America, Africa or India. Case report Here we report a kindred from Venezuela, South America with the PRSS1 R122H variant. Only the proband, an 11-year old boy with severe chronic pancreatitis, and a maternal grandmother with pancreatitis at age 60 years (confirmed PRSS1 R122H, are symptomatic. Conclusions Issues of mutation prevalence, non-penetrance, and disease recognition in various countries are discussed.

  10. NOD2/CARD15 mutations in Polish and Bosnian populations with and without Crohn's disease: prevalence and genotype-phenotype analysis

    Nermin N Salkic

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Data on prevalence and phenotypic consequences of nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain 2/caspase recruitment domains 15 (NOD2/CARD15 variants in Crohn's disease (CD population in Poland and Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H are nonexistent. We aimed to determine the prevalence of NOD2/CARD15 mutations and their association with disease phenotype in Polish and Bosnian patients with CD and in healthy controls. We prospectively recruited 86 CD patients and 83 controls in Poland and 30 CD patients and 30 controls in B&H, 229 in total. We determined the prevalence of NOD2/CARD15 mutations and their association with the disease phenotype according to Montreal classification. Participants were genotyped for Leu1007fsinsC and Gly908Arg mutations. At least one CD-associated allele was found in 29/86 (33.7% of Polish CD patients and in 9/83 (10.8% of healthy controls (p<0.001. In both CD patients and controls in Bosnian sample, at least one NOD2 mutation was found in equal number of patients (3/30; 10% with all of the NOD2 mutation positive CD patients being homozygous, while controls being heterozygous. In Polish sample, perianal disease was less frequent in CD patients with any NOD2 mutation (1/21; 4.8% compared to those without (11/41; 26.8%; p=0.046. Higher percentage of patients with NOD2 mutations had history of CD related surgery when compared with those without mutations (66.7% vs. 43.3%; p=0.05. The risk for CD is increased in patients with NOD2 mutations (Poland and especially in the presence of homozygous NOD2 mutations (Poland and Bosnia. The presence of variant NOD2 alleles is associated with increased need for surgery and reduced occurrence of perianal disease.

  11. hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations are rare in patients with "multisystem proteinopathy" and frontotemporal lobar degeneration phenotypes.

    Le Ber, Isabelle; Van Bortel, Inge; Nicolas, Gael; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Camuzat, Agnès; Wallon, David; De Septenville, Anne; Latouche, Morwena; Lattante, Serena; Kabashi, Edor; Jornea, Ludmila; Hannequin, Didier; Brice, Alexis

    2014-04-01

    hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations have been recently identified by exome sequencing in three families presenting with multisystem proteinopathy (MSP), a rare complex phenotype associating frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), Paget disease of bone (PDB), inclusion body myopathy (IBM), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). No study has evaluated the exact frequency of these genes in cohorts of MSP or FTD patients so far. We sequenced both genes in 17 patients with MSP phenotypes, and in 60 patients with FTLD and FTLD-ALS to test whether mutations could be implicated in the pathogenesis of these disorders. No disease-causing mutation was identified. We conclude that hnRNPA2B1 and hnRNPA1 mutations are rare in MSP and FTLD spectrum of diseases, although further investigations in larger populations are needed. PMID:24119545

  12. Characterization of the hyperrecombination phenotype of the pol3-t mutation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Galli, Alvaro; Cervelli, Tiziana; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    The DNA polymerase delta (Pol3p/Cdc2p) allele pol3-t of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has previously been shown to increase the frequency of deletions between short repeats (several base pairs), between homologous DNA sequences separated by long inverted repeats, and between distant short repeats, increasing the frequency of genomic deletions. We found that the pol3-t mutation increased intrachromosomal recombination events between direct DNA repeats up to 36-fold and interchromosomal recombinatio...

  13. Mutations of PTEN in patients with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba phenotype.

    Longy, M; Coulon, V; Duboué, B; David, A.; Larrègue, M; Eng, C.; Amati, P; Kraimps, J L; Bottani, A; Lacombe, D.; Bonneau, D.

    1998-01-01

    We report three new mutations in PTEN, the gene responsible for Cowden disease in five patients with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome from three unrelated families. This finding confirms that Cowden disease, a dominant cancer predisposing syndrome, and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, which includes macrocephaly, multiple lipomas, intestinal hamartomatous polyps, vascular malformations, and pigmented macules of the penis, are allelic disorders at the PTEN locus on chromosome 10q.

  14. Germline Missense Mutations Affecting KRAS Isoform B Are Associated with a Severe Noonan Syndrome Phenotype

    Carta, Claudio; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Stella, Lorenzo; Vasta, Isabella; Sarkozy, Anna; Digilio, Cristina; Palleschi, Antonio; Pizzuti, Antonio; Grammatico, Paola; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a developmental disorder characterized by short stature, facial dysmorphia, congenital heart disease, and multiple skeletal and hematologic defects. NS is an autosomal dominant trait and is genetically heterogeneous. Gain of function of SHP-2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase that positively modulates RAS signaling, is observed in nearly 50% of affected individuals. Here, we report the identification of heterozygous KRAS gene mutations in two subjects exhibiting a severe...

  15. Hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome: Worldwide mutations and phenotype of an increasingly diagnosed genetic disorder

    Millonig Gunda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hereditary hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome (HHCS is characterised by an autosomal dominant cataract and high levels of serum ferritin without iron overload. The cataract develops due to L-ferritin deposits in the lens and its pulverulent aspect is pathognomonic. The syndrome is caused by mutations within the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin. These mutations prevent efficient binding of iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 to the IRE in L-ferritin mRNA, resulting in an unleashed ferritin translation. This paper reviews all 31 mutations (27 single nucleotide transitions and four deletions that have been described since 1995. Laboratory test showing hyperferritinaemia, normal serum iron and normal transferrin saturation are indicative for HHCS after exclusion of other causes of increased ferritin levels (inflammation, malignancy, alcoholic liver disease and should prompt an ophthalmological consultation for diagnostic confirmation. Invasive diagnostics such as liver biopsy are not indicated. HHCS is an important differential diagnosis of hyperferritinaemia. Haematologists, gastroenterologists and ophthalmologists should be aware of this syndrome to spare patients from further invasive diagnosis (liver biopsy, and also from a false diagnosis of hereditary haemochromatosis followed by venesections. Patients diagnosed with HHCS should be counselled regarding the relative harmlessness of this genetic disease, with early cataract surgery as the only clinical consequence.

  16. SETD5 loss-of-function mutation as a likely cause of a familial syndromic intellectual disability with variable phenotypic expression.

    Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Brzezinska, Monika; Kot, Justyna; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Walczak, Anna; Stawiński, Piotr; Werner, Bożena; Płoski, Rafał

    2016-09-01

    Loss-of-function de novo mutations in the SETD5 gene, encoding a putative methyltransferase, are an important cause of moderate/severe intellectual disability as evidenced by the results of sequencing large patient cohorts. We present the first familial case of a SETD5 mutation contributing to a phenotype of congenital heart defects and dysmorphic features, with variable expression, in two siblings and their father. Interestingly, the father demonstrated only mild intellectual impairment. Family based exome sequencing combined to careful parental phenotyping may reveal a more complex clinical picture in newly recognized syndromes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27375234

  17. Influence of uvrD3, uvrE502, and recL152 mutations on the phenotypes of Escherichia coli K-12 dam mutants.

    Marinus, M G

    1980-01-01

    The recF143 allele did not alter the phenotypes of dam mutants of Escherichia coli. The uvrD3, uvrE502, and recL152 mutations did alter some of the phenotypes of dam bacteria. It was concluded that the uvrD, uvrE, and recL gene products are involved in the same deoxyribonucleic acid repair pathway as the dam gene product.

  18. High Incidence of Noonan Syndrome Features Including Short Stature and Pulmonic Stenosis in Patients carrying NF1 Missense Mutations Affecting p.Arg1809: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W; Basel, Lina; Bellus, Gary; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Bialer, Martin G; Bick, David; Blumberg, Bruce; Cortes, Fanny; David, Karen L; Destree, Anne; Duat-Rodriguez, Anna; Earl, Dawn; Escobar, Luis; Eswara, Marthanda; Ezquieta, Begona; Frayling, Ian M; Frydman, Moshe; Gardner, Kathy; Gripp, Karen W; Hernández-Chico, Concepcion; Heyrman, Kurt; Ibrahim, Jennifer; Janssens, Sandra; Keena, Beth A; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Leppig, Kathy; McDonald, Marie; Misra, Vinod K; Mulbury, Jennifer; Narayanan, Vinodh; Orenstein, Naama; Galvin-Parton, Patricia; Pedro, Helio; Pivnick, Eniko K; Powell, Cynthia M; Randolph, Linda; Raskin, Salmo; Rosell, Jordi; Rubin, Karol; Seashore, Margretta; Schaaf, Christian P; Scheuerle, Angela; Schultz, Meredith; Schorry, Elizabeth; Schnur, Rhonda; Siqveland, Elizabeth; Tkachuk, Amanda; Tonsgard, James; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C; Wallace, Stephanie; Williams, Charles; Zackai, Elaine; Zonana, Jonathan; Lazaro, Conxi; Claes, Kathleen; Korf, Bruce; Martin, Yolanda; Legius, Eric; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2015-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype-phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple café-au-lait macules (CALM) with or without freckling and Lisch nodules, but no externally visible plexiform neurofibromas or clear cutaneous neurofibromas were found. About 25% of the individuals had Noonan-like features. Pulmonic stenosis and short stature were significantly more prevalent compared with classic cohorts (P < 0.0001). Developmental delays and/or learning disabilities were reported in over 50% of patients. Melanocytes cultured from a CALM in a segmental NF1-patient showed two different somatic NF1 mutations, p.Arg1809Cys and a multi-exon deletion, providing genetic evidence that p.Arg1809Cys is a loss-of-function mutation in the melanocytes and causes a pigmentary phenotype. Constitutional missense mutations at p.Arg1809 affect 1.23% of unrelated NF1 probands in the UAB cohort, therefore this specific NF1 genotype-phenotype correlation will affect counseling and management of a significant number of patients. PMID:26178382

  19. Analysis of Large Phenotypic Variability of EEC and SHFM4 Syndromes Caused by K193E Mutation of the TP63 Gene

    Jianhua Wei; Yang Xue; Lian Wu; Jie Ma; Xiuli Yi; Junrui Zhang; Bin Lu; Chunying Li; Dashuang Shi; Songtao Shi; Xinghua Feng; Tao Cai

    2012-01-01

    EEC (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting; OMIM 604292) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder resulting mainly from pathogenic mutations of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of the TP63 gene. In this study, we showed that K193E mutation in nine affected individuals of a four-generation kindred with a large degree of phenotypic variability causes four different syndromes or TP63-related disorders: EEC, Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia (EE), isolated ectodermal dysplasia, and isol...

  20. Exploring the complete mutational space of the LDL receptor LA5 domain using molecular dynamics: linking SNPs with disease phenotypes in familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Orozco, Modesto; Sancho, Javier

    2016-03-15

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a genetic disorder with a prevalence of 0.2%, represents a high-risk factor to develop cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The majority and most severe FH cases are associated to mutations in the receptor for low-density lipoproteins receptor (LDL-r), but the molecular basis explaining the connection between mutation and phenotype is often unknown, which hinders early diagnosis and treatment of the disease. We have used atomistic simulations to explore the complete SNP mutational space (227 mutants) of the LA5 repeat, the key domain for interacting with LDL that is coded in the exon concentrating the highest number of mutations. Four clusters of mutants of different stability have been identified. The majority of the 50 FH known mutations (33) appear distributed in the unstable clusters, i.e. loss of conformational stability explains two-third of FH phenotypes. However, one-third of FH phenotypes (17 mutations) do not destabilize the LR5 repeat. Combining our simulations with available structural data from different laboratories, we have defined a consensus-binding site for the interaction of the LA5 repeat with LDL-r partner proteins and have found that most (16) of the 17 stable FH mutations occur at binding site residues. Thus, LA5-associated FH arises from mutations that cause either the loss of stability or a decrease in domain's-binding affinity. Based on this finding, we propose the likely phenotype of each possible SNP in the LA5 repeat and outline a procedure to make a full computational diagnosis for FH. PMID:26755827

  1. Spectrum of pontocerebellar hypoplasia in 13 girls and boys with CASK mutations: confirmation of a recognizable phenotype and first description of a male mosaic patient

    Burglen Lydie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by lack of development and/or early neurodegeneration of cerebellum and brainstem. According to clinical features, seven subtypes of PCH have been described, PCH type 2 related to TSEN54 mutations being the most frequent. PCH is most often autosomal recessive though de novo anomalies in the X-linked gene CASK have recently been identified in patients, mostly females, presenting with intellectual disability, microcephaly and PCH (MICPCH. Methods Fourteen patients (12 females and two males; aged 16 months-14 years presenting with PCH at neuroimaging and with clinical characteristics unsuggestive of PCH1 or PCH2 were included. The CASK gene screening was performed using Array-CGH and sequencing. Clinical and neuroradiological features were collected. Results We observed a high frequency of patients with a CASK mutation (13/14. Ten patients (8 girls and 2 boys had intragenic mutations and three female patients had a Xp11.4 submicroscopic deletion including the CASK gene. All were de novo mutations. Phenotype was variable in severity but highly similar among the 11 girls and was characterized by psychomotor retardation, severe intellectual disability, progressive microcephaly, dystonia, mild dysmorphism, and scoliosis. Other signs were frequently associated, such as growth retardation, ophthalmologic anomalies (glaucoma, megalocornea and optic atrophy, deafness and epilepsy. As expected in an X-linked disease manifesting mainly in females, the boy hemizygous for a splice mutation had a very severe phenotype with nearly no development and refractory epilepsy. We described a mild phenotype in a boy with a mosaic truncating mutation. We found some degree of correlation between severity of the vermis hypoplasia and clinical phenotype. Conclusion This study describes a new series of PCH female patients with CASK inactivating mutations and confirms that

  2. Ophthalmological phenotype associated with homozygous null mutation in the NEUROD1 gene

    Orosz Orsolya (1989-) (Biológus); Czeglédi Miklós; Kántor Irén; Balogh István (1972-) (molekuláris biológus, genetikus); Vajas Attila (1973-) (szemész); Takács Lili (1969-) (szemész); Berta András; Losonczy Gergely (1977-) (szemész)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose NEUROD1 is a tissue-specific basic helix loop helix (bHLH) protein involved in the development and maintenance of the endocrine pancreas and neuronal elements. Loss of NEUROD1 causes ataxia, cerebellar hypoplasia, sensorineural deafness, and severe retinal dystrophy in mice. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in NEUROD1 have previously been described as a cause of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) and late-onset diabetes. To date, homozygous loss-of-function NEUROD1 mut...

  3. A mutation in the rice chalcone isomerase gene causes the golden hull and internode 1 phenotype.

    Hong, Lilan; Qian, Qian; Tang, Ding; Wang, Kejian; Li, Ming; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2012-07-01

    The biosynthesis of flavonoids, important secondary plant metabolites, has been investigated extensively, but few mutants of genes in this pathway have been identified in rice (Oryza sativa). The rice gold hull and internode (gh) mutants exhibit a reddish-brown pigmentation in the hull and internode and their phenotype has long been used as a morphological marker trait for breeding and genetic study. Here, we characterized that the gh1 mutant was a mutant of the rice chalcone isomerase gene (OsCHI). The result showed that gh1 had a Dasheng retrotransposon inserted in the 5′ UTR of the OsCHI gene, which resulted in the complete loss of OsCHI expression. gh1 exhibited golden pigmentation in hulls and internodes once the panicles were exposed to light. The total flavonoid content in gh1 hulls was increased threefold compared to wild type. Consistent with the gh1 phenotype, OsCHI transcripts were expressed in most tissues of rice and most abundantly in internodes. It was also expressed at high levels in panicles before heading, distributed mainly in lemmas and paleae, but its expression decreased substantially after the panicles emerged from the sheath. OsCHI encodes a protein functionally and structurally conserved to chalcone isomerases in other species. Our findings demonstrated that the OsCHI gene was indispensable for flux of the flavonoid pathway in rice. PMID:22286805

  4. The exome sequencing identified the mutation in YARS2 encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase as a nuclear modifier for the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Peng, Yanyan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zengjun; Ji, Yanchun; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Minglian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Ye; Mo, Jun Qin; Huang, Taosheng; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disorder. Nuclear modifier genes are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. By using an exome sequencing approach, we identified a LHON susceptibility allele (c.572G>T, p.191Gly>Val) in YARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which interacts with m.11778G>A mutation to cause visual failure. We performed functional assays by using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from members of Chinese families (asymptomatic individuals carrying m.11778G>A mutation, or both m.11778G>A and heterozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations and symptomatic subjects harboring m.11778G>A and homozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations) and controls lacking these mutations. The 191Gly>Val mutation reduced the YARS2 protein level in the mutant cells. The aminoacylated efficiency and steady-state level of tRNA(Tyr) were markedly decreased in the cell lines derived from patients both carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The failure in tRNA(Tyr) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for polypeptides with high content of tyrosine codon such as ND4, ND5, ND6 and COX2 in cells lines carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The YARS2 p.191Gly>Val mutation worsened the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G>A mutation, especially reducing activities of complexes I and IV. The respiratory deficiency altered the efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mutated YARS2 aggravates mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with the m.11778G>A mutation, exceeding the threshold for the expression of blindness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and mutated nuclear-modifier YARS2. PMID:26647310

  5. A new mutation in MC1R explains a coat color phenotype in 2 "old" breeds: Saluki and Afghan hound.

    Dreger, Dayna L; Schmutz, Sheila M

    2010-01-01

    Melanocortin 1 Receptor (MC1R) has been studied in a wide variety of domestic animals (Klungland et al. 1995; Marklund et al. 1996; Våge et al. 1997; Kijas et al. 1998; Newton et al. 2000; Våge et al. 2003), and also several wild animals (Robbins et al. 1993; Ritland et al. 2001; Eizirik et al. 2003; Nachman et al. 2003; McRobie et al. 2009) in relation to coat color variation. A variety of phenotypic changes have been reported including coat colors from pure black to pure red, as well as some phenotypes with hairs with red and black bands. One phenotype, called grizzle in Salukis and domino in Afghan Hounds, appears to be unique to these 2 old dog breeds. This pattern is characterized by a pale face with a widow's peak above the eyes. The body hairs on the dorsal surface of Salukis and Afghan Hounds have both phaeomelanin and eumelanin portions, even though they had an a(t)/a(t) genotype at ASIP. In addition, all had at least one copy of a newly identified mutation in MC1R, g.233G>T, resulting in p.Gly78Val. This new allele, that we suggest be designated as E(G), is dominant to the E and e (p.Arg306ter) alleles at MC1R but recessive to the E(M) (p.Met264Val) allele. The K(B) allele (p.Gly23del) at DEFB103 and the a(y) allele (p.Ala82Ser and p.Arg83His) of ASIP are epistatic to grizzle and domino. PMID:20525767

  6. An emerging, recognizable facial phenotype in association with mutations in GLI-similar 3 (GLIS3).

    Dimitri, Paul; De Franco, Elisa; Habeb, Abdelhadi M; Gurbuz, Fatih; Moussa, Khairya; Taha, Doris; Wales, Jerry K H; Hogue, Jacob; Slavotinek, Anne; Shetty, Ambika; Balasubramanian, Meena

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal diabetes and hypothyroidism (NDH) syndrome was first described in 2003 in a consanguineous Saudi Arabian family where two out of four siblings were reported to have presented with proportionate IUGR, neonatal non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus, severe congenital hypothyroidism, cholestasis, congenital glaucoma, and polycystic kidneys. Liver disease progressed to hepatic fibrosis. The renal disease was characterized by enlarged kidneys and multiple small cysts with deficient cortico-medullary junction differentiation and normal kidney function. There was minor facial dysmorphism (depressed nasal bridge, large anterior fontanelle, long philtrum) reported but no facial photographs were published. Mutations in the transcription factor GLI-similar 3 (GLIS3) gene in the original family and two other families were subsequently reported in 2006. All affected individuals had neonatal diabetes, congenital hypothyroidism but glaucoma and liver and kidney involvement were less consistent features. Detailed descriptions of the facial dysmorphism have not been reported previously. In this report, we describe the common facial dysmorphism consisting of bilateral low-set ears, depressed nasal bridge with overhanging columella, elongated, upslanted palpebral fissures, persistent long philtrum with a thin vermilion border of the upper lip in a cohort of seven patients with GLIS3 mutations and report the emergence of a distinct, probably recognizable facial gestalt in this group which evolves with age. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27148679

  7. Impact of TP53 mutation variant allele frequency on phenotype and outcomes in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Sallman, D A; Komrokji, R; Vaupel, C; Cluzeau, T; Geyer, S M; McGraw, K L; Al Ali, N H; Lancet, J; McGinniss, M J; Nahas, S; Smith, A E; Kulasekararaj, A; Mufti, G; List, A; Hall, J; Padron, E

    2016-03-01

    Although next-generation sequencing has allowed for the detection of somatic mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), the clinical relevance of variant allele frequency (VAF) for the majority of mutations is unknown. We profiled TP53 and 20 additional genes in our training set of 219 patients with MDS or secondary acute myeloid leukemia with findings confirmed in a validation cohort. When parsed by VAF, TP53 VAF predicted for complex cytogenetics in both the training (P=0.001) and validation set (P 40% had a median overall survival (OS) of 124 days versus an OS that was not reached in patients with VAF 40% was an independent covariate (HR, 1.61; P<0.0001). In addition, SRSF2 VAF predicted for monocytosis (P=0.003), RUNX1 VAF with thrombocytopenia (P=0.01) and SF3B1 with ringed sideroblasts (P=0.001). Together, our study indicates that VAF should be incorporated in patient management and risk stratification in MDS. PMID:26514544

  8. Splice mutations preserve myophosphorylase activity that ameliorates the phenotype in McArdle disease

    Vissing, John; Duno, Morten; Schwartz, Marianne;

    2009-01-01

    features of two patients with a variant form of McArdle disease, associated with unusually high exercise capacity. Physiologic findings were compared to those in 47 patients with typical McArdle disease, and 17 healthy subjects. Subjects performed an ischaemic forearm exercise test to assess lactate...... and ammonia production. Peak oxidative capacity (VO2max) and cardiac output were determined, using cycle ergometry as the exercise modality. The two patients with atypical McArdle disease carried common mutations on one allele (R50X and G205S), and novel splice mutations in introns 3 [IVS3-26A>G (c.425-26A......>G)] and 5 [IVS5-601G>A (c.856-601G>A)] on the other allele. Plasma lactate after ischaemic exercise decreased in all typical McArdle patients, but increased in the two atypical McArdle patients (10% of that in healthy subjects). Peak workload and oxidative capacity were 2-fold higher in patients...

  9. Biochemical and computational analyses of two phenotypically related GALT mutations (S222N and S135L) that lead to atypical galactosemia

    Benjamin Cocanougher; Umut Aypar; Amber McDonald; Linda Hasadsri; Bennett, Michael J; Edward Highsmith, W.; Kristin D׳Aco

    2015-01-01

    Galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene [1,2]. We encountered a patient heterozygous for a known pathogenic H132Q mutation and a novel S222N variant of unknown significance [3]. Reminiscent of patients with the S135L mutation, our patient had loss of GALT enzyme activity in erythrocytes but a very mild clinical phenotype [3–8]. We performed splicing experiments and computational structural analyses to investigate the role of the novel S222N variant. Alamut so...

  10. DCIS in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: prevalence, phenotype, and expression of oncodrivers C-MET and HER3

    Yang, Rachel L.; Mick, Rosemarie; Lee, Kathreen; Holly L Graves; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Kelz, Rachel R; Zhang, Paul J; Czerniecki, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies report conflicting evidence regarding the existence of a DCIS-associated premalignant pathway in BRCA mutation carriers. We aimed to examine the prevalence, phenotype, and expression of oncodrivers in pure DCIS (pDCIS) and invasive breast cancer with concurrent DCIS (IBC + DCIS) in mutation carriers. Methods A cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers >18 years old who underwent surgery for breast cancer at an academic hospital (1992–2011) and had pathology available for ...

  11. Mutations in GTP binding protein Obg of Mycoplasma synoviae vaccine strain MS-H: implications in temperature-sensitivity phenotype.

    Muhammad A Shahid

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma synoviae strain MS-H, developed by chemical mutagenesis of the Australian field strain 86079/7NS, is a live temperature-sensitive (ts (+ vaccine used for control of M. synoviae infection in poultry worldwide. Genetic basis of temperature sensitivity and attenuation of MS-H has not been revealed thus far. Comparison of the complete genome sequence of MS-H, its parent strain 86079/7NS and two non-temperature sensitive (ts (- reisolates of MS-H revealed a mutation in a highly conserved domain of GTP binding protein Obg of MS-H, with reversion in ts (- MS-H reisolates. Nucleotide change from G to A at position 369 of the obg gene resulted in an alteration of glycine to arginine at position 123 in Obg fold. Further analysis of the complete obg gene sequence in several MS-H reisolates revealed that a Gly123Arg substitution was associated with alteration in temperature sensitivity phenotype of MS-H. A second mutation, C to T at position 629, in obg gene was found in some of the MS-H reisolates and appeared to suppress the effects of the Gly123Arg substitution. In silico analysis of point mutations revealed that Gly123Arg has highly destabilizing effect on the MS-H Obg structure that can potentially abolish its biological functions in vivo especially at non-permissive temperature. Findings of this study implicate Obg alteration (Gly123Arg as one of the possible causes of MS-H attenuation/temperature sensitivity and warrant further investigations into exploring the role of Obg-like proteins, an evolutionarily conserved protein from human to bacteria, in the biology of mycoplasmas.

  12. Novel sporadic and recurrent mutations in KRT5 and KRT14 genes in Polish epidermolysis bullosa simplex patients: further insights into epidemiology and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    Wertheim-Tysarowska, K; Ołdak, M; Giza, A; Kutkowska-Kaźmierczak, A; Sota, J; Przybylska, D; Woźniak, K; Śniegórska, D; Niepokój, K; Sobczyńska-Tomaszewska, A; Rygiel, A M; Płoski, R; Bal, J; Kowalewski, C

    2016-05-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is a hereditary genodermatosis characterised by trauma-induced intraepidermal blistering of the skin. EBS is mostly caused by mutations in the KRT5 and KRT14 genes. Disease severity partially depends on the affected keratin type and may be modulated by mutation type and location. The aim of our study was to identify the molecular defects in KRT5 and KRT14 in a cohort of 46 Polish and one Belarusian probands with clinical suspicion of EBS and to determine the genotype-phenotype correlation. The group of 47 patients with clinical recognition of EBS was enrolled in the study. We analysed all coding exons of KRT5 and KRT14 using Sanger sequencing. The pathogenic status of novel variants was evaluated using bioinformatical tools, control group analysis (DNA from 100 healthy population-matched subjects) and probands' parents testing. We identified mutations in 80 % of patients and found 29 different mutations, 11 of which were novel and six were found in more than one family. All novel mutations were ascertained as pathogenic. In the majority of cases, the most severe genotype was associated with mutations in highly conserved regions. In some cases, different inheritance mode and clinical significance, than previously reported by others, was observed. We report 11 novel variants and show novel genotype-phenotype correlations. Our data give further insight into the natural history of EBS molecular pathology, epidemiology and mutation origin. PMID:26432462

  13. Novel UBR1 gene mutation in a patient with typical phenotype of Johanson-Blizzard syndrome.

    Fallahi, Gholam Hossein; Sabbaghian, Mozhgan; Khalili, Manijeh; Parvaneh, Nima; Zenker, Martin; Rezaei, Nima

    2011-02-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by exocrine pancreatic deficiency and a wide range of other abnormalities. We present here an infant with failure to thrive, exocrine pancreatic deficiency, short stature and developmental delay, cutis aplasia on the scalp, aplasia of alae nasi, hypospadias, hypothyroidism, myxomatous mitral valve, and patent ductus arteriosus. Molecular studies revealed a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 38 of the UBR1 gene, which confirmed the diagnosis of Johanson-Blizzard syndrome. It should be acknowledged that the combination of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and nasal wing hypo-aplasia is pathognomonic for this syndrome. Prompt diagnosis and exact monitoring of the patients with JBS are required to avoid further complications. PMID:20556423

  14. Genotype-phenotype studies in nail-patella syndrome show that LMX1B mutation location is involved in the risk of developing nephropathy

    Bongers, Ernie M H F; Huysmans, Frans T; Levtchenko, Elena; de Rooy, Jacky W; Blickman, Johan G; Admiraal, Ronald J C; Huygen, Patrick L M; Cruysberg, Johannes R M; Toolens, Pauline A M P; Prins, Judith B; Krabbe, Paul F M; Borm, George F; Schoots, Jeroen; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Remortele, Angela M F; Hoefsloot, Lies H; van Kampen, Albert; Knoers, Nine V A M

    2005-01-01

    Nail-patella syndrome (NPS) is characterized by developmental defects of dorsal limb structures, nephropathy, and glaucoma and is caused by heterozygous mutations in the LIM homeodomain transcription factor LMX1B. In order to identify possible genotype-phenotype correlations, we performed LMX1B muta

  15. Nonsense mutations in the rhodopsin gene that give rise to mild phenotypes trigger mRNA degradation in human cells by nonsense-mediated decay.

    Roman-Sanchez, Ramon; Wensel, Theodore G; Wilson, John H

    2016-04-01

    Eight different nonsense mutations in the human rhodopsin gene cause retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited degenerative disease of the retina that can lead to complete blindness. Although all these nonsense mutations lead to premature termination codons (PTCs) in rhodopsin mRNA, some display dominant inheritance, while others are recessive. Because nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) can degrade mRNAs containing PTCs and modulate the inheritance patterns of genetic diseases, we asked whether any of the nonsense mutations in the rhodopsin gene generated mRNAs that were susceptible to degradation by NMD. We hypothesized that nonsense mutations that caused mild RP phenotypes would trigger NMD, whereas those that did not engage NMD would cause more severe RP phenotypes-presumably due to the toxicity of the truncated protein. To test our hypothesis, we transfected human rhodopsin nonsense mutants into HEK293 and HT1080 human cells and measured transcript levels by qRT-PCR. In both cell lines, rhodopsin mutations Q64X and Q344X, which cause severe phenotypes that are dominantly inherited, yielded the same levels of rhodopsin mRNA as wild type. By contrast, rhodopsin mutations W161X and E249X, which cause recessive RP, showed decreased rhodopsin mRNA levels, consistent with NMD. Rhodopsin mutant Y136X, a dominant mutation that causes late-onset RP with a very mild pathology, also gave lower mRNA levels. Treatment of cells with Wortmannin, an inhibitor of NMD, eliminated the degradation of Y136X, W161X, and E249X rhodopsin mRNAs. These results suggest that NMD modulates the severity of RP in patients with nonsense mutations in the rhodopsin gene. PMID:26416182

  16. The rem mutations in the ATP-binding groove of the Rad3/XPD helicase lead to Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome-like phenotypes.

    Emilia Herrera-Moyano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic TFIIH complex is involved in Nucleotide Excision Repair and transcription initiation. We analyzed three yeast mutations of the Rad3/XPD helicase of TFIIH known as rem (recombination and mutation phenotypes. We found that, in these mutants, incomplete NER reactions lead to replication fork breaking and the subsequent engagement of the homologous recombination machinery to restore them. Nevertheless, the penetrance varies among mutants, giving rise to a phenotype gradient. Interestingly, the mutations analyzed reside at the ATP-binding groove of Rad3 and in vivo experiments reveal a gain of DNA affinity upon damage of the mutant Rad3 proteins. Since mutations at the ATP-binding groove of XPD in humans are present in the Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome (XP-CS, we recreated rem mutations in human cells, and found that these are XP-CS-like. We propose that the balance between the loss of helicase activity and the gain of DNA affinity controls the capacity of TFIIH to open DNA during NER, and its persistence at both DNA lesions and promoters. This conditions NER efficiency and transcription resumption after damage, which in human cells would explain the XP-CS phenotype, opening new perspectives to understand the molecular basis of the role of XPD in human disease.

  17. The expanding phenotype of MELAS caused by the m.3291T > C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene.

    Keilland, E; Rupar, C A; Prasad, Asuri N; Tay, K Y; Downie, A; Prasad, C

    2016-03-01

    m.3291T > C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene has been infrequently encountered in association with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), however remains poorly characterized from a clinical perspective. In the following report we describe in detail the phenotypic features, long term follow up (> 7 years) and management in a Caucasian family with MELAS due to the m.3291T > C mutation and review the literature on m.3291T > C mutation. The clinical phenotype in the proposita included overlapping features of MELAS, MERRF (Myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fiber syndrome), MNGIE (Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy), KSS (Kearns-Sayre Syndrome) and CPEO (Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia). PMID:27014580

  18. The expanding phenotype of MELAS caused by the m.3291T>C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene

    E. Keilland

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available m.3291T>C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene has been infrequently encountered in association with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS, however remains poorly characterized from a clinical perspective. In the following report we describe in detail the phenotypic features, long term follow up (>7 years and management in a Caucasian family with MELAS due to the m.3291T>C mutation and review the literature on m.3291T>C mutation. The clinical phenotype in the proposita included overlapping features of MELAS, MERRF (Myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fiber syndrome, MNGIE (Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy, KSS (Kearns-Sayre Syndrome and CPEO (Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

  19. Adult siblings with homozygous G6PC3 mutations expand our understanding of the severe congenital neutropenia type 4 (SCN4 phenotype

    Fernandez Bridget A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe congenital neutropenia type 4 (SCN4 is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the third subunit of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC3. Its core features are congenital neutropenia and a prominent venous skin pattern, and affected individuals have variable birth defects. Oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4 is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in SLC45A2. Methods We report a sister and brother from Newfoundland, Canada with complex phenotypes. The sister was previously reported by Cullinane et al., 2011. We performed homozygosity mapping, next generation sequencing and conventional Sanger sequencing to identify mutations that cause the phenotype in this family. We have also summarized clinical data from 49 previously reported SCN4 cases with overlapping phenotypes and interpret the medical histories of these siblings in the context of the literature. Results The siblings’ phenotype is due in part to a homozygous mutation in G6PC3, [c.829C > T, p.Gln277X]. Their ages are 38 and 37 years respectively and they are the oldest SCN4 patients published to date. Both presented with congenital neutropenia and later developed Crohn disease. We suggest that the latter is a previously unrecognized SCN4 manifestation and that not all affected individuals have an intellectual disability. The sister also has a homozygous mutation in SLC45A2, which explains her severe oculocutaneous hypopigmentation. Her brother carried one SLC45A2 mutation and was diagnosed with “partial OCA” in childhood. Conclusions This family highlights that apparently novel syndromes can in fact be caused by two known autosomal recessive disorders.

  20. Nine known and five novel mutations in the erythroid transcription factor KLF1 gene and phenotypic expression of fetal hemoglobin in hemoglobin E disorder.

    Tepakhan, Wanicha; Yamsri, Supawadee; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Xu, Xiangmin; Fucharoen, Supan

    2016-07-01

    Hemoglobin E is the most common Hb variant found in South East Asia. Variation of Hb F expression in Hb E syndrome is associated with several genetic modifiers. We report several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including nine known and five novel mutations of the Krüppel-like factor 1 (KLF1; an erythroid specific transcription factor) gene and determine their associations with phenotypic expression of Hb F in Hb E disorders. KLF1 mutations were examined using high resolution melting (HRM) assay and DNA sequencing in 575 homozygous Hb E, 278 heterozygous Hb E and 100 normal subjects. Fourteen mutations were mostly observed in subjects with elevated Hb F, including nine known mutations (G176AfsX179, T334R, R238H, -154 (C>T), A298P, S270W, R301H, -148 (G>A) and G335R and five novel mutations (Q217X, Q223X, Y290_S293del, K307N, and M358I). None of them, but the -148 (G>A), were observed in normal controls to have Hb F <1%. Combined KLF1 mutations with other SNPs including (G)γ-XmnI, BCL11A and HBS1L-MYB were associated with higher Hb F levels. KLF1 is therefore an important genetic factor associated with increased Hb F and in combination with other modifying factors could explain the phenotypic variation of Hb F expression in this common hemoglobinopathy. PMID:27282573

  1. A mutation in the cytosolic O-acetylserine (thiol lyase induces a genome-dependent early leaf death phenotype in Arabidopsis

    Schippers Jos HM

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysteine is a component in organic compounds including glutathione that have been implicated in the adaptation of plants to stresses. O-acetylserine (thiol lyase (OAS-TL catalyses the final step of cysteine biosynthesis. OAS-TL enzyme isoforms are localised in the cytoplasm, the plastids and mitochondria but the contribution of individual OAS-TL isoforms to plant sulphur metabolism has not yet been fully clarified. Results The seedling lethal phenotype of the Arabidopsis onset of leaf death3-1 (old3-1 mutant is due to a point mutation in the OAS-A1 gene, encoding the cytosolic OAS-TL. The mutation causes a single amino acid substitution from Gly162 to Glu162, abolishing old3-1 OAS-TL activity in vitro. The old3-1 mutation segregates as a monogenic semi-dominant trait when backcrossed to its wild type accession Landsberg erecta (Ler-0 and the Di-2 accession. Consistent with its semi-dominant behaviour, wild type Ler-0 plants transformed with the mutated old3-1 gene, displayed the early leaf death phenotype. However, the old3-1 mutation segregates in an 11:4:1 (wild type: semi-dominant: mutant ratio when backcrossed to the Colombia-0 and Wassilewskija accessions. Thus, the early leaf death phenotype depends on two semi-dominant loci. The second locus that determines the old3-1 early leaf death phenotype is referred to as odd-ler (for old3 determinant in the Ler accession and is located on chromosome 3. The early leaf death phenotype is temperature dependent and is associated with increased expression of defence-response and oxidative-stress marker genes. Independent of the presence of the odd-ler gene, OAS-A1 is involved in maintaining sulphur and thiol levels and is required for resistance against cadmium stress. Conclusions The cytosolic OAS-TL is involved in maintaining organic sulphur levels. The old3-1 mutation causes genome-dependent and independent phenotypes and uncovers a novel function for the mutated OAS-TL in cell

  2. On the traces of XPD: cell cycle matters - untangling the genotype-phenotype relationship of XPD mutations

    Cameroni Elisabetta

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mutations in the human gene coding for XPD lead to segmental progeria - the premature appearance of some of the phenotypes normally associated with aging - which may or may not be accompanied by increased cancer incidence. XPD is required for at least three different critical cellular functions: in addition to participating in the process of nucleotide excision repair (NER, which removes bulky DNA lesions, XPD also regulates transcription as part of the general transcription factor IIH (TFIIH and controls cell cycle progression through its interaction with CAK, a pivotal activator of cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs. The study of inherited XPD disorders offers the opportunity to gain insights into the coordination of important cellular events and may shed light on the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium between cell proliferation and functional senescence, which is notably altered during physiological aging and in cancer. The phenotypic manifestations in the different XPD disorders are the sum of disturbances in the vital processes carried out by TFIIH and CAK. In addition, further TFIIH- and CAK-independent cellular activities of XPD may also play a role. This, added to the complex feedback networks that are in place to guarantee the coordination between cell cycle, DNA repair and transcription, complicates the interpretation of clinical observations. While results obtained from patient cell isolates as well as from murine models have been elementary in revealing such complexity, the Drosophila embryo has proven useful to analyze the role of XPD as a cell cycle regulator independently from its other cellular functions. Together with data from the biochemical and structural analysis of XPD and of the TFIIH complex these results combine into a new picture of the XPD activities that provides ground for a better understanding of the patophysiology of XPD diseases and for future development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools.

  3. Compound heterozygosity for COL7A1 mutations in twins with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: A recessive paternal deletion/insertion mutation and a dominant negative maternal glycine substitution result in a severe phenotype

    Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Anton-Lamprecht, I.; Ebschner, U. [Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Amano, S.; Burgeson, R.E. [Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    We have previously demonstrated genetic linkage between the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) and the dominant (DDEB) and recessive (RDEB) forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) and have subsequently identified pathogenetic mutations in several families. Mutations in DDEB identified thus far are glycine substitutions in the collagenous domain of COL7A1, while the most severe forms of RDEB result from premature termination codon (PTC) mutations on both alleles. In this study, we performed mutation analysis in the COL7A1 gene in twins who displayed a severe DEB phenotype. Mutational analysis revealed a paternal 2-bp deletion/1-bp insertion in exon 56, designated 5103CC{yields}G, which results in a frameshift and downstream PTC. Analysis of the maternal COL7A1 allele revealed a glycine-to-arginine substitution in exon 91 (G2351R). Careful questioning of the mother revealed that she and her father had a history of shedding of toenails and occasional poorly heating erosions, consistent with a mild form of DDEB. Immunoprecipitation of type VII collagen from fibroblasts of the twins revealed a marked reduction in intracellular protein production, consistent with the drastic reduction in mRNA transcript from the paternal mutant allele, while the majority of polypeptides bearing the glycine substitution appeared to be degraded intracellularly. Thus, the severe RDEB phenotype in the probands results from compound heterozygosity for one glycine substitution and one PTC mutation in COL7A1. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Alpha-thalassemia intellectual disability: variable phenotypic expression among males with a recurrent nonsense mutation - c.109C>T (p.R37X).

    Basehore, M J; Michaelson-Cohen, R; Levy-Lahad, E; Sismani, C; Bird, L M; Friez, M J; Walsh, T; Abidi, F; Holloway, L; Skinner, C; McGee, S; Alexandrou, A; Syrrou, M; Patsalis, P C; Raymond, G; Wang, T; Schwartz, C E; King, M-C; Stevenson, R E

    2015-05-01

    Alpha-thalassemia intellectual disability, one of the recognizable X-linked disability syndromes, is characterized by short stature, microcephaly, distinctive facies, hypotonic appearance, cardiac and genital anomalies, and marked skewing of X-inactivation in female carriers. With the advent of next generation sequencing, mutations have been identified that result in less severe phenotypes lacking one or more of these phenotypic manifestations. Here we report five unrelated kindreds in which a c.109C>T (p.R37X) mutation segregates with a variable but overall milder phenotype. The distinctive facial appearance of alpha-thalassemia intellectual disability was present in only one of the 18 affected males evaluated beyond the age of puberty, although suggestive facial appearance was present in several during infancy or early childhood. Although the responsible genetic alteration is a nonsense mutation in exon 2 of ATRX, the phenotype appears to be partially rescued by the production of alternative transcripts and/or other molecular mechanisms. PMID:24805811

  5. A mutation in the neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor-suppressor gene, giving rise to widely different clinical phenotypes in two unrelated individuals

    Bourn, D.; Carter, S.A.; Goodship, J.; Strachan, T. (Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)); Evans, G.R.; Coakham, H.

    1994-07-01

    The authors have sought mutations in the recently identified neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor-suppressor gene in a large panel of NF2 patients, using PCR-based SSCP and heteroduplex analysis, followed by cloning and sequencing of appropriate PCR products. Two unrelated NF2 patients were found to have identical nonsense mutations caused by a C-to-T transition in a CpG dinucleotide that is a potential mutational hot spot in the NF2 tumor-suppressor gene. Unexpectedly, the two individuals had widely different clinical phenotypes, representing the severe Wishart and mild Gardner clinical subtypes. Analysis of DNA samples from different tissues of the mildly affected patient suggests that he is a somatic mosaic for the mutation. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Identification, expression, and biochemical characterization of N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase mutations and relationship with clinical phenotype in MPS-VI patients

    Litjens, T.; Brooks, D.A.; Hopwood, J.J. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, or mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS-VI), is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the defective degradation of dermatan sulfate due to the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase (4S). The clinical severity of MPS-VI ranges in a continuum from mildly affected to severely affected patients. Mutations in MPS-VI patient samples were identified by chemical cleavage and direct DNA sequencing of PCR products derived from patient cDNA. Five amino acid substitutions were identified (T92M, R95Q, Y210C, H393P, and L498P), individually introduced into the wild-type 4S cDNA by site-directed in vitro mutagenesis, and transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells. Three of the five mutations (R95Q, Y210C, and H393P) were observed in > 1 of 25 unrelated MPS-VI patients; however, the mutations were not found in 20 control individuals. The residual 4S activity and protein (biochemical phenotype) were determined for each mutant in order to confirm their identity as mutations and to dissect the contribution of each mutant allele to the overall clinical phenotype of the patient. For each patient, the combined biochemical phenotypes of the two 4S mutant alleles demonstrated a good correspondence with the observed clinical phenotype (with the possible exception of a patient who was a compound heterozygote for T92M and L498P). This preliminary correspondence between genotype and the phenotype in MPS-VI may, with further refinement, contribute to the assessment of therapeutic approaches for MPS-VI patients. 30 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Oral mucosal stigmata in hereditary-cancer syndromes: From germline mutations to distinctive clinical phenotypes and tailored therapies.

    Ponti, Giovanni; Tomasi, Aldo; Manfredini, Marco; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2016-05-10

    Numerous familial tumor syndromes are associated with distinctive oral mucosal findings, which may make possible an early diagnosis as an efficacious marker for the risk of developing visceral malignancies. In detail, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), Gardner syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Cowden Syndrome, Gorlin Syndrome, Lynch/Muir-Torre Syndrome and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia show specific lesions of the oral mucosa and other distinct clinical and molecular features. The common genetic background of the above mentioned syndromes involve germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes, such as APC, PTEN, PTCH1, STK11, RET, clearly implied in both ectodermal and mesodermal differentiation, being the oral mucosal and dental stigmata frequently associated in the specific clinical phenotypes. The oral and maxillofacial manifestations of these syndromes may become visible several years before the intestinal lesions, constituting a clinical marker that is predictive for the development of intestinal polyps and/or other visceral malignancies. A multidisciplinary approach is therefore necessary for both clinical diagnosis and management of the gene-carriers probands and their family members who have to be referred for genetic testing or have to be investigated for the presence of visceral cancers. PMID:26850131

  8. Two novel mutations of the GTP cyclohydrolase 1 gene and genotype-phenotype correlation in Chinese Dopa-responsive dystonia patients.

    Yu, Lihua; Zhou, Huayong; Hu, Fayun; Xu, Yanming

    2013-07-01

    The most common form of Dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD) is caused by heterozygous mutations in the GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1) gene. We screened two unrelated, DRD-symptomatic Chinese Han individuals, for GCH1 gene mutations by direct sequencing. As the clinical manifestations of DRD are highly variable, we also explored the association between genotype and phenotype in all Chinese DRD patients reported so far in the literature, comprising 62 DRD-affected patients from 36 Chinese families. Two novel missense mutations (T94M, L145F) and a novel variant (c. 453+6 G>T) were identified in our two new patients. None of these variants was detected in 200 healthy controls. On the basis of this and other reports, heterozygous mutations were detected in 90.3% of Chinese Han subjects with DRD. Seeming the age of onset for males and females, the mean age was 13 years older in males than in females (P=0.006). Different mutation types did not show any significant differences in age of onset, gender composition, initial symptoms, or the L-dopa dose that abolished the symptoms. Among DRD patients lacking missense or exon-intron boundary mutations, 68.4% were found to possess a large deletion in GCH1, which were detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Most GCH1 mutations were found to cluster in two regions of the coding sequence, suggesting the probable existence of mutation hotspot for the first time. The genotype-phenotype correlation described here may improve our understanding of DRD in Chinese individuals. PMID:23211702

  9. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: Different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation

    Hanna, M.G.; Nelson, I.; Sweeney, M.G.; Cooper, J.M.; Watkins, P.J.; Morgan-Hughes, J.A.; Harding, A.E. [Kings College Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-05-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Biochemical and computational analyses of two phenotypically related GALT mutations (S222N and S135L that lead to atypical galactosemia

    Benjamin Cocanougher

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene [1,2]. We encountered a patient heterozygous for a known pathogenic H132Q mutation and a novel S222N variant of unknown significance [3]. Reminiscent of patients with the S135L mutation, our patient had loss of GALT enzyme activity in erythrocytes but a very mild clinical phenotype [3–8]. We performed splicing experiments and computational structural analyses to investigate the role of the novel S222N variant. Alamut software data predicted loss of splicing enhancers for the S222N and S135L mutations [9,10]. A cDNA library was generated from our patient׳s RNA to investigate for splicing errors, but no change in transcript length was seen [3]. In silico structural analysis was performed to investigate enzyme stability and attempt to understand the mechanism of the atypical galactosemia phenotype. Stability results are publicly available in the GALT Protein Database 2.0 [11–14]. Animations were created to give the reader a dynamic view of the enzyme structure and mutation locations. Protein database files and python scripts are included for further investigation.

  11. Biochemical and computational analyses of two phenotypically related GALT mutations (S222N and S135L) that lead to atypical galactosemia.

    Cocanougher, Benjamin; Aypar, Umut; McDonald, Amber; Hasadsri, Linda; Bennett, Michael J; Edward Highsmith, W; D׳Aco, Kristin

    2015-06-01

    Galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene [1,2]. We encountered a patient heterozygous for a known pathogenic H132Q mutation and a novel S222N variant of unknown significance [3]. Reminiscent of patients with the S135L mutation, our patient had loss of GALT enzyme activity in erythrocytes but a very mild clinical phenotype [3-8]. We performed splicing experiments and computational structural analyses to investigate the role of the novel S222N variant. Alamut software data predicted loss of splicing enhancers for the S222N and S135L mutations [9,10]. A cDNA library was generated from our patient׳s RNA to investigate for splicing errors, but no change in transcript length was seen [3]. In silico structural analysis was performed to investigate enzyme stability and attempt to understand the mechanism of the atypical galactosemia phenotype. Stability results are publicly available in the GALT Protein Database 2.0 [11-14]. Animations were created to give the reader a dynamic view of the enzyme structure and mutation locations. Protein database files and python scripts are included for further investigation. PMID:26217714

  12. A novel mutation in NF1 is associated with diverse intra-familial phenotypic variation and astrocytoma in a Chinese family.

    Banerjee, Santasree; Dai, Yi; Liang, Shengran; Chen, Huishuang; Wang, Yanyan; Tang, Lihui; Wu, Jing; Huang, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a dysregulated neurocutaneous disorder, characterized by neurofibromas and café-au-lait spots. NF1 is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene, encoding neurofibromin. Here, we present a clinical molecular study of a three-generation Chinese family with NF1. The proband was a male patient who showed café-au-lait spots and multiple subcutaneous neurofibromas over the whole body, but his siblings only had regional lesions. The man's daughter presented with severe headache and vomiting. Neurological examination revealed an intracranial space occupying lesion. Surgery was undertaken and the histopathological examination showed a grade I-II astrocytoma. Next-Generation sequencing (Illumina HiSeq2500 Analyzers; Illumina, San Diego, CA, USA) and Sanger sequencing (ABI PRISM 3730 automated sequencer; Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA) identified the c.227delA mutation in the NF1 gene in the man. The mutation is co-segregated with the disease phenotypes among the affected members of this family and was absent in 100 healthy controls. This novel mutation results in a frameshift (p.Asn78IlefsX7) as well as truncation of neurofibromin by formation of a premature stop codon. Our results not only extended the mutational and phenotypic spectra of the gene and the disease, but also highlight the importance of the other genetic or environmental factors in the development and severity of the disease. PMID:27234610

  13. Portuguese family with the co-occurrence of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis phenotypes due to progranulin gene mutation.

    Almeida, Maria R; Macário, Maria C; Ramos, Lina; Baldeiras, Inês; Ribeiro, Maria H; Santana, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    We and others have reported heterozygous progranulin mutations as an important cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). It has been identified a complete progranulin deficiency because of a homozygous mutation in a sibling pair with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Here, we describe the first case of NCL caused by a homozygous progranulin mutation segregating in a family with neuropathological confirmed FTLD. In this FTLD-NCL family, we detail the clinical phenotype, neuropsychological evaluation and imaging data of our proband harboring a homozygous mutation, c.900_901dupGT, with serum progranulin level (retinal dystrophy diagnosis and magnetic resonance imaging showed severe global cerebellar atrophy. In contrast, heterozygous relatives presented behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and some also developed extrapyramidal features compatible with corticobasal syndrome. Our findings suggest the importance of assessing serum progranulin levels in suspected recessive adult-onset NCL cases. Overall, a more holistic neurologic intervention is needed to guarantee a proper genetic counseling in cases like the present family where two distinct phenotypes are generated according to the individuals' mutation state. PMID:27021778

  14. Missense mutation of the EDA gene in a Jordanian family with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia: phenotypic appearance and speech problems.

    Khabour, O F; Mesmar, F S; Al-Tamimi, F; Al-Batayneh, O B; Owais, A I

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the EDA gene are responsible for X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, the most common form of ectodermal dysplasia. Males show a severe form of this disease, while females often manifest mild to moderate symptoms. We identified a missense mutation (c.463C>T) in the EDA gene in a Jordanian family, using direct DNA sequencing. This mutation leads to an amino acid change of arginine to cysteine in the extracellular domain of ectodysplasin-A, a protein encoded by the EDA gene. The phenotype of a severely affected 11-year-old boy with this mutation included heat intolerance, sparse hair (hypotrichosis), absence of 17 teeth (oligodontia), speech problems, and damaged eccrine glands, resulting in reduced sweating (anhidrosis). Both the mother (40 years old) and the sister (10 years old) were carriers with mild to moderate symptoms of this disease, while the father was healthy. This detailed description of the phenotype caused by this missense mutation could be useful for prenatal diagnosis. PMID:20486090

  15. International Commission for Protection against Environmental Mutagens and Carcinogens. ICPEMC Working Paper 5/6. Perspectives in mutation epidemiology, 6. A 1983 view of sentinel phenotypes.

    Mulvihill, J J; Czeizel, A

    1983-12-01

    A sentinel phenotype is a clinical disorder or syndrome that (1) occurs sporadically as a consequence of a single, highly penetrant mutant gene, (2) is a dominant or X-linked trait of considerable frequency and low fitness, and (3) is uniformly expressed and accurately diagnosable with minimal effort at or near birth. Although 1828 autosomal dominant traits are known in human beings, 36 can be considered as candidate sentinel phenotypes, along with 5 X-linked disorders. Based on surveys of malformations in infants and children, 16 additional traits are proposed beyond previous lists. In Hungary, the 24 syndromes or defects with reliable manifestations in newborn infants occur with a frequency of 2.5-3.3 per 10 000 live births. As markers of human mutations, sentinel phenotypes have the advantage of representing germinal mutations that result in significant health problems. There are severe disadvantages that have, to date, prevented the launching of a field demonstration of the value of these phenotypes in mutation epidemiology. Agreement on a list of phenotypes has been delayed by continued recognition of two or more distinct genetic diseases within what was once thought to be a single disorder. For the same reason, most of the candidate sentinel phenotypes have not been assigned unique codes in the International Classification of Diseases. Each of the disorders is so rare and has features that overlap with so many other syndromes that highly trained clinical dysmorphologist and pediatric ophthalmologists would have to be engaged in any study. The sentinel phenotype approach, like other strategies in mutation epidemiology, would encounter problems with linkage among files of data, privacy, and access to sufficiently large populations. In contrast with the approach using multiple protein variants (as in the study of blood from offspring of survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki), the sentinel phenotype approach would likely be much less expensive

  16. Frequency and phenotypic implications of mitochondrial DNA mutations in human squamous cell cancers of the head and neck

    Zhou, Shaoyu; Kachhap, Sushant; Sun, Wenyue; Wu, Guojun; Chuang, Alice; Poeta, Luana; Grumbine, Lawson; Mithani, Suhail K.; Chatterjee, Aditi; Koch, Wayne; Westra, William H.; Maitra, Anirban; Glazer, Chad; Carducci, Michael; Sidransky, David

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomic mutations are found in a variety of human cancers; however, the frequency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in coding regions remains poorly defined, and the functional effects of mitochondrial mutations found in primary human cancers are not well described. Using MitoChip, we sequenced the whole mitochondrial genome in 83 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Forty-one of 83 (49%) tumors contained mtDNA mutations. Mutations occurred within noncoding (D-loop) and ...

  17. Phenotypic features and genetic characterization of male breast cancer families: identification of two recurrent BRCA2 mutations in north-east of Italy

    Miolo GianMaria

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer in men is an infrequent occurrence, accounting for ~1% of all breast tumors with an incidence of about 1:100,000. The relative rarity of male breast cancer (MBC limits our understanding of the epidemiologic, genetic and clinical features of this tumor. Methods From 1997 to 2003, 10 MBC patients were referred to our Institute for genetic counselling and BRCA1/2 testing. Here we report on the genetic and phenotypic characterization of 10 families with MBC from the North East of Italy. In particular, we wished to assess the occurrence of specific cancer types in relatives of MBC probands in families with and without BRCA2 predisposing mutations. Moreover, families with recurrent BRCA2 mutations were also characterized by haplotype analysis using 5 BRCA2-linked dinucleotide repeat markers and 8 intragenic BRCA2 polymorphisms. Results Two pathogenic mutations in the BRCA2 gene were observed: the 9106C>T (Q2960X and the IVS16-2A>G (splicing mutations, each in 2 cases. A BRCA1 mutation of uncertain significance 4590C>G (P1491A was also observed. In families with BRCA2 mutations, female breast cancer was more frequent in the first and second-degree relatives compared to the families with wild type BRCA1/2 (31.9% vs. 8.0% p = 0.001. Reconstruction of the chromosome phasing in three families and the analysis of three isolated cases with the IVS16-2A>G BRCA2 mutation identified the same haplotype associated with MBC, supporting the possibility that this founder mutation previously detected in Slovenian families is also present in the North East of our Country. Moreover, analysis of one family with the 9106C>T BRCA2 mutation allowed the identification of common haplotypes for both microsatellite and intragenic polymorphisms segregating with the mutation. Three isolated cases with the same mutation shared the same intragenic polymorphisms and three 5' microsatellite markers, but showed a different haplotype for 3' markers

  18. Genotypes and phenotypes of a family with a deaf child carrying combined heterozygous mutations in SLC26A4 and GJB3 genes.

    Li, Yunlong; Zhu, Baosheng

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the SLC26A4 gene have been shown to cause a type of deafness referred to as large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS), whereas mutations in the GJB3 gene have been associated with nonsyndromic deafness. However, the clinical phenotypes of these mutations vary and remain to be fully elucidated. The present study performed genetic analysis of a Chinese family, in which the child was deaf and the parents were healthy. Sanger sequencing demonstrated that the affected individual harbored three heterogeneous mutations in the SLC26A4 and GJB3 genes, as follows: SLC26A4 IVS-2 A>G, SLC26A4 c.2168 A>G and GJB3 c.538 C>T. The affected individual exhibited hearing loss and was diagnosed with LVAS by computed tomography scan. The mother and father of the affected individual harbored the heterogeneous mutations of SLC26A4 IVS-2 A>G and GJB3 c.538 C>T, and the heterozygous mutation of SLC26A4 c.2168 A>G, respectively. Neither parents exhibited any hearing loss. The results obtained from the deaf patient provided genetic and clinical evidence that carrying combined heterogeneous mutations in the GJB3 and SLC26A4 genes may be involved in the etiology of severe hearing loss, of which the mechanism requires further examination. PMID:27176802

  19. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás;

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse...... alone. However, the reversal of the dental phenotype of overgrown and laterally displaced lower incisors in HGPS mice could be attributed to resveratrol. Our results indicate that the HGPS bone defects were reversible upon suppressed transgenic expression and suggest that treatments targeting aberrant...... progerin splicing give hope to patients who are affected by HGPS.-Strandgren, C., Nasser, H. A., McKenna, T., Koskela, A., Tuukkanen, J., Ohlsson, C., Rozell, B., Eriksson, M. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas...

  20. Junctophilin 3 (JPH3) expansion mutations causing Huntington disease like 2 (HDL2) are common in South African patients with African ancestry and a Huntington disease phenotype.

    Krause, Amanda; Mitchell, Claire; Essop, Fahmida; Tager, Susan; Temlett, James; Stevanin, Giovanni; Ross, Christopher; Rudnicki, Dobrila; Margolis, Russell

    2015-10-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by abnormal movements, cognitive decline, and psychiatric symptoms, caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene on chromosome 4p. A CAG/CTG repeat expansion in the junctophilin-3 (JPH3) gene on chromosome 16q24.2 causes a Huntington disease-like phenotype (HDL2). All patients to date with HDL2 have some African ancestry. The present study aimed to characterize the genetic basis of the Huntington disease phenotype in South Africans and to investigate the possible origin of the JPH3 mutation. In a sample of unrelated South African individuals referred for diagnostic HD testing, 62% (106/171) of white patients compared to only 36% (47/130) of black patients had an expansion in HTT. However, 15% (20/130) of black South African patients and no white patients (0/171) had an expansion in JPH3, confirming the diagnosis of Huntington disease like 2 (HDL2). Individuals with HDL2 share many clinical features with individuals with HD and are clinically indistinguishable in many cases, although the average age of onset and diagnosis in HDL2 is 5 years later than HD and individual clinical features may be more prominent. HDL2 mutations contribute significantly to the HD phenotype in South Africans with African ancestry. JPH3 haplotype studies in 31 families, mainly from South Africa and North America, provide evidence for a founder mutation and support a common African origin for all HDL2 patients. Molecular testing in individuals with an HD phenotype and African ancestry should include testing routinely for JPH3 mutations. PMID:26079385

  1. OCRL-mutated fibroblasts from patients with Dent-2 disease exhibit INPP5B-independent phenotypic variability relatively to Lowe syndrome cells.

    Montjean, Rodrick; Aoidi, Rifdat; Desbois, Pierrette; Rucci, Julien; Trichet, Michaël; Salomon, Rémi; Rendu, John; Fauré, Julien; Lunardi, Joël; Gacon, Gérard; Billuart, Pierre; Dorseuil, Olivier

    2015-02-15

    OCRL mutations are associated with both Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease, two rare X-linked conditions. Lowe syndrome is an oculo-cerebro-renal disorder, whereas Dent-2 patients mainly present renal proximal tubulopathy. Loss of OCRL-1, a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase, leads in Lowe patients' fibroblasts to phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) accumulation, with defects in F-actin network, α-actinin distribution and ciliogenesis, whereas fibroblasts of Dent-2 patients are still uncharacterized. To search for mechanisms linked to clinical variability observed between these two OCRL mutation-associated pathologies, we compared dermal fibroblasts from independent patients, four affected by Dent-2 disease and six with Lowe syndrome. For the first time, we describe that Dent-2 fibroblasts with OCRL loss-of-function (LOF) mutations exhibit decrease in actin stress fibers, appearance of punctate α-actinin signals and alteration in primary cilia formation. Interestingly, we quantified these phenotypes as clearly intermediate between Lowe and control fibroblasts, thus suggesting that levels of these defects correlate with clinical variations observed between patients with OCRL mutations. In addition, we show that Lowe and Dent-2 fibroblasts display similar PI(4,5)P2 accumulation levels. Finally, we analyzed INPP5B, a paralogous gene already reported to exhibit functional redundancy with OCRL, and report neither differences in its expression at RNA or protein levels, nor specific allelic variations between fibroblasts of patients. Altogether, we describe here differential phenotypes between fibroblasts from Lowe and Dent-2 patients, both associated with OCRL LOF mutations, we exclude direct roles of PI(4,5)P2 and INPP5B in this phenotypic variability and we underline potential key alterations leading to ocular and neurological clinical features in Lowe syndrome. PMID:25305077

  2. Mutation-Specific Phenotypes in hiPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes Carrying Either Myosin-Binding Protein C Or α-Tropomyosin Mutation for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Marisa Ojala; Chandra Prajapati; Risto-Pekka Pölönen; Kristiina Rajala; Mari Pekkanen-Mattila; Jyrki Rasku; Kim Larsson; Katriina Aalto-Setälä

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease, which affects the structure of heart muscle tissue. The clinical symptoms include arrhythmias, progressive heart failure, and even sudden cardiac death but the mutation carrier can also be totally asymptomatic. To date, over 1400 mutations have been linked to HCM, mostly in genes encoding for sarcomeric proteins. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease are still largely unknown. Two founder mutations for HCM in ...

  3. Mutations in the ALK-1 gene and the phenotype of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia in two large Danish families

    Kjeldsen, A D; Brusgaard, K; Poulsen, L;

    2001-01-01

    families mutations were identified in exon 8 of the ALK-1 gene. In family 6 we found a T1193A mutation. In this family a high prevalence of PAVM and severe GI bleeding was documented, while in family 8 with a C1120T mutation no individuals with PAVM were identified and only one patient had a history of...... severe GI bleeding. No mutations in the endoglin locus were found in either family....

  4. CDH3-Related Syndromes: Report on a New Mutation and Overview of the Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    Basel-Vanagaite, L; Pasmanik-Chor, M.; Lurie, R.; Yeheskel, A.; Kjaer, K W

    2011-01-01

    Hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy (HJMD) and ectodermal dysplasia, ectrodactyly and macular dystrophy (EEM) are both caused by mutations in the CDH3 gene. In this report, we describe a family with EEM syndrome caused by a novel CDH3 gene mutation and review the mutation spectrum and limb abnormalities in both EEM and HJMD. A protein structure model showing the localization of different mutations causing both syndromes is presented. The CDH3 gene was sequenced and investigation of ...

  5. Mutations in COX10 result in a defect in mitochondrial heme A biosynthesis and account for multiple, early-onset clinical phenotypes associated with isolated COX deficiency.

    Antonicka, Hana; Leary, Scot C; Guercin, Guy-Hellen; Agar, Jeffrey N; Horvath, Rita; Kennaway, Nancy G; Harding, Cary O; Jaksch, Michaela; Shoubridge, Eric A

    2003-10-15

    Deficiencies in the activity of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) are an important cause of autosomal recessive respiratory chain disorders. Patients with isolated COX deficiency are clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in several different assembly factors have been found to cause specific clinical phenotypes. Two of the most common clinical presentations, Leigh Syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, have so far only been associated with mutations in SURF1 or SCO2 and COX15, respectively. Here we show that expression of COX10 from a retroviral vector complements the COX deficiency in a patient with anemia and Leigh Syndrome, and in a patient with anemia, sensorineural deafness and fatal infantile hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A partial rescue was also obtained following microcell-mediated transfer of mouse chromosomes into patient fibroblasts. COX10 functions in the first step of the mitochondrial heme A biosynthetic pathway, catalyzing the conversion of protoheme (heme B) to heme O via the farnesylation of a vinyl group at position C2. Heme A content was reduced in mitochondria from patient muscle and fibroblasts in proportion to the reduction in COX enzyme activity and the amount of fully assembled enzyme. Mutation analysis of COX10 identified four different missense alleles, predicting amino acid substitutions at evolutionarily conserved residues. A topological model places these residues in regions of the protein shown to have important catalytic functions by mutation analysis of a prokaryotic ortholog. Mutations in COX10 have previously been reported in a single family with tubulopathy and leukodystrophy. This study shows that mutations in this gene can cause nearly the full range of clinical phenotypes associated with early onset isolated COX deficiency. PMID:12928484

  6. Effect of GBA Mutations on Phenotype of Parkinson’s Disease: A Study on Chinese Population and a Meta-Analysis

    Yuan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available GBA has been identified as a genetic risk factor for PD. Whether the clinical manifestations of PD patients with or without GBA mutations are different has still not reached a consensus. We firstly detected the GBA mutation L444P in 1147 Chinese PD patients and simultaneously evaluated their corresponding clinical data. Then we compared the phenotypes between 646 PD patients with GBA mutations and 10344 PD patients without GBA mutations worldwide through meta-analysis. Through the method of meta-analysis, there was significant difference in age at onset (MD = −3.10 [95% CI: −4.88, −1.32], bradykinesia as an initial symptom (OR = 1.49 [95% CI: 1.15, 1.94], having family history (OR = 1.50 [95% CI: 1.18, 1.91], and dementia (OR = 3.21 [95% CI: 1.97, 5.24] during the comparison between PD patients with and without GBA mutations. While, in the aspect of tremor as an initial symptom (OR = 0.81 [95% CI: 0.64, 1.03], the severity of motor symptoms such as H-Y (MD = 0.06 [95% CI: −0.06, 0.17] and UPDRS-III (MD = 1.61 [95% CI: −0.65, 3.87] and having dyskinesia (OR = 1.60 [95% CI: 0.90, 2.84] during the comparison between the two groups revealed no statistical differences. Our results suggested that the phenotypes of PD patients with GBA mutations are different from GBA noncarriers.

  7. Phenotypic, metabolic, and molecular genetic characterization of six patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by novel mutations in the CYP11B1 gene.

    Nguyen, Huy-Hoang; Eiden-Plach, Antje; Hannemann, Frank; Malunowicz, Ewa M; Hartmann, Michaela F; Wudy, Stefan A; Bernhardt, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of steroidogenesis. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency (11β-OHD) due to mutations in the CYP11B1 gene is the second most common form of CAH. In this study, 6 patients suffering from CAH were diagnosed with 11β-OHD using urinary GC-MS steroid metabolomics analysis. The molecular basis of the disorder was investigated by molecular genetic analysis of the CYP11B1 gene, functional characterization of splicing and missense mutations, and analysis of the missense mutations in a computer model of CYP11B1. All patients presented with abnormal clinical signs of hyperandrogenism. Their urinary steroid metabolomes were characterized by excessive excretion rates of metabolites of 11-deoxycortisol as well as metabolites of 11-deoxycorticosterone, and allowed definite diagnosis. Patient 1 carries compound heterozygous mutations consisting of a novel nonsense mutation p.Q102X (c.304C>T) in exon 2 and the known missense mutation p.T318R (c.953C>G) in exon 5. Two siblings (patient 2 and 3) were compound heterozygous carriers of a known splicing mutation c.1200+1G>A in intron 7 and a known missense mutation p.R448H (c.1343G>A) in exon 8. Minigene experiments demonstrated that the c.1200+1G>A mutation caused abnormal pre-mRNA splicing (intron retention). Two further siblings (patient 4 and 5) were compound heterozygous carriers of a novel missense mutation p.R332G (c.994C>G) in exon 6 and the known missense mutation p.R448H (c.1343G>A) in exon 8. A CYP11B1 activity study in COS-1 cells showed that only 11% of the enzyme activity remained in the variant p.R332G. Patient 6 carried a so far not described homozygous deletion g.2470_5320del of 2850 bp corresponding to a loss of the CYP11B1 exons 3-8. The breakpoints of the deletion are embedded into two typical 6 base pair repeats (GCTTCT) upstream and downstream of the gene. Experiments analyzing the influence of mutations on splicing and on enzyme

  8. NEFL N98S mutation: another cause of dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with heterogeneous early-onset phenotype.

    Berciano, José; Peeters, Kristien; García, Antonio; López-Alburquerque, Tomás; Gallardo, Elena; Hernández-Fabián, Arantxa; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; De Vriendt, Els; Infante, Jon; Jordanova, Albena

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a pedigree with NEFL N98S mutation associated with a dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (DI-CMT) and heterogeneous early-onset phenotype. The pedigree comprised two patients, the proband and her son, aged 38 and 5 years. The proband, evaluated at age 31, showed delayed motor milestones that, as of the second decade, evolved into severe phenotype consisting of sensorimotor neuropathy, pes cavus, clawing hands, gait and kinetic cerebellar ataxia, nystagmus and dysarthria, she being wheelchair bound. By then, a working diagnosis of sporadic early onset cerebellar ataxia with peripheral neuropathy was established. Screening of mutations associated with SCA and autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias was negative. Her son showed a mild phenotype characterized by delayed motor milestones, and lower-limb hypotonia and areflexia. Electrophysiology in both patients showed nerve conduction slowing in the intermediate range, both in proximal and distal nerve segments, but where compound muscle action potentials exhibited severe attenuation there was conduction slowing down to the demyelinating range. In the proband, cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebellar atrophy, electromyography disclosed active denervation in tibialis anterior, and MRI of lower-limb musculature demonstrated widespread and distally accentuated muscle fatty atrophy; furthermore, on water sensitive MRI sequences there was edema of calf muscles. We conclude that the NEFL N98S mutation is associated with a DI-CMT phenotype characterized by early-onset sensorimotor neuropathy delaying motor milestones, which may evolve into a severe and complex clinical picture including cerebellar ataxia. PMID:26645395

  9. Insights into genotype-phenotype correlations from CREBBP point mutation screening in a cohort of 46 Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome patients.

    Spena, S; Milani, D; Rusconi, D; Negri, G; Colapietro, P; Elcioglu, N; Bedeschi, F; Pilotta, A; Spaccini, L; Ficcadenti, A; Magnani, C; Scarano, G; Selicorni, A; Larizza, L; Gervasini, C

    2015-11-01

    The genetic basis of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS), a rare, sporadic, clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by cognitive impairment and a wide spectrum of multiple congenital anomalies, is primarily due to private mutations in CREBBP (approximately 55% of cases) or EP300 (approximately 8% of cases). Herein, we report the clinical and the genetic data taken from a cohort of 46 RSTS patients, all carriers of CREBBP point mutations. Molecular analysis revealed 45 different gene alterations including 31 inactivating (21 frameshift and 10 nonsense), 10 missense and 4 splicing mutations. Bioinformatic tools and transcript analyses were used to predict the functional effects of missense and splicing alterations. Of the 45 mutations, 42 are unreported and 3 were described previously. Recurrent mutations maybe a key tool in addressing genotype-phenotype correlations in patients sharing the same defects (at the genomic or transcript level) and specific clinical signs, demonstrated here in two cases. The clinical data of our cohort evidenced frequent signs such as arched eyebrows, epicanthus, synophrys and/or frontal hypertrichosis and broad phalanges that, previously overlooked in RSTS diagnosis, now could be considered. Some suggested correlations between organ-specific anomalies and affected CREB-binding protein domains broaden the RSTS clinical spectrum and perhaps will enhance patient follow-up and clinical care. PMID:25388907

  10. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal;

    2010-01-01

    COL2A1. In 188 probands with the clinical diagnosis of Stickler syndrome, the COL2A1 gene was analyzed by either a mutation scanning technique or bidirectional fluorescent DNA sequencing. The effect of splice site alterations was investigated by analyzing mRNA. Multiplex ligation......-dependent amplification analysis was used for the detection of intragenic deletions. We identified 77 different COL2A1 mutations in 100 affected individuals. Analysis of the splice site mutations showed unusual RNA isoforms, most of which contained a premature stop codon. Vitreous anomalies and retinal detachments were...... found more frequently in patients with a COL2A1 mutation compared with the mutation-negative group (P90% of the mutations were predicted to result in nonsense-mediated decay. On the basis of binary regression analysis, we developed a scoring system that may be useful when evaluating patients with...